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Sample records for heel pain calcaneal

  1. Heel raises versus prefabricated orthoses in the treatment of posterior heel pain associated with calcaneal apophysitis (Sever's Disease): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Posterior Heel pain can present in children of 8 to 14 years, associated with or clinically diagnosed as Sever's disease, or calcaneal apophysitis. Presently, there are no comparative randomised studies evaluating treatment options for posterior heel pain in children with the clinical diagnosis of calcaneal apophysitis or Sever's disease. This study seeks to compare the clinical efficacy of some currently employed treatment options for the relief of disability and pain associated with posterior heel pain in children. Method Design: Factorial 2 × 2 randomised controlled trial with monthly follow-up for 3 months. Participants: Children with clinically diagnosed posterior heel pain possibly associated with calcaneal apophysitis/Sever's disease (n = 124). Interventions: Treatment factor 1 will be two types of shoe orthoses: a heel raise or prefabricated orthoses. Both of these interventions are widely available, mutually exclusive treatment approaches that are relatively low in cost. Treatment factor 2 will be a footwear prescription/replacement intervention involving a shoe with a firm heel counter, dual density EVA midsole and rear foot control. The alternate condition in this factor is no footwear prescription/replacement, with the participant wearing their current footwear. Outcomes: Oxford Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and the Faces pain scale. Discussion This will be a randomised trial to compare the efficacy of various treatment options for posterior heel pain in children that may be associated with calcaneal apophysitis also known as Sever's disease. Trial Registration Trial Number: ACTRN12609000696291 Ethics Approval Southern Health: HREC Ref: 09271B PMID:20196866

  2. Heel Pain in Recreational Runners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzoli, Allan S.; Pollina, Frank S.

    1989-01-01

    Provides physicians with the signs, symptoms, and management of heel/sole pain in recreational runners (usually due to plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendinitis, and calcaneal stress fractures). Remedies involve palliative treatment of symptoms, correction of underlying biomechanical problems, and flexibility exercises. (SM)

  3. Heel pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... often Tightness in your calf muscle or the Achilles tendon Sudden inward or outward turning of your ... the back of the heel bone under the Achilles tendon (bursitis) Bone spurs in the heel Swelling ...

  4. Heel Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inflammation of the band of fibrous connective tissue (fascia) running along the bottom (plantar surface) of the ... quite painful. The condition occurs when the plantar fascia is strained over time beyond its normal extension, ...

  5. Bilateral heel pain in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Loren T R; Mehdi, Adil M S; Baker, Dennis; Edwards, Max R

    2015-06-01

    A rare case of bilateral calcaneal stress fractures in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anaemia is described. This has not been previously reported in the literature. A calcaneal stress fracture is an important differential diagnosis in a patient presenting with heel pain. Bilaterality of symptoms should not exclude this diagnosis and clinicians should be especially vigilant with predisposed patients. PMID:26004126

  6. [A jogger with painful heels].

    PubMed

    Van Gool, Arthur R; Pepels, Wout R J

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old man had chronic pain of his left heel region, which was initially diagnosed as 'tendinopathy'. An X-ray of the ankle joint showed a Haglund deformity. After successful surgery, he developed pain on his right heel, where again a Haglund deformity was diagnosed. PMID:22551752

  7. Heel Pain in the Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Kenneth John; Anderson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Heel pain, a relatively common problem in the athlete, can present a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. The purpose of this article is to review treatment techniques for common causes of heel pain in the athlete. Evidence Acquisition: Articles in the English literature through August 2008 were selected and reviewed in the context of the management of heel pain in the athlete. Clinical and surgical photographs are presented as an illustration of preferred techniques and pertinent pathologic findings. Results: Although nonoperative treatment remains the mainstay for most painful heel pathologies, a number of surgical interventions have shown encouraging results in carefully selected patients. Conclusions: The management of heel pain in the athlete requires diagnostic skill, appropriate imaging evaluation, and a careful, initially conservative approach to treatment. Surgical treatment can be successful in carefully selected patients. PMID:23015903

  8. Heel pain: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Agyekum, Edward Kwame; Ma, Kaiyu

    2015-06-01

    Heel pain is a very common foot disease. Varieties of names such as plantar fasciitis, jogger's heel, tennis heal, policeman's heel are used to describe it. Mechanical factors are the most common etiology of heel pain. Common causes of hell pain includes: Plantar Fasciitis, Heel Spur, Sever's Disease, Heel bump, Achilles Tendinopathy, Heel neuritis, Heel bursitis. The diagnosis is mostly based on clinical examination. Normally, the location of the pain and the absence of associated symptoms indicating a systemic disease strongly suggest the diagnosis. Several therapies exist including rest, physical therapy, stretching, and change in footwear, arch supports, orthotics, night splints, anti-inflammatory agents, and surgery. Almost all patients respond to conservative nonsurgical therapy. Surgery is the last treatment option if all other treatments had failed. Rest, ice, massage, the use of correct exercise and complying with a doctor's advice all play important part in helping to recover from this hell pain condition, but getting good quality, suitable shoes with the appropriate amount of support for the whole foot is the most important. PMID:26643244

  9. Clinical Characteristics of the Causes of Plantar Heel Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tae Im; Seo, In Seok; Huh, Won Seok; Yoon, Tae Hee; Kim, Bo Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objectives of this study were to investigate the causes of plantar heel pain and find differences in the clinical features of plantar fasciitis (PF) and fat pad atrophy (FPA), which are common causes of plantar heel pain, for use in differential diagnosis. Method This retrospective study analyzed the medical records of 250 patients with plantar heel pain at the Foot Clinic of Rehabilitation Medicine at Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital from January to September, 2008. Results The subjects used in this study were 114 men and 136 women patients with a mean age of 43.8 years and mean heel pain duration of 13.3 months. Causes of plantar heel pain were PF (53.2%), FPA (14.8%), pes cavus (10.4%), PF with FPA (9.2%), pes planus (4.8%), plantar fibromatosis (4.4%), plantar fascia rupture (1.6%), neuropathy (0.8%), and small shoe syndrome (0.8%). PF and FPA were most frequently diagnosed. First-step pain in the morning, and tenderness on medial calcaneal tuberosity correlated with PF. FPA mainly involved bilateral pain, pain at night, and pain that was aggravated by standing. Heel cord tightness was the most common biomechanical abnormality of the foot. Heel spur was frequently seen in X-rays of patients with PF. Conclusion Plantar heel pain can be provoked by PF, FPA, and other causes. Patients with PF or FPA typically show different characteristics in clinical features. Plantar heel pain requires differential diagnosis for appropriate treatment. PMID:22506166

  10. Plantar heel pain and fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Plantar heel pain causes soreness or tenderness of the sole of the foot under the heel, which sometimes extends into the medial arch. The prevalence and prognosis are unclear, but the symptoms seem to resolve over time in most people. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for plantar heel pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to January 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 15 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: casted orthoses (custom-made insoles), corticosteroid injection (alone, or plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), extracorporeal shock wave therapy, heel cups, heel pads (alone or with corticosteroid injection), lasers, local anaesthetic injection (alone or with corticosteroid injection), night splints plus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, stretching exercises, surgery, taping, and ultrasound. PMID:19450330

  11. Lung cancer presenting as heel pain: A case report

    PubMed Central

    DAI, HAO; QIANG, MINFEI; CHEN, YANXI; ZHAI, WEITAO; ZHANG, KUN

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastasis as the first symptom of lung cancer is common, particularly in the axial skeleton. The calcaneus is an unusual site of metastatic involvement. Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is one of the most common complaints of the foot requiring medical treatment. The most typical symptom of CPHP is pain under the medial heel during weight-bearing, and this symptom is therefore generally initially diagnosed as CPHP by clinicians. The current case study reports a female patient never-smoker with non-small cell lung cancer accompanied by calcaneal metastasis presenting as heel pain. The patient was initially diagnosed with CPHP without any imaging examinations. As there was no relief from the heel pain six months later, a foot X-ray was performed, which revealed a lesion of the calcaneus. The analysis of a biopsy obtained from the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The present case indicates that patients suspected to have CPHP should be conventionally examined with radiography of the foot during the initial diagnosis. Similarly, if a patient with lung cancer has symptoms such as CPHP, distant metastasis should be accounted for; despite their rarity, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion, since accurate diagnosis and timely treatment is important in management and outcome. PMID:25009652

  12. Lung cancer presenting as heel pain: A case report.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hao; Qiang, Minfei; Chen, Yanxi; Zhai, Weitao; Zhang, Kun

    2014-08-01

    Bone metastasis as the first symptom of lung cancer is common, particularly in the axial skeleton. The calcaneus is an unusual site of metastatic involvement. Chronic plantar heel pain (CPHP) is one of the most common complaints of the foot requiring medical treatment. The most typical symptom of CPHP is pain under the medial heel during weight-bearing, and this symptom is therefore generally initially diagnosed as CPHP by clinicians. The current case study reports a female patient never-smoker with non-small cell lung cancer accompanied by calcaneal metastasis presenting as heel pain. The patient was initially diagnosed with CPHP without any imaging examinations. As there was no relief from the heel pain six months later, a foot X-ray was performed, which revealed a lesion of the calcaneus. The analysis of a biopsy obtained from the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma. The present case indicates that patients suspected to have CPHP should be conventionally examined with radiography of the foot during the initial diagnosis. Similarly, if a patient with lung cancer has symptoms such as CPHP, distant metastasis should be accounted for; despite their rarity, clinicians should maintain a high level of suspicion, since accurate diagnosis and timely treatment is important in management and outcome. PMID:25009652

  13. Gastrocnemius shortening and heel pain.

    PubMed

    Solan, Matthew C; Carne, Andrew; Davies, Mark S

    2014-12-01

    Pain and reduced function caused by disorders of either the plantar fascia or the Achilles tendon are common. Although heel pain is not a major public health problem it affects millions of people each year. For most patients, time and first-line treatments allow symptoms to resolve. A proportion of patients have resistant symptoms. Managing these recalcitrant cases is a challenge. Gastrocnemius contracture produces increased strain in both the Achilles tendon and the plantar fascia. This biomechanical feature must be properly assessed otherwise treatment is compromised. PMID:25456718

  14. Heel pain and Achilles tendonitis - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... inflammation and pain. Wear a walking boot or heel lifts if recommended by your provider. Talk with your provider before using pain medicines if you have heart disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, or have had stomach ...

  15. “Effectiveness of interventions in reducing pain and maintaining physical activity in children and adolescents with calcaneal apophysitis (Sever’s disease): a systematic review”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Calcaneal apophysitis, also commonly known as sever’s disease, is a condition seen in children usually aged between 8–15?years. Conservative therapies, such as taping, heel lifts and orthotic intervention are accepted management practices for calcaneal apophysitis, though there is very little high quality research examining the efficacy of such treatment modalities. Previous narrative literature reviews and opinion pieces provide some evidence for the use of heel raises or orthoses. The aim of this manuscript was to complete a systemic review on the treatment options for calcaneal apophysitis as measured by pain reduction and maintenance of physical activity. Methods A search strategy completed by two reviewers examined nine databases from inception to May 2012. Search terms included heel pain, children, adolescent, calcaneal apophysitis, sever’s disease, treatment, and management (full text publications, human studies). Systematic reviews, randomised control trials, case series, and case studies were included. The reference lists of the selected articles were also examined. The methodology, quality and risk of bias was examined and assessed using the PEDro scale. Results Nine articles were retrieved including three clinical trials involving randomisation, two case series, two retrospective case reviews, and two case reports. Effect size calculations and a meta analysis were unable to be completed due to the limited data reported within the literature. Numerous treatment options were reported throughout the literature, though few were examined against a control or alternate treatment option in well-designed trials. The limited evidence indicated that orthoses provided greater short-term pain relief than heel raises. Health practitioners should view these results with caution, as there were apparent methodological problems with the employed study design and limited follow-up of participants. Conclusion There is limited evidence to support the use of heel raises and orthoses for children who have heel pain related to calcaneal apophysitis. Further research is needed to generate higher quality evidence with larger sample sizes, and validated measures of pain and function to establish effective treatment approaches for children with calcaneal apophysitis. PMID:23641779

  16. Plantar heel pain and foot loading during normal walking.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Justin; Burns, Joshua; Adams, Roger; Pappas, Evangelos; Crosbie, Jack

    2015-02-01

    Plantar heel pain is aggravated by weight-bearing, yet limited evidence exists regarding how people with heel pain load their feet during walking. Knowledge of loading patterns in people with plantar heel pain would enhance the understanding of their foot function and assist in developing intervention strategies. Plantar pressure using the Emed-AT platform (Novel Gmbh, Germany) was collected from 198 people with plantar heel pain and 70 asymptomatic controls during normal walking. Maximum force, force-time integral, peak pressure, pressure-time integral and contact time were measured in four quadrants of the heel, the midfoot and the medial and lateral forefoot. The symptomatic group was sub-divided into equal low-pain and high-pain groups using the Foot Health Status Questionnaire pain score. Following age and body mass comparison, multivariate analyses of covariance were performed to compare the heel pain group to the controls, and the low-pain group to the high-pain group, for each loading variable. The heel pain group displayed lower maximum force beneath the heel, lower peak pressure beneath the postero-lateral heel and lower maximum force beneath the medial forefoot. Force-time integrals were lower beneath the posterior heel regions and higher at the lateral forefoot. People with heel pain also had longer midfoot and forefoot contact time. Higher pain level was associated with lower peak pressure and maximum force beneath regions of the heel. Compared to the controls, people with plantar heel pain demonstrated reduced heel loading and modified forefoot loading consistent with a strategy to offload the painful heel. PMID:25724260

  17. Heel pain-plantar fasciitis: revision 2014.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robroy L; Davenport, Todd E; Reischl, Stephen F; McPoil, Thomas G; Matheson, James W; Wukich, Dane K; McDonough, Christine M

    2014-11-01

    The Orthopaedic Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has an ongoing effort to create evidence-based practice guidelines for orthopaedic physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal impairments described in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The purpose of these revised clinical practice guidelines is to review recent peer-reviewed literature and make recommendations related to nonarthritic heel pain. PMID:25361863

  18. Don't Ignore Your Kid's Heel Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Text Size Print Bookmark Don’t Ignore Your Kid’s Heel Pain Address Pain Early, Avoid Long Recovery ... and ankle surgeon. The good news is that kids are good healers and treatment may be simple ...

  19. Customized heel pads and soft orthotics to treat heel pain and plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Deborah A; Dawson, Deirdre R

    2003-10-01

    We describe the design of a new cost-effective, comfortable orthotic designed to treat heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis. The heel pad is fabricated from a 4 degrees Sorbothane medial wedge with a customized insertion of low-density Plastazote. The orthotic is medium-density Plastazote reinforced with cork in the medial longitudinal arch. One pair of orthotics takes less than 1 hour to make. Pilot data were collected retrospectively to evaluate the efficacy of the orthotic for reducing pain. Ten clients at a hand and foot orthotic clinic with a mean age of 71+/-9.1 years and with unilateral or bilateral heel pain associated with plantar fasciitis were provided with customized heel pads and soft, molded orthotics at their initial visit. Pain levels were recorded with verbal and Likert-type scales. After 5 weeks of heel pad and orthotic use, all patients showed a reduction in pain, with the overall reduction being highly significant (Pheel pads and soft molded orthotics are an effective first-line treatment for the heel pain and loss of function associated with plantar fasciitis. PMID:14586928

  20. Plantar Fasciitis—Heel Pain in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Jeffery A.; Kolodin, Eric L.

    1992-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is the most frequent hind foot problem that affects runners. It occurs when repetitive stress is placed on the heel from a chronic or acute condition. Athletes with biomechanical imbalances are most susceptible to this condition. They exhibit pain in the morning upon weight bearing and, frequently, in the acute stage, have discoloration of the injured area. Management includes preventive and therapeutic exercise, physical therapy, strengthening routines, taping, and the use of orthotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although injections and NSAIDs bring relief, their effects are often only temporary. This condition is best treated with therapeutic exercises and orthotics in order to correct the athlete's biomechanical faults. This article presents principles and techniques that can be used to effectively prevent and treat plantar fasciitis. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4.Fig 5.Fig 6.Fig 7.Fig 8.Fig 9.Fig 11. PMID:16558136

  1. Classification of Calcaneal Spurs and Their Relationship With Plantar Fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Binghua; Zhou, You; Tao, Xu; Yuan, Chengsong; Tang, Kanglai

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal spurs, as a cause of plantar fasciitis, are currently debatable. A prospective study was performed to classify calcaneal spurs according to the findings from an investigation of the relationship between calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis. Thirty patients with calcaneal spurs and plantar heel pain underwent calcaneal spur removal and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy. The relationship between the classification of calcaneal spurs and plantar fasciitis was evaluated by endoscopic findings, clinical symptoms, radiographic images, and biopsy findings. The visual analog scale for pain and the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores for functional evaluation were used preoperatively and postoperatively, respectively. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Two separate types of calcaneal spurs were recognized. Type A calcaneal spurs were located superior to the plantar fascia insertion, and type B calcaneal spurs were located within the plantar fascia. Magnetic resonance imaging results showed a more severe plantar fasciitis grade in type B calcaneal spurs preoperatively. Histologic examination showed that the numbers of granulocytes per image in type B spurs were significantly increased compared with those in type A spurs. Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean visual analog scale and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society scores and magnetic resonance imaging results in both groups. The amount of change in the visual analog scale score and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society score, the number of granulocytes per image, and calcaneal spur length showed a high association with the classification of the calcaneal spurs. Calcaneal spurs were completely removed and did not recur in any of the patients on radiographic assessment during the follow-up period. Calcaneal spurs can be classified into 2 distinct types that are indicative of the severity of plantar fasciitis. PMID:25771476

  2. Management of subcalcaneal pain and Achilles tendonitis with heel inserts

    PubMed Central

    Maclellan, G. E.; Vyvyan, Barbara

    1981-01-01

    Soft tissue symptoms in the leg due to sporting activity are commonly associated with the force of heel strike. Conventional training shoes compromise between comfort and performance; few models are suitably designed for both considerations. Using a visco-elastic polymer insert the symptoms of heel pain and Achilles tendonitis have been largely or completely abolished in a preliminary study. Imagesp117-ap117-bp117-cp118-a PMID:7272653

  3. Plantar calcaneal spurs in older people: longitudinal traction or vertical compression?

    PubMed Central

    Menz, Hylton B; Zammit, Gerard V; Landorf, Karl B; Munteanu, Shannon E

    2008-01-01

    Background Plantar calcaneal spurs are common, however their pathophysiology is poorly understood. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and correlates of plantar calcaneal spurs in a large sample of older people. Methods Weightbearing lateral foot radiographs of 216 people (140 women and 76 men) aged 62 to 94 years (mean age 75.9, SD 6.6) were examined for plantar calcaneal and Achilles tendon spurs. Associations between the presence of spurs and sex, body mass index, radiographic measures of foot posture, self-reported co-morbidities and current or previous heel pain were then explored. Results Of the 216 participants, 119 (55%) had at least one plantar calcaneal spur and 103 (48%) had at least one Achilles tendon spur. Those with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to have Achilles tendon spurs (odds ratio [OR] = 2.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2 to 3.5). Prevalence of spurs did not differ according to sex. Participants with plantar calcaneal spurs were more likely to be obese (OR = 7.9, 95% CI 3.6 to 17.0), report osteoarthritis (OR = 2.6, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.8) and have current or previous heel pain (OR = 4.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 9.4). No relationship was found between the presence of calcaneal spurs and radiographic measures of foot posture. Conclusion Calcaneal spurs are common in older men and women and are related to obesity, osteoarthritis and current or previous heel pain, but are unrelated to radiographic measurements of foot posture. These findings support the theory that plantar calcaneal spurs may be an adaptive response to vertical compression of the heel rather than longitudinal traction at the calcaneal enthesis. PMID:18822162

  4. Efficacy of a single-formula acupuncture treatment for horses with palmar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine A; Manning, Stephen T

    2015-12-01

    Acupuncture is used without strong scientific evidence to treat many diseases of the horse, including palmar heel pain. Research is needed to provide evidence for the application of these treatments. Within the confines of our study, acupuncture did not reliably modulate palmar heel pain in horses. PMID:26663921

  5. Heel pain due to psoriatic arthritis in a 50 year old recreational male athlete: case report

    PubMed Central

    Yedon, Dominique Forand; Howitt, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Heel pain is a common presentation in a sports injury practice, with a list of common differentials including achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis. However, seronegative arthritis can also cause enthesopathies that produce heel pain and should be considered in a differential diagnosis list. In this case, a 50 year old recreationally active male presented with non-traumatic insidious heel pain and without history of any skin conditions or any other symptoms of seronegative spondyloarthritis. Clinical suspicion led to laboratory testing and radiographs/bone scan which yielded the diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis. PMID:22131565

  6. Effect of Monophasic Pulsed Current on Heel Pain and Functional Activities caused by Plantar Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, Abdullah K.; Petrofsky, Jerrold S.; Daher, Noha S.; Lohman, Everett; Laymon, Michael; Syed, Hasan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Plantar fasciitis (PF) is a soft tissue disorder considered to be one of the most common causes of inferior heel pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of monophasic pulsed current (MPC) and MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific stretching exercises (SE) on the treatment of PF. Material/Methods Forty-four participants (22 women and 22 men, with a mean age of 49 years) diagnosed with PF were randomly assigned to receive MPC (n=22) or MPC coupled with plantar fascia-specific SE (n=22). Prior to and after 4 weeks of treatment, participants underwent baseline evaluation; heel pain was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS), heel tenderness threshold was quantified using a handheld pressure algometer (PA), and functional activities level was assessed using the Activities of Daily Living subscale of the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (ADL/FAAM). Results Heel pain scores showed a significant reduction in both groups compared to baseline VAS scores (P<0.001). Heel tenderness improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline PA scores (P<0.001). Functional activity level improved significantly in both groups compared with baseline (ADL/FAAM) scores (P<0.001). However, no significant differences existed between the 2 treatment groups in all post-intervention outcome measures. Conclusions This trial showed that MPC is useful in treating inferior heel symptoms caused by PF. PMID:25791231

  7. An atypical calcaneal fracture in a child: a literature review concerning the treatment.

    PubMed

    Guterres, Leonardo Waihrich; Ribeiro, Deryck Aguiar; Ribeiro, Tiango Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures are considered uncommon accounting for 0.005-0.41% of all children fractures. Few reports concerning treatment are available. Most of these fractures are non-displaced/minimally displaced and are associated with a fall of less than 1 m. The aim of this case report was to discuss the diagnosis and treatment of a child calcaneal fracture, an atypical presentation despite the high energy mechanism of trauma. A 7-year-old child fell from a 5-m ladder with all his weight on his right heel. Significantly hind-foot reduced range of motion associated with a lateral/plantar calcaneal swelling and pain was found. Neurovascular examination and other parts of the body were normal. Radiograph showed an undisplaced calcaneal body fracture and computed tomography confirmed no subtalar joint involvement. A splint followed by plaster was applied. Weight bearing and deambulation were not allowed. After 4 weeks, no pain and limping was reported by the child's parents. Plaster was removed and radiograph showed fracture consolidation. Patient had no complaints of pain, no restrictions in range of motion and normal walking. Limping in children is a difficult complaint to assess. Differential diagnoses of a calcaneal fractures should be performed, even without a history of trauma or a history of trivial trauma. PMID:25368703

  8. Management of pain from heel stick in neonates: an analysis of research conducted in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Prasopkittikun, Tassanee; Tilokskulchai, Fongcum

    2003-01-01

    The heel stick procedure is the most common painful procedure performed in preterm and full-term neonates. Various nonpharmacologic interventions have been used for pain relief. However, the magnitude of the effect of different interventions has received little attention. In this study, 4 eligible studies conducted in Thailand, focusing on the effects of interventions on pain responses to heel stick procedure in neonates, were obtained for analysis. Swaddling in full-term newborns was found to have the largest mean effect size (dmn = 0.79). However, the moderate-to-large effect sizes (dmn = 0.5-0.75) of positioning in preterm newborns tended to exist throughout the poststick period while the effect sizes of other interventions decreased over time. The effect sizes of these interventions for physiological responses varied. PMID:14655790

  9. Proximal plantar fibroma as an etiology of recalcitrant plantar heel pain.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Shaun; Han, Nancy; Pressman, Martin M; Wallace, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Prompted by repeated pathology reports of fibromas at the origin of the plantar fascia after fasciectomy for chronic plantar heel pain, this study examined the incidence of proximal plantar fibroma. A retrospective study of 100 pathology specimens from 97 patients with the preoperative diagnosis of recalcitrant plantar fasciitis was performed. Patients ranged in age from 36 to 82, and included 31 males and 66 females. The specimens consisted of medial and central bands of the fascia obtained from transverse plantar fasciectomies. The fasciectomies were performed by 4 surgeons between July 1994 and March 2008. One quarter of the cases studied had a histological appearance of plantar fibroma. This new finding has not been reported in any literature in connection with recalcitrant heel pain. Histologic findings of the specimens were placed into 3 groups: neoplastic involvement (25%, 21 female and 6 male), inflammation without neoplastic involvement (21%, 13 female and 6 male), and other, which consisted of having no inflammatory or neoplastic response (54%, 32 female and 19 male). All of the patients ailed a 3- to 6-month conservative treatment regimen, which included anti-inflammatory medication, modification of activities, injection of corticosteroids, night splints, custom molded orthotics, and physical therapy. Only 3 patients underwent bilateral plantar fasciectomies. No patient required a revisional procedure. The authors conclude that 25% of recalcitrant heel pain is neoplastic in origin, and that patients presenting with these lesions require excision and not fasciotomy. PMID:21353998

  10. Heel pain and HIV-associated lipodystrophy: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Maja; Tibbles, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Plantar fasciitis is diagnosed based on a pathognomonic clinical presentation and physical examination including plantar heel pain with the initial few steps after a period of inactivity. People living with HIV/AIDS, who are taking anti-retroviral medications, often have an associated redistribution of body fat (lipodystrophy). Lipoatrophy of the extremities may involve the heel fat-pad in this population and result in the signs and symptoms of plantar fasciitis. Two cases of plantar heel pain in HIV-associated lipodystrophy are presented to discuss the possible clinical association between the two conditions. Although conservative therapies have limited evidence, they are commonly used and have been seen, clinically, to result in a resolution of symptoms. In the presented cases, the individuals benefited from soft tissue therapy, modalities, activity modification and education on proper footwear. Clinicians should be aware that the association between these two conditions may be a significant cause of morbidity in a population of patients with HIV. PMID:18516231

  11. The effect of melody on the physiological responses of heel sticks pain in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Marofi, Maryam; Nikobakht, Farzaneh; Badiee, Zohreh; Golchin, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Background: During health care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), infants undergo extremely painful procedures, which may cause problems, if not controlled, such as changes in the pattern of respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation. The present study aimed to find the effect of melody on the physiological responses of neonates’ heel stick pain. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was conducted in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) for 5 months. Fifty infants were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly assigned in equal numbers to two groups (n = 25). In the melody group (intervention), a selected melody was played for the infants at a distance of 1 m from them, with a sound intensity of 65 dB, from 3 minutes before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively, and their physiological responses were observed with a monitoring system and recorded at the afore-mentioned time periods. Physiological responses were also recorded in the control group (no intervention) 3 min before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively. Results: Means of respiratory and pulse rates in the melody and control groups showed a significant difference at different time points. But the mean blood oxygen saturation in the melody group showed no significant difference at different time points, although the difference was significant in the control group. Conclusions: The results showed that melody could maintain more balance in some physiological responses of infants, such as the respiratory rate and pulse rate during the Guthrie test. Therefore, melody is recommended to be used to prevent the destructive effects of pain in infants during painful procedures. PMID:26120343

  12. Use of Lateral Calcaneal Flap for Coverage of Hindfoot Defects: An Anatomical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Zygouris, Panagiotis; Michalinos, Adamantios; Protogerou, Vassilis; Kotsiomitis, Evangelos; Mazarakis, Antonios; Dimovelis, Ioannis; Troupis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Lateral calcaneal flap is an established surgical option for coverage of lateral calcaneum and posterior heel defects. Lateral calcaneal flap vascularization and innervations are based on lateral calcaneal artery neurovascular bundle, that is, lateral calcaneal artery, small saphenous vein, and sural nerve. Anatomical research has allowed exploration of its many advantages but can also lead to its various modifications, permitting a wide variety of clinical applications. In this paper the authors report an anatomical and clinical study on lateral calcaneal artery course and lateral calcaneal flap clinical applications. Anatomic part of our study focused on lateral calcaneal artery course and optimization of surgical technique for flap harvesting. Data were used for design of lateral calcaneal flap in 5 patients. Our results were satisfactory in terms of coverage adequacy, perioperative morbidity, and functional and aesthetical outcome. PMID:26640707

  13. Three-dimensional printed calcaneal prosthesis following total calcanectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Imanishi, Jungo; Choong, Peter F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The majority of patients with extremity sarcoma can be surgically treated without amputation. However, limb-salvage surgery for foot sarcomas including the calcaneus remains challenging. Presentation of case A 71-year-old man presented with a 5-year history of right heel persistent pain. Imaging studies revealed an osteolytic, destructive and highly metabolic lesion in the right calcaneus. Computed tomography guided core needle biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of grade 2 chondrosarcoma. A total calcanectomy was performed, and the defect was reconstructed with a patient matched three-dimensional printed titanium calcaneal prosthesis. Intra-operatively, ligaments including the Achilles tendon, and plantar fascia were reattached. The post-operative course was uneventful, and at the 5-month clinical follow-up, the patient was fully weightbearing, with a mobile ankle without pain. Discussion This case is the first to use additive manufacturing to create a prosthetic calcaneus. The complex peri-calcaneal articular surfaces and reattachment of tendinous structures facilitate efforts to stabilize the prosthesis in situ. Conclusion Three-dimensional-printed prosthesis of the calcaneus is a viable alternative to amputation. PMID:25827294

  14. Effectiveness of low-Dye taping for the short-term treatment of plantar heel pain: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Radford, Joel A; Landorf, Karl B; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Cook, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Background Plantar heel pain is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders of the foot and ankle. Treatment of the condition is usually conservative, however the effectiveness of many treatments frequently used in clinical practice, including supportive taping of the foot, has not been established. We performed a participant-blinded randomised trial to assess the effectiveness of low-Dye taping, a commonly used short-term treatment for plantar heel pain. Methods Ninety-two participants with plantar heel pain (mean age 50 ± 14 years; mean body mass index 30 ± 6; and median self-reported duration of symptoms 10 months, range of 2 to 240 months) were recruited from the general public between February and June 2005. Participants were randomly allocated to (i) low-Dye taping and sham ultrasound or (ii) sham ultrasound alone. The duration of follow-up for each participant was one week. No participants were lost to follow-up. Outcome measures included 'first-step' pain (measured on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale) and the Foot Health Status Questionnaire domains of foot pain, foot function and general foot health. Results Participants treated with low-Dye taping reported a small improvement in 'first-step' pain after one week of treatment compared to those who did not receive taping. The estimate of effect on 'first-step' pain favoured the low-Dye tape (ANCOVA adjusted mean difference -12.3 mm; 95% CI -22.4 to -2.2; P = 0.017). There were no other statistically significant differences between groups. Thirteen participants in the taping group experienced an adverse event however most were mild to moderate and short-lived. Conclusion When used for the short-term treatment of plantar heel pain, low-Dye taping provides a small improvement in 'first-step' pain compared with a sham intervention after a one-week period. PMID:16895612

  15. Evaluation of clinical examination for differential diagnosis of lameness by navicular apparatus or heel pain in horses.

    PubMed

    Sardari, Kamran; Kazemi, Hossain

    2008-07-01

    To evaluation of clinical examination for differential diagnosis of navicular region pain from other forms of palmar heel pain in the forelimb in horses the present study was undertaken. Thirty four horses with lameness referable to the palmar aspect of the hoof based on their response to the palmar digital nerves analgesia were divided into 2 groups based on their response to both distal interphalangeal joint and navicular bursa analgesia. Horses that were profoundly improved by both analgesic blocks (distal interphalangeal joint and navicular bursa) were considered to have navicular region pain whereas, all other horses were considered to have other cause of palmar heel pain. The responses to various diagnostic tests such as hoof tester, distal limb flexion and toe wedge tests were compared between the groups. For all diagnostic tests, sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values for navicular pain were calculated. According to the present study the single most accurate diagnostic test was analgesia of the distal interphalangeal joint for navicular region pain. PMID:18819633

  16. A comparison of the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave and ultrasound therapy in the management of heel pain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheing, G. L. Y.; Chang, H.; Lo, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) and ultrasound therapy (US) for managing heel pain. Thirty-seven subjects received either: ESWT (once a week), US (three times a week), or CONTROL (no treatment) for 3 consecutive weeks and were followed-up for 3 more weeks. A visual analogue scale (VAS), the maximum tolerable duration for prolonged walking or standing, and the Mayo clinical scoring system (MCSS) were evaluated. Mixed models treating baseline measures as covariates were adopted for statistical analysis. By week 3, intensity of heel pain on palpation was reduced by 37% (VAS score from 7.5 to 4.6) in the ESWT group, 24% (from 5.3 to 4.2) in the US group, and increased by 3% (5.6-5.7) in the control group; this difference was significant after adjusting for baseline VAS scores ( p = 0.022). The improvements in the maximum tolerable duration of prolonged walking or standing was only significant in the ESWT group (157% increase, p = 0.043) but not the other two groups. Both active treatment groups maintained the treatment effect at the three-week follow-up. We conclude that ESWT is potentially more effective in reducing heel pain than ultrasound therapy but additional evidence is needed due to the various limitations of the study.

  17. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for chronic painful heel syndrome: a prospective, double blind, randomized trial assessing the efficacy of a new electromagnetic shock wave device.

    PubMed

    Gollwitzer, Hans; Diehl, Peter; von Korff, Alexej; Rahlfs, Volker W; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger

    2007-01-01

    Published data describing the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave therapy for the treatment of plantar heel pain provide conflicting results, and optimal treatment guidelines are yet to be determined. To assess the efficacy and safety of extracorporeal shockwave therapy compared with placebo in the treatment of chronic painful heel syndrome with a new electromagnetic device, we undertook a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial conducted among 40 participants who were randomly allocated to either active, focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy (0.25 mJ/mm(2)) or sham shockwave therapy. Both groups received 3 applications of 2000 shockwave impulses, each session 1 week apart. The primary outcome was the change in composite heel pain (morning pain, pain with activities of daily living, and pain upon application of pressure with a focal force meter) as quantified using a visual analog pain scale at 12 weeks after completion of the interventions compared with baseline. Secondary endpoints included changes in morning pain, pain with activities of daily living, and pain upon application of pressure with a focal force meter, as measured on a visual analog pain scale, as well as the change in the Roles and Maudsley score, at 12 weeks after the baseline measurement. Active extracorporeal shockwave therapy resulted in a 73.2% reduction in composite heel pain, and this was a 32.7% greater reduction than that achieved with placebo. The difference was not statistically significant (1-tailed Wilcoxon Mann-Whitney U test, P =.0302), but reached clinical relevance (Mann-Whitney effect size = 0.6737). In regard to the secondary outcomes, active extracorporeal shockwave therapy displayed relative superiority in comparison with the sham intervention. No relevant adverse events occurred in either intervention group. The results of the present study support the use of electromagnetically generated extracorporeal shockwave therapy for the treatment of refractory plantar heel pain. PMID:17761319

  18. Percutaneous Arthroscopic Calcaneal Osteosynthesis: A Minimally Invasive Technique for Displaced Intra-Articular Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Pastides, Philip S; Milnes, Lydia; Rosenfeld, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    The management of calcaneal fracture remains challenging. Open surgery has been fraught with high infection rates and soft tissue complications. More minimally invasive procedures have reduced this risk, but the patient outcomes after treatment of displaced calcaneal fractures have remained relatively unsatisfactory. We present a method for the management of Sanders grade II and III calcaneal fractures: percutaneous arthroscopic calcaneal osteosynthesis. Thirty-three fractures in 30 patients who had presented to our tertiary foot and ankle trauma center in central London were treated with percutaneous arthroscopic calcaneal osteosynthesis for calcaneal fractures, and the data were prospectively collected. The mean patient age at injury was 39 years. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Of our patients, 58% were smokers at injury. Of the 33 fractures, 46% were classified as grade II and 54% as grade III. The mean length of stay was 1.92 days. At the final follow-up visit, the mean Böhler angle had increased from 11.10° (range 2° to 24°) to 23.41° (range 15° to 35°). The modified American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society scale score was 72.18 (range 18 to 100), the calcaneal fracture scoring system score was 79.34 (range 42 to 100), and the visual analog scale score was 29.50 (range 0 to 100). We had a single case of a superficial port site infection and 2 cases of prominent screws, which were removed. No cases of deep infection developed, and no conversion to subtalar fusion was required. This technique significantly reduced the incidence of postoperative wound complications. Direct visualization of the fracture site allowed accurate restoration of the articular surface and correction of heel varus. Furthermore, it was associated with a high self-reported functional outcome and a return to preinjury employment levels. Also, the results did not appear to be influenced by tobacco consumption. PMID:25960056

  19. Cracked Heels

    MedlinePLUS

    The official consumer website of: Visit ACFAS.org | About ACFAS | Información en Español Advanced Search Home » Foot & Ankle Conditions » Cracked Heels Text Size Print Bookmark Cracked Heels There are many potential causes of " cracked heels ." Dry skin (xerosis) is common and can ...

  20. Orthosis-Shaped Sandals Are as Efficacious as In-Shoe Orthoses and Better than Flat Sandals for Plantar Heel Pain: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vicenzino, Bill; McPoil, Thomas G.; Stephenson, Aoife; Paul, Sanjoy K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate efficacy of a contoured sandal being marketed for plantar heel pain with comparison to a flat flip-flop and contoured in-shoe insert/orthosis. Method 150 volunteers aged 50 (SD: 12) years with plantar heel pain (>4 weeks) were enrolled after responding to advertisements and eligibility determined by telephone and at first visit. Participants were randomly allocated to receive commercially available contoured sandals (n = 49), flat flip-flops (n = 50) or over the counter, pre-fabricated full-length foot orthotics (n = 51). Primary outcomes were a 15-point Global Rating of Change scale (GROC: 1 = a very great deal worse, 15 = a very great deal better), 13 to 15 representing an improvement and the 20-item Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) on which participants rate 20 common weight bearing activities and activities of daily living on a 5-point scale (0 = extreme difficulty, 4 = no difficulty). Secondary outcomes were worst level of heel pain in the preceding week, and the foot and ankle ability measure. Outcomes were collected blind to allocation. Analyses were done on an intention to treat basis with 12 weeks being the primary outcome time of interest. Results The contoured sandal was 68% more likely to report improvement in terms of GROC compared to flat flip-flop. On the LEFS the contoured sandal was 61% more likely than flat flip-flop to report improvement. The secondary outcomes in the main reflected the primary outcomes, and there were no differences between contoured sandal and shoe insert. Conclusions and Relevance Physicians can have confidence in supporting a patient's decision to wear contoured sandals or in-shoe orthoses as one of the first and simple strategies to manage their heel pain. Trial Registration The Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000463875 PMID:26669302

  1. Heel lipoma mimicking plantar fasciitis in a ballroom dancer.

    PubMed

    Taweel, Nicholas R; Raikin, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    The present case illustrates a lipoma as an unusual cause of heel pain. A 64-year-old female ballroom dancer presented with 8 months of pain that was unresponsive to previous treatment of plantar fasciitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a heel lipoma. Her pain was fully resolved after surgical excision. Soft tissue tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis of heel pain, especially when symptoms and treatment response do not follow the typical course of plantar fasciitis. PMID:25624040

  2. Pediatric calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Hobie; Ann Kramer, Patricia; Benirschke, Stephen K.

    2009-01-01

    Although operative treatment of displaced, intra-articular fractures of the calcaneus in adults is generally accepted as standard practice, operative treatment for the same fractures in the skeletally immature remains controversial, potentially because the outcome for fracture types (intra- vs. extra-articular) and severity (displaced vs. nondisplaced) have been confounded in studies of children. We review herein the results of 21 displaced, intra-articular fractures in 18 skeletally immature patients, who were treated with open reduction and internal fixation using a standard surgical approach and protocol developed for adults. The average pre-operative Böhler's angle on the injured side was ?5° (range: ?35 – +35) compared to 31° (range: +22 – +47) on the uninjured side, indicating substantial displacement. There were no post-operative infections or wound healing problems, and all but one patient was followed to union (average follow-up: 1.5 years; range: 0.30–4.3 years). Maintenance of reduction was confirmed on follow-up radiographs with an average Böhler's angle of 31° (range: +22 – +49). We demonstrate that results for operative fixation of displaced, intra-articular calcaneal fractures in the skeletally immature are comparable to those in adults when the treatment protocol is the same. PMID:21808673

  3. Bilateral Heel Numbness due to External Compression during Obstetric Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kamphuis, Vivian P.; Zegers, Marie P.A.; Koppen, Hille

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who developed bilateral heel numbness after obstetric epidural analgesia. We diagnosed her with bilateral neuropathy of the medial calcaneal nerve, most likely due to longstanding pressure on both heels. Risk factors for the development of this neuropathy were prolonged labour with spinal analgesia and a continuation of analgesia during episiotomy. Padded footrests decrease pressure and can possibly prevent this neuropathy. PMID:25802500

  4. Plating for intra-articular calcaneal fractures…. Is it an overkill?

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Himanshu Gurunath; Mane, Vilas S.; Gaonkar, Kiran L.; Patil, Pravin P.; Shaha, Mandar S.; Patel, Nirav S.; Desai, Nagesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Even after evolution of computerized tomography and improved surgical measures, treatment of intraarticular calcaneal fractures remains a controversy. Hence this study was carried out to compare functional outcomes of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures, treated with operative management with plating and conservative management with cast. Material and methods This study was carried out as a prospective, comparative study. Twenty nine (30 fractures) patients with acute, displaced intraarticular fractures of calcaneum aged 18–50 years, were enrolled in the study. Open fractures and fractures older than two weeks were excluded. 30 fractures were divided into two groups (operative and conservative; n = 15 in each). Evaluation in form of post treatment restoration of Bohler's angle, heel varus angle and with Creighton–Nebraska (C–N) score for functional outcome was done at the end of 12 months. Results When we consider the clinical evaluation under the C–N score, the results of operatively managed calcaneal fractures are slightly better than those of the conservative group. But this did not have any statistical significance. Also, there was significant difference in pre and post treatment Bohler's angle and heel varus angle in operative group. Three cases of plating suffered from post-operative wound dehiscence. Conclusion A relatively better functional outcome was observed in displaced and comminuted fractures in plating, provided that the Bohler's angle was restored. In conservative group, functional outcome of minimally displaced fractures were better than displaced comminuted fractures. Post treatment Bohlers angle has prognostic importance in functional outcome. PMID:26155050

  5. Comparison of usual podiatric care and early physical therapy intervention for plantar heel pain: study protocol for a parallel-group randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A significant number of individuals suffer from plantar heel pain (PHP) and many go on to have chronic symptoms and continued disability. Persistence of symptoms adds to the economic burden of PHP and cost-effective solutions are needed. Currently, there is a wide variation in treatment, cost, and outcomes of care for PHP with limited information on the cost-effectiveness and comparisons of common treatment approaches. Two practice guidelines and recent evidence of effective physical therapy intervention are available to direct treatment but the timing and influence of physical therapy intervention in the multidisciplinary management of PHP is unclear. The purpose of this investigation is to compare the outcomes and costs associated with early physical therapy intervention (ePT) following initial presentation to podiatry versus usual podiatric care (uPOD) in individuals with PHP. Methods A parallel-group, block-randomized clinical trial will compare ePT and uPOD. Both groups will be seen initially by a podiatrist before allocation to a group that will receive physical therapy intervention consisting primarily of manual therapy, exercise, and modalities, or podiatric care consisting primarily of a stretching handout, medication, injections, and orthotics. Treatment in each group will be directed by practice guidelines and a procedural manual, yet the specific intervention for each participant will be selected by the treating provider. Between-group differences in the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure 6 months following the initial visit will be the primary outcome collected by an independent investigator. In addition, differences in the European Quality of Life – Five Dimensions, Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Global Rating of Change (GROC), health-related costs, and cost-effectiveness at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year will be compared between groups. The association between successful outcomes based on GROC score and participant expectations of recovery generally, and specific to physical therapy and podiatry treatment, will also be analyzed. Discussion This study will be the first pragmatic trial to investigate the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of ePT and uPOD in individuals with PHP. The results will serve to inform clinical practice decisions and management guidelines of multiple disciplines. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01865734 PMID:24299257

  6. Bursitis of the heel

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by the heel. It is where the large Achilles tendon connects the calf muscles to the heel ... jumping. This condition is very often linked to Achilles tendinitis . Sometimes retrocalcaneal bursitis may be mistaken for ...

  7. Achilles Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of jogger's heel.

    PubMed

    Horobin, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Plantar fasciitis, the most common cause of heel pain, is a self-limiting condition exacerbated by weight bearing after episodes at rest that usually resolves within 12 months after conservative treatment. This article outlines the aetiology of plantar fasciitis and refers to a case study in discussing diagnosis, examination and management. PMID:25659794

  9. Detachable high heel shoe construction

    E-print Network

    Morales, Alfredo Louis

    2007-01-01

    The goal on this investigation was to develop a detachable high heel shoe construction that could enter the current high heel market. The impact of high heel shoes on women's fashion is enormous but there are associated ...

  10. Randomized, Multicenter Trial on the Effect of Radiation Therapy on Plantar Fasciitis (Painful Heel Spur) Comparing a Standard Dose With a Very Low Dose: Mature Results After 12 Months' Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Niewald, Marcus; Micke, Oliver; Graeber, Stefan; Schaefer, Vera; Scheid, Christine; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ruebe, Christian

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To conduct a randomized trial of radiation therapy for painful heel spur, comparing a standard dose with a very low dose. Methods and Materials: Sixty-six patients were randomized to receive radiation therapy either with a total dose of 6.0 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 1.0 Gy twice weekly (standard dose) or with a total dose of 0.6 Gy applied in 6 fractions of 0.1 Gy twice weekly (low dose). In all patients lateral opposing 4- to 6-MV photon beams were used. The results were measured using a visual analogue scale, the Calcaneodynia score, and the SF12 health survey. The fundamental phase of the study ended after 3 months, and the follow-up was continued up to 1 year. Patients with insufficient pain relief after 3 months were offered reirradiation with the standard dosage at any time afterward. Results: Of 66 patients, 4 were excluded because of withdrawal of consent or screening failures. After 3 months the results in the standard arm were highly significantly superior compared with those in the low-dose arm (visual analogue scale, P=.001; Calcaneodynia score, P=.027; SF12, P=.045). The accrual of patients was stopped at this point. Further evaluation after 12 months' follow-up showed the following results: (1) highly significant fewer patients were reirradiated in the standard arm compared with the low-dose arm (P<.001); (2) the results of patients in the low-dose arm who were reirradiated were identical to those in the standard arm not reirradiated (reirradiation as a salvage therapy if the lower dose was ineffective); (3) patients experiencing a favorable result after 3 months showed this even after 12 months, and some results even improved further between 3 and 12 months. Conclusions: This study confirms the superior analgesic effect of radiation therapy with 6-Gy doses on painful heel spur even for a longer time period of at least 1 year.

  11. The painful foot, Part II: Common rearfoot deformities.

    PubMed

    Van Wyngarden, T M

    1997-05-01

    As with deformities of the forefoot, deformities of the rearfoot often respond well to conservative therapy. Rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications are often used. Patients with plantar fasciitis may benefit from corticosteroid injections. Surgery may be helpful in refractory cases. Haglund's deformity is associated with pain in the area of the osseous ridge on the posterosuperior aspect of the calcaneus. The retrocalcaneal bursa may be inflamed. This disorder is diagnosed by palpation of the painful area. Conservative treatment consists of minimizing pressure over the osseous ridge. Corticosteroid injection is not advised since it may weaken the Achilles tendon. Surgical intervention consists of resection or reduction of the osseous ridge. Posterior calcaneal spur is another cause of heel pain. The spur can be visualized radiographically in the tendon insertion. Treatment is conservative, with footgear modification and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy. Surgery to remove the spur may be indicated if conservative measures fall to relieve the pain. Tarsal tunnel syndrome is characterized by pain and numbness from the medial malleolus to the sole of the foot. Conservative treatment includes reducing abnormal pronation with an orthosis. PMID:9149647

  12. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8?cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225-230?mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  13. Muscle activation of paraspinal muscles in different types of high heels during standing

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study researched the effects of different types of high heels on the muscles surrounding the cervical spine, the thoracic spine, and the lumbar spine by analyzing muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles during standing while wearing high heels. The high heels were all of the same height: 8?cm. [Subjects and Methods] The 28 subjects in this experiment were females in their 20s with a foot size of 225–230?mm and a normal gait pattern. To measure the muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles, EMG electrodes were attached on the paraspinal muscles around C6, T7, and L5. The muscle activation during standing while wearing 8-cm-high wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels was then measured. The measurements were performed 3 times each, and the mean value was used for analysis. [Results] The levels of muscle activation of the paraspinal muscles induced by standing on wedge heels, setback heels, and French heels in the cervical and lumbar areas were significantly higher than those induced by standing on bare feet. But there was no significant difference according to the heel types. [Conclusion] The height of the heels presented a greater variable than the width of the heels on the muscle activation of paraspinal muscles. Therefore, wearing high heels is not recommended for those who have pain or functional problems in the cervical and/or lumbar spine. PMID:25642040

  14. Treatment of Calcaneal Fracture With Severe Soft Tissue Injury and Osteomyelitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Karns, Michael; Dailey, Steven K; Archdeacon, Michael T

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in surgical technique have resulted in the ability to reconstruct lower extremity injuries that would have previously been treated by amputation. Currently, a paucity of data is available specifically addressing limb amputation versus reconstruction for calcaneal fractures with severe soft tissue compromise. Reconstruction leaves the patient with their native limb; however, multiple surgeries, infections, chronic pain, and a poor functional outcome are very real possibilities. We present the case of a complex calcaneal fracture complicated by soft tissue injury and osteomyelitis that highlights the importance of shared decision-making between patient and surgeon when considering reconstruction versus amputation. This case exemplifies the need for open communication concerning the risks and benefits of treatment modalities while simultaneously considering the patient's expectations and desired outcomes. PMID:25128313

  15. Superior peroneal retinacular injuries in calcaneal fractures.

    PubMed

    Kwaadu, Kwasi Yiadom; Fleming, Justin James; Florek, Derek

    2015-01-01

    Calcaneal fractures are injuries that occur generally as the result of high-energy mechanisms, and, as such, the presence of concurrent injuries should be suspected. The presence of peroneal tendon and superior retinacular injuries has been underreported. We sought to report the incidence of peroneal tendon pathologic features in our population of patients with calcaneal fractures, with emphasis on the method of identification. Furthermore, we sought to identify whether specific fracture patterns were more commonly associated with this pathologic finding. Of the 97 cases, 13 (13.4%) required repair of the superior peroneal retinaculum, 11 of which demonstrated the Sanders A fracture line. Our findings have demonstrated an incidence of pathologic features, in particular, with the presence of the Sanders A fracture line, that warrants attention to potentially help improve the outcome of these devastating injuries. PMID:25726126

  16. Calcaneal loading during walking and running

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giddings, V. L.; Beaupre, G. S.; Whalen, R. T.; Carter, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study of the foot uses experimentally measured kinematic and kinetic data with a numerical model to evaluate in vivo calcaneal stresses during walking and running. METHODS: External ground reaction forces (GRF) and kinematic data were measured during walking and running using cineradiography and force plate measurements. A contact-coupled finite element model of the foot was developed to assess the forces acting on the calcaneus during gait. RESULTS: We found that the calculated force-time profiles of the joint contact, ligament, and Achilles tendon forces varied with the time-history curve of the moment about the ankle joint. The model predicted peak talocalcaneal and calcaneocuboid joint loads of 5.4 and 4.2 body weights (BW) during walking and 11.1 and 7.9 BW during running. The maximum predicted Achilles tendon forces were 3.9 and 7.7 BW for walking and running. CONCLUSIONS: Large magnitude forces and calcaneal stresses are generated late in the stance phase, with maximum loads occurring at approximately 70% of the stance phase during walking and at approximately 60% of the stance phase during running, for the gait velocities analyzed. The trajectories of the principal stresses, during both walking and running, corresponded to each other and qualitatively to the calcaneal trabecular architecture.

  17. An evaluation of a silicone adhesive shaped heel dressing.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Sylvie

    Tissue breakdown is complex and involves many factors. Pressure ulcer development in the heels is subject to extrinsic factors such as pressure, shear, friction and moisture. The heels are the most common sites for friction and shear damage, which can lead to blistering, skin erosion and tissue breakdown (Grey et al, 2006). To address the issues of wounds that are painful on dressing removal and friable skin, Smith & Nephew has introduced a soft silicone adhesive dressing to its Allevyn dressing range. Silicone does not adhere to wounded areas and can be removed gently without trauma to the periwound area. This paper discusses the findings of a 20-patient multi-site evaluation examining the performance and acceptability of Allevyn Gentle Border Heel dressing in the management of heel wounds. PMID:20335927

  18. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait.

    PubMed

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  19. Effect of heel pressure pad attached to ankle-foot orthosis on the energy conversion efficiency in post-stroke hemiplegic gait

    PubMed Central

    Kon, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Shingo; Tsuruga, Takeshi; Murahara, Shin; Haruna, Hirokazu; Ino, Takumi; Inagaki, Jun; Yamamoto, Sumiko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to analyze the effect of heel pads in ankle-foot orthoses on dynamic motion aspects of gait in stroke patients from the viewpoint of energy conversion efficiency. [Subjects] Fourteen chronic stroke patients who were ambulatory and had lower extremity motor function categorized as Brunnstrom stage IV participated in the study. [Methods] A three-dimensional motion analysis system was used to assess the effect of heel pad intervention on dynamic motion gait parameters using a single-system A-B-A design. [Results] The results showed that a heel pad attached to the ankle-foot orthosis caused significant retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function and significant increase in the dorsiflexion moment and the height of the center of gravity. [Conclusion] The present study showed that a heel pad attached to the calcaneal region of an ankle-foot orthosis caused slight retention of the center-of-pressure at the heel during the heel rocker function along with center of gravity elevation in the stance phase and improved the energy conversion efficiency, especially on the non-paretic side. PMID:26157215

  20. The effect of heel elevation on strain within the plantar aponeurosis: in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kogler, G F; Veer, F B; Verhulst, S J; Solomonidis, S E; Paul, J P

    2001-05-01

    Mild, temporary reduction of symptoms from plantar fasciitis have been reported with the use of high heeled shoes (i.e. cowboy boots, ladies pumps). However, little is known on how heel elevation may contribute to a decrease in the pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to quantify strain in the plantar aponeurosis in cadaveric feet with the use of various heel elevation configurations. An in vitro method that simulated "static" stance was used to determine the loading characteristics of the plantar aponeurosis (n = 12). Heel elevation was evaluated with blocks placed beneath the heel and with a contoured platform that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at three different heel heights (2.0, 4.0, 6.0 cm) with a level plane serving as the control. Strain in the plantar aponeurosis decreased with elevations of the heel that simulated the arch profile of a shoe at load levels (337, 450 N) (P < 0.05). Elevations of the heel with blocks did not significantly affect strain in the plantar aponeurosis (P < 0.05). Contrasting results of some specimen limbs compared with the overall means suggests that the influence of heel elevation on loading of the plantar aponeurosis may be dependent on individual variation and foot structure differences. Therefore, clinicians should be cautious in recommending heel elevation as a treatment for plantar fasciitis since some subjects may not achieve the desired decrease in plantar aponeurosis strain. PMID:11428764

  1. Examining the degree of pain reduction using a multielement exercise model with a conventional training shoe versus an ultraflexible training shoe for treating plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael; Fraser, Scott; McDonald, Kymberly; Taunton, Jack

    2009-12-01

    Plantar fasciitis is a common injury to the plantar aponeurosis, manifesting as pain surrounding its proximal insertion at the medial calcaneal tubercle. Pain is typically worse in the morning when getting out of bed, and may subside after the tissue is sufficiently warmed up. For running-based athletes and individuals who spend prolonged periods of time on their feet at work, plantar fasciitis may become recalcitrant to conservative treatments such as ice, rest, and anti-inflammatory medication. Exercise-based therapies have received only limited attention in the literature for this common problem, yet they are becoming increasingly validated for pain relief and positive tissue remodeling at other sites of similar soft-tissue overuse injury. This study reports on pain outcomes in individuals experiencing chronic plantar fasciitis while wearing a shoe with an ultraflexible midsole (Nike Free 5.0) (FREE) versus a conventional training (CON) shoe in a 12-week multielement exercise regimen, and after a 6-month follow-up. Adults with >or= 6-month history of painful heel pain were recruited and randomly assigned to wear 1 of the 2 shoes. All subjects completed the same exercise protocol. A visual analogue scale item tracked peak pain in the preceding 24 hours taken at baseline, 6- and 12-week points, and at the 6-month follow-up. Twenty-one subjects completed the program (9 FREE; 12 CON). Both groups reported significant improvements in pain by the 6-month follow-up, and the FREE group reported an overall reduced level of pain throughout the study as a result of lower mean pain scores at the midpoint and post-test compared with the CON group. The exercise regimen employed in this study appears to reduce pain associated with chronic plantar fasciitis, and in doing so, the Nike 5.0 shoe may result in reductions in pain earlier than conventional running shoes. PMID:20048543

  2. Rearward movement of the heel at heel strike.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; Chang, Chien-Chi; DiDomenico, Angela

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes the observation of rearward movement (RM) of the heel following heel strike occurring during normal gait. Thirty-one participants recruited as part of a larger study on slip kinematics walked the length of an 8-m runway at a speed of 1.5 m/s. Several floor surfaces, presented dry and with contaminant, were used for the purpose of eliciting a wide range of small slip distances. The normal force applied to a forceplate mounted in the runway was used to identify heel strike, as well as to calculate the utilized coefficient of friction during early stance phase. A motion analysis system tracked the displacement of two heel-mounted markers, and the data were used to derive kinematic variables related to the heel strike event. Results showed that RMs occurred in 18.1% of 494 trials, with a mean rearward displacement of 5.02 (+/-3.68) mm. When present, RMs occurred in close temporal proximity to heel strike, typically completing RM within 40 ms of the heel strike event. When divided into groups by age, older participants (>40 years) were more than twice as likely to have RMs as younger participants. When grouped by height or weight, differences in the proportion of trials with RMs were small. In trials where RMs were observed, forward slip distances were significantly less than for trials with no RMs, 2.17 (+/-3.87) mm vs. 12.58 (+/-10.71) mm, respectively. The time until the heel stopped moving during the post-heel strike period was not significantly different between RM and non-RM trials. Further investigation of this gait feature may improve understanding of normal gait patterns and may have implications for future slipmeter development. PMID:18280459

  3. High Heels Increase Women's Attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    Research has found that the appearance of women's apparel helps increase their attractiveness as rated by men and that men care more about physical features in potential opposite-sex mates. However, the effect of sartorial appearance has received little interest from scientists. In a series of studies, the length of women's shoe heels was examined. A woman confederate wearing black shoes with 0, 5, or 9 cm heels asked men for help in various circumstances. In Study 1, she asked men to respond to a short survey on gender equality. In Study 2, the confederate asked men and women to participate in a survey on local food habit consumption. In Study 3, men and women in the street were observed while walking in back of the female confederate who dropped a glove apparently unaware of her loss. It was found that men's helping behavior increased as soon as heel length increased. However, heel length had no effect on women's helping behavior. It was also found that men spontaneously approached women more quickly when they wore high-heeled shoes (Study 4). Change in gait, foot-size judgment, and misattribution of sexiness and sexual intent were used as possible explanations. PMID:25408499

  4. How I Manage Heel Spur Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seder, Joseph I.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses plantar fascitis and heel spurs, the two contributing causes of heel spur syndrome. Treatment methods, which include rest, anti-inflammatory medication, shoe padding, and, as a last resort, surgery are described. (Author/MT)

  5. Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle ANIMAL WELFARE

    E-print Network

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle ANIMAL WELFARE PROGRAM Heel Erosion in Dairy Cattle Lorna Baird, Luis erosion is a common problem in dairy cattle. An eroded heel provides less shock absorbance and increases erosion is associated with standing in moisture and manure, but little is known about other risk factors

  6. Pain.

    PubMed

    Melzack, Ronald; Katz, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Pain has many valuable functions. It often signals injury or disease, generates a wide range of adaptive behaviors, and promotes healing through rest. Despite these beneficial aspects of pain, there are negative features that challenge our understanding of the puzzle of pain, including persistent phantom limb pain after amputation or total spinal cord transection. Pain is a personal, subjective experience influenced by cultural learning, the meaning of the situation, attention, and other psychological variables. Pain processes do not begin with the stimulation of receptors. Rather, injury or disease produces neural signals that enter an active nervous system that (in the adult organism) is the substrate of past experience, culture, and a host of other environmental and personal factors. These brain processes actively participate in the selection, abstraction, and synthesis of information from the total sensory input. Pain is not simply the end product of a linear sensory transmission system; it is a dynamic process that involves continuous interactions among complex ascending and descending systems. The neuromatrix theory guides us away from the Cartesian concept of pain as a sensation produced by injury, inflammation, or other tissue pathology and toward the concept of pain as a multidimensional experience produced by multiple influences. These influences range from the existing synaptic architecture of the neuromatrix-which is determined by genetic and sensory factors-to influences from within the body and from other areas in the brain. Genetic influences on synaptic architecture may determine-or predispose toward-the development of chronic pain syndromes. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:1-15. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1201 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26304172

  7. Regional plantar foot pressure distributions on high-heeled shoes-shank curve effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Yan; Lee, Winson; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-01

    Forefoot pain is common in high-heeled shoe wearers due to the high pressure caused by the center of body mass moving forward and the increased arch height with heel elevation. Sufficient arch support could reduce the high pressure over forefoot. However, too much arch support could lead to abnormal foot alignment and pain over midfoot. Little information is reported on the relationship among plantar arch height, shank curve design and plantar pressure. This study aimed at quantifying the plantar arch height changes at different heel heights and investigating the effect of shank curve on plantar pressure distribution. The plantar arch height increased to (7.6±1.3)mm at heel height of 75 mm. The Chinese standard suggests the depth of last should be 8.5mm for heel height of 75 mm. When a shank curve with higher depth of last (11 mm) was used, the peak pressure over forefoot further decreased in midstance phase, which might ease the forefoot problems, while the peak pressure over midfoot increased but not exceeded the discomfort pressure thresholds. To achieve a more ideal pressure distribution in high-heeled shoes, a higher than expected depth of last would be suggested that would not cause discomfort over midfoot.

  8. Biomechanics of calcaneal fractures: a model for the motor vehicle.

    PubMed

    Seipel, R C; Pintar, F A; Yoganandan, N; Boynton, M D

    2001-07-01

    Changes in legislation, availability of passive or active restraint systems, or both, together with increased public awareness for safety and the need for use of restraint, have shifted the spectrum of trauma in motor vehicle crashes from the head and torso to other regions. Lower extremity trauma in motor vehicle crashes continues to be a significant problem. The objective of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the human foot and ankle complex under impact loading and replicate calcaneal fractures routinely seen in motor vehicle crashes. Twenty-two unembalmed cadaver lower extremity specimens were subjected to dynamic loads using a minisled pendulum device. Input and output forces and results of pathologic analysis were obtained using load cell data, radiographs obtained before and after testing, and gross dissection. The intraarticular fracture patterns produced were similar to those seen clinically and described in the literature. Maximum forces ranged from 3.6 to 11.4 kN for the fracture, and 0.5 to 7.3 kN for the nonfracture groups. Logistic regression analysis revealed a 50% probability of calcaneal fracture at 5.5 kN and a 25% probability at 4.0 kN. These studies will lead to an understanding of the tolerance of the lower extremity in sustaining calcaneal fractures under impact. Implications of the work are in the design of crash test dummies, data acquisition, and modifications in motor vehicle design and safety. PMID:11451123

  9. Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Imaging in Calcaneal Fracture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Heui-Chul; Kim, Jung-Han; Roh, Sang-Myung

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the effectiveness of intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) image and conventional two-dimensional (2D) fluoroscopic images, which are used in the treatment of acute calcaneal fractures. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 40 patients who suffered calcaneal fracture and underwent surgery at Inje University Busan Paik Hospital. The patients were divided into two groups. Only 2D fluoroscopy was used to evaluate 20 patients of group 1. On the other hand, 3D fluoroscopy was performed on the remaining 20 patients of group 2; 3D fluoroscopy was performed on these patients after they were extensively evaluated by 2D fluoroscopy during surgery. We reviewed the radiographic and clinical outcomes of these patients, whose average follow-up period was 42.6 months. Results In group 2, 3D fluoroscopy detected four cases (20%) of articular incongruence and screw misplacement. All these complicated cases were corrected during surgery. At the final follow-up session, the mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) hind foot score was 78.3 (range, 65 to 95) in group 1 and 82.3 (range, 68 to 95) in group 2. Conclusions Intraoperative 3D imaging of calcaneal fractures is considered to be useful in evaluating the congruence of joints and the placement of implants. PMID:26640632

  10. Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to play a role in causing the pain Chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms • long-lasting fatigue that doesn’t get ... painfoundation. org Phone number: (888) 615-7246 The Chronic Fatigue and Immune Dysfunction Syndrome Association of America PO Box 220398 Charlotte, NC ...

  11. Evolution and Allometry of Calcaneal Elongation in Living and Extinct Primates

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Doug M.; Seiffert, Erik R.; Gladman, Justin T.; Bloch, Jonathan I.

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal elongation are likely adaptations for more effective acrobatic leaping, highlighting the importance of this behavior in early euprimate evolution. PMID:23844094

  12. Evolution and allometry of calcaneal elongation in living and extinct primates.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Doug M; Seiffert, Erik R; Gladman, Justin T; Bloch, Jonathan I

    2013-01-01

    Specialized acrobatic leaping has been recognized as a key adaptive trait tied to the origin and subsequent radiation of euprimates based on its observed frequency in extant primates and inferred frequency in extinct early euprimates. Hypothesized skeletal correlates include elongated tarsal elements, which would be expected to aid leaping by allowing for increased rates and durations of propulsive acceleration at takeoff. Alternatively, authors of a recent study argued that pronounced distal calcaneal elongation of euprimates (compared to other mammalian taxa) was related primarily to specialized pedal grasping. Testing for correlations between calcaneal elongation and leaping versus grasping is complicated by body size differences and associated allometric affects. We re-assess allometric constraints on, and the functional significance of, calcaneal elongation using phylogenetic comparative methods, and present an evolutionary hypothesis for the evolution of calcaneal elongation in primates using a Bayesian approach to ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). Results show that among all primates, logged ratios of distal calcaneal length to total calcaneal length are inversely correlated with logged body mass proxies derived from the area of the calcaneal facet for the cuboid. Results from phylogenetic ANOVA on residuals from this allometric line suggest that deviations are explained by degree of leaping specialization in prosimians, but not anthropoids. Results from ASR suggest that non-allometric increases in calcaneal elongation began in the primate stem lineage and continued independently in haplorhines and strepsirrhines. Anthropoid and lorisid lineages show stasis and decreasing elongation, respectively. Initial increases in calcaneal elongation in primate evolution may be related to either development of hallucal-grasping or a combination of grasping and more specialized leaping behaviors. As has been previously suggested, subsequent increases in calcaneal elongation are likely adaptations for more effective acrobatic leaping, highlighting the importance of this behavior in early euprimate evolution. PMID:23844094

  13. Metastatic calcaneal lesion associated with uterine carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Rice, Brittany M; Todd, Nicholas W; Jensen, Richard; Rush, Shannon M; Rogers, William

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic lesions of uterine carcinosarcoma most commonly occur in the abdomen and lungs and less frequently in highly vascularized bone. We report a rare case of an 86-year-old female with uterine carcinosarcoma with metastasis to the left calcaneus. The patient had a history of uterine carcinosarcoma with hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, along with bilateral pelvic and aortic lymphadenectomy, with no adjuvant therapy. The initial pedal complaint was that of left foot pain. The initial radiographic findings were negative; however, magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a substantial area of marrow edema in the calcaneus. An excisional biopsy was performed, and histopathologic analysis revealed adenocarcinoma with features consistent with the patient's previous uterine tumor specimen. The patient was given one treatment of chemotherapy and was discharged to a hospice, where she died of her disease 2 weeks later. PMID:23871174

  14. Longitudinal changes in calcaneal quantitative ultrasound measures during childhood

    PubMed Central

    Nahhas, R. W.; Choh, A. C.; Demerath, E. W.; Duren, D. L.; Chumlea, W. C.; Sherwood, R. J.; Towne, B.; Siervogel, R. M.; Czerwinski, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary This longitudinal study examined how calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measures change during childhood while taking into account skeletal maturation, body mass index (BMI), and physical activity. The study reported sex differences in QUS growth curves and an inverse relationship between BMI and speed of sound (SOS) measures. Introduction The aim of this study was to examine how calcaneal QUS parameters change over time during childhood and to determine what factors influence these changes. Methods The study sample consisted of a total of 192 Caucasian children participating in the Fels Longitudinal Study. A total of 548 calcaneal broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and SOS observations were obtained between the ages of 7.6 and 18 years. The best fitting growth curves were determined using statistical methods for linear mixed effect models. Results There are significant sex differences in the pattern of change in QUS parameters (p<0.05). The relationship between QUS measures and skeletal age is best described by a cubic growth curve in boys and a linear pattern among girls. Boys experience their most rapid growth in BUA and SOS in early and late adolescence, while girls experience constant growth throughout childhood. Adiposity levels were significantly associated with the changes in SOS among boys (p<0.001) and girls (p<0.01), indicating that children with higher BMI are likely to have lower SOS over time compared to children with lower BMI. For girls, physical activity levels showed positive associations with changes in QUS measures (p<0.05). Conclusion This study documents significant sex differences in the pattern of change in QUS measures over childhood and adolescence. Our study also shows significant influences of adiposity and physical activity on the pattern of change in QUS measures during childhood. PMID:20976593

  15. Clinical Allograft of a Calcaneal Tendon in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Lemoy, Marie-Josee; Summers, Laura; Colagross-Schouten, Angela

    2014-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) housed in an outdoor field cage presented for severe trauma involving the left calcaneal tendon. Part of the management of this wound included an allograft of the calcaneal tendon from an animal that was euthanized for medical reasons. This case report describes the successful medical and surgical management of a macaque with a significant void of the calcaneal tendon. To our knowledge, this report is the first description of a successful tendon allograft in a rhesus macaque for clinical purposes. PMID:25255076

  16. Long-term follow-up of flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, C; Whitehouse, S L; Saxby, T S

    2015-03-01

    Flexor digitorum longus transfer and medial displacement calcaneal osteotomy is a well-recognised form of treatment for stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Although excellent short- and medium-term results have been reported, the long-term outcome is unknown. We reviewed the clinical outcome of 31 patients with a symptomatic flexible flat-foot deformity who underwent this procedure between 1994 and 1996. There were 21 women and ten men with a mean age of 54.3 years (42 to 70). The mean follow-up was 15.2 years (11.4 to 16.5). All scores improved significantly (p < 0.001). The mean American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score improved from 48.4 pre-operatively to 90.3 (54 to 100) at the final follow-up. The mean pain component improved from 12.3 to 35.2 (20 to 40). The mean function score improved from 35.2 to 45.6 (30 to 50). The mean visual analogue score for pain improved from 7.3 to 1.3 (0 to 6). The mean Short Form-36 physical component score was 40.6 (sd 8.9), and this showed a significant correlation with the mean AOFAS score (r = 0.68, p = 0.005). A total of 27 patients (87%) were pain free and functioning well at the final follow-up. We believe that flexor digitorum longus transfer and calcaneal osteotomy provides long-term pain relief and satisfactory function in the treatment of stage II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. PMID:25737518

  17. Effect of Foot Orthoses on Children With Lower Extremity Growing Pains

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-Jae; Lim, Kil-Byung; Yoo, JeeHyun; Jeong, Tae-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of custom molded foot orthoses on children with growing pains of the lower extremities. Methods Children with growing pains were recruited during a clinic visit. None had any bony deformities, inflammatory joint disease or depression. Resting calcaneal stance position (RCSP) and calcaneal pitch angle were measured, and individual custom molded rigid foot orthoses were prescribed using the inverted orthotic technique to control for foot overpronation using the RCSP angle. Pain sites, degree and frequency of pain, and balance ability were evaluated using Balance Master computerized posturography prior to foot orthosis fitting, and 1 and 3 months later. Results Twenty children completed the study. Seventeen (75%) had overpronated feet. Significant improvements were noted after 1 and 3 months in pain degree and frequency, and after 3 months in balancing ability. Conclusion The use of custom molded foot orthoses is a good method for treating children with multiple musculoskeletal pains in the leg. PMID:25932426

  18. On high heels and short muscles: a multiscale model for sarcomere loss in the gastrocnemius muscle.

    PubMed

    Zöllner, Alexander M; Pok, Jacquelynn M; McWalter, Emily J; Gold, Garry E; Kuhl, Ellen

    2015-01-21

    High heels are a major source of chronic lower limb pain. Yet, more than one third of all women compromise health for looks and wear high heels on a daily basis. Changing from flat footwear to high heels induces chronic muscle shortening associated with discomfort, fatigue, reduced shock absorption, and increased injury risk. However, the long-term effects of high-heeled footwear on the musculoskeletal kinematics of the lower extremities remain poorly understood. Here we create a multiscale computational model for chronic muscle adaptation to characterize the acute and chronic effects of global muscle shortening on local sarcomere lengths. We perform a case study of a healthy female subject and show that raising the heel by 13cm shortens the gastrocnemius muscle by 5% while the Achilles tendon remains virtually unaffected. Our computational simulation indicates that muscle shortening displays significant regional variations with extreme values of 22% in the central gastrocnemius. Our model suggests that the muscle gradually adjusts to its new functional length by a chronic loss of sarcomeres in series. Sarcomere loss varies significantly across the muscle with an average loss of 9%, virtually no loss at the proximal and distal ends, and a maximum loss of 39% in the central region. These changes reposition the remaining sarcomeres back into their optimal operating regime. Computational modeling of chronic muscle shortening provides a valuable tool to shape our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of muscle adaptation. Our study could open new avenues in orthopedic surgery and enhance treatment for patients with muscle contracture caused by other conditions than high heel wear such as paralysis, muscular atrophy, and muscular dystrophy. PMID:25451524

  19. Soft tissue reconstruction for calcaneal fractures or osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Attinger, C; Cooper, P

    2001-01-01

    A systematic approach of the surgical management of a calcaneal fracture can minimize the potential of soft tissue complications. When reducing a closed calcaneal fracture, the incision used affects the postoperative complications. The L-shaped incision with the horizontal limb lying on the lateral glabrous junction ensures maximum blood flow to either side of the incision. Whether or not the wound can be closed primarily depends on the preexisting edema, the lost calcaneal height, and the delay between the fracture and reduction (Fig. 20). The wrinkle test is a good indicator that the incision can be closed primarily if the amount of height restored is minimal. If the edema is too great, steps should be taken to reduce it sufficiently to allow successful wound closure. If the wound, after reduction, is too wide to allow primary closure, an ADM flap laterally or an AHM flap medially should be used. For larger defects, a free flap should be considered. The three important steps to reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the calcaneus include good blood supply, a infection-free wound, and the simplest soft tissue reconstructive option that covers the wound successfully. Adequate blood supply can be determined by the use of Doppler. If the supply is inadequate, revascularization is necessary before proceeding. Achieving a clean wound requires aggressive debridement, intravenous antibiotics, and good wound care. Adjuncts that can help in achieving a clean wound include topical antibiotics (silver sulfadiazine), the VAC, and hyperbaric oxygen. Osteomyelitis has to be treated aggressively. Any suspicious bone has to be removed. Only clean, healthy, bleeding bone is left behind. Antibiotic beads can be useful when there is doubt as to whether the cancellous bone is infection-free. The beads are not a substitute for good debridement, however. Soft tissue reconstruction ranges from delayed primary closure to the use of microsurgical free flaps (Fig. 21). When bone or hardware is exposed, a muscle flap should cover the wound because of the extra blood supply it carries with it. The soft tissue option depends on the width of the wound. For wounds 1 cm wide or less, the options include allowing the wound to close by secondary intention (VAC), delayed primary closure, or a local muscle flap. For wounds 2 cm wide or less, allowing the wound to close by secondary intention (VAC) and a local muscle flap are the best options. For wider wounds, one has to assess whether the local muscle flap has sufficient bulk to close the defect. If it does, it is the simplest solution. If the local muscle is inadequate, a microsurgical free flap has to be used. The VAC sometimes can convert a large wound to a smaller wound so that a local muscle flap can be used. This procedure takes time, however, and adds to the cost of the repair. PMID:11465125

  20. Use of Allograft in Skeletally Immature Patients for Calcaneal Neck Lengthening Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Yoon Hae; Park, Kun Bo; Park, Hui Wan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To date, there have been no studies evaluating the usefulness of allograft as a substitute for autograft in calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy. This retrospective study examined the results of calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy using allograft for pathologic flatfoot deformity in children and adolescents with various neuromuscular diseases. Materials and Methods 118 feet in 79 children treated surgically between Mar 2000 and July 2005 were reviewed. The mean age at the time of the operation was 9 + 3 years (range, 3 - 17 years) and follow-up averaged 15.4 months (range, 13 - 21 months) postoperatively. Talo-1st metatarsal angle, talo-calcaneal angle, calcaneal pitch were measured before and after operation and bony union was estimated. Results Bony union was noted at the latest follow-up and there were no postoperative complications such as reduction loss, infection, nonunion, delayed union or graft loss during the follow-up period in all but one foot. All radiographic indices were improved postoperatively in all cases. Conclusion Our results indicate that use of allograft in calcaneal neck lengthening osteotomy is a useful option for correction of the planovalgus deformity in skeletally immature patients whose enough autobone can not be obtained. PMID:18306473

  1. Substantially reduced calcaneal bone ultrasound parameters in severe untreated asthma.

    PubMed

    Mainz, Jochen G; Kaiser, Werner A; Beck, James F; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a 9-year-old male patient with severe bronchial asthma, who had not received inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) despite persistent asthma symptoms and 2 life-threatening asthma attacks. ICS application had been avoided for fear of systemic side effects like bone density loss. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a noninvasive and ionizing radiation-free method to assess bone characteristics. In our clinic, regional age-, sex-, weight- and height-related references for calcaneal QUS were generated from 3,299 children and adolescents. Ultrasonic bone parameters from our patient were substantially reduced at the initial measurement when the patient was 6 years of age by up to -3.75 standard deviation scores. At the same time, chronic pulmonary hyperinflation led to severe thoracic deformation. Only when a second life-threatening asthma attack almost required mechanical ventilation, the family was convinced to have ICS therapy initiated. This treatment led to clinical stabilization including normalization of the thoracic shape. In parallel, QUS values improved continuously up to the normal range. Our case report emphasizes the risks of omitting ICS in severe asthma for fear for systemic side effects. On the contrary, ICS in low to medium dosages may allow regular growth, bone development and normalization of previously severe effects of the disease itself. PMID:19246875

  2. Improved method for determining tank heel volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, S.H.; Livingston, R.R.; Nave, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    As part of the tank calibration process, the instrument heel is that part of the tank that cannot be measured by the liquid level instrumentation. if the tank being calibrated is not a bottom drain tank, some volume of fluid will be present in the bottom of the tank after draining as much as possible. The amount of fluid remaining in the tank at the start of each run can be estimated by measuring a concentration change of an added spiking material. With the great improvement of liquid level measuring instruments, the total error associated with the instrument heel determination can be greatly affected by the laboratory method used to measure the concentration difference. At the Savannah River Site, the laboratory method used has historically been Direct Current Plasma Emission Spectroscopy, which yielded very marginal results at best. In the most recent tank calibrations, the laboratory method was changed to Absorption Spectrophotometry, which reduces the total error on the instrument heel measurement by a factor of 2.5 times. This paper describes the method used to determine tank instrument heels and the improvements made to this process.

  3. Reductions in heel bone quality across gestation are attenuated in pregnant adolescents with higher prepregnancy weight and greater increases in PTH across gestation.

    PubMed

    Whisner, Corrie M; Young, Bridget E; Witter, Frank R; Harris, Zena Leah; Queenan, Ruth A; Cooper, Elizabeth M; O'Brien, Kimberly O

    2014-09-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of maternal calcium intake and vitamin D status on bone health across gestation in pregnant adolescents. This study aimed to characterize maternal bone quality and determinants of bone-quality change across gestation in pregnant adolescents. Healthy pregnant adolescents (n?=?156; aged 13 to 18 years) with singleton pregnancies and at 12 to 30 weeks gestation at enrollment were recruited from two urban maternity clinics in Baltimore, MD, and Rochester, NY, for this prospective longitudinal study. Maternal serum was collected at midgestation and at delivery for assessment of bone biomarkers and calcitropic hormones. Maternal bone quality (assessed by heel ultrasound) and sonographic fetal biometry were measured up to three times across pregnancy. Racially diverse teens (64.7% African American, 35.3% white) were followed from 21.0 (interquartile range [IQR] 17.3, 27.0) weeks of gestation until delivery at 40.0 (IQR 39.0, 40.7) weeks. Significant decreases in calcaneal speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), and quantitative ultrasound index (QUI) (-9.2?±?16.1?m/s, -3.2 (-8.0, 2.1) dB/MHz and -5.3?±?8.8, respectively) were evident across pregnancy. Multivariate analysis controlling for baseline measures and measurement intervals was used to identify independent predictors of normalized (per week) calcaneal bone loss. Weekly decreases in bone quality were not significantly associated with maternal calcium intake or 25(OH)D concentration. Greater weekly reductions in calcaneal bone quality were evident in teens with lower prepregnancy weight (BUA, p?=?0.006 and QUI, p?=?0.012) and among those with lower weekly increase in PTH (SOS, p?=?0.046). Overall, significant decreases in calcaneal bone quality occurred across pregnancy in adolescents, but the magnitude of this loss was attenuated in those with greater prepregnancy weight and weekly increases in PTH. Further studies are needed to understand the role of elevated PTH and greater prepregnancy weight in preserving adolescent bone during pregnancy. PMID:24676885

  4. The relationship of heel contact in ascent and descent from jumps to the incidence of shin splints in ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Gans, A

    1985-08-01

    I conducted a study to determine whether ballet dancers with a history of shin splints make heel contact on ascent and descent from jumps less often than dancers without this history. Sixteen dancers were filmed as they executed a sequence of jumps at two different speeds. Eight of the subjects had a history of shin-splint pain; eight had no such history. The film was viewed on a Super 8 movie projector. Heel contacts on ascent and descent from jumps were counted. Double heel strikes (heel rise between landing and pushing off) were also counted. A nonparametric t test showed no differences between the two groups in the number of contacts on ascent or descent. The dancers with a history of shin splints, however, demonstrated more double heel strikes (p = .02) than the other group. Clinically, this finding may represent a lack of control or a tight Achilles tendon or both. Further study is necessary to confirm these theories. For treatment and prevention of shin splints, a clinician must evaluate a dancer's jumping technique and then provide systematic training to develop the skin strength, flexibility, and coordination that make up control. PMID:4023066

  5. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  6. A simple technique for assessing heel contact in orthoses.

    PubMed

    Grant, A D; Sala, D A; Kummer, F J; Kiriakatis, A

    1996-01-01

    Orthoses are used by patients with neuromuscular disorders to control their ankle and foot position. Heel contact inside an orthosis is difficult to determine. A simple, inexpensive device was constructed that could be positioned between the heel and the inside of the orthosis. It consists of a thin, single-cell pressure sensor connected to a low-cost, digital multimeter. The resistance reading was used to determine the presence or absence of heel contact during a controlled standing protocol. The device was evaluated in 23 patients. The majority of patients did not weightbear on their heels. The heel contact of five patients was reassessed by using a computerized F-scan system, which determines plantar weightbearing forces. A 100% agreement was found between the single-cell sensor and the F-scan system. This single-cell sensor is a simple, inexpensive, and easily used device to determine the presence or absence of heel contact within an orthosis. PMID:8728643

  7. Waste Tank Heel Chemical Cleaning Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.J.

    2003-12-02

    At the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, there are approximately 40 million gallons of legacy High Level Waste stored in large capacity sub-surface tanks. Twelve of these tanks are single-containment, non-conforming tanks with leaks. These tanks were built in the 1950s. Some of these tanks contain sludge heels and are being considered for near-term removal efforts and vitrification. Currently, only mechanical methods (i.e., pumps) are used to remove the sludge waste with varying degrees of success. To provide for additional levels of removal, chemically-aided techniques are being considered. The objective of the was to collect and evaluate information available on chemical-based methods for removing residual solids from the Site's waste tanks. As part of this study, the team was requested to develop recommendations for chemical treatments to remove residual heels (primarily sludge). Ideally, one agent alone would be efficient at dissolving all residual tank heels and yet satisfy all safety and process concerns. No such chemical cleaning agent was found. The cleaning agents identified from the literature, included oxalic acid, a mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid, a combination of oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide, nitric acid, formic acid, and organics. A criteria matrix for evaluating the various cleaning agents was developed. The results of the evaluation conclusively support oxalic acid as the cleaning agent of choice for the immediate future. Oxalic acid scored nearly double the next closest cleaning agent. Nitric acid, formic acid, and oxalic acid with hydrogen peroxide were all closely grouped for the next best choice. The mixture of oxalic acid and citric acid rated poorly. Organics rated even more poorly due to large uncertainties in performance and downstream impacts.

  8. Reliability and Validity of the Standing Heel-Rise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocum, Allison; McCoy, Sarah Westcott; Bjornson, Kristie F.; Mullens, Pamela; Burton, Gay Naganuma

    2010-01-01

    A standardized protocol for a pediatric heel-rise test was developed and reliability and validity are reported. Fifty-seven children developing typically (CDT) and 34 children with plantar flexion weakness performed three tests: unilateral heel rise, vertical jump, and force measurement using handheld dynamometry. Intraclass correlation…

  9. On muscle, tendon and high heels.

    PubMed

    Csapo, R; Maganaris, C N; Seynnes, O R; Narici, M V

    2010-08-01

    Wearing high heels (HH) places the calf muscle-tendon unit (MTU) in a shortened position. As muscles and tendons are highly malleable tissues, chronic use of HH might induce structural and functional changes in the calf MTU. To test this hypothesis, 11 women regularly wearing HH and a control group of 9 women were recruited. Gastrocnemius medialis (GM) fascicle length, pennation angle and physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA), the Achilles' tendon (AT) length, cross-sectional area (CSA) and mechanical properties, and the plantarflexion torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were assessed in both groups. Shorter GM fascicle lengths were observed in the HH group (49.6+/-5.7 mm vs 56.0+/-7.7 mm), resulting in greater tendon-to-fascicle length ratios. Also, because of greater AT CSA, AT stiffness was higher in the HH group (136.2+/-26.5 N mm(-1) vs 111.3+/-20.2 N mm(-1)). However, no differences in the GM PCSA to AT CSA ratio, torque-angle and torque-velocity relationships were found. We conclude that long-term use of high-heeled shoes induces shortening of the GM muscle fascicles and increases AT stiffness, reducing the ankle's active range of motion. Functionally, these two phenomena seem to counteract each other since no significant differences in static or dynamic torques were observed. PMID:20639419

  10. Branching Patterns of Medial and Inferior Calcaneal Nerves Around the Tarsal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Beom Suk; Choung, Phil Woo; Kwon, Soon Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the bifurcation pattern of the tibial nerve and its branches. Methods Eleven legs of seven fresh cadavers were dissected. The reference line for the bifurcation point of tibial nerve branches was an imaginary horizontal line passing the tip of the medial malleolus. The distances between the reference line and the bifurcation points were measured. The bifurcation branching patterns were categorized as type I, the pattern in which the medial calcaneal nerve (MCN) branched most proximally; type II, the pattern in which the three branches occurred at the same point; and type III, in which MCN branched most distally. Results There were seven cases (64%) of type I, three cases (27%) of type III, and one case (9%) of type II. The median MCN branching point was 0.2 cm (range, -1 to 3 cm). The median bifurcation points of the lateral plantar nerves and inferior calcaneal nerves was -0.6 cm (range, -1.5 to 1 cm) and -2.5 cm (range, -3.5 to -1 cm), respectively. Conclusion MCN originated from the tibial nerve in most cases, and plantar nerves were bifurcated below the medial malleolus. In all cases, inferior calcaneal nerves originated from the lateral plantar nerve. These anatomical findings could be useful for performing procedures, such as nerve block or electrophysiologic studies. PMID:25750872

  11. The relationship of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and Sanders hand scores to the timing of peak height velocity in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, A D; Sanders, J O; Liu, R W; Cooperman, D R

    2015-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skeletal maturity is essential in the management of orthopaedic conditions in the growing child. In order to identify the time of peak height velocity (PHV) in adolescents, two systems for assessing skeletal maturity have been described recently; the calcaneal apophyseal ossification method and the Sanders hand scores. The purpose of this study was to compare these methods in assessing skeletal maturity relative to PHV. We studied the radiographs of a historical group of 94 healthy children (49 females and 45 males), who had been followed longitudinally between the ages of three and 18 years with serial radiographs and physical examination. Radiographs of the foot and hand were undertaken in these children at least annually between the ages of ten and 15 years. We reviewed 738 radiographs of the foot and 694 radiographs of the hand. PHV was calculated from measurements of height taken at the time of the radiographs. Prior to PHV we observed four of six stages of calcaneal apophyseal ossification and two of eight Sanders stages. Calcaneal stage 3 and Sanders stage 2 was seen to occur about 0.9 years before PHV, while calcaneal stage 4 and Sanders stage 3 occurred approximately 0.5 years after PHV. The stages of the calcaneal and Sanders systems can be used in combination, offering better assessment of skeletal maturity with respect to PHV than either system alone. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1710-17. PMID:26637689

  12. Impact reduction through long-term intervention in recreational runners: midfoot strike pattern versus low-drop/low-heel height footwear.

    PubMed

    Giandolini, Marlène; Horvais, Nicolas; Farges, Yohann; Samozino, Pierre; Morin, Jean-Benoît

    2013-08-01

    Impact reduction has become a factor of interest in the prevention of running-related injuries such as stress fractures. Currently, the midfoot strike pattern (MFS) is thought as a potential way to decrease impact. The purpose was to test the effects of two long-term interventions aiming to reduce impact during running via a transition to an MFS: a foot strike retraining versus a low-drop/low-heel height footwear. Thirty rearfoot strikers were randomly assigned to two experimental groups (SHOES and TRAIN). SHOES progressively wore low-drop/low-heel height shoes and TRAIN progressively adopted an MFS, over a 3-month period with three 30-min running sessions per week. Measurement sessions (pre-training, 1, 2 and 3 months) were performed during which subjects were equipped with three accelerometers on the shin, heel and metatarsals, and ran for 15 min on an instrumented treadmill. Synchronized acceleration and vertical ground reaction force signals were recorded. Peak heel acceleration was significantly lower as compared to pre-training for SHOES (-33.5 ± 12.8 % at 2 months and -25.3 ± 18.8 % at 3 months, p < 0.001), and so was shock propagation velocity (-12.1 ± 9.3 %, p < 0.001 at 2 months and -11.3 ± 4.6 %, p < 0.05 at 3 months). No change was observed for TRAIN. Important inter-individual variations were noted in both groups and reported pains were mainly located at the shin and calf. Although it induced reversible pains, low-drop/low-heel height footwear seemed to be more effective than foot strike retraining to attenuate heel impact in the long term. PMID:23584279

  13. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group. PMID:26310621

  14. Influence of Inflammatory Polyarthritis on Quantitative Heel Ultrasound Measurements

    E-print Network

    Pye, Stephen R; Marshall, Tarnya; Gaffney, Karl; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Silman, Alan J; Symmons, Deborah PM; O'Neill, Terence W

    2012-07-26

    the influence of undifferentiated inflam- matory polyarthritis on heel ultrasound parameters. Data concerning the impact of disease related variables on heel ultrasound parameters are somewhat conflicting. Some, though not all, report an association between SOS... JA, Halse JI, et al: Self reported non-vertebral fractures in rheumatoid arthritis and population based controls: incidence and relationship with bone mineral density and clinical variables. Ann Rheum Dis 2004, 63:177–182. 4. Huusko TM, Korpela M...

  15. Does Plasmodium falciparum have an Achilles' heel?

    E-print Network

    Liao Y Chen

    2013-05-21

    Plasmodium falciparum is the parasite that causes the most severe form of malaria. Currently, science has been established about its cellular structures, its metabolic processes, and even the molecular structures of its intrinsic membrane proteins responsible for transporting water, nutrient, and waste molecules across the parasite plasma membrane (PPM). I hypothesize that Plasmodium falciparum has an Achilles' heel that can be attacked with erythritol, the well-known sweetener that is classified as generally safe. Most organisms have in their cell membrane two types of water-channel proteins: aquaporins to maintain hydro-homeostasis across the membrane and aquaglyceroporins to uptake glycerols etc. In contrast, P. falciparum has only one type of such proteins---the multi-functional aquaglyceroporin (PfAQP) expressed in the PPM---to do both jobs. Moreover, the parasite also uses PfAQP to excrete its metabolic wastes (ammonia included) produced at a very high rate in the blood stage. This extremely high efficiency of the bug using one protein for multiple essential tasks makes the parasite fatally vulnerable. Erythritol in the blood stream can kill the parasite by clogging up its PfAQP channel that needs to be open for maintaining hydro-homeostasis and for excreting toxic wastes across the bug's PPM. In vitro tests are to measure the growth/death rate of P. falciparum in blood with various erythritol concentrations. In vivo experiments are to administer groups of infected mice with various doses of erythritol and monitor the parasite growth levels from blood samples drawn from each group. Clinic trials can be performed to observe the added effects of administering to patients erythritol along with the known drugs because erythritol was classified as a safe food ingredient.

  16. Is heel prick as safe as we think?

    PubMed

    Onesimo, Roberta; Fioretti, Maria; Pili, Stefania; Monaco, Serena; Romagnoli, Costantino; Fundarò, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Purulent lymphadenitis is rare in newborn and is associated with prematurity and invasive procedure. Neonatal staphylococcal infections due to skin interruption during intramuscular vitamin K administration and national metabolic screening programme (heel prick or Guthrie card test) have been already previously described. This is a report of a premature infant who developed an inguinal adenitis as a result of late complications from heel pricks. The diagnosis was made on clinical grounds and confirmed by ultrasound scans. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Bacteremia did not occur and the lymphadenitis had a complete resolution with antimicrobial therapy. The heel prick is a well-established procedure in neonatal practice, nevertheless it is not risk-free. The attention to signs of infections is important to avoid complications such as purulent lymphadenitis, abscess formation and septicemia. Best practice prevention and control in minimising the risk of infections are the most important intervention to prevent this complication. PMID:22675035

  17. Biomechanical Performance of Lateral Versus Dual Locking Plates for Calcaneal Fractures.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Abby B; Owen, John R; Gilbert, Todd M; Romash, Michael M; Wayne, Jennifer S; Adelaar, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Given the high rates of wound complications with a standard lateral extensile incision, small dual incision techniques might result in less soft tissue destruction. The goal of the present study was to compare the biomechanical performance between a single locking plate and a dual locking plating system for an intra-articular calcaneal fracture model. A Sanders IIB type joint depression calcaneal fracture was created in 10 paired, fresh-frozen, cadaveric calcanei (age 47 ± 12, range 35 to 78 years). The calcanei of each pair were randomly assigned for fixation using either a lateral locking reconstruction plate or lateral and medial locking reconstruction plates. The specimens were axially loaded in cyclic fashion for 1000 cycles, followed by load to failure. The relative fragment movement was monitored optically in both the sagittal and the coronal planes. The amount of overall construct displacement increased with cycling, although no difference was found between the plating techniques. For fragment movement during cycling, the lateral joint fragment migrated anteroinferiorly along the fracture line relative to the tuberosity fragment for dual plated specimens by a small, but statistically significant, amount. This same translation was smaller for lateral plated specimens but was not found to be significant. During load to failure testing, no statistically significant differences were found for construct stiffness. A tendency was seen toward more interfragmentary motion in the sagittal plane (lateral joint fragment movement relative to the fracture line), with less movement overall in the coronal plane (anterior fragment translation and twist) for dual plating, although the difference from the lateral plate was not statistically significant. The present study demonstrated that for this calcaneal fracture model, the dual plating technique experienced a small amount of fragment translation during cycling that was significantly different statistically from that with lateral plating but was not clinically relevant. During the load to failure, the dual plating technique was comparable to the lateral plate. Thus, dual plating could be a viable biomechanical option for fracture reduction if avoidance of a large extensile lateral approach associated with lateral plating is warranted. PMID:25960057

  18. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  19. Factors in Daily Physical Activity Related to Calcaneal Mineral Density in Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchinson, Teresa M.; Whalen, Robert T.; Cleek, Tammy M.; Vogel, John M.; Arnaud, Sara B.

    1995-01-01

    To determine the factors in daily physical activity that influence the mineral density of the calcaneus, we recorded walking steps and the type and duration of exercise in 43 healthy 26-to 51-yr-old men. Areal (g/sq cm) calcaneal bone mineral density (CBMD) was measured by single energy x-ray densitometry. Subjects walked a mean (+/- SD) of 7902(+/-2534) steps per day or approximately 3.9(+/-1.2) miles daily. Eight subjects reported no exercise activities. The remaining 35 subjects spent 143(2-772) (median and range) min/wk exercising. Twenty-eight men engaged in exercise activities that generate single leg peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRF(sub z)) of 2 or more body weights (high loaders, HL), and 15 reported exercise or daily activities that typically generate GRF(sub z) less than 1.5 body weights (low loaders, LL). CBMD was 12% higher in HL than LL (0.668 +/- 0.074 g/sq cm vs 0.597 +/- 0.062 g/sq cm, P less than 0.004). In the HL group, CBMD correlated to reported minutes of high load exercise (r = 0.41, P less than 0.03). CBMD was not related to the number of daily walking steps (N = 43, r = 0.03, NS). The results of this study support the concept that the dominant factor in daily physical activity relating to bone mineral density is the participation in site specific high loading activities, i.e., for the calcaneus, high calcaneal loads.

  20. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  1. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  2. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  3. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  4. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section... Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given normal operating condition or severe storm condition is the sum of the individual wind...

  5. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  6. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  7. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  8. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  9. 46 CFR 174.055 - Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). 174.055 Section...Drilling Units § 174.055 Calculation of wind heeling moment (Hm). (a) The wind heeling moment (Hm) of a unit in a given...

  10. Groin pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - groin; Lower abdominal pain; Genital pain; Perineal pain ... Common causes of groin pain include: Pulled muscle, tendon, or ligaments in the leg. This problem often occurs in people who play sports such as ...

  11. Muscle fatigue in a standing heel-rise test.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, U; Osterberg, U; Thomeé, R; Grimby, G

    1998-06-01

    The fatigue process of the triceps surae was evaluated during a standing heel-rise test, comprising of eccentric and concentric muscle actions. Ten healthy women with a mean age of 24 years participated. The heel-rise test was performed until exhaustion. Work and electromyographic activity expressed as root mean square and mean power frequency of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were calculated. The average number of heel-rises performed was 25 +/- 1. Work decreased significantly during the test. Mean power frequency decreased significantly in both phases. During the eccentric phase the decrease was significantly larger in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus muscle. There were no significant changes in root mean square except for a decrease in the soleus muscle during the eccentric phase. The present results, showing different fatigue patterns in the two muscles, could be used as reference when testing the fatigue process in different clinical conditions. Recommendations for standardization of a heel-rise test are given. PMID:9606767

  12. Non-union of calcaneum - A rare complication of calcaneal fracture - A case report with brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narinder

    2015-09-01

    Intra-articular fractures of calcaneum are known to be difficult to manage and lead to multiple complications including subtalar arthritis and malunion. However, non-union of calcaneum is rarely encountered. Only a total of six studies reporting on 12 patients could be found on reviewing the available literature (English language only). One such case of non-union of calcaneal fracture and its successful management is being reported in this case report. In addition, extremely limited literature available on calcaneal non-union is also briefly reviewed. Role of subtalar arthrodesis with internal fixation of fracture and bone grafting for successful management of this rare complication is highlighted along with the possibility of under-reporting of this relatively unknown complication. PMID:26155055

  13. Flank pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - side; Side pain ... Flank pain can be a sign of a kidney problem. But, since many organs are in this area, other causes are possible. If you have flank pain and fever , chills, blood in the urine, or ...

  14. Abdominal pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Stomach pain; Pain - abdomen; Belly ache; Abdominal cramps; Bellyache; Stomachache ... Almost everyone has pain in the abdomen at some point. Most of the time, it is not serious. How bad your pain is does not always reflect the seriousness ...

  15. Heel and toe driving on fuel cell vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Tayoung; Chen, Dongmei

    2012-12-11

    A system and method for providing nearly instantaneous power in a fuel cell vehicle. The method includes monitoring the brake pedal angle and the accelerator pedal angle of the vehicle, and if the vehicle driver is pressing both the brake pedal and the accelerator pedal at the same time and the vehicle is in a drive gear, activating a heel and toe mode. When the heel and toe mode is activated, the speed of a cathode compressor is increased to a predetermined speed set-point, which is higher than the normal compressor speed for the pedal position. Thus, when the vehicle brake is removed, the compressor speed is high enough to provide enough air to the cathode, so that the stack can generate nearly immediate power.

  16. Intravascular Myopericytoma in the Heel: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Valero, José; Salcini, José L.; Gordillo, Luis; Gallart, José; González, David; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravascular myopericytoma (IVMP), regarded as a variant of myopericytoma, is a rare tumor. Very few cases have been described, none in the foot. The first case of IVMP located in the heel of the foot is described in this article. A literature review is reported of all cases of IVMP published in the English literature. A 48-year-old man possessed an IVMP on the heel of the right foot. The physical examination and histopathological and ultrasound studies are described. The literature review yielded 5 cases of IVMP, 2 of which were in the thigh and 1 each in the oral mucosa, the periorbital region, and the leg. The possibility that these lesions may be malignant suggests that the histopathological study of vascular tumors should include immunohistochemical tests. PMID:25789958

  17. Intravascular myopericytoma in the heel: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Valero, José; Salcini, José L; Gordillo, Luis; Gallart, José; González, David; Deus, Javier; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    Intravascular myopericytoma (IVMP), regarded as a variant of myopericytoma, is a rare tumor. Very few cases have been described, none in the foot.The first case of IVMP located in the heel of the foot is described in this article. A literature review is reported of all cases of IVMP published in the English literature.A 48-year-old man possessed an IVMP on the heel of the right foot. The physical examination and histopathological and ultrasound studies are described. The literature review yielded 5 cases of IVMP, 2 of which were in the thigh and 1 each in the oral mucosa, the periorbital region, and the leg.The possibility that these lesions may be malignant suggests that the histopathological study of vascular tumors should include immunohistochemical tests. PMID:25789958

  18. Effects of high heel wear and increased weight on the knee during walking.

    PubMed

    Titchenal, Matthew R; Asay, Jessica L; Favre, Julien; Andriacchi, Thomas P; Chu, Constance R

    2015-03-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA), a leading cause of disability, is more prevalent in women than men. Wearing high heeled shoes has been implicated as a potential contributing factor for the higher lifetime risk of osteoarthritis in women. This study tests the hypotheses that changes to knee kinematics and kinetics observed during high heeled walking increase in magnitude with increasing heel height and are accentuated by a 20% increase in weight. Fourteen healthy females were tested using marker-based gait analysis in combinations of footwear (flat athletic shoe, 3.8?cm and 8.3?cm heeled shoes) and weight (with and without 20% bodyweight vest). At preferred walking speed, knee flexion angle at heel-strike and midstance increased with increasing heel height and weight. Maximum knee extension moment during loading response decreased with added weight; maximum knee extension moment during terminal stance decreased with heel height; maximum adduction moments increased with heel height. Many of the changes observed with increasing heel height and weight were similar to those seen with aging and OA progression. This suggests that high heel use, especially in combination with additional weight, may contribute to increased OA risk in women. PMID:25532875

  19. TL-61 versus Rohadur orthoses in heel spur syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, H; Raskowsky, M; Blake, R L; Denton, J A

    1991-08-01

    The authors present the subjective responses of 40 patients with heel spur syndrome or plantar fascitis to orthotic treatment. Twenty patients had Rohadur orthoses and 20 patients had TL-61 orthoses. These data show no difference in the response to or problems created by either TL-61 or Rohadur orthoses. The authors recommend TL-61 as one alternative to Rohadur, now that that latter is unavailable. PMID:1920106

  20. Successful replantation of the heel pad: a seven-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Sanger, J R; Matloub, H S

    1989-04-01

    The authors present a case of successful replantation of the soft tissue of the heel. Circulation was restored by the use of a vein graft from the posterior tibial artery to an arterial branch of the subcutaneous plexus found on the medial aspect of the heel. Two small veins were anastomosed at the edge of the defect. The heel lacks sensation, but the patient has been able to return to work as a heavy laborer in a steel foundry and is walking without the use of orthotics or modified shoes seven years later. This is the first reported case of successful replantation of only the soft tissue of the heel. PMID:2705713

  1. Biomechanical evaluation of heel elevation on load transfer — experimental measurement and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luximon, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Yu, Jia; Zhang, Ming

    2012-02-01

    In spite of ill-effects of high heel shoes, they are widely used for women. Hence, it is essential to understand the load transfer biomechanics in order to design better fit and comfortable shoes. In this study, both experimental measurement and finite element analysis were used to evaluate the biomechanical effects of heel height on foot load transfer. A controlled experiment was conducted using custom-designed platforms. Under different weight-bearing conditions, peak plantar pressure, contact area and center of pressure were analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element foot model was used to simulate the high-heel support and to predict the internal stress distributions and deformations for different heel heights. Results from both experiment and model indicated that heel elevations had significant effects on all variables. When heel elevation increased, the center of pressure shifted from the midfoot region to the forefoot region, the contact area was reduced by 26% from 0 to 10.2 cm heel and the internal stress of foot bones increased. Prediction results also showed that the strain and total tension force of plantar fascia was minimum at 5.1 cm heel condition. This study helps to better understand the biomechanical behavior of foot, and to provide better suggestions for design parameters of high heeled shoes.

  2. Effect of whole-body vibration on calcaneal quantitative ultrasound measurements in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Slatkovska, Lubomira; Beyene, Joseph; Alibhai, Shabbir M H; Wong, Queenie; Sohail, Qazi Z; Cheung, Angela M

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of whole-body vibration (WBV) on calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurements; which has rarely been examined. We conducted a single-centre, 12-month, randomized controlled trial. 202 postmenopausal women with BMD T score between -1.0 and -2.5, not receiving bone medications, were asked to stand on a 0.3 g WBV platform oscillating at either 90- or 30-Hz for 20 consecutive minutes daily, or to serve as controls. Calcium and vitamin D was provided to all participants. Calcaneal broadband attenuation (BUA), speed of sound, and QUS index were obtained as pre-specified secondary endpoints at baseline and 12 months by using a Hologic Sahara Clinical Bone Sonometer. 12-months of WBV did not improve QUS parameters in any of our analyses. While most of our analyses showed no statistical differences between the WBV groups and the control group, mean calcaneal BUA decreased in the 90-Hz (-0.4 [95% CI -1.9 to 1.2] dB MHz(-1)) and 30-Hz (-0.7 [95% CI -2.3 to 0.8] dB MHz(-1)) WBV groups and increased in the control group (1.3 [95% CI 0.0-2.6] dB MHz(-1)). Decreases in BUA in the 90-, 30-Hz or combined WBV groups were statistically different from the control group in a few of the analyses including all randomized participants, as well as in analyses excluding participants who had missing QUS measurement and those who initiated hormone therapy or were <80% adherent. Although there are consistent trends, not all analyses reached statistical significance. 0.3 g WBV at 90 or 30 Hz prescribed for 20 min daily for 12 months did not improve any QUS parameters, but instead resulted in a statistically significant, yet small, decrease in calcaneal BUA in postmenopausal women in several analyses. These unexpected findings require further investigation. PMID:25388526

  3. Lateral Calcaneal Artery Flaps in Atherosclerosis: Cadaveric Study, Vascular Assessment and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tanthanatip, Pattaya; Kuhaphensaeng, Paiboon; Ruamthanthong, Anuchit; Pitiseree, Anont; Suwantemee, Chaichoompol

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soft tissue defects of the lateral malleolus (LM) and Achilles tendon pose difficult reconstructive problems due to the bony prominence and limited local tissue available. The objectives were to study the anatomical landmarks of the lateral calcaneal artery (LCA) and patency of LCA in atherosclerotic patients. Methods: Part I: Thirty-four cadaveric feet were dissected to identify the LCA. The distance between the LCA and the most prominent point of the LM was measured horizontally (LCAa-LM), obliquely (LCAb-LM), and vertically (LCAc-LM). Part II: Thirty-two patients were divided in 2 groups as nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups. The LCA was assessed by both Doppler ultrasonography and computed tomographic angiography (CTA). Part III: Clinical applications were demonstrated. Results: Part I: Mean distances of LCAa-LM, LCAb-LM, and LCAc-LM were 24.76, 33.68, and 35.03 mm, respectively. The LCA originated 94.12% from the peroneal artery. Part II: Doppler ultrasonography detected the LCA at 90.62% and 87.50% in nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic groups, respectively, whereas 100.00% and 93.75%, respectively, were detected by CTA. No statistically significant difference was found in the patency of the LCA between nonatherosclerotic and atherosclerotic patients. Part III: Clinical applications were performed in atherosclerotic patients. Conclusions: The LM is a reliable point to identify the LCA, and the LCA flap can be raised safely in atherosclerotic patients. Preoperative CTA should be performed in severely atherosclerotic patients or cases of major lower extremity vascular injuries. PMID:26495230

  4. Elbow pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - elbow ... Elbow pain can be caused by many problems. A common cause in adults is tendinitis . This is inflammation and ... a partial dislocation ). Other common causes of elbow pain are: Bursitis -- inflammation of a fluid-filled cushion ...

  5. Hip pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip directly over the hip area. ... your provider will ask questions about: Where you feel the pain When and how the pain started Things that ...

  6. Pain Relievers

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There ... also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever. Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for ...

  7. The Achilles Heel of the GSR-Shuffle A Note on New Age Solitaire

    E-print Network

    Schalekamp, Frans

    The Achilles Heel of the GSR-Shuffle A Note on New Age Solitaire Anke van Zuylen Frans Schalekamp that is shuffled using the GSR-shuffle (and two variants) are studied. We show that this game pinpoints the Achilles heel of the GSR-shuffle as is demonstrated using the variation distance. 1 Introduction Since

  8. Reliability of the Kinetic Measures under Different Heel Conditions during Normal Walking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yong Tai

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the reliability of 3 dimension reaction forces and impulses in walking with 3 different heel shoe conditions. These results suggest that changing the height of the heels affects mainly the reliability of the ground reaction force and impulse measures on the medial and lateral dimension and not…

  9. Heel Removal Analysis for Mixing Pumps of Tank 8

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-05-21

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 8. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the east side of Tank 8 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Removal Closure (WRC) Engineering. The calculated results demonstrated that for pump speeds higher than 1800 rpm and at a 130 inch liquid level, a recommended orientation of the slurry pumps could be provided, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft per sec. Further results showed that the time to reach a steady-state flow pattern was affected by both the tank level and the pump speed. Sensitivity studies showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

  10. Epidemiology of High-Heel Shoe Injuries in U.S. Women: 2002 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin Xavier; Lambert, Brice; Jenkins, Gabrielle P; McGwin, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the epidemiology of high-heel-related injuries among a nationally representative population of women in the United States and to analyze the demographic differences within this group. The data used in the present study were collected from the Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System. A total of 3294 injuries, representing an estimated 123,355 high-heel-related injuries, were treated in emergency departments within the United States from 2002 to 2012. The overall rate of high-heel-related injuries for the study was 7.32 per 100,000 females (95% confidence interval 7.08 to 7.56). The injury rate was greatest for young adult females, with the greatest rates observed for those aged 20 to 29 years (18.38 per 100,000 females) and those aged 30 to 39 years (11.07 per 100,000 females). The results from the present study suggest that high-heel-related injuries have nearly doubled during the 11-year period from 2002 to 2012. Injuries from high heels are differential by body region, with most injuries occurring as sprains and strains to the foot and ankle. Although high heels might be stylish, from a health standpoint, it could be worthwhile for females and those interested in wearing high heels to understand the risks of wearing high-heeled shoes and the potential harm that precarious activities in high-heeled shoes can cause. The results of the present study can be used in the development of a prospective cohort study to investigate the risk of injury from high-heeled shoes, accounting for the exposure time and studying differences in demographics (e.g., age and race). PMID:25977152

  11. Shoulder pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - shoulder ... changes around the rotator cuff can cause shoulder pain. You may have pain when lifting the arm above your head or ... The most common cause of shoulder pain occurs when rotator cuff tendons ... The tendons become inflamed or damaged. This condition ...

  12. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  13. Adults with flexible pes planus and the approach to the prescription of customised foot orthoses in clinical practice: A clinical records audit.

    PubMed

    Banwell, Helen A; Thewlis, Dominic; Mackintosh, Shylie

    2015-06-01

    A clinical records audit of the University of South Australia's podiatry clinic clients attending in 2010 was undertaken to determine prevalence of symptomatic flexible pes planus, presenting reasons and treatment options most frequently used. Analysis of rearfoot measures (resting calcaneal stance position, subtalar joint range of motion) between those prescribed a vertical (heel) or inverted (heel) cast pour and a medial heel (Kirby) skive was undertaken. Of 223 clinical records audited, 50% (111/223) of clients were assessed with flexible pes planus, 77% (86/111) of clients with pes planus presented with back or lower limb pain and 58% (64/111) were prescribed customised foot orthoses. Of 42 prescriptions for customised foot orthoses audited; 64% (27/42) were prescribed a vertical (heel) cast pour, 36% (15/42) an inverted (heel) cast pour and 19% (8/42) received a medial heel (Kirby) skive. Those prescribed a medial heel (Kirby) skive had a more everted resting calcaneal stance position than those that were not (mean -8.6±2.8° vs. -5.5±3.4°, p=0.02). Those prescribed an inverted (heel) cast pour had a greater range of subtalar joint motion than those prescribed a vertical (heel) cast pour (median 36.0±10.0° vs. 29.0±5.0°, p=0.01). PMID:26001993

  14. Effect of Breast-Feeding and Maternal Holding in Relieving Painful Responses in Full-Term Neonates: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Obeidat, Hala M; Shuriquie, Mona A

    2015-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the efficacy of breast-feeding with maternal holding as compared with maternal holding without breast-feeding in relieving painful responses during heel lance blood drawing in full-term neonates. A convenience sample of 128 full-term newborn infants, in their fourth to sixth days of life, undergoing heel lance blood drawing for screening of hypothyroidism were included in the study. The neonates were randomly assigned into 2 equivalent groups. During heel lance blood drawing for infants, they either breast-fed with maternal holding (group I) or were held in their mother's lap without breast-feeding (group II). The painful responses were assessed simultaneously by 2 neonatal nurses blinded to the purpose of the study. Outcome measures for painful responses of the full-term neonates were evaluated with the Premature Infant Pain Profile scale. Independent t test showed significant differences in Premature Infant Pain Profile scale scores among the 2 groups (t = -8.447, P = .000). Pain scores were significantly lower among infants who were breast-fed in addition to maternal holding. Evidence from this study indicates that the combination of breast-feeding with maternal holding reduces painful responses of full-term infants during heel lance blood drawing. PMID:26218818

  15. Trypanosome resistance to human innate immunity: targeting Achilles’ heel

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Natalie A.; Kieft, Rudo; MacLeod, Annette; Hajduk, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosome lytic factors (TLFs) are powerful, naturally-occurring toxins in humans that provide sterile protection against infection by several African trypanosomes. These trypanocidal complexes predominantly enter the parasite by binding to the trypanosome haptoglobin/hemoglobin receptor (HpHbR), trafficking to the lysosome, causing membrane damage and ultimately, cell lysis. Despite TLF-mediated immunity, the parasites that cause human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, have developed independent mechanisms of resistance to TLF killing. Here we describe the parasite defenses that allow trypanosome infections of humans and discuss how targeting these apparent strengths of the parasite may reveal their Achilles’ heel, leading to new approaches in the treatment of HAT. PMID:23059119

  16. Radiation levels on empty cylinders containing heel material

    SciTech Connect

    Shockley, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Empty UF{sub 6} cylinders containing heel material were found to emit radiation levels in excess of 200 mr/hr, the maximum amount stated in ORO-651. The radiation levels were as high as 335 mr/hr for thick wall (48X and 48Y) cylinders and 1050 mr/hr for thin wall (48G and 48H) cylinders. The high readings were found only on the bottom of the cylinders. These radiation levels exceeded the maximum levels established in DOT 49 CFR, Part 173.441 for shipment of cylinders. Holding periods of four weeks for thick-wall cylinders and ten weeks for thin-wall cylinders were established to allow the radiation levels to decay prior to shipment.

  17. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten B; Nørreslet, Andreas; Baldvinsson, Henrik K; Heilskov-Hansen, Thomas; Larsen, Peter K; Alkjær, Tine; Henriksen, Marius

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance phase was doubled when walking on high heels. The knee joint angle showed that high-heeled walking caused the subjects to flex the knee joint significantly more in the first half of the stance phase. In the frontal plane a significant increase was observed in the knee joint abductor moment and the hip joint abductor moment. Several EMG parameters increased significantly when walking on high-heels. The results indicate a large increase in bone-on-bone forces in the knee joint directly caused by the increased knee joint extensor moment during high-heeled walking, which may explain the observed higher incidence of osteoarthritis in the knee joint in women as compared with men. PMID:22431211

  18. Finger pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - finger ... Nearly everyone has had finger pain at some time. You may have: Tenderness Burning Stiffness Numbness Tingling Coldness Swelling Change in skin color Redness Many conditions, such ...

  19. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (also called Causalgia and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome) information page compiled by the ... Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (also called Causalgia and Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome) information page compiled by the ...

  20. Ribcage pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not cause the pain in someone who has pleurisy (swelling of the lining of the lungs) or ... Inflammation of cartilage near the breastbone ( costochondritis ) Osteoporosis Pleurisy (the pain is worse when breathing deeply)

  1. Pain Assessment

    MedlinePLUS

    ... clarify its impact, and evaluate other medical and psychosocial problems. The assessment determines whether additional evaluation is ... pain Describe the negative effects on physical and psychosocial functioning caused by the pain Understand the medical ...

  2. Patellofemoral Pain.

    PubMed

    Dutton, Rebecca A; Khadavi, Michael J; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Patellofemoral pain is characterized by insidious onset anterior knee pain that is exaggerated under conditions of increased patellofemoral joint stress. A variety of risk factors may contribute to the development of patellofemoral pain. It is critical that the history and physical examination elucidate those risk factors specific to an individual in order to prescribe an appropriate and customized treatment plan. This article aims to review the epidemiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of patellofemoral pain. PMID:26616176

  3. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cope. You could also try progressive relaxation or self-hypnosis . For more information about non-drug pain relief techniques, see YourChild : Pain and Your Child or Teen . What diet and medication treatments are available for the pain of functional ...

  4. Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anything you do to relax or get your mind off your problems may help control pain. It's important to include relaxing activities in your daily life, even if you are already taking medicine for pain. Relaxation can actually change the body's chemicals that produce pain. You might have to ...

  5. Analysis of Factors Affecting Stress Solution at Concrete Gravity Dam Heel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Vu Hoang; Quoc Cong, Trinh; Tongchun, Li

    2010-05-01

    Along with Vietnam's development, various hydraulic constructions including concrete gravity dams have been being built. In some of these dams, the fractures occurred at the heel of the dams are even in small and media dams. There are various reasons cause the factures at dam heel but the main reason is the stress states at dam heel are not determined correctly while designing dam. In this paper, several factors affecting stress solution at concrete gravity dam heel such as element mesh size, crack joints of upstream foundation, execution process are investigated by using finite element model of Banve concrete gravity dam. This work is very significant when the more high concrete gravity dams will be constructed in Vietnam year after year.

  6. Intervention with Formulated Collagen Gel for Chronic Heel Pressure Ulcers in Older Adults with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agosti, Jennifer K; Chandler, Lois A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic pressure ulcers (PrUs), ulcers that fail to progress through the expected phases of wound healing in a timely fashion, are not only a concern for the patients afflicted with them, but are also a significant burden for the long-term-care facilities in which patients reside. The heel is the second most common location for PrUs. Morbidity and mortality rates for heel PrUs, particularly in the diabetic population, are alarming. Therefore, a consistently effective, cost-conscious, and user-friendly topical treatment for heel ulcers would be welcomed by patients and clinicians. This article describes a marked and rapid improvement in wound granulation in 3 older adult patients following weekly treatment for 8 weeks of chronic (?1-year duration) heel ulcers with an easy-to-use, cost-effective, topical, formulated collagen gel. PMID:26479694

  7. Sludge Heel Removal Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 11

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-09-30

    Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to develop and recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 11. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the edge of Tank 11 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Tank Closure Project (TCP) Engineering. Computational fluid dynamics models of Tank 11 with different operating conditions were developed using the FLUENT(tm) code. The modeling results were used to assess the efficiency of sludge suspension and removal operations in the 75-ft tank. The models employed a three-dimensional approach, a two-equation turbulence model, and an approximate representation of flow obstructions. The calculated local velocity was used as a measure of sludge removal and mixing capability. For the simulations, a series of the modeling calculations was performed with indexed pump orientations until an efficient flow pattern near the potential location of the sludge mound was established for sludge removal. The calculated results demonstrated that the existing slurry pumps running at 1600 rpm could remove the sludge mound from the tank with a 103 in. liquid level, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft/sec. In this case, the only exception is the region within about 2 ft. from the tank wall. Further results showed that the capabilities of sludge removal were affected by the indexed pump orientation, the number of operating pumps, and the pump speed. A recommended operational strategy for an efficient flow pattern was developed to remove the sludge mound assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and removal. Sensitivity results showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions such as valve housing structure were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

  8. Minimally Invasive Sinus Tarsi Approach With Cannulated Screw Fixation Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure for Treatment of Severe Open Calcaneal Fractures With Medial Wounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiyuan; Yan, Yan; Xie, Xinmin; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our prospective study was to investigate the clinical results and advantages of a minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach with cannulated screw fixation combined with vacuum-assisted closure for the treatment of severe open calcaneal fractures with medial wounds. A total of 31 patients (32 feet) with open calcaneal fractures who were admitted to our hospital from January 2008 to May 2013 were selected for the study and randomly divided into 2 groups: the cannulated screw group (n = 16 patients, 16 feet) and the plate group (n = 15 patients, 16 feet). The Böhler and Gissane angles were compared before and after surgery. The clinical results were evaluated using according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scale and the rate of infection. The follow-up duration for all patients ranged from 10 to 36 (mean 24) months. No statistically significant differences were found in the radiologic indicators, incidence of early postoperative complications, or American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society ankle-hindfoot scores (p > .05) between the 2 groups. However, a statistically significant difference was seen in the duration of hospitalization (p < .05) between the 2 groups. A minimally invasive sinus tarsi approach with cannulated screw fixation combined with vacuum-assisted closure is an effective method for the treatment of severe open calcaneal fractures with medial wounds. It provides good reduction and requires fewer days of hospitalization. PMID:26372552

  9. Do Mantle Cell Lymphomas have an “Achilles Heel”?

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Nakhle; Wiestner, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a mature B-cell malignancy that continues to have a high mortality rate. In this manuscript we discuss key pathogenic pathways in MCL biology and their possible therapeutic targeting. Recent findings In addition to Cyclin-D1 the transcription factor SOX-11 emerged as a common characteristic of MCL. Genomic studies have identified a number of recurrently mutated genes; in order of descending frequency these include ATM, CCND1, UBR5, TP53, BIRC3, NOTCH1/2 and TRAF2. However, no clear oncogenic driver has been identified. In contrast, several observations indicate that MCL cells are antigen-experienced cells and that the tumor microenvironment and B-cell receptor engagement are important. This is underscored by the impressive clinical responses achieved with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib. Recently identified activating mutations in the non-canonical NF-?B pathway could give rise to ibrutinib resistance. PARP and aurora kinase inhibitors may be synthetic lethal with the common aberrations in DNA damage pathways found in MCL. Also, ABT-199, a potent and selective inhibitor of BCL-2 has promising activity in early studies. Summary MCL is a heterogeneous disease and no single Achilles heel has been identified. Nevertheless, genomic, molecular, and clinical studies have revealed vulnerabilities that can be exploited for effective therapy. PMID:24857884

  10. Heel effect adaptive flat field correction of digital x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yongjian; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Anode heel effect renders large-scale background nonuniformities in digital radiographs. Conventional offset/gain calibration is performed at mono source-to-image distance (SID), and disregards the SID-dependent characteristic of heel effect. It results in a residual nonuniform background in the corrected radiographs when the SID settings for calibration and correction differ. In this work, the authors develop a robust and efficient computational method for digital x-ray detector gain correction adapted to SID-variant heel effect, without resorting to physical filters, phantoms, complicated heel effect models, or multiple-SID calibration and interpolation.Methods: The authors present the Duo-SID projection correction method. In our approach, conventional offset/gain calibrations are performed only twice, at the minimum and maximum SIDs of the system in typical clinical use. A fast iterative separation algorithm is devised to extract the detector gain and basis heel patterns from the min/max SID calibrations. The resultant detector gain is independent of SID, while the basis heel patterns are parameterized by the min- and max-SID. The heel pattern at any SID is obtained from the min-SID basis heel pattern via projection imaging principles. The system gain desired at a specific acquisition SID is then constructed using the projected heel pattern and detector gain map.Results: The method was evaluated for flat field and anatomical phantom image corrections. It demonstrated promising improvements over interpolation and conventional gain calibration/correction methods, lowering their correction errors by approximately 70% and 80%, respectively. The separation algorithm was able to extract the detector gain and heel patterns with less than 2% error, and the Duo-SID corrected images showed perceptually appealing uniform background across the detector.Conclusions: The Duo-SID correction method has substantially improved on conventional offset/gain corrections for digital x-ray imaging in an SID-variant environment. The technique is relatively simple, and can be easily incorporated into multiple-point gain calibration/correction techniques. It offers a potentially valuable tool for preprocessing digital x-ray images to boost image quality of mammography, chest and cardiac radiography, as well as automated computer aided diagnostic radiology.

  11. Anode heel affect in thoracic radiology: a visual grading analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mearon, T.; Brennan, P. C.

    2006-03-01

    For decades, the antero-posterior (AP) projection of the thoracic spine has represented a substantial challenge. Patient thickness varies substantially along the cranio-caudal axis resulting in images that are too dark for the upper vertebrae and too light, or with excessive quantum mottle, towards the 9th to 12th thoracic vertebra. The anode heel affect is a well known phenomenon, however there is a paucity of reports demonstrating its exploitation in clinical departments for optimising images. The current work, using an adult, tissue-equivalent anthropomorphic phantom, explores if appropriate positioning ofthe anode can improve image quality for thoracic spine radiology. At each of 5 kVps (70, 81, 90, 102, 109) thirty AP thoracic spine images were produced, 15 with the anode end of the tube towards the cranial part of the phantom and 15 with the anode end of the tube facing caudally. Visual grading analysis of the resultant images demonstrated significant improvements in overall image quality and visualisation of specific anatomical features for the cranially facing anode compared with the alternative position, which were most pronounced for the 1st to 4th and 9th to 12th vertebrae. These improvements were evident at 70, 81 and 90 kVp, but not for the higher beam energies. The results demonstrate that correct positioning of the X-ray tube can improve image quality for thoracic radiology at specific tube potentials. Further work is ongoing to investigate whether this easy to implement and cost-free technique can be employed for other examinations.

  12. An Achilles' Heel in an Amyloidogenic Protein and Its Repair

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yanwu; Petkova, Aneta; Huang, Kun; Xu, Bin; Hua, Qing-xin; Ye, I-Ju; Chu, Ying-Chi; Hu, Shi-Quan; Phillips, Nelson B.; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Mackin, Robert B.; Katsoyannis, Panayotis G.; Tycko, Robert; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin fibrillation provides a model for a broad class of amyloidogenic diseases. Conformational distortion of the native monomer leads to aggregation-coupled misfolding. Whereas ?-cells are protected from proteotoxicity by hexamer assembly, fibrillation limits the storage and use of insulin at elevated temperatures. Here, we have investigated conformational distortions of an engineered insulin monomer in relation to the structure of an insulin fibril. Anomalous 13C NMR chemical shifts and rapid 15N-detected 1H-2H amide-proton exchange were observed in one of the three classical ?-helices (residues A1–A8) of the hormone, suggesting a conformational equilibrium between locally folded and unfolded A-chain segments. Whereas hexamer assembly resolves these anomalies in accordance with its protective role, solid-state 13C NMR studies suggest that the A-chain segment participates in a fibril-specific ?-sheet. Accordingly, we investigated whether helicogenic substitutions in the A1–A8 segment might delay fibrillation. Simultaneous substitution of three ?-branched residues (IleA2 ? Leu, ValA3 ? Leu, and ThrA8 ? His) yielded an analog with reduced thermodynamic stability but marked resistance to fibrillation. Whereas amide-proton exchange in the A1–A8 segment remained rapid, 13C? chemical shifts exhibited a more helical pattern. This analog is essentially without activity, however, as IleA2 and ValA3 define conserved receptor contacts. To obtain active analogs, substitutions were restricted to A8. These analogs exhibit high receptor-binding affinity; representative potency in a rodent model of diabetes mellitus was similar to wild-type insulin. Although 13C? chemical shifts remain anomalous, significant protection from fibrillation is retained. Together, our studies define an “Achilles' heel” in a globular protein whose repair may enhance the stability of pharmaceutical formulations and broaden their therapeutic deployment in the developing world. PMID:20106984

  13. Pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain

    PubMed Central

    Kjøgx, Heidi; Zachariae, Robert; Pfeiffer-Jensen, Mogens; Kasch, Helge; Svensson, Peter; Jensen, Troels S.; Vase, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pain frequency has been shown to influence sensitization, psychological distress, and pain modulation. The present study examined if pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and pain. Method: A non-clinical (247 students) and a clinical (223 pain patients) sample completed the Danish versions of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS), Beck Depression Inventory, and the State Trait Anxiety Inventory and rated pain intensity, unpleasantness and frequency. Results: In both samples, high pain frequency was found to moderate the association between pain catastrophizing and pain intensity, whereas low pain frequency did not. The psychometric properties and the factor structure of the Danish version of the PCS were confirmed. Conclusions: This is the first study to validate the Danish version of the PCS and to show that pain frequency moderates the relationship between pain catastrophizing and reported pain in both non-clinical and clinical populations. PMID:25646089

  14. The influence of a yacht's heeling stability on optimum sail design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneyd, A. D.; Sugimoto, T.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents fundamental results concerning the optimum design of yacht sails and masts. The aerodynamics of a high aspect ratio sail in uniform flow is analysed using lifting line theory to maximise thrust for a given sail area. The novel feature of this work is that thrust is optimised subject to the constraint that the aerodynamic heeling moment generated by the sail is balanced by the righting moment due to hull buoyancy (and the weight of the keel). Initially, the heel angle is therefore unknown, and determined as part of the solution process. Under the assumption of small heel angle, the problem reduces to minimising a quadratic form in the Fourier coefficients for the circulation distribution along the mast, and a simple analytic solution can be derived. It is found that if the mast is too high, the upper section is unused, and as a consequence there is a theoretically ideal mast height for a yacht of given heeling stability. Under the constraints of given sail area and heeling equilibrium it is found that no advantage is to be gained by allowing reverse circulation near the top of the mast. Various implications for yacht performance are discussed.

  15. Quantification of tritium ``heels`` and isotope exchange mechanisms in La-Ni-Al tritides

    SciTech Connect

    Wermer, J.R.

    1992-07-27

    Formation of tritium heels in LANA (LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x}) 0.30 (x=0.30) and 0.75 tritides was quantified; size of the heel is dependent on storage and processing conditions. Absorption-desorption cycling of the tritide beds mitigates formation of the tritium heel and can reduce its size. The higher pressure material LANA 0.30 showed slower heel formation than LANA 0.75; this allows more tritium to be removed at the maximum processing temperature. In plant application, LANA 0.30 beds are used as compressors; except during compressor operation, their aging will be very slow. Tritium heel removal by D exchange was demonstrated. Absorption-desorption cycling during an exchange cycle does not improve the exchange efficiency. Residual tritium can be removed to very low levels. For a tritide bed scheduled for removal from the process, a final tritium level can be estimated based on the number of D exchange cycles. 13 refs, 8 figs, 6 tabs.

  16. The use of a heel-mounted accelerometer as an adjunct measure of slip distance.

    PubMed

    McGorry, Raymond W; DiDomenico, Angela; Chang, Chien-Chi

    2007-05-01

    A human-centered measure of floor slipperiness could be useful as an adjunct to conventional tribologic measures. This paper reports on the development and evaluation of a measure of slip distance based on variables derived from the signal of a heel-mounted accelerometer. Twenty-one participants walked on a laboratory runway under several surface slipperiness conditions at three walking speeds during a protocol designed to produce a wide range of slip distances at heel strike. Analysis of variance showed significant effects of slip distance (no-slip, micro-slip and slide), walking speed (1.52, 1.78 and 2.13 m/s) and their interactions on peak forward acceleration, peak vertical acceleration and deceleration time of the heel following heel strike in 704 trials. Regression analysis of slip distance and deceleration time showed the strongest relationship with R2=0.511. Large individual variation in the strength of this relationship was observed. The heel-mounted accelerometer may have utility as an adjunct measure in the evaluation of floor slipperiness, particularly for field applications where direct measurement may not be feasible. PMID:16806040

  17. Effect of antipronation foot orthosis geometry on compression of heel and arch soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Declan; Nester, Christopher; Preece, Stephen; Mickle, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to understand how systematic changes in arch height and two designs of heel wedging affect soft tissues under the foot. Soft tissue thickness under the heel and navicular was measured using ultrasound. Heel pad thickness was measured when subjects were standing on a flat surface and standing on an orthosis with 4 and 8 degree extrinsic wedges and 4 mm and 8 mm intrinsic wedges (n = 27). Arch soft tissue thickness was measured when subjects were standing and when standing on an orthosis with -6 mm, standard, and +6 mm increments in arch height (n = 25). Extrinsic and intrinsic heel wedges significantly increased soft tissue thickness under the heel compared with no orthosis. The 4 and 8 degree extrinsic wedges increased tissue thickness by 28% and 27.6%, respectively, while the 4 mm and 8 mm intrinsic wedges increased thickness by 23% and 14.6%, respectively. Orthotic arch height significantly affected arch soft tissue thickness. Compared with the no orthosis condition, the -6 mm, standard, and +6 mm arch heights decreased arch tissue thickness by 9%, 10%, and 11.8%, respectively. This study demonstrates that change in orthotic geometry creates different plantar soft tissue responses that we expect to affect transmission of force to underlying foot bones. PMID:26465089

  18. Effect of Different Forefoot and Heel Support Surfaces on the Activities of the RF and HAM Muscles during the Sit-to-stand Task while Wearing High-heel Shoes.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2014-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to show the effect of different forefoot and heel support surfaces on the activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles during the sit-to-stand task while wearing high-heel shoes. [Subjects] Fifteen female subjects were recruited. [Methods] The muscle activities of the rectus femoris and hamstring muscles were recorded using an MP150 system during the sit-to-stand task while wearing various high-heeled shoes. [Results] The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 1 shoes compared with when they wore condition 2, 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. The activities of the rectus femoris and medial hamstring muscles significantly decreased when subjects wore condition 2 high-heeled shoes compared with condition 3 or 4 high-heeled shoes. [Conclusion] The results can be interpreted as indicating that the size of the forefoot supporting surface can influence the lower extremity muscles of women wearing high-heeled shoes more than the size of the heel supporting surface. PMID:25364105

  19. Reconstruction of Ankle and Heel Defects with Peroneal Artery Perforator-Based Pedicled Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Deok Ki; Lew, Dae Hyun; Roh, Tai Suk

    2015-01-01

    Background The reconstruction of ankle and heel defects remains a significant problem for plastic surgeons. The following options exist for reconstructing such defects: local random flaps, reverse flow island flaps, and free flaps. However, each of these methods has certain drawbacks. Peroneal artery perforators have many advantages; in particular, they are predictable and reliable for ankle and heel reconstructions. In this study, we report our clinical experience with peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flaps in ankle and heel reconstructions. Methods From July 2005 to October 2012, 12 patients underwent the reconstruction of soft tissue defects in the ankle and heel using a peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flap. These 12 cases were classified according to the anatomical area involved. The cause of the wound, comorbidities, flap size, operative results, and complications were analyzed through retrospective chart review. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.4 years. The size of the flaps ranged from 5×4 to 20×8 cm2. The defects were classified into two groups based on whether they occurred in the Achilles tendon (n=9) or heel pad (n=3). In all 12 patients, complete flap survival was achieved without significant complications; however, two patients experienced minor wound dehiscence. Nevertheless, these wounds healed in response to subsequent debridement and conservative management. No patient had any functional deficits of the lower extremities. Conclusions Peroneal artery perforator-based pedicled flaps were found to be a useful option for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the ankle and heel. PMID:26430635

  20. Chronic pain - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - resources; Resources - chronic pain ... The following organizations are good resources for information on chronic pain: American Chronic Pain Association -- www.theacpa.org National Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain Association -- www.fmcpaware.org ...

  1. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-yeol

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5?cm, 7?cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5?cm, and 7?cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  2. The Effects of Wearing High Heels while Pressing a Car Accelerator Pedal on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaemin; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2014-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of wearing high heels while driving on lower extremity muscle activation. [Subjects] The subjects of this experimental study were 14 healthy women in their 20s who normally wear shoes with high heels. [Methods] The subjects were asked to place their shoes on an accelerator pedal with the heel touching the floor and then asked to press the pedal with as much pressure as possible for 3 seconds before removing their feet from the pedal. A total of 3 measurements were taken for each heel height (flat, 5?cm, 7?cm), and the heel height was randomly selected. [Results] The levels of muscle activity, indicated as the percentage of reference voluntary contraction, for gastrocnemius muscle in the flat, 5?cm, and 7?cm shoes were 180.8±61.8%, 285.4±122.3%, and 366.2±193.7%, respectively, and there were significant differences between groups. Those for the soleus muscle were 477.3±209.2%, 718.8±380.5%, and 882.4±509.9%, and there were significant differences between groups. [Conclusion] To summarize the results of this study, it was found that female drivers require greater lower extremity muscle activation when wearing high heels than when wearing low heels. Furthermore, instability and muscle fatigue of the ankle joint, which results from wearing high heels on a daily basis, could also occur while driving. PMID:25435684

  3. Neuropathic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... know that it can erode quality of life. Communication Tools View All Everyday Tools During Your Visit ... pain. Online Tool Printable Tool (PDF) Show More Communication Tools Where Does It Hurt? / Nerve Man With ...

  4. Joint pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... both rest and exercise are important. Warm baths, massage, and stretching exercises should be used as often ... Does keeping the joint elevated help? Do medicines, massage, or applying heat reduce the pain? What other ...

  5. Pain (PDQ)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... swelling. Decrease pain caused by muscle spasms and tension. Massage has a direct effect on body tissues ... slowly, feel yourself begin to relax; feel the tension leaving your body. Step 3. Breathe in and ...

  6. Orofacial Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... percent of all headaches are caused by muscle tension, which may be related to the bite. Headaches ... the touch Earaches or ringing in the ears Neck, shoulder or back pain Dizziness ?xml:namespace> Sleep ...

  7. Urination Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... small masses of minerals) in the urinary tract. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common cause of painful ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Urinary Tract Infections A to Z: Dysuria Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections ...

  8. Penis pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain - penis ... Bites, either human or insect Cancer of the penis Erection that does not go away (priapism) Genital herpes Infected hair follicles Infected prosthesis of the penis Infection under the foreskin of uncircumcised men ( balanitis ) ...

  9. Phantom Pain 

    E-print Network

    Valentine, A.

    , and neurotransmitter release, thereby making them immensely important therapeutic targets for treating medical conditions such as pain, depression, obesity, learning, and memory.61,62 Despite their sequence homology, NTs elicit their action by binding to two...

  10. Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Use anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen and aspirin, to relieve pain and discomfort, and apply heat ... Use anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen or aspirin, and apply heat to the sore area. See ...

  11. Effects of heel base size, walking speed, and slope angle on center of pressure trajectory and plantar pressure when wearing high-heeled shoes.

    PubMed

    Luximon, Yan; Cong, Yan; Luximon, Ameersing; Zhang, Ming

    2015-06-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and a high risk of fall, fracture, and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of heel base size (HBS) on walking stability under different walking speeds and slope angles. The trajectory of the center of pressure (COP), maximal peak pressure, pressure time integral, contact area, and perceived stability were analyzed. The results revealed that a small HBS increased the COP deviations, shifting the COP more medially at the beginning of the gait cycle. The slope angle mainly affected the COP in the anteroposterior direction. An increased slope angle shifted the COP posterior and caused greater pressure and a larger contact area in the midfoot and rearfoot regions, which can provide more support. Subjective measures on perceived stability were consistent with objective measures. The results suggested that high-heeled shoes with a small HBS did not provide stable plantar support, particularly on a small slope angle. The changes in the COP and pressure pattern caused by a small HBS might increase joint torque and muscle activity and induce lower limb problems. PMID:25910862

  12. Occurrence, Characterization and Synthesis of Hanford and SRS Tank Heel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    KRUMHANSL, JAMES L.

    2002-07-01

    The long-range objective of this study was to develop chemically assisted technologies for removing heels from tanks. In FY 01, the first two steps toward this objective were taken: (1) catalogue the occurrence and nature of tank heels and assess which materials are available for study and (2) develop methods for synthesizing non-radioactive surrogate heel materials for use in testing potential removal technologies. The chief finding of Task 1 was the existence of ''heels'', depending on the definition used. Hard materials that would be almost impossible to remove by sluicing are all but absent from the records of both Savannah River and Hanford. Historical usage suggests that the term ''heel'' may also apply to chunky, granular, or semi-solid pasty accumulations. These materials are documented and may also be difficult to remove by conventional sluicing technologies. Such heels may be comprised of normal sludge components, dominantly iron and aluminum hydroxides, or they may result from added materials which were not part of the normal fuel reprocessing operations: Portland cement, diatomaceous earth, sand and soil and spent zeolite ion exchange ''resins''. The occurrence and chemistry of the most notable ''heel'', that of the zeolite mass in Tank 19F at Savannah River, is reviewed in some detail. Secondly, no clear correlation was found between high tank temperatures and difficulties encountered in removing materials from a tank at a later date; nor did the sludges from these tanks give any indication of being particularly solid. Experimental studies to develop synthetic heel materials were caned out using a number of different approaches. For normal sludge materials settling, even when assisted by a centrifuge, it proved ineffective. The same result was obtained from drying sludge samples. Even exposing sludges to a molten salt melt at 233 C, only produced a fine powder, rather than a resilient ceramic which resisted disaggregation. A cohesive material, however, was produced by wicking the pore fluid out of a sludge gel (into packed diatomaceous earth), while simultaneously applying pressure to compact the sludge as it dehydrated. Osmotic gradients could provide the same function as the capillary forces provided by the diatomaceous earth sorbant placed in contact with the sludge. Tests on the anomalous materials added to the tanks all indicated potential problems. Hard granules, and maybe chunks, may be encountered where Portland cement was added to a tank. Sand, spent zeolite resin, and diatomaceous earth, will all react with the tank fluids to produce a sodalite/cancrinite material. The degree of reaction determines whether the grains become cemented together. SRS activities showed that heels formed when spent zeolites were added to tanks can be readily dislodged and it is expected that heels from sand would possess equal or less cohesion. Diatomaceous earth may form more resilient crusts or masses. To summarize, the existence of ''hard'' heels has yet to be documented. A broader definition suggests inclusion of poorly cohesive cancrinite-cemented masses and dense past-like accumulations of abnormally compacted ''normal'' sludges. Chemical treatments to remove these materials must focus on agents that are active against aluminosilicates and hydrous oxides of iron and aluminum. Exploiting the high pore-water content of these materials may provide a second avenue for dislodging such accumulations. Techniques were developed to produce synthetic sludges on which various removal technologies could be tried.

  13. Neonatal pain

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Suellen M

    2014-01-01

    Effective management of procedural and postoperative pain in neonates is required to minimize acute physiological and behavioral distress and may also improve acute and long-term outcomes. Painful stimuli activate nociceptive pathways, from the periphery to the cortex, in neonates and behavioral responses form the basis for validated pain assessment tools. However, there is an increasing awareness of the need to not only reduce acute behavioral responses to pain in neonates, but also to protect the developing nervous system from persistent sensitization of pain pathways and potential damaging effects of altered neural activity on central nervous system development. Analgesic requirements are influenced by age-related changes in both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response, and increasing data are available to guide safe and effective dosing with opioids and paracetamol. Regional analgesic techniques provide effective perioperative analgesia, but higher complication rates in neonates emphasize the importance of monitoring and choice of the most appropriate drug and dose. There have been significant improvements in the understanding and management of neonatal pain, but additional research evidence will further reduce the need to extrapolate data from older age groups. Translation into improved clinical care will continue to depend on an integrated approach to implementation that encompasses assessment and titration against individual response, education and training, and audit and feedback. PMID:24330444

  14. The X-ray attenuation characteristics and density of human calcaneal marrow do not change significantly during adulthood

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Les, C. M.; Whalen, R. T.; Beaupre, G. S.; Yan, C. H.; Cleek, T. M.; Wills, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in the material characteristics of bone marrow with aging can be a significant source of error in measurements of bone density when using X-ray and ultrasound imaging modalities. In the context of computed tomography, dual-energy computed techniques have been used to correct for changes in marrow composition. However, dual-energy quantitative computed tomography (DE-QCT) protocols, while increasing the accuracy of the measurement, reduce the precision and increase the radiation dose to the patient in comparison to single-energy quantitative computed tomography (SE-QCT) protocols. If the attenuation properties of the marrow for a particular bone can be shown to be relatively constant with age, it should be possible to use single-energy techniques without experiencing errors caused by unknown marrow composition. Marrow was extracted by centrifugation from 10 mm thick frontal sections of 34 adult cadaver calcanei (28 males, 6 females, ages 17-65 years). The density and energy-dependent linear X-ray attenuation coefficient of each marrow sample were determined. For purposes of comparing our results, we then computed an effective CT number at two GE CT/i scan voltages (80 and 120 kVp) for each specimen. The coefficients of variation for the density, CT number at 80 kVp and CT number at 120 kVp were each less than 1%, and the parameters did not change significantly with age (p > 0.2, r2 < 0.02, power > 0.8 where the minimum acceptable r2 = 0.216). We could demonstrate no significant gender-associated differences in these relationships. These data suggest that calcaneal bone marrow X-ray attenuation properties and marrow density are essentially constant from the third through sixth decades of life.

  15. Pain relief can be painful

    PubMed Central

    Bindra, Ashish; Bithal, Parmod; Sokhal, Navdeep; Arora, Ankit

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular nerve block is periodically used procedure used to treat neuralgic pain in the distribution of trigeminal nerve. It is a commonly performed block in outpatient settings at our institute. We present a case of an elderly edentulous patient with trigeminal neuralgia who suffered recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation following mandibular nerve block. The patient presented with complaints of severe pain, inability to close mouth, and eat food since 2 days. Anterior closed reduction of TMJ resulted in reduction of joint and immediate pain relief. However, the maneuver failed due to recurrent dislocation of the joint. A Barton dressing was applied to prevent another dislocation. This was followed by autologous blood injection into the joint. This case focuses on the preponderance of clinical evaluation and accentuates the need for additional forethought to be taken during pain procedures, particularly in the geriatric population.

  16. Feasibility of Quantitative Ultrasound Measurement of the Heel Bone in People with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mergler, S.; Lobker, B.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Penning, C.

    2010-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures are common in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Reduced mobility in case of motor impairment and the use of anti-epileptic drugs contribute to the development of low BMD. Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) measurement of the heel bone is a non-invasive and radiation-free method for measuring bone…

  17. 200 Years of History 1815-2015 On the heels of the Revolutionary War our fledgling

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    1 #12;2 200 Years of History 1815-2015 On the heels of the Revolutionary War our fledgling nation would find itself again at war in 1812 with the superpower of that time, Great Britain. As in our first war with Great Britain, the outcome was uncertain and potential costs were great. In our lifetime we

  18. Investigating the Effects of Knee Flexion during the Eccentric Heel-Drop Exercise.

    PubMed

    Weinert-Aplin, Robert A; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to characterise the biomechanics of the widely practiced eccentric heel-drop exercises used in the management of Achilles tendinosis. Specifically, the aim was to quantify changes in lower limb kinematics, muscle lengths and Achilles tendon force, when performing the exercise with a flexed knee instead of an extended knee. A musculoskeletal modelling approach was used to quantify any differences between these versions of the eccentric heel drop exercises used to treat Achilles tendinosis. 19 healthy volunteers provided a group from which optical motion, forceplate and plantar pressure data were recorded while performing both the extended and flexed knee eccentric heel-drop exercises over a wooden step when barefoot or wearing running shoes. This data was used as inputs into a scaled musculoskeletal model of the lower limb. Range of ankle motion was unaffected by knee flexion. However, knee flexion was found to significantly affect lower limb kinematics, inter-segmental loads and triceps muscle lengths. Peak Achilles load was not influenced despite significantly reduced peak ankle plantarflexion moments (p < 0.001). The combination of reduced triceps lengths and greater ankle dorsiflexion, coupled with reduced ankle plantarflexion moments were used to provide a basis for previously unexplained observations regarding the effect of knee flexion on the relative loading of the triceps muscles during the eccentric heel drop exercises. This finding questions the role of the flexed knee heel drop exercise when specifically treating Achilles tendinosis. Key pointsA more dorsiflexed ankle and a flexing knee are characteristics of performing the flexed knee heel-drop eccentric exercise.Peak ankle plantarflexion moments were reduced with knee flexion, but did not reduce peak Achilles tendon force.Kinematic changes at the knee and ankle affected the triceps muscle length and resulted in a reduction in the amount of Achilles tendon work performed.A version of the heel-drop exercise which reduces the muscle length change will also reduce the amount of tendon stretch, reducing the clinical efficacy of the exercise. PMID:25983597

  19. Pain management.

    PubMed

    Wild, L

    1990-12-01

    Postoperative pain management in the critically ill patient is a challenge for nurses. Knowing the basis of pain transmission and mechanisms of action of interventions can assist the critical care nurse in making clinical decisions regarding pain control for individual patients. There are a number of modalities available to treat postoperative pain including both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Techniques such as PCA not only can provide good analgesia, but allow the critically ill patient at least one aspect of control in the otherwise highly controlled environment of the critical care unit. Epidural or intrathecal analgesia, using either opioids or LAAs alone or in combination, provides excellent analgesic effect (with minimal side effects) and may improve patient outcomes. Nonpharmacologic techniques, unfortunately, are commonly overlooked as adjuncts to traditional analgesia routines because of the nature of the illness in the critically ill patient. Nonpharmacologic techniques of pain management have a place in the care of the critically ill when applied based on the assessment of an individual patient's needs and abilities to participate in his or her care. Ensuring optimal patient comfort can benefit critically ill patients and improve clinical outcomes. PMID:2096859

  20. Kinematics and Kinetics of Single-Limb Heel Rise in Diabetes Related Medial Column Foot Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, Mary K.; Woodburn, James; Mueller, Michael J.; Strube, Michael J; Johnson, Jeffrey E.; Sinacore, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes-related medial column foot deformities contribute to high plantar pressure, joint instability, ulceration and amputation. Impaired foot function may be an early indicator of foot structural incompetence and contribute to deformity progression. This study examines the ability of single-limb heel rise multi-segmental kinematics and kinetics to identify midfoot and hindfoot dysfunction in those with diabetes-related medial column foot deformity. Methods Single-limb heel rise foot kinematics and kinetics were examined in adults with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy with and without medial column foot deformity and age-, weight-matched controls. Findings Hindfoot relative to shank plantarflexion, peak and excursion, were reduced in bothdiabetes groups compared to controls (P<0.017). Controls' initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position was plantarflexed 31 degrees and plantarflexed an additional 13 degrees during heel rise. The initial forefoot relative to hindfoot position for the diabetes group without deformity was similarly plantarflexed as controls (34 degrees) while the diabetes deformity group was less plantarflexed (lower arch position: 23 degrees, P<0.017). During the heel rise task both diabetes groups demonstrated less ability to plantarflex the forefoot relative to the hindfoot compared to controls (2 and 5 degrees respectively, P<0.017). Ankle plantarflexion power was reduced in the diabetes deformity group compared to controls (P<0.017). Interpretation The single-limb heel rise task identified movement dysfunction in those with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Failure to plantarflex the forefoot relative to hindfoot may compromise midfoot joint stability and increase the risk of injury and arch collapse. PMID:25218437

  1. The mechanical characteristics of the human heel pad during foot strike in running: an in vivo cineradiographic study.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, D; Aerts, P; Kunnen, M

    1994-10-01

    The compressive properties of the heel pad during the heel strike when running (barefoot and shod, two subjects, 4.5 m s-1) were studied by means of a high-speed two-dimensional cineradiographic registration (150 frames s-1) of an actual running step. Vertical ground reaction forces were measured with a force platform. In barefoot running the heel pad deforms to a maximal percentage deformation of 60.5 +/- 5.5%. In shod running the heel pad deforms only 35.5 +/- 2.5% and the nonlinear force-deformation relationship reflects an increasing stiffness when deformation rises. Although the amplitudes of the vertical ground reaction forces do not differ notably in both conditions, barefoot running implies a maximal deformation to the fatty heel tissue, reducing its functional role from shock reduction towards local protection of the heel bone. It is argued that embedding the foot in a well-fitting shoe increases the effective stiffness of the heel pad. PMID:7962009

  2. Comparison of the Calcaneal Pitch Angle and Modified Projection Area Per Length Squared Method for Medial Longitudinal Arch Evaluation of the Foot

    PubMed Central

    Akdo?an, Ilgaz; Akkaya, Semih; Akkaya, Nuray; K?ter, Esat

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the calcaneal pitch angle (CPA) values measured on direct lateral radiographs of feet, and the modified projection area per length squared (PAL), which was calculated as a new method for the evaluation of the medial longitudinal arch (MLA) of the foot. Material and Methods: Direct lateral radiographs of patients who had weightbearing feet radiographies for any reason except trauma were retrospectively obtained from the archives. Direct lateral radiographs of the feet were printed and a transparent sheet was placed on it. A straight line was drawn between the most plantar process of the calcaneus and the head of the first metatarsal bone for the calculation of the PAL of the MLA. Two semilunar arcs were drawn upon this straight line. PAL1 and PAL2 were estimated using a point-counting technique. The CPA, lateral talo-calcaneal angles (LTCA), and talo-first metatarsal angles (TFMA) were measured. The correlations between PAL1, PAL2 of right and left feet and CPA, LTCA, and TFMA were explored. Results: Fifty patients (27 females, 23 males) with a mean age of 40.12 (4–78) years were evaluated. Significant correlations were detected between PAL1, PAL2 and CPA, and TFMA for both right and left feet (p<0.05). Conclusion: A significant correlation was detected between the modified PAL method as a new technique and the standard CPA method for MLA evaluation. The PAL method is suggested as a simple and practical method for MLA evaluation. PMID:25207043

  3. Somatoform pain disorder

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain disorder ... thought to be related to emotional stress. The pain was often said to be "all in their head." However, patients with somatoform pain disorder seem to experience painful sensations in a ...

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a chronic pain condition. It causes intense pain, usually in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. ... in skin temperature, color, or texture Intense burning pain Extreme skin sensitivity Swelling and stiffness in affected ...

  5. Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... least 6 months. Other studies are comparing different health care approaches to the management of acute low back pain (standard care versus chiropractic, acupuncture, or massage therapy). These studies are measuring ... changes in health-related quality of life among patients suffering from ...

  6. Abdominal Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... that is sudden and sharp You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting

  7. Breast pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast pain may be cyclical (worse before a period) or non-cyclical, originating from the breast or the chest wall, and occurs at some time in 70% of women. Cyclical breast pain resolves spontaneously in 20% to 30% of women, but tends to recur in 60% of women. Non-cyclical pain responds poorly to treatment but tends to resolve spontaneously in half of women. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical question: What are the effects of treatments for breast pain? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 24 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics, bromocriptine, combined oral contraceptive pill, danazol, diuretics, evening primrose oil, gestrinone, gonadorelin analogues, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), lisuride, low-fat diet, progestogens, pyridoxine, tamoxifen, tibolone, topical or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), toremifene, and vitamin E. PMID:21477394

  8. [Social pain].

    PubMed

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi

    2011-09-01

    This chapter focuses on what social pain is and how it should be managed. In order to understand social pain in a cancer patient, it is necessary to recognize the change in the patient's daily life after the diagnosis of cancer. Because the degree of suffering and the relationships with family members and the people he or she worked with differ from patient to patient, it is important to note that the context of social pain is different in each patient. Five points shown below are essential in managing social pain. 1. Economical suffering may be alleviated by utilization of the social security system while taking into account each patient's standard of living. 2. Burdens on family members should be lessened, such as by not having them stay at the patient's bedside every day and letting them go home occasionally. 3. The normal patterns of communication, support, and conflict in the family should be identified, and the extent to which they have been disrupted by the illness should be assessed. 4. It is important to understand the ethnic, cultural, and religious background of the patient and the potential impact of their influence on the individual and the illness. 5. Practical or emotional unfinished business that the patient has needs to be identified, and efforts should be made to support fulfillment. PMID:21950034

  9. EM-31 RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER MEETING REPORT: MOBILIZE AND DISLODGE TANK WASTE HEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, A.

    2010-02-16

    The Retrieval Knowledge Center sponsored a meeting in June 2009 to review challenges and gaps to retrieval of tank waste heels. The facilitated meeting was held at the Savannah River Research Campus with personnel broadly representing tank waste retrieval knowledge at Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. This document captures the results of this meeting. In summary, it was agreed that the challenges to retrieval of tank waste heels fell into two broad categories: (1) mechanical heel waste retrieval methodologies and equipment and (2) understanding and manipulating the heel waste (physical, radiological, and chemical characteristics) to support retrieval options and subsequent processing. Recent successes and lessons from deployments of the Sand and Salt Mantis vehicles as well as retrieval of C-Area tanks at Hanford were reviewed. Suggestions to address existing retrieval approaches that utilize a limited set of tools and techniques are included in this report. The meeting found that there had been very little effort to improve or integrate the multiple proven or new techniques and tools available into a menu of available methods for rapid insertion into baselines. It is recommended that focused developmental efforts continue in the two areas underway (low-level mixing evaluation and pumping slurries with large solid materials) and that projects to demonstrate new/improved tools be launched to outfit tank farm operators with the needed tools to complete tank heel retrievals effectively and efficiently. This document describes the results of a meeting held on June 3, 2009 at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina to identify technology gaps and potential technology solutions to retrieving high-level waste (HLW) heels from waste tanks within the complex of sites run by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The meeting brought together personnel with extensive tank waste retrieval knowledge from DOE's four major waste sites - Hanford, Savannah River, Idaho, and Oak Ridge. The meeting was arranged by the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC), which is a technology development project sponsored by the Office of Technology Innovation & Development - formerly the Office of Engineering and Technology - within the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM).

  10. Impact of heel effect and ROI size on the determination of contrast-to-noise ratio for digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsager, Abdulaziz; Young, Kenneth C.; Oduko, Jennifer M.

    2008-03-01

    The European Guidelines for quality control in digital mammography specify a procedure for measuring contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) using a 0.2mm thickness of aluminium with different thicknesses of Plexiglas. The relationship between ROI size and heel effect and how this affects CNR measurement is investigated in this work for DR and CR systems. The measured relative noise for the CR images was found to be strongly dependant on the ROI size due to the heel effect. After applying heel effect correction there was very little dependence on ROI size. The relative noise in the images from the DR system showed very little dependence on ROI size. The heel effect also distorted the CNR measurement on CR images when larger ROI is used. However the use of multiple small ROIs led to a result that was essentially the same as if a heel effect correction had been applied. The appropriate ROI size which should be used for CNR measurement was found to be 0.25 × 0.25 cm. Using this size the heel effect had an insignificant impact on the measurement of relative noise and CNR. This approach has the advantage that only a single image is required for each measurement. The application of heel effect correction with CR systems requires two images and complex image processing. The current suggestion in the European guidelines to use a 2 × 2cm ROI is inappropriate for CR systems and leads to an error of 8% to 18% in CNR determination due to the heel effect.

  11. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy, physical treatments, postural techniques (yoga, pilates, Alexander technique), pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) treatment, soft collars and special pillows, spray and stretch, surgery, traction, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). PMID:19445809

  12. The Effects of Lower Extremity Angle According to Heel-height Changes in Young Ladies in Their 20s during Gait.

    PubMed

    Lee, ChangRyeol

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of heel-height changes on the low joint angles of the lower extremities of women in their 20s during gait. [Subjects and Methods] Qualisys Track Manager Software ver. 2.8 (Qualisys, Sweden) was used to perform measurements on 14 female university students in their 20s. To measure movements, the subjects were asked to walk while wearing high-heeled shoes and reflective stickers on their hip joints, knee joints, and ankle joints, the changes in joint angles were measured at heel strike, foot flat, and toe off. [Results] Analysis of the amount of change according to heel height changes during gait showed that the angle of the hip joints was reduced with an increase in heel-height. Although the changes were not significant, the angle of the knee joints was reduced during heel strike, foot flat, and midstance, and it was increased during toe off. In contrast, the angle of the ankle joints was increased by a significant amount during heel strike, foot flat, midstance, and toe off. [Conclusions] During gait with high heels, the movements of the lower extremities of women in their 20s were reduced significantly with an increase in heel height. Therefore, it is concluded that the restrictions on gait can only be reduced by wearing low-heeled shoes. PMID:25140096

  13. Ability to perform a single heel-rise is significantly related to patient-reported outcome after Achilles tendon rupture.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Karlsson, J; Eriksson, B I; Brorsson, A; Lundberg, M; Silbernagel, K G

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the short-term recovery of function after an acute Achilles tendon rupture, measured by a single-legged heel-rise test, with main emphasis on the relation to the patient-reported outcomes and fear of physical activity and movement (kinesiophobia). Eighty-one patients treated surgically or non-surgically with early active rehabilitation after Achilles tendon rupture were included in the study. Patient's ability to perform a single-legged heel-rise, physical activity level, patient-reported symptoms, general health, and kinesiophobia was evaluated 12 weeks after the injury. The heel-rise test showed that 40 out of 81 (49%) patients were unable to perform a single heel-rise 12 weeks after the injury. We found that patients who were able to perform a heel-rise were significantly younger, more often of male gender, reported a lesser degree of symptoms, and also had a higher degree of physical activity at 12 weeks. There was also a significant negative correlation between kinesiophobia and all the patient-reported outcomes and the physical activity level. The heel-rise ability appears to be an important early achievement and reflects the general level of healing, which influences patient-reported outcome and physical activity. Future treatment protocols focusing on regaining strength early after the injury therefore seem to be of great importance. Kinesiophobia needs to be addressed early during the rehabilitation process. PMID:22716232

  14. The standing heel-rise test in patients with upper motor neuron lesion due to stroke.

    PubMed

    Svantesson, U; Osterberg, U; Grimby, G; Sunnerhagen, K S

    1998-06-01

    The objective was to investigate the fatigue process in the triceps surae during the heel-rise test (eccentric and concentric phases) in comparison with a walking test and muscle strength. Eight men with prior stroke and 8 age-matched healthy men participated. The electromyographic activity in form of root mean square and mean power frequency of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were measured and work estimated. Walking speed and maximal peak torque were measured and differed significantly between the patient and reference groups. There were no significant differences between the groups nor legs concerning the number of heel-rises or work performed. In the eccentric phase, mean power frequency decreased significantly more in the gastrocnemius than in the soleus muscle in the reference group, while mean power frequency in the soleus muscle tended to decrease more, though non-significantly, in the affected leg. The conclusion is that the capacity to perform the heel-rise test in patients with prior stroke is better than plantarflexor peak torque and walking speed. PMID:9606768

  15. NOTE: Prototype heel effect compensation filter for cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Endo, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kanae; Ohno, Mari; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Tsujita, Kazuhiko; Saito, Yasuo

    2005-11-01

    The prototype cone-beam CT (CBCT) has a larger beam width than the conventional multi-detector row CT (MDCT). This causes a non-uniform angular distribution of the x-ray beam intensity known as the heel effect. Scan conditions for CBCT tube current are adjusted on the anode side to obtain an acceptable clinical image quality. However, as the dose is greater on the cathode side than on the anode side, the signal-to-noise ratio on the cathode side is excessively high, resulting in an unnecessary dose amount. To compensate for the heel effect, we developed a heel effect compensation (HEC) filter. The HEC filter rendered the dose distribution uniform and reduced the dose by an average of 25% for free air and by 20% for CTDI phantoms compared to doses with the conventional filter. In addition, its effect in rendering the effective energy uniform resulted in an improvement in image quality. This new HEC filter may be useful in cone-beam CT studies.

  16. Pain and Hand Function.

    PubMed

    Howland, Nicholas; Lopez, Mariela; Zhang, Andrew Y

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a unique somatosensory perception that can dramatically affect our ability to function. It is also a necessary perception, without which we would do irreparable damage to ourselves. In this article, the authors assess the impact of pain on function of the hand. Pain can be categorized into acute pain, chronic pain, and neuropathic pain. Hand function and objective measurements of hand function are analyzed as well as the impact of different types of pain on each of these areas. PMID:26611383

  17. Descending pain modulation and chronification of pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.; Morimura, Kozo; Porreca, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic pain is an important public health problem that negatively impacts quality of life of affected individuals and exacts an enormous socio-economic cost. Currently available therapeutics provide inadequate management of pain in many patients. Acute pain states generally resolve in most patients. However, for reasons that are poorly understood, in some individuals, acute pain can transform to a chronic state. Our understanding of the risk factors that underlie the development of chronic pain is limited. Recent studies have suggested an important contribution of dysfunction in descending pain modulatory circuits to pain ‘chronification’. Human studies provide insights into possible endogenous and exogenous factors that may promote the conversion of pain into a chronic condition. Recent findings Descending pain modulatory systems have been studied and characterized in animal models. Human brain imaging techniques, deep brain stimulation and the mechanisms of action of drugs that are effective in the treatment of pain confirm the clinical relevance of top-down pain modulatory circuits. Growing evidence supports the concept that chronic pain is associated with a dysregulation in descending pain modulation. Disruption of the balance of descending modulatory circuits to favour facilitation may promote and maintain chronic pain. Recent findings suggest that diminished descending inhibition is likely to be an important element in determining whether pain may become chronic. This view is consistent with the clinical success of drugs that enhance spinal noradrenergic activity, such as serotonin/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), in the treatment of chronic pain states. Consistent with this concept, a robust descending inhibitory system may be normally engaged to protect against the development of chronic pain. Imaging studies show that higher cortical and subcortical centres that govern emotional, motivational and cognitive processes communicate directly with descending pain modulatory circuits providing a mechanistic basis to explain how exogenous factors can influence the expression of chronic pain in a susceptible individual. Summary Preclinical studies coupled with clinical pharmacologic and neuroimaging investigations have advanced our understanding of brain circuits that modulate pain. Descending pain facilitatory and inhibitory circuits arising ultimately in the brainstem provide mechanisms that can be engaged to promote or protect against pain ‘chronification’. These systems interact with higher centres, thus providing a means through which exogenous factors can influence the risk of pain chronification. A greater understanding of the role of descending pain modulation can lead to novel therapeutic directions aimed at normalizing aberrant processes that can lead to chronic pain. PMID:24752199

  18. Medications for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... help with your back pain. Over-the-counter pain relievers Over-the-counter pain relievers can help with your back pain. Over-the- ... your health care provider. If you are taking pain relievers for more than a week, tell your doctor. ...

  19. Relationship between hamstring activation rate and heel contact velocity: Factors influencing age-related slip-induced falls

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Kim, Sukwon

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether a decreased hamstring activation rate among the elderly is responsible for a higher horizontal heel contact velocity and increased likelihood of slip-induced falls compared to their younger counterparts. Twenty-eight subjects from two age groups (14 young and 14 old) walked across a linear walking track with embedded force platforms while wearing a fall arresting harness attached to an overhead arresting rig for safety. In order to obtain realistic unexpected slip-induced fall data, a soapy vinyl floor surface was hidden from the subjects and unexpectedly introduced. Synchronized kinematics, kinetic and electromyography (EMG) analyses during the heel contact phase of the gait cycle while walking over slippery and non-slippery floor surfaces were examined in the study. Normalized EMG data were examined in terms of hamstring activation rate and evaluated with heel contact velocity and friction demand characteristic (as measured by peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF)) on the dry vinyl floor surface. Furthermore, slip parameters (i.e. slip distances and slipping velocity) were assessed on the soapy vinyl floor surface. The results indicated that younger adults’ hamstring activation rate was higher than older adults, whereas younger adults’ heel contact velocity was not different from older adults. These results suggested that heel contact velocity in younger adults was sufficiently reduced before the heel contact phase of the gait cycle. This could be due to the outcome of higher hamstring activation rate in younger adults in comparison to older adults. However, lower friction demand (peak RCOF), shorter slip distances, slower peak sliding heel velocity and more falls among older adults suggested that the slip initiation characteristics were not the only factors contributing to slip-induced falls among the elderly. PMID:16112575

  20. Methods for Heel Retrieval for Tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site - 13064

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, T.L.; Kirch, N.W.; Reynolds, J.H.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis. (authors)

  1. Methods for heel retrieval for tanks C-101, C-102, and C-111 at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, Terry L.; Kirch, N. W.; Reynolds, Jacob G.

    2013-01-11

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the prospects of using bulk waste characteristics to determine the most appropriate heel retrieval technology. If the properties of hard to remove heels can be determined before bulk retrieval, then a heel retrieval technology can be selected before bulk retrieval is complete. This would save substantially on sampling costs and would allow the deployment of the heel retrieval technology immediately after bulk retrieval. The latter would also accelerate the heel removal schedule. A number of C-farm retrievals have been fully or partially completed at the time of this writing. Thus, there is already substantial information on the success of different technologies and the composition of the heels. There is also substantial information on the waste types in each tank based on historical records. Therefore, this study will correlate the performance of technologies used so far and compare them to the known waste types in the tanks. This will be used to estimate the performance of future C Farm heel retrievals. An initial decision tree is developed and employed on tanks C-101, C-102, and C 111. An assumption of this study is that no additional characterization information would be available, before or after retrieval. Note that collecting additional information would substantially increase the probability of success. Deploying some in-situ testing technologies, such as a water lance or an in-situ Raman probe, might substantially increase the probability of successfully selecting the process conditions without having to take samples from the tanks for laboratory analysis.

  2. Pain and pain management in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Beiteke, Ulrike; Bigge, Stefan; Reichenberger, Christina; Gralow, Ingrid

    2015-10-01

    It is estimated that 23 million Germans suffer from chronic pain. A recent survey has revealed that 30 % of chronic pain patients are dissatisfied with their pain management. Furthermore, five million Germans suffer from neuropathic pain, 20 % of whom are inadequately treated. Pain is also a symptom of many dermatologic diseases, which is mostly somatic and may be classified as mild in the majority of cases. Nevertheless, research on the quality of life (QoL) has increasingly shown a marked impairment of QoL by moderate pain such as in psoriatic arthritis. -Severe pain is associated with herpes zoster (shingles), leg ulcers, and pyoderma gangrenosum. This article addresses the basics of pain classification and, in a short excerpt, pain transduction/transmission and modulation. The use of standardized diagnostic -scales is recommended for the purpose of recording and monitoring pain intensity, which allows for the optimization of therapy and consistent interdisciplinary -communication. Any dermatology residency program includes the acquisition of knowledge and skills in pain management. This review therefore aims to present fundamental therapeutic concepts based on the expanded WHO analgesic ladder, and describes a step-wise therapeutic approach and combination therapies. The article focuses on the pain management of the above-mentioned severely painful, conservatively treated dermatoses. Besides well-established therapeutic agents and current -therapeutic standards, it discusses specific options based on guidelines (where available). Current knowledge on peri- and postoperative pain management is briefly outlined. This article addresses: ? The fundamentals of the classification and neurophysiology of pain; ? Standards for pain documentation in children and adults; ? General standards for pharmaceutical pain management; ? Current specific treatment options for postherpetic neuralgia, leg ulcers, and -pyoderma gangrenosum in conjunction with the expanded WHO analgesic -ladder. PMID:26408457

  3. Pain drawings in somatoform-functional pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Pain drawings are a diagnostic adjunct to history taking, clinical examinations, and biomedical tests in evaluating pain. We hypothesized that somatoform-functional pain, is mirrored in distinctive graphic patterns of pain drawings. Our aim was to identify the most sensitive and specific graphic criteria as a tool to help identifying somatoform-functional pain. Methods We compared 62 patients with somatoform-functional pain with a control group of 49 patients with somatic-nociceptive pain type. All patients were asked to mark their pain on a pre-printed body diagram. An investigator, blinded with regard to the patients’ diagnoses, analyzed the drawings according to a set of numeric or binary criteria. Results We identified 13 drawing criteria pointing with significance to a somatoform-functional pain disorder (all p-values???0.001). The most specific and most sensitive criteria combination for detecting somatoform-functional pain included the total number of marks, the length of the longest mark, and the presence of symmetric patterns. The area under the ROC-curve was 96.3% for this criteria combination. Conclusion Pain drawings are an easy-to-administer supplementary technique which helps to identify somatoform-functional pain in comparison to somatic-nociceptive pain. PMID:23256679

  4. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  5. Overview of Neck Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Back) > Overview of Neck Pain Overview of Neck Pain Page Content Developing a Program That's Right for ... activity? What Kinds of Problems Might Cause Neck Pain? Treatment for any neck condition is recommended as ...

  6. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Anterior knee pain is pain that occurs at the front and center of the knee. It can be caused by ... attach to the top of the kneecap) Anterior knee pain begins when the kneecap does not move properly ...

  7. What Is Back Pain?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... some types of treatments for chronic back pain. Hot or Cold Packs (or Both) Hot or cold packs can soothe sore, stiff backs. ... helps reduce swelling and numbs deep pain. Using hot or cold packs may relieve pain, but this ...

  8. NIH Pain Consortium

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info Recent News NINDS Director's Message on Pain ...

  9. What Is Chronic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Chronic Pain Medications & Treatments The Art of Pain Management What We Have Learned Going to the ER Communication Tools Pain Management Programs Videos Resources Glossary FAQs Surveys September is ...

  10. Pain: Hope through Research

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain management. Together the opioids provide effective pain relief for many people with pain. Other peptide s also ... the use of imagery as a distraction provide relief. These methods may be powerful and effective, according ...

  11. Pelvic Pain: Other FAQs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... it affect my ability to become pregnant? Can alternative therapies help? Can it affect my emotional well-being? ... pain affect my ability to become pregnant? Can alternative therapies treat my pain? Can pelvic pain affect my ...

  12. Palliative care - managing pain

    MedlinePLUS

    End of life - pain management; Hospice - pain management ... or if you have side effects from your pain treatments. ... Bookbinder M, McHugh ME. Symptom management in palliative care and ... Medicine . 1st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2008:chap ...

  13. Assessment of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jeans, Mary-Ellen; Stratford, Joseph G.; Melzack, Ronald; Monks, Richard C.

    1979-01-01

    The assessment of pain presents a major problem in both research and clinical practice. Until recently our methods for evaluating pain were based on a sensory conceptual model of pain and an acute care approach to illness. These traditional views are often inadequate, particularly in relation to chronic pain syndromes. Clinical assessment of chronic pain must include extensive physical and psychological examination. New approaches to pain measurement and clinical assessment of the patient are discussed.

  14. What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Games Kids' Medical Dictionary En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Girls and Puberty Boys and Puberty ... the Body Works Main Page What a Pain! Kids and Growing Pains KidsHealth > Kids > Illnesses & Injuries > Aches, ...

  15. Pain Management: Post-Amputation Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain Management Post-Amputation Pain Volume 8 · Issue 2 · March/April 1998 Text size Larger text Smaller text Java ... of the most frequently asked questions. Ideas about management are one of the frequent topics of conversation ...

  16. The damping properties of the venous plexus of the heel region of the foot during simulated heelstrike.

    PubMed

    Weijers, René E; Kessels, Alphons G H; Kemerink, Gerrit J

    2005-12-01

    The damping mechanisms that are operational in the heel pad during the impact phase of locomotion have the important function to protect the musculo-skeletal system from injuries. How this is achieved is still not fully understood, as is for instance illustrated by the 'heel pad paradox', the observation that in vivo and in vitro experiments yielded widely different results. This paradox could so far only partially be explained. In the light of this paradox, and a previous study by our group, we conjectured that the venous plexus might contribute as a hydraulic shock absorber to the damping properties of the heel pad. To investigate this hypothesis in vivo, heel pads of 11 volunteers were subjected to pendulum impact tests, using velocities of 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 m/s, and three physiologically different, consecutive conditions: (i) a relatively empty venous plexus, (ii) a congested venous plexus, and (iii) a decongested venous plexus. At congestion, the maximum impact force decreased slightly but significantly by 2.6% at 0.2 m/s and 1.8% at 0.4 m/s. This effect was no longer found at 0.6 m/s. Although these effects are rather small, they confirm the fundamental hypothesis that the venous plexus contributes to the damping properties of the heel pad during walking. It is likely that some underestimation of the effect has occurred. PMID:16214490

  17. SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.

    2012-01-12

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

  18. Low heel ultrasound parameters predict mortality in men: results from the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R.; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Boonen, Steven; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E.; Ward, Kate A.; Lee, David M.; Bartfai, György; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Finn, Joseph D.; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S.; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.; Kula, Krzysztof; Lean, Michael E.; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Wu, Frederick C.; O'Neill, Terence W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: low bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry is associated with increased mortality. The relationship between other skeletal phenotypes and mortality is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quantitative heel ultrasound parameters and mortality in a cohort of European men. Methods: men aged 40–79 years were recruited for participation in a prospective study of male ageing: the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). At baseline, subjects attended for quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the heel (Hologic—SAHARA) and completed questionnaires on lifestyle factors and co-morbidities. Height and weight were measured. After a median of 4.3 years, subjects were invited to attend a follow-up assessment, and reasons for non-participation, including death, were recorded. The relationship between QUS parameters (broadband ultrasound attenuation [BUA] and speed of sound [SOS]) and mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards model. Results: from a total of 3,244 men (mean age 59.8, standard deviation [SD] 10.8 years), 185 (5.7%) died during the follow-up period. After adjusting for age, centre, body mass index, physical activity, current smoking, number of co-morbidities and general health, each SD decrease in BUA was associated with a 20% higher risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] per SD = 1.2; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0–1.4). Compared with those in higher quintiles (2nd–5th), those in the lowest quintile of BUA and SOS had a greater mortality risk (BUA: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1–2.3 and SOS: HR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2–2.2). Conclusion: lower heel ultrasound parameters are associated with increased mortality in European men. PMID:26162912

  19. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-110 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-30

    Nine samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-110 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, the sample solids were primarily white to light-brown with minor dark-colored inclusions. The maximum dimension of the majority of the solids was <2 mm; however, numerous pieces of aggregate, microcrystalline, and crystalline solids with maximum dimensions ranging from 5-70 mm were observed. In general, the larger pieces of aggregate solids were strongly cemented. Natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O] was the dominant solid phase identified in the heel solids. Results of chemical analyses suggested that 85-87 wt% of the heel solids were the fluoridephosphate double salt. The average bulk density measured for the heel solids was 1.689 g/mL; the reference density of natrophosphate is 1.71 g/mL. Dissolution tests on composite samples indicate that 94 to 97 wt% of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids can be retrieved by dissolution in water. Dissolution and recovery of the soluble components in 1 kg (0.59 L) of the heel solids required the addition of ≈9.5 kg (9.5 L) of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.4 kg (4.45 L) of water at 45 ?C. Calculations performed using the Environmental Simulation Program indicate that dissolution of the ≈0.86 kg of natrophosphate in each kilogram of the tank 241-C-110 heel solids would require ≈9.45 kg of water at 15 ?C and ≈4.25 kg of water at 45 ?C. The slightly larger quantities of water determined to be required to retrieve the soluble components in 1 kg of the heel solids are consistent with that required for the dissolution of solids composed mainly of natrophosphate with a major portion of the balance consisting of highly soluble sodium salts. At least 98% of the structural water, soluble phosphate, sodium, fluoride, nitrate, carbonate, nitrite, sulfate, oxalate, and chloride in the test composites was dissolved and recovered in the dissolution tests. Most of the {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs present in the initial heel solids composites was removed in the water dissolution tests. The estimated activities/weights of {sup 129}I, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, and {sup 238}U in the dry residual solids were <25% of the weights/activities in the initial composite solids. Gibbsite and nordstrandite [both Al(OH){sub 3}] were the major solid phases identified in the solids remaining after completion of the dissolution tests. Chemical analysis indicated that the residual solids may have contained up to 62 wt% Al(OH){sub 3}. Significant quantities of unidentified phosphate-, iron-, bismuth-, silicon-, and strontium- bearing species were also present in the residual solids. The reference density of gibbsite (and nordstrandite) is 2.42 g/mL. The measured density of the residual solids, 2.65 g/mL, would be a reasonable value for solids containing gibbsite as the major component with minor quantities of other, higher density solids. Sieve analysis indicated that 22.2 wt% of the residual solids were discrete particles >710 μm in size, and 77.8 wt% were particulates <710 μm in size. Light-scattering measurements suggested that nearly all of the <710-μm particulates with diameters >12 μm were weakly bound aggregates of particles with diameters <2 μm. The <710-μm residual solids settled very slowly when dispersed in reagent water. The physical appearance of a suspension containing ≈0.4 vol% of the solids in pure water changed very little over a period of 46.5 hours. It should be noted that the distribution of particle sizes in the residual solids and the observed settling behavior were both strongly influenced by the procedures followed in the dissolution tests.

  20. Patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Salama-Hanna, Joseph; Chen, Grace

    2013-11-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with chronic pain is important because it may lead to multidisciplinary preoperative treatment of patients' pain and a multimodal analgesia plan for effective pain control. Preoperative multidisciplinary management of chronic pain and comorbid conditions, such as depression, anxiety, deconditioning, and opioid tolerance, can improve patient satisfaction and surgical recovery. Multimodal analgesia using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies shifts the burden of analgesia away from simply increasing opioid dosing. In more complicated chronic pain patients, multidisciplinary treatment, including pain psychology, physical therapy, judicious medication management, and minimally invasive interventions by pain specialists, can improve patients' satisfaction and surgical outcome. PMID:24182727

  1. [Painful shoulder syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jaji?, Zrinka

    2003-01-01

    Painful shoulder syndrome was described by S.E. Duplay 1872. showing the patient with pain and stiffness of the shoulder after trauma. Codman et. al. at the beginning of 20th century expanded the syndrome on several causes of shoulder pain. Syndrome is characterized by pain and limitation of joint movements. One of the most common nontraumatic causes of shoulder pain is periarticular disorder. The potential sources of local or referred pain may be muscle, tendon, bursa or neurovascular structures. Secondary referral pain to the shoulder may be due to coronary artery disease, hepatic or splenic disease. PMID:15098371

  2. Programmed death 1 blockade, an Achilles heel for MMR-deficient tumors?

    PubMed

    Lin, Andy Yingjie; Lin, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Program death receptor-1 (PD-1) is upregulated in many tumors and in tumor microenvironment, and PD-1 blockade has led to remarkable immune-based anti-tumor responses in across many tumor types. Pembrolizumab, an anti-programmed death 1 checkpoint inhibitor, resulted in a high rate of immune response in 41 patients with previously treated mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient tumor including colorectal cancer but not in MMR-stable tumor with expectant toxicities. Both immune-based progression-free and overall survival are quite promising and correlate with high mutation loads in the tumor. MMR-deficient tumors made up not an insignificant proportion of GI and GU cancers and are found mostly in younger patients who had better prognosis than MMR-stable tumors. However, MMR-deficient tumors do not respond to cytotoxic chemotherapy as these agents may require intact DNA mismatch repair to be effective. MMR deficiency occurred as a result of mutations in defined DNA repair complex mutations or epigenetics modifications and gene upstream of DNA repair complex. PD-1 blockade represents our first successful shot at one of the Achilles heels of this MMR-deficient tumor Goliath. Only coordinated attack on all of its Achilles heels and healing mechanisms can this tumor Goliath be brought down to its knees. PMID:26542241

  3. CHEMICAL SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT 8183

    SciTech Connect

    Thaxton, D; Timothy Baughman, T

    2008-01-16

    Chemical Sludge Removal (CSR) is the final waste removal activity planned for some of the oldest nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC. In 2008, CSR will be used to empty two of these waste tanks in preparation for final closure. The two waste tanks chosen to undergo this process have previously leaked small amounts of nuclear waste from the primary tank into an underground secondary containment pan. CSR involves adding aqueous oxalic acid to the waste tank in order to dissolve the remaining sludge heel. The resultant acidic waste solution is then pumped to another waste tank where it will be neutralized and then stored awaiting further processing. The waste tanks to be cleaned have a storage capacity of 2.84E+06 liters (750,000 gallons) and a target sludge heel volume of 1.89E+04 liters (5,000 gallons) or less for the initiation of CSR. The purpose of this paper is to describe the CSR process and to discuss the most significant technical issues associated with the development of CSR.

  4. The Brain in Pain

    PubMed Central

    AHMAD, Asma Hayati; ABDUL AZIZ, Che Badariah

    2014-01-01

    Pain, while salient, is highly subjective. A sensation perceived as painful by one person may be perceived as uncomfortable, not painful or even pleasant to others. Within the same person, pain may also be modulated according to its threat value and the context in which it is presented. Imaging techniques, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography, have identified a distributed network in the brain, the pain-relevant brain regions, that encode the sensory-discriminative aspect of pain, as well as its cognitive and affective/emotional factors. Current knowledge also implicates the prefrontal cortex as the modulatory area for pain, with its subdivisions forming the cortico-cortical pathway, an alternative pain modulatory pathway distinct from the descending modulatory pathway of pain. These findings from neuroimaging in human subjects have paved the way for the molecular mechanisms of pain modulation to be explored in animal studies. PMID:25941463

  5. Planus Foot Posture and Pronated Foot Function are Associated with Foot Pain: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Menz, Hylton B.; Dufour, Alyssa B.; Riskowski, Jody L.; Hillstrom, Howard J.; Hannan, Marian T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations of foot posture and foot function to foot pain. Methods Data were collected on 3,378 members of the Framingham Study who completed foot examinations in 2002–2008. Foot pain (generalized and at six locations) was based on the response to the question “On most days, do you have pain, aching or stiffness in either foot?” Foot posture was categorized as normal, planus or cavus using static pressure measurements of the arch index. Foot function was categorized as normal, pronated or supinated using the center of pressure excursion index from dynamic pressure measurements. Sex-specific multivariate logistic regression models were used to examine the effect of foot posture and function on generalized and location-specific foot pain, adjusting for age and weight. Results Planus foot posture was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of arch pain in men (odds ratio [OR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01 – 1.90), while cavus foot posture was protective against ball of foot pain (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55 – 1.00) and arch pain (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.48 – 0.85) in women. Pronated foot function was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of generalized foot pain (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04 – 1.56) and heel pain (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.04 – 2.27) in men, while supinated foot function was protective against hindfoot pain in women (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.55 – 1.00). Conclusion Planus foot posture and pronated foot function are associated with foot symptoms. Interventions that modify abnormal foot posture and function may therefore have a role in the prevention and treatment of foot pain. PMID:23861176

  6. Results of Characterization and Retrieval Testing on Tank 241-C-109 Heel Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, William S.

    2013-09-26

    Eight samples of heel solids from tank 241-C-109 were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for characterization and dissolution testing. After being drained thoroughly, one-half to two-thirds of the solids were off-white to tan solids that, visually, were fairly evenly graded in size from coarse silt (30-60 μm) to medium pebbles (8-16 mm). The remaining solids were mostly strongly cemented aggregates ranging from coarse pebbles (16-32 mm) to fine cobbles (6-15 cm) in size. Solid phase characterization and chemical analysis indicated that the air-dry heel solids contained ≈58 wt% gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] and ≈37 wt% natrophosphate [Na{sub 7}F(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}?19H{sub 2}O]. The strongly cemented aggregates were mostly fine-grained gibbsite cemented with additional gibbsite. Dissolution testing was performed on two test samples. One set of tests was performed on large pieces of aggregate solids removed from the heel solids samples. The other set of dissolution tests was performed on a composite sample prepared from well-drained, air-dry heel solids that were crushed to pass a ?-in. sieve. The bulk density of the composite sample was 2.04 g/mL. The dissolution tests included water dissolution followed by caustic dissolution testing. In each step of the three-step water dissolution tests, a volume of water approximately equal to 3 times the initial volume of the test solids was added. In each step, the test samples were gently but thoroughly mixed for approximately 2 days at an average ambient temperature of 25 ?C. The caustic dissolution tests began with the addition of sufficient 49.6 wt% NaOH to the water dissolution residues to provide ≈3.1 moles of OH for each mole of Al estimated to have been present in the starting composite sample and ≈2.6 moles of OH for each mole of Al potentially present in the starting aggregate sample. Metathesis of gibbsite to sodium aluminate was then allowed to proceed over 10 days of gentle mixing of the test samples at temperatures ranging from 26-30 ?C. The metathesized sodium aluminate was then dissolved by addition of volumes of water approximately equal to 1.3 times the volumes of caustic added to the test slurries. Aluminate dissolution was allowed to proceed for 2 days at ambient temperatures of ≈29 ?C. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.0 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 crushed heel solids composite test sample. The 20 wt% of solids remaining after the dissolution tests were 85-88 wt% gibbsite. If the density of the residual solids was approximately equal to that of gibbsite, they represented ≈17 vol% of the initial crushed solids composite test sample. In the water dissolution tests, addition of a volume of water ≈6.9 times the initial volume of the crushed solids composite was sufficient to dissolve and recover essentially all of the natrophosphate present. The ratio of the weight of water required to dissolve the natrophosphate solids to the estimated weight of natrophosphate present was 8.51. The Environmental Simulation Program (OLI Systems, Inc., Morris Plains, New Jersey) predicts that an 8.36 w/w ratio would be required to dissolve the estimated weight of natrophosphate present in the absence of other components of the heel solids. Only minor amounts of Al-bearing solids were removed from the composite solids in the water dissolution tests. The caustic metathesis/aluminate dissolution test sequence, executed at temperatures ranging from 27-30 ?C, dissolved and recovered ≈69 wt% of the gibbsite estimated to have been present in the initial crushed heel solids composite. This level of gibbsite recovery is consistent with that measured in previous scoping tests on the dissolution of gibbsite in strong caustic solutions. Overall, the sequential water and caustic dissolution tests dissolved and removed 80.3 wt% of the tank 241-C-109 aggregate solids test sample. The residual solids were 92-95 wt% gibbsite. Only a minor portion (≈4.

  7. Automatic Detection of Calcaneal-Fifth Metatarsal Angle Using Radiograph: A Computer-Aided Diagnosis of Flat Foot for Military New Recruits in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-Hua; Chou, Kuei-Ting; Chung, Mu-Bai; Chuang, K S; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Flatfoot (pes planus) is one of the most important physical examination items for military new recruits in Taiwan. Currently, the diagnosis of flatfoot is mainly based on radiographic examination of the calcaneal-fifth metatarsal (CA-MT5) angle, also known as the arch angle. However, manual measurement of the arch angle is time-consuming and often inconsistent between different examiners. In this study, seventy male military new recruits were studied. Lateral radiographic images of their right and left feet were obtained, and mutual information (MI) registration was used to automatically calculate the arch angle. Images of two critical bones, the calcaneus and the fifth metatarsal bone, were isolated from the lateral radiographs to form reference images, and were then compared with template images to calculate the arch angle. The result of this computer-calculated arch angle was compared with manual measurement results from two radiologists, which showed that our automatic arch angle measurement method had a high consistency. In addition, this method had a high accuracy of 97% and 96% as compared with the measurements of radiologists A and B, respectively. The findings indicated that our MI registration measurement method cannot only accurately measure the CA-MT5 angle, but also saves time and reduces human error. This method can increase the consistency of arch angle measurement and has potential clinical application for the diagnosis of flatfoot. PMID:26126115

  8. Managing your chronic back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  9. Chiropractic care for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  10. Epidural injections for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Society Low Back Pain Guideline Panel. Interventional therapies, surgery, and interdisciplinary rehabilitation for low back pain: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline from the American Pain Society. ...

  11. Influence of the calcaneus shape on the risk of posterior heel ulcer using 3D patient-specific biomechanical modeling.

    PubMed

    Luboz, V; Perrier, A; Bucki, M; Diot, B; Cannard, F; Vuillerme, N; Payan, Y

    2015-02-01

    Most posterior heel ulcers are the consequence of inactivity and prolonged time lying down on the back. They appear when pressures applied on the heel create high internal strains and the soft tissues are compressed by the calcaneus. It is therefore important to monitor those strains to prevent heel pressure ulcers. Using a biomechanical lower leg model, we propose to estimate the influence of the patient-specific calcaneus shape on the strains within the foot and to determine if the risk of pressure ulceration is related to the variability of this shape. The biomechanical model is discretized using a 3D Finite Element mesh representing the soft tissues, separated into four domains implementing Neo Hookean materials with different elasticities: skin, fat, Achilles' tendon, and muscles. Bones are modelled as rigid bodies attached to the tissues. Simulations show that the shape of the calcaneus has an influence on the formation of pressure ulcers with a mean variation of the maximum strain over 6.0 percentage points over 18 distinct morphologies. Furthermore, the models confirm the influence of the cushion on which the leg is resting: a softer cushion leading to lower strains, it has less chances of creating a pressure ulcer. The methodology used for patient-specific strain estimation could be used for the prevention of heel ulcer when coupled with a pressure sensor. PMID:25384835

  12. Easing pain in children.

    PubMed

    Manley, L

    1997-01-01

    The assessment and management of pain in children has been essentially ignored until recently. Thankfully, these "dark ages of pain" are ending. The trauma nurse is an integral part of the pain management team and can have a positive impact on outcome by using a combination of relatively simple strategies. These include using multiple types of assessment to measure the severity of pain; providing adequate pain relief with a combination of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions; and carefully monitoring and documenting the efficacy of all pain management approaches. PMID:9391359

  13. Pediatric pain management.

    PubMed

    Lederhaas, G

    1997-01-01

    It is now recognized that from the newborn period onwards, children are capable of experiencing pain. This includes the premature infant. The challenge for healthcare providers is to incorporate methods of pain assessment and treatment into their daily practices. The child's understanding of pain closely follows the cognitive and behavioral model developed by Jean Piaget. Based on these developmental stages, pain assessment measures have been developed. Pharmacologic advances have accompanied this improved understanding of infant, child, and adolescent psychology. While acute pain accounts for the majority of children's experiences, recurrent/chronic pain states do occur (e.g. sickle cell related and neuropathic) and can be effectively treated. PMID:9037997

  14. Complaining about chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kugelmann, R

    1999-12-01

    This paper examines how a group of working class people describes and experiences chronic pain. This hermeneutical-phenomenological study concentrates on the lived body of pain from three perspectives, drawing on interviews with 14 people who were attending a pain management program. First I consider the terms in which pain is circumscribed in the narratives, stories told in the context of learning to manage pain. These terms are polarities, ways of specifying and legitimating pain in relation to "mind" and "body." Pain, in the discursive polarities that define it, is the private property of an individual, who must in some fashion prove that pain exists in an objective manner. The speaker, in this discourse, stands as the one responsible for the production of pain. In the second part, the analysis turns to what this discourse reveals about pain as a lived body phenomenon. Here the analysis centers upon the torment of having to inhabit the intolerable, upon how pain unmakes the lifeworld of the sufferer, and how, simultaneously, people make pain. The place of pain is the body, as body-in-place. The place of pain is at the boundaries of human dwelling, a kind of non-place, expressed metaphorically as "prison" or "homelessness." Finally, after these considerations of how pain is described, in part three, I turn to the act of "saying" pain, that is, to the narratives as addressed to someone else. The participants were not simply dispensing information; they were saying something to me. The narratives had the form of complaints. The form of the narratives, in the context of the pain program, was a quasi-legal call to rectify wrongs. PMID:10574237

  15. Quantitative heel ultrasound in assessment of bone structure in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mondry, A; Hetzel, G R; Willers, R; Feldkamp, J; Grabensee, B

    2001-05-01

    Many patients with advanced renal disease have osteopenia or even osteoporosis by the definition of the World Health Organization based on bone mineral density (BMD). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the standard method to assess BMD, is not always available. Quantitative heel ultrasound (QUS) is an inexpensive, mobile, and radiation-free diagnostic alternative, yet few data address this method's usefulness in patients with renal disease. The present study assessed the value of QUS in detecting changes in bone structure in renal transplant recipients compared with DXA. In a cross-sectional analysis, 50 patients (29 women) with a mean age of 50 +/- 13 years, mean time since transplantation of 60 months (range, 1 to 205 months), and stable renal allograft function were studied. BMD was quantified by DXA of the hip and spine. QUS of the left heel measured broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and speed of sound (SOS). Stiffness index (SI) was calculated as SI = (0.67 * BUA + 0.28 * SOS) - 420. DXA measurements established the diagnoses of osteopenia and osteoporosis in 49% and 22% of the patients, respectively. Femoral neck BMD and QUS parameters showed good correlation (r = 0.638; P < 0.001). Sensitivities of BUA, SOS, and SI for diagnosing osteoporosis were 100%, and specificities were 73%, 76%, and 78%, respectively. Positive predictive values were 50%, 53%, and 56%, and negative predictive values were 100%. QUS can be recommended for screening patients who do not have osteoporosis. Those suspected of osteopenic bone structure should be examined by additional DXA measurement for quantification before initiation of therapy. PMID:11325674

  16. Heel bone strength is related to lifestyle factors in Okinawan men with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Michiko; Komiya, Ichiro; Ueda, Shinichiro; Kobayashi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aims/Introduction Although male diabetic patients have an increased risk of fracture, there is little information about this in the literature. The association between heel bone stiffness and the lifestyle of male patients with diabetes was evaluated. Materials and Methods The study included 108 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and 168 age-adjusted, healthy male volunteers. None of the participants had a history of osteoporosis or other severe diseases. Heel bone stiffness was examined by quantitative ultrasound, and each participant completed a health interview survey questionnaire. Bone stiffness was taken as an indicator of bone strength. Stepwise regression analysis was used to investigate associations between bone stiffness and lifestyle-related factors, such as sunlight exposure, intake of milk or small fish, regular exercise, cigarette smoking, consumption of alcohol, and number of remaining teeth. Results Bone stiffness showed a significant negative association with cigarette smoking [standardized coefficient (SC) = ?0.297, F-value (F) = 10.059] and age (SC = ?0.207, F = 7.565) in diabetic patients. Bone stiffness showed a significant negative association with age (SC = ?0.371, F = 12.076) and height (SC = ?0.193, F = 7.898), as well as a significant positive association with sunlight exposure (SC = 0.182, F = 9.589) and intake of small fish (SC = 0.170, F = 7.393) in controls. Conclusions These findings suggest that cigarette smoking and age are negatively associated with bone stiffness in Okinawan male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:25802722

  17. Painful Intercourse Is Significantly Associated with Evoked Pain Perception and Cognitive Aspects of Pain in Women with Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Alappattu, Meryl J; George, Steven Z; Robinson, Michael E; Fillingim, Roger B; Moawad, Nashat; LeBrun, Emily Weber; Bishop, Mark D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evidence suggests that painful intercourse, pain-related psychosocial factors, and altered pain processing magnify the pain experience, but it is not clear how these factors are related to each other. Aim The aims were to (i) characterize differences between women with pelvic pain and pain-free women using a battery of pain-related psychosocial measures, clinical pain ratings, and evoked local and remote pain sensitivity; and (ii) examine the relationship between intercourse pain, clinical pain, and local and remote evoked pain sensitivity. Methods Women with pelvic pain lasting at least 3 months and pain-free women completed questionnaires and underwent pain sensitivity testing. Self-report measures included clinical pain intensity, pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, pain anxiety, depression, sexual function, and self-efficacy. Pain sensitivity measures included threshold and tolerance and temporal summation of pain. Separate analyses of variance (anova) were used to test group differences in self-report and pain sensitivity measures. Correlations were calculated among dyspareunia, psychosocial factors, and evoked pain. Main Outcome Measures Self-reported pain and pain sensitivity measures. Results Twenty-eight pain-free women and 14 women with pelvic pain participated in this study. Women with pelvic pain reported greater pain intensity and greater psychosocial involvement compared with pain-free women. No differences existed between groups for thermal or pressure measures, but women with pelvic pain rated their pain with pain testing significantly higher than pain-free women. Intercourse pain was significantly associated with affective and sensory pain and pressure pain ratings at the puborectalis, vulvar vestibule, adductor longus tendons, and tibialis anterior muscle. Conclusions Differences in local pain ratings suggest that women with pelvic pain perceive stimuli in this region as more painful than pain-free women although the magnitude of stimuli does not differ. Alappattu MJ, George SZ, Robinson ME, Fillingim RB, Moawad N, LeBrun EW, and Bishop MD. Painful intercourse is significantly associated with evoked pain perception and cognitive aspects of pain in women with pelvic pain. Sex Med 2015;3:14–23. PMID:25844171

  18. Pain in cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Juan D; Farquhar-Smith, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment exert a heavy psychological and physical toll. Of the myriad symptoms which result, pain is common, encountered in between 30% and 60% of cancer survivors. Pain in cancer survivors is a major and growing problem, impeding the recovery and rehabilitation of patients who have beaten cancer and negatively impacting on cancer patients’ quality of life, work prospects and mental health. Persistent pain in cancer survivors remains challenging to treat successfully. Pain can arise both due to the underlying disease and the various treatments the patient has been subjected to. Chemotherapy causes painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), radiotherapy can produce late effect radiation toxicity and surgery may lead to the development of persistent post-surgical pain syndromes. This review explores a selection of the common causes of persistent pain in cancer survivors, detailing our current understanding of the pathophysiology and outlining both the clinical manifestations of individual pain states and the treatment options available. PMID:26516548

  19. Low back pain - chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for low-back pain with or without sciatica. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(5):CD003010. Henschke N, ... al. Behavioural treatment for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010;(7):CD002014. Chou R, ...

  20. Breast Pain in Women

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Breast Pain in Women Overview Breast pain is a common problem in women who are having periods (menstrual ... to talk to your doctor about it. Diagnosis & Tests How can my doctor find the cause of ...

  1. Communicating about Cancer Pain

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with cancer may be reluctant to discuss their pain with their doctors for a variety of reasons. NCI sponsors research that examines the barriers that prevent patients from talking about pain.

  2. Chest Pain, Chronic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Yes Your pain may be caused by POSTHERPETIC NEURALGIA, a condition that can remain after the shingles infection. See your doctor. In many cases, postherpetic neuralgia can be treated with over-the-counter pain ...

  3. Depression and Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain? For More Information on Depression Citations Reprints Depression and Chronic Pain Order a free hardcopy En ... difficult, so proper treatment is important. What is depression? Major depressive disorder, or depression, is a serious ...

  4. Pain Information Index

    MedlinePLUS

    Skip Navigation Search: header Home About PC Symposia & Meetings NIH Pain Programs Funding Opportunities Conferences & Seminars Federal Pain Activities News & Health Info You Are Here: Home Home Page Not ...

  5. Patient Education on Pain

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... People with Pain Press Room Position Statements Patient Education on Pain AAPM Past President, Perry G. Fine, ... Member Center Patient Center Research Advocacy Practice Management Education Annual Meeting Contact Us Privacy Policy Sitemap Close ...

  6. American Pain Society

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015. The meeting will feature invited speakers and discussions of committee business items including pain research updates from federal agencies and discussion of a federal pain research strategy. The meeting ...

  7. When Sex Is Painful

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a gynecologic problem, such as ovarian cysts or endometriosis . Pain during sex also may be caused by ... medications, or surgery. • Other causes— Pelvic inflammatory disease , endometriosis, and adhesions are all associated with pain during ...

  8. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anD human services national institutes of health Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Pain “I was worried about getting ... need help to pay for pain medicine. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Pain Keep track of the pain. ...

  9. Definitions and Types of Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Types of Pain Defining Pain Pain is a perception that signals the individual that tissue damage has ... in the body that are involved in the perception of pain are called "nociception." Basic and clinical ...

  10. American Academy of Pain Medicine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Resources Clinical Pearls AAPM... the Voice of Pain Medicine The professional organization representing over 2,200 pain ... for Anesthesia/Pain Medicine For more information... Pain Medicine Journal Members: Log in for Full Journal Access ...

  11. Posttonsillectomy pain in children.

    PubMed

    Sutters, Kimberly A; Isaacson, Glenn

    2014-02-01

    Tonsillectomy, used to treat a variety of pediatric disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, peritonsillar cellulitis or abscesses, and very frequent throat infection, is known to produce nausea, vomiting, and prolonged, moderate-to-severe pain. The authors review the causes of posttonsillectomy pain, current findings on the efficacy of various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions in pain management, recommendations for patient and family teaching regarding pain management, and best practices for improving medication adherence. PMID:24445532

  12. Pain Examination and Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Catherine

    2016-02-01

    Pain is a clinical challenge to health care providers who care for hand disorders. Pathologic pain that prevents recovery leads to dissatisfaction for both patients and providers. Despite pain being common, the root cause is often difficult to diagnose. This article reviews the examination and diagnostic tools that are helpful in identifying pathologic and neuropathic pain. This article provides tools to speed recognition of these processes to allow earlier intervention and better patient outcomes. PMID:26611385

  13. Acute vs. chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Auvenshine, R C

    2000-07-01

    The differences between acute and chronic pain are many and varied. They are so different from one another that they must be considered separate entities. The chronic pain patient does not fit the traditional acute illness model as conceptualized by patients and healthcare providers. Because of the complex nature of the pain mechanism as a protective "reflex" and the fact that the pain response gets caught up in emotional expression, pain becomes a learned behavior pattern. When the patient who presents to the dental office suffering from pain is found not to respond to conventional methods of treatment, the dentist should first consider the nature of the pain response and the fact that the patient may not meet all the requirements for the acute illness model. The manner in which the patient describes his or her pain can be a major clue as to the temporal classification of the pain, thus allowing the dentist the advantage of better decision-making. Great discernment on the part of the dental practitioner must be exercised in order to provide the optimum care for the patient. It is important for the dentist to consider the fact that there may be no underlying cause for the pain and it may be necessary to make proper referrals for management of this type of patient. At a more practical and human level, patients want to know if their pain will ever completely go away. Patients are frightened that their pain is attributable to some unrecognized pathology (catastrophic thinking). This drives them to search for the ultimate cure. Going from practitioner to practitioner worsens the confusion as the patient hopes that someone will be able to illuminate the problem. By being able to classify the pain into a recognizable and explainable syndrome, the pain practitioner is often able to offer hope to the patient. Although treatment often does not yield a completely pain-free state, understanding the basis for the pain can provide significant relief through proper management. PMID:11858059

  14. Technology for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyi; Seymour, Ben

    2014-09-22

    Technology developed for chronic pain management has been fast evolving and offers new stand-alone prospects for the diagnosis and treatment of pain, rather than simply addressing the limitations of pharmacology-based approaches. There are two central challenges to be tackled: developing objective measures that capture the subjectivity of pain experience, and providing technology-based interventions that offer new approaches for pain management. Here we highlight recent developments that hold promise in addressing both of these challenges. PMID:25247372

  15. Knee pain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The location of knee pain can help identify the problem. Pain on the front of the knee can be due to bursitis, arthritis, or ... synovial fluid) that forms behind the knee. Overall knee pain can be due to bursitis, arthritis, tears in ...

  16. Pediatric Procedural Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Ronald L.; Piira, Tiina; Cohen, Lindsey L.; Cheng, Patricia S.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the various settings in which infants, children, and adolescents experience pain during acute medical procedures and issues related to referral of children to pain management teams. In addition, self-report, reports by others, physiological monitoring, and direct observation methods of assessment of pain and related constructs…

  17. Pain inhibits pain; human brainstem mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Youssef, A M; Macefield, V G; Henderson, L A

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned pain modulation is a powerful analgesic mechanism, occurring when a painful stimulus is inhibited by a second painful stimulus delivered at a different body location. Reduced conditioned pain modulation capacity is associated with the development of some chronic pain conditions and the effectiveness of some analgesic medications. Human lesion studies show that the circuitry responsible for conditioned pain modulation lies within the caudal brainstem, although the precise nuclei in humans remain unknown. We employed brain imaging to determine brainstem sites responsible for conditioned pain modulation in 54 healthy individuals. In all subjects, 8 noxious heat stimuli (test stimuli) were applied to the right side of the mouth and brain activity measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. This paradigm was then repeated. However, following the fourth noxious stimulus, a separate noxious stimulus, consisting of an intramuscular injection of hypertonic saline into the leg, was delivered (conditioning stimulus). During this test and conditioning stimulus period, 23 subjects displayed conditioned pain modulation analgesia whereas 31 subjects did not. An individual's analgesic ability was not influenced by gender, pain intensity levels of the test or conditioning stimuli or by psychological variables such as pain catastrophizing or fear of pain. Brain images were processed using SPM8 and the brainstem isolated using the SUIT toolbox. Significant increases in signal intensity were determined during each test stimulus and compared between subjects that did and did not display CPM analgesia (p<0.05, small volume correction). The expression of analgesia was associated with reduction in signal intensity increases during each test stimulus in the presence of the conditioning stimulus in three brainstem regions: the caudalis subdivision of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, i.e., the primary synapse, the region of the subnucleus reticularis dorsalis and in the dorsolateral pons in the region of the parabrachial nucleus. Furthermore, the magnitudes of these signal reductions in all three brainstem regions were significantly correlated to analgesia magnitude. Defining conditioned pain modulation circuitry provides a framework for the future investigations into the neural mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of persistent pain conditions thought to involve altered analgesic circuitry. PMID:26343321

  18. Painful Flexible Flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Sheikh Taha, Abdel Majid; Feldman, David S

    2015-12-01

    Flatfoot is commonly encountered by pediatric orthopedic surgeons and pediatricians. A paucity of literature exists on how to define a flatfoot. The absence of the medial arch with a valgus hindfoot is the hallmark of this pathology. Flatfoot can be flexible or rigid. This review focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of the flexible flatfoot. Most flatfeet are flexible and clinically asymptomatic, and warrant little intervention. If feet are symptomatic, treatment is needed. Most patients who require treatment improve with foot orthotics and exercises. Only feet resistant to conservative modalities are deemed surgical candidates. The presence of a tight heel cord is often found in patients who fail conservative management. PMID:26589087

  19. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, Robert Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Nitsche, Mirko

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ?6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  20. Reducing pain during procedures.

    PubMed

    Liebelt, E L

    1996-10-01

    There is an increasing focus on the recognition, assessment, and management of pain in children. Children undergo many painful procedures in different clinical environments and are frequently undertreated for their pain. The pediatrician should be familiar with general concepts about the perception of pain in children. Many pain-assessment tools have been developed and restructured to provide the clinician with valid and reliable scales to assess pain in children and assess the effect of interventions. New pharmacologic agents for conscious sedation are being used with increasing frequency in the pediatric outpatient setting for reducing pain and anxiety. Also there has been increasing use of regional anesthetic techniques for procedures once requiring general anesthesia. There has been an increase in the development of topical anesthetics as well as modifying injectable local anesthetic to decrease the pain of local infiltration. Nonpharmacologic methods of pain management are being tested, developed, and used alone or as adjuncts to pharmacologic therapy for children undergoing painful procedures. It is imperative that clinicians keep themselves informed about new advances pertaining to pain treatment and incorporate them into their practices. PMID:8946121

  1. Preventing chronic postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D

    2016-01-01

    Chronic postoperative pain is common. Nerve injury and inflammation promote chronic pain, the risk of which is influenced by patient factors, including psychological characteristics. Interventional trials to prevent chronic postoperative pain have been underpowered with inadequate patient follow-up. Ketamine may reduce chronic postoperative pain, although the optimum treatment duration and dose for different operations have yet to be identified. The evidence for gabapentin and pregabalin is encouraging but weak; further work is needed before these drugs can be recommended for the prevention of chronic pain. Regional techniques reduce the rates of chronic pain after thoracotomy and breast cancer surgery. Nerve-sparing surgical techniques may be of benefit, although nerve injury is not necessary or sufficient for chronic pain to develop. PMID:26620149

  2. Pain in children.

    PubMed

    Eland, J M

    1990-12-01

    The assessment and management of children's pain is a topic that has received a great deal of attention since the late 1970s. Nurse researchers have played a dominant role in all areas of pediatric pain relief and likely will continue to do so. There are currently a number of pediatric pain assessment instruments developed that are used in selected practice settings, but their use should be extended to document the existence of pediatric pain and its relief. Pharmacologic interventions for pediatric pain relief have been hampered by incorrect beliefs about analgesic risks, prescribing and administrating habits, and a virtual explosion of information in the area of analgesics. Although nurses have traditionally used nonpharmacologic interventions for pain relief, these methods have not been well researched. Continued research efforts in this important area will result in improved diagnosis and management of pediatric pain. PMID:2235640

  3. The Pain of Labour

    PubMed Central

    Labor, Simona

    2008-01-01

    Labour is an emotional experience and involves both physiological and psychological mechanisms. The pain of labour is severe but despite this its memory diminishes with time. Labour pain has two components: visceral pain which occurs during the early first stage and the second stage of childbirth, and somatic pain which occurs during the late first stage and the second stage. The pain of labour in the first stage is mediated by T10 to L1 spinal segments, whereas that in the second stage is carried by T12 to L1, and S2 to S4 spinal segments. Pain relief in labour is complex and often challenging without regional analgesia. Effective management of labour pain plays a relatively minor role in a woman's satisfaction with childbirth. PMID:26526404

  4. Common medical pains

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Pain in infancy and childhood is extremely common. Sources of pain include illness, injury, and medical and dental procedures. Over the past two decades, tremendous progress has been made in the assessment, prevention and treatment of pain. It is important for the paediatric health care provider to be aware of the implications and consequences of pain in childhood. A multitude of interventions are available to reduce or alleviate pain in children of all ages, including neonates. These include behavioural and psychological methods, as well as a host of pharmacological preparations, which are safe and effective when used as indicated. Many complementary and alternative treatments appear to be promising in treating and relieving pain, although further research is required. The present article reviews the most common sources of pain in childhood and infancy, as well as current treatment strategies and options. PMID:19030348

  5. Effects of low-intensity non-coherent light therapy on the inflammatory process in the calcaneal tendon of ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Helrigle, Carla; de Carvalho, Paulo deTarso Camilo; Casalechi, Heliodora Leão; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Fernandes, Guilherme Henrique Cardoso; Helrigel, Panmera Almeida; Rabelo, Rogério Leão; de Oliveira Aleixo-Junior, Ivo; Aimbire, Flavio; Albertini, Regiane

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effects of low-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) phototherapy on the inflammatory process in the calcaneal tendon of ovariectomized rats (OVX) through the involvement of the inflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?). Thirty-five female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups: 3 groups of OVX rats totaling 30 rats (untreated OVX rats [OVX injury group], treated OVX rats [OVX LED group], and control OVX rats; subgroