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Sample records for heel pain calcaneal

  1. Heel pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - heel ... Heel pain is most often the result of overuse. Rarely, it may be caused by an injury. Your heel ... on the heel Conditions that may cause heel pain include: When the tendon that connects the back ...

  2. The lateral calcaneal flap for sensate heel reconstruction revisited.

    PubMed

    Korentager, R

    1994-06-01

    Defects of the heel can be difficult to treat because they require a thin, sensate, soft-tissue cover. The lateral calcaneal flap can provide this type of reconstruction in selected patients. A 27-year-old man had a painful defect in a grafted heel that prevented him from working. A satisfactory painless heel was provided by resurfacing the area with a lateral calcaneal flap. The donor defect was minimized by interfascicular dissection of the sural nerve. PMID:8199942

  3. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA. PMID:27073185

  4. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  5. Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... inch. When there is no indication of bone enlargement, the condition is sometimes referred to as "heel ... heel spur; Haglund's deformity ("pump bump"), a bone enlargement at the back of the heel bone in ...

  6. Isolated Calcaneal Metastasis: An Unusual Presentation of Lung Carcinoma as Heel Pain.

    PubMed

    Singh, Charanjeet; Gupta, Mamta; Singh, Jagadeesh; Ali, Amjad

    2016-03-01

    A 63-year-old woman initially presented with progressive left foot pain for 3 months, not responding to conservative management. MRI of the left foot showed a suspicious lesion in calcaneus. An open biopsy was consistent with metastatic lung adenocarcinoma. Tc-MDP total-body bone scintigraphy was ordered for possible other bony lesions, and only left calcaneus lesion was identified on bone scan. CT scan of the chest revealed a soft tissue mass in the superior aspect of the right lower lobe. Staging FDG PET/CT showed hypermetabolic right lung mass and left calcaneus lesion. She received chemotherapy and local radiation to the left calcaneus metastatic lesion. PMID:26562577

  7. Bilateral heel pain in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Loren T R; Mehdi, Adil M S; Baker, Dennis; Edwards, Max R

    2015-06-01

    A rare case of bilateral calcaneal stress fractures in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is described. This has not been previously reported in the literature. A calcaneal stress fracture is an important differential diagnosis in a patient presenting with heel pain. Bilaterality of symptoms should not exclude this diagnosis and clinicians should be especially vigilant with predisposed patients. PMID:26004126

  8. Heel Pain in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kenneth John; Anderson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Heel pain, a relatively common problem in the athlete, can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The purpose of this article is to review treatment techniques for common causes of heel pain in the athlete. Evidence Acquisition: Articles in the English literature through August 2008 were selected and reviewed in the context of the management of heel pain in the athlete. Clinical and surgical photographs are presented as an illustration of preferred techniques and pertinent pathologic findings. Results: Although nonoperative treatment remains the mainstay for most painful heel pathologies, a number of surgical interventions have shown encouraging results in carefully selected patients. Conclusions: The management of heel pain in the athlete requires diagnostic skill, appropriate imaging evaluation, and a careful, initially conservative approach to treatment. Surgical treatment can be successful in carefully selected patients. PMID:23015903

  9. Heel pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Agyekum, Edward Kwame; Ma, Kaiyu

    2015-01-01

    Heel pain is a very common foot disease. Varieties of names such as plantar fasciitis, jogger's heel, tennis heal, policeman's heel are used to describe it. Mechanical factors are the most common etiology of heel pain. Common causes of hell pain includes: Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spur, Sever's Disease, Heel bump, Achilles Tendinopathy, Heel neuritis, Heel bursitis. The diagnosis is mostly based on clinical examination. Normally, the location of the pain and the absence of associated symptoms indicating a systemic disease strongly suggest the diagnosis. Several therapies exist including rest, physical therapy, stretching, and change in footwear, arch supports, orthotics, night splints, anti-inflammatory agents, and surgery. Almost all patients respond to conservative nonsurgical therapy. Surgery is the last treatment option if all other treatments had failed. Rest, ice, massage, the use of correct exercise and complying with a doctor's advice all play important part in helping to recover from this hell pain condition, but getting good quality, suitable shoes with the appropriate amount of support for the whole foot is the most important. PMID:26643244

  10. Imaging study of the painful heel syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.L.; Smibert, J.G.; Cox, R.; Mitchell, R.; Klenerman, L.

    1987-06-01

    A total of 45 patients with the painful heel syndrome without evidence of an associated inflammatory arthritis, seven of whom had pain in both heels, were studied using technetium-99 isotope bone scans and lateral and 45 degrees medial oblique radiographs of both feet. Of the 52 painful heels 31 (59.6%) showed increased uptake of tracer at the calcaneum. Patients with scans showing increased uptake tended to have more severe heel pain and responded more frequently to a local hydrocortisone injection. On plain x-ray, 39 of 52 painful heels (75%) and 24 of the 38 opposite nonpainful heels (63%) showed plantar spurs, compared with five of 63 (7.9%) heels in 59 age- and sex-matched controls. No evidence of stress fractures was seen.

  11. Gastrocnemius shortening and heel pain.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew C; Carne, Andrew; Davies, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Pain and reduced function caused by disorders of either the plantar fascia or the Achilles tendon are common. Although heel pain is not a major public health problem it affects millions of people each year. For most patients, time and first-line treatments allow symptoms to resolve. A proportion of patients have resistant symptoms. Managing these recalcitrant cases is a challenge. Gastrocnemius contracture produces increased strain in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia. This biomechanical feature must be properly assessed otherwise treatment is compromised. PMID:25456718

  12. [Vascularization of the lateral heel in relation to extensive skin incisions in osteosynthesis of calcaneal fractures].

    PubMed

    Rak, V; Matonoha, P; Otáhal, M; Masek, M M

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the study was to document soft tissue vascularization of the lateral heel on cadavers and, therefore, to indirectly demonstrate the importance to perform perfectly precise incisions, in order to prevent ischemic complications. Sections of 8 human lower limb cadavers were performed in cooperation with the Anatomical Institute of the MU Medical Faculty in Brno, according to current common standards for anatomical preparations. In successive steps, cutaneous and subcutanous covers of the lateral ankle, malleolar and heel regions were preparated. Final branches of the individual arteries were followed and the authors aimed to demonstrate their vascular arcade consisting of anastomosis of the lateral calcaneal artery--LCA (a branch of a. peronea)--which is a clinical term for rami calcaneares laterales, ventrolateral tarsal arteries--LTA (a branch of a. dorsalis pedis) and lateral malleolar artery branching off medially--LMA (a branch of a. tibialis ant.). The course of the arteries and their location is related to a reference point--a lateral tip of the lateral ankle. The investigators found out that all three arteries, as well as the arterial arch, had standard courses. The course of the arch defines the outline of the lateral extensive incision during osteosynthesis in calcaneal fractures, which lies fairly close to the lateral outline of this vascular arcade. Incorrect performance of the incision results, invitably, in serious ischemic complications. Open reduction and internal fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures has become a standard surgical method. Correct indication, good timing and saving open reduction, internal fixation using arthroscopy and early mobilization are the prerequisites to prevent further postoperative complications and to achieve complete healing of the fracture. Considering the demandingness of these fractures treatment and their rare incidence, their management should be centred in specialized traumatological clinics. PMID

  13. Careful assessment the key to diagnosing adolescent heel pain.

    PubMed

    Davison, Martin J; David-West, S Kenneth; Duncan, Roderick

    2016-05-01

    The most common cause of adolescent heel pain is calcaneal apophysitis also known as Sever's disease. The condition may occur in adolescent athletes, particularly those involved in running or jumping activities, during the pubertal growth spurt. The mean age of presentation in Sever's disease is ten, (range 7-15). It presents with posterior heel pain that is worse with activity and relieved by rest in most cases. Sever's disease, Osgood Schlatter's disease (tibial tuberosity) and Sinding-Larsen Johansson syndrome (distal patella) are all overuse syndromes brought about by repetitive submaximal loading and microtrauma. They are, however, entirely self-limiting and resolve at skeletal maturity or earlier. Careful assessment is required to differentiate them from other rare pathologies. Achilles tendinitis is rare under the age of 14. As in Sever's disease, it may occur in jumping athletes, those who suddenly increase their sporting activities and in individuals with relative gastrosoleus tightness. It may also occur in those with inflammatory arthropathies and merit rheumatological investigation if there are other suggestive signs or symptoms. Benign and malignant tumours of the adolescent calcaneus are extremely rare In a unilateral case, atypical features such as night pain or absence of a precipitating activity should raise the index of suspicion. There may be localised swelling and bony expansion. PMID:27382917

  14. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Calcaneal Apophysitis? Calcaneal apophysitis is a painful inflammation of the heel’s growth plate. It typically affects children between the ages of 8 and 14 years old... Ingrown Toenails in Children Parents can help prevent a common and painful foot problem in children ...

  15. Customized heel pads and soft orthotics to treat heel pain and plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Deborah A; Dawson, Deirdre R

    2003-10-01

    We describe the design of a new cost-effective, comfortable orthotic designed to treat heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis. The heel pad is fabricated from a 4 degrees Sorbothane medial wedge with a customized insertion of low-density Plastazote. The orthotic is medium-density Plastazote reinforced with cork in the medial longitudinal arch. One pair of orthotics takes less than 1 hour to make. Pilot data were collected retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of the orthotic for reducing pain. Ten clients at a hand and foot orthotic clinic with a mean age of 71+/-9.1 years and with unilateral or bilateral heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis were provided with customized heel pads and soft, molded orthotics at their initial visit. Pain levels were recorded with verbal and Likert-type scales. After 5 weeks of heel pad and orthotic use, all patients showed a reduction in pain, with the overall reduction being highly significant (Pheel pads and soft molded orthotics are an effective first-line treatment for the heel pain and loss of function associated with plantar fasciitis. PMID:14586928

  16. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Don’t Ignore Your Kid’s Heel Pain Address Pain Early, Avoid Long Recovery ... and ankle surgeon. The good news is that kids are good healers and treatment may be simple ...

  17. Plantar Fasciitis—Heel Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jeffery A.; Kolodin, Eric L.

    1992-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent hind foot problem that affects runners. It occurs when repetitive stress is placed on the heel from a chronic or acute condition. Athletes with biomechanical imbalances are most susceptible to this condition. They exhibit pain in the morning upon weight bearing and, frequently, in the acute stage, have discoloration of the injured area. Management includes preventive and therapeutic exercise, physical therapy, strengthening routines, taping, and the use of orthotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although injections and NSAIDs bring relief, their effects are often only temporary. This condition is best treated with therapeutic exercises and orthotics in order to correct the athlete's biomechanical faults. This article presents principles and techniques that can be used to effectively prevent and treat plantar fasciitis. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8.Fig 9.Fig 11. PMID:16558136

  18. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  19. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... the length of the tendon when walking or running. Your pain and stiffness might increase in the ... or decrease activities that cause pain, such as running or jumping. Do activities that do not strain ...

  20. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine A; Manning, Stephen T

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  1. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Katherine A.; Manning, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  2. Psychological variables associated with foot function and foot pain in patients with plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Cotchett, Matthew P; Whittaker, Glen; Erbas, Bircan

    2015-05-01

    It is widely accepted that psychological variables are associated with self-reported pain and self-reported physical function in patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the relationship between psychological variables and foot pain and foot function has not been evaluated in people with plantar heel pain. Eighty-four participants with plantar heel pain completed the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale short version (DASS-21) and Foot Health Status Questionnaire. Using a hierarchical regression analysis, a baseline model with age, sex and BMI explained 10 % of the variability in foot function. The addition of depression and stress in separate models explained an additional 7.3 % and 8.1 % of foot function scores, respectively. In the respective models, depression was a significant predictor (β = -0.28; p = 0.009) as was stress (β = -0.29; p = 0.006). Females drove the effect between stress and foot function (β = -0.50; p = 0.001) and depression and foot function (β = -0.53; p < 0.001). In regression models for foot pain, depression, anxiety and stress did not contribute significantly to pain scores. When the data was stratified by sex, stress (β = -0.36; p = 0.024) and depression (β = -0.41; p = 0.013) were significantly associated with foot pain in females but not in males. For participants with plantar heel pain, stress and depression scores were significantly associated with foot function but not foot pain. When the data was stratified by sex, stress and depression were significant predictors of foot pain and function in females. PMID:24647980

  3. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  4. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  5. Effectiveness of trigger point dry needling for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis) is a common and disabling condition, which has a detrimental impact on health-related quality of life. Despite the high prevalence of plantar heel pain, the optimal treatment for this disorder remains unclear. Consequently, an alternative therapy such as dry needling is increasingly being used as an adjunctive treatment by health practitioners. Only two trials have investigated the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain, however both trials were of a low methodological quality. This manuscript describes the design of a randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. Methods Eighty community-dwelling men and woman aged over 18 years with plantar heel pain (who satisfy the inclusion and exclusion criteria) will be recruited. Eligible participants with plantar heel pain will be randomised to receive either one of two interventions, (i) real dry needling or (ii) sham dry needling. The protocol (including needling details and treatment regimen) was formulated by general consensus (using the Delphi research method) using 30 experts worldwide that commonly use dry needling for plantar heel pain. Primary outcome measures will be the pain subscale of the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and "first step" pain as measured on a visual analogue scale. The secondary outcome measures will be health related quality of life (assessed using the Short Form-36 questionnaire - Version Two) and depression, anxiety and stress (assessed using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale - short version). Primary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and secondary outcome measures will be performed at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Data will be analysed using the intention to treat principle. Conclusion This study is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of dry needling for plantar heel pain. The trial will be reported in

  6. The effect of melody on the physiological responses of heel sticks pain in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Nikobakht, Farzaneh; Badiee, Zohreh; Golchin, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Background: During health care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), infants undergo extremely painful procedures, which may cause problems, if not controlled, such as changes in the pattern of respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation. The present study aimed to find the effect of melody on the physiological responses of neonates’ heel stick pain. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) for 5 months. Fifty infants were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly assigned in equal numbers to two groups (n = 25). In the melody group (intervention), a selected melody was played for the infants at a distance of 1 m from them, with a sound intensity of 65 dB, from 3 minutes before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively, and their physiological responses were observed with a monitoring system and recorded at the afore-mentioned time periods. Physiological responses were also recorded in the control group (no intervention) 3 min before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively. Results: Means of respiratory and pulse rates in the melody and control groups showed a significant difference at different time points. But the mean blood oxygen saturation in the melody group showed no significant difference at different time points, although the difference was significant in the control group. Conclusions: The results showed that melody could maintain more balance in some physiological responses of infants, such as the respiratory rate and pulse rate during the Guthrie test. Therefore, melody is recommended to be used to prevent the destructive effects of pain in infants during painful procedures. PMID:26120343

  7. Impaired Foot Plantar Flexor Muscle Performance in Individuals With Plantar Heel Pain and Association With Foot Orthosis Use.

    PubMed

    McClinton, Shane; Collazo, Christopher; Vincent, Ebonie; Vardaxis, Vassilios

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common foot and ankle conditions seen in clinical practice, and many individuals continue to have persisting or recurrent pain after treatment. Impaired foot plantar flexor muscle performance is a factor that may contribute to limited treatment success, but reliable methods to identify impairments in individuals with plantar heel pain are needed. In addition, foot orthoses are commonly used to treat this condition, but the implications of orthosis use on muscle performance have not been assessed. Objectives To assess ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance in individuals with plantar heel pain using clinically feasible measures and to examine the relationship between muscle performance and duration of foot orthosis use. Methods The rocker-board plantar flexion test (RBPFT) and modified paper grip test for the great toe (mPGTGT) and lesser toes (mPGTLT) were used to assess foot plantar flexor muscle performance in 27 individuals with plantar heel pain and compared to 27 individuals without foot pain who were matched according to age, sex, and body mass. Pain ratings were obtained before and during testing, and self-reported duration of foot orthosis use was recorded. Results Compared to the control group, individuals with plantar heel pain demonstrated lower performance on the RBPFT (P = .001), the mPGTGT (P = .022), and the mPGTLT (P = .037). Longer duration of foot orthosis use was moderately correlated to lower performance on the RBPFT (r = -0.52, P = .02), the mPGTGT (r = -0.54, P = .01), and the mPGTLT (r = -0.43, P = .03). Conclusion Ankle plantar flexor and toe flexor muscle performance was impaired in individuals with plantar heel pain and associated with longer duration of self-reported foot orthosis use. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(8):681-688. Epub 3 Jul 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6482. PMID:27374013

  8. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  9. Effects of heel support banding using an elastic band on chronic pain at the achilles tendon in a mountaineer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study developed heel support banding (HSB) using an elastic band for flexible heel support and investigated its effect on chronic Achilles tendon pain of a mountaineer. [Subject] A 40-year-old male mountaineer with chronic Achilles tendon pain [Methods] Ankle dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles, VISA-A questionnaire, load-induced pain, total pain threshold and tenderness at 3 kg of pressure were measured before and after applying HSB. [Results] After one month of applying HSB, the dorsiflexion and plantar flexion angles increased; the VISA-A questionnaire score increased; the load-induced pain assessment score decreased; the pain threshold increased; and tenderness at 3 kg decreased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that HSB use improves ankle range of motion, decreases pressure and pain, and could provide a new approach for effective intervention and management of chronic Achilles tendon pain. PMID:26957781

  10. Anterior subtalar dislocation with comminuted fracture of the anterior calcaneal process.

    PubMed

    Hui, Siu Hung Kenneth; Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-01-01

    Anterior subtalar dislocation is a very rare injury. We report a case of an 81-year-old woman who had her right foot injured during a motor vehicle accident. Radiographs showed anterior subtalar dislocation with comminuted fracture of the anterior calcaneal process. The dislocation was closely reduced and protected by a short leg cast. One year postinjury, the patient had only mild pain when walking on uneven ground. There was mild tenderness over the lateral heel. Subtalar motion was mildly painful. There was no pain with ankle motion. PMID:26887882

  11. Vertical ground reaction forces in patients with unilateral plantar heel pain - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Liddle, D; Rome, K; Howe, T

    2000-02-01

    Plantar heel pain (PHP) is a foot pathology commonly reported in both athletic and non-athletic populations. The etiology of PHP is complex and identification of risk factors associated with PHP is required to predict who is at increased risk of injury. Excessive plantar heel force and pressures are intrinsic risk factors that may play a contributing role in the development of PHP. Limited research, however, has been undertaken in terms of ground reaction forces associated with PHP. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that there were significant differences in the vertical ground reaction forces and loading rates at rearfoot contact between symptomatic and contra-lateral asymptomatic feet in 23 subjects diagnosed with unilateral PHP. The equipment consisted of a portable force plate using a 10-m modular walkway sampled at 200 Hz by an independent observer. Paired t-tests demonstrated no significant difference (P0.05) in the vertical ground reaction forces and loading rates between the symptomatic and contra-lateral asymptomatic feet. The results suggest that single risk factors such as vertical ground reaction force and loading rates do not contribute to PHP. The authors conclude that a model that incorporates a multi-factorial approach to risk factors may lead to a better understanding into the etiology and management of those individuals who suffer from heel pathologies. PMID:10664487

  12. Calcaneal fractures: selection bias is key.

    PubMed

    Pearce, C J; Wong, K L; Calder, J D F

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we critically appraise the recent publication of the United Kingdom Heel Fracture Trial, which concluded that when patients with an absolute indication for surgery were excluded, there was no advantage of surgical over non-surgical treatment in the management of calcaneal fractures. We believe that selection bias in that study did not permit the authors to reach a firm conclusion that surgery was not justified for most intra-articular calcaneal fractures. PMID:26130340

  13. Use of an orthotic device in the treatment of posterior heel pain.

    PubMed

    Wooten, B; Uhl, T L; Chandler, J

    1990-01-01

    Research Funded by the Lexington Clinic Foundation for Research and Education. Posterior heel pain (PHP) presents a difficult clinical challenge. The causes of PHP include Haglund syndrome (pump bump deformity), Achilles tendinitis, and Sever's disease (retrocalcaneal bursitis, traction apophysitis). The purposes of this study were to 1) describe a new orthotic device used in the treatment of PHP and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of this device. The orthotic device consisted of a neoprene sleeve holding 1/4 inch PPT foam rubber horseshoe (Sports Supports, Inc., Dallas, TX). The horseshoe was placed directly over the injury to protect and relieve pressure or was inverted and used as a counterforce brace to reduce the tensile stress to the Achilles tendon. Eight patients (6 children, 2 adults) were evaluated at the time of application and after 1 month of use. Three criteria were considered: 1) subjective pain scale, 2) active goniometric measurements, and 3) toe raise test. The statistical analysis indicated a significant improvement in pain during activity from initial to follow-up and in pain after activity from initial to follow-up. All patients demonstrated improved strength and flexibility. It was concluded that this device may be an effective adjunct to the treatment of PHP. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 1990;11(9):410-413. PMID:18787273

  14. Use of Lateral Calcaneal Flap for Coverage of Hindfoot Defects: An Anatomical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Zygouris, Panagiotis; Michalinos, Adamantios; Protogerou, Vassilis; Kotsiomitis, Evangelos; Mazarakis, Antonios; Dimovelis, Ioannis; Troupis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Lateral calcaneal flap is an established surgical option for coverage of lateral calcaneum and posterior heel defects. Lateral calcaneal flap vascularization and innervations are based on lateral calcaneal artery neurovascular bundle, that is, lateral calcaneal artery, small saphenous vein, and sural nerve. Anatomical research has allowed exploration of its many advantages but can also lead to its various modifications, permitting a wide variety of clinical applications. In this paper the authors report an anatomical and clinical study on lateral calcaneal artery course and lateral calcaneal flap clinical applications. Anatomic part of our study focused on lateral calcaneal artery course and optimization of surgical technique for flap harvesting. Data were used for design of lateral calcaneal flap in 5 patients. Our results were satisfactory in terms of coverage adequacy, perioperative morbidity, and functional and aesthetical outcome. PMID:26640707

  15. A comparison of the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave and ultrasound therapy in the management of heel pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheing, G. L. Y.; Chang, H.; Lo, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound therapy (US) for managing heel pain. Thirty-seven subjects received either: ESWT (once a week), US (three times a week), or CONTROL (no treatment) for 3 consecutive weeks and were followed-up for 3 more weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the maximum tolerable duration for prolonged walking or standing, and the Mayo clinical scoring system (MCSS) were evaluated. Mixed models treating baseline measures as covariates were adopted for statistical analysis. By week 3, intensity of heel pain on palpation was reduced by 37% (VAS score from 7.5 to 4.6) in the ESWT group, 24% (from 5.3 to 4.2) in the US group, and increased by 3% (5.6-5.7) in the control group; this difference was significant after adjusting for baseline VAS scores ( p = 0.022). The improvements in the maximum tolerable duration of prolonged walking or standing was only significant in the ESWT group (157% increase, p = 0.043) but not the other two groups. Both active treatment groups maintained the treatment effect at the three-week follow-up. We conclude that ESWT is potentially more effective in reducing heel pain than ultrasound therapy but additional evidence is needed due to the various limitations of the study.

  16. Three-dimensional printed calcaneal prosthesis following total calcanectomy☆

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Jungo; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of patients with extremity sarcoma can be surgically treated without amputation. However, limb-salvage surgery for foot sarcomas including the calcaneus remains challenging. Presentation of case A 71-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of right heel persistent pain. Imaging studies revealed an osteolytic, destructive and highly metabolic lesion in the right calcaneus. Computed tomography guided core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of grade 2 chondrosarcoma. A total calcanectomy was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with a patient matched three-dimensional printed titanium calcaneal prosthesis. Intra-operatively, ligaments including the Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia were reattached. The post-operative course was uneventful, and at the 5-month clinical follow-up, the patient was fully weightbearing, with a mobile ankle without pain. Discussion This case is the first to use additive manufacturing to create a prosthetic calcaneus. The complex peri-calcaneal articular surfaces and reattachment of tendinous structures facilitate efforts to stabilize the prosthesis in situ. Conclusion Three-dimensional-printed prosthesis of the calcaneus is a viable alternative to amputation. PMID:25827294

  17. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Barman, Sandip; Diwaker, Preeti; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-06-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  18. Aneurysmal Bone Cyst: An Uncommon Secondary Event in Calcaneal Chondroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Sandip; Bansal, Divya; Wadhwa, Neelam; Singh, Gurvinder

    2016-01-01

    Chondroblastoma is an uncommon benign bone tumour, involvement of epiphysis of long bones is typical. Chondroblastoma of the calcaneum is uncommon and its association with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst is even rarer. Only two cases of calcaneal chondroblastoma associated with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst have been reported till date. A 22-year-old male presented to the department of orthopaedics with complains of pain and swelling in the left heel since the last 10 months. On clinico-radiological grounds differentials considered were giant cell tumour of bone and aneurysmal bone cyst. In view of the histopathological findings of bone curettage and results of special stain and immunohistochemical marker, final diagnosis of chondroblastoma with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst, left calcaneum was rendered. Although rare, chondroblastoma should always be considered in osteolytic lesions of calcaneum. The identification of secondary aneurysmal bone cyst component is important as it has higher chances of recurrence than usual chondroblastoma. PMID:27504302

  19. Percutaneous Arthroscopic Calcaneal Osteosynthesis: A Minimally Invasive Technique for Displaced Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Pastides, Philip S; Milnes, Lydia; Rosenfeld, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    The management of calcaneal fracture remains challenging. Open surgery has been fraught with high infection rates and soft tissue complications. More minimally invasive procedures have reduced this risk, but the patient outcomes after treatment of displaced calcaneal fractures have remained relatively unsatisfactory. We present a method for the management of Sanders grade II and III calcaneal fractures: percutaneous arthroscopic calcaneal osteosynthesis. Thirty-three fractures in 30 patients who had presented to our tertiary foot and ankle trauma center in central London were treated with percutaneous arthroscopic calcaneal osteosynthesis for calcaneal fractures, and the data were prospectively collected. The mean patient age at injury was 39 years. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Of our patients, 58% were smokers at injury. Of the 33 fractures, 46% were classified as grade II and 54% as grade III. The mean length of stay was 1.92 days. At the final follow-up visit, the mean Böhler angle had increased from 11.10° (range 2° to 24°) to 23.41° (range 15° to 35°). The modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score was 72.18 (range 18 to 100), the calcaneal fracture scoring system score was 79.34 (range 42 to 100), and the visual analog scale score was 29.50 (range 0 to 100). We had a single case of a superficial port site infection and 2 cases of prominent screws, which were removed. No cases of deep infection developed, and no conversion to subtalar fusion was required. This technique significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative wound complications. Direct visualization of the fracture site allowed accurate restoration of the articular surface and correction of heel varus. Furthermore, it was associated with a high self-reported functional outcome and a return to preinjury employment levels. Also, the results did not appear to be influenced by tobacco consumption. PMID:25960056

  20. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  1. Case 13: chronic painful ulcer on the heel of a diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Price, Juliet; Boulton, Zoe

    2016-03-01

    This painful ulcer, which had signs of biofilm, was covered in necrotic tissue. Octenilin Wound Gel was used to soften the necrosis in preparation for sharp debridement. Three weeks later, the devitalised tissue had been completely removed, while there was a 50% reduction in wound size at week 5. PMID:26949857

  2. Cracked Heels

    MedlinePlus

    ... as diabetes or loss of nerve function (autonomic neuropathy). Heels should be kept well moisturized with a ... shoe materials to accommodate for conditions, such as neuropathy (numb feet), poor circulation and foot... Diabetic Peripheral ...

  3. Endoscopic Achilles tenolysis for management of heel cord pain after repair of acute rupture of Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon pain after repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture can result from suture granuloma formation, modification of the threshold of the pain receptors inside the tendon by scar tissue, expansion of the paratenon by tendon enlargement with secondary stimulation of mechanoreceptors, or underlying tendon degeneration. In the present technique report, an endoscopic technique of Achilles tenolysis for denervation and debulking is described that might be applicable in cases in which conservative treatment fails to alleviate the pain. PMID:23085384

  4. Quantitative scintigraphy in diagnosis and management of plantar fasciitis (Calcaneal periostitis): concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, J.R.; Black, C.M.; Chapman, A.H.; Statham, J.; Hughes, G.R.V.; Lavender, J.P.

    1980-07-01

    We have found that Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate imaging of the heel is of diagnostic value in the painful heel syndrome, permitting positive identification of the site of inflammation in cases where radiography is unhelpful. With this technique, tracer uptake in the heel is susceptible to quantification, allowing a serial and objective assessment of response to therapy.

  5. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery

  6. Plating for intra-articular calcaneal fractures…. Is it an overkill?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Himanshu Gurunath; Mane, Vilas S.; Gaonkar, Kiran L.; Patil, Pravin P.; Shaha, Mandar S.; Patel, Nirav S.; Desai, Nagesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Even after evolution of computerized tomography and improved surgical measures, treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures remains a controversy. Hence this study was carried out to compare functional outcomes of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures, treated with operative management with plating and conservative management with cast. Material and methods This study was carried out as a prospective, comparative study. Twenty nine (30 fractures) patients with acute, displaced intraarticular fractures of calcaneum aged 18–50 years, were enrolled in the study. Open fractures and fractures older than two weeks were excluded. 30 fractures were divided into two groups (operative and conservative; n = 15 in each). Evaluation in form of post treatment restoration of Bohler's angle, heel varus angle and with Creighton–Nebraska (C–N) score for functional outcome was done at the end of 12 months. Results When we consider the clinical evaluation under the C–N score, the results of operatively managed calcaneal fractures are slightly better than those of the conservative group. But this did not have any statistical significance. Also, there was significant difference in pre and post treatment Bohler's angle and heel varus angle in operative group. Three cases of plating suffered from post-operative wound dehiscence. Conclusion A relatively better functional outcome was observed in displaced and comminuted fractures in plating, provided that the Bohler's angle was restored. In conservative group, functional outcome of minimally displaced fractures were better than displaced comminuted fractures. Post treatment Bohlers angle has prognostic importance in functional outcome. PMID:26155050

  7. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  8. Skin-to-skin contact (Kangaroo Care) analgesia for preterm infant heel stick.

    PubMed

    Ludington-Hoe, Susan M; Hosseini, Robert; Torowicz, Deborah L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare a heel stick conducted during Kangaroo Care (skin-to-skin contact) with the mother to a heel stick in a warmer in reducing premature infant physiologic and behavioral pain responses. Twenty-four premature infants in a university-based neonatal intensive care unit were recruited and randomized to 2 sequences: sequence A group received 3 hours of Kangaroo Care (with a heel stick in Kangaroo Care) followed by 3 hours in a warmer (with a heel stick in the warmer). Sequence B group had warmer care and a heel stick (in the warmer) before Kangaroo Care and a heel stick (in Kangaroo Care). Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, crying time, and behavioral state were measured before, during, and after heel stick. Repeated measures ANOVA and Mann Whitney U statistics were performed. Heart rate and length of crying in response to pain were significantly reduced during Kangaroo Care and the Kangaroo Care heel stick as compared to when infants were in the warmer and had a heel stick in the warmer. Three infants did not cry at all during the Kangaroo Care heel stick; infants slept more during Kangaroo Care than in the warmer. Kangaroo Care positioning before and during heel stick is a simple and inexpensive analgesic intervention to ameliorate pain in stable premature infants. PMID:16082239

  9. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8 cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230 mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  10. Bilateral calcaneal stress fractures in two cats.

    PubMed

    Cantatore, M; Clements, D N

    2015-06-01

    Two cats that developed bilateral calcaneal stress fractures are reported. One cat developed lameness associated with incomplete fractures at the base of both calcanei, both of which progressed to acute, complete fractures 2 months later. The second cat presented with acute complete calcaneal fracture, with evidence of remodelling of the contralateral calcaneus, which subsequently fractured two years later. The calcaneal fractures were successfully stabilised with lateral bone plates in each case. Stress fractures were suspected because of the bilateral nature, the simple and similar configuration, the consistent location of the fractures, the absence of other signs of trauma in both cases and the suspected insidious onset of the lameness. The feline calcaneus is susceptible to stress fracture, and cats presenting with calcaneal fractures without evidence of trauma should be evaluated for concurrent skeletal pathology. PMID:25929309

  11. A Novel Technique for Closed Reduction and Fixation of Paediatric Calcaneal Fracture Dislocation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Faroug, Radwane; Stirling, Paul; Ali, Farhan

    2013-01-01

    Paediatric calcaneal fractures are rare injuries usually managed conservatively or with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Closed reduction was previously thought to be impossible, and very few cases are reported in the literature. We report a new technique for closed reduction using Ilizarov half-rings. We report successful closed reduction and screwless fixation of an extra-articular calcaneal fracture dislocation in a 7-year-old boy. Reduction was achieved using two Ilizarov half-ring frames arranged perpendicular to each other, enabling simultaneous application of longitudinal and rotational traction. Anatomical reduction was achieved with restored angles of Bohler and Gissane. Two K-wires were the definitive fixation. Bony union with good functional outcome and minimal pain was achieved at eight-weeks follow up. ORIF of calcaneal fractures provides good functional outcome but is associated with high rates of malunion and postoperative pain. Preservation of the unique soft tissue envelope surrounding the calcaneus reduces the risk of infection. Closed reduction prevents distortion of these tissues and may lead to faster healing and mobilisation. Closed reduction and screwless fixation of paediatric calcaneal fractures is an achievable management option. Our technique has preserved the soft tissue envelope surrounding the calcaneus, has avoided retained metalwork related complications, and has resulted in a good functional outcome. PMID:23819090

  12. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  13. Eccrine Syringofibroadenoma of the Heel: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Doobay, Nathalia; Mallette, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma is a rare, benign tumor of eccrine ductal differentiation, typically presenting in the extremities. Herein we report a case of a 77-year-old man with pain in the lateral midfoot and the presence of an eccrine syringofibroadenoma lesion in the lateral heel. On surgical excision of the lesion, the foot pain promptly resolved, and at the most recent follow-up visit, the patient remained pain free. PMID:26895365

  14. A comparison of the effects of local analgesic solution in the navicular bursa of horses with lameness caused by solar toe or solar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Schumacher, J; de Graves, F; Schramme, M; Smith, R; Coker, M; Steiger, R

    2001-07-01

    We hypothesised that analgesia of the navicular bursa is not selective for the navicular apparatus; and that solar pain in some horses can be temporarily abolished or attenuated by analgesia of the navicular bursa. To test this hypothesis, we caused lameness in horses by inducing pain in the dorsal margin or the angles of the sole and then evaluated the ability of a local analgesic solution administered into the navicular bursa to attenuate lameness. The response of horses with solar pain in the dorsal or palmar aspect of the foot to 3.5 ml local analgesic solution administered into the navicular bursa was examined. Lameness was induced in 6 horses by creating solar pain in the dorsal aspect of one forefoot and, at another time, the palmar aspect of the other forefoot, with set-screws inserted into a custom-made shoe. Horses were videotaped trotting before and after application of set-screws and after administering 3.5 ml local analgesic solution into the navicular bursa. Lameness scores were assigned by examining videotaped gaits. Scores were significantly lower (P<0.05) for all horses with set-screws applied to the dorsal margin of the sole after administration of local analgesic solution into the navicular bursa. In conclusion, analgesia of the navicular bursa was less effective in desensitising the angles of the sole than in desensitising the dorsal margin of the sole. Pain arising from the sole should not be excluded as a cause of lameness when lameness is attenuated by analgesia of the navicular bursa. PMID:11469772

  15. Correlation between Parameters of Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound and Hip Structural Analysis in Osteoporotic Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hailiang; Li, Ming; Yin, Pengbin; Peng, Ye; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2015-01-01

    Background Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS), which is used in the evaluation of osteoporosis, is believed to be intimately associated with the characteristics of the proximal femur. However, the specific associations of calcaneal QUS with characteristics of the hip sub-regions remain unclear. Design A cross-sectional assessment of 53 osteoporotic patients was performed for the skeletal status of the heel and hip. Methods We prospectively enrolled 53 female osteoporotic patients with femoral fractures. Calcaneal QUS, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and hip structural analysis (HSA) were performed for each patient. Femoral heads were obtained during the surgery, and principal compressive trabeculae (PCT) were extracted by a three-dimensional printing technique-assisted method. Pearson’s correlation between QUS measurement with DXA, HSA-derived parameters and Young’s modulus were calculated in order to evaluate the specific association of QUS with the parameters for the hip sub-regions, including the femoral neck, trochanteric and Ward’s areas, and the femoral shaft, respectively. Results Significant correlations were found between estimated BMD (Est.BMD) and BMD of different sub-regions of proximal femur. However, the correlation coefficient of trochanteric area (r = 0.356, p = 0.009) was higher than that of the neck area (r = 0.297, p = 0.031) and total proximal femur (r = 0.291, p = 0.034). Furthermore, the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) was significantly correlated with the HSA-derived parameters of the trochanteric area (r value: 0.315–0.356, all p<0.05) as well as with the Young’s modulus of PCT from the femoral head (r = 0.589, p<0.001). Conclusion The calcaneal bone had an intimate association with the trochanteric cancellous bone. To a certain extent, the parameters of the calcaneal QUS can reflect the characteristics of the trochanteric area of the proximal hip, although not specifically reflective of those of the femoral neck

  16. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  17. Explicit finite element modelling of heel pad mechanics in running: inclusion of body dynamics and application of physiological impact loads.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lee, Peter Vee-Sin

    2015-01-01

    Many heel pathologies including plantar heel pain may result from micro tears/trauma in the subcutaneous tissues, in which internal tissue deformation/stresses within the heel pad play an important role. Previously, many finite element models have been proposed to evaluate stresses inside the heel pad, but the majority of these models only focus on static loading boundary conditions. This study explored a dynamics modelling approach to the heel pad subjected to realistic impact loads during running. In this model, the inertial property and action of the body are described by a lumped parameter model, while the heel/shoe interactions are modelled using a viscoelastic heel pad model with contact properties. The impact force pattern, dynamic heel pad deformation and stress states predicted by the model were compared with published experimental data. Further parametrical studies revealed the model responses, in terms of internal stresses in the skin and fatty tissue, change nonlinearly when body dynamics changes. A reduction in foot's touchdown velocity resulted in a less severe impact landing and stress relief inside the heel pad, for example peak von-Mises stress in fatty tissue, was reduced by 11.3%. Applications of the model may be extendable to perform iterative analyses to further understand the complex relationships between body dynamics and stress distributions in the soft tissue of heel pad during running. This may open new opportunities to study the mechanical aetiology of plantar heel pain in runners. PMID:24980181

  18. Treatment of Calcaneal Fracture With Severe Soft Tissue Injury and Osteomyelitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karns, Michael; Dailey, Steven K; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in surgical technique have resulted in the ability to reconstruct lower extremity injuries that would have previously been treated by amputation. Currently, a paucity of data is available specifically addressing limb amputation versus reconstruction for calcaneal fractures with severe soft tissue compromise. Reconstruction leaves the patient with their native limb; however, multiple surgeries, infections, chronic pain, and a poor functional outcome are very real possibilities. We present the case of a complex calcaneal fracture complicated by soft tissue injury and osteomyelitis that highlights the importance of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon when considering reconstruction versus amputation. This case exemplifies the need for open communication concerning the risks and benefits of treatment modalities while simultaneously considering the patient's expectations and desired outcomes. PMID:25128313

  19. Biomechanical comparison of conventional and anatomical calcaneal plates for the treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures - a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bin; Chen, Wen-Chuan; Lee, Pei-Yuan; Lin, Kang-Ping; Lin, Kun-Jhih; Tsai, Cheng-Lun; Wei, Hung-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Initial stability is essential for open reduction internal fixation of intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Geometrical feature of a calcaneal plate is influential to its endurance under physiological load. It is unclear if conventional and pre-contoured anatomical calcaneal plates may exhibit differently in biomechanical perspective. A Sanders' Type II-B intraarticular calcaneal fracture model was reconstructed to evaluate the effectiveness of calcaneal plates using finite element methods. Incremental vertical joint loads up to 450 N were exerted on the subtalar joint to evaluate the stability and safety of the calcaneal plates and bony structure. Results revealed that the anatomical calcaneal plate model had greater average structural stiffness (585.7 N/mm) and lower von Mises stress on the plate (774.5 MPa) compared to those observed in the conventional calcaneal plate model (stiffness: 430.9 N/mm; stress on plate: 867.1 MPa). Although both maximal compressive and maximal tensile stress and strain were lower in the anatomical calcaneal plate group, greater loads on fixation screws were found (average 172.7 MPa compared to 82.18 MPa in the conventional calcaneal plate). It was noted that high magnitude stress concentrations would occur where the bone plate bridges the fracture line on the lateral side of the calcaneus bone. Sufficient fixation strength at the posterolateral calcaneus bone is important for maintaining subtalar joint load after reduction and fixation of a Sanders' Type II-B calcaneal fracture. In addition, geometrical design of a calcaneal plate should worth considering for the mechanical safety in practical usage. PMID:26813403

  20. Superior peroneal retinacular injuries in calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Florek, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures are injuries that occur generally as the result of high-energy mechanisms, and, as such, the presence of concurrent injuries should be suspected. The presence of peroneal tendon and superior retinacular injuries has been underreported. We sought to report the incidence of peroneal tendon pathologic features in our population of patients with calcaneal fractures, with emphasis on the method of identification. Furthermore, we sought to identify whether specific fracture patterns were more commonly associated with this pathologic finding. Of the 97 cases, 13 (13.4%) required repair of the superior peroneal retinaculum, 11 of which demonstrated the Sanders A fracture line. Our findings have demonstrated an incidence of pathologic features, in particular, with the presence of the Sanders A fracture line, that warrants attention to potentially help improve the outcome of these devastating injuries. PMID:25726126

  1. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  2. Joint-Preserving Osteotomies for Malaligned Intraarticular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Benirschke, Stephen K; Kramer, Patricia A

    2016-03-01

    Intraarticular calcaneal fracture treatments that result in malalignment often require reconstructive surgery. Seven cases are used to demonstrate the intricacies of reconstructive case management. Reestablishment of calcaneal height, length, orientation, and position relative to the other tarsals is necessary to reestablish appropriate foot function. Inherent or acquired gastrocnemius equinus should be treated with recession to reduce destructive forces on the reconstruction. PMID:26915782

  3. High Heels Increase Women's Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Research has found that the appearance of women's apparel helps increase their attractiveness as rated by men and that men care more about physical features in potential opposite-sex mates. However, the effect of sartorial appearance has received little interest from scientists. In a series of studies, the length of women's shoe heels was examined. A woman confederate wearing black shoes with 0, 5, or 9 cm heels asked men for help in various circumstances. In Study 1, she asked men to respond to a short survey on gender equality. In Study 2, the confederate asked men and women to participate in a survey on local food habit consumption. In Study 3, men and women in the street were observed while walking in back of the female confederate who dropped a glove apparently unaware of her loss. It was found that men's helping behavior increased as soon as heel length increased. However, heel length had no effect on women's helping behavior. It was also found that men spontaneously approached women more quickly when they wore high-heeled shoes (Study 4). Change in gait, foot-size judgment, and misattribution of sexiness and sexual intent were used as possible explanations. PMID:25408499

  4. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  5. Spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Spina, Antonio; Clemente, Alberto; Vancini, Chiara; Fejzo, Majlinda; Campioni, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) leads to a progressive weakening of the skeleton which may result in bone fractures. However, spontaneous fractures (exclusive of stress fractures, vertebral collapse, and superficial articular fragmentation) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been only occasionally reported in the medical literature. A case of spontaneous talar and calcaneal fracture in rheumatoid arthritis is described. Bone lesions were identified on radiographs, MR images and scintigraphy in a patient with right ankle pain. The absence of episodes of acute trauma, and the presence of acute clinical manifestations should guide the clinical suspicion. PMID:22470803

  6. Computed tomography of calcaneal fractures

    SciTech Connect

    Heger, L.; Wulff, K.; Seddiqi, M.S.A.

    1985-07-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of 25 fractured calcanei was performed to investigate the potential of CT in evaluating the pattern and biomechanics of these fractures. The characteristic findings of typical fractures are presented, including the number and type of principal fragments, size and dislocation of the sustentacular fragment, and involvement of the anterior and posterior facets of the subtalar joint. In 17 cases, the calcaneus consisted of four or more fragments. Furthermore, in 17 cases the sustentacular fragment included all or part of the posterior facet joint. In 18 of the 25 cases, the sustentacular fragment was displaced. It is concluded that well performed CT is an invaluable adjunct in understanding the fracture mechanism and in detecting pain-provoking impingement between the fibular malleolus and the tuberosity fragment.

  7. Functional total and subtotal heel reconstruction with free composite osteofasciocutaneous groin flaps of the deep circumflex iliac vessels.

    PubMed

    Peek, Alberto; Giessler, Goetz A

    2006-06-01

    Functional and esthetic reconstruction of the bony and tendinous structures with a stable, sensate soft tissue integument after complex posttraumatic defects of the heel is demanding. Cases are rare in the literature and hardly comparable due to their heterogeneity. The reconstructive approach has to consider both patient profile and the reconstructive tree, with free microvascular flaps playing a primary role. The goals are the reconstruction of both osteotendinous structures and slender soft tissue lining for proper shoe fitting for ambulation and mechanical and thermal protection. The flap should be sensate in weightbearing areas to optimize gait and to prevent long-term complications by ulcers. The osteofasciocutaneous deep inferior circumflex artery (DCIA) flap is especially suitable for complex heel defects with subtotal or total loss of the calcaneal bone as all components (iliac bone, groin skin, and fascia lata) can have a wide range of size and shape. We operated on 2 cases with this variable composite flap. One patient had a complete heel defect by war shrapnel. The complete calcaneus, soft heel, and Achilles tendon were reconstructed. The second patient had an empty os calcis after a comminuted fracture and a lateral crush-induced soft tissue defect. In both patients, a stable wound closure, osseous integration, and weightbearing ambulation could be achieved. PMID:16721075

  8. The surgical dilemma of the malunited calcaneal joint depression fracture: the VAMC Miami experience.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M

    1996-01-01

    During the period of October 1985 through March 1995, 25 patients presented to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Miami with a chief complaint of chronic pain status post calcaneal joint depression fracture. Their acute injury was treated conservatively at this and various other institutions. Nine patients were managed conservatively with orthotics, University of California Biomechanics Laboratory braces (UCBLs), shoe modification, or prosthetics. Sixteen patients underwent hindfoot fusions. Good to excellent results were obtained in 15 of the 16 fusions. The remaining patient, having an isolated subtalar fusion, was later diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. Proper evaluation of the chronic pain patient is critical when mapping out an appropriate treatment plan. Hindfoot arthrodesis with soft tissue decompression is a successful tool in eliminating chronic pain due to malunited depression fractures. PMID:8722881

  9. Effects of the height of shoe heels on muscle activation of cervical and lumbar spine in healthy women.

    PubMed

    Park, Kisu; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different height of high heels on muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy women were recruited in this study. To examine the effects of different heights of heels on muscle activation, the paraspinalis cervicis (cervical spine) and erector spinae (lumbar spine) were measured at the time of heel strike and toe off during gait on three different conditions (barefoot, 4 cm high heels, and 10 cm high heels). There are no previous trials or reports that have evaluated this approach in patients with chronic neck pain. [Results] A significant increase in muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae at heel strike and toe off (except that of the paraspinalis cervicis at toe off in healthy subjects) was observed in the under 10 cm high heel condition as, compared to that with barefoot condition, in all the subjects. [Conclusion] The height of the high heels affects to the activation demand of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in patients with neck pain. PMID:27134392

  10. Effects of the height of shoe heels on muscle activation of cervical and lumbar spine in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kisu; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different height of high heels on muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy women were recruited in this study. To examine the effects of different heights of heels on muscle activation, the paraspinalis cervicis (cervical spine) and erector spinae (lumbar spine) were measured at the time of heel strike and toe off during gait on three different conditions (barefoot, 4 cm high heels, and 10 cm high heels). There are no previous trials or reports that have evaluated this approach in patients with chronic neck pain. [Results] A significant increase in muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae at heel strike and toe off (except that of the paraspinalis cervicis at toe off in healthy subjects) was observed in the under 10 cm high heel condition as, compared to that with barefoot condition, in all the subjects. [Conclusion] The height of the high heels affects to the activation demand of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in patients with neck pain. PMID:27134392

  11. Oral sucrose for heel lance enhances adenosine triphosphate use in preterm neonates with respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Angeles, Danilyn M; Asmerom, Yayesh; Boskovic, Danilo S; Slater, Laurel; Bacot-Carter, Sharon; Bahjri, Khaled; Mukasa, Joseph; Holden, Megan; Fayard, Elba

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of oral sucrose on procedural pain, and on biochemical markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization and oxidative stress in preterm neonates with mild to moderate respiratory distress. Study design: Preterm neonates with a clinically required heel lance that met study criteria (n = 49) were randomized into three groups: (1) control (n = 24), (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (n = 15) and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and non-nutritive sucking (n = 10). Plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance, chi-square and one-way analysis of variance. Results: We found that in preterm neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2, a single dose of oral sucrose given before a heel lance significantly increased markers of adenosine triphosphate use. Conclusion: We found that oral sucrose enhanced adenosine triphosphate use in neonates who were intubated and/or were receiving ⩾30% FiO2. Although oral sucrose decreased pain scores, our data suggest that it also increased energy use as evidenced by increased plasma markers of adenosine triphosphate utilization. These effects of sucrose, specifically the fructose component, on adenosine triphosphate metabolism warrant further investigation. PMID:26770807

  12. Regional plantar foot pressure distributions on high-heeled shoes-shank curve effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; Lee, Winson; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Forefoot pain is common in high-heeled shoe wearers due to the high pressure caused by the center of body mass moving forward and the increased arch height with heel elevation. Sufficient arch support could reduce the high pressure over forefoot. However, too much arch support could lead to abnormal foot alignment and pain over midfoot. Little information is reported on the relationship among plantar arch height, shank curve design and plantar pressure. This study aimed at quantifying the plantar arch height changes at different heel heights and investigating the effect of shank curve on plantar pressure distribution. The plantar arch height increased to (7.6±1.3)mm at heel height of 75 mm. The Chinese standard suggests the depth of last should be 8.5mm for heel height of 75 mm. When a shank curve with higher depth of last (11 mm) was used, the peak pressure over forefoot further decreased in midstance phase, which might ease the forefoot problems, while the peak pressure over midfoot increased but not exceeded the discomfort pressure thresholds. To achieve a more ideal pressure distribution in high-heeled shoes, a higher than expected depth of last would be suggested that would not cause discomfort over midfoot.

  13. Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain ... Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain ...

  14. Calcaneal Tuberosity Fixation Using a Locking Compression Hook Plate.

    PubMed

    Agni, Nickil; Fearon, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Calcaneal tuberosity fractures account for 1% to 3% of all calcaneal fractures. Surgical fixation is particularly challenging owing to osteoporosis and numerous comorbidities and risk factors in this patient population. Numerous techniques have been proposed; however, we describe the use of a locking compression hook plate in the treatment of type 2 fracture patterns. This has the advantage of providing stable fixation in osteoporotic bone, avoiding the disadvantages of soft tissue and metalwork irritation that have been described with other techniques. PMID:27067200

  15. Oral Sucrose for Heel Lance Increases ATP Utilization and Oxidative Stress in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Asmerom, Yayesh; Slater, Laurel; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Bahjri, Khaled; Plank, Megan S; Phillips, Raylene; Deming, Douglas; Ashwal, Stephen; Fayard, Elba; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of sucrose on pain and biochemical markers of adenosine trisphosphate(ATP) degradation and oxidative stress in preterm neonates experiencing a clinically required heel lance. Study design Preterm neonates that met study criteria (n=131) were randomized into three groups: (1) control; (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (NNS); and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and NNS. Plasma markers of ATP degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman rho. Results We found significant increases in plasma hypoxanthine and uric acid over time in neonates who received sucrose. We also found a significant negative correlation between plasma allantoin concentration and PIPP in a subgroup of neonates who received sucrose. Conclusion A single dose of oral sucrose, given before heel lance, significantly increased ATP utilization and oxidative stress in premature neonates. Because neonates are given multiple doses of sucrose per day, randomized trials are needed to examine the effect of repeated sucrose administration on ATP degradation, oxidative stress and cell injury. PMID:23415615

  16. A retrospective comparison of percutaneous plantar fasciotomy and open plantar fasciotomy with heel spur resection.

    PubMed

    Fallat, Lawrence M; Cox, J Todd; Chahal, Ruby; Morrison, Pamela; Kish, John

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of recalcitrant heel pain is a relatively new approach. To compare the 2 approaches, a retrospective chart review was conducted of 53 patients (55 feet) who had undergone surgical treatment of plantar fasciitis by either open fasciotomy with heel spur resection or percutaneous medial fascial release. The outcomes measures included perioperative pain and the interval to return to full activity. Pain was measured on a subjective 10-point visual analog scale. Of the 55 fasciotomies performed, 23 were percutaneous and 32 were open, with adjunctive heel spur resection. The percutaneous group experienced a mean pain reduction of 5.69 points at the first postoperative visit, whereas open fasciotomy group experienced a mean pain reduction of 3.53 points. At 12 months postoperatively, no statistically significant difference was found in the pain levels between the 2 groups. The results also showed that the percutaneous group returned to normal activity an average of 2.82 weeks (p < .001) faster than the open group. In the patient cohorts studied, percutaneous medial fascial release was as effective at resolving recalcitrant plantar fasciitis pain as the open procedure and involved less postoperative pain and a faster return to full activity. PMID:23473671

  17. DETERMINING OSTEOPOROSIS RISK IN OLDER COLONO ADULTS FROM RURAL AMAZONIAN ECUADOR USING CALCANEAL ULTRASONOMETRY

    PubMed Central

    MADIMENOS, FELICIA C.; LIEBERT, MELISSA A.; CEPON-ROBINS, TARA J.; SNODGRASS, J. JOSH; SUGIYAMA, LAWRENCE S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low bone density and osteoporosis prevalence, while well-documented in wealthy nations, are poorly studied in rural, non-clinical contexts in economically-developing regions such as Latin America. This study contributes preliminary osteoporosis risk data for a rural Colono (mestizo) population from Amazonian Ecuador. Methods Anthropometrics were collected for 119 adult participants (74 females, 45 males [50–90 years old]). Heel bone density and T-scores were recorded using calcaneal ultrasonometry Results Approximately 33.6% of the participants had low bone density and were at high-risk for osteoporosis. Four times as many females as males were considered high-risk. Consistent with epidemiological literature, advancing age was significantly associated with lower bone density values (p=0.001). Conclusions Low bone density and osteoporosis prevalence are expected to increase in this and other economically-transitioning populations, yet infrastructure to monitor this changing epidemiological landscape is almost non-existent. Human biologists are uniquely positioned to contribute data from remote populations, a critical step towards initiating increased resource allocation for diagnosis and prevention. PMID:25242164

  18. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. PMID:25998470

  19. Three-dimensional evaluation of heel raise test in pediatric planovalgus feet and normal feet.

    PubMed

    Krautwurst, Britta K; Wolf, Sebastian I; Dreher, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Planovalgus foot is a common pediatric deformity which may be associated with pain. To evaluate flexibility of the foot, the heel raise test is used. During this test the arch and hindfoot are assessed. Several studies have described planovalgus foot based on 3D gait and standing analysis. However, no studies have evaluated foot flexibility during heel raise using an objective 3D analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the flexibility of planovalgus feet during the heel raise test using an objective 3D assessment and to determine whether any hypotheses can be generated about potential differences between painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet and reference feet. Here, 3D foot analysis was conducted in 33 children (7 reference feet, 16 painless, and 10 painful flexible planovalgus feet) during the heel raise test. To identify the characteristics of planovalgus foot, the concept of 3D projection angles was used as introduced in the Heidelberg Foot Measurement Method (HFMM), with a modified marker set. All feet showed dynamic movements of the medial arch and hindfoot from valgus to varus position during heel raise. Reference feet had the smallest range of motion, perhaps due to joint stability and absence of foot deformity. Painful and painless flexible planovalgus feet demonstrated similar movements. No significant differences were found between the painful and painless groups. However, the kinematics of the pain group seemed to differ more from those of the reference group than did kinematics of the painless group. This assessment is a new, practical, and objective method to measure the flexibility of small children's feet. PMID:27262407

  20. Plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Onuba, O; Ireland, J

    1986-12-01

    Thirty patients presenting with the heel pain syndrome, commonly referred to as "plantar fasciitis", were studied prospectively over a two year period. The pain was associated with a calcaneal spur in 21 patients (70%). In a control series of 25 patients without heel symptoms, calcaneal spurs were present in only 4 out of 50 heels (8%). This difference is highly significant (p 0.001). Seven patients (22%) in the plantar fasciitis group complained of ipsilateral sciatica. PMID:3610621

  1. Practice recommendations for preventing heel pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Evonne; Scott-Williams, Suzy; McGuire, James B

    2008-10-01

    Heels are the second most common anatomical location for pressure ulcers. A combination of risk factors, including pressure, may cause ulceration. Heel pressure ulcers are a particular concern for surgical patients. A review of the literature, including poster presentations, shows that controlled clinical studies to assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of available interventions are not available. Case series (with or without historical controls) as well as pressure ulcer guideline recommendations suggest the most important aspect of heel ulcer prevention is pressure relief (offloading). It also has been documented that the incidence of heel ulcers can be reduced using a total-patient care approach and heel offloading devices. Guidelines, observational studies, and expert opinion intimate that reducing heel ulceration rates can be expected to improve patient outcomes, decrease costs associated with their care, and avoid costs related to hospital-acquired pressure ulcers. The heel pressure ulcer prevention strategies reviewed should be implemented until the results of prospective, randomized controlled studies to compare the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these strategies are available. PMID:18927483

  2. A comparison of the effects of two volumes of local analgesic solution in the distal interphalangeal joint of horses with lameness caused by solar toe or solar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, J; Schumacher, J; de Graves, F; Steiger, R; Schramme, M; Smith, R; Coker, M

    2001-05-01

    The response of horses, with solar pain in the dorsal or palmar aspect of the foot, to 6 or 10 ml local analgesic solution administered into the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint was examined. Lameness was induced in 7 horses by creating solar pain in the dorsal aspect of one forefoot and, at another time, the palmar aspect of the other forefoot with set-screws inserted into a custom-made shoe. Horses were videotaped trotting before and after application of set-screws and, in separate trials, after 6 or 10 ml local analgesic solution was administered into the DIP joint. Lameness scores were assigned by examining videotaped gaits. Scores were significantly lower (P < 0.05) for horses with set-screws applied to the angles of the sole and receiving 10 ml, but not 6 ml, local analgesic solution into the DIP joint. Scores were significantly lower (P < 0.05) for all horses with set-screws in the dorsal margin of the sole receiving either volume of local analgesic solution. Analgesia of the DIP joint was less effective in desensitising the angles of the sole than in desensitising the dorsal margin of the sole, and 10 ml local analgesic solution was more effective than 6 ml in desensitising these regions. The response of horses with solar pain to local analgesic solution in the DIP joint was influenced by the volume administered and the region of sole affected. PMID:11352348

  3. Spontaneous calcaneal fracture in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: Four cases report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Evran, Mehtap; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Akkuş, Gamze; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar

    2016-07-16

    Spontaneous calcaneal fractures in diabetic patients without obvious trauma may occur, sometimes accompanying diabetic foot ulcers. In the current study we report four cases who were hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer with concomitant calcaneal fractures. There were four diabetic patients (one type 1 and three type 2) who registered with diabetic foot ulcers with coexisting calcaneal fractures, all of which were classified as Type A according to Essex Lopresti Calcaneal Fracture Classification. Two of the patients with renal failure were in a routine dialysis program, as well as vascular compromise and osteomyelitis in all of the patients. The diabetic foot ulcer of the 61 years old osteoporotic female patient healed with local debridement, vacuum assisted closure and then epidermal growth factor while the calcaneal fracture was then followed by elastic bandage. In two patients could not prevent progression of diabetic foot ulcers and calcaneal fractures to consequent below-knee amputation. The only patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus improved with antibiotic therapy and split thickness skin grafting, while the calcaneal fracture did not heal. In the current study we aimed to emphasize the spontaneous calcaneal fractures as possible co-existing pathologies in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. After all the medical treatment, amputation below knee had to be performed in 2 patients. It should be noted that other accompanying conditions such as impaired peripheral circulation, osteomyelitis, chronic renal failure, and maybe osteoporosis is a challenge of the recovery of calcaneal fractures and accelerate the progress to amputation in diabetic patients. PMID:27458594

  4. Spontaneous calcaneal fracture in patients with diabetic foot ulcer: Four cases report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Evran, Mehtap; Sert, Murat; Tetiker, Tamer; Akkuş, Gamze; Biçer, Ömer Sunkar

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous calcaneal fractures in diabetic patients without obvious trauma may occur, sometimes accompanying diabetic foot ulcers. In the current study we report four cases who were hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer with concomitant calcaneal fractures. There were four diabetic patients (one type 1 and three type 2) who registered with diabetic foot ulcers with coexisting calcaneal fractures, all of which were classified as Type A according to Essex Lopresti Calcaneal Fracture Classification. Two of the patients with renal failure were in a routine dialysis program, as well as vascular compromise and osteomyelitis in all of the patients. The diabetic foot ulcer of the 61 years old osteoporotic female patient healed with local debridement, vacuum assisted closure and then epidermal growth factor while the calcaneal fracture was then followed by elastic bandage. In two patients could not prevent progression of diabetic foot ulcers and calcaneal fractures to consequent below-knee amputation. The only patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus improved with antibiotic therapy and split thickness skin grafting, while the calcaneal fracture did not heal. In the current study we aimed to emphasize the spontaneous calcaneal fractures as possible co-existing pathologies in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. After all the medical treatment, amputation below knee had to be performed in 2 patients. It should be noted that other accompanying conditions such as impaired peripheral circulation, osteomyelitis, chronic renal failure, and maybe osteoporosis is a challenge of the recovery of calcaneal fractures and accelerate the progress to amputation in diabetic patients. PMID:27458594

  5. High-heeled shoes and musculoskeletal injuries: a narrative systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Barnish, Maxwell S; Barnish, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To conduct the first systematic review from an epidemiological perspective regarding the association between high-heeled shoe wear and hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain, osteoarthritis (OA) and both first-party and second-party injury in human participants without prior musculoskeletal conditions. Setting A systematic review of international peer-reviewed scientific literature across seven major languages. Data sources Searches were conducted on seven major bibliographic databases in July 2015 to initially identify all scholarly articles on high-heeled shoes. Supplementary manual searches were conducted. Titles, abstracts and full-text articles were sequentially screened to identify all articles assessing epidemiological evidence regarding the association between high-heeled shoe wear and hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain, OA and both first-party and second-party injury in human participants without prior musculoskeletal conditions. Standardised data extraction and quality assessment (Threats to Validity tool) were conducted. Primary and secondary outcome measures Musculoskeletal pain or OA as assessed by clinical diagnosis or clinical assessment tool. First-party or second-party injury. Results 644 unique records were identified, 56 full-text articles were screened and 18 studies included in the review. Four studies assessed the relationship with hallux valgus and three found a significant association. Two studies assessed the association with OA and neither found a significant association. Five studies assessed the association with musculoskeletal pain and three found a significant association. Eight studies assessed first-party injury and seven found evidence of a significant injury toll associated with high-heeled shoes. One study provided data on second-party injury and the injury toll was low. Conclusions High-heeled shoes were shown to be associated with hallux valgus, musculoskeletal pain and first-party injury. No conclusive evidence

  6. The effect of high-heeled shoes on lumbar lordosis: a narrative review and discussion of the disconnect between Internet content and peer-reviewed literature

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Brent S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Some women complain of low back pain that they believe is due to wearing high-heeled shoes, and some clinicians seem to think the reason is that high-heeled shoes cause increased lumbar lordosis. This article examines Internet information aimed at the general public and presents a literature review of available research in this area. Methods The keywords high heels and high-heeled shoes, combined with the words lumbar, lordosis, and pelvic tilt, were used in an Internet search of Ask.com; in published literature searches of PubMed, MANTIS, CINAHL, Scopus, and ProceedingsFirst; and in searches for theses and dissertations of PapersFirst through June 2010. Results There are many Internet sites that support the belief that high-heeled shoes cause increased lordosis. However, published research for this topic mostly does not support this belief; but some mixed results, small subject groups, and questionable methods have left the issue unclear. Conclusions It appears that some health care providers are offering advice about the effect of high-heeled shoes on lumbar lordosis that conflicts with most published research. However, the prevalence of such advice is unknown; and the published research is equivocal. Considering that both low back pain and the wearing of high heeled-shoes are common, clinicians could use some clearer guidance; this is an area that deserves further investigation. PMID:22027108

  7. A new modified technique for harvest of calcaneal bone grafts in surgery on the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Biddinger, K R; Komenda, G A; Schon, L C; Myerson, M S

    1998-05-01

    Reported sites for retrieval of cancellous bone for grafts include the iliac crest, greater trochanter, proximal tibia, and distal tibia. A new lateral technique for retrieval of cancellous bone from the calcaneus is evaluated through anatomic review, quantitative analysis, and retrospective clinical assessment. Of 22 patients managed with this technique over a 2-year period, 17 returned for an evaluation by questionnaire, physical examination, and radiographic follow-up at an average of 7 months after surgery (range, 4-16 months). Complaints/complications were minor: three had minor incisional symptoms, five had medial heel pain (3 caused by plantar fasciitis), and one had unchanged preoperative heel pain secondary to clubfoot deformity. Compared with more extensive bone-grafting procedures, this procedure offers the advantages of bone harvested under local anesthesia using a readily accessible ipsilateral extremity and producing minor complications. PMID:9622424

  8. On high heels and short muscles: A multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Pok, Jacquelynn M.; McWalter, Emily J.; Gold, Garry E.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13 cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  9. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  10. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve).

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Frederick-Dyer, Katherine; Ferguson, N Lynn; Lewis, James; Fu, Yitong

    2012-09-01

    Fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) is a rare, benign lesion of the peripheral nerves most frequently involving the median nerve and its digital branches (80 %). Pathognomonic MR features of FLH such as coaxial-cable-like appearance on axial planes and a spaghetti-like appearance on coronal planes have been described by Marom and Helms, obviating the need for diagnostic biopsy. We present a case of fibrolipomatous hamartoma of the inferior calcaneal nerve (Baxter nerve) with associated subcutaneous fat proliferation. PMID:22526881

  11. Can We Measure the Heel Bump? Radiographic Evaluation of Haglund's Deformity.

    PubMed

    Bulstra, Gythe H; van Rheenen, Thijs A; Scholtes, Vanessa A B

    2015-01-01

    Haglund's deformity is a symptomatic posterosuperior deformity of the heel. The lateral radiograph of the ankle will show a prominent, large, posterosuperior part of the calcaneus, which can be measured using the Fowler and Philips angle (FPA, the angle between the posterior and plantar surface of the calcaneus) and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA, the angle between the sole of the foot and the plantar part of the calcaneus). Although these angles are commonly used, these radiographic angle measurements have never shown a relationship with Haglund's deformity. In 78 patients (51% male) with symptomatic Haglund's deformity and a control group of 100 patients (41% male) with no heel complaints, we measured the FPA and CPA on weightbearing lateral radiographs of the foot. Using an unpaired t tests, no significant difference was found between the 2 groups in the FPA (p = .40). We measured a significant difference in the CPA between the Haglund group and the control group (p = .014). Subgroup analysis showed that this difference was mainly found in females (p < .00), with no significant difference seen in the males (p < .48). Females with Haglund's deformity will have a greater CPA than will females without Haglund's deformity. The CPA showed a difference between the Haglund and non-Haglund groups, although mainly in females. Although the evidence from our study is limited, it would be interesting to study the CPA further, because it implicates the verticalization of the calcaneus. This change in position results in extra traction on the Achilles tendon and can eventually cause tendinitis and bursitis. Radiographic measurement should be used as an auxiliary tool. If the calcaneus tends to change position, it would be interesting to understand this process, which could eventually lead to improvement in the treatment of Haglund's deformity. PMID:25179453

  12. An exploration of emergency department presentations related to high heel footwear in Victoria, Australia, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many women are warned against the dangers of wearing high heel footwear however there is limited empirical evidence demonstrating an association between wearing high heel with injury. Gait laboratory testing has found a higher heel height placed the foot in a position that increases the risk of ankle sprain. Women have also been surveyed about wearing high heels and approximately half of those reported inconvenience and pain after wearing a high heel shoe. This study aims to explore emergency department presentations of injuries and the estimated costs that have been directly attributed to wearing high heeled footwear within Victoria, Australia during 2006–2010. Methods The Victorian Emergency Minimum Dataset (VEMD) was searched for all injuries attributed to wearing high heel footwear presenting to emergency departments in Victoria Australia, between the years of 2006–2010. The VEMD produced a report detailing sex, age at presentation, month of presentation, time of day of presentation, day of presentation, location that injury occurred and type of injury for presentation. Monash Health in Victoria Australia, provided emergency department estimates for injury types to calculate an estimated cost of an acute injury related to wearing high heel footwear. Results There were 240 injuries presenting to Victorian emergency departments directly attributed to wearing high heeled footwear. The majority of people injured were women (n = 236) and all were less than 55 years of age. More injuries presented on a Sunday (n = 83) and more in the 8 am-12 pm time bracket (n = 64). There were also more injuries presenting in the months of November, December and January (n = 80). The most commonly injured body part was the ankle (n = 123). The emergency department estimate of the cost of these injuries over this time-frame was almost $72,000 (mean of $316.72 per presentation). Conclusions People who wear high heel footwear on weekends appear to

  13. Clinical efficacy and prognosis factors of open calcaneal fracture: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Liu, Yueju; Peng, Aqin; Wang, Haili; Zhang, Yingze

    2015-01-01

    Background: Treatment of open calcaneal fractures remains to be a challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. The aim of this study is to assess factors affecting the treatment results of open calcaneal fractures. Methods: A total of 98 patients who have 101 open calcaneal fractures were recruited in our hospital, they were all treated with a standard protocol based on the appearance of the traumatic wound. Data on mechanism of injury, location and size of wound, classification, fixation methods and subsequent soft-tissue complications were collected and evaluated. AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot Survey and physical examinations were performed to access outcomes. Results: No statistical difference was found in complication and AOFAS score in open calcaneal fractures treated with different fixation, and no statistical difference was found in AOFAS between gustilo I and II type open calcaneal fractures (P > 0.05). There was significant difference between gustilo I and III type or gustilo II and III type fractures (P < 0.05). The more serious soft tissue injury of open calcaneal fracture lead to the worse outcome and higher incidence of complications obtained. Conclusion: Open calcaneal fractures have a high propensity for soft-tissue complications no matter which fixation method was chose. There was no significant difference between patients who had been treated with different fixations in complication rates. Soft-tissue injury played an important role in outcomes of open calcaneal fractures. Deep infections and osteomyelitis were rare by means of emergency debridement and following repeated debridement. PMID:26064282

  14. Cement Calcaneoplasty: An Innovative Method for Treating Nonunion in Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture.

    PubMed

    Godavitarne, Charles; Fawzy, Ernest; Giancola, Giorgio; Louette, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency type stress fractures are common in older patients with osteoporosis. Persistent pain after nonunion of these fractures can be disabling, with the management options often limited. We aimed to assess the suitability of fluoroscopic-guided injection of bone cement into a persistently symptomatic nonuniting calcaneal insufficiency fracture. To the best of our knowledge, this technique has not previously been described in the published data. After local subcutaneous anesthesia, the midpoint of the fracture site was accessed by trocar insertion under radiographic guidance, and bone cement was injected directly into the site. A preprocedure visual analog scale pain score of 90 of 100 was recorded. This had improved to 0 of 100 at the 12-month follow-up point after the procedure. The aim of the present case report was to raise awareness of percutaneous calcaneoplasty, which we believe to be a safe and well-tolerated technique for the management of osteoporotic insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus. We propose that this technique be considered when conservative methods aimed at promoting fracture healing have failed. PMID:26875768

  15. Analysis of heel pad tissues mechanics at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, C G; Forestiero, A; Carniel, E L; Natali, A N

    2013-04-01

    A combined experimental and numerical approach is used to investigate the interaction phenomena occurring between foot and footwear during the heel strike phase of the gait. Two force platforms are utilised to evaluate the ground reaction forces of a subject in bare and shod walking. The reaction forces obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as loading conditions for the numerical analyses using three dimensional models of the heel region and of the running shoe. The heel pad region, as fat and skin tissues, is described by visco-hyperelastic and fibre-reinforced hyperelastic formulations respectively and bone region by a linear orthotropic formulation. Different elastomeric foams are considered with regard to the outsole, the midsole and the insole layers. The mechanical properties are described by a hyperfoam formulation. The evaluation of the mechanical behaviour of the heel pad tissues at the heel strike in bare and shod conditions is performed considering different combinations of materials for midsole and insole layers. Results allow for the definition of the influence of different material characteristics on the mechanical response of the heel pad region, in particular showing the compressive stress differentiation in the bare and shod conditions. PMID:22789809

  16. Evolution and Allometry of Calcaneal Elongation in Living and Extinct Primates

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Doug M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Gladman, Justin T.; Bloch, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal

  17. Presence of a long accessory flexor tendon of the toes in surgical treatment for tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Gomes Júnior, Nelson Pelozo; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Raduan, Fernando Cipolini; Ejnisman, Benno; Cohen, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The presence of accessory tendons in the foot and ankle needs to be recognized, given that depending on their location, they may cause disorders relating either to pain processes or to handling of the surgical findings. We describe the presence of an accessory flexor tendon of the toes, seen in surgical exposure for transferring the long flexor tendon of the hallux to the calcaneus, due to the presence of a disorder of tendinopathy of the insertion of the calcaneal tendon in association with Haglund's syndrome. PMID:26962495

  18. Closed Reduction and Percutaneous Fixation of Calcaneal Fractures in Children.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yongzeng; Yu, Yang; Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Cai, Leyi; Hong, Jianjun

    2016-07-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation has been widely used to treat displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures in children. However, the complications of surgical trauma and the wound created through the extended lateral approach cannot be ignored. This study analyzed the outcomes of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in children treated with closed reduction and percutaneous fixation. Medical records of pediatric patients who had displaced intra-articular calcaneus fractures and underwent closed reduction and percutaneous fixation at the study institution between January 2008 and January 2013 were reviewed. Preoperative radiographs and computed tomography scans were used to evaluate and classify the fractures. Clinical outcomes and radiographic findings were assessed at postoperative follow-up. The study included 14 displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 11 patients (7 boys and 4 girls). Mean patient age was 11.18 years (range, 6-16 years), and average follow-up time was 42.8 months postoperatively (range, 12-72 months). There were 6 tongue-type fractures and 8 joint depression-type fractures, based on the Essex-Lopresti classification, and there were 11 type II and 3 type III fractures, based on the Sanders classification. Average Böhler angle was 8.00° (range, -5° to 18°) preoperatively and 30.79° (range, 26° to 40°) postoperatively (P<.001). Average subjective American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score was 65.7 (range, 52-68). No patients had wound breakdown or infection. In the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in pediatric patients, closed reduction and percutaneous fixation achieved good outcomes, with few complications. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):e744-e748.]. PMID:27111072

  19. Metastatic calcaneal lesion associated with uterine carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rice, Brittany M; Todd, Nicholas W; Jensen, Richard; Rush, Shannon M; Rogers, William

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic lesions of uterine carcinosarcoma most commonly occur in the abdomen and lungs and less frequently in highly vascularized bone. We report a rare case of an 86-year-old female with uterine carcinosarcoma with metastasis to the left calcaneus. The patient had a history of uterine carcinosarcoma with hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, along with bilateral pelvic and aortic lymphadenectomy, with no adjuvant therapy. The initial pedal complaint was that of left foot pain. The initial radiographic findings were negative; however, magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a substantial area of marrow edema in the calcaneus. An excisional biopsy was performed, and histopathologic analysis revealed adenocarcinoma with features consistent with the patient's previous uterine tumor specimen. The patient was given one treatment of chemotherapy and was discharged to a hospice, where she died of her disease 2 weeks later. PMID:23871174

  20. Corrective Osteotomies for Malunited Extra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Ketz, John; Clare, Michael; Sanders, Roy

    2016-03-01

    The most effective way to treat calcaneal malunions is avoidance. With any articular fracture, progressive arthrosis and dysfunction are common. By restoring the anatomy initially through reduction, late reconstructive options become less complicated. Numerous studies have shown that restoration of the anatomic alignment either through percutaneous or open techniques is effective. In patients with no or minimal articular degeneration, extrarticular joint-sparing procedures can be performed. This represents a small select group who may benefit from simple osteotomy procedures with associated soft tissue reconstruction, if needed. PMID:26915784

  1. The Heel Pad in Congenital Idiopathic Clubfoot: Implications of Empty Heel for Clinical Severity Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Adegbehingbe, Olayinka O.; Asuquo, J. E.; Joseph, Mejabi O.; Alzahrani, Mohammed; Morcuende, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clubfoot has been evaluated in many ways, including the most common classifications of clubfoot, described by Caterrall and Piraniis based on six clinical signs. The purpose of this study was to gain better understanding of the heel pad in relation to the term “empty heel”, and to propose modification of clubfoot severity scoring system based on “empty heel”. Methods A combination of prospective study of 79 clubfoot patients treated with Ponseti method and literature review of heel pad anatomy and biomechanics. The setting was a university teaching hospital. The ethical research committee approved study protocol and informed consent of patients' parent obtained. The selection criteria included patients' diagnosed congenital idiopathic clubfoot, age < 2years, no history of previous treatment and tenotomy indicated. An evaluation of patient was assessed by orthopaedic surgeons trained on Ponseti method and has above 5 years experience. Data analysis performed on the age, sex, Pirani scores at onset of treatment, tenotomy, and 6 month after initial full correction. Results One hundred and thirty-two clubfeet in 79 patients (56 males, 23 females) completed Ponseti protocol. The median age at presentation was 5.2 months (range 0.1–23.7 months). The mean right foot abduction after correction 57.30(S.D. 9.20), and for the left foot, was 56.30 (S.D. 9.40). The mean right foot dorsiflexion was −13.70 (S.D. 18.40) before correction while after correction, it was 20.00 (S.D. 4.50) and for the left, the mean was −8.50 (S.D. 9.60) before correction and 21.00 (S.D. 4.30) after correction. Eighteen (22.8%) patients (10 bilateral, 9 unilateral) had clubfeet with empty heel score above zero point at initial full correction (p<0.001). Clinic anatomy shows the heel pad is a solid complex structure existing in normal, moderate and severe atrophied form. Heel pad is attached tightly to calcaneus without a cavity for the calcaneus to drop. Conclusions Heel pad

  2. Clinical Allograft of a Calcaneal Tendon in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Summers, Laura; Colagross-Schouten, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) housed in an outdoor field cage presented for severe trauma involving the left calcaneal tendon. Part of the management of this wound included an allograft of the calcaneal tendon from an animal that was euthanized for medical reasons. This case report describes the successful medical and surgical management of a macaque with a significant void of the calcaneal tendon. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a successful tendon allograft in a rhesus macaque for clinical purposes. PMID:25255076

  3. ASSESSMENT OF REPRODUCIBILITY OF SANDERS CLASSIFICATION FOR CALCANEAL FRACTURES

    PubMed Central

    Piovesana, Lucas Gonzaga; Lopes, Hériston Cristovam; Pacca, Daniel Moreira; Ninomiya, André Felipe; Dinato, Mauro César Mattos e; Pagnano, Rodrigo Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    Objective : To assess intra- and interobserver reproducibility of Sanders Classification System of calcaneal fractures among experienced and less experienced observers. Methods : Forty-six CT scans of intra-articular calcaneal fractures were reviewed. Four observers, two with ten years of experience in foot and ankle surgery and two third-year residents in Orthopedics and Traumatology classified the fractures on two separate occasions three weeks apart from each other. The intra and inter-observer reliability was analyzed using the Kappa index. Results : There was good intraobserver reliability for the two experienced observers and one less experienced observer (Kappa values 0.640, 0.632 and 0.629, respectively). The interobserver reliability was fair between the experienced observers (Kappa = 0.289) and moderate among the less experienced observers (Kappa = 0.527). Conclusions : The Sanders Classification System showed good intraobserver reliability, but interobserver reproducibility below the ideal level, both among experienced and less experienced observers. Level of Evidence III, Diagnostic Studies. PMID:26981043

  4. Subtalar versus triple arthrodesis after intra-articular calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kieboom, Brenda C. T.; Bessems, Gert H. J. M.; Vogels, Lucas M. M.; van Lieshout, Esther M. M.; Patka, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Depending upon initial treatment, between 2 and 30% of patients with a displaced intra-articular calcaneal fracture require a secondary arthrodesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subtalar versus triple arthrodesis on functional outcome. A total of 33 patients with 37 secondary arthrodeses (17 subtalar and 20 triple) with a median follow-up of 116 months were asked to complete questionnaires regarding disease-specific functional outcome (Maryland Foot Score, MFS), quality of life (SF-36) and overall satisfaction with the treatment (Visual Analogue Scale, VAS). Patient groups were comparable considering median age at fracture, initial treatment (conservative or operative), time to arthrodesis, median follow-up, and post-arthrodesis radiographic angles. The MFS score was similar after subtalar versus triple arthrodesis (59 vs. 56 points; P = 0.79). No statistically significant difference was found for the SF-36 (84 vs. 83 points; P = 0.67) and the VAS (5 vs. 6; P = 0.21). Smoking was statistically significantly associated with a non-union (χ2 = 6.60, P = 0.017). The current study suggests that there is no significant difference in functional outcome between an in situ subtalar or triple arthrodesis as a salvage technique for symptomatic arthrosis after an intra-articular calcaneal fracture. Smoking is a risk factor for non-union. PMID:21811905

  5. INTRA ARTICULAR CALCANEAL FRACTURES: A CLINICAL AND BIOMECHANICAL ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnaroff Contreras, Marcos Emilio; Kroth, Luciano Manoel; Kotani, Keith Lúcia; Da Silva Junior, Jorge Luiz; De Andrade, Mário Cesar; Vargas Ávila, Aluísio Otávio; Berral, Francisco José

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Verify the variables of plantar pressure distribution of patients submitted to surgical procedure for calcaneal fracture, and correlate them with two different surgical approaches. Method: The authors studied 15 patients between 20 and 53 years of age (average 40.06 yrs.) who had intra-joint calcaneal fractures, submitted to surgical treatment by means of two different approaches: the lateral and the sinus tarsi. The authors checked the plantar pressure distribution by correlating these variables with the two different surgical approaches. The plantar pressure distribution was assessed using the Pedar System (Novel, Gmbh, Munich, Germany), by checking the maximum peak of the hindfoot and forefoot pressure on the affected and the normal sides. Results: the mean maximum pressure of the hindfoot plantigram in both approaches showed no statistical difference (t=0.11; p=0.91), as well as the mean maximum pressure of the forefoot plantigram (t=-0,48; p=0,64). Conclusion: The authors have concluded that there were no significant statistical differences between the average maximum peak of the hindfoot and forefoot pressure on the affected side as compared to the normal side, and these variables have showed no differences when compared to the surgical approach used. PMID:27077059

  6. Posterior heel pain (retrocalcaneal bursitis, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy).

    PubMed

    Aronow, Michael S

    2005-01-01

    The majority of patients with Achilles tendinopathy respond to nonoperative treatment. In patients with refractory symptoms, surgery can be considered. If paratenonitis is present, the paratenon is partially excised, and adhesions are released. Areas of symptomatic tendinosis are excised with repair of the residual defect in the Achilles tendon. An alternative for patients with tendinosis who are at increased risk for wound problems or who do not want a large open incision is percutaneous or endoscopic tenotomy. A symptomatic Haglund's deformity or inflamed retrocalcaneal bursa is excised. Augmentation of the Achilles tendon may be considered if debridement threatens the structural integrity of the tendon, in older patients, and in revision surgery. PMID:15555841

  7. Calcaneal robusticity in Plio-Pleistocene hominins: implications for locomotor diversity and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Prang, Thomas C

    2015-03-01

    A key pedal adaptation to bipedality is a relatively large, weight-bearing calcaneus. The earliest evidence for a human-like, robust calcaneus is at 3.2 Ma in Australopithecus afarensis (A.L. 333-8, A.L. 333-55, A.L. 333-37) from Hadar, Ethiopia. Australopithecus sediba at 1.98 Ma from Malapa, South Africa displays a unique combination of primitive australopith features and more derived Homo-like features, but surprisingly is characterized by a gracile, chimpanzee-like calcaneus. The differences in calcaneal morphology suggest that these taxa differed in the frequency of arboreality and in the manner of foot function during terrestrial bipedal locomotion. This study examines calcaneal morphology in extant hominids (i.e., great apes and humans; N = 95) and fossil hominins (N = 5) to better understand the evolutionary development of calcaneal robusticity in early hominins. In particular, this study focuses on two additional fossil hominin calcanei that have not figured prominently in previous discussions of calcaneal robusticity: StW 352 and Omo 33-74-896. A measure of calcaneal robusticity was quantified as the ratio of calcaneal tuber cross-sectional area to calcaneal tuber length, which significantly differs between humans and non-humans using a sequential Bonferroni alpha adjustment for multiple comparisons. Additional multivariate analyses using Mosimann shape variables show that StW 352 and Omo 33-74-896 are more similar to Au. sediba in calcaneal tuber morphology than to Au. afarensis, suggesting that the latter taxon is better adapted for terrestrial bipedalism than at least some later species of Australopithecus. This finding implies the possibility of several complex evolutionary scenarios involving either multiple reversals in postcranial morphology in Australopithecus or the independent acquisition of adaptations to terrestrial bipedalism in Au. afarensis and Homo. PMID:25440133

  8. Waste Tank Heel Chemical Cleaning Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-12-02

    At the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, there are approximately 40 million gallons of legacy High Level Waste stored in large capacity sub-surface tanks. Twelve of these tanks are single-containment, non-conforming tanks with leaks. These tanks were built in the 1950s. Some of these tanks contain sludge heels and are being considered for near-term removal efforts and vitrification. Currently, only mechanical methods (i.e., pumps) are used to remove the sludge waste with varying degrees of success. To provide for additional levels of removal, chemically-aided techniques are being considered. The objective of the was to collect and evaluate information available on chemical-based methods for removing residual solids from the Site's waste tanks. As part of this study, the team was requested to develop recommendations for chemical treatments to remove residual heels (primarily sludge). Ideally, one agent alone would be efficient at dissolving all residual tank heels and yet satisfy all safety and process concerns. No such chemical cleaning agent was found. The cleaning agents identified from the literature, included oxalic acid, a mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid, a combination of oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, formic acid, and organics. A criteria matrix for evaluating the various cleaning agents was developed. The results of the evaluation conclusively support oxalic acid as the cleaning agent of choice for the immediate future. Oxalic acid scored nearly double the next closest cleaning agent. Nitric acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide were all closely grouped for the next best choice. The mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid rated poorly. Organics rated even more poorly due to large uncertainties in performance and downstream impacts.

  9. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel. PMID:27104146

  10. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis Associated With a Severe Abscess.

    PubMed

    Memis, Ali; Mutluoglu, Mesut; Öztürk, Sinan; Kara, Kemal; Ay, Hakan

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic foot osteomyelitis (DFO) is a common complication of the diabetic foot and the majority of minor and major amputations are preceded by DFO. The diagnosis and treatment of DFO are both challenging. Early recognition and comprehensive management of diabetic foot infections may obviate DFO, hence the dreadful consequence-resection of the infected bone. Herein, we present the successful management of a patient presenting with DFO and severe abscess formation of the heel. PMID:27104146

  11. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  12. Subtalar arthrodesis for complications of intra-articular calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Flemister, A S; Infante, A F; Sanders, R W; Walling, A K

    2000-05-01

    Eighty six subtalar arthrodeses performed between 1985 and 1996 for complications associated with intra-articular calcaneal fractures were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were divided into three Groups: (I) 59 patients with calcaneal malunions (II) 13 patients with failed open reduction and internal fixation, and (III) eight patients undergoing open reductions and primary fusion for highly comminuted fractures. In each scenario, internal fixation was achieved with cancellous lag screws. Bone graft material consisted of either autogenous iliac crest graft, local graft obtained from the lateral wall exostectomy of the malunion, or freeze-dried cancellous allograft. Fusions in Groups II and III were performed in situ. Fusions in Group I were performed either in situ or utilizing a variety of reconstructive procedures depending upon the type of malunion encountered. Eighty three of the 86 fusion attempts were successful following the initial operations for a union rate of 96%. Fusion rates were similar regardless of the graft material used. Complications included four varus malunions, four cases of osteomyelitis, and two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy. A statistically significant shorter hospital stay was found for patients not undergoing iliac crest bone graft procedures. Eighty patients with at least two year follow up achieved a mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score of 75.0. Scores were similar for all three groups and for the various types of reconstructive procedures used. No correlation was found between postoperative talar declination angle and the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score. Worker's compensation patients tended to have a poorer clinical outcome. PMID:10830657

  13. Effect of Foot Orthoses on Children With Lower Extremity Growing Pains

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom molded foot orthoses on children with growing pains of the lower extremities. Methods Children with growing pains were recruited during a clinic visit. None had any bony deformities, inflammatory joint disease or depression. Resting calcaneal stance position (RCSP) and calcaneal pitch angle were measured, and individual custom molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using the inverted orthotic technique to control for foot overpronation using the RCSP angle. Pain sites, degree and frequency of pain, and balance ability were evaluated using Balance Master computerized posturography prior to foot orthosis fitting, and 1 and 3 months later. Results Twenty children completed the study. Seventeen (75%) had overpronated feet. Significant improvements were noted after 1 and 3 months in pain degree and frequency, and after 3 months in balancing ability. Conclusion The use of custom molded foot orthoses is a good method for treating children with multiple musculoskeletal pains in the leg. PMID:25932426

  14. The heel-contact gait pattern of habitual toe walkers.

    PubMed

    Crenna, P; Fedrizzi, E; Andreucci, E; Frigo, C; Bono, R

    2005-04-01

    We used kinematic, kinetic and EMG analysis to compare the spontaneous heel-contact gait patterns of 13 children classified as habitual toe walkers (HTWs) and age-matched controls. In the HTWs, the incidence of spontaneous heel-contact strides during a single recording session ranged from 15% to 92%, with no correlation with age, passive ankle joint excursion, walking speed and trial order. Hallmarks of the heel-contact strides were premature heel-rise, reversal of the second rocker, relative shortening of the loading response and anticipation and enhancement of the electromyographic (EMG) activity normally observed in the triceps surae (TS) during the first half of the stance phase. This variant of the locomotor program is different from the walking patterns observed in normally developing toddlers and children with cerebral palsy (CP). It does not necessarily reflect a functional adaptation to changes in the rheological properties of the muscle-tendon complex. PMID:15760747

  15. Human touch effectively and safely reduces pain in the newborn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Herrington, Carolyn J; Chiodo, Lisa M

    2014-03-01

    This was a feasibility pilot study to evaluate the efficacy of the nonpharmacologic pain management technique of gentle human touch (GHT) in reducing pain response to heel stick in premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Eleven premature infants ranging from 27 to 34 weeks' gestational age, in a level III NICU in a teaching hospital, were recruited and randomized to order of treatment in this repeated-measures crossover-design experiment. Containment with GHT during heel stick was compared with traditional nursery care (side lying and "nested" in an incubator). Heart rate, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and cry were measured continuously beginning at baseline and continuing through heel warming, heel stick, and recovery following the heel stick. Infants who did not receive GHT had decreased respiration, increased heart rate, and increased cry time during the heel stick. In contrast, infants who received GHT did not have decreased respirations, elevated heart rates, or increased cry time during the heel stick. No significant differences were noted in oxygen saturation in either group. GHT is a simple nonpharmacologic therapy that can be used by nurses and families to reduce pain of heel stick in premature infants in the NICU. PMID:24602430

  16. Effects of high heeled shoes wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility.

    PubMed

    Hapsari, Vaniessa Dewi; Xiong, Shuping

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of high heeled shoes (HHS) wearing experience and heel height on human standing balance and functional mobility. Thirty young and healthy females (ten experienced and twenty inexperienced HHS wearers) participated in a series of balance tests when they wore shoes of four different heel heights: 1 cm (flat), 4 cm (low), 7 cm (medium) and 10 cm (high). Experimental results show that regardless of the wearing experience, the heel elevation induces more effort from lower limb muscles (particularly calf muscles) and results in worse functional mobility starting at 7 cm heel height. While the heel height increased to 10 cm, the standing balance also becomes worse. Experienced HHS wearers do not show significantly better overall performance on standing balance and functional mobility than inexperienced controls, even though they have better directional control (76.8% vs. 74.4%) and larger maximum excursion (93.3% vs. 89.7%). To maintain standing balance, experienced wearers exert less effort on tibialis anterior, vastus lateralis and erector spinae muscles at the cost of more intensive effort from gastrocnemius medialis muscle. PMID:26155823

  17. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  18. Protective Effect of Surgery Against Early Subtalar Arthrodesis in Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Zhi; Li, Heng; Zhang, Yingze; Wang, Pengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine whether surgery offers protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Systematic review and meta-analysis: searches of electronic databases 1980 to August 2014, checking of reference lists, hand searching of journals, and contact with experts. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which surgical treatment was compared with nonsurgical treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from 1980 to 2014. The modified Jadad scale was used for trial quality and effective data were pooled for meta-analysis. Study results related to early subtalar arthrodesis were extracted and risk assessment was combined with surgical treatment and nonsurgical treatment. The primary analysis included 4 studies and 966 participants. The estimated overall risk ratio was 4.40 (95% confidence interval 2.67–7.39), indicating the incidence of early subtalar arthrodesis in nonsurgical group is 4.4 times the surgical group. The results showed that surgical treatment was superior to nonsurgical treatment in protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures (Z = 5.600, P < 0.001). Surgery offers protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. PMID:26559281

  19. Subtalar Joint Distraction Arthrodesis to Correct Calcaneal Valgus in Pediatric Patients with Tarsal Coalition: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jaclyn M; Kihm, Carl A; Camasta, Craig A

    2015-01-01

    Subtalar joint middle facet coalitions commonly present in children who have a painful, rigid, pes planovalgus foot type. The middle facet coalition allows rearfoot forces to be distributed medially through the coalition, and this can result in arthritis or lateral tarsal wedging. The senior author has used a wedged bone graft distraction subtalar joint arthrodesis to correct calcaneal valgus and restore the talar height in these patients. The tight, press-fit nature of the tricortical iliac crest allograft provides stability and can negate the need for internal fixation. We retrospectively reviewed 9 pediatric subtalar joint distraction arthrodesis procedures performed on 8 patients during a 6-year period. All patients began weightbearing at 6 weeks after surgery. All patients had osseous union, and no complications developed that required a second surgery. The clinical outcomes, assessed at a mean of 25.5 (range, 6.3 to 75.8) months postoperatively, were satisfactory. The mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society score was 90.1 (range, 79 to 94), on a 94-point scale. The wedged distraction arthrodesis technique has not been previously described for correction of pediatric patients with lateral tarsal wedging, but it is an effective option and yields successful outcomes. PMID:25704449

  20. A Retrospective Quality Improvement Study Comparing Use Versus Nonuse of a Padded Heel Dressing to Offload Heel Ulcers of Different Etiologies.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Noreen A; Campbell, Donna L; Turner, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    patients were lost to review (P less than 0.000). No adverse events were reported in the records of the PHD use group; the PHD nonuse group reported periwound maceration, skin stripping, pressure injury, and sensitivity. Patient and nurse feedback identified pain relief, improved mobility, easy technique, low cost, and reduced workload as benefits of PHD. The results of this quality improvement review warrant a prospective clinical study to examine the efficacy, effectiveness, and cost-effectiveness of PHD for the care of patients with heel ulcers. PMID:26544017

  1. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  2. The sustentaculum tali screw fixation for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qing-Jiang; Yu, Xiao; Guo, Zong-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the surgery of calcaneal fracture, whether the sustentaculum tali screw should always be placed is widely controversial. The aim of this study was to explore the necessity and function of the sustentaculum tali screw placement for the treatment of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture. Methods: The finite element analysis was used in this study. After the establishment of the finite element model of Sanders type II calcaneal fracture, the two internal fixation simulations were designed. In one model, the AO calcaneal plate was simulated on the lateral side of the calcanues with 7 screws being fixated at different position of the plate. In the other model, the calcaneus was fixated with the same AO calcaneal plate together with an additional screw being infiltrated into the sustentaculum tali. The two models were simulated under the same loading and the displacement of the fracture line and the stress distribution in the two models were calculated respectively. Results: The maximum principal stress focused on the cortical bone of sustentaculum tali in both the models under the same loading. The displacement of the fracture line, the maximum principal stress of calcaneus and internal fixation system in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation were smaller than that in the model without sustentaculum screw fixation. The stress in the model with sustentaculum screw fixation was more dispersed. Conclusions: The placement of sustentaculum tali screw is essential for fixation of type II calcaneal fracture to achieve the biomechanical stability. PMID:25225534

  3. Randomized crossover trial of kangaroo care to reduce biobehavioral pain responses in preterm infants: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xiaomei; Ludington-Hoe, Susan M; Walsh, Stephen

    2011-04-01

    Kangaroo care (KC), skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant, is a promising method for blunting pain responses. This crossover pilot tested KC effects on biobehavioral responses to heel stick in preterm infants (30-32 weeks' gestational age, 2-9 days old) measured by Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) and salivary and serum cortisol. Mother-infant dyads were randomly assigned to KC heel stick (KCH) first or incubator heel stick (IH) first. Study 1 (80-min study, N = 18) tested the effect of 80 min of KC before and throughout the heel stick procedure versus incubator care. Study 2 (30-min study, N = 10) tested 30 min of KC before and throughout the heel stick versus incubator care. KCH and IH began during a premeasurement phase and continued through four data collection phases: baseline, heel warming, heel stick, and recovery. PIPP responses were measured every 30 s during data collection; salivary cortisol was measured at the end of baseline and recovery; and serum cortisol was measured during heel stick. Study 1 showed no differences between KCH and IH. Study 2 showed lower PIPP scores at four time points during recovery (p < .05 to p < .001), lower salivary cortisol at the end of recovery (p < .05), and lower serum cortisol during heel stick for the KCH condition (p < .05) as well as clinically lower PIPP scores in the KCH condition during heel stick. Thirty minutes of KC before and throughout the heel stick reduced biobehavioral responses to pain in preterm infants. PMID:21196428

  4. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  5. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  6. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  7. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in...

  8. Using heel protectors for the prevention of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Rajpaul, Kumal; Acton, Claire

    2016-03-01

    Pressure ulcers are a frequent, but often preventable, occurrence among patients in acute care facilities, and the heel is one of the anatomical locations most commonly affected. Multiple clinical guidelines recommend the use of robust assessments to identify at-risk patients and the application of heel protection devices to reduce the likelihood of developing heel pressure ulcers. A quality improvement initiative involving robust skin-assessment practices, staff education, and the use of heel protection devices was analysed retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of current practice interventions. These analyses revealed that the incidence of heel pressure ulcers was inversely correlated with the number of heel protectors used at two large acute NHS teaching hospitals in inner London, and that the consistent and early use of heel protectors improved patient outcomes and reduced costs of care. PMID:27019180

  9. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae-Im; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  10. Calcaneal Osteomyelitis due to Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yi, Tae-Im; Ha, Seung-A; Choe, Yeo-Reum; Kim, Joo-Sup; Kwon, Kye-Won

    2016-02-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection caused by bacteria or other germs. Gram-positive cocci are the most common etiological organisms of calcaneal osteomyelitis; whereas, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are rarely documented. We reported a case of NTM calcaneal osteomyelitis in a 51-year-old female patient. She had been previously treated in many local clinics with multiple local steroid injection over 50 times and extracorporeal shock-wave therapy over 20 times with the impression of plantar fasciitis for 3 years prior. Diagnostic workup revealed a calcaneal osteomyelitis and polymerase chain reaction assay on bone aspirate specimens confirmed the diagnosis of non-tuberculous mycobacterial osteomyelitis. The patient had a partial calcanectomy with antitubercular therapy. Six months after surgery, a follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed localized chronic osteomyelitis with abscess formation. We continued anti-tubercular therapy without operation. At 18-month follow-up after surgery and comprehensive rehabilitation therapy, she was ambulating normally and able to carry out her daily activities without any discomfort. PMID:26949685

  11. [Anatomical variants of the medial calcaneal nerve and the Baxter nerve in the tarsal tunnel].

    PubMed

    Martín-Oliva, X; Elgueta-Grillo, J; Veliz-Ayta, P; Orosco-Villaseñor, S; Elgueta-Grillo, M; Viladot-Perice, R

    2013-01-01

    The tarsal tunnel is composed of the posterior border of the medial malleoulus, the posterior aspect of the talus and the medial aspect of the calcaneus. The medial calcaneal nerve emerges from the posterior aspect of the posterior tibial nerve in 75% of cases and from the lateral plantar nerve in the remaining 25%. Finally, the medial calcaneal nerve ends as a single terminal branch in 79% of cases and in numerous terminal branches in the remaining 21%. To describe the anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches. To describe the steps for tarsal tunnel release. To describe Baxter nerve release. The anatomical variants of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches within the tarsal tunnel were studied. Then the Lam technique was performed; it consists of: 1) opening of the laciniate ligament, 2) opening of the fascia over the abductor hallucis muscle, 3) exoneurolysis of the posterior tibial nerve and its terminal branches, identifying the emergence and pathway of the medial calcaneal branch, the lateral plantar nerve and its Baxter nerve branch and the medial plantar nerve. Baxter nerve was found in 100% of cases. In 100% of cases in our series the nerve going to the abductor digiti minimi muscle of the foot was found; 87.5% of cases had two terminal branches. The dissections proved that a crucial step was the release of the distal tarsal tunnel. PMID:24701749

  12. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  13. Nerve Injury and Pain after Operative Repair of Calcaneal Fractures: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Haugsdal, Jaclyn; Dawson, Jeremiah; Phisitkul, Phinit

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a common problem in foot and ankle surgery. We look at evidence of nerve injury as it relates to different operative approaches to the fractured calcaneus. The direct lateral, extended lateral, smile, sinus tarsi, and percutaneous approaches are discussed and the reported incidence of nerve injury in each is identified. We expect to identify divergent rates of injury between approaches and stimulate further investigation into prevention and treatment. PMID:24027484

  14. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Back Pain information sheet compiled by ...

  15. The relationship of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and Sanders hand scores to the timing of peak height velocity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A D; Sanders, J O; Liu, R W; Cooperman, D R

    2015-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skeletal maturity is essential in the management of orthopaedic conditions in the growing child. In order to identify the time of peak height velocity (PHV) in adolescents, two systems for assessing skeletal maturity have been described recently; the calcaneal apophyseal ossification method and the Sanders hand scores. The purpose of this study was to compare these methods in assessing skeletal maturity relative to PHV. We studied the radiographs of a historical group of 94 healthy children (49 females and 45 males), who had been followed longitudinally between the ages of three and 18 years with serial radiographs and physical examination. Radiographs of the foot and hand were undertaken in these children at least annually between the ages of ten and 15 years. We reviewed 738 radiographs of the foot and 694 radiographs of the hand. PHV was calculated from measurements of height taken at the time of the radiographs. Prior to PHV we observed four of six stages of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and two of eight Sanders stages. Calcaneal stage 3 and Sanders stage 2 was seen to occur about 0.9 years before PHV, while calcaneal stage 4 and Sanders stage 3 occurred approximately 0.5 years after PHV. The stages of the calcaneal and Sanders systems can be used in combination, offering better assessment of skeletal maturity with respect to PHV than either system alone. PMID:26637689

  16. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  17. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8 cm and 8.3 cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  18. Cement mantle stress under retroversion torque at heel-strike.

    PubMed

    Afsharpoya, B; Barton, D C; Fisher, J; Purbach, B; Wroblewski, M; Stewart, T D

    2009-12-01

    The paper presents a theory of fixation failure and loosening in cemented total hip prostheses and proceeds to investigate this using an experimentally validated finite element model and two prosthesis types, namely the Charnley and the C-Stem. The study investigates the effects of retroversion torque occurring at heel-strike in combination with a loss of proximal cement/bone support and distal implant/cement support with a good distal cement/bone interface. A 3D finite element model was validated by comparison of femoral surface strains with those measured in an in vitro experimental simulation using an implanted Sawbone femur loaded in the heel-strike position and including a simplified representation of muscle forces. Results showed that the heel-strike position applies a high retroversion torque to the femoral stem that when combined with proximal debonding of the cement/bone interface and distal debonding of the implant/cement interface increases the strain transfer to the cement that may ultimately lead to the breakdown of the cement mantle leading on to osteolysis and loosening of the prostheses. Experimental fatigue testing of the implanted Charnley stem in a Sawbone femur produced cracks within the cement mantle that were located in positions of maximum stress supporting the finite element analysis results and theory of failure. PMID:19879794

  19. Heel-region properties of prosthetic feet and shoes.

    PubMed

    Klute, Glenn K; Berge, Jocelyn S; Segal, Ava D

    2004-07-01

    The properties of the prosthetic components prescribed to amputees have the potential to ameliorate or exacerbate their comfort, mobility, and health. To measure the difference in heel-region structural properties of currently available prosthetic feet and shoes, we simulated the period of initial heel-ground contact with a pendulum apparatus. The energy dissipation capacity of the various prosthetic feet ranged from 33.6% to 52.6% of the input energy. Donning a shoe had a large effect. Energy dissipation of a Seattle Lightfoot 2 prosthetic foot was 45.3%, while addition of a walking, running, and orthopedic shoe increased energy dissipation to 63.0%, 73.0%, and 82.4%, respectively. The force versus deformation response to impact was modeled as a hardening spring in parallel with a position-dependent damping element. A nonlinear least-squares curve fit produced model coefficients useful for predicting the heel-region impact response of both prosthetic feet and shoes. PMID:15558382

  20. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  1. An optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts reduces plantar pressure of healthy males.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianyi; Li, Bo; Liang, Kaiyun; Wan, Qiufeng; Vanwanseele, Benedicte

    2016-06-01

    Conventional heel lift with a flat surface increases the risk of foot problems related to higher plantar pressure and decreased stability. In this study, an optimized design of in-shoe heel lifts developed to maintain the midfoot function was tested to investigate if the plantar pressure distribution was improved. The design was based on three dimensional foot plantar contour which was captured by an Infoot 3D scanning system while the heel was elevated by a heel wedge. To facilitate midfoot function, an arch support was designed to support the lateral longitudinal arch, while allowing functional movement of the medial longitudinal arch. Twenty healthy male subjects were asked to walk along an 8m walkway while wearing high-cut footwear with and without the optimized heel lift. Peak pressure, contact area and force-time integral were measured using the Pedar insole system. Range and velocity of medial-lateral center of pressure during forefoot contact phase and foot flat phase were collected using a Footscan pressure plate. Compared to the shoe only condition, peak pressure under the rearfoot decreased with the optimized heel lift, while no increase of peak pressure was observed under the forefoot and midfoot regions, indicating improved plantar pressure distribution. The findings of this study suggest that this optimized heel lift has better biomechanical performance than a conventional flat heel lift. Results from this study may have implications for insole and shoe last design, especially for people who need additional heel height without sacrificing midfoot function. PMID:27264401

  2. Menarchal status and calf circumference predict calcaneal ultrasound measurements in girls

    PubMed Central

    Hergenroeder, Albert C.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Day, R. Sue; Kelder, Steven H.; Ward, Jerri L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to predict calcaneal QUS measurements in healthy adolescent females as a function of anthropometric measures, pubertal stage and menarchal status. Methods This was a secondary data analysis from a two-year intervention designed to increase bone accretion. Simple Pearson correlation and Spearman’s rank correlation analyses, followed by linear stepwise regression analyses were conducted. Setting: 12 middle schools. Participants: 672 female students, baseline; 587 students at 18 months. Main outcome measure: Calcaneal stiffness index (SI) by quantitative ultrasound. Results Eighty percent of the subjects were premenarchal at baseline; 33% at 18 months. Although SI correlated with self-assessed pubic hair (rho = 0.21) and menarchal status (rho = 0.23, p<0.01 for both) at baseline, the model for predicting SI included menarchal status, not pubic hair, and calf circumference, controlling for BMI (R2 = 0.22, P< 0.01). At 18 months, SI correlated with self-assessed pubic hair (rho = 0.21) and menarchal status (rho = 0.25, p<0.01 for both). The best model to predict SI included calf circumference and pubic hair stage (R2 = 0.14, p < 0.01), and not menarchal status as 67% of the subjects at 18 months were postmenarchal. Conclusions In research assessing calcaneal SI in groups of adolescents, assessment of pubertal stage could be replaced with menarchal status and calf circumference when the majority of subjects are premenarchal. When the majority is postmenarchal, pubic hair stage and calf circumference together may be used to assess for pubertal maturation without menstrual status. PMID:17367724

  3. Endoscopic Versus Open Surgery for Calcaneal Bone Cysts: A Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kato, Ko; Aasanuma, Kunihiro; Nakamura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Aki; Sudo, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of an endoscopic procedure for patients with symptomatic calcaneal bone cyst compared with an open procedure. The cases of 16 consecutive patients with a calcaneal bone cyst were reviewed. Of the 16 patients, 8 had undergone the open procedure (O group) from October 2003 to August 2011, and 8 had undergone the endoscopic procedure (E group) from September 2011 to April 2013. The endoscopic procedure used a 2-portal technique in which skin incisions were made to avoid the peroneal tendon according to the preoperative ultrasonography. All surgeries (open or endoscopic) consisted of curettage of the inner wall of the bone cyst, followed by injection of calcium phosphate cement. The following factors were evaluated: radiographic assessment, operative time, postoperative adverse effects, and interval to the return to sports. No significant difference between the 2 groups was observed in the operative time (53.5 ± 6.5 minutes in the O group and 56.1 ± 13.8 minutes in the E group). The E group experienced no adverse effects; however, the O group had 1 temporary irritation in the sural nerve area and 1 calcium phosphate cement leakage along the peroneal tendon sheath. The interval to a return to sports was significantly shorter in the E group (14.5 ± 0.9 weeks in the O group and 6.5 ± 1.1 weeks in the E group; p < .01). In conclusion, endoscopic surgery is a useful approach for the treatment of calcaneal bone cysts, allowing early rehabilitation and an early return to sports without any adverse effects. PMID:27067197

  4. Autograft versus sterilized allograft for lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies: Comparison of 50 patients.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian A; Barg, Alexej; Vavken, Patrick; Valderrabano, Victor; Müller, Andreas M

    2016-07-01

    Sterilized allografts may be less resistant to collapse and prone to nonunion leading to loss of correction in open wedge osteotomies. These adverse events usually occur at early time points (i.e., < 9 months postoperatively). The goal of this study was to compare sterilized allografts to autologous grafts in respect to secondary loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation after lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies.Fifty patients (22 F/ 28 M, age: 16-69 years) who had undergone 50 lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies for adult flatfoot deformity were included in this retrospective study. Cortical sterilized allografts were used in 25 patients, autologous grafts in the remaining 25. Patients' preoperative, 6 and 12 weeks, and 6 to 9 months follow-up weight-bearing radiographs of the affected foot were analyzed by 2 blinded radiologists: on each radiograph, graft incorporation, the talo-first metatarsal angle (TFMA), the talo-navicular coverage angle (TNCA), and the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) were assessed. Loss of hindfoot alignment was defined as an increase of the TFMA or the TNCA or a decrease of the CPA, each by 5°.Inter- and intraclass correlation coefficients for TFMA, TNCA, and CPA measurements ranged from 0.93 to 0.99. At all follow-up visits, the ratio of patients with loss of hindfoot alignment and graft incorporation was not significantly different between the allograft and autograft group. However, loss of correction was associated with failure of graft incorporation.Compared with autografts, sterilized allografts do not increase the risk for loss of hindfoot alignment in lateral column lengthening of the calcaneus. With respect to mechanical resistance, allografts thus mean an equal and valid alternative without risk of donor site morbidities. PMID:27472719

  5. Screw placement relative to the calcaneal fracture constant fragment: an anatomic study.

    PubMed

    Bussewitz, Bradly W; Hyer, Christopher F

    2015-01-01

    Placement of a screw from the lateral wall of the calcaneus into the constant sustentaculum tali fragment can be difficult when surgically repairing a calcaneal fracture. This screw serves to compress the fracture fragments and support the posterior facet. This difficulty results from the small landing zone of the sustentaculum tali with its nearby vulnerable soft tissue structures. We present an anatomic study of 10 cadavers to determine a starting point and angle of screw advancement when placing a constant fragment screw. PMID:25441853

  6. Foot pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoes or from abnormal bone alignment. Calluses and corns : Thickened skin from rubbing or pressure. Calluses are on the balls of the feet or heels. Corns appear on the top of your toes. Hammer ...

  7. The relationship between the calcaneal bone mineral density and the mental index in post-menopausal females

    PubMed Central

    Jagelaviciene, E; Krasauskiene, A; Zalinkevicius, R; Kubilius, R; Vaitkeviciene, I

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between the bone mineral density in the calcaneus and the mental index (MI) of the mandible in post-menopausal females, and to evaluate the diagnostic threshold of the index. Methods: The post-menopausal females aged 50 years and older were examined using panoramic radiography of the mandible for mandibular cortical width measurements at the mental foramen (mental index, MI) determination and DXL Calscan P/N 031000 (Demetech AB, Solna, Sweden) for the examination of calcaneal bone mineral density (BMD). The statistical analysis was performed to determine the tendencies between the data. Results: According to the T-score values of calcaneal BMD, the subjects were distributed into T1, T2 and T3 groups. BMD differences between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). The panoramic radiographic examination of the mandible was performed, MI (mm) was determined and the mean values in the groups were calculated. The differences of MI mean values between the groups were statistically significant (p < 0.001). In the general group, a statistically significant relationship was found between calcaneal BMD, T-score and MI (p < 0.001). In the logistic analysis, the diagnostic threshold of MI was 3 mm (sensitivity 73.5%; specificity 72.6%). Conclusions: A diagnostic threshold for MI of 3 mm or less is suggested as the appropriate threshold for referral of calcaneal BMD reduction. PMID:23420860

  8. Protective Effect of Surgery Against Early Subtalar Arthrodesis in Displaced Intra-articular Calcaneal Fractures: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yueju; Li, Zhi; Li, Heng; Zhang, Yingze; Wang, Pengcheng

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether surgery offers protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Systematic review and meta-analysis: searches of electronic databases 1980 to August 2014, checking of reference lists, hand searching of journals, and contact with experts. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which surgical treatment was compared with nonsurgical treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from 1980 to 2014. The modified Jadad scale was used for trial quality and effective data were pooled for meta-analysis. Study results related to early subtalar arthrodesis were extracted and risk assessment was combined with surgical treatment and nonsurgical treatment. The primary analysis included 4 studies and 966 participants. The estimated overall risk ratio was 4.40 (95% confidence interval 2.67-7.39), indicating the incidence of early subtalar arthrodesis in nonsurgical group is 4.4 times the surgical group. The results showed that surgical treatment was superior to nonsurgical treatment in protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures (Z = 5.600, P < 0.001).Surgery offers protection against early subtalar arthrodesis in displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. PMID:26559281

  9. Traitement chirurgical des fractures articulaires du calcanéum par plaque vissée

    PubMed Central

    Hammou, Nassreddine; Abid, Hatim; Shimi, Mohammed; El Ibrahimi, Abdelhalim; El Mrini, Abdelmajid

    2015-01-01

    Les fractures du calcanéum sont peu fréquentes mais le plus souvent graves. Le traitement chirurgical par plaque vissée est ardemment défendu. L'objectif de notre travail rétrospectif est d’évaluer les résultats du traitement chirurgical des fractures articulaires du calcanéum à travers une série de 12 patients opérée aux service d'orthopédie du CHU Hassan II de Fès sur une durée de 3 ans, et les comparer aux données de la littérature. L’âge moyen dans notre série était de 34 ans, le geste opératoire était réalisé au 7ème jour. Tous nos patient ont bénéficie d'une réduction à foyer ouvert avec une ostéosynthèse par plaques vissées. Le recul moyen était de 12 mois et les résultats fonctionnels ont été évaluer selon le score de Kitaoka. PMID:26161214

  10. Antibiotic Treatment and Surgery for Acute Hematogenous Calcaneal Osteomyelitis of Childhood.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Kallio, Markku J T; Peltola, Heikki; Kallio, Pentti E

    2015-01-01

    Acute hematogenous calcaneal osteomyelitis characteristically affects children. A recent trend has emerged toward shorter courses of antibiotics. In our randomized, prospective treatment trial of children aged 3 months to 15 years, the intravenous antibiotic (clindamycin or a first-generation cephalosporin) was given only for the first 2 to 4 days and the remainder of the 20- to 30-day course was completed orally. A bone sample for culture was to be taken routinely, but all additional surgery was performed on special demand. We performed a retrospective subanalysis of cases affecting the calcaneus. The follow-up period was 1 year. Of the 14 participants enrolled, 11 completed the 1-year follow-up period, and their data were analyzed. Staphylococcus aureus was the cause of 10 cases; all strains were methicillin sensitive. The median intravenous treatment duration was 3 days. Four patients required open incisional trepanation (trephination). All participants attending the 1-year follow-up examination had fully recovered. The outcome of calcaneal osteomyelitis caused by methicillin-sensitive S. aureus in a child will be good, if the patient seeks treatment early and antibiotic therapy is started promptly. A bone biopsy is needed to obtain a representative sample for bacteriology. PMID:25912854

  11. Precise and feasible measurements of lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies by radiostereometric analysis in cadaver feet

    PubMed Central

    Martinkevich, P.; Rahbek, O.; Møller-Madsen, B.; Søballe, K.; Stilling, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lengthening osteotomies of the calcaneus in children are in general grafted with bone from the iliac crest. Artificial bone grafts have been introduced, however, their structural and clinical durability has not been documented. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is a very accurate and precise method for measurements of rigid body movements including the evaluation of joint implant and fracture stability, however, RSA has not previously been used in clinical studies of calcaneal osteotomies. We assessed the precision of RSA as a measurement tool in a lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomy (LCLO). Methods LCLO was performed in six fixed adult cadaver feet. Tantalum markers were inserted on each side of the osteotomy and in the cuboideum. Lengthening was done with a plexiglas wedge. A total of 24 radiological double examinations were obtained. Two feet were excluded due to loose and poorly dispersed markers. Precision was assessed as systematic bias and 95% repeatability limits. Results Systematic bias was generally below 0.10 mm for translations. Precision of migration measurements was below 0.2 mm for translations in the osteotomy. Conclusion RSA is a precise tool for the evaluation of stability in LCLO. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:78–83. PMID:25957380

  12. Risk of injury to vascular-nerve bundle after calcaneal fracture: comparison among three techniques

    PubMed Central

    Labronici, Pedro José; Reder, Vitor Rodrigues; de Araujo Marins Filho, Guilherme Ferreira; Pires, Robinson Esteves Santos; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether the number of screws or pins placed in the calcaneus might increase the risk of injury when three different techniques for treating calcaneal fractures. Method 126 radiographs of patients who suffered displaced calcaneal fractures were retrospectively analyzed. Three surgical techniques were analyzed on an interobserver basis: 31 radiographs of patients treated using plates that were not specific for the calcaneus, 48 using specific plates and 47 using an external fixator. The risk of injury to the anatomical structures in relation to each Kirschner wire or screw was determined using a graded system in accordance with the Licht classification. The total risk of injury to the anatomical structures through placement of more than one wire/screw was quantified using the additive law of probabilities for the product, for independent events. Results All of the models presented high explanatory power for the risk evaluated, since the coefficient of determination values (R2) were greater than 98.6 for all the models. Therefore, the set of variables studied explained more than 98.6% of the variations in the risks of injury to arteries, veins or nerves and can be classified as excellent models for prevention of injuries. Conclusion The risk of injury to arteries, veins or nerves is not defined by the total number of pins/screws. The region and the number of pins/screws in each region define and determine the best distribution of the risk. PMID:27069891

  13. Reliability of the Kinetic Measures under Different Heel Conditions during Normal Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yong Tai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of 3 dimension reaction forces and impulses in walking with 3 different heel shoe conditions. These results suggest that changing the height of the heels affects mainly the reliability of the ground reaction force and impulse measures on the medial and lateral dimension and not…

  14. Finite element analysis of heel pad with insoles.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gangming; Houston, Vern L; Garbarini, Mary Anne; Beattie, Aaron C; Thongpop, Chaiya

    2011-05-17

    To design optimal insoles for reduction of pedal tissue trauma, experimental measurements and computational analyses were performed. To characterize the mechanical properties of the tissues, indentation tests were performed. Pedal tissue geometry and morphology were obtained from magnetic resonance scan of the subject's foot. Axisymmetrical finite element models of the heel of the foot were created with 1/4 of body weight load applied. The stress, strain and strain energy density (SED) fields produced in the pedal tissues were computed. The effects of various insole designs and materials on the resulting stress, strain, and SED in the soft pedal tissues were analyzed. The results showed: (a) Flat insoles made of soft material provide some reductions in the maximum stress, strain and SED produced in the pedal tissues. These maximum values were computed near the calcaneus. (b) Flat insoles, with conical/cylindrical reliefs, provided more reductions in these maximum values than without reliefs. (c) Custom insoles, contoured to match the pedal geometry provide most reductions in the maximum stress, strain and SED. Also note, the maximum stress, strain and SED computed near the calcaneus were found to be about 10 times the corresponding peak values computed on the skin surface. Based on the FEA analysis, it can be concluded that changing insole design and using different material can significantly redistribute the stress/strain inside the heel pad as well as on the skin surface. PMID:21420682

  15. Astragalar and calcaneal morphology of the middle Eocene primate Anchomomys frontanyensis (Anchomomyini): Implications for early primate evolution.

    PubMed

    Marigó, Judit; Roig, Imma; Seiffert, Erik R; Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Boyer, Doug M

    2016-02-01

    Astragali and calcanei of Anchomomys frontanyensis, a small adapiform from the middle Eocene of Sant Jaume de Frontanyà (Southern Pyrenean basins, northeastern Spain) are described in detail. Though these bones have been known for some time, they have never been carefully analyzed in a context that is comprehensively comparative, quantitative, considers sample variation (astragalus n = 4; calcaneus n = 16), and assesses the phylogenetic significance of the material in an explicit cladistic context, as we do here. Though these bones are isolated, regression analyses provide the first formal statistical support for attribution to A. frontanyensis. The astragalus presents features similar to those of the small stem strepsirrhine Djebelemur from the middle Eocene of Tunisia, while the calcaneus more closely resembles those of the basal omomyiform Teilhardina. The new phylogenetic analyses that include Anchomomys' postcranial and dental data recover anchomomyins outside of the adapiform clade, and closer to djebelemurids, azibiids, and crown strepsirrhines. The small size of A. frontanyensis allows comparison of similarly small adapiforms and omomyiforms (haplorhines) such that observed variation has more straightforward implications for function. Previous studies have demonstrated that distal calcaneal elongation is reflective of leaping proclivity when effects of body mass are appropriately accounted for; in this context, A. frontanyensis has calcaneal elongation suggesting a higher degree of leaping specialization than other adapiforms and even some early omomyiforms. Moreover, comparison to a similarly-sized early adapiform from India, Marcgodinotius (which shows no calcaneal elongation) confirms that high distal calcaneal elongation in A. frontanyensis cannot be simply explained by allometric effects of small size compared to larger adapiform taxa. This pattern is consistent with the idea that significant distal calcaneal elongation evolved at least twice in early

  16. The effect of flat horseshoes, raised heels and lowered heels on the biomechanics of the equine hoof assessed by finite element analysis (FEA).

    PubMed

    Hinterhofer, C; Stanek, C; Haider, H

    2000-03-01

    The biomechanical effects of lowering and raising the heels were studied using a finite element (FE) computer model of the equine hoof capsule consisting of 18,635 finite elements. A static load of 3000 N was distributed to nodes of the inner hoof wall (80%) according to the suspension of the coffin bone, 20% loaded sole and frog. When loaded the FE hoof capsules showed the following deformations: the proximal dorsal wall moves back, the quarters flare to the side and sole and frog perform a downward movement. Stresses are high in the material surrounding the quarter nails, in the heels and in the proximal dorsal wall. Three types of horseshoes were simulated, a regular shoe with flat branches, a shoe with 5 degrees raised heels and a shoe with 5 degrees lowered heels. Raising the heels resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) low stress and displacement values. The lowered heels model calculated highest stress and displacement values and the results of the FE model with the regular horseshoe were found in between. PMID:10803106

  17. The influence of heel height on utilized coefficient of friction during walking.

    PubMed

    Blanchette, Mark G; Brault, John R; Powers, Christopher M

    2011-05-01

    Wearing high heel shoes has been associated with an increased potential for slips and falls. The association between wearing high heels and the increased potential for slipping suggests that the friction demand while wearing high heels may be greater when compared to wearing low heel shoes. The purpose of this study was to determine if heel height affects utilized friction (uCOF) during walking. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare kinematics at the ankle, knee, and hip that may explain uCOF differences among shoes with varied heel heights. Fifteen healthy women (mean age 24.5±2.5yrs) participated. Subjects walked at self-selected velocity under 3 different shoe conditions that varied in heel height (low: 1.27cm, medium: 6.35cm, and high: 9.53cm). Ground reaction forces (GRFs) were recorded using a force platform (1560Hz). Kinematic data were obtained using an 8 camera motion analysis system (120Hz). Utilized friction was calculated as the ratio of resultant shear force to vertical force. One-way repeated measures ANOVAs were performed to test for differences in peak uCOF, GRFs at peak uCOF and lower extremity joint angles at peak uCOF. On average, peak uCOF was found to increase with heel height. The increased uCOF observed in high heel shoes was related to an increase in the resultant shear force and decrease in the vertical force. Our results signify the need for proper public education and increased footwear industry awareness of how high heel shoes affect slip risk. PMID:21536444

  18. Biomechanical Performance of Lateral Versus Dual Locking Plates for Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Abby B; Owen, John R; Gilbert, Todd M; Romash, Michael M; Wayne, Jennifer S; Adelaar, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Given the high rates of wound complications with a standard lateral extensile incision, small dual incision techniques might result in less soft tissue destruction. The goal of the present study was to compare the biomechanical performance between a single locking plate and a dual locking plating system for an intra-articular calcaneal fracture model. A Sanders IIB type joint depression calcaneal fracture was created in 10 paired, fresh-frozen, cadaveric calcanei (age 47 ± 12, range 35 to 78 years). The calcanei of each pair were randomly assigned for fixation using either a lateral locking reconstruction plate or lateral and medial locking reconstruction plates. The specimens were axially loaded in cyclic fashion for 1000 cycles, followed by load to failure. The relative fragment movement was monitored optically in both the sagittal and the coronal planes. The amount of overall construct displacement increased with cycling, although no difference was found between the plating techniques. For fragment movement during cycling, the lateral joint fragment migrated anteroinferiorly along the fracture line relative to the tuberosity fragment for dual plated specimens by a small, but statistically significant, amount. This same translation was smaller for lateral plated specimens but was not found to be significant. During load to failure testing, no statistically significant differences were found for construct stiffness. A tendency was seen toward more interfragmentary motion in the sagittal plane (lateral joint fragment movement relative to the fracture line), with less movement overall in the coronal plane (anterior fragment translation and twist) for dual plating, although the difference from the lateral plate was not statistically significant. The present study demonstrated that for this calcaneal fracture model, the dual plating technique experienced a small amount of fragment translation during cycling that was significantly different statistically from that

  19. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  20. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles' heel.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Natalie A; Kieft, Rudo; Macleod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L

    2012-12-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and, ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. In this review we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles' heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  1. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles’ heel

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Kieft, Rudo; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally-occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. Here we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles’ heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  2. The Malaria Parasite's Achilles' Heel: Functionally-relevant Invasion Structures.

    PubMed

    Patarroyo, Manuel E; Alba, Martha P; Reyes, Cesar; Rojas-Luna, Rocio; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2016-01-01

    Malaria parasites have their Achilles' heel; they are vulnerable in small parts of their relevant molecules where they can be wounded and killed. These are sporozoite and merozoite protein conserved high activity binding peptides (cHABPs), playing a critical role in binding to and invasion of host cells (hepatocytes and erythrocytes, respectively). cHABPs can be modified by specific amino acid replacement, according to previously published physicochemical rules, to produce analogues (mHABPs) having left-handed polyproline II (PPIIL)-like structures which can modulate an immune response due to fitting perfectly into the HLA-DRβ1* peptide binding region (PBR) and having an appropriate presentation to the T-cell receptor (TCR). PMID:25830771

  3. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hashmi, Faiz R.; Elfandi, Khaled O.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis. PMID:27433300

  4. Heel Ultrasound Scan in Detecting Osteoporosis in Low Trauma Fracture Patients.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Faiz R; Elfandi, Khaled O

    2016-06-27

    Osteoporosis is the most common metabolic disease with significant impact on the morbidity and mortality of affected patients. Osteoporosis has a significant impact on the economy worldwide. The aim of this study was to find out whether heel ultrasound is as good as central bone densitometry scanning in diagnosing osteoporosis in patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis. This was a prospective study of patients comparing heel ultrasound to central bone densitometry scanning (dual X-ray absorptiometry, DEXA) in patients. The recruited patients attended for a DEXA scan of the left hip and lumbar spine. All subjects had an ultrasound of the left heel using the quantitative heel ultrasound machine. The results of DEXA scan were blinded from the results of ultrasound and vice versa. There were 59 patients who took part in the study, 12 men and 47 women. The mean age was 66 years (SD 11.9) and mean weight was 62.5 kg (SD 10.7). The sensitivity and specificity of the ultrasound heel test to predict osteoporosis were 53% (95%CI: 29-77) and 86% (95%CI: 75-96) respectively. Specificity for predicting bone mineral density (BMD)-defined osteoporosis was high (86%), but sensitivity was low (53%). A heel ultrasound result in the osteoporotic range was highly predictive of BMD-defined osteoporosis. A positive ultrasound heel test in high risk patients is more useful in ruling in osteoporosis than a negative test to rule out osteoporosis. PMID:27433300

  5. Irreducible tongue-type calcaneal fracture due to interposition of flexor hallucis longus.

    PubMed

    Wong-Chung, John; O'Longain, Diarmaid; Lynch-Wong, Matthew; Julian, Harriet

    2016-06-01

    We present a rare case of interposition of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) tendon blocking percutaneous closed reduction of a displaced tongue-type calcaneal fracture, and necessitating open repositioning of the tendon and internal fixation through a single extensile lateral approach. Although not recognized until during surgery, with a high index of suspicion, preoperative diagnosis of this injury combination should be possible on high resolution CT, thus enabling better planning of the procedure. The presence of a small sustentacular fragment, especially if markedly displaced or rotated, should further alert the physician as to increased likelihood of such tendon entrapment within the fracture. In the literature, fracture fixation and extrication of the FHL tendon have been performed via either or both lateral and medial approaches. A medial approach may prove necessary when there is severe displacement or rotation of the sustentacular fragment. Arthroscopically assisted surgery may aid in disengaging the tendon from within the fracture site. PMID:26802813

  6. Groin pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg: This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  7. The Changes of COP and Foot Pressure after One Hour's Walking Wearing High-heeled and Flat Shoes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Dong Yeol; Lee, Han Suk

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the most appropriate height for shoe heels by measuring the displacement of the COP (center of pressure) and changes in the distribution of foot pressure after walking in flat (0.5 cm), middle-heeled (4 cm), and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for 1 hour. [Methods] A single-subject design was used, with 15 healthy women wearing shoes with heels of each height in a random order. The foot pressure and displacement of COP before and after walking in an ordinary environment for 1 hour were measured using an FDM-S (zebris Medical GmbH, Germany). [Results] The distribution of foot pressure did not change significantly after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but did change significantly after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. Similarly, the COP was not significantly displaced after walking in middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes but was significantly displaced after walking in either flat (0.5 cm) or high-heeled (9 cm) shoes. [Conclusion] Both flat and high-heeled shoes had adverse effects on the body. Middle-heeled (4 cm) shoes are preferable to both flat (0.5 cm) and high-heeled (9 cm) shoes for the health and comfort of the feet. PMID:24259782

  8. Factors in Daily Physical Activity Related to Calcaneal Mineral Density in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Teresa M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Cleek, Tammy M.; Vogel, John M.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the factors in daily physical activity that influence the mineral density of the calcaneus, we recorded walking steps and the type and duration of exercise in 43 healthy 26-to 51-yr-old men. Areal (g/sq cm) calcaneal bone mineral density (CBMD) was measured by single energy x-ray densitometry. Subjects walked a mean (+/- SD) of 7902(+/-2534) steps per day or approximately 3.9(+/-1.2) miles daily. Eight subjects reported no exercise activities. The remaining 35 subjects spent 143(2-772) (median and range) min/wk exercising. Twenty-eight men engaged in exercise activities that generate single leg peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRF(sub z)) of 2 or more body weights (high loaders, HL), and 15 reported exercise or daily activities that typically generate GRF(sub z) less than 1.5 body weights (low loaders, LL). CBMD was 12% higher in HL than LL (0.668 +/- 0.074 g/sq cm vs 0.597 +/- 0.062 g/sq cm, P less than 0.004). In the HL group, CBMD correlated to reported minutes of high load exercise (r = 0.41, P less than 0.03). CBMD was not related to the number of daily walking steps (N = 43, r = 0.03, NS). The results of this study support the concept that the dominant factor in daily physical activity relating to bone mineral density is the participation in site specific high loading activities, i.e., for the calcaneus, high calcaneal loads.

  9. Calcaneus, calcaneal tendon and retrocalcaneal bursa. Historical overview and plea for an accurate terminology.

    PubMed

    Kachlik, D; Musil, V; Vasko, S; Klaue, K; Stingl, J; Baca, V

    2010-01-01

    Diseases and injuries of several specific structures in the heel region have been an enduring focus of medicine: The anatomical terminology of many of these structures has not been established until recently. The aim of the study was a historical analysis of the advances of anatomical terminology of three selected morphological units in the heel region--the Achilles tendon, calcaneus and retrocalcaneal bursa. It starts with a critical evaluation of the mythological eposes, the Illiad and Odyssey, describing the exploits of heroes in the Trojan war, followed by a review of relevant terms used for the designation of selected heel structures in the Middle Ages as well as in the 18" and 19" centuries. Principal versions of Latin anatomical terms used for the denotation of the mentioned structures are discussed. Recently applicable Latin terms and their recommended English synonyms, according to the latest version of Terminologia Anatomica (1998) are summed up. It surveys examples of "not very appropriate" terms, which are frequently used in clinical literature. The authors consider the use of official anatomical terms (both Latin and English) as an important step for the improvement of the clinical expressions and formulations. PMID:20514849

  10. A three-dimensional inverse finite element analysis of the heel pad.

    PubMed

    Chokhandre, Snehal; Halloran, Jason P; van den Bogert, Antonie J; Erdemir, Ahmet

    2012-03-01

    Quantification of plantar tissue behavior of the heel pad is essential in developing computational models for predictive analysis of preventive treatment options such as footwear for patients with diabetes. Simulation based studies in the past have generally adopted heel pad properties from the literature, in return using heel-specific geometry with material properties of a different heel. In exceptional cases, patient-specific material characterization was performed with simplified two-dimensional models, without further evaluation of a heel-specific response under different loading conditions. The aim of this study was to conduct an inverse finite element analysis of the heel in order to calculate heel-specific material properties in situ. Multidimensional experimental data available from a previous cadaver study by Erdemir et al. ("An Elaborate Data Set Characterizing the Mechanical Response of the Foot," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131(9), pp. 094502) was used for model development, optimization, and evaluation of material properties. A specimen-specific three-dimensional finite element representation was developed. Heel pad material properties were determined using inverse finite element analysis by fitting the model behavior to the experimental data. Compression dominant loading, applied using a spherical indenter, was used for optimization of the material properties. The optimized material properties were evaluated through simulations representative of a combined loading scenario (compression and anterior-posterior shear) with a spherical indenter and also of a compression dominant loading applied using an elevated platform. Optimized heel pad material coefficients were 0.001084 MPa (μ), 9.780 (α) (with an effective Poisson's ratio (ν) of 0.475), for a first-order nearly incompressible Ogden material model. The model predicted structural response of the heel pad was in good agreement for both the optimization (<1.05% maximum tool force, 0.9% maximum tool

  11. Effects of bridging plus exercises with heel lift on lower extremity muscles

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of the bridging plus exercise with heel lift on lower extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy males participated. The subjects performed bridging exercises under two conditions. Surface electromyography was used to measure the electrical activities of the medial hamstring (MH) and the gluteus maximus (GM) muscles. [Results] Activation of the MH muscle during bridging with heel lift decreased, and activation of the GM muscle during bridging with heel lift increased compared to those with the bridging exercise. [Conclusion] This result showed that bridging plus exercises with heel lift could be an effective exercise for patients with compensatory mechanisms during bridging exercises, such as weak GM with hamstring tightness. PMID:27313376

  12. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (≥1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel. PMID:26479694

  13. Analysis of Factors Affecting Stress Solution at Concrete Gravity Dam Heel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Vu Hoang; Quoc Cong, Trinh; Tongchun, Li

    2010-05-01

    Along with Vietnam's development, various hydraulic constructions including concrete gravity dams have been being built. In some of these dams, the fractures occurred at the heel of the dams are even in small and media dams. There are various reasons cause the factures at dam heel but the main reason is the stress states at dam heel are not determined correctly while designing dam. In this paper, several factors affecting stress solution at concrete gravity dam heel such as element mesh size, crack joints of upstream foundation, execution process are investigated by using finite element model of Banve concrete gravity dam. This work is very significant when the more high concrete gravity dams will be constructed in Vietnam year after year.

  14. Urinary Mineral Concentrations in European Pre-Adolescent Children and Their Association with Calcaneal Bone Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements.

    PubMed

    Van den Bussche, Karen; Herrmann, Diana; De Henauw, Stefaan; Kourides, Yiannis A; Lauria, Fabio; Marild, Staffan; Molnár, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Sioen, Isabelle; On Behalf Of The Dedipac Consortium

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates differences and associations between urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal bone measures assessed by quantitative ultrasonography (QUS) in 4322 children (3.1-11.9 years, 50.6% boys) from seven European countries. Urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal QUS parameters differed significantly across countries. Clustering revealed a lower stiffness index (SI) in children with low and medium urinary mineral concentrations, and a higher SI in children with high urinary mineral concentrations. Urinary sodium (uNa) was positively correlated with urinary calcium (uCa), and was positively associated with broadband ultrasound attenuation and SI after adjustment for age, sex and fat-free mass. Urinary potassium (uK) was negatively correlated with uCa but positively associated with speed of sound after adjustment. No association was found between uCa and QUS parameters after adjustment, but when additionally adjusting for uNa, uCa was negatively associated with SI. Our findings suggest that urinary mineral concentrations are associated with calcaneal QUS parameters and may therefore implicate bone properties. These findings should be confirmed in longitudinal studies that include the food intake and repeated measurement of urinary mineral concentrations to better estimate usual intake and minimize bias. PMID:27164120

  15. The correlation between calcaneal valgus angle and asymmetrical thoracic-lumbar rotation angles in patients with adolescent scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaeyong; Lee, Sang Gil; Bae, Jongjin; Lee, Jung Chul

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to provide a predictable evaluation method for the progression of scoliosis in adolescents based on quick and reliable measurements using the naked eye, such as the calcaneal valgus angle of the foot, which can be performed at public facilities such as schools. [Subjects and Methods] Idiopathic scoliosis patients with a Cobb's angle of 10° or more (96 females, 22 males) were included in this study. To identify relationships between factors, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was computed. The degree of scoliosis was set as a dependent variable to predict thoracic and lumbar scoliosis using ankle angle and physique factors. Height, weight, and left and right calcaneal valgus angles were set as independent variables; thereafter, multiple regression analysis was performed. This study extracted variables at a significance level (α) of 0.05 by applying a stepwise method, and calculated a regression equation. [Results] Negative correlation (R=-0.266) was shown between lumbar lordosis and asymmetrical lumbar rotation angles. A correlation (R=0.281) was also demonstrated between left calcaneal valgus angles and asymmetrical thoracic rotation angles. [Conclusion] Prediction of scoliosis progress was revealed to be possible through ocular inspection of the calcaneus and Adams forward bending test and the use of a scoliometer. PMID:26834376

  16. Urinary Mineral Concentrations in European Pre-Adolescent Children and Their Association with Calcaneal Bone Quantitative Ultrasound Measurements †

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bussche, Karen; Herrmann, Diana; De Henauw, Stefaan; Kourides, Yiannis A.; Lauria, Fabio; Marild, Staffan; Molnár, Dénes; Moreno, Luis A.; Veidebaum, Toomas; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Sioen, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates differences and associations between urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal bone measures assessed by quantitative ultrasonography (QUS) in 4322 children (3.1–11.9 years, 50.6% boys) from seven European countries. Urinary mineral concentrations and calcaneal QUS parameters differed significantly across countries. Clustering revealed a lower stiffness index (SI) in children with low and medium urinary mineral concentrations, and a higher SI in children with high urinary mineral concentrations. Urinary sodium (uNa) was positively correlated with urinary calcium (uCa), and was positively associated with broadband ultrasound attenuation and SI after adjustment for age, sex and fat-free mass. Urinary potassium (uK) was negatively correlated with uCa but positively associated with speed of sound after adjustment. No association was found between uCa and QUS parameters after adjustment, but when additionally adjusting for uNa, uCa was negatively associated with SI. Our findings suggest that urinary mineral concentrations are associated with calcaneal QUS parameters and may therefore implicate bone properties. These findings should be confirmed in longitudinal studies that include the food intake and repeated measurement of urinary mineral concentrations to better estimate usual intake and minimize bias. PMID:27164120

  17. Reorganised anticipatory postural adjustments due to experimental lower extremity muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Automated movements adjusting postural control may be hampered during musculoskeletal pain leaving a risk of incomplete control of balance. This study investigated the effect of experimental muscle pain on anticipatory postural adjustments by reaction task movements. While standing, nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (shoulder flexion of dominant side and bilateral heel lift) before, during and after experimental muscle pain. On two different days experimental pain was induced in the m. vastus medialis (VM) or the m. tibialis anterior (TA) of the dominant side by injections of hypertonic saline (1ml, 5.8%). Isotonic saline (1ml, 0.9%) was used as control injection. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 muscles. EMG onset, EMG amplitude, and kinematic parameters (shoulder and ankle joint) were extracted. During shoulder flexion and VM pain the onset of the ipsilateral biceps femoris was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions. During heels lift in the VM and TA pain conditions the onset of the contralateral TA was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions in bilateral side. VM pain significantly reduced m. quadriceps femoris activity and TA pain significantly reduced ipsilateral VM activity and TA activity during bilateral heel lift. The EMG reaction time was delayed in bilateral soleus muscles during heels lift with VM and TA pain. The faster onset of postural muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments may suggest a compensatory function to maintain postural control whereas the reduced postural muscle activity during APAs may indicate a pain adaptation strategy to avoid secondary damage. PMID:24071550

  18. Effects of Kangaroo Care on Neonatal Pain in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seo, Young Sun; Lee, Joohyun; Ahn, Hye Young

    2016-06-01

    Blood sampling for a newborn screening test is necessary for all neonates in South Korea. During the heel stick, an appropriate intervention should be implemented to reduce neonatal pain. This study was conducted to identify the effectiveness of kangaroo care (KC), skin contact with the mother, on pain relief during the neonatal heel stick. Twenty-six neonates undergoing KC and 30 control neonates at a university hospital participated in this study. Physiological responses of neonates, including heart rate, oxygen saturation, duration of crying and Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) scores were measured and compared before, during and 1 min and 2 min after heel sticks. The heart rate of KC neonates was lower at both 1 and 2 min after sampling than those of the control group. Also, PIPP scores of KC neonates were significantly lower both during and after sampling. The duration of crying for KC neonates was around 10% of the duration of the control group. In conclusion, KC might be an effective intervention in a full-term nursery for neonatal pain management. PMID:26867561

  19. Effect of Custom-Molded Foot Orthoses on Foot Pain and Balance in Children With Symptomatic Flexible Flat Feet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Yun, Hyun-Ju; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom-molded foot orthoses on foot pain and balance in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot 1 month and 3 months after fitting foot orthosis. Method A total of 24 children over 6 years old with flexible flat feet and foot pain for at least 6 months were recruited for this study. Their resting calcaneal stance position and calcaneal pitch angle were measured. Individual custom-molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using inverted orthotic technique to control foot overpronation. Pain questionnaire was used to obtain pain sites, degree, and frequency. Balancing ability was determined using computerized posturography. These evaluations were performed prior to custom-molded foot orthoses, 1 month, and 3 months after fitting foot orthoses. Result Of 24 children with symptomatic flexible flat feet recruited for this study, 20 completed the study. Significant (p<0.001) improvements in pain degree and frequency were noted after 1 and 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. In addition, significant (p<0.05) improvement in balancing ability was found after 3 months of custom-molded foot orthoses. Conclusion Short-term use of custom-molded foot orthoses significantly improved foot pain and balancing ability in children with symptomatic flexible flat foot. PMID:26798604

  20. Percutaneous Reduction and Fixation with Kirschner Wires versus Open Reduction Internal Fixation for the Management of Calcaneal Fractures: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianbin; Zhou, Feiya; Yang, Lei; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our meta-analysis was to compare outcomes for two surgical treatments of calcaneal fractures, percutaneous reduction and fixation with Kirschner wires (PRFK) and open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), with the intent of evaluating the quality of evidence to inform practice. Search of MEDLINE, Cochrane and CNKI databases to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PRKF and ORIF on the following outcomes: post-operative function, complications and quality of the reduction. Odd ratios (OR) and weighted mean differences were pooled using either a fixed-effects or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity of the trials included in the analysis. Eighteen RCTs provided the data from 1407 patients. PRFK was associated with a lower risk of surgical wound complications, and ORIF with better post-operative function, angle of Gissane, calcaneal height, and calcaneal width. There were no statistically significant differences between the techniques with regards to post-operative Böhler’s angle. PRFK does not provide a substantive advantage over ORIF for the treatment of calcaneal fractures in adults. PRFK may, however, yield comparable functional outcomes to ORIF for closed Sanders type II calcaneal fractures but with less complication related to surgical wound healing. PMID:27457262

  1. Flank pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  2. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... your pain. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ... If your doctor recommends an over-the-counter pain reliever, read and follow the instructions on the box. ...

  3. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for

  4. Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound Indicates Reduced Bone Status Among Physically Active Adult Forager-Horticulturalists.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Madimenos, Felicia; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Sedentary lifestyle contributes to osteoporosis and fragility fracture risks among modern humans, but whether such risks are prevalent in physically active preindustrial societies with lower life expectancies is unclear. Osteoporosis should be readily observable in preindustrial societies if it was regularly experienced over human history. In this study of 142 older adult Tsimane forager-horticulturalists (mean age ± SD, 62.1 ± 8.6 years; range, 50 to 85 years; 51% female) we used calcaneal quantitative ultrasonography (qUS) to assess bone status, document prevalence of adults with reduced bone status, and identify factors (demographic, anthropometric, immunological, kinesthetic) associated with reduced bone status. Men (23%) are as likely as women (25%) to have reduced bone status, although age-related decline in qUS parameters is attenuated for men. Adiposity and fat-free mass positively co-vary with qUS parameters for women but not men. Leukocyte count is inversely associated with qUS parameters controlling for potential confounders; leukocyte count is positively correlated within adults over time, and adults with persistently low counts have higher adjusted qUS parameters (6% to 8%) than adults with a high count. Reduced bone status characteristic of osteoporosis is common among active Tsimane with minimal exposure to osteoporosis risk factors found in industrialized societies, but with energetic constraints and high pathogen burden. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26460548

  5. Biochemical and morphological alterations of the extracellular matrix of chicken calcaneal tendon during maturation.

    PubMed

    Fêo, Haline Ballestero; Biancalana, Adriano; Nakagaki, Wilson Romero; De Aro, Andrea Aparecida; Gomes, Laurecir

    2015-11-01

    The region in tendons that surrounds bone extremities adapts to compression forces, developing a fibrocartilaginous structure. During maturation, changes occur in the amount and organization of macromolecules of the extracellular matrix of tendons, changing the tissue morphology. To study the effect of maturation on tendons, Pedrês chickens were sacrificed at 1, 5, and 8 months old and had the calcaneal tendon (CT) divided into proximal region, submitted to tension/compression forces (p), and distal region submitted to tension force (d). Morphological analysis of the p region showed the presence of fibrocartilage in all ages. In the central part of the fibrocartilage, near a diminishment of the metachromasy, there was also a development of a probable fat pad that increased with the maturation. The activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was higher at 5 and 8 months old, in both regions, compared with 1-month-old animals. In SDS-PAGE analysis, components with electrophoretic migration similar to decorin and fibromodulin increased with maturation, particularly in the d region. The Western blotting confirmed the increased amount of fibromodulin with maturation. In conclusion, our results show that process of maturation leads to the appearance of a probable fat pad in the center of the fibrocartilage of CT, with a reduced amount of glycosaminoglycans and an increased activity of MMPs. PMID:26250889

  6. Previous physical exercise slows down the complications from experimental diabetes in the calcaneal tendon

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Márcio Almeida; da Silva Nery, Cybelle; de Castro Silveira, Patrícia Verçoza; de Mesquita, Gabriel Nunes; de Gomes Figueiredo, Thainá; Teixeira, Magno Felipe Holanda Barboza Inácio; de Moraes, Silvia Regina Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background the complications caused by diabetes increase fragility in the muscle-tendon system, resulting in degeneration and easier rupture. To avoid this issue, therapies that increase the metabolism of glucose by the body, with physical activity, have been used after the confirmation of diabetes. We evaluate the biomechanical behavior of the calcaneal tendon and the metabolic parameters in rats induced to experimental diabetes and submitted to pre- and post-induction exercise. Methods 54-male-Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: Control Group (CG), Swimming Group (SG), Diabetic Group (DG), and Diabetic Swimming Group (DSG). The trained groups were submitted to swimming exercise, while unexercised groups remained restricted to the cages. Metabolic and biomechanical parameters were assessed. Results the clinical parameters of DSG showed no change due to exercise protocol. The tendon analysis of the DSG showed increased values for the elastic modulus (p<0.01) and maximum tension (p<0.001) and lowest value for transverse area (p<0.001) when compared to the SG, however it showed no difference when compared to DG. Conclusion the homogeneous values presented by the tendons of the DG and DSG show that physical exercise applied in the pre- and post-induction wasn’t enough to promote a protective effect against the tendinopathy process, but prevent the progress of degeneration. PMID:27331036

  7. The influence of a yacht's heeling stability on optimum sail design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneyd, A. D.; Sugimoto, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents fundamental results concerning the optimum design of yacht sails and masts. The aerodynamics of a high aspect ratio sail in uniform flow is analysed using lifting line theory to maximise thrust for a given sail area. The novel feature of this work is that thrust is optimised subject to the constraint that the aerodynamic heeling moment generated by the sail is balanced by the righting moment due to hull buoyancy (and the weight of the keel). Initially, the heel angle is therefore unknown, and determined as part of the solution process. Under the assumption of small heel angle, the problem reduces to minimising a quadratic form in the Fourier coefficients for the circulation distribution along the mast, and a simple analytic solution can be derived. It is found that if the mast is too high, the upper section is unused, and as a consequence there is a theoretically ideal mast height for a yacht of given heeling stability. Under the constraints of given sail area and heeling equilibrium it is found that no advantage is to be gained by allowing reverse circulation near the top of the mast. Various implications for yacht performance are discussed.

  8. A mathematical method for quantifying in vivo mechanical behaviour of heel pad under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Naemi, Roozbeh; Chatzistergos, Panagiotis E; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2016-03-01

    Mechanical behaviour of the heel pad, as a shock attenuating interface during a foot strike, determines the loading on the musculoskeletal system during walking. The mathematical models that describe the force deformation relationship of the heel pad structure can determine the mechanical behaviour of heel pad under load. Hence, the purpose of this study was to propose a method of quantifying the heel pad stress-strain relationship using force-deformation data from an indentation test. The energy input and energy returned densities were calculated by numerically integrating the area below the stress-strain curve during loading and unloading, respectively. Elastic energy and energy absorbed densities were calculated as the sum of and the difference between energy input and energy returned densities, respectively. By fitting the energy function, derived from a nonlinear viscoelastic model, to the energy density-strain data, the elastic and viscous model parameters were quantified. The viscous and elastic exponent model parameters were significantly correlated with maximum strain, indicating the need to perform indentation tests at realistic maximum strains relevant to walking. The proposed method showed to be able to differentiate between the elastic and viscous components of the heel pad response to loading and to allow quantifying the corresponding stress-strain model parameters. PMID:26044551

  9. Extended lateral approach for intra-articular calcaneal fractures: an inverse relationship between surgeon experience and wound complications.

    PubMed

    Schepers, Tim; Den Hartog, Dennis; Vogels, Lucas M M; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-01-01

    The current reference standard for the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures is open reduction and internal fixation using an extended lateral approach. In the present retrospective study, we evaluated the results of a consecutive series of patients treated in the same fashion from June 2005 to September 2011 using a subcuticular single-layer closure technique. We also determined the risk factors for the development of wound complications and the rate of wound complications. Also, we assessed which patient, fracture, and surgical characteristics affected these complications. During the 75-month study period, we operated on 53 displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 50 patients using the extended lateral approach. The incision was closed using the subcuticular technique in 49 cases (92.45%). In the subcuticular closure group 2 (4.1%) deep infections and 2 (4.1%) superficial wound complications (1 dehiscence and 1 infection) occurred. Wound edge or flap necrosis was not encountered. The use of bone-void filler and the experience of the surgical team were significantly (p < .001 and p = .026, respectively) associated with the occurrence of wound complications. The subcuticular single-layer suture technique is a suitable closure technique in the treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. It was associated with a low complication rate combined with the extended lateral approach. The effect of bone void fillers on the incidence of complications should receive more attention in future research. The association between wound complications and the experience level of the surgical team supports the need for centralization of this complex injury. PMID:23318101

  10. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group. PMID:26310621

  11. Operative Versus Nonoperative Treatment for Displaced Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiangping; Li, Qi; He, Shengmao; He, Shunqing

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to perform an updated meta-analysis of the operative versus nonoperative treatment of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in adults. We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Google Scholar for eligible studies. All published randomized controlled trials comparing operative with nonoperative treatment for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures were eligible. The meta-analysis was performed using RevMan, version 5.0, software. Seven studies assessing 824 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis. The pooled results indicated no significant differences between the 2 groups with regard to the functional results. The incidence of complications was 25.0% (80 of 319) in the operative group and 16.6% (55 of 330) in the nonoperative group (relative risk 1.53, 95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.08; p = .006) with a significant difference. The rate of subtalar arthrodesis was significantly lower in the operative group than in the nonoperative group. The current evidence is still insufficient to ascertain whether operative treatment is superior to nonoperative treatment for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures. Operative treatment can reduce the risk of late subtalar arthrodesis but is associated with a greater risk of complications. The small sample size and the great heterogeneity of the included studies made it difficult to draw conclusions regarding some of the combined results. Furthermore, more high-quality, randomized controlled trials with long-term follow-up data on this issue are required to provide evidence for surgeons to make an informed decision. PMID:27150233

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain March 2015 Handout on Health: Back Pain This publication is for people who have back ... to discuss them with your doctor. What Is Back Pain? Back pain is an all-too-familiar problem ...

  13. Cancer pain

    SciTech Connect

    Swerdlow, M.; Ventafridda, V.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Importance of the Problem; Neurophysiology and Biochemistry of Pain; Assessment of Pain in Patients with Cancer; Drug Therapy; Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Cancer Pain; Sympton Control as it Relates to Pain Control; and Palliative Surgery in Cancer Pain Treatment.

  14. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... BACK PAIN? There are many possible causes of low back pain, including stretched (strained) muscles, torn or stretched (sprained) ... appear to be at an increased risk for low back pain in comparison to the general population (estimates range ...

  15. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  16. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  17. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  18. Eye pain

    MedlinePlus

    Ophthalmalgia; Pain - eye ... Pain in the eye can be an important symptom of a health problem. Make sure you tell your health care provider if you have eye pain that does not go away. Tired eyes or ...

  19. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... Carpal tunnel syndrome: A common cause of wrist pain is carpal tunnel syndrome . You may feel aching, ...

  20. Depression, Pain, and Pain Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keefe, Francis J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the degree to which depression predicted pain and pain behavior. The Beck Depression Inventory was administered to 207 low back pain patients. Depression and physical findings were the most important predictors of pain and pain behavior. Depression proved significant even after controlling for important demographic and medical status…

  1. The lateral calcaneal artery: Anatomic basis for planning safe surgical approaches.

    PubMed

    Elsaidy, Mohamed A; El-Shafey, Khaled

    2009-10-01

    The proximity of the lateral calcaneal artery (LCA) to surgical incisions applied to the lateral hindfoot makes it vulnerable to iatrogenic injury and subsequent postoperative skin necrosis. This study aimed to investigate the course of the LCA and to define anatomical points that can be used by surgeons during lateral approaches to the calcaneus. Thirteen leg-ankle-foot specimens were dissected and the superficial course of the LCA was outlined by three anatomic points: (a) tip of lateral malleolus, (b) the point where it pierces the deep fascia, and (c) the point where it crosses the line connecting the lateral malleolus with the insertion of Achilles tendon. Fifteen healthy volunteers were investigated by color Doppler ultrasound where the diameter and depth of LCA were measured. The LCA pierced the deep fascia at a maximum height of 4.5 cm (mean 3.78) above the midpoint of a line extending from the lateral malleolus to the insertion of Achilles tendon. It crossed the previous line at a maximum distance of 3 cm (mean 2.6) posterior to lateral malleolus. At this point, its mean diameter was 1.75 mm on the right and 1.73 mm on the left sides, while its mean depth was 7.73 mm on the right and 8.0 mm on the left sides. A dangerous triangle that contained the superficial course of the artery was mapped out in the lower lateral part of the leg. This triangle should be considered during surgical approaches applied to the lateral hindfoot to avoid damage of the LCA. PMID:19637301

  2. Lateral Calcaneal Artery Flaps in Atherosclerosis: Cadaveric Study, Vascular Assessment and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tanthanatip, Pattaya; Kuhaphensaeng, Paiboon; Ruamthanthong, Anuchit; Pitiseree, Anont; Suwantemee, Chaichoompol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue defects of the lateral malleolus (LM) and Achilles tendon pose difficult reconstructive problems due to the bony prominence and limited local tissue available. The objectives were to study the anatomical landmarks of the lateral calcaneal artery (LCA) and patency of LCA in atherosclerotic patients. Methods: Part I: Thirty-four cadaveric feet were dissected to identify the LCA. The distance between the LCA and the most prominent point of the LM was measured horizontally (LCAa-LM), obliquely (LCAb-LM), and vertically (LCAc-LM). Part II: Thirty-two patients were divided in 2 groups as nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups. The LCA was assessed by both Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Part III: Clinical applications were demonstrated. Results: Part I: Mean distances of LCAa-LM, LCAb-LM, and LCAc-LM were 24.76, 33.68, and 35.03 mm, respectively. The LCA originated 94.12% from the peroneal artery. Part II: Doppler ultrasonography detected the LCA at 90.62% and 87.50% in nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups, respectively, whereas 100.00% and 93.75%, respectively, were detected by CTA. No statistically significant difference was found in the patency of the LCA between nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic patients. Part III: Clinical applications were performed in atherosclerotic patients. Conclusions: The LM is a reliable point to identify the LCA, and the LCA flap can be raised safely in atherosclerotic patients. Preoperative CTA should be performed in severely atherosclerotic patients or cases of major lower extremity vascular injuries. PMID:26495230

  3. The influence of whole body vibration on the plantarflexors during heel raise exercise.

    PubMed

    Robbins, D; Goss-Sampson, M

    2013-06-01

    Whole body vibration (WBV) during exercise offers potential to augment the effects of basic exercises. However, to date there is limited information on the basic physiological and biomechanical effects of WBV on skeletal muscles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of WBV (40Hz, 1.9mm synchronous vertical displacement) on the myoelectrical activity of selected plantarflexors during heel raise exercise. 3D motion capture of the ankle, synchronised with sEMG of the lateral gastrocnemius and soleus, was obtained during repetitive heel raises carried out at 0.5Hz on 10 healthy male subjects (age 27±5 years, height 1.78±0.04m, weight 75.75±11.9kg). During both vibration and non vibration the soleus activation peaked earlier than that of the lateral gastrocnemius. The results indicate that WBV has no effect on the timing of exercise completion or the amplitude of the lateral gastrocnemius activity, however significant increases in amplitudes of the soleus muscle activity (77.5-90.4% MVC P<0.05). WBV had no significant effect on median frequencies of either muscle. The results indicate that the greatest effect of WBV during heel raise activity is in the soleus muscles during the early phases of heel raise. PMID:23261083

  4. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  5. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section 174.055 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SUBDIVISION AND STABILITY SPECIAL RULES PERTAINING TO SPECIFIC VESSEL TYPES Special Rules Pertaining to Mobile Offshore Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind...

  6. Lower limb mechanics during moderate high-heel jogging and running in different experienced wearers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Fengqin; Zhang, Yan; Shu, Yang; Ruan, Guoqing; Sun, Jianjun; Baker, Julien; Gu, Yaodong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the differences in lower limb kinematics and kinetics between experienced (EW) and inexperienced (IEW) moderate high-heel wearers during jogging and running. Eleven experienced female wearers of moderate high-heel shoes and eleven matched controls participated in jogging and running tests. A Vicon motion analysis system was used to capture kinematic data and a Kistler force platform was used to collect ground reaction force (GRF). There were no significant differences in jogging and running speed respectively. Compared with IEW, EW adopted larger stride length (SL) with lower stride frequency (SF) at each corresponding speed. During running, EW enlarged SL significantly while IEW increased both SL and SF significantly. Kinematic data showed that IEW had generally larger joint range of motion (ROM) and peak angles during stance phase. Speed effect was not obvious within IEW. EW exhibited a significantly increased maximal vertical GRF (Fz2) and vertical average loading rate (VALR) during running, which was potentially caused by overlong stride. These suggest that both EW and IEW are at high risk of joint injuries when running on moderate high heels. For wearers who have to do some running on moderate high heels, it is crucial to control joint stability and balance SL and SF consciously. PMID:27101561

  7. Implementation guide for Hanford Tanks Initiative C-106 heel retrieval contract management HNF-2511

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, L.B.

    1998-04-17

    This report is an Implementation Guide for Hanford Tanks Initiative C-106 heel retrieval contract management HNF-2511 to provide a set of uniform instructions for managing the two contractors selected. The primary objective is to produce the necessary deliverables and services for the HTI project within schedule and budget.

  8. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM 183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2000-09-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm-with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the "clear" layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm.

  9. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    SciTech Connect

    Batcheller, T.A.; Huestis, G.M.

    2000-08-31

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the ''clear'' layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm.

  10. A Prospective Study on Radiological and Functional Outcome of Displaced Tongue Type Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures Treated by Percutaneous Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Anoop; Mathias, Lawrence John; Shetty, Vikram; Shetty, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Calcaneal fractures have posed a challenge to orthopaedic surgeon for many years. The major problem is to reconstruct the fracture and improve healing of the fracture and also the surrounding tissues. Anatomic restoration of the three-dimensional anatomy of the calcaneum is the goal of surgical management of calcaneal fractures. Over the years, various techniques have been developed to accomplish this goal. Aim To determine the functional outcome in displaced tongue-type calcaneal fracture treated by percutaneous screw fixation. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted from October 2012 and September 2014. A total of 23 patients with intra-articular ‘tongue type’ calcaneal fractures were included in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation was done. The surgical procedure encompassed closed reduction and fixation with two criss-cross 6.5 mm cannulated cancellous across the fracture site under fluoroscopic guidance. Postoperatively, on day three ankle and toe mobilization was begun. Non-weight bearing crutch mobilization was begun on postoperative day three. Reviews were done at 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 24 weeks postoperatively. At 6 weeks partial weight bearing mobilization was started. Full weight bearing was begun at 12 weeks. The patient was finally reviewed at 24 weeks and assessment of ankle function was done as per the Maryland foot scoring system. Radiographs were compared and preoperative and postoperative Gissane’s and Bohler’s angles were also compared. The results were analysed as per descriptive statistics (frequency, percentage). The complications noted were documented. Results Of the 23 patients under the study, three had excellent results with mean score of 90, 17 had good results with mean score of 82.94 and three had fair results with mean score of 74. Only one patient had subtalar arthritis as a complication. No other complications were seen. Conclusion Percutaneous screw fixation of tongue type

  11. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A.; Bull, Anthony M.J.; McGregor, Alison H.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key points A more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise. Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force. Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed. A version

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Back Pain Information Page Condensed from Low Back Pain Fact ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Back Pain? Acute or short-term low back pain generally ...

  13. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  14. A comparative study of nonpharmacological methods to reduce pain in neonates.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Sheila; Natrajan, Nisha; Rajalakshmi, N R

    2006-12-01

    A randomized study was done to compare non pharmacological methods to reduce the pain of heel pricks in 104 stable term neonates. Non-nutritive sucking (NNS), rocking, massage, sucrose (20 percent), distilled water (DW) and expressed breast milk (EBM) were used as pain reducing agents. Duration of cry and Douleur Aiguë du Nouveau né (DAN) score were used to assess pain. Physiological parameters were also recorded before and after the stimulus. At 30 seconds after the stimulus, the pain scores were lowest in the sucrose group but this was not sustained at 1, 2 and 4 minutes. At 2 and 4 minutes pain scores were lowest in the NNS and rocking groups as compared to sucrose, distilled water, expressed breast milk and massage. The total duration of crying was also lowest in the NNS and rocking groups. Physiological parameters were comparable in all groups. Babies who were in Prechtl State 1 and 2 (sleeping) at the time of stimulus showed significantly lesser response to pain compared to babies who were awake. This was seen in all the intervention groups. In conclusion, our study suggests that rocking or giving a baby a pacifier are more effective non-pharmacological analgesics than EBM, DW, sucrose or massage for the pain of heel pricks in neonates. A calm or sleeping state before a painful procedure also appears to decrease crying and pain scores. PMID:17202604

  15. Kinematics and Kinetics of Single-Limb Heel Rise in Diabetes Related Medial Column Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J.; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Sinacore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related medial column foot deformities contribute to high plantar pressure, joint instability, ulceration and amputation. Impaired foot function may be an early indicator of foot structural incompetence and contribute to deformity progression. This study examines the ability of single-limb heel rise multi-segmental kinematics and kinetics to identify midfoot and hindfoot dysfunction in those with diabetes-related medial column foot deformity. Methods Single-limb heel rise foot kinematics and kinetics were examined in adults with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with and without medial column foot deformity and age-, weight-matched controls. Findings Hindfoot relative to shank plantarflexion, peak and excursion, were reduced in bothdiabetes groups compared to controls (P<0.017). Controls' initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position was plantarflexed 31 degrees and plantarflexed an additional 13 degrees during heel rise. The initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position for the diabetes group without deformity was similarly plantarflexed as controls (34 degrees) while the diabetes deformity group was less plantarflexed (lower arch position: 23 degrees, P<0.017). During the heel rise task both diabetes groups demonstrated less ability to plantarflex the forefoot relative to the hindfoot compared to controls (2 and 5 degrees respectively, P<0.017). Ankle plantarflexion power was reduced in the diabetes deformity group compared to controls (P<0.017). Interpretation The single-limb heel rise task identified movement dysfunction in those with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Failure to plantarflex the forefoot relative to hindfoot may compromise midfoot joint stability and increase the risk of injury and arch collapse. PMID:25218437

  16. The influence of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and center of pressure during standing in young women

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Lee, Suk Min

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Revised high-heeled shoes were developed to minimize foot deformities by reducing excessive load on the forefoot during walking or standing in adult females, who frequently wear standard high-heeled shoes. Specifically, this study aimed to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance during standing in adult females. [Subjects and Methods] Twelve healthy adult females were recruited to participate in this study. Foot pressures were obtained under 3 conditions: barefoot, in revised high-heeled shoes, and in standard 7-cm high-heeled shoes. Foot pressure was measured using the Tekscan HR mat scan system. One-way repeated analysis of variance was used to compare the foot pressure distribution and center of pressure distance under these 3 conditions. [Results] The center of pressure distance between the two lower limbs and the fore-rear distribution of foot pressure were significantly different for the 3 conditions. [Conclusion] Our findings support the premise that wearing revised high-heeled shoes seems to provide enhanced physiologic standing posture compared to wearing standard high-heeled shoes. PMID:26834343

  17. Orthotic Heel Wedges Do Not Alter Hindfoot Kinematics and Achilles Tendon Force During Level and Inclined Walking in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-04-01

    Conservative treatments such as in-shoe orthotic heel wedges to treat musculoskeletal injuries are not new. However, weak evidence supporting their use in the management of Achilles tendonitis suggests the mechanism by which these heel wedges works remains poorly understood. It was the aim of this study to test the underlying hypothesis that heel wedges can reduce Achilles tendon load. A musculoskeletal modeling approach was used to quantify changes in lower limb mechanics when walking due to the introduction of 12-mm orthotic heel wedges. Nineteen healthy volunteers walked on an inclinable walkway while optical motion, force plate, and plantar pressure data were recorded. Walking with heel wedges increased ankle dorsiflexion moments and reduced plantar flexion moments; this resulted in increased peak ankle dorsiflexor muscle forces during early stance and reduced tibialis posterior and toe flexor muscle forces during late stance. Heel wedges did not reduce overall Achilles tendon force during any walking condition, but did redistribute load from the medial to lateral triceps surae during inclined walking. These results add to the body of clinical evidence confirming that heel wedges do not reduce Achilles tendon load and our findings provide an explanation as to why this may be the case. PMID:26502456

  18. The Relationship of Body Weight and Clinical Foot and Ankle Measurements to the Heel Forces of Forward and Backward Walking

    PubMed Central

    Albensi, Raymond J.; Nyland, John; Caborn, David N.M.

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To compare and contrast the relationships of selected static clinical measurements with the heel forces of forward and backward walking among healthy high school athletes. Design and Setting: Single-group, cross-order-controlled, repeated-measures design. All data were collected in a high school athletic training room. Subjects: Seventeen healthy high school student-athlete volunteers. Measurements: We performed static clinical measurements of the foot, ankle, and knee using handheld goniometers. We used a metric ruler to assess navicular drop and a beam balance platform scale to measure body weight. Mean peak heel forces were measured using F-scan insole force sensors. Data were sampled for 3 5-second trials (50-Hz sampling rate). Mean peak heel forces were determined from 3 to 5 consecutive right foot contacts during forward and backward walking at approximately 4.02 to 4.83 km/h (2.5 to 3.0 mph). Subjects wore their own athletic shoes and alternated their initial walking direction. Results: Forward stepwise multiple regression analyses revealed that body weight, navicular drop, and standing foot angle predicted mean peak heel forces during forward and backward walking. Conclusions: Heel forces during forward and backward walking increase as body weight and navicular drop magnitude increase, and they decrease as standing foot angle increases. Subtle differences in foot, ankle, and knee joint postures and kinematics can affect heel forces even among normal subjects. Injury and protective bracing or taping may further affect these heel forces. PMID:16558581

  19. The role of beaded activated carbon's pore size distribution on heel formation during cyclic adsorption/desorption of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Atkinson, John D; Hashisho, Zaher; Phillips, John H; Anderson, James E; Nichols, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The effect of activated carbon's pore size distribution (PSD) on heel formation during adsorption of organic vapors was investigated. Five commercially available beaded activated carbons (BAC) with varying PSDs (30-88% microporous) were investigated. Virgin samples had similar elemental compositions but different PSDs, which allowed for isolating the contribution of carbon's microporosity to heel formation. Heel formation was linearly correlated (R(2)=0.91) with BAC micropore volume; heel for the BAC with the lowest micropore volume was 20% lower than the BAC with the highest micropore volume. Meanwhile, first cycle adsorption capacities and breakthrough times correlated linearly (R(2)=0.87 and 0.93, respectively) with BAC total pore volume. Micropore volume reduction for all BACs confirmed that heel accumulation takes place in the highest energy pores. Overall, these results show that a greater portion of adsorbed species are converted into heel on highly microporous adsorbents due to higher share of high energy adsorption sites in their structure. This differs from mesoporous adsorbents (low microporosity) in which large pores contribute to adsorption but not to heel formation, resulting in longer adsorbent lifetime. Thus, activated carbon with high adsorption capacity and high mesopore fraction is particularly desirable for organic vapor application involving extended adsorption/regeneration cycling. PMID:27173087

  20. A systematic review and meta-analyses of nonsucrose sweet solutions for pain relief in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Mariana; Yamada, Janet; Harrison, Denise; Khan, Sobia; Ohlsson, Arne; Adams-Webber, Thomasin; Beyene, Joseph; Stevens, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sucrose has been demonstrated to provide analgesia for minor painful procedures in infants. However, results of trials investigating other sweet solutions for neonatal pain relief have not yet been synthesized. OBJECTIVE: To establish the efficacy of nonsucrose sweet-tasting solutions for pain relief during painful procedures in neonates. METHOD: The present article is a systematic review and meta-analyses of the literature. Standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Collaborative Review Group were used. Literature searches were reviewed for randomized controlled trials investigating the use of sweet solutions, except sucrose, for procedural pain management in neonates. Outcomes assessed included validated pain measures and behavioural and physiological indicators. RESULTS: Thirty-eight studies (3785 neonates) were included, 35 of which investigated glucose. Heel lancing was performed in 21/38 studies and venipuncture in 11/38 studies. A 3.6-point reduction in Premature Infant Pain Profile scores during heel lances was observed in studies comparing 20% to 30% glucose with no intervention (two studies, 124 neonates; mean difference −3.6 [95% CI −4.6 to −2.6]; P<0.001; I2=54%). A significant reduction in the incidence of cry after venipuncture for infants receiving 25% to 30% glucose versus water or no intervention was observed (three studies, 130 infants; risk difference −0.18 [95% CI −0.31 to −0.05]; P=0.008, number needed to treat = 6 [95% CI 3 to 20]; I2=63%). CONCLUSIONS: The present systematic review and meta-analyses demonstrate that glucose reduces pain scores and crying during single heel lances and venipunctures. Results indicate that 20% to 30% glucose solutions have analgesic effects and can be recommended as an alternative to sucrose for procedural pain reduction in healthy term and preterm neonates. PMID:23748256

  1. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River

  2. Usefulness of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound stiffness for the evaluation of bone health in HIV-1-infected subjects: comparison with dual X-ray absorptiometry

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Floridia, Marco; Ceci, Fabrizio; Cacciatore, Francesco; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2016-01-01

    Objectives With the development of effective treatments and the resulting increase in life expectancy, bone mineral density (BMD) alteration has emerged as an important comorbidity in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. The potential contributors to the pathogenesis of osteopenia/osteoporosis include a higher prevalence of risk factors, combined antiretroviral therapy (cART)-exposure, HIV-1 itself and chronic immune activation/inflammation. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the “gold standard” technique for assessing bone status in HIV-1 population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate bone mineral status in a group of 158 HIV-1-infected subjects. The primary endpoint was the feasibility of calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) as a screening tool for BMD. All subjects were receiving stable cART and were virologically suppressed (HIV-RNA <37 copies/mL) from at least 12 months. Calcaneal QUS parameters were analyzed to obtain information on bone mass and microarchitecture. The results were compared with those obtained by DXA. Results No correlations were found between DXA/QUS parameters and demographic or HIV-1-specific characteristics, also including cART strategies. In the univariate analyses BMD, QUS indexes, and Fracture Risk Assessment Tool scores conversely showed significant associations with one or more demographic or HIV-1-related variables. Moreover, a significant relationship between calcaneal quantitative ultrasound index/stiffness and femoral/lumbar BMD values from DXA was described. The multivariate analysis showed an independent association between calcaneal quantitative ultrasound index/stiffness and body mass index, higher CD4+ T-cell numbers and low 25-OH D2/D3 vitamin D levels <10 ng/mL (P-values: 0.004, 0.016, and 0.015, respectively). Conclusion As an alternative and/or integrative examination to DXA, calcaneal QUS could be proposed as a useful screening in HIV-1-infected

  3. Acute pain.

    PubMed

    Good, M

    1999-01-01

    The review of acute pain describes the problem of unresolved pain and its effects on the neural, autonomic, and immune systems. Conceptualizations and mechanisms of pain are reviewed as well as theories of pain management. Descriptive studies of patient and nurse factors that inhibit effective pain management are discussed, followed by studies of pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions. Critical analysis reveals that most studies were atheoretical, and therefore, this proliferation of information lacked conceptual coherence and organization. Furthermore, the nature and extent of barriers to pain management were described, but few intervention studies have been devised, as yet, to modify the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes of nurses and patients that are barriers to pain management. Although some of the complementary therapies have sufficient research support to be used in clinical pain management, the physiological mechanisms and outcomes need to be studied. It is critical at this time to design studies of interventions to improve assessment, decision making, attentive care, and patient teaching. PMID:10418655

  4. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... threatening conditions, such as colon cancer or early appendicitis , may only cause mild pain or no pain. ... Food poisoning Stomach flu Other possible causes include: Appendicitis Abdominal aortic aneurysm (bulging and weakening of the ...

  5. Pain Management

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brain played a role in producing the perception of pain. In the 19th century, physician-scientists ... they are experiencing. Discoveries of differences in pain perceptions and responses to treatment by gender has have ...

  6. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain. If penis pain is caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it is important for your sexual partner to ... Are you at risk for exposure to any sexually transmitted diseases? What other symptoms do you have? The physical ...

  7. Breast pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - breast; Mastalgia; Mastodynia; Breast tenderness ... There are many possible causes for breast pain. For example, hormone level changes from menstruation or pregnancy often cause breast tenderness. Some swelling and tenderness just before your period ...

  8. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or bone changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain ...

  9. Elbow pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is ... injure the tendons on the outside of the elbow. This condition is commonly called tennis elbow . Golfers ...

  10. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  11. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... water or other clear fluids. You may have sports drinks in small amounts. People with diabetes must ... pain occur? For example, after meals or during menstruation? What makes the pain worse? For example, eating, ...

  12. Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oh, my aching back!", you are not alone. Back pain is one of the most common medical problems, ... 10 people at some point during their lives. Back pain can range from a dull, constant ache to ...

  13. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a result of the pain, and the nature of other medical and psychiatric problems, should be ... information helps the health care provider understand the nature of the pain or the potential benefits of ...

  14. Finger pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  15. Chest pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, including your heart, lungs, esophagus, muscles, ribs, tendons, or nerves. Pain may also spread to ... often occurs with fast breathing Inflammation where the ribs join the breast bone or sternum ( costochondritis ) Shingles , ...

  16. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  17. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5 cm, 7 cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5 cm, and 7 cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  18. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    Face pain may be dull and throbbing or an intense, stabbing discomfort in the face or forehead. It can occur in one or ... Pain that starts in the face may be caused by a nerve problem, injury, or infection. Face pain may also begin in other places in the body. ...

  19. The "Heel Hook"-A Climbing-Specific Technique to Injure the Leg.

    PubMed

    Schöffl, Volker; Lutter, Christoph; Popp, Dominik

    2016-06-01

    Acute injuries in rock climbing either come from a fall onto the lower leg or from performing a hard move and injuring the upper extremity. Further evaluations of lower leg injuries in rock climbing athletes have been performed recently finding sport characteristics such as peroneal tendon dislocations or chronic deformations of the feet. One injury mechanism described in case reports is the so-called heel hook position, which is used more frequently today compared with the beginngs of rock climbing. In addition, the number of these injuries is expected to rise with the increase in popularity of climbing and bouldering. Therefore, it is important to further analyze this pathology. We investigated 17 patients with injuries of the lower extremities after performing a heel hook. PMID:27009908

  20. The effects of high heeled shoes on female gait: a review.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J

    2014-04-01

    Walking is the most common form of human locomotion. From a motor control perspective, human bipedalism makes the task of walking extremely complex. For parts of the step cycle, there is only one foot on the ground, so both balance and propulsion are required in order for the movement to proceed smoothly. One condition known to compound the difficulty of walking is the use of high heeled shoes, which alter the natural position of the foot-ankle complex, and thereby produce a chain reaction of (mostly negative) effects that travels up the lower limb at least as far as the spine. This review summarises recent studies that have examined acute and chronic effects of high heels on balance and locomotion in young, otherwise healthy women. Controversial issues, common study limitations and directions for future research are also addressed in detail. PMID:24508305

  1. The effects of isolation on the mechanics of the human heel pad.

    PubMed

    Aerts, P; Ker, R F; de Clercq, D; Ilsley, D W

    1996-04-01

    In previous studies on the mechanical properties of the human heel pad (Bennett & Ker, 1990; Aerts et al. 1995) the fat pad and part of the calcaneus was removed from amputated test specimens. The present study tested whether this procedure influences the mechanical behaviour of the sample. Intact amputated feet were therefore mounted on steel rods driven through the calcaneus and placed in a mechanical test situation (pendulum or servohydraulic material tester). The mechanical properties of the pad were determined for a series of experiments in which the pad was gradually freed from the foot in the way done by Bennett & Ker (1990) and Aerts et al. (1995). The results showed no observable differences in the mechanics of the pad by isolating it from the rest of the foot. Thus, in relation to human locomotion, the load-deformation relation of heel pads as described by Aerts et al. (1995) is the most appropriate to date. PMID:8621341

  2. Dynamic material characterization of the human heel pad based on in vivo experimental tests and numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kardeh, M; Vogl, T J; Huebner, F; Nelson, K; Stief, F; Silber, G

    2016-09-01

    A numerical-experimental, proof-of-concept approach is described to characterize the mechanical material behavior of the human heel pad under impact conditions similar to a heel strike while running. A 3D finite-element model of the right foot of a healthy female subject was generated using magnetic resonance imaging. Based on quasi-static experimental testing of the subject's heel pad, force-displacement data was obtained. Using this experimental data as well as a numerical optimization algorithm, an inverse finite-element analysis and the 3D model, heel pad hyperelastic (long-term) material parameters were determined. Applying the same methodology, based on the dynamic experimental data from the impact test and obtained long-term parameters, linear viscoelastic parameters were established with a Prony series. Model validation was performed employing quasi-static and dynamic force-displacement data. Coefficients of determination when comparing model to experimental data during quasi-static and dynamic (initial velocity: 1480mm/s) procedure were R(2) = 0.999 and R(2) = 0.990, respectively. Knowledge of these heel pad material parameters enables realistic numerical analysis to evaluate internal stress and strain in the heel pad during different quasi-static or dynamic load conditions. PMID:27387903

  3. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  4. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  5. Impact of age, anthropometric data and body composition on calcaneal bone characteristics, as measured by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) in an older German population.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Christiane; Pons-Kühnemann, Jörn; Neuhäuser-Berthold, Monika

    2011-12-01

    The impact of fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM), body mass index (BMI), body mass and body height on calcaneal bone characteristics as measured with quantitative ultrasound (QUS) was investigated in 137 women and 85 men aged 62-92 years, considering age, smoking, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and physical activity level (PAL). In regression analyses using various models, in women, age was a negative predictor of speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and stiffness index (SI) and smoking was a negative predictor of SOS; positive predictors of SOS, BUA, and SI were BMI, body mass and FFM. In men, smoking was a negative predictor and BMI, body mass and FFM were positive predictors of BUA and SI. In both sexes, PAL, body height, WHR and FM had no effect on QUS parameters. The influence of BMI on calcaneal bone characteristics in elderly people depends on FFM rather than on FM. PMID:22036641

  6. Discriminatory Performance of the Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound and Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool to Select Older Women for Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Katherine M; Johnson, Shanthi; Rasali, Drona; Verma, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the accuracy of the calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool (OST) in identifying older women with osteoporosis as defined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and to establish optimal cutoffs to determine risk. We assessed bone mineral density of the femoral neck and lumbar spine using DXA and subsequent calcaneal QUS and OST measurements in 174 women aged 50-80 years. Pearson product correlation coefficients between QUS, OST, and DXA parameters were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed and areas under the curves (AUCs) and optimal thresholds for QUS and OST were defined based on sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio analysis. The ability of calcaneal QUS to identify women with a T-score ≤-2.5 at the femoral neck (AUC = 0.892) consistently outperformed a T-score ≤-2.5 at the lumbar spine (AUC = 0.696) and OST at both the femoral neck and lumbar spine (AUC = 0.706-0.807). Stiffness index cutoff values that fall between 65 and 78 were found to warrant DXA screening, with a cutoff <65 indicating high likelihood of osteoporosis. Further prospective research is needed to examine the gender-related differences of QUS and OST diagnostic performance and their usefulness in clinical practice. PMID:25937306

  7. Fighting Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... pain, bone pain from spread of cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome Neurologic: "Phantom limb" pain after amputation, nerve pain from diabetes Read More "Chronic Pain" Articles Easing Chronic Pain: Better Treatments and ...

  8. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePlus

    Nonspecific back pain; Backache - chronic; Lumbar pain - chronic; Pain - back - chronic; Chronic back pain - low ... Low back pain is common. Almost everyone has back pain at some time in their life. Often, the exact cause ...

  9. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  10. Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Costigan, Michael; Scholz, Joachim; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is triggered by lesions to the somatosensory nervous system that alter its structure and function so that pain occurs spontaneously and responses to noxious and innocuous stimuli are pathologically amplified. The pain is an expression of maladaptive plasticity within the nociceptive system, a series of changes that constitute a neural disease state. Multiple alterations distributed widely across the nervous system contribute to complex pain phenotypes. These alterations include ectopic generation of action potentials, facilitation and disinhibition of synaptic transmission, loss of synaptic connectivity and formation of new synaptic circuits, and neuroimmune interactions. Although neural lesions are necessary, they are not sufficient to generate neuropathic pain; genetic polymorphisms, gender, and age all influence the risk of developing persistent pain. Treatment needs to move from merely suppressing symptoms to a disease-modifying strategy aimed at both preventing maladaptive plasticity and reducing intrinsic risk. PMID:19400724

  11. Methods for Heel Retrieval for Tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site - 13064

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, T.L.; Kirch, N.W.; Reynolds, J.H.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis. (authors)

  12. Methods for heel retrieval for tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, Terry L.; Kirch, N. W.; Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis.

  13. Facial pain.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Steven B

    2009-07-01

    Facial pain is a debilitating disorder if left untreated. Too often, patients are labeled as having psychopathology when face pain etiology is unclear. These patients are categorized as "atypical," "idiopathic," or "psychogenic." Cases of facial pain involving neuropathic, neurovascular, musculoskeletal, as well as intracranial and extracranial systems will be reviewed. Peripheral and central mechanisms associated with these disorders are used to provide an update of these frequently seen clinical issues. PMID:19590376

  14. Imaging Pain.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Katherine T; Mackey, Sean C

    2016-06-01

    The challenges and understanding of acute and chronic pain have been illuminated through the advancement of central neuroimaging. Through neuroimaging research, new technology and findings have allowed us to identify and understand the neural mechanisms contributing to chronic pain. Several regions of the brain are known to be of particular importance for the maintenance and amplification of chronic pain, and this knowledge provides novel targets for future research and treatment. This article reviews neuroimaging for the study of chronic pain, and in particular, the rapidly advancing and popular research tools of structural and functional MRI. PMID:27208709

  15. Modification of the sinus tarsi approach for open reduction and plate fixation of intra-articular calcaneus fractures: the limits of proximal extension based upon the vascular anatomy of the lateral calcaneal artery.

    PubMed

    Femino, John E; Vaseenon, Tanawat; Levin, David A; Yian, Edward H

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of displaced calcaneal fractures remains controversial. Early surgical management to restore articular congruence and the structural function of the calcaneus is widely accepted as the best way to avoid the negative consequences of malunion. Concerns remain however regarding the best approach for reducing and maintaining reduction of these complex fractures, while minimizing the risk of surgical complications. The potential for serious wound complications is a major concern, particularly breakdown of the lateral calcaneal skin flap with the extensile lateral approach. Various approaches have been developed to try and balance the need for direct reduction of the articular surface while minimizing the potential for wound complications. Palmer originally described a laterally based approach through the sinus tarsi for direct visualization of the articular surface for reduction. He and others have found this approach to be useful and reasonably safe. At times, however, it may be necessary to extend the limits of a small incision over the sinus tarsi to treat adjacent fractures or to aid reduction in more complex fractures. In addition, a limited sinus tarsi incision without elevation of the lateral calcaneal skin flap does not allow for plate fixation, a notable advantage of the extensile lateral approach, particularly in gaining reduction of the body of the calcaneus. The authors have used an extended sinus tarsi approach to include placement of plate percutaneously beneath the lateral calcaneal skin flap through a sinus tarsi approach, and to treat adjacent fractures and soft tissue injuries. A clinical series of 13 patients (including 7 chronic smokers and 1 with diabetes and vascular disease) with closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures (Sanders types II and III) were treated by open reduction and internal fixation via this approach. Adjacent fractures were treated through the same incision. Two patients developed wound complications. No

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF HEEL HEIGHT ON VERTICAL GROUND REACTION FORCE DURING LANDING TASKS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE AND ATHLETIC COLLEGIATE FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if heel height alters vertical ground reaction forces (vGRF) when landing from a forward hop or drop landing. Background: Increased vGRF during landing are theorized to increase ACL injury risk in female athletes. Methods: Fifty collegiate females performed two single‐limb landing tasks while wearing heel lifts of three different sizes (0, 12 & 24 mm) attached to the bottom of a athletic shoe. Using a force plate, peak vGRF at landing was examined. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine the influence of heel height on the dependent measures. Results: Forward hop task‐ Peak vGRF (normalized for body mass) with 0 mm, 12 mm, and 24 mm lifts were 2.613±0.498, 2.616±0.497 and 2.495±0.518% BW, respectively. Significant differences were noted between 0 and 24 mm lift (p<.001) and 12 and 24 mm lifts (p=.004), but not between the 0 and 12 mm conditions (p=.927). Jump‐landing task‐ No significant differences were found in peak vGRF (p=.192) between any of the heel lift conditions. Conclusions: The addition of a 24 mm heel lift to the bottom of a sneaker significantly alters peak vGRF upon landing from a unilateral forward hop but not from a jumping maneuver. PMID:23439490

  17. Pain channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Roman; Momin, Aliakmal; Rugiero, Francois; Wood, John N; Zhao, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Pain remains a major clinical challenge, severely afflicting around 6% of the population at any one time. Channelopathies that underlie monogenic human pain syndromes are of great clinical relevance, as cell surface ion channels are tractable drug targets. The recent discovery that loss-of-function mutations in the sodium channel Nav1.7 underlie a recessive pain-free state in otherwise normal people is particularly significant. Deletion of channel-encoding genes in mice has also provided insights into mammalian pain mechanisms. Ion channels expressed by immune system cells (e.g. P2X7) have been shown to play a pivotal role in changing pain thresholds, whilst channels involved in sensory transduction (e.g. TRPV1), the regulation of neuronal excitability (potassium channels), action potential propagation (sodium channels) and neurotransmitter release (calcium channels) have all been shown to be potentially selective analgesic drug targets in some animal pain models. Migraine and visceral pain have also been associated with voltage-gated ion channel mutations. Insights into such channelopathies thus provide us with a number of potential targets to control pain. PMID:20142270

  18. [Chest pain].

    PubMed

    Horn, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain in ambulatory setting is predominantly not heart-associated. Most patients suffer from muskuloskeletal or functional (psychogenic) chest pain. Differential diagnosis covers aortic dissection, rib-fracture, shingles, GERD, Tietze-Syndrome, pulmonary embolism, pleuritis, pneumothorax, pleurodynia and metastatic disease. In most cases history, symptoms and signs allow a clinical diagnosis of high pretest-probability. PMID:25533261

  19. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  20. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  1. SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.

    2012-01-12

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

  2. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  3. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}·19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a 1/4-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 °C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the

  4. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}°19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 °C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 °C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 °C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 °C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note.

    PubMed

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin's ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  6. Squamous cell carcinoma of the heel with free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap reconstruction: case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Al Maksoud, Ahmed Mahmoud; Barsoum, Adel K.; Moneer, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the second most common skin cancer; however, it is relatively rare on the foot. Wide excision of SCC is the recommended surgical treatment. The extent of the excision may involve resection of muscles and bone in cases of deep lesions. The functional and anatomic properties and lack of sufficient locally available tissues make the reconstruction of post-oncosurgical defects of the foot a challenging process. Heel reconstruction poses the biggest challenge due to the unique weight-bearing requirements. We present a case of a Marjolin’s ulcer on the heel in a 62-year-old woman complicating a chronic non-healing wound. The heel defect was reconstructed with a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap with delayed secondary closure. The outcome was successful both functionally and cosmetically. No further procedures were needed. PMID:27161144

  7. Pedicled sensate composite calcaneal flap to achieve full weight-bearing surface in midshaft leg amputations: case report.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; de Castro, Gabriel F; Filho, Jose R Tonelli; Belangero, William D; Ramos, Tamara M; Mongon, Mauricio

    2011-01-01

    Of the possible levels of amputation, transtibial amputations result in functionally excellent outcomes. However, in contrast to hind foot amputations, such as Syme and especially Boyd amputation, acute or late complications related to the amputated stump are frequent with the various described techniques. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) pedicled sensate flap with a surface that allowed full terminal weight-bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. One male patient, 66 years old with schizophrenia and chronic distal tibial osteomyelitis, underwent a leg amputation with sensate composite calcaneal flap construction. The stump was painless and able to bear total terminal weight at 12 weeks. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed at 12-week postoperative follow-up. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted in 12 weeks, and at the 1-year follow-up, the patient was completely satisfied with the functional performance of his stump. The flap described provides proprioceptive feedback with the best bone and skin to support weight bearing. Another advantage is the possibility to use the same prosthesis commonly used in Boyd or Syme amputation due a longer arm leverage, which also allows full terminal weight-bearing. In the current study, a transtibial amputation covered with a pedicled sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong full weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:20945284

  8. Sensate composite calcaneal flap in leg amputation: a full terminal weight-bearing surface-experience in eight adult patients.

    PubMed

    Livani, Bruno; Castro, Gabriel; Filho, Jose Roberto Tonelli; Morgatho, Tâmara Ramos; Mongon, Mauricio Leal Dias; Belangero, William Dias; Davitt, Michael; Carvalho, Jose André

    2011-08-01

    Despite modern reconstruction techniques and replantation, the preservation of a severely traumatised limb, or even a limb affected by a congenital malformation, usually gives poorer functional results compared with amputation and prosthetisation. The aim of this study was to describe a hind foot (including the calcaneum and fat pad) sensate flap with a surface that allows full terminal weight bearing in transtibial amputations in adults. Between June 2007 and September 2008, eight patients underwent leg amputations with a sensate composite calcaneal flap reconstruction of the stump. Patients consisted of four men and four women with a mean age of 46.5 (26-66) years. All amputations were unilateral. The mean follow-up was 28.3 (25-42) months. There were no complications. Calcaneum tibial fusion was observed in all patients in a mean time of 3.5 (3-4) months. A below-knee prosthesis was adapted at 16 weeks postoperatively in all cases, and no need for stump revision occurred in this series during the entire follow-up period. A transtibial amputation covered with a sensate plantar flap preserving the calcaneum was proposed. In theory, the anatomic structures spared in this technique provide a strong, full, weight-bearing terminal surface of the stump that will last a lifetime. PMID:21789589

  9. [Spiritual pain].

    PubMed

    Sato, Satoru

    2011-09-01

    We defined a spiritual pain as feelings of failure and regret at end-of-life, followed by hopelessness and worthlessness in patient's own life. In Japanese, spiritual pain should be assessed in patient's dignity, psycho-social factor, and prognostic stage, not only in religious context. And patient's spirituality should be supported with providing pain and symptom relief based on human relationships. "Sterbebegleitung" is a German proverb, introduced by Alfons Deeken, and seemed to be a suggestive word for such hope-recovering relationships. PMID:21950035

  10. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > For Kids > What a Pain! Kids and ... something doctors call growing pains . What Are Growing Pains? Growing pains aren't a disease. You probably ...

  11. CHEMICAL SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT 8183

    SciTech Connect

    Thaxton, D; Timothy Baughman, T

    2008-01-16

    Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small amounts of nuclear waste from the primary tank into an underground secondary containment pan. CSR involves adding aqueous oxalic acid to the waste tank in order to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resultant acidic waste solution is then pumped to another waste tank where it will be neutralized and then stored awaiting further processing. The waste tanks to be cleaned have a storage capacity of 2.84E+06 liters (750,000 gallons) and a target sludge heel volume of 1.89E+04 liters (5,000 gallons) or less for the initiation of CSR. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CSR process and to discuss the most significant technical issues associated with the development of CSR.

  12. Comparison of ankle plantar flexor activity between double-leg heel raise and walking.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroto; Nishiyama, Toru; Suzuki, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] We aimed to evaluate the difference in the muscle activity between the double-leg heel raise (DHR) and treadmill walking. [Subjects] Thirty healthy males aged 21.5 ± 1.6 years (body mass 63.6 ± 9.3 kg, height 171.0 ± 4.5 cm) participated in the study. [Methods] Electromyograms were simultaneously recorded from both heads of the gastrocnemius and the soleus of the right side during the DHR and treadmill walking. The DHR conditions were maximum plantar flexion (MPF), 3/4 MPF, 2/4 MPF, and 1/4 MPF, and the walking speeds were 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 m/min. [Results] The muscle activity during the DHR and walking significantly increased with increments in the height of the heel raise and walking speed, respectively. Comparison of the muscle activity at MPF with that at each walking speed revealed that the muscle activity in the soleus and gastrocnemius medial head during walking exceeded that during the DHR in less than 3.3% of cases. [Conclusion] The DHR test is useful for evaluating the ankle plantar flexor activity necessary for walking. PMID:26157255

  13. Prevent Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Print This Topic En español Prevent Back Pain Browse Sections The Basics Overview Am I at ... Health: Back Pain . There are different types of back pain. Back pain can be acute or chronic. It ...

  14. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  15. Pain Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... have tried to find relief from cancer pain. ■■ Physical Therapy. Exercises or methods used to help restore strength, ... that you see a licensed expert when trying physical therapy, massage, hypnosis, or acupuncture. 25 To learn more ...

  16. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Signs that may indicate a headache of dental origin include: ; Pain behind the eyes Sore jaw muscles or "tired" ... t Sleep? Check Your Bite What Causes a Toothache? Your Posture May Be the Cause of Jaw ...

  17. Penis pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  18. Feeling pain

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... protective mechanism, alerting it to potential or actual damage to the body’s tissues. In the example of ... the pain receptors in the skin detect tissue damage from the bee sting. Then, the peripheral nerves ...

  19. Knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the front of your knee around the kneecap Torn ligament. An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, or ... into your knee, swelling, or an unstable knee. Torn cartilage (a meniscus tear ). Pain felt on the ...

  20. Testicle pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a hernia or kidney stone. Testicular cancer is almost always painless. But any testicle lump ... Read More Abdominal pain Scrotum Testes Testicle lump Testicular cancer Testicular torsion Update Date 8/31/2015 Updated ...

  1. Hip pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bones or cartilage of your hip, including: Hip fractures – can cause sudden hip pain. These injuries can be serious and lead to major problems. Hip fractures are more common as people get older because ...

  2. Wrist pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... wrist; Pain - carpal tunnel; Injury - wrist; Arthritis - wrist; Gout - wrist; Pseudogout - wrist ... 37.7°C), and recent illness. Other Causes Gout : This occurs when your body produces too much ...

  3. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pain - shoulder ... The shoulder is the most movable joint in the human body. A group of 4 muscles and their tendons, called the rotator cuff, give the shoulder its wide range of motion. Swelling, damage, or ...

  4. Joint pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: gout (especially ...

  5. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... can help the overall situation for the child. Teaching kids self-hypnosis [8] or guided imagery [8a] ... related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, ...

  6. Face pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... gets worse when you bend forward) Tic douloureux Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome Sometimes the reason for the face pain ... is persistent, unexplained, or accompanied by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider. What to Expect at ...

  7. Up-regulation of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23 and occurrence of apoptosis in human chondrocytes isolated from fractured calcaneal osteochondral fragments

    PubMed Central

    Sena, Paola; Manfredini, Giuseppe; Benincasa, Marta; Mariani, Francesco; Smargiassi, Alberto; Catani, Fabio; Palumbo, Carla

    2014-01-01

    To study the expression level of a panel of pro/anti-apoptotic factors and inflammation-related receptors in chondral fragments from patients undergoing surgical treatment for intra-articular calcaneal fractures, cartilage fragments were retrieved from calcaneal fractures of 20 patients subjected to surgical treatment. Primary cultures were performed using chondral fragments from fractured and control patients. Chondrocyte cultures from each patient of the fractured and control groups were subjected to immunofluorescence staining and quantitatively analyzed under confocal microscopy. Proteins extracted from the cultured chondrocytes taken from the fractured and control groups were processed for Western blot experiments and densitometric analysis. The percentage of apoptotic cells was determined using the cleaved PARP-1 antibody. The proportion of labelled cells was 35% for fractured specimens, compared with 7% for control samples. Quantification of caspase-3 active and Bcl-2 proteins in chondrocyte cultures showed a significant increase of the apoptotic process in fractured specimens compared with control ones. Fractured chondrocytes were positively stained for ChemR23 with statistically significant differences with respect to control samples. Densitometric evaluation of the immunoreactive bands confirmed these observations. Human articular chondrocytes obtained from patients with intra-articular calcaneal fractures express higher levels of pivotal pro-apoptotic factors, and of the chemo-attractive receptor ChemR23, compared with control cultures. On the basis of these observations, the authors hypothesize that consistent prolonged chondrocyte death, associated with the persistence of high levels of pro-inflammatory factors, could enhance the deterioration of cartilage tissue with consequent development of post-traumatic arthritis following intra-articular bone fracture. PMID:24689495

  8. Association between vitamin D status and serum parathyroid hormone concentration and calcaneal stiffness in Japanese adolescents: sex differences in susceptibility to vitamin D deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tsugawa, Naoko; Uenishi, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Hiromi; Ozaki, Reo; Takase, Tomoki; Minekami, Takuya; Uchino, Yuri; Kamao, Maya; Okano, Toshio

    2016-07-01

    There is currently insufficient information on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations, and bone mineral status in healthy adolescents to allow reference values to be set. This study aimed to provide comparable data on vitamin D status in Japanese adolescents and to assess sex differences in susceptibility to vitamin D insufficiency. Serum 25OHD and PTH concentrations were measured in 1,380 healthy adolescents (aged 12-18 years). Subjects completed a questionnaire on exercise history, diet, and lifestyle factors. Calcaneal stiffness was evaluated by quantitative ultrasound. Serum 25OHD concentrations in boys and girls were 60.8 ± 18.3 and 52.8 ± 17.0 nmol/L, respectively. Approximately 30 % of boys and 47 % of girls had suboptimal 25OHD concentrations (<50 nmol/L). Serum PTH concentration was negatively correlated with serum 25OHD concentration in boys, but negatively correlated with calcium intake rather than serum 25OHD in girls. In contrast, the increment in calcaneal stiffness as a result of elevation of serum 25OHD was higher in girls than in boys. As vitamin D deficiency is common in Japanese adolescents, it was estimated that intakes of ≥12 and ≥14 μg/day vitamin D would be required to reach 25OHD concentrations of 50 nmol/L in boys and girls, respectively. Moreover, the results of the present study indicate that vitamin D deficiency has a greater association with calcaneal stiffness in girls than in boys. PMID:26260151

  9. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  10. Treatment of Unicameral Bone Cysts of the Calcaneus: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Levy, David M; Gross, Christopher E; Garras, David N

    2015-01-01

    The calcaneus is the most common tarsal affected by unicameral bone cysts (UBCs); however, the treatment of calcaneal UBCs remains controversial. The purpose of the present systematic review was to evaluate the treatment modalities for calcaneal UBCs. A systematic review was performed using clinical studies of calcaneal UBCs with a minimum of 1 year of follow-up and level I to IV evidence. Ten studies with 171 patients (181 cysts) were selected. Heel pain and radiographic cyst consolidation were the primary outcomes. A series of Z tests were used to compare the outcomes in the nonoperative and operative groups, cannulated screw and bone augmentation groups, and autografting and allografting groups. All patients treated with open curettage and bone augmentation had significant improvements in heel pain (p < .001). Only 1.1% ± 1.0% of the cysts treated conservatively had healed on radiographs compared with 93.0% ± 13.0% of the cysts after surgery (p < .001). A greater percentage of patients treated with bone augmentation had preoperative heel pain and resolution of that pain than did patients treated with cannulated screws (p < .001). Autografting had a significantly greater percentage of radiographic cyst consolidation than did allografting (97.4% ± 11.1% versus 85.1% ± 15.8%, p < .001, Z = 3.5). Objective outcomes data on calcaneal UBCs are relatively sparse. The results of the present review suggest that open curettage with autograft bone augmentation is the most effective procedure. We would encourage future comparative clinical studies to elucidate differences in UBC treatment modalities. PMID:25638776

  11. Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon

    PubMed Central

    Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

  12. Bohler’s angle’s role in assessing the injury severity and functional outcome of internal fixation for displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Controversy exits over the role of Böhler’s angle in assessing the injury severity of displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures and predicting the functional outcome following internal fixation. This study aims to investigate whether a correlation exists between Böhler’s angle and the injury severity of displaced calcaneal fractures, and between surgical improvement of Böhler’s angle and functional outcome. Methods Patients treated operatively for unilateral closed displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures from January 1, 2004 to March 31, 2008 were identified. The Böhler’s angles of both calcaneus were measured, and the measurement of the uninjured foot was used as its normal control. The difference in the value of Böhler’s angle measured preoperatively or postoperatively between the angle of the injured foot and that of the contralateral calcaneus were calculated, respectively. The change in Böhler’s angle by ratio was calculated by dividing the difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus by its normal control. The injury severity was assessed according to Sanders classification. The functional outcomes were assessed using American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scores. Results 274 patients were included into the study with a mean follow-up duration of 71 months. According to Sanders classification, the fracture pattern included 105 type II, 121 type III and 48 type IV fractures. According to American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society hindfoot scoring system, the excellent, good, fair and poor results were achieved in 104, 132, 27, and 11 patients, respectively. The preoperative Böhler’s angle, difference value of Böhler’s angle between bilateral calcaneus, and change in Böhler’s angle by ratio each has a significant correlation with Sanders classification (rs=−0.178, P=0.003; rs=−0.174, P=0.004; rs=−0.172, P=0.005, respectively), however, is not correlated with functional outcome

  13. The effect of age, sex hormones, and bone turnover markers on calcaneal quantitative ultrasonometry in healthy German men.

    PubMed

    Kyvernitakis, Ioannis; Saeger, Ulf; Ziller, Volker; Bauer, Thomas; Seker-Pektas, Berna; Hadji, Peyman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the age-dependent variations of calcaneal quantitative ultrasonometry (QUS) and the association with sex hormones and biochemical bone turnover markers in a large sample of unselected healthy German men. Bone measurements are expected to behave differently among men and women. The speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and stiffness index (SI) of the os calcaneus were measured in 506 German men aged 20-79 yr (mean age: 45.7 yr). Additionally, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), estradiol, prolactin, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) as well as N-terminal propeptide of human procollagen type I (PINP), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), osteocalcin, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, and CrossLaps were measured with standardized essays and correlated with the QUS results. The QUS results comprised an overall change of 12.4%, 3.2%, and 23.2% for BUA, SOS, and SI, respectively, between the 20-29 and 70-79 yr age groups (p ≤ 0.001). The annual rate of the age-related differences was 0.33% (standard deviation [SD]: 0.31), 0.06% (SD: 0.08), and 0.53% (SD: 0.56) for BUA, SOS, and SI, respectively. Testosterone and DHEA-S were significantly associated with QUS parameters and increasing age, whereas SHBG showed an age-related increase and was inversely related with QUS values (p < 0.05). Bone turnover markers present lower values gradually, and we found a significant correlation between carboxy-terminal collagen crosslinks (CTX), osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), and QUS variables (p < 0.05). PMID:23582469

  14. The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Les, C. M.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yan, C. H.; Cleek, T. M.; Wills, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the material characteristics of bone marrow with aging can be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities. In the context of computed tomography, dual-energy computed techniques have been used to correct for changes in marrow composition. However, dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (DE-QCT) protocols, while increasing the accuracy of the measurement, reduce the precision and increase the radiation dose to the patient in comparison to single-energy quantitative computed tomography (SE-QCT) protocols. If the attenuation properties of the marrow for a particular bone can be shown to be relatively constant with age, it should be possible to use single-energy techniques without experiencing errors caused by unknown marrow composition. Marrow was extracted by centrifugation from 10 mm thick frontal sections of 34 adult cadaver calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17-65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation coefficient of each marrow sample were determined. For purposes of comparing our results, we then computed an effective CT number at two GE CT/i scan voltages (80 and 120 kVp) for each specimen. The coefficients of variation for the density, CT number at 80 kVp and CT number at 120 kVp were each less than 1%, and the parameters did not change significantly with age (p > 0.2, r2 < 0.02, power > 0.8 where the minimum acceptable r2 = 0.216). We could demonstrate no significant gender-associated differences in these relationships. These data suggest that calcaneal bone marrow X-ray attenuation properties and marrow density are essentially constant from the third through sixth decades of life.

  15. Preventing healthcare-associated transmission of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Our Achilles heel.

    PubMed

    Balkhy, Hanan H; Perl, Trish M; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus is the most recent among the Coronaviridae family to jump species and infect humans. Major healthcare associated MERS outbreaks have occurred in the Middle East and Korea that affected both patients and healthcare workers. These outbreaks were characterized by intra and inter-hospital spread and were exacerbated specifically by overcrowding, delayed diagnosis and appropriate use of personal protective equipment. Recent experience with this virus emphasizes the importance of compliance with infection control practices and with other interventions addressing patient triage, placement and flow within and between healthcare facilities. Our Achilles heel remains compliance with the best infection prevention practices and their harmonization with patient flow. Both infection prevention compliance and maintenance of patient flow are critical in preventing healthcare-associated transmission of many of these emerging infectious diseases, including MERS. PMID:27158023

  16. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment of chronic pain usually involves medicines and therapy. Medicines used for chronic pain include pain relievers, antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Different types of medicines help ...

  17. Effectiveness of MIS technique as a treatment modality for open intra-articular calcaneal fractures: A prospective evaluation with matched closed fractures treated by conventional technique.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Mandeep Singh; Gahlot, Nitesh; Satyaprakash, Sambit; Kanojia, Rajendra Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Twenty-five displaced intra-articular calcaneal fractures in 21 patients, aged 15-55 years were included in this study. Sanders' type I fractures, severe crushing or partial amputation, were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into group 1 (open fractures treated by MIS), and group 2 (closed fractures treated by ORIF). Group 1 had 16 and group 2 had 9 cases. Seven of 25 fractures (28%) developed wound related issues postoperatively. One patient (11.1%) in group 2 had wound margin necrosis, while 6 patients (37.5%) in group 1 developed pin tract and/or wound infection. At 1-year follow-up, the mean MFS for group 1 was 79 and mean MFS for group 2 was 84.4 (66.67% were good). The AOFAS score for group 1 was 77.37 and for group 2 was 86.1. The Bohlers' angle was restored in 81.16% cases in group 1 and 88.8% in group 2, while Gissane angle was restored in 68.75% of group 1 cases and 77.79% of group 2 cases. This study shows that acceptable fracture reduction can be obtained and maintained by MIS technique and it can be used as the primary definitive treatment option in open calcaneal fractures. PMID:26209469

  18. Facts and Figures on Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... adults. Common chronic pain complaints include headache, low back pain, cancer pain, arthritis pain, neurogenic pain (pain resulting ... Institute of Health Statistics survey indicated that low back pain was the most common (27%), followed by severe ...

  19. Chest Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Having a pain in your chest can be scary. It does not always mean that you are having a heart attack. There can be many other causes, ... embolism Costochondritis - an inflammation of joints in your chest Some of these problems can be serious. Get ...

  20. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  1. Painful menstrual periods

    MedlinePlus

    ... related activities for a few days during each menstrual cycle. Painful menstruation is the leading cause of lost ... when did the pain begin? When in your menstrual cycle do you experience the pain? Is the pain ...

  2. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  3. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS FAQ020 When Sex Is Painful • How common is painful sex? • What causes pain during sex? • Where is pain during sex felt? • When should ...

  4. American Pain Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Award Recipients Strong Evidence Still Lacking on Medical Marijuana for Pain Fibromyalgia Has Central Nervous System Origins ... Mayday Fund American Pain Society Offers Guidance on Medical Marijuana for Pain Study Shows Pain Often Improves in ...

  5. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  6. Alternative medicine - pain relief

    MedlinePlus

    Acupuncture - pain relief; Hypnosis - pain relief; Guided imagery - pain relief ... you repeat a positive statement over and over. Hypnosis may help relieve pain for: After surgery or labor Arthritis Cancer Fibromyalgia ...

  7. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... ACPA Contact Us Shop FAQs The Art of Pain Management Resources Going to the ER Glossary Surveys What We Have Learned Communication Tools Videos Pain Management Programs Resource Guide to Chronic Pain Treatments Pain ...

  8. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  9. Understanding pain, part 2: pain management.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Helen

    This article is the second in a two-part series which explores pain and its management from a physiological perspective. Nurses play an important role in assessing and managing pain. Effective pain management by nurses requires them to have an understanding of the biological basis of the pain interventions which may be used to control pain. This article emphasizes the importance of pain assessment as a precursor for effective pain management and explores the biological basis of pain interventions which contribute to pain control. The role of non-pharmacological approaches in alleviating pain and their actions which contribute to pain relief are explored. The three main types of pharmaceutical agents used, non-opioids, opioids and adjuvant drugs, are introduced and their mechanisms of actions discussed. PMID:16224328

  10. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  11. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese

  12. The potential influence of the heel counter on internal stress during static standing: a combined finite element and positional MRI investigation.

    PubMed

    Spears, I R; Miller-Young, J E; Sharma, J; Ker, R F; Smith, F W

    2007-01-01

    Confinement of the heel due to the counter of the shoe is believed to influence heel pad biomechanics. Using a two-dimensional finite element model of the heel pad and shoe during a simulation of static standing, the aim of this study was to quantify the potential effect of confinement on internal heel pad stress. Non-weightbearing MRI and weightbearing MRI with plantar pressure and ground reaction force data were recorded for a single subject. The non-weightbearing MRI was used to create two FE models of the heel pad, using either homogeneous or composite material properties. The composite model included a distinction in material properties between fat pad and skin. Vertical and medial-lateral forces, as measured on the subject's heel, were applied to the models and vertical compressive strains for both models were comparable with those observed by weightbearing MRI. However, only for the composite model was the predicted plantar pressure distribution comparable with measured data. The composite model was therefore used in further analyses. In this composite model, the internal stresses were located mainly in the skin and were predominantly tensile in nature, whereas the stress state in the fat pad approached hydrostatic conditions. A representation of a running shoe, including an insole, midsole and heel counter was then added to the composite heel pad to form the shod model. In order to investigate the counter effect, the load was applied to the shod model with and without the heel counter. The effect of the counter on peak stress was to elevate compression (0-50%), reduce tension (22-34%) and reduce shear (22-28%) in the skin. In addition, the counter reduced both compressive (20-40%) and shear (58-80%) stress in the fat pad and tension in the fat pad remained negligible. Taken together the results indicate that a well-fitted counter works in sympathy with the internal structure of the heel pad and could be an effective reducer of heel pad stress. However

  13. Relationship between self-reported high-heeled shoe use and bone mineral density using quantitative ultrasound at a community health fair.

    PubMed

    Glassy, Crystal M; Glassy, Matthew S; Guggenheim, Carla

    2013-01-01

    This is the first known study to examine the relationship between high-heel use and bone mineral density (BMD). Because women are disproportionately affected by osteoporosis, it is important to identify possible modifiable behaviors of women that may adversely affect bone health. Many studies have shown changes in body mechanics when wearing high-heeled shoes in comparison to normal gait. Because the composition of bone changes according to mechanical load and muscle activity, this study investigates whether wearing high heels may alter BMD. Two hundred and twenty-one participants at a community health fair in Lansing, Michigan, were surveyed on high-heel use and bone health risk (gender, thin/small frame, fair skin, family history of fracture, smoking history, walking, dairy consumption, and early menopause or oopherectomy at <45 years old). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel by Hologic's Sahara Sonometer was used to measure BMD. The mean age was 45.2 (SD 13.7) years, and the majority of participants were female (208, 94 %). A significant difference between mean BMD and high-heel use was not found. Independent correlations existed between fair skinned/sunburn easily and BMD, r(212) = -0.14, p = 0.038, as well as history of smoking and BMD, r(212) = -0.14, p = 0.042. Bone health risk score was strongly correlated with heel use binary variable "yes/no," r(210) = 0.21, p = 0.003. Our study suggests that wearing high-heeled shoes does not lead to appreciable differences in BMD among community health fair participants as assessed by QUS. PMID:22983265

  14. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

    2000-05-17

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  15. The relation between bone mineral density in the heel and pixel intensity in the mandibular jaw bone among elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Hedström, L; Baigi, A; Bergh, H

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between pixel intensity (PI) in digital radiographs of the lower jaw and bone mineral density (BMD) in the heels of post-menopausal women (as measured with DXL, a combination of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and lasers). Methods Two intraoral periapical digital radiographs were taken in the right and left mandible premolar region, and the digital images were analysed by a computer program (Dimaxis) regarding PI. As the radiographs were taken, the BMD of the patient's left heel was measured via a portable Calscan device. The patient answered a questionnaire concerning risk factors. The correlation between variables was analysed using statistical tests. Results A significant correlation was found between the PI in the left (P = 0.001) and right (P = 0.004) mandible and the BMD of the left heel for the whole group. A pronounced correlation was found to exist for women > 70 years old. Based on a cut-off value of the PI, to differentiate between healthy individuals and those who required further analysis for osteoporosis, the following values were obtained: sensitivity 0.74, specificity 0.50, positive predictive value 0.77 and negative predictive value 0.46. Conclusion A positive correlation was found between PI in digital radiographs of the mandible and the BMD of the heel. The low predictive value does not allow any definite conclusions to be drawn from the present study. A reasonable recommendation could be for future studies to employ a larger study population to explore the effect on this value. PMID:20841458

  16. The oscillatory behavior of the CoM facilitates mechanical energy balance between push-off and heel strike.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seyoung; Park, Sukyung

    2012-01-10

    Humans use equal push-off and heel strike work during the double support phase to minimize the mechanical work done on the center of mass (CoM) during the gait. Recently, a step-to-step transition was reported to occur over a period of time greater than that of the double support phase, which brings into question whether the energetic optimality is sensitive to the definition of the step-to-step transition. To answer this question, the ground reaction forces (GRFs) of seven normal human subjects walking at four different speeds (1.1-2.4 m/s) were measured, and the push-off and heel strike work for three differently defined step-to-step transitions were computed based on the force, work, and velocity. To examine the optimality of the work and the impulse data, a hybrid theoretical-empirical analysis is presented using a dynamic walking model that allows finite time for step-to-step transitions and incorporates the effects of gravity within this period. The changes in the work and impulse were examined parametrically across a range of speeds. The results showed that the push-off work on the CoM was well balanced by the heel strike work for all three definitions of the step-to-step transition. The impulse data were well matched by the optimal impulse predictions (R(2)>0.7) that minimized the mechanical work done on the CoM during the gait. The results suggest that the balance of push-off and heel strike energy is a consistent property arising from the overall gait dynamics, which implies an inherited oscillatory behavior of the CoM, possibly by spring-like leg mechanics. PMID:22035641

  17. Immunoediting and Antigen Loss: Overcoming the Achilles Heel of Immunotherapy with Antigen Non-Specific Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Monjazeb, Arta Monir; Zamora, Anthony E.; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Mirsoian, Annie; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a mainstream therapy option in the battle against cancer. Pre-clinical data demonstrates the ability of immunotherapy to harness the immune system to fight disseminated malignancy. Clinical translation has failed to recapitulate the promising results of pre-clinical studies although there have been some successes. In this review we explore some of the short-comings of cancer immunotherapy that have limited successful clinical translation. We will give special consideration to what we consider the most formidable hurdle to successful cancer immunotherapy: tumor-induced immune suppression and immune escape. We will discuss the need for antigen-specific immune responses for successful immunotherapy but also consider the need for antigen specificity as an Achilles heel of immunotherapy given tumor heterogeneity, immune editing, and antigen loss. Finally, we will discuss how combinatorial strategies may overcome some of the pitfalls of antigen specificity and highlight recent studies from our lab which suggest that the induction of antigen non-specific immune responses may also produce robust anti-tumor effects and bypass the need for antigen specificity. PMID:23898464

  18. Achilles' heel of sociality revealed by energetic poverty trap in cursorial hunters.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Gregory S A; Gusset, Markus; Courchamp, Franck; Macdonald, David W

    2008-10-01

    This study empirically tests two foundation ecological theories: (1) pack hunting is a driver for the evolution of sociality; and (2) species have a finite energy potential, whereby increased maintenance costs result in decreased reproductive effort. Using activity and prey data from 22 packs of African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus), we parameterized a model detailing the energetic cost/benefit of cooperative hunting. Larger pack size increased foraging time, prey size, and capture probability while reducing chase distance, resulting in a rapidly increasing net rate of energy intake up to a pack size of five, which peaked at 10 individuals and then declined. With a streamlined body plan necessary for hypercursoriality limiting stomach capacity in smaller packs, it was demonstrated that the group hunting benefit will rather accrue to widely foraging predators than to "sit-and-wait" ones. Reproductive effort, measured by the number of pups born, revealed smaller litters with decreasing pack size, validated finite energy theory, and highlighted a "poverty trap" where smaller groups have lower foraging gains, smaller litters, and increased vulnerability to extirpation. Consequently, these results demonstrated a mechanistic example of pervasive selection for maximal body size (Cope's rule), leading to a macroevolutionary ratchet, where sociality linked to hypercursoriality is betrayed by an Achilles' heel. PMID:18729728

  19. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications. PMID:19936167

  20. Reconstruction of Heel With Propeller Flap in Postfasciotomy and Popliteal Artery Revascularization State.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Seok; Choi, Hwan Jun; Tak, Min Sung

    2016-06-01

    Free flaps are still the gold standard for large defects of the lower limb, but propeller perforator flaps have become a simpler and faster alternative to free flaps because of some advantages such as reliable vascular pedicle, wide mobilization and rotation, great freedom in design, low donor site morbidity, and easy harvest with no requirement for anastomosis. But when the vessels show insufficient findings in preoperative evaluation using a Doppler probe or the vessel is injured, the surgeon should avoid performing free flap surgery to prevent flap failure and should select a propeller perforator flap as an alternative method on the condition that more than one perforator is intact. In this study, we report reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the heel with a pedicled propeller flap in postfasciotomy and popliteal artery revascularization state by making an incision on the central portion above the Achilles tendon, which can be covered by the posterior tibial artery perforator or the peroneal artery perforator based flaps. In conclusion, we showed that although the popliteal artery was injured, the soft tissue defect can be reconstructed using a perforator propeller flap if intact distal flow in the anastomosis site was confirmed. PMID:25673623

  1. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M; King, W; Martino, C

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  2. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems' Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  3. Dendritic cells as Achilles’ heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems’ Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  4. EM-31 ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL - 11220

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.; Wiersma, B.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-10

    Mixtures of oxalic acid with nitric acid have been shown to be superior to oxalic acid alone for the dissolution of iron-rich High Level Waste sludge heels. Optimized conditions resulting in minimal oxalate usage and stoichiometric iron dissolution (based on added oxalate ion) have been determined for hematite (a primary sludge iron phase) in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures. The acid mixtures performed better than expected based on the solubility of hematite in the individual acids through a synergistic effect in which the preferred 1:1 Fe:oxalate complex is formed. This allows for the minimization of oxalate additions to the waste stream. Carbon steel corrosion rates were measured in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures to evaluate the impacts of chemical cleaning with these solutions on waste tank integrity. Manageable corrosion rates were observed in the concentration ranges of interest for an acid contact timescale of 1 month. Kinetics tests involving hematite and gibbsite (a primary sludge aluminum phase) have confirmed that {ge}90% solids dissolution occurs within 3 weeks. Based on these results, the chemical cleaning conditions recommended to promote minimal oxalate usage and manageable corrosion include: 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid/0.175 M nitric acid mixture, 50 C, 2-3 week contact time with agitation.

  5. Beware the Emergency Ankle Fracture Referral: An Unusual Case of Lateral Subtalar Joint Dislocation Secondary to Calcaneal Fracture with associated Lateral Malleolus Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Colegate-Stone, TJ; James, SE; Koka, SR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The referral of a lateral malleolus fracture is one of the commonest orthopaedic trauma presentations. Failure to fully assess the patient and radiography can lead to missing associated injuries in the hindfoot. Case Report: We describe an unusual hindfoot injury with an atypical combination of lateral subtalar dislocation and calcaneal fracture with associated lateral malleolus fracture that was initially not appreciated by the referring emergency department. This case is of particular interest as subtalar dislocation is a rare injury and lateral subtalar dislocation is even rarer. Conclusion: Failure to fully assess such injuries and manage non-operatively leads to early degenerative tibia-talar, hindfoot and midfoot changes and a difficult situation for the surgeon to salvage. We advocate early CT scan and open reduction with fixation for such cases. PMID:27299009

  6. Inherited Pain

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam; Nakajima, Julika; Klinger, Alexandra B.; Neacsu, Cristian; Hühne, Kathrin; O'Reilly, Andrias O.; Kist, Andreas M.; Lampe, Anne K.; Fischer, Kerstin; Gibson, Jane; Nau, Carla; Winterpacht, Andreas; Lampert, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) causes debilitating episodic neuropathic pain characterized by burning in the extremities. Inherited “paroxysmal extreme pain disorder” (PEPD) differs in its clinical picture and affects proximal body areas like the rectal, ocular, or jaw regions. Both pain syndromes have been linked to mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7. Electrophysiological characterization shows that IEM-causing mutations generally enhance activation, whereas mutations leading to PEPD alter fast inactivation. Previously, an A1632E mutation of a patient with overlapping symptoms of IEM and PEPD was reported (Estacion, M., Dib-Hajj, S. D., Benke, P. J., Te Morsche, R. H., Eastman, E. M., Macala, L. J., Drenth, J. P., and Waxman, S. G. (2008) NaV1.7 Gain-of-function mutations as a continuum. A1632E displays physiological changes associated with erythromelalgia and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder mutations and produces symptoms of both disorders. J. Neurosci. 28, 11079–11088), displaying a shift of both activation and fast inactivation. Here, we characterize a new mutation of Nav1.7, A1632T, found in a patient suffering from IEM. Although transfection of A1632T in sensory neurons resulted in hyperexcitability and spontaneous firing of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, whole-cell patch clamp of transfected HEK cells revealed that Nav1.7 activation was unaltered by the A1632T mutation but that steady-state fast inactivation was shifted to more depolarized potentials. This is a characteristic normally attributed to PEPD-causing mutations. In contrast to the IEM/PEPD crossover mutation A1632E, A1632T failed to slow current decay (i.e. open-state inactivation) and did not increase resurgent currents, which have been suggested to contribute to high-frequency firing in physiological and pathological conditions. Reduced fast inactivation without increased resurgent currents induces symptoms of IEM, not PEPD, in the new Nav1.7 mutation, A1632T

  7. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  8. Foot Kinematics During a Bilateral Heel Rise Test in Participants With Stage II Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    HOUCK, JEFF; NEVILLE, CHRISTOPHER; TOME, JOSHUA; FLEMISTER, ADOLPH

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Experimental laboratory study using a cross-sectional design. OBJECTIVES To compare foot kinematics, using 3-dimensional tracking methods, during a bilateral heel rise between participants with posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD) and participants with a normal medial longitudinal arch (MLA). BACKGROUND The bilateral heel rise test is commonly used to assess patients with PTTD; however, information about foot kinematics during the test is lacking. METHODS Forty-five individuals volunteered to participate, including 30 patients diagnosed with unilateral stage II PTTD (mean ± SD age, 59.8 ± 11.1 years; body mass index, 29.9 ± 4.8 kg/m2) and 15 controls (mean ± SD age, 56.5 ± 7.7 years; body mass index, 30.6 ± 3.6 kg/m2). Foot kinematic data were collected during a bilateral heel rise task from the calcaneus (hindfoot), first metatarsal, and hallux, using an Optotrak motion analysis system and Motion Monitor software. A 2-way mixed-effects analysis of variance model, with normalized heel height as a covariate, was used to test for significant differences between the normal MLA and PTTD groups. RESULTS The patients in the PTTD group exhibited significantly greater ankle plantar flexion (mean difference between groups, 7.3°; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.1° to 9.5°), greater first metatarsal dorsiflexion (mean difference between groups, 9.0°; 95% CI: 3.7° to 14.4°), and less hallux dorsiflexion (mean difference, 6.7°; 95% CI: 1.7° to 11.8°) compared to controls. At peak heel rise, hindfoot inversion was similar (P = .130) between the PTTD and control groups. CONCLUSION Except for hindfoot eversion/inversion, the differences in foot kinematics in participants with stage II PTTD, when compared to the control group, mainly occur as an offset, not an alteration in shape, of the kinematic patterns. PMID:19648723

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF HEEL HEIGHT ON SAGITTAL PLANE KNEE KINEMATICS DURING LANDING TASKS IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE AND ATHLETIC COLLEGIATE FEMALES

    PubMed Central

    Carcia, Christopher R.; Phelps, Amy L.; Martin, RobRoy L.; Burrows, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine if heel height alters sagittal plane knee kinematics when landing from a forward hop or drop landing. Background: Knee angles close to extension during landing are theorized to increase ACL injury risk in female athletes. Methods: Fifty collegiate females performed two single-limb landing tasks while wearing heel lifts of three different sizes (0, 12 & 24 mm) attached to the bottom of a sneaker. Using an electrogoniometer, sagittal plane kinematics (initial contact [KAIC], peak flexion [KAPeak], and rate of excursion [RE]) were examined. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine the influence of heel height on the dependent measures. Results: Forward hop task- KAIC with 0 mm, 12 mm, and 24 mm lifts were 8.88±6.5, 9.38±5.8 and 11.28±7.0, respectively. Significant differences were noted between 0 and 24 mm lift (p<.001) and 12 and 24 mm lifts (p=.003), but not between the 0 and 12 mm conditions (p=.423). KAPeak with 0 mm, 12 mm, and 24 mm lifts were 47.08±10.9, 48.18±10.3 and 48.88±9.7, respectively. A significant difference was noted between 0 and 24 mm lift (p=.004), but not between the 0 and 12 mm or 12 and 24 mm conditions (p=.071 and p=.282, respectively). The RE decreased significantly from 2128/sec±52 with the 12 mm lift to 1958/sec±55 with the 24 mm lift (p=.004). RE did not differ from 0 to 12 or 0 to 24 mm lift conditions (p=.351 and p=.086, respectively). Jump-landing task- No significant differences were found in KAIC (p=.531), KAPeak (p=.741), or the RE (p=.190) between any of the heel lift conditions. Conclusions: The addition of a 24 mm heel lift to the bottom of a sneaker significantly alters sagittal plane knee kinematics upon landing from a unilateral forward hop but not from a drop jump. PMID:21904697

  10. Descending pain modulation and chronification of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Morimura, Kozo; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts quality of life of affected individuals and exacts an enormous socio-economic cost. Currently available therapeutics provide inadequate management of pain in many patients. Acute pain states generally resolve in most patients. However, for reasons that are poorly understood, in some individuals, acute pain can transform to a chronic state. Our understanding of the risk factors that underlie the development of chronic pain is limited. Recent studies have suggested an important contribution of dysfunction in descending pain modulatory circuits to pain ‘chronification’. Human studies provide insights into possible endogenous and exogenous factors that may promote the conversion of pain into a chronic condition. Recent findings Descending pain modulatory systems have been studied and characterized in animal models. Human brain imaging techniques, deep brain stimulation and the mechanisms of action of drugs that are effective in the treatment of pain confirm the clinical relevance of top-down pain modulatory circuits. Growing evidence supports the concept that chronic pain is associated with a dysregulation in descending pain modulation. Disruption of the balance of descending modulatory circuits to favour facilitation may promote and maintain chronic pain. Recent findings suggest that diminished descending inhibition is likely to be an important element in determining whether pain may become chronic. This view is consistent with the clinical success of drugs that enhance spinal noradrenergic activity, such as serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), in the treatment of chronic pain states. Consistent with this concept, a robust descending inhibitory system may be normally engaged to protect against the development of chronic pain. Imaging studies show that higher cortical and subcortical centres that govern emotional, motivational and cognitive processes

  11. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Low Back Pain Overview What is low back pain? Low back pain is a common problem for many people. It can be caused by many ... lift and exercise correctly. Symptoms When is low back pain serious? Call your family doctor if: Pain goes ...

  12. Time to Onset of Pain: Effects of Magnitude and Location for Static Pressures Applied to the Plantar Foot

    PubMed Central

    Wiggermann, Neal; Keyserling, W. Monroe

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms that cause foot discomfort during prolonged standing are poorly understood. There is currently no method for evaluating discomfort associated with low levels of static pressure that are typical during standing. Pain thresholds were measured for 20 healthy participants by applying five levels of static pressure at different plantar foot locations. A survival analysis was performed to determine the effects of pressure magnitude and foot location on the time until pain onset. Time to pain onset was significantly affected by pressure magnitude (P<0.001); time decreased as pressure increased. Foot location was also significant (P<0.001); greatest times to pain onset (least sensitive) were observed under the heel and fifth metatarsal head, shortest times (most sensitive) were found under the midfoot. This research presents a novel methodology for evaluating static pressure that may be applicable to product design. PMID:25118168

  13. Regional soft tissue pains: alias myofascial pain?

    PubMed

    Tunks, E; Crook, J

    1999-06-01

    This chapter deals with four main questions: what is the evidence that 'myofascial pain' syndromes exist?; what is the evidence that the myofascial pain concept is clinically useful?; what is the evidence that managing patients in terms of the myofascial pain diagnosis confers benefits?; and what is the evidence-based management of myofascial pain? The purpose of a diagnosis is to provide boundaries around subgroups of illness in a population since each subgroup presumably has a different mechanism, natural history, prognosis, course and response to treatment. The current literature is divided in its conceptual approach to the problem of regional musculoskeletal pain. Some authors regard myofascial pain as being distinct from regional musculoskeletal pain while others regard these as synonymous. A postulated theory of the pathophysiology of myofascial pain is discussed. This contrasts with a view that regional myofascial pain represents a non-specific localized pain arising from multiple regional, systemic and psychosocial factors. In order to consider myofascial pain as a distinct diagnosis, it would be necessary to resolve reliability issues in the identification of its critical diagnostic features. Beyond reliability issues, there are also problems of sensitivity and specificity--i.e. of the patient population that it identifies--which must be resolved if controlled trials are to be conducted. The clinical usefulness of the myofascial pain diagnosis is considered with regard to what is believed about the course of healing, the determinants of disability, the course of regional versus widespread musculoskeletal pain, the relationship of musculoskeletal injury to pain, and the evidence-based management of musculoskeletal pain. An epidemiological perspective is proposed with regard to regional musculoskeletal pain. This allows for the identification of operationally defined strata of regional musculoskeletal pain and permits studies in course, prognosis and

  14. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back Pain Find a Clinical Trial Journal Articles Back Pain PDF Version Size: 127 KB Audio Version Time: ... Size: 12.5 MB November 2014 What Is Back Pain? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of ...

  15. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... intolerable bursts of sharp pain similar to the pain caused by a dental probe on an exposed nerve. Individuals may have numbness in the areas affected by the pain. The burning and loss of touch sensations are ...

  16. Low Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... focuses on their pain as well as their perception of its severity. Pain that becomes chronic also ... that stimulating the nervous system can modify the perception of pain. Early studies of TENS suggested that ...

  17. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... illness, our very lives. Pain is a complex perception that differs enormously among individual patients, even those ... that the two peptides are involved in the perception of pain sensations, especially moderate-to-severe pain. ...

  18. Complex regional pain syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition that can affect any area of the ... Bailey A, Audette JF. Complex regional pain syndrome. In: Frontera ... of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  19. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter means you can buy them ... and tell your provider. If you are taking pain relievers for more than a week, tell your provider. ...

  20. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and end of life care. Nurs Clin North Am . 2010;45:271-327. Mercadente S. Challenging pain problems. In: ...

  1. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    Painkillers; Drugs for pain; Analgesics; Opioids ... Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are used only for pain that is severe and is not helped by other types of painkillers. When used ...

  2. 'Hip' pain.

    PubMed

    Zacher, Josef; Gursche, Angelika

    2003-02-01

    'Hip' pain is usually located in the groin, upper thigh or buttock and is a common complaint. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis, avascular femoral head necrosis and apophyseal avulsion are the most common diagnoses in childhood and adolescents. Strains and fractures are common in sport-active adults. Osteoarthritis occurs in middle-aged and older adults. Trauma may result in femoral head fracture or typical muscle and tendon sprains and bursitis. Septic or inflammatory arthritis can occur at every age. Septic arthritis, fractures and acute epiphyseal slipping are real emergency cases. Congenital dysplasia of the hip joint may lead to labral tears and early osteoarthritis. The most important hip problems in children, adolescents, adult and older people are discussed; these problems originate from intra-articular disorders and the surrounding extra-articular soft tissues. Medical history, clinical examination and additional tests, including imaging, will be demonstrated. Principles of treatment are given for specific disorders. PMID:12659822

  3. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  4. An Ethylene-Protected Achilles’ Heel of Etiolated Seedlings for Arthropod Deterrence

    PubMed Central

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A small family of Kunitz protease inhibitors exists in Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of which (encoded by At1g72290) accomplishes highly specific roles during plant development. Arabidopsis Kunitz-protease inhibitor 1 (Kunitz-PI;1), as we dubbed this protein here, is operative as cysteine PI. Activity measurements revealed that despite the presence of the conserved Kunitz-motif the bacterially expressed Kunitz-PI;1 was unable to inhibit serine proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, but very efficiently inhibited the cysteine protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21. Western blotting and cytolocalization studies using mono-specific antibodies recalled Kunitz-PI;1 protein expression in flowers, young siliques and etiolated seedlings. In dark-grown seedlings, maximum Kunitz-PI;1 promoter activity was detected in the apical hook region and apical parts of the hypocotyls. Immunolocalization confirmed Kunitz-PI;1 expression in these organs and tissues. No transmitting tract (NTT) and HECATE 1 (HEC1), two transcription factors previously implicated in the formation of the female reproductive tract in flowers of Arabidopsis, were identified to regulate Kunitz-PI;1 expression in the dark and during greening, with NTT acting negatively and HEC1 acting positively. Laboratory feeding experiments with isopod crustaceans such as Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) pinpointed the apical hook as ethylene-protected Achilles’ heel of etiolated seedlings. Because exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and mechanical stress (wounding) strongly up-regulated HEC1-dependent Kunitz-PI;1 gene expression, our results identify a new circuit controlling herbivore deterrence of etiolated plants in which Kunitz-PI;1 is involved. PMID:27625656

  5. On Heels and Toes: How Ants Climb with Adhesive Pads and Tarsal Friction Hair Arrays.

    PubMed

    Endlein, Thomas; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Ants are able to climb effortlessly on vertical and inverted smooth surfaces. When climbing, their feet touch the substrate not only with their pretarsal adhesive pads but also with dense arrays of fine hairs on the ventral side of the 3rd and 4th tarsal segments. To understand what role these different attachment structures play during locomotion, we analysed leg kinematics and recorded single-leg ground reaction forces in Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) climbing vertically on a smooth glass substrate. We found that the ants engaged different attachment structures depending on whether their feet were above or below their Centre of Mass (CoM). Legs above the CoM pulled and engaged the arolia ('toes'), whereas legs below the CoM pushed with the 3rd and 4th tarsomeres ('heels') in surface contact. Legs above the CoM carried a significantly larger proportion of the body weight than legs below the CoM. Force measurements on individual ant tarsi showed that friction increased with normal load as a result of the bending and increasing side contact of the tarsal hairs. On a rough sandpaper substrate, the tarsal hairs generated higher friction forces in the pushing than in the pulling direction, whereas the reverse effect was found on the smooth substrate. When the tarsal hairs were pushed, buckling was observed for forces exceeding the shear forces found in climbing ants. Adhesion forces were small but not negligible, and higher on the smooth substrate. Our results indicate that the dense tarsal hair arrays produce friction forces when pressed against the substrate, and help the ants to push outwards during horizontal and vertical walking. PMID:26559941

  6. An Ethylene-Protected Achilles' Heel of Etiolated Seedlings for Arthropod Deterrence.

    PubMed

    Boex-Fontvieille, Edouard; Rustgi, Sachin; von Wettstein, Diter; Pollmann, Stephan; Reinbothe, Steffen; Reinbothe, Christiane

    2016-01-01

    A small family of Kunitz protease inhibitors exists in Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of which (encoded by At1g72290) accomplishes highly specific roles during plant development. Arabidopsis Kunitz-protease inhibitor 1 (Kunitz-PI;1), as we dubbed this protein here, is operative as cysteine PI. Activity measurements revealed that despite the presence of the conserved Kunitz-motif the bacterially expressed Kunitz-PI;1 was unable to inhibit serine proteases such as trypsin and chymotrypsin, but very efficiently inhibited the cysteine protease RESPONSIVE TO DESICCATION 21. Western blotting and cytolocalization studies using mono-specific antibodies recalled Kunitz-PI;1 protein expression in flowers, young siliques and etiolated seedlings. In dark-grown seedlings, maximum Kunitz-PI;1 promoter activity was detected in the apical hook region and apical parts of the hypocotyls. Immunolocalization confirmed Kunitz-PI;1 expression in these organs and tissues. No transmitting tract (NTT) and HECATE 1 (HEC1), two transcription factors previously implicated in the formation of the female reproductive tract in flowers of Arabidopsis, were identified to regulate Kunitz-PI;1 expression in the dark and during greening, with NTT acting negatively and HEC1 acting positively. Laboratory feeding experiments with isopod crustaceans such as Porcellio scaber (woodlouse) and Armadillidium vulgare (pillbug) pinpointed the apical hook as ethylene-protected Achilles' heel of etiolated seedlings. Because exogenous application of the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and mechanical stress (wounding) strongly up-regulated HEC1-dependent Kunitz-PI;1 gene expression, our results identify a new circuit controlling herbivore deterrence of etiolated plants in which Kunitz-PI;1 is involved. PMID:27625656

  7. Orofacial pain: a primer.

    PubMed

    De Rossi, Scott S

    2013-07-01

    Orofacial pain refers to pain associated with the soft and hard tissues of the head, face, and neck. It is a common experience in the population that has profound sociologic effects and impact on quality of life. New scientific evidence is constantly providing insight into the cause and pathophysiology of orofacial pain including temporomandibular disorders, cranial neuralgias, persistent idiopathic facial pains, headache, and dental pain. An evidence-based approach to the management of orofacial pain is imperative for the general clinician. This article reviews the basics of pain epidemiology and neurophysiology and sets the stage for in-depth discussions of various painful conditions of the head and neck. PMID:23809298

  8. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Goff, James D; Crawford, Robert

    2011-09-15

    Plantar fasciitis, a self-limiting condition, is a common cause of heel pain in adults. It affects more than 1 million persons per year, and two-thirds of patients with plantar fasciitis will seek care from their family physician. Plantar fasciitis affects sedentary and athletic populations. Obesity, excessive foot pronation, excessive running, and prolonged standing are risk factors for developing plantar fasciitis. Diagnosis is primarily based on history and physical examination. Patients may present with heel pain with their first steps in the morning or after prolonged sitting, and sharp pain with palpation of the medial plantar calcaneal region. Discomfort in the proximal plantar fascia can be elicited by passive ankle/first toe dorsiflexion. Diagnostic imaging is rarely needed for the initial diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Use of ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging is reserved for recalcitrant cases or to rule out other heel pathology; findings of increased plantar fascia thickness and abnormal tissue signal the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis. Conservative treatments help with the disabling pain. Initially, patient-directed treatments consisting of rest, activity modification, ice massage, oral analgesics, and stretching techniques can be tried for several weeks. If heel pain persists, then physician-prescribed treatments such as physical therapy modalities, foot orthotics, night splinting, and corticosteroid injections should be considered. Ninety percent of patients will improve with these conservative techniques. Patients with chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis lasting six months or longer can consider extracorporeal shock wave therapy or plantar fasciotomy. PMID:21916393

  10. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Back pain often goes away on its own over several weeks. In some people, back pain persists. It may not go away completely or ... at times. Medicines can also help with your back pain. OVER-THE-COUNTER PAIN RELIEVERS Over-the-counter ...

  11. Thai perspectives on pain.

    PubMed

    Mongkhonthawornchai, Siriporn; Sangchart, Bumpenchit; Sornboon, Ariya; Chantarasiri, Jongkolnee

    2013-09-01

    This qualitative research aimed to study the meaning, the characteristics, and the dimensions of pain from a Thai point of view. It was conducted under the research project on the development of the quality of pain management for people in the hospital. The subjects were 62 patients, experiencing pain and receiving treatment in 4 hospitals in northeast Thailand. Data were analyzed through content analysis. The findings included: 1) concept from experience of pain, perceived pain as suffering physically and psychologically, 2) different characteristics between acute and chronic pain, 3) four levels of pain intensity: mild, moderate, high and severe, 4) pain effects on four dimensions: physical, psychological, behavioral and societal (family-social-economy), 5) two factors related to pain: alleviating factor and predisposing factor, and 6) pain management relies on beliefs, culture and religion i.e. good deeds in Buddhism affected six dimensions: physical, psychological, social, spiritual, treatment seeking and asking health personnel for help. The results of the present study revealed the influence of culture beliefs on the meaning of pain, pain characteristics, and the effects of pain as well as pain management in terms of cultural contexts. The findings may be implemented for the development of pain assessment and the model development of pain management more appropriately according to cultural contexts. PMID:24386747

  12. Painful Traumatic Trigeminal Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rafael, Benoliel; Sorin, Teich; Eli, Eliav

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses neuropathic pain of traumatic origin affecting the trigeminal nerve. This syndrome has been termed painful traumatic trigeminal neuropathy by the International Headache Society and replaces atypical odontalgia, deafferentation pain, traumatic neuropathy, and phantom toothache. The discussion emphasizes the diagnosis and the early and late management of injuries to the trigeminal nerve and subsequent painful conditions. PMID:27475512

  13. Pain, emotion, headache.

    PubMed

    Bussone, Gennaro; Grazzi, Licia; Panerai, Alberto E

    2012-10-01

    Pain has been considered as part of a defensive strategy whose specific role is to signal an immediate active danger to the organism. This definition fits well for acute pain. It does not work well, however, for chronic pain that is maintained even in absence of an ongoing, active threat. Currently, acute and chronic pain are considered to be separate conditions. What follows is a review of the different theories about pain and its history. Different hypotheses regarding pain mechanisms are illustrated. New data emerging from scientific research on chronic pain (migraine in particular) involving innovative imaging techniques are reported and discussed. PMID:23030540

  14. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  15. Pain assessment and management.

    PubMed

    Leith, B A

    1999-09-01

    Little research is currently available related to pain management by neuroscience nurses. However, due to concerns about the potential for altering neurological status, some neurosurgery patients may not receive optimal pain management. This paper describes findings from a pain related survey which was distributed during the Canadian Association of Neuroscience Nurses June 1998 national conference. The survey was intended to assess Canadian neuroscience nurses pain management knowledge and to explore pain management techniques after intracranial surgery. While 60% of respondents answered four pain assessment and management case study related questions correctly, some respondents rated pain differently when it was expressed by a smiling or grimacing patient. The most common methods for pain control after intracranial surgery included intermittent codeine and/or morphine, often by intramuscular injection. Findings from this study suggest that some neuroscience nurses require further education about pain management and that many patients do not receive optimal pain management after intracranial surgery. PMID:10732518

  16. SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEEL SAMPLES FROM TANK 241-C-110

    SciTech Connect

    PAGE JS; COOKE GA; PESTOVICH JA; HUBER HJ

    2011-12-01

    During sluicing operations of tank 241-C-110, a significant amount of solids were unable to be retrieved. These solids (often referred to as the tank 'heel') were sampled in 2010 and chemically and mineralogically analyzed in the 222-S Laboratory. Additionally, dissolution tests were performed to identify the amount of undissolvable material after using multiple water contacts. This report covers the solid phase characterization of six samples from these tests using scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The chemical analyses, particle size distribution analysis, and dissolution test results are reported separately. Two of the samples were from composites created from as-received material - Composite A and Composite B. The main phase in these samples was sodium-fluoride-phosphate hydrate (natrophosphate) - in the X-ray diffraction spectra, this phase was the only phase identifiable. Polarized light microscopy showed the presence of minor amounts of gibbsite and other phases. These phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as sodium aluminosilicates, sodium diuranate, and sodium strontium phosphate hydrate (nastrophite) crystals. The natrophosphate crystals in the scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a variety of erosive and dissolution features from perfectly shaped octahedral to well-rounded appearance. Two samples were from water-washed Composites A and B, with no change in mineralogy compared to the as-received samples. This is not surprising, since the water wash had only a short period of water contact with the material as opposed to the water dissolution tests. The last two samples were residual solids from the water dissolution tests. These tests included multiple additions of water at 15 C and 45 C. The samples were sieved to separate a coarser fraction of > 710 {mu}m and a finer fraction of < 710 {mu}m. These two fractions were analyzed separately. The

  17. Preliminary study report: topological texture features extracted from standard radiographs of the heel bone are correlated with femoral bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    With the growing number of eldery patients in industrialized nations the incidence of geriatric, i.e. osteoporotic fractures is steadily on the rise. It is of great importance to understand the characteristics of hip fractures and to provide diagnostic tests for the assessment of an individual's fracture-risk that allow to take preventive action and give therapeutic advice. At present, bone-mineral-density (BMD) obtained from DXA (dual-energy x-ray-absorptiometry) is the clinical standard of reference for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. Since availability of DXA - other than that of clinical X-ray imaging - is usually restricted to specialized medical centers it is worth trying to implement alternative methods to estimate an individual's BMD. Radiographs of the peripheral skeleton, e.g. the ankle, range among the most ordered diagnostic procedures in surgery for exclusion or confirmation of fracture. It would be highly beneficial if - as a by-product of conventional imaging - one could obtain a quantitative parameter that is closely correlated with femoral BMD in addition to the original diagnostic information, e.g. fracture status at the peripheral site. Previous studies could demonstrate a correlation between calcaneal BMD and osteoporosis. The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that topological analysis of calcaneal bone texture depicted by a lateral x-ray projection of the ankle allows to estimate femoral BMD. Our analysis on 34 post-menopausal patients indicate that texture properties based on graylevel topology in calcaneal x-ray-films are closely correlated with BMD at the hip and may qualify as a substitute indicator of femoral fracture risk.

  18. Three-dimensional morphology and strain of the human Achilles free tendon immediately following eccentric heel drop exercise.

    PubMed

    Obst, Steven J; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the immediate effects of exercise on Achilles free tendon transverse morphology is limited to single site measurements acquired at rest using 2D ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed 3D description of changes in Achilles free tendon morphology immediately following a single clinical bout of exercise. Freehand 3D ultrasound was used to measure Achilles free tendon length, and regional cross-sectional area (CSA), medio-lateral (ML) diameter and antero-posterior (AP) diameter in healthy young adults (N=14) at rest and during isometric muscle contraction, immediately before and after 3×15 eccentric heel drops. Post-exercise reductions in transverse strain were limited to CSA and AP diameter in the mid-proximal region of the Achilles free tendon during muscle contraction. The change in CSA strain during muscle contraction was significantly correlated to the change in longitudinal strain (r=-0.72) and the change in AP diameter strain (r=0.64). Overall findings suggest the Achilles free tendon experiences a complex change in 3D morphology following eccentric heel drop exercise that manifests under contractile but not rest conditions, is most pronounced in the mid-proximal tendon and is primarily driven by changes in AP diameter strain and not ML diameter strain. PMID:26519510

  19. Effect of footwear on minimum foot clearance, heel slippage and spatiotemporal measures of gait in older women.

    PubMed

    Davis, Annette M; Galna, Brook; Murphy, Anna T; Williams, Cylie M; Haines, Terry P

    2016-02-01

    Footwear has been implicated as a factor in falls, which is a major issue affecting the health of older adults. This study investigated the effect of footwear with dorsal fixation, slippers and bare feet on minimum foot clearance, heel slippage and spatiotemporal variables of gait in community dwelling older women. Thirty women participated (mean age (SD) 69.1 (5.1) years) in a gait assessment using the GaitRITE and Vicon 612 motion analysis system. Conditions included footwear with dorsal fixation, slippers or bare feet. Footwear with dorsal fixation resulted in improved minimum foot clearance compared to the slippers and bare feet conditions and less heel slippage than slippers and an increase in double support. These features lend weight to the argument that older women should be supported to make footwear choices with optimal fitting features including dorsal fixation. Recommendations of particular styles and features of footwear may assist during falls prevention education to reduce the incidence of foot trips and falls. PMID:27004631

  20. Life-course predictors of ultrasonic heel measurement in a cross-sectional study of immigrant women from Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Lauderdale, D S; Salant, T; Han, K L; Tran, P L

    2001-03-15

    Few studies address chronic disease risk for Southeast Asians in the United States. In 1999, the authors conducted a cross-sectional study of bone mineral density (BMD) estimated from ultrasonic calcaneal measurements in women born in Southeast Asia who then lived in Chicago, Illinois. The study addressed three questions: Do Southeast-Asian women have relatively low BMD? What factors before and after immigration are associated with BMD? Are factors that reflect the childhood/adolescent environment equally associated with BMD for postmenopausal and premenopausal women? An interviewer-administered bilingual questionnaire collected immigration, reproductive, and lifestyle data from 213 women (aged 20--80 years) born in Vietnam, Cambodia, or Laos. The authors found that the estimated mean BMD of postmenopausal Southeast-Asian women was lower than the reference values for White women. Four summary indicators of childhood/adolescent environment were predictive of higher BMD: more years of education, earlier age at menarche, lower height, and coastal birth; these indicators were more strongly associated with BMD for premenopausal (multiple-partial R(2) = 0.21) than postmenopausal (R(2) = 0.06) women. Young-adult exposures (e.g., early first pregnancy and age at immigration) and proximal lifestyle factors (e.g., smoking, physical inactivity, vegetarian diet, and betel nut use) were also assessed as potential predictors of BMD. PMID:11257066

  1. History of pain theories.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun

    2011-10-01

    The concept of pain has remained a topic of long debate since its emergence in ancient times. The initial ideas of pain were formulated in both the East and the West before 1800. Since 1800, due to the development of experimental sciences, different theories of pain have emerged and become central topics of debate. However, the existing theories of pain may be appropriate for the interpretation of some aspects of pain, but are not yet comprehensive. The history of pain problems is as long as that of human beings; however, the understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from sufficient. Thus, intensive research is required. This historical review mainly focuses on the development of pain theories and the fundamental discoveries in this field. Other historical events associated with pain therapies and remedies are beyond the scope of this review. PMID:21934730

  2. The problem of pain.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Keith; Martelli, Michael F

    2004-01-01

    Pain problems, especially posttraumatic headache, are very common following head trauma. Pain may be the most significant problem, more disabling than any brain or other injuries, and interfering with aspects of cognition or other function. However, posttraumatic headache and most other chronic posttraumatic pain problems remain poorly understood. This article reviews fundamental issues that should be considered in understanding the nature of chronic pain including the distinction between acute and chronic pain; neurobiological distinctions between the lateral and medial pain system; nociceptive versus neuropathic or other central pain; sensitization effects; the widely accepted view of chronic pain as a multidimensional subjective experience involving sensory, motivational-affective and cognitive-behavioral components; the problem of mind-body dualism; the role of psychosocial factors in the onset, maintenance, exacerbation or severity of pain; plus issues of response bias and malingering. PMID:14732827

  3. Pain and the ethics of pain management.

    PubMed

    Edwards, R B

    1984-01-01

    In this article I clarify the concepts of 'pain', 'suffering', 'pains of body', 'pains of soul'. I explore the relevance of an ethic to the clinical setting which gives patients a strong prima facie right to freedom from unnecessary and unwanted pain and which places upon medical professionals two concomitant moral obligations to patients. First, there is the duty not to inflict pain and suffering beyond what is necessary for effective diagnosis, treatment and research. Next, there is the duty to do all that can be done to relieve all the pain and suffering which can be alleviated. I develop in some detail that individuality of pain sensitivity must be taken into account in fulfilling these obligations. I explore the issue of the relevance of informed consent and the right to refuse treatment to the matter of pain relief. And I raise the question of what conditions, if any, should override the right to refuse treatment where pain relief is of paramount concern. PMID:6710192

  4. [Muscle-skeletal pain].

    PubMed

    Vygonskaya, M V; Filatova, E G

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the most complicated aspects of low back pain. The differences between specific and nonspecific low back pain using the "red flags" system is highlighted. The authors consider the causes of pain chronification (the "yellow flags" system) and the necessity of using a biopsychosocial model. Main pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic muscle/skeletal pain are considered and the possible involvement of several mechanism in the pathogenesis of chronic pain as well as the use of complex therapy is discussed. The high efficacy and safety of ketorolac in treatment of nonspecific muscle/skeletal pain is demonstrated. PMID:27042717

  5. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  6. Automatic Detection of Calcaneal-Fifth Metatarsal Angle Using Radiograph: A Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Flat Foot for Military New Recruits in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chin-Hua; Chou, Kuei-Ting; Chung, Mu-Bai; Chuang, K. S.; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Flatfoot (pes planus) is one of the most important physical examination items for military new recruits in Taiwan. Currently, the diagnosis of flatfoot is mainly based on radiographic examination of the calcaneal-fifth metatarsal (CA–MT5) angle, also known as the arch angle. However, manual measurement of the arch angle is time-consuming and often inconsistent between different examiners. In this study, seventy male military new recruits were studied. Lateral radiographic images of their right and left feet were obtained, and mutual information (MI) registration was used to automatically calculate the arch angle. Images of two critical bones, the calcaneus and the fifth metatarsal bone, were isolated from the lateral radiographs to form reference images, and were then compared with template images to calculate the arch angle. The result of this computer-calculated arch angle was compared with manual measurement results from two radiologists, which showed that our automatic arch angle measurement method had a high consistency. In addition, this method had a high accuracy of 97% and 96% as compared with the measurements of radiologists A and B, respectively. The findings indicated that our MI registration measurement method cannot only accurately measure the CA–MT5 angle, but also saves time and reduces human error. This method can increase the consistency of arch angle measurement and has potential clinical application for the diagnosis of flatfoot. PMID:26126115

  7. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  8. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  9. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  10. Complaining about chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, R

    1999-12-01

    This paper examines how a group of working class people describes and experiences chronic pain. This hermeneutical-phenomenological study concentrates on the lived body of pain from three perspectives, drawing on interviews with 14 people who were attending a pain management program. First I consider the terms in which pain is circumscribed in the narratives, stories told in the context of learning to manage pain. These terms are polarities, ways of specifying and legitimating pain in relation to "mind" and "body." Pain, in the discursive polarities that define it, is the private property of an individual, who must in some fashion prove that pain exists in an objective manner. The speaker, in this discourse, stands as the one responsible for the production of pain. In the second part, the analysis turns to what this discourse reveals about pain as a lived body phenomenon. Here the analysis centers upon the torment of having to inhabit the intolerable, upon how pain unmakes the lifeworld of the sufferer, and how, simultaneously, people make pain. The place of pain is the body, as body-in-place. The place of pain is at the boundaries of human dwelling, a kind of non-place, expressed metaphorically as "prison" or "homelessness." Finally, after these considerations of how pain is described, in part three, I turn to the act of "saying" pain, that is, to the narratives as addressed to someone else. The participants were not simply dispensing information; they were saying something to me. The narratives had the form of complaints. The form of the narratives, in the context of the pain program, was a quasi-legal call to rectify wrongs. PMID:10574237

  11. [Pain from AIDS (adult)].

    PubMed

    Bouhassira, D

    1997-10-01

    Pain, a major handicapping factor for HIV patients, has been underestimated and insufficiently treated. The pain may have various origins, including the virus itself, antiviral or anticancer treatments, secondary infections or their treatments, or unrelated intercurrent infection. Just as in the general population, three types of pain may be distinguished: nociceptive, neuropathic, and idiopathic. The lesions capable of producing nociceptive pain are numerous in HIV patients. The most common etiologies are oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal, and rheumatic. Neurological complications are among the most frequently encountered in the course of HIV infection, and some may cause typical neuropathic pain. Such pain may be secondary to a central lesion, as in cerebral toxoplasmosis, but usually is related to a peripheral effect. The principal etiologies of peripheral neuropathic pain are HIV neuropathies, postherpetic neuralgia, toxic neuropathies secondary to antiviral treatment, and diabetic neuropathies. Pain management should be part of the treatment of HIV complications. In the absence of a validated protocol for treatment of HIV-related pain, the guidelines for cancer pain management developed by the World Health Organization can be used as a starting point for nociceptive pain. Dosage and administration should be individually adjusted. Treatment of neuropathic pain is based primarily on tricyclic antidepressants and anticonvulsants. Nonpharmaceutical interventions such as transcutaneous electric stimulation, hypnosis, and acupuncture may also be useful. Evaluation and management of psychological factors should be an integral part of treatment, as in all patients with chronic pain. PMID:12348806

  12. Back pain and sports

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000519.htm Back pain and sports To use the sharing features on ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Back Injuries Back Pain Sports Injuries Sports Safety Browse the Encyclopedia A. ...

  13. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... of pain, and may be best treated with physical therapy without taking any medicine at all. Pain can ... medicine and non-medicine strategies. Treatments such as physical therapy, massage, heat and/or cold packs, exercise, and ...

  14. Painful periods (dysmenorrhea) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be caused by abnormal conditions such as endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. Unless one of these potentially serious conditions is present, the treatment for painful periods is pain relief. If a ...

  15. Rib cage pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply) Home ...

  16. Pain in Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... for increased overall health care costs. A person’s perception of pain can be affected by emotional factors. ... medications such as levodopa can affect a person’s perception of pain. People with Parkinson’s who are in ...

  17. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info Recent News Congratulations to 2016 Mitchell Max Awardee, Dr. Ditre Asst. ...

  18. Lower Back Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Get plenty of rest and use an anti-inflammatory medicine to relieve pain. If your pain is ... or a HERNIATED DISK. Apply heat, use an anti-inflammatory medicine and get rest. If you don't ...

  19. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007489.htm Pain medications - narcotics To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Narcotics are also called opioid pain relievers. They are ...

  20. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  1. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    ... is good to prepare yourself for natural childbirth. Natural Childbirth The pain felt during childbirth is different for every woman. Some women choose natural childbirth, or giving birth without medicine for pain. ...

  2. Phytotherapy for pain relief.

    PubMed

    Zareba, Grazyna

    2009-06-01

    Pain is considered the third most common healthcare problem disabling more individuals than heart disease and cancer together. Although pharmacological pain management offers a significant relief in several pain-related diseases, many patients turn to its supplementation with complementary and alternative medicine. Botanicals used in pain therapy can contribute to restoring the quality of life to a patient and may effect and enhance conventional pain management. Herbal analgesic use in several pain-related diseases such as rheumatologic diseases, back pain, cancer, diabetic peripheral neuropathy and migraine will be discussed. In addition, this review describes botanicals with known analgesic activity for which randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials assessing their efficacy in different pain-related diseases have been published and which have been recently evaluated in many systematic reviews with well-described methodology. PMID:19649334

  3. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients’ quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  4. Low back pain - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... as ice, mild painkillers, physical therapy, and proper exercises. Most of the time, back pain will get ... prevent getting back pain again. Stretching and strengthening exercises are important. But, starting these exercises too soon ...

  5. Neuropathic pain in cancer.

    PubMed

    Urch, C E; Dickenson, A H

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic pain in cancer arises following injury to peripheral or central neurons, in a similar manner to such pain arising from a non-cancer injury. Much of our knowledge of neuropathic pain is based on peripheral originating events with little known about central neuropathic pain. This article explores some of the similarities and differences between cancer and non-cancer-related neuropathic pain. The neural pathways, ion channels, receptors and neurotransmitters that potentially can be altered in both neuropathies are the same; however the nature of the injury, the timing, repeated injuries and the co-existence of simultaneous non-neuropathic pain states lead to potential unique constellations of neuroreceptor and neurotransmitter expression in the context of cancer pain. This in turn may lead to different clinical presentation of pain sensations and potentially lead to specific treatment options. PMID:18492553

  6. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... block. This is an injection of an anesthetic (pain reliever) into certain nerves to block the pain signals. If the injection works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a ...

  7. Employees with Chronic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... related, condition. Chronic Pain and the Americans with Disabilities Act Is chronic pain a disability under the ADA? The ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. Instead, the ADA has a general definition of ...

  8. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Altındas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  9. A pedestrian dead-reckoning system that considers the heel-strike and toe-off phases when using a foot-mounted IMU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Hojin; Lee, Min Su; Park, So Young; Song, Jin Woo; Park, Chan Gook

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an advanced pedestrian dead-reckoning (PDR) algorithm that considers the heel-strike and toe-off phases. Generally, PDR systems that use a foot-mounted inertial measurement unit are based on an inertial navigation system with an extended Kalman filter (EKF). To reduce the influence of the bias and white noises in the gyroscope and accelerometer signals, a zero-velocity update is often adopted at the stance phase. However, transient and large acceleration, which cannot be measured by the accelerometer used in pedestrian navigation, occur momentarily in the heel-strike phase. The velocity information from integration of the acceleration is not reliable because the acceleration is not measured in the heel-strike phase. Therefore, the designed EKF does not correctly reflect the actual environment, because conventional algorithms do not take the non-measurable acceleration into consideration. In order to reflect the actual environment, we propose a PDR system that considers the non-measurable acceleration from the heel-strike impact. To improve the PDR system’s performance, the proposed algorithm uses a new velocity measurement obtained using the constraint between the surface and the foot during the toe-off phase. The experimental results show improved filter performance after comparison of the proposed algorithm and a conventional algorithm.

  10. Posttonsillectomy pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sutters, Kimberly A; Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-02-01

    Tonsillectomy, used to treat a variety of pediatric disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, peritonsillar cellulitis or abscesses, and very frequent throat infection, is known to produce nausea, vomiting, and prolonged, moderate-to-severe pain. The authors review the causes of posttonsillectomy pain, current findings on the efficacy of various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in pain management, recommendations for patient and family teaching regarding pain management, and best practices for improving medication adherence. PMID:24445532

  11. Computer Modeling Studies to Assess Whether a Prophylactic Dressing Reduces the Risk for Deep Tissue Injury in the Heels of Supine Patients with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Levy, Ayelet; Gefen, Amit

    2016-04-01

    Heels are susceptible to pressure ulcer (PU) development. Some evidence suggests dressings may provide mechanical cushioning, reduce friction with support, and lower localized internal tissue loading, which together may minimize the risk for heel ulcers (HUs). To examine the effect of dressing application on pressure ulcer prevention, 20 computer simulations were performed. Volumetric exposure of soft tissues to effective and shear strains and stresses, with and without a multilayered foam dressing, were assessed, with the extent of tissue exposure considered as measures of the theoretical risk for PUs. The simulations, conducted using the finite element method, provided the mechanical strain and stress magnitudes and distributions in the weight-bearing tissues of the heel, which were visualized and analyzed post-hoc for comparing diabetic to healthy tissue loads with/without prophylactic dressings and at different foot (plantar flexion) postures. The volumetric exposure of the soft tissues of the heel to elevated strains and stresses was considerably reduced by the presence of the dressing, whether diabetic or nondiabetic tissue conditions existed, and for the entire range of the simulated plantar flexion positions. Further, greater plantar flexion, which occurs with elevation of the head of the bed, reduced the volumetric exposure of subcutaneous fat to increased effective strains and stresses, again, particularly when the dressing was on. Specifically, peak (maximum of raw data) effective strains in the soft tissues of the heel decreased by 14.8% and 13.5% with the use of the dressing for healthy persons and persons with diabetes, respectively. Additionally, volumetric exposures of the soft tissues to large effective strains, defined as exposures to >50% strain, decreased substantially, by at least a factor of 2, with the angle of plantar flexion and with respect to a neutral foot posture. Volumetric exposures to midrange (less than 50%) strains were more mildly

  12. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  13. Pain assessment: the cornerstone to optimal pain management

    PubMed Central

    2000-01-01

    Pain assessment is critical to optimal pain management interventions. While pain is a highly subjective experience, its management necessitates objective standards of care. The WILDA approach to pain assessment—focusing on words to describe pain, intensity, location, duration, and aggravating or alleviating factors—offers a concise template for assessment in patients with acute and chronic pain. PMID:16389388

  14. Back Pain Facts and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain and Depression Preventing Travel Aches and Strains Back Pain Facts and Statistics Although doctors of chiropractic (DCs) ... time. 1 A few interesting facts about back pain: Low back pain is the single leading cause of disability ...

  15. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is a perception that signals the individual that tissue damage has ... in the body that are involved in the perception of pain are called "nociception." Basic and clinical ...

  16. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lumbar pain - chronic - narcotics; Pain - back - chronic - narcotics; Chronic back pain - low - narcotics ... Opioids compared to placebo or other treatments for chronic low-back pain: an update of the Cochrane Review. Spine . 2014;( ...

  17. Chest pain in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Robson, W. L.; Cho, H.

    1996-01-01

    Chest pain is usually a benign symptom in children. The most common identifiable causes are musculoskeletal. Often, no cause can be identified. Cardiac disorders are uncommon causes of chest pain children. Most causes can be diagnosed from history and physical examination. Treatment should be directed at the underlying cause. For idiopathic chest pain, reassurance and regular follow-up examinations are important. PMID:8704491

  18. Growing Pains (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Joints affected by more serious diseases are swollen, red, tender, or warm — the joints of kids having growing pains look normal. Although growing pains often strike in late afternoon or early evening before bed, pain can sometimes wake a sleeping child. The ...

  19. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  20. [Chronic pain and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Berker, Ender; Dinçer, Nilay

    2005-04-01

    The perception and interpretation of pain is the end point of an interaction of cognitive, cultural, and environmental factors and this complex interaction effects the pain response and quality of life of each person which shows that pain perception and the verbal and behavioral response shows variations and is specific for each patient. Chronic pain can be due to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS) and Neuropathic Pain (NP) where the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms are being revealed or it can be chronic low back pain (CLBP) where pain persists in spite of healing of tissue and no underlying pathologic mechanism can be defected. Central sensitization, inhibition of descending pain inhibitory systems, functional changes in autonomic nervous system amd neurotransmitter as well as changes in stress response system are factors contributing to the initiation and maintenance of pain and cognitive, behavioral factors are also important contributors in chronic pain. Biopsychosocial and biomedical mechanisms should be assessed in the rehabilitation interventions. The aims of rehabilitation in chronic pain are to increase activity tolerance, functional capacity and to decrease socio-economic loads. The targets of activity should be physical, functional and social. Psychologic based programs as cognitive-behavioral techniques and operant conditioning are also valid procedures in rehabilitation of chronic pain patients. Rehabilitation should be multidisciplinary and of long-term targeted to valid out-come for success. PMID:15977088

  1. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the

  2. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12–24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  3. Effects of therapeutic massage on gait and pain after delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Han, Jun-Ho; Kim, Min-Jeong; Yang, Hyuk-Jin; Lee, Yu-Jin; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2014-04-01

    Unfamiliar or sudden exercise can induce delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) within 12-24 h. So, several researchers have reported various interventions to treat DOMS. Massage is generally known to eliminate muscle fatigue. However, effect of massage after DOMS is still not clear. We investigated whether the massage is effective on pain and gait after DOMS. The participants were divided into a control group (n= 10) with DOMS and an experimental group (n= 11) with the massage treated after DOMS. We induced DOMS by taking isotonic exercise with going up and down 20 times in 5-story building. We applied the massage and assessment on gastrocnemius of dominant foot. The change of gait and pain was assessed using gaitrite and algometer. In the present results, the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS showed significant difference in pain (P< 0.05). Also, there was a significant difference in gait (P< 0.05), especially, spatial parameters (distance, step length, stride length) and temporal parameters (ambulation, heel on off time, stride velocity). Moreover, the pain relief after massage-treated in DOMS correlated with gait. These results suggest that the massage on gastrocnemius after DOMS has influence on pain and gait performance. Therefore, massage can be applied as intervention for delayed onset muscle soreness. PMID:24877051

  4. The influence of the heel effect in cone-beam computed tomography: artifacts in standard and novel geometries and their correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, H.; Kyriakou, Y.; Kachelrieß, M.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-10-01

    For decades, the heel effect has been known to cause an angular dependence of the emitted spectrum of an x-ray tube. In radiography, artifacts were observed and attributed to the heel effect. However, no problems due to the heel effect were discerned in multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) so far. With flat-detector CT (FDCT), involving larger cone angles and different system geometries, the heel effect might cause new artifacts. These artifacts were analyzed in this paper for system geometries different from the ones widely used nowadays. Simulations and measurements were performed. Simulations included symmetric as well as asymmetric detector layouts and different x-ray tube orientations with respect to the detector plane. The measurements were performed on a micro-CT system in an asymmetric detector layout. Furthermore, an analytical correction scheme is proposed to overcome heel effect artifacts. It was shown that the type of artifact greatly depends on the orientation of the x-ray tube and also on the type of detector alignment (i.e. symmetric or different types of asymmetric alignment). Certain combinations exhibited almost no significant artifact while others greatly influenced the quality of the reconstructed images. The proposed correction scheme showed good results that were further improved when also applying a scatter correction. When designing CT systems, care should be taken when placing the tube and the detector. Orientation of the x-ray tube like in most MSCT systems seems advisable in asymmetric detector layouts. However, a different type of tube orientation can be overcome with suitable correction schemes.

  5. Managing phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Singh, Vijay

    2004-07-01

    Since the first medical description of post-amputation phenomena reported by Ambrose Paré, persistent phantom pain syndromes have been well recognized. However, they continue to be difficult to manage. The three most commonly utilized terms include phantom sensation, phantom pain, and stump pain. Phantom limb sensation is an almost universal occurrence at some time during the first month following surgery. However, most phantom sensations generally resolve after two to three years without treatment, except in the cases where phantom pain develops. The incidence of phantom limb pain has been reported to vary from 0% to 88%. The incidence of phantom limb pain increases with more proximal amputations. Even though phantom pain may diminish with time and eventually fade away, it has been shown that even two years after amputation, the incidence is almost the same as at onset. Consequently, almost 60% of patients continue to have phantom limb pain after one year. In addition, phantom limb pain may also be associated with multiple pain problems in other areas of the body. The third symptom, stump pain, is located in the stump itself. The etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms of phantom pain are not clearly defined. However, both peripheral and central neural mechanisms have been described, along with superimposed psychological mechanisms. Literature describing the management of phantom limb pain or stump pain is in its infancy. While numerous treatments have been described, there is little clinical evidence supporting drug therapy, psychological therapy, interventional techniques or surgery. This review will describe epidemiology, etiology and pathophysiological mechanisms, risk factors, and treatment modalities. The review also examines the effectiveness of various described modalities for prevention, as well as management of established phantom pain syndromes. PMID:16858476

  6. Low-pressure, single-point grout injection for tank heel sludge mixing and in-situ immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes tests conducted in an approximately 9-ft diameter test tank situated outside the 336 building in Hanford`s 300 area. The tests were performed to measure the ability of jets of grout slurry to mobilize and mix simulated tank sludge. The technique is intended for in situ immobilization of tank waste heels. The current approach uses a single, rotated, larger-diameter nozzle driven at lower pressure. Due to the larger diameter, the potential for plugging is reduced and the effective radius around an injection point over which the jet is effective in mobilizing sludge from the tank bottom can be made larger. A total of three grout injection tests were conducted in a 9-ft diameter tank. In each case, a 2-in. layer of kaolin clay paste was placed on a dry tank floor to simulate a sludge heel. The clay was covered with 4 inches of water. The grout slurry, consisting of Portland cement, class F fly ash, and eater, was prepared and delivered by an offsite vendor. In the third test, the sludge in half of the tank was replaced by a layer of 20x50 mesh zeolite, and bentonite clay was added to the grout formulation. After injection, the grout was allowed to set and then the entire grout monolith was manually broken up and excavated using a jack hammer. Intact pieces of clay were visually apparent due to a sharp color contrast between the grout and clay. Remaining clay deposits were collected and weighed and suspended clay pieces within the monolith were photographed. The mobilization performance of the grout jets exceeded expectations.

  7. Ethnic differences in pain and pain management

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Considerable evidence demonstrates substantial ethnic disparities in the prevalence, treatment, progression and outcomes of pain-related conditions. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying these group differences is of crucial importance in reducing and eliminating disparities in the pain experience. Over recent years, accumulating evidence has identified a variety of processes, from neurophysiological factors to structural elements of the healthcare system, that may contribute to shaping individual differences in pain. For example, the experience of pain differentially activates stress-related physiological responses across various ethnic groups, members of different ethnic groups appear to use differing coping strategies in managing pain complaints, providers’ treatment decisions vary as a function of patient ethnicity and pharmacies in predominantly minority neighborhoods are far less likely to stock potent analgesics. These diverse factors, and others may all play a role in facilitating elevated levels of pain-related suffering among individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds. Here, we present a brief, nonexhaustive review of the recent literature and potential physiological and sociocultural mechanisms underlying these ethnic group disparities in pain outcomes. PMID:23687518

  8. Neuropathic orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Benoliel, Rafael; Eliav, Eli

    2008-05-01

    Neuropathic orofacial pain is a general term employed to describe a number of clinical syndromes, which may be spontaneous or triggered by local trauma or systemic disorders. Symptomatically these painful syndromes may be episodic or continuous and are often difficult to distinguish from dental pathology. In the present article, we review the diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutic approaches to trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgias, orofacial pain associated with herpetic infection, persistent idiopathic facial pain (previously termed atypical facial pain), post-traumatic orofacial neuropathy and neuritis. PMID:18343328

  9. [Neurorehabilitation for Neuropathic Pain].

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Jun; Osumi, Michihiro; Ogata, Toru; Sumitani, Masahiko

    2015-07-01

    Deafferentation, like as in limb amputation, brachial plexus avulsion injury and spinal cord injury, is usually followed by neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain is a debilitating condition and it impairs the quality of life profoundly. Based on recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience, we explain intimate relationships among neuropathic pain, reorganization of primary sensory and motor cortices and the sensorimotor integration of the deafferentated limb. From the standpoint of the sensorimotor integration theory for emerging phantom limb pain, we further discuss the analgesic mechanism of neurorehabilitation techniques such as mirror visual feedback treatment and its related neurorobotics advancement for neuropathic pain. PMID:26422941

  10. Pain emotion and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Panerai, Alberto E

    2011-05-01

    Pain has always been considered as part of a defensive strategy, whose specific role is to signal an immediate, active danger. This definition partially fits acute pain, but certainly not chronic pain, that is maintained also in the absence of an active noxa or danger and that nowadays is considered a disease by itself. Moreover, acute pain is not only an automatic alerting system, but its severity and characteristics can change depending on the surrounding environment. The affective, emotional components of pain have been and are the object of extensive attention and research by psychologists, philosophers, physiologists and also pharmacologists. Pain itself can be considered to share the same genesis as emotions and as a specific emotion in contributing to the maintenance of the homeostasis of each unique subject. Interestingly, this role of pain reaches its maximal development in the human; some even argue that it is specific for the human primate. PMID:21533708

  11. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  12. [Latest pain management for painful bony metastases].

    PubMed

    Ikenaga, Masayuki

    2006-04-01

    Pain management for painful bony metastases is the most important problem for symptom relief of terminally-ill cancer patients. Pathological fractures often decrease the activity of daily life (ADL) of patients, and cause deterioration of the quality of life (QOL) and prognosis. Basically pharmacological therapies of the World Health Organization (WHO) method are essential for symptom relief from cancer pain. This article provides the latest pain managements (palliative irradiation, bisphosphonate, orthopedic surgery, percutaneous vertebroplasty and radiopharmaceutical therapy) of bony metastases, and mentions the indications and the problems of these interventions. In consideration to prognosis, the QOL and patient's needs, medical staffs have to perform multidisciplinary approach for providing suitable palliative care. PMID:16582515

  13. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... common complaints heard by the staff of the Amputee Coalition, and how to manage the pain is ... one of the frequent topics of conversation at amputee support group meetings and on amputee discussion list ...

  14. Effects of low-intensity non-coherent light therapy on the inflammatory process in the calcaneal tendon of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Helrigle, Carla; de Carvalho, Paulo deTarso Camilo; Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Fernandes, Guilherme Henrique Cardoso; Helrigel, Panmera Almeida; Rabelo, Rogério Leão; de Oliveira Aleixo-Junior, Ivo; Aimbire, Flavio; Albertini, Regiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on the inflammatory process in the calcaneal tendon of ovariectomized rats (OVX) through the involvement of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Thirty-five female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 3 groups of OVX rats totaling 30 rats (untreated OVX rats [OVX injury group], treated OVX rats [OVX LED group], and control OVX rats; subgroups existed based on the sampling times, which were 3, 7, and 14 days) and 1 group of non-OVX rats (not OVX; n = 5). Tendon injury was induced by trauma using a 208-g mass placed at 20 cm from the right tendon of each animal with energy of 0.70 J. The animals were treated 12 h after tendonitis with LED therapy and every 48 h thereafter until euthanasia (at 3, 7, or 14 days). The tendons were dissected and stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 °C, thawed only at the time of immunoenzymatic testing (ELISA). Groups treated with LED showed a decrease in the number of pro-inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-α (p <0.05), and an increase in IL-10 (p < 0.05) when compared to the not OVX group (p < 0.05). It was concluded that low-intensity LED treatment using the parameters and wavelength of 945 nm in the time periods studied reduced the release of IL-6 and TNF-α and increased the release of IL-10, thereby improving the inflammatory response in OVX rats. PMID:26507001

  15. The genetics of pain and pain inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, J S; Sternberg, W F; Marek, P; Sadowski, B; Belknap, J K; Liebeskind, J C

    1996-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the genetics of pain-related phenomena and illustrates the scope and power of genetic approaches to the study of pain. We focus on work performed in our laboratories in Jastrzebiec, Poland; Portland, OR; and Los Angeles, which we feel demonstrates the continuing usefulness of classical genetic approaches, especially when used in combination with newly available molecular genetic techniques. PMID:8610166

  16. 21. Phantom pain.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Andre; Vanduynhoven, Eric; van Kleef, Maarten; Huygen, Frank; Pope, Jason E; Mekhail, Nagy

    2011-01-01

    Phantom pain is pain caused by elimination or interruption of sensory nerve impulses by destroying or injuring the sensory nerve fibers after amputation or deafferentation. The reported incidence of phantom limb pain after trauma, injury or peripheral vascular diseases is 60% to 80%. Over half the patients with phantom pain have stump pain as well. Phantom pain can also occur in other parts of the body; it has been described after mastectomies and enucleation of the eye. Most patients with phantom pain have intermittent pain, with intervals that range from 1 day to several weeks. Even intervals of over a year have been reported. The pain often presents itself in the form of attacks that vary in duration from a few seconds to minutes or hours. In most cases, the pain is experienced distally in the missing limb, in places with the most extensive innervation density and cortical representation. Although there are still many questions as to the underlying mechanisms, peripheral as well as central neuronal mechanisms seem to be involved. Conservative therapy consists of drug treatment with amitriptyline, tramadol, carbamazepine, ketamine, or morphine. Based on the available evidence some effect may be expected from drug treatment. When conservative treatment fails, pulsed radiofrequency treatment of the stump neuroma or of the spinal ganglion (DRG) or spinal cord stimulation could be considered (evidence score 0). These treatments should only be applied in a study design. PMID:21447079

  17. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  18. Pain after earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction On 6 April 2009, at 03:32 local time, an Mw 6.3 earthquake hit the Abruzzi region of central Italy causing widespread damage in the City of L Aquila and its nearby villages. The earthquake caused 308 casualties and over 1,500 injuries, displaced more than 25,000 people and induced significant damage to more than 10,000 buildings in the L'Aquila region. Objectives This observational retrospective study evaluated the prevalence and drug treatment of pain in the five weeks following the L'Aquila earthquake (April 6, 2009). Methods 958 triage documents were analysed for patients pain severity, pain type, and treatment efficacy. Results A third of pain patients reported pain with a prevalence of 34.6%. More than half of pain patients reported severe pain (58.8%). Analgesic agents were limited to available drugs: anti-inflammatory agents, paracetamol, and weak opioids. Reduction in verbal numerical pain scores within the first 24 hours after treatment was achieved with the medications at hand. Pain prevalence and characterization exhibited a biphasic pattern with acute pain syndromes owing to trauma occurring in the first 15 days after the earthquake; traumatic pain then decreased and re-surged at around week five, owing to rebuilding efforts. In the second through fourth week, reports of pain occurred mainly owing to relapses of chronic conditions. Conclusions This study indicates that pain is prevalent during natural disasters, may exhibit a discernible pattern over the weeks following the event, and current drug treatments in this region may be adequate for emergency situations. PMID:22747796

  19. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  20. Neurological diseases and pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain is a frequent component of many neurological disorders, affecting 20–40% of patients for many primary neurological diseases. These diseases result from a wide range of pathophysiologies including traumatic injury to the central nervous system, neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation, and exploring the aetiology of pain in these disorders is an opportunity to achieve new insight into pain processing. Whether pain originates in the central or peripheral nervous system, it frequently becomes centralized through maladaptive responses within the central nervous system that can profoundly alter brain systems and thereby behaviour (e.g. depression). Chronic pain should thus be considered a brain disease in which alterations in neural networks affect multiple aspects of brain function, structure and chemistry. The study and treatment of this disease is greatly complicated by the lack of objective measures for either the symptoms or the underlying mechanisms of chronic pain. In pain associated with neurological disease, it is sometimes difficult to obtain even a subjective evaluation of pain, as is the case for patients in a vegetative state or end-stage Alzheimer's disease. It is critical that neurologists become more involved in chronic pain treatment and research (already significant in the fields of migraine and peripheral neuropathies). To achieve this goal, greater efforts are needed to enhance training for neurologists in pain treatment and promote greater interest in the field. This review describes examples of pain in different neurological diseases including primary neurological pain conditions, discusses the therapeutic potential of brain-targeted therapies and highlights the need for objective measures of pain. PMID:22067541

  1. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Glare, Paul A; Davies, Pamela S; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Paice, Judith A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Syrjala, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  2. Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium.

    PubMed

    Moayyeri, Alireza; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Karasik, David; Estrada, Karol; Xiao, Su-Mei; Nielson, Carrie; Srikanth, Priya; Giroux, Sylvie; Wilson, Scott G; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Smith, Albert V; Pye, Stephen R; Leo, Paul J; Teumer, Alexander; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ohlsson, Claes; McGuigan, Fiona; Minster, Ryan L; Hayward, Caroline; Olmos, José M; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lewis, Joshua R; Swart, Karin M A; Masi, Laura; Oldmeadow, Chris; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Cheng, Sulin; van Schoor, Natasja M; Harvey, Nicholas C; Kruk, Marcin; del Greco M, Fabiola; Igl, Wilmar; Trummer, Olivia; Grigoriou, Efi; Luben, Robert; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Brown, Suzanne J; Williams, Frances M; Soranzo, Nicole; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Holliday, Kate L; Hannemann, Anke; Go, Min Jin; Garcia, Melissa; Polasek, Ozren; Laaksonen, Marika; Zhu, Kun; Enneman, Anke W; McEvoy, Mark; Peel, Roseanne; Sham, Pak Chung; Jaworski, Maciej; Johansson, Åsa; Hicks, Andrew A; Pludowski, Pawel; Scott, Rodney; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; van der Velde, Nathalie; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S; Sievänen, Harri; Raitakari, Olli T; González-Macías, Jesús; Hernández, Jose L; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Osten; Cho, Yoon Shin; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Haring, Robin; Brown, Matthew A; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R; Dennison, Elaine M; Wark, John; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C W; Aspelund, Thor; Richards, J Brent; Bauer, Doug; Hofman, Albert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Dedoussis, George; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pramstaller, Peter P; Lorenc, Roman S; Cooper, Cyrus; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lips, Paul; Alen, Markku; Attia, John; Brandi, Maria Luisa; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Riancho, José A; Campbell, Harry; Liu, Yongmei; Harris, Tamara B; Akesson, Kristina; Karlsson, Magnus; Lee, Jong-Young; Wallaschofski, Henri; Duncan, Emma L; O'Neill, Terence W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Timothy D; Rousseau, François; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steven R; Wareham, Nick J; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Prince, Richard L; Kiel, Douglas P; Reeve, Jonathan; Kaptoge, Stephen K

    2014-06-01

    Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10(-8)) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10(-14)). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10(-6) also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology. PMID:24430505

  3. [Physiological Basis of Pain Mechanisms for Pain Management].

    PubMed

    Kawamata, Mikito

    2016-05-01

    Physician anesthesiologists should ensure a future leadership position in perioperative medicine and pain medicine. In order to establish the missions, anesthesiologists need to know how to relieve pain in surgical patients, critically ill patients and patients with cancer and non-cancer chronic pain. Thus, anesthesiologists should realize physiology of pain representation from pain management I will review physiological basis of pain mechanisms in this manuscript which includes 1) evolutional aspect of pain perception, 2) transduction of noxious stimuli, 3) the types of nociceptors and conduction of noxious stimuli, 4) the ascending pathway of pain and central modulation of pain, 5) the descending inhibitory pain system, and 6) various types of pain. Finally, anesthesiologists should manage pain from physiological basis of pain mechanisms. PMID:27319092

  4. Treatment of myofascial pain.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Bean, Matthew C; Heckman, Thomas W; Jayaseelan, Dhinu; Moats, Nick; Nava, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The objective of this article was to perform a narrative review regarding the treatment of myofascial pain syndrome and to provide clinicians with treatment recommendations. This paper reviews the efficacy of various myofascial pain syndrome treatment modalities, including pharmacological therapy, injection-based therapies and physical therapy interventions. Outcomes evaluated included pain (visual analog scale), pain pressure threshold and range of motion. The evidence found significant benefit with multiple treatments, including diclofenac patch, thiocolchicoside and lidocaine patches. Trigger point injections, ischemic compression therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, spray and stretch, and myofascial release were also efficacious. The authors recommend focusing on treating underlying pathologies, including spinal conditions, postural abnormalities and underlying behavioral issues. To achieve maximum pain reduction and improve function, we recommend physicians approach myofascial pain syndrome with a multimodal plan, which includes a combination of pharmacologic therapies, various physical therapeutic modalities and injection therapies. PMID:24645933

  5. [Palliative pain therapy, cannabinoids].

    PubMed

    Radbruch, L; Elsner, F

    2005-10-01

    Cancer pain treatment should follow the recommendations of the World Health Organisation. Treatment should be with oral application, regular application times and following the analgesic step-ladder. Non-opioids such as dipyrone or non-steroids are used for slight to moderate pain, step-2 opioids such as tramadol or tilidine/naloxone for moderate pain and step-3 opioids such as morphine, oxycodone or hydromorphone for severe pain. Transdermal application of fentanyl or buprenorphine offer a non-invasive parenteral alternative for patients with stable pain syndromes. Cannabinoids such as tetrahydrocannabinol offer a valuable add-on option for cancer patients with refractory pain, spasticity, nausea or appetite loss. PMID:15965665

  6. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  7. Pain management in newborns.

    PubMed

    Hall, Richard W; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S

    2014-12-01

    As a standard of care for preterm/term newborns effective pain management may improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain is assessed using context-specific, validated, and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Therapeutic approaches reducing invasive procedures and using pharmacologic, behavioral, or environmental measures are used to manage neonatal pain. Nonpharmacologic approaches like kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose, and others can be used for procedural pain or adjunctive therapy. Local/topical anesthetics, opioids, NSAIDs/acetaminophen and other sedative/anesthetic agents can be incorporated into NICU protocols for managing moderate/severe pain or distress in all newborns. PMID:25459780

  8. Characterizing individual painDETECT symptoms by average pain severity

    PubMed Central

    Sadosky, Alesia; Koduru, Vijaya; Bienen, E Jay; Cappelleri, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Background painDETECT is a screening measure for neuropathic pain. The nine-item version consists of seven sensory items (burning, tingling/prickling, light touching, sudden pain attacks/electric shock-type pain, cold/heat, numbness, and slight pressure), a pain course pattern item, and a pain radiation item. The seven-item version consists only of the sensory items. Total scores of both versions discriminate average pain-severity levels (mild, moderate, and severe), but their ability to discriminate individual item severity has not been evaluated. Methods Data were from a cross-sectional, observational study of six neuropathic pain conditions (N=624). Average pain severity was evaluated using the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, with severity levels defined using established cut points for distinguishing mild, moderate, and severe pain. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was followed by ridit analysis to represent the probability that a randomly selected subject from one average pain-severity level had a more favorable outcome on the specific painDETECT item relative to a randomly selected subject from a comparator severity level. Results A probability >50% for a better outcome (less severe pain) was significantly observed for each pain symptom item. The lowest probability was 56.3% (on numbness for mild vs moderate pain) and highest probability was 76.4% (on cold/heat for mild vs severe pain). The pain radiation item was significant (P<0.05) and consistent with pain symptoms, as well as with total scores for both painDETECT versions; only the pain course item did not differ. Conclusion painDETECT differentiates severity such that the ability to discriminate average pain also distinguishes individual pain item severity in an interpretable manner. Pain-severity levels can serve as proxies to determine treatment effects, thus indicating probabilities for more favorable outcomes on pain symptoms. PMID:27555789

  9. Painful Peripheral Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Marchettini, P; Lacerenza, M; Mauri, E; Marangoni, C

    2006-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases affecting peripheral nerves. The causes are multiple: hereditary, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, toxic, traumatic. The temporal profile includes acute, subacute and chronic conditions. The majority of peripheral neuropathies cause mainly muscle weakness and sensory loss, positive sensory symptoms and sometimes pain. When pain is present, however, it is usually extremely intense and among the most disabling symptoms for the patients. In addition, the neurological origin of the pain is often missed and patients receive inadequate or delayed specific treatment. Independently of the disease causing the peripheral nerve injury, pain originating from axonal pathology or ganglionopathy privileges neuropathies affecting smaller fibres, a clinical observation that points towards abnormal activity within nociceptive afferents as a main generator of pain. Natural activation of blood vessels or perineurial nociceptive network by pathology also causes intense pain. Pain of this kind, i.e. nerve trunk pain, is among the heralding symptoms of inflammatory or ischemic mononeuropathy and for its intensity represents itself a medical emergency. Neuropathic pain quality rekindles the psychophysical experience of peripheral nerves intraneural microstimulation i.e. a combination of large and small fibres sensation temporally distorted compared to physiological perception evoked by natural stimuli. Pins and needles, burning, cramping mixed with numbness, and tingling are the wording most used by patients. Nociceptive pain instead is most often described as aching, deep and dull. Good command of peripheral nerve anatomy and pathophysiology allows timely recognition of the different pain components and targeted treatment, selected according to intensity, type and temporal profile of the pain. PMID:18615140

  10. Low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Violante, Francesco S; Mattioli, Stefano; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Low-back pain is one of the most common painful conditions experienced by humans throughout their life. Some occupational risk factors (namely, heavy manual material handling) may also contribute to the development of low-back pain: due to the high prevalence of both low-back pain and manual material handling in the adult working population, it has been estimated that low-back pain is probably the most common occupational disorder worldwide. Lifetime prevalence of low-back pain has been reported to be as high as 84%, depending on the case definition used, and no age group is spared, even children. Although low-back pain is not a lethal condition, it was estimated at the third rank among all diseases by disability-adjusted life-years in 2010 in the USA, after ischemic heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and at the first rank by years lived with disability. It also ranked high (13th) globally for the same year, in disability-adjusted life-years. Low-back pain is currently classified as nonspecific/specific as to putative cause and as acute (lasting less than 6 weeks), subacute (6-12 weeks), or chronic (more than 12 weeks) according to duration of symptoms. The distinction between nonspecific/specific and acute/subacute/chronic low-back pain is useful not only for epidemiologic studies, but also (mainly) for choosing the appropriate strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of the disorder. Workplace risk factors for low-back pain include manual lifting and whole-body vibration exposure. This chapter will provide an overview of modern concepts of low-back pain (in general) and will then outline some distinctive features of work-related low-back pain. PMID:26563799

  11. [Pain and opioids].

    PubMed

    Murányi, Marianna; Radák, Zsolt

    2008-12-14

    Noxious stimuli cause pain to protect the body from harmful situations and attract attention to pathophysiologic changes of the body. Specific receptors of pain (nociceptors) can be found all over our body. Pain initiates protecting mechanisms such as vegetative and motor reflexes, and emotional, behavioral changes. However, chronic pain is practically useless and leads to psychopathological changes. There are several ways to relieve pain including non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents, opioids, neurosurgical and non-invasive methods. Central and peripheral effects of opioids can be realized through opioid receptors of the central and the enteric nervous system. In the central nervous system, they can inhibit the perception of pain or change the emotional reactions. Opioids are indicated in postoperative pain, neuropathic pain and cancer. However, the use of opioids has severe side-effects such as breathing depression and the development of tolerance and dependence which do not make opioids optimal painkillers. There are several laboratories in Hungary and abroad working on the design of optimal pain relievers. Furthermore, the euphoric effects of opioids lead to abuse which makes the research important on the mechanisms of opioid addiction. Taken together, opioid research, the design of new compounds and the exploration of the mechanisms of opiate addiction are very important. PMID:19073443

  12. Extraversion and pain.

    PubMed

    Barnes, G E

    1975-09-01

    According to Eysenck's (1957, 1960, 1967) theory of personality, extroverts are posited as having higher pain thresholds and greater pain tolerance than introverts. The evidence for these hypothesized relationships is reviewed. Findings appear inconclusive in both cases. Probability pooling (Mosteller & Bush, 1954) is therefore performed, grouping the comparable studies and carrying out overall tests of significance. Results support the hypothesized relationships between extraversion and pain threshold and between extraversion and pain tolerance. Possible reasons why certain studies failed to find these results are discussed. PMID:1182410

  13. Hypnosis for pain management.

    PubMed

    Valente, Sharon M

    2006-02-01

    Nurses are in a key position to learn and use hypnosis with patients to reduce pain and enhance self-esteem. However, most nurses lack knowledge about the clinical effectiveness of hypnosis and may seek continuing education to become skilled in its use. Painful procedures, treatments, or diseases remain a major nursing challenge, and nurses need complementary ways to relieve pain from surgery, tumors, injuries, and chemotherapy. This article examines the evidence base related to hypnosis for pain management, as well as how to assess and educate patients about hypnosis. PMID:16526529

  14. [Chronic lower back pain].

    PubMed

    Werber, A; Schiltenwolf, M

    2012-02-01

    Poor efficiency in terms of treatment of unspecific back pain and related chronic pain syndromes has led to the necessity of general care guidelines addressing evidence-based strategies for treatment of lower back pain (LBP). Systematically validated and reviewed algorithms have been established for all kinds of unspecific back pain, covering both acute and chronic syndromes. Concerning the impact of psychosocial risk factors in the development of chronic LBP, multimodal treatment is preferred to monomodal strategies. Self-responsible acting on the part of the patient should be supported while invasive methods in particular, i.e. operative treatment, should be avoided due to lacking evidence in outcome efficiency. PMID:22349772

  15. Painful Boney Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Boney metastasis may lead to terrible suffering from debilitating pain. The most likely malignancies that spread to bone are prostate, breast, and lung. Painful osseous metastases are typically associated with multiple episodes of breakthrough pain which may occur with activities of daily living, weight bearing, lifting, coughing, and sneezing. Almost half of these breakthrough pain episodes are rapid in onset and short in duration and 44% of episodes are unpredictable. Treatment strategies include: analgesic approaches with "triple opioid therapy", bisphosphonates, chemotherapeutic agents, hormonal therapy, interventional and surgical approaches, steroids, radiation (external beam radiation, radiopharmaceuticals), ablative techniques (radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation), and intrathecal analgesics. PMID:23861996

  16. Managing Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert Carter Wellford; Lawson, Erin; Backonja, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) arises from injuries or diseases affecting the somatosensory component of the nervous system at any level of the peripheral or central nervous system. NP is diagnosed based on common neurologic signs and symptoms. NP is best treated with a combination of multiple therapeutic approaches, and treatments include conservative, complementary, medical, interventional, and surgical treatment modalities. Goals of treatment are the same as in pain management and include improvement in pain control and in coping skills as well as restoration of functional status. Most patients with NP benefit most from an individualized, multimodal approach that emphasizes both pain and function. PMID:26614725

  17. MedlinePlus: Pain Relievers

    MedlinePlus

    ... things you can do to help ease pain. Pain relievers are just one part of a pain treatment plan. Start Here Chronic Pain Medicines (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Pain Relievers: Understanding Your OTC Options (American Academy of Family ...

  18. Finite element analysis as a tool for parametric prosthetic foot design and evaluation. Technique development in the solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Marnie M; Schwentker, Edwards P; Kay, David B; Bennett, Gordon; Jacobs, Christopher R; Verstraete, Mary C; Njus, Glen O

    2003-02-01

    In this study, we developed an approach for prosthetic foot design incorporating motion analysis, mechanical testing and computer analysis. Using computer modeling and finite element analysis, a three-dimensional (3D), numerical foot model of the solid ankle cushioned heel (SACH) foot was constructed and analyzed based upon loading conditions obtained from the gait analysis of an amputee and validated experimentally using mechanical testing. The model was then used to address effects of viscoelastic heel performance numerically. This is just one example of the type of parametric analysis and design enabled by this approach. More importantly, by incorporating the unique gait characteristics of the amputee, these parametric analyses may lead to prosthetic feet more appropriately representing a particular user's needs, comfort and activity level. PMID:12623440

  19. Differential diagnosis and treatment of iliotibial band pain secondary to a hypomobile cuboid in a 24-year-old female tri-athlete

    PubMed Central

    Brandon, Kristina; Patla, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to relate an episode of movement impairment at the cuboid calcaneal articulation leading to symptoms of iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. An explanation of the etiology and clinical diagnosis in relation to the differential diagnosis, treatment techniques, and patient outcomes are described. The 24-year-old female tri-athlete reported pain at Gerdy’s tubercle and lateral femoral condyle areas occurring within 2 miles of a run. VAS score was 6/10 for the running activity and the lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) score was 93% (74/80). Over the previous 2 years, the ITB symptoms had failed to resolve with extensive conservative treatment at the knee. On weight bearing, the patient demonstrated pain free limitation of active midtarsal pronation more than supination, which correlated with a decrease in passive internal rotation of the cuboid. Symptoms resolved after one cuboid whip manipulation and the patient was able to run pain free. Post-manipulation treatment consisted of two more sessions, which included motor retraining for weight bearing active midtarsal pronation and supination. LEFS was 100% (80/80) and VAS 0/10 with running greater than 10 miles. While causality cannot be inferred from a single case, this report may foster further investigation regarding the differential diagnosis and treatment of a hypomobile cuboid. PMID:24421625

  20. Fatigue Fracture of the Calcaneus: From Early Diagnosis to Treatment: A Case Report of a Triathlon Athlete.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Simão; Figueiredo, Pedro; Páscoa Pinheiro, João

    2016-06-01

    Stress fractures are frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated despite being common in sports. Early diagnosis is crucial; therefore, a high index of clinical suspicion is required. Complementary examinations are essential for diagnosis and follow-up. The authors report a clinical case of a young adult triathlon athlete referring mechanical pain in the rear left foot, with 2 weeks' progression. An earlier increase in daily training intensity was recorded. Complementary examinations confirmed a calcaneal fatigue fracture. Immobilization and no weight bearing were introduced for an initial period of 4 weeks, and the rehabilitation process was started. Progressive weight bearing was introduced between fourth and eighth weeks. Sports activity started at the 12th week. Boundaries to sports activity were eliminated by the 24th week, without pain or functional limitation. Repetitive overload to the heel and intense axial weight bearing in association to repetitive concentric/eccentric gastrocnemius contraction are related to calcaneal stress fracture, the second most common stress fracture in the foot. Calcaneal stress fractures can be adequately treated with activity modification, without casting or surgical intervention. When in the presence of bilateral stress fractures, metabolic and nutritional issues must be considered. The case report highlights the importance of sports medicine examination for detecting intrinsic and extrinsic fatigue fracture risk factors. PMID:26945212

  1. Tradeoffs between impact loading rate, vertical impulse and effective mass for walkers and heel strike runners wearing footwear of varying stiffness.

    PubMed

    Addison, Brian J; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-05-01

    Humans experience repetitive impact forces beneath the heel during walking and heel strike running that cause impact peaks characterized by high rates and magnitudes of loading. Impact peaks are caused by the exchange of momentum between the ground and a portion of the body that comes to a full stop (the effective mass) during the period of the impact peak. A number of factors can influence this exchange of momentum, including footwear stiffness. This study presents and tests an impulse-momentum model of impact mechanics which predicts that effective mass and vertical impulse is greater in walkers and heel strike runners wearing less stiff footwear. The model also predicts a tradeoff between impact loading rate and effective mass, and between impact loading rate and vertical impulse among individuals wearing footwear of varying stiffness. We tested this model using 19 human subjects walking and running in minimal footwear and in two experimental footpads. Subjects walked and ran on an instrumented treadmill and 3D kinematic data were collected. As predicted, both vertical impulse (walking: F(2,54)=52.0, p=2.6E-13; running: F(2,54)=25.2, p=1.8E-8) and effective mass (walking: F(2,54)=12.1, p=4.6E-5; running: F(2,54)=15.5, p=4.7E-6) increase in less stiff footwear. In addition, there is a significant inverse relationship between impact loading rate and vertical impulse (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.78, p<0.0001) and between impact loading rate and effective mass (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.82, p<0.0001). The tradeoff relationships documented here raise questions about how and in what ways the stiffness of footwear heels influence injury risk during human walking and running. PMID:25814181

  2. Pain characteristics and pain catastrophizing in incarcerated women with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Darnall, Beth D; Sazie, Elizabeth

    2012-05-01

    Chronic pain in incarcerated women is understudied and poorly described. Study objectives were to describe pain characteristics, correlates, and predictors in a convenience sample of incarcerated women with chronic pain. A survey packet that included the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF) and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) was distributed to all inmates at a state prison for women. Those who self-identified as having chronic pain ≥4 on a 0-10 numeric rating scale were invited to complete the survey. Demographics and medical and psychiatric diagnoses were abstracted by chart review. Participants (N=159) rated their current and average pain intensity as severe. Pain catastrophizing was found to predict average pain intensity and level of pain-related interference in functioning. Pain catastrophizing is treatable with behavioral intervention in the general population. Findings suggest that pain catastrophizing may be an important target for research and treatment in incarcerated women with chronic pain. PMID:22643606

  3. The pain management approach to chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Rapkin, A J; Kames, L D

    1987-05-01

    Chronic pelvic pain remains a difficult management problem that is often refractory to traditional medical or surgical therapy. The pain management center approach used successfully for the treatment of cancer pain and headache can be adapted to the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. The results of this pilot study suggest that the multidisciplinary techniques of pain management promise to be an effective modality for the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:2439689

  4. TelePain: A Community of Practice for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Meins, Alexa R.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda; Gordon, Debra; Theodore, Brian; Tauben, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive pain management services are primarily located in urban areas, limiting specialist consultation opportunities for community healthcare providers. A community of practice (CoP) for pain management could create opportunities for consultation by establishing professional relationships between community healthcare providers and pain management specialists. A CoP is a group of people with a common concern, set of problems, or a passion for something they do. Members of a CoP for pain management increase their knowledge of evidence-based pain management strategies in a way that is meaningful and relevant. In this article, we provide evidence that TelePain, an interdisciplinary, case-based pain management teleconference consultation program through the University of Washington, qualifies as a CoP and present preliminary evidence of TelePain's effectiveness as a CoP for pain management. Methods Specific behaviors and conversations gathered through participant observation during TelePain sessions were analyzed based on the 14 indicators Wegner developed to evaluate the presence of a CoP. To demonstrate preliminary effectiveness of TelePain as a CoP for pain management, descriptive statistics were used to summarize TelePain evaluation forms. Results TelePain is an example of a successful CoP for pain management as demonstrated by the presence of Wegner's 14 indicators. Additionally, evaluation forms showed that TelePain enhanced community healthcare providers' knowledge of pain management strategies and that continued participation in TelePain lead to community healthcare providers' increased confidence in their ability to provide pain management. Conclusion TelePain, a CoP for pain management, facilitates multidisciplinary collaboration and allows members to develop interdisciplinary care plans for complex pain patients through case study discussions. Evidence-based pain management strategies gained through CoP membership could be disseminated to

  5. Patients' perspectives on pain.

    PubMed

    Norrbrink, Cecilia; Löfgren, Monika; Hunter, Judith P; Ellis, Jaqueline

    2012-01-01

    Nociceptive and neuropathic pain (NP) are common consequences following spinal cord injury (SCI), with large impact on sleep, mood, work, and quality of life. NP affects 40% to 50% of individuals with SCI and is sometimes considered the major problem following SCI. Current treatment recommendations for SCI-NP primarily focus on pharmacological strategies suggesting the use of anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs, followed by tramadol and opioid medications. Unfortunately, these are only partly successful in relieving pain. Qualitative studies report that individuals with SCI-related long-lasting pain seek alternatives to medication due to the limited efficacy, unwanted side effects, and perceived risk of dependency. They spend time and money searching for additional treatments. Many have learned coping strategies on their own, including various forms of warmth, relaxation, massage, stretching, distraction, and physical activity. Studies indicate that many individuals with SCI are dissatisfied with their pain management and with the information given to them about their pain, and they want to know more about causes and strategies to manage pain. They express a desire to improve communication with their physicians and learn about reliable alternative sources for obtaining information about their pain and pain management. The discrepancy between treatment algorithms and patient expectations is significant. Clinicians will benefit from hearing the patient´s voice. PMID:23459087

  6. Chemical Interventions for Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronoff, Gerald M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews properties and pharmacological effects of medications for pain, including peripherally acting analgesics, centrally acting narcotics, and adjuvant analgesics including antidepressants. Discusses the role of the endogenous opioid system in pain and depression. Explores clinical management issues in both inpatient and outpatient settings,…

  7. Patients’ Perspectives on Pain

    PubMed Central

    Norrbrink, Cecilia; Löfgren, Monika; Hunter, Judith P.; Ellis, Jaqueline

    2012-01-01

    Nociceptive and neuropathic pain (NP) are common consequences following spinal cord injury (SCI), with large impact on sleep, mood, work, and quality of life. NP affects 40% to 50% of individuals with SCI and is sometimes considered the major problem following SCI. Current treatment recommendations for SCI-NP primarily focus on pharmacological strategies suggesting the use of anticonvulsant and antidepressant drugs, followed by tramadol and opioid medications. Unfortunately, these are only partly successful in relieving pain. Qualitative studies report that individuals with SCI-related long-lasting pain seek alternatives to medication due to the limited efficacy, unwanted side effects, and perceived risk of dependency. They spend time and money searching for additional treatments. Many have learned coping strategies on their own, including various forms of warmth, relaxation, massage, stretching, distraction, and physical activity. Studies indicate that many individuals with SCI are dissatisfied with their pain management and with the information given to them about their pain, and they want to know more about causes and strategies to manage pain. They express a desire to improve communication with their physicians and learn about reliable alternative sources for obtaining information about their pain and pain management. The discrepancy between treatment algorithms and patient expectations is significant. Clinicians will benefit from hearing the patient´s voice. PMID:23459087

  8. The pain of altruism.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Barbara L; Syal, Supriya

    2014-12-01

    Sociality and cooperation are benefits to human cultures but may carry unexpected costs. We suggest that both the human experience of pain and the expression of distress may result from many causes not experienced as painful in our close primate relatives, because human ancestors motivated to ask for help survived in greater numbers than either the thick-skinned or the stoic. PMID:25200380

  9. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  10. Regs and Pains.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2015-09-01

    Newly adopted changes to the Texas Medical Board's pain management rules turn numerous chronic pain treatment guidelines into minimum requirements. The stricter rules prompt liability concerns as the board strives to ensure patients receive treatment that matches the evolving standard of care. PMID:26360340

  11. Pain description and severity of chronic orofacial pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Vickers, E R; Cousins, M J; Woodhouse, A

    1998-12-01

    A multidisciplinary pain centre study of 120 consecutive chronic orofacial pain patients assessed pain description and intensity ratings, gender differences, prevalence of concurrent conditions, and interinstrument relationships of the McGill Pain Questionnaire and visual analogue scale. Pain words chosen by patients to describe conditions were predominantly sensory words, and patients with concurrent conditions often listed words indicating a substantial affective component. Results showed pain intensity ratings of chronic orofacial pain conditions have similar or higher pain ratings when compared with other medical chronic pain conditions such as back pain, cancer pain and arthritis. There was a significantly higher female: male ratio (88:32) with gender playing an important but poorly understood causal role. The most frequent condition diagnosed was atypical facial pain (n = 40), followed by temporomandibular disorder (n = 32), atypical odontalgia (n = 29) and pathology of the orofacial region (n = 19). Temporomandibular disorder was present in 75 of the 120 subjects, as the sole pain complaint (n = 32) or as an associated secondary condition (n = 43), indicating concurrent pain conditions exist and may be related. There were significantly higher total pain scores of the McGill Pain Questionnaire in patients with multiple conditions compared with patients with a single condition. The visual analogue scale showed a significant correlation to the number of words chosen index of the McGill Pain Questionnaire for orofacial pain. PMID:9973710

  12. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Abdominal Pain, Long-term See complete list of charts. Ongoing or recurrent abdominal pain, also called chronic pain, may be difficult to diagnose, causing frustration for ...

  13. American Academy of Pain Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pain Specialists Need to Know Get Started Medications Management Prescribing for the Whole Patient Get Started AAPM... ... and credentialing as a way to advance pain management. Donate Now Latest Pain News FDA MedWatch - Drug ...

  14. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000827.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with pain To use the sharing features on this page, ... health care provider about your options. What Causes Pain The pain from cancer can have a few ...

  15. Post surgical pain treatment - adults

    MedlinePlus

    Postoperative pain relief ... Pain that occurs after surgery is an important concern. Before your surgery, you and your surgeon may have discussed how much pain you should expect and how it will be ...

  16. Spinal cord injury pain.

    PubMed

    Beric, Aleksandar

    2003-01-01

    Awareness that SCI pain is common emerged during the past decade. However, there are a number of unresolved issues. There is a need for variety of experimental models to reflect diversity of SCI pains. Current classification is not as user-friendly as it should be. More attention should be given to a condition of the spinal cord below and above the SCI lesion. A consensus for what is an optimal SCI functional assessment for patients with sensory complaints and pain should be developed. Further extensive SCI pain research is needed prior to spinal cord regeneration trials in order to be able to cope with a potential for newly developed pains that may appear during incomplete spinal cord regenerative attempts. PMID:12821403

  17. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  18. Chronicity of orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Gerschman, J A

    2000-10-01

    Acute and chronic orofacial pain continues to be poorly understood and managed. The National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) 1999 report on acute pain management promotes the development of evidence based clinical practice guidelines aimed at improving both the quality of health care and health outcomes in medical and dental practice in Australia. Nerve signals arising from sites of tissue or nerve injury lead to long term changes in the central nervous system and the amplification and persistence of pain. These nociceptor activity-induced neuronal changes known as central sensitization, have important clinical implications in the development of new approaches to the management of persistent pain. These findings and implications are discussed in relationship to poorly managed and understood conditions such as oral dysaesthesia, burning mouth syndrome, atypical facial pain/atypical odontalgia, peripheral nerve injury, deafferentation and phantom tooth syndrome. PMID:11709938

  19. Musculoskeletal chest wall pain

    PubMed Central

    Fam, Adel G.; Smythe, Hugh A.

    1985-01-01

    The musculoskeletal structures of the thoracic wall and the neck are a relatively common source of chest pain. Pain arising from these structures is often mistaken for angina pectoris, pleurisy or other serious disorders. In this article the clinical features, pathogenesis and management of the various musculoskeletal chest wall disorders are discussed. The more common causes are costochondritis, traumatic muscle pain, trauma to the chest wall, “fibrositis” syndrome, referred pain, psychogenic regional pain syndrome, and arthritis involving articulations of the sternum, ribs and thoracic spine. Careful analysis of the history, physical findings and results of investigation is essential for precise diagnosis and effective treatment. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4027804

  20. [Groin pain in athletes].

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rick J M; Kokshoorn, Arjan P J; Kolkman, Karel A; van der Wal, Wybren A; van Loon, Corné J M

    2014-01-01

    Groin pain in young athletes is a common problem, accounting for significant downtime in sports participation. It can be difficult to make the correct diagnosis as groin pain has a wide differential diagnosis, which encompasses acute as well as chronic causative factors. In this article this is illustrated by presenting three cases of patients who attended our hospital. In all three cases the main complaint was sports-related groin pain, and the patients presented with very similar symptoms. However, after further investigation the patients were diagnosed with three very different types of injury: sportsman's hernia; hip labral tear; and pubic osteitis. This emphasises the need for every general practitioner and medical specialist to understand that there is a wide differential diagnosis for groin pain in athletes, in order to be able to implement specific therapy targeting the actual cause of groin pain. PMID:25315329

  1. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  2. An archaeology of pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Dennis Michael

    Pain is a discursive construct of science and medicine. Through the discourses of biopower and technoscience pain is used to construct and maintain the social body. Biopower and technoscience are discursive practices that are enveloped within the disciplines of Western society. Specifically, the disciplines of education, science, and medicine use biopower and technoscience to normalize the body and construct binaries which create the abnormal. The cyborg is a discursive practice used to implode the binaries of the disciplines which maintain the social body. Through the implosion of binaries, the binary of mind/body is no longer plausible in the explanation of pain. Neuropathic chronic pain and phantom limb pain become cyborg discourses which operate to deconstruct the pedagogies of science and medicine.

  3. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Nett, Michael P

    2010-09-01

    Although the long-term results following traditional total joint arthroplasty are excellent, postoperative pain management has been suboptimal. Under-treatment of pain is a focus of growing concern to the orthopedic community. Poorly controlled postoperative pain leads to undesirable outcomes, including immobility, stiffness, myocardial ischemia, atelectasis, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, anxiety, depression, and chronic pain. Over the past decade, the attempt to minimize postoperative complications, combined with the move toward minimally invasive surgery and early postoperative mobilization, has made pain management a critical aspect of joint replacement surgery. Effective protocols are currently available; all include a multimodal approach. Debate continues regarding the ideal approach; however, reliance on narcotic analgesia alone is suboptimal. PMID:20839719

  4. Changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties following eccentric heel drop exercise are specific to the free tendon.

    PubMed

    Obst, S J; Newsham-West, R; Barrett, R S

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical loading of the Achilles tendon during isolated eccentric contractions could induce immediate and region-dependent changes in mechanical properties. Three-dimensional ultrasound was used to examine the immediate effect of isolated eccentric exercise on the mechanical properties of the distal (free tendon) and proximal (gastrocnemii) regions of the Achilles tendon. Participants (n = 14) underwent two testing sessions in which tendon measurements were made at rest and during a 30% and 70% isometric plantar flexion contractions immediately before and after either: (a) 3 × 15 eccentric heel drops or (b) 10-min rest. There was a significant time-by-session interaction for free tendon length and strain for all loading conditions (P < 0.05). Pairwise comparisons revealed a significant increase in free tendon length and strain at all contraction intensities after eccentric exercise (P < 0.05). There was no significant time-by-session interaction for the gastrocnemii (medial or lateral) aponeurosis or tendon for any of the measured parameters. Immediate changes in Achilles tendon mechanical properties were specific to the free tendon and consistent with changes due to mechanical creep. These findings suggest that the mechanical properties of the free tendon may be more vulnerable to change with exercise compared with the gastrocnemii aponeurosis or tendon. PMID:25919320

  5. The Neurobiology of Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-12-01

    Oral cancers are often severely painful and clinically difficult to manage. Few researchers have investigated the neurobiologic factors responsible for cancer pain; however, the study of oral cancer pain might inform us about the fundamental biology of cancer. The purpose of the present report was to summarize the clinical challenges inherent in oral cancer pain management, oral cancer pain mechanisms and mediators, and the convergence of the investigation of carcinogenesis and pain. PMID:26608142

  6. Spirituality and Religion in Pain and Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Dedeli, Ozden; Kaptan, Gulten

    2013-01-01

    Pain relief is a management problem for many patients, their families, and the medical professionals caring for them. Although everyone experiences pain to some degree, responses to it vary from one person to another. Recognizing and specifying someone else’s pain is clinically a well know challenge. Research on the biology and neurobiology of pain has given us a relationship between spirituality and pain. There is growing recognition that persistent pain is a complex and multidimensional experience stemming from the interrelations among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors. Patients with pain use a number of cognitive and behavioral strategies to cope with their pain, including religious/spiritual factors, such as prayers, and seeking spiritual support to manage their pain. This article provides an overview of the complex phenomenon of pain, with a focus on spiritual and religious issues in pain management. PMID:26973914

  7. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management.

    PubMed

    Doody, S B; Smith, C; Webb, J

    1991-03-01

    Managing pain is a complex and inexact science. Acute and chronic pain physically and psychologically affects and disables an overwhelming number of people. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management have been reviewed. These methods can be used independently or in combination with other nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic methods of pain control. The goals of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management include the reduction of pain, minimal adverse effects, and allowing patients to become active participants in their own care. Nurses are called on many times to comfort patients in pain. It is through their expertise and intervention that the goals of pain management succeed. PMID:2043331

  8. Pain Catastrophising Affects Cortical Responses to Viewing Pain in Others

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Pain catastrophising is an exaggerated cognitive attitude implemented during pain or when thinking about pain. Catastrophising was previously associated with increased pain severity, emotional distress and disability in chronic pain patients, and is also a contributing factor in the development of neuropathic pain. To investigate the neural basis of how pain catastrophising affects pain observed in others, we acquired EEG data in groups of participants with high (High-Cat) or low (Low-Cat) pain catastrophising scores during viewing of pain scenes and graphically matched pictures not depicting imminent pain. The High-Cat group attributed greater pain to both pain and non-pain pictures. Source dipole analysis of event-related potentials during picture viewing revealed activations in the left (PHGL) and right (PHGR) paraphippocampal gyri, rostral anterior (rACC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) cortices. The late source activity (600–1100 ms) in PHGL and PCC was augmented in High-Cat, relative to Low-Cat, participants. Conversely, greater source activity was observed in the Low-Cat group during the mid-latency window (280–450 ms) in the rACC and PCC. Low-Cat subjects demonstrated a significantly stronger correlation between source activity in PCC and pain and arousal ratings in the long latency window, relative to high pain catastrophisers. Results suggest augmented activation of limbic cortex and higher order pain processing cortical regions during the late processing period in high pain catastrophisers viewing both types of pictures. This pattern of cortical activations is consistent with the distorted and magnified cognitive appraisal of pain threats in high pain catastrophisers. In contrast, high pain catastrophising individuals exhibit a diminished response during the mid-latency period when attentional and top-down resources are ascribed to observed pain. PMID:26186545

  9. Assessment of pain

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.; Alamri, Majed S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present data on knowledge and attitudes toward pain assessment among health care providers in Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia. Methods: This exploratory study required at least 100 participants to attain an effect size of 0.2 or larger. A convenience sample was recruited from the major hospitals in Almadinah Almunawwarah, Saudi Arabia; King Fahad Hospital, Ohud Hospital, Alansar Hospital, Almeqat Hospital, and the Maternity Hospital. Data collection occurred between January and April 2014. Knowledge of pain assessment was examined by administering the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain. Results: Data from 105 participants was collected. Seventy-three participants scored 44% or below (69.5%), and 32 participants scored 45% and above (30.5%). Additionally, only 6 participants (5.7%) scored above 60%. There were significant differences between male and female scores (p=0.05), physicians’ and nurses’ scores (p=0.001), and level of education (p=0.009). There were no significant differences in the passing scores across means of nationality, the department where participants worked, years of experience, and age of participants. Conclusion: There is a deficit in pain assessment knowledge, and pain management in the study group. Continuous education on pain assessment is required to increase the health care providers’ knowledge, and enhance their practices regarding pain assessment and treatment. PMID:25864065

  10. Pain in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark R; Ehrhardt, Ken P; Ripoll, Juan G; Sharma, Bharat; Padnos, Ira W; Kaye, Rachel J; Kaye, Alan D

    2016-04-01

    Pain management in the elderly has increasingly become problematic in the USA as the aged population grows. The proportion of the population over 65 continues to climb and may eclipse 20 % in the next decade. In order to effectively diagnosis and treat these patients, a proper history and physical exam remain essential; pain assessment scales such as the Verbal Descriptor Scales (VDS), the Numerical Rating Scales (NRS), and the Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) often but not always prove beneficial. The conditions most frequently afflicting this population include osteoarthritis, diabetic neuropathy, post-herpetic neuralgia, and lower back pain which include spondylosis and radiculopathies. While the normal aging process does not necessarily guarantee symptoms of chronic pain, elderly individuals are far more likely to develop these painful conditions than their younger counterparts. There are many effective treatment modalities available as potential therapeutic interventions for elderly patients, including but not limited to analgesics such as NSAIDs and opioids, as well as multiple interventional pain techniques. This review will discuss chronic pain in the elderly population, including epidemiology, diagnostic tools, the multitude of co-morbidities, and common treatment modalities currently available to physicians. PMID:26896947

  11. Low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance, and is the most common reason for medical consultations. Few cases of back pain are due to specific causes; most cases are non-specific. Acute back pain is the most common presentation and is usually self-limiting, lasting less than three months regardless of treatment. Chronic back pain is a more difficult problem, which often has strong psychological overlay: work dissatisfaction, boredom, and a generous compensation system contribute to it. Among the diagnoses offered for chronic pain is fibromyalgia, an urban condition (the diagnosis is not made in rural settings) that does not differ materially from other instances of widespread chronic pain. Although disc protrusions detected on X-ray are often blamed, they rarely are responsible for the pain, and surgery is seldom successful at alleviating it. No single treatment is superior to others; patients prefer manipulative therapy, but studies have not demonstrated that it has any superiority over others. A WHO Advisory Panel has defined common outcome measures to be used to judge the efficacy of treatments for studies. PMID:14710509

  12. [Multimodal pain therapy].

    PubMed

    Böger, A

    2014-06-01

    Chronic pain has both high prevalence and a significant economic impact in Germany. The most common chronic pain types are low back pain and headache. On the one hand, the management of chronic pain patients is incomplete, yet it is often overtreated in orthopaedic surgical settings with interventional procedures. The reason for this is the structure of outpatient management and the way it is paid for in Germany. Pain management of patients with private insurance cover is no better because of "doctor shopping". Medical guidelines could be of some help in improving the situation, but they are widely unknown, and have still to demonstrate whether they have any impact on GP treatment pathways. The "gold standard" multimodal pain therapy shows significant improvement in many studies compared to monomodal therapy regimes and interventional regimes, but is too rarely recommended by the patients' physicians, whether GPs or specialists. Because of the huge number of institutions nowadays that, for the sake of form, offer such multimodal therapies, these need to be differentiated in terms of their structural and process quality. A first step is the "k edoq" project. It is essential to improve knowledge of the principles of modern pain management. This includes better networking and communication between doctors, physiotherapists and psychologists, and at the grassroots level, providing the public with more detailed and better information. PMID:25000627

  13. Pain pathways and transmission.

    PubMed Central

    Kitahata, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    Pain has been a major concern of humankind since the ancient times, and it remains one of the most important subjects of all health care professionals. Despite the obvious overwhelming clinical importance, the major advances in its diagnosis and therapy have been made only recently. "How do the sensory apparatus of the body and system of signal transmission relate to pain of peripheral origin?" is the topic of discussion. To do this, it is important to understand what constitutes the total pain experience. It consists of: 1) signal transduction at the peripheral receptor site, 2) signal conduction along the peripheral nerve, 3) pain modulation at the level of the spinal cord, 4) pain perception at the supraspinal site, and 5) the associated sensations, emotional reactions, and effective state. The signal transmission related to pain may be modified by various analgesic agents. Specific analgesic agent has a specific site of action which may be at peripheral receptors, at peripheral nerves, at the level of the spinal cord, at supraspinal levels by activating descending inhibitory systems, or at more cephalad levels by reducing the affective component of pain. PMID:7825344

  14. Systematic pain assessment in horses.

    PubMed

    de Grauw, J C; van Loon, J P A M

    2016-03-01

    Accurate recognition and quantification of pain in horses is imperative for adequate pain management. The past decade has seen a much needed surge in formal development of systematic pain assessment tools for the objective monitoring of pain in equine patients. This narrative review describes parameters that can be used to detect pain in horses, provides an overview of the various pain scales developed (visual analogue scales, simple descriptive scales, numerical rating scales, time budget analysis, composite pain scales and grimace scales), and highlights their strengths and weaknesses for potential clinical implementation. The available literature on the use of each pain assessment tool in specific equine pain states (laminitis, lameness, acute synovitis, post-castration, acute colic and post-abdominal surgery) is discussed, including any problems with sensitivity, reliability or scale validation as well as translation of results to other clinical pain states. The review considers future development and further refinement of currently available equine pain scoring systems. PMID:26831169

  15. Contextual determinants of pain judgments.

    PubMed

    Martel, M O; Thibault, P; Roy, C; Catchlove, R; Sullivan, M J L

    2008-10-31

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of variations in contextual features of a physically demanding lifting task on the judgments of others' pain. Healthy undergraduates (n=98) were asked to estimate the pain experience of chronic pain patients who were filmed while lifting canisters at different distances from their body. Of interest was whether contextual information (i.e., lifting posture) contributed to pain estimates beyond the variance accounted for by pain behavior. Results indicated that the judgments of others' pain varied significantly as a function of the contextual features of the pain-eliciting task; observers estimated significantly more pain when watching patients lifting canisters positioned further away from the body than canisters closest from the body. Canister position contributed significant unique variance to the prediction of pain estimates even after controlling for observers' use of pain behavior as a basis of pain estimates. Correlational analyses revealed that greater use of the contextual features when judging others' pain was related to a lower discrepancy (higher accuracy) between estimated and self-reported pain ratings. Results also indicated that observers' level of catastrophizing was associated with more accurate pain estimates. The results of a regression analysis further showed that observers' level of catastrophizing contributed to the prediction of the accuracy of pain estimates over and above the variance accounted for by the utilisation of contextual features. Discussion addresses the processes that might underlie the utilisation of contextual features of a pain-eliciting task when estimating others' pain. PMID:18701219

  16. Nonspecific Arm Pain

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Ring, David

    2013-01-01

    Nonspecific activity-related arm pain is characterized by an absence of objective physical findings and symptoms that do not correspond with objective pathophysiology. Arm pain without strict diagnosis is often related to activity, work-related activity in particular, and is often seen in patients with physically demanding work. Psychological factors such as catastrophic thinking, symptoms of depression, and heightened illness concern determine a substantial percentage of the disability associated with puzzling hand and arm pains. Ergonomic modifications can help to control symptoms, but optimal health may require collaborative management incorporating psychosocial and psychological elements of illness. PMID:25207288

  17. Intraoral Pain Disorders.

    PubMed

    Edens, Mary Hil; Khaled, Yasser; Napeñas, Joel J

    2016-08-01

    Those experiencing intraoral pain associated with dental and oral diseases are likely to pursue treatment from medical and dental providers. The causes for intraoral pain include odontogenic, periodontal, oral mucosal, or contiguous hard and soft tissue structures to the oral cavity. Providers should be vigilant when diagnosing these, as they should be among the first in their differential diagnoses to be ruled out. This review provides brief overviews of frequently encountered oral/dental diseases that cause intraoral pain, originating from the teeth, the surrounding mucosa and gingivae, tongue, bone, and salivary glands and their causes, features, diagnosis, and management strategies. PMID:27475507

  18. Greater Trochanteric Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Redmond, John M; Chen, Austin W; Domb, Benjamin G

    2016-04-01

    Patients who have lateral hip pain historically have been diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, corticosteroid injections, and physical therapy. Although this strategy is effective for most patients, a substantial number of patients continue to have pain and functional limitations. Over the past decade, our understanding of disorders occurring in the peritrochanteric space has increased dramatically. Greater trochanteric pain syndrome encompasses trochanteric bursitis, external coxa saltans (ie, snapping hip), and abductor tendinopathy. A thorough understanding of the anatomy, examination findings, and imaging characteristics aids the clinician in treating these patients. Open and endoscopic treatment options are available for use when nonsurgical treatment is unsuccessful. PMID:26990713

  19. Cholecystokinin and Pain*

    PubMed Central

    McRoberts, Jay W.

    1986-01-01

    The recent discovery that cholecystokinin (CCK) is present in the nervous system has prompted studies that have nearly proven its neurotransmitter status. Pain modulation appears to be a major effect of CCK and proglumide, its antagonist. CCK's inhibitory effect and proglumide's potentiating effect on opiate analgesia may have clinical application; proglumide's inhibitory effect on opiate tolerance may help in management of chronic pain. More research is required before the CCK/opiate interaction can be exploited on a large scale to relieve pain. PMID:2872841

  20. Back pain in adults.

    PubMed

    Becker, Jonathan A; Stumbo, Jessica R

    2013-06-01

    This article provides a summary of the many causes of back pain in adults. There is an overview of the history and physical examination with attention paid to red flags that alert the clinician to more worrisome causes of low back pain. An extensive differential diagnosis for back pain in adults is provided along with key historical and physical examination findings. The various therapeutic options are summarized with an emphasis on evidence-based findings. These reviewed treatments include medication, physical therapy, topical treatments, injections, and complementary and alternative medicine. The indications for surgery and specialty referral are also discussed. PMID:23668645

  1. Maintenance of pain in children with functional abdominal pain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A significant proportion of children with functional abdominal pain develop chronic pain. Identifying clinical characteristics predicting pain persistence is important in targeting interventions. We examined whether child anxiety and/or pain-stooling relations were related to maintenance of abdomina...

  2. Sever's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tests How do I know if my child's heel pain is caused by Sever's disease? In Sever's disease, heel pain can be in one or both heels. It ... cut down or stop any activity that causes heel pain. Apply ice to the injured heel for 20 ...

  3. Measurement of Trigeminal Neuralgia Pain: Penn Facial Pain Scale.

    PubMed

    Lee, John Y K

    2016-07-01

    Pain is a subjective experience that cannot be directly measured. Therefore, patient-reported outcome is one of the currently accepted methods to capture pain intensity and its impact on activities of daily living. This article focuses on five patient-reported outcomes that have been used to measure trigeminal neuralgia pain-Visual Analog Scale, numeric rating scale, Barrow Neurological Institute Pain Intensity Score, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Penn Facial Pain Scale. Each scale is evaluated for its practicality, applicability, comprehensiveness, reliability, validity, and sensitivity to measuring trigeminal neuralgia pain. PMID:27324999

  4. Over-the-counter pain relievers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Analgesics; Acetaminophen; NSAID; Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; Pain medicine - over-the-counter; Pain medicine - OTC ... Pain medicines are also called analgesics. Each kind of pain medicine has benefits and risks. Some types of pain ...

  5. Postamputation pain: studies on mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nikolajsen, Lone

    2012-10-01

    Amputation is followed by both painful and non-painful phantom phenomena in a large number of amputees. Non-painful phantom sensations rarely pose any clinical problem, but 60-80% of all amputees also experience painful sensations (i.e. phantom pain) located to the missing limb. The severity of phantom pain usually decreases with time, but severe pain persists in 5-10% of patients. Pain in the residual limb (i.e. stump pain) is another consequence of amputation. Both stump and phantom pain can be very difficult to treat. Treatment guidelines used for other neuropathic pain conditions are probably the best approximation, especially for the treatment of stump pain. The aim of the present doctoral thesis was to explore some of the mechanisms underlying pain after amputation. Ten studies were carried out (I-X). My PhD thesis from 1998 dealt with pain before the amputation and showed that preamputation pain increases the risk of phantom pain after amputation (I). A perioperative epidural blockade, however, did not reduce the incidence of pain or abnormal sensory phenomena after amputation (II, III). The importance of sensitization before amputation for the subsequent development of pain is supported by study IV, in which pressure pain thresholds obtained at the limb before amputation were inversely related to stump and phantom pain after 1 week. Afferent input from the periphery is likely to contribute to postamputation pain as sodium channels were upregulated in human neuromas (VI), although neuroma removal did not always alleviate phantom pain (V). Sensitization of neurons in the spinal cord also seems to be involved in pain after amputation as phantom pain was reduced by ketamine, an NMDA-receptor antagonist. Another NMDA-receptor antagonist, memantine, and gabapentin, a drug working by binding to the δ2α-subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, had no effect on phantom pain (VII-IX). Supraspinal factors are also important for pain after amputation as

  6. Angina (Chest Pain)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of High Blood Pressure ... The discomfort also can occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. Angina pain may even feel like indigestion. But, ...

  7. Migraines: What a Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Migraines: What a Pain! KidsHealth > For Kids > Migraines: What ... coming and how to avoid them. What's a Migraine? Almost everyone gets headaches . You might have one ...

  8. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePlus

    Palliative care helps people with serious illnesses feel better. One of the problems a serious illness can cause ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Challenging pain problems. In: Walsh D, Caraceni AT, Fainsinger ...

  9. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... found. How is chronic pelvic pain diagnosed? Your health care provider will ask about your medical history. You will have a physical exam, including a pelvic exam . Tests also may be done to find the cause. ...

  10. Pain management in photoepilation.

    PubMed

    Aimonetti, Jean-Marc; Ribot-Ciscar, Edith

    2016-06-01

    The hair follicle is a complex, hormonally active structure with permanent and cyclically renewed parts which are highly innervated by myelinated and unmyelinated afferent fibers. Hair removal, a very ancient practice, affects this sensory network and causes both acute and diffuse pain associated with inflammatory reaction. Optic permanent hair removal is becoming a popular alternative to traditional methods such as shaving, waxing, among other methods. These optical removal devices thermally destroy the target chromophore, that is, melanin, without damaging the surrounding skin. The increase in the skin surface temperature causes mild-to-severe pain, and optical hair removal has to be combined with pain relieving devices. Pain management relies on topical anesthetic agents, cooling devices, or non-noxious cutaneous stimulation whose mechanisms of action and efficiency are discussed in this article. PMID:26589969

  11. [Phantom limb pains].

    PubMed

    Giraux, Pascal

    2015-03-01

    With the radical experience of an amputation, the adaptation of body image is often incomplete. Some people experience phantom body perceptions, often painful and difficult to treat, after the amputation of a limb. PMID:26145132

  12. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... an important role in sustaining the pain. Another theory is that CRPS is caused by a triggering ... All NINDS-prepared information is in the public domain and may be freely copied. Credit to the ...

  13. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician January 15, 2007, http://www.aafp.org/afp/2007/0115/p194.html) Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A ... Physician November 01, 1999, http://www.aafp.org/afp/991101ap/2012.html) Written by familydoctor.org editorial ...

  14. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePlus

    A systemic analgesic is a pain medicine that is injected into your vein or muscle. This medicine acts on your entire ... away, but it will be dulled. With systemic analgesics, some women have an easier labor and feel ...

  15. Pain and your emotions

    MedlinePlus

    ... feelings and emotions can worsen your back pain. Mind-body Relationship The mind and body work together, they cannot be separated. The way your mind controls thoughts and attitudes affects the way your ...

  16. Phantom limb pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... the missing arm or leg. Reading, listening to music, or doing something that takes your mind off ... Zhou YL. Principles of Pain Management. In: Daroff RB, Fenichel ... Clinical Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; ...

  17. Breast Pain in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... problem in women who are having periods (menstrual cycles). It is less common in older women. The pain can be in ... some of them: Hormone changes during your period Water retention, which may happen during your period Injury ...

  18. Treatments for Managing Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle massage. Electrical stimulation - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the most common form of electrical stimulation ... painful and does not require needles or medicine. TENS consists of a small, battery-operated device that ...

  19. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000610.htm Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe the ...

  20. Veterans and chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Summary points 1. Musculoskeletal problems are the commonest reason for medical discharge in all the British armed forces. By definition, these problems are chronic and resistant to treatment. 2. Pain is also common in veterans who have experienced severe injuries (polytrauma), often accompanied by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) orpostconcussive syndrome. 3. In veterans seeking treatment for chronic pain, PTSD is common. There is also evidence for elevated levels of alcohol misuse in veterans who have been deployed to conflict. However, most veterans do not have pain, PTSD or alcohol problems. 4. Pain clinicians would benefit from training in meeting veterans’ needs, in order to promote their engagement and successful treatment. This should include countering stereotypes, information about the military and support for the assessment and onward referral of PTSD and alcohol problems. PMID:26516504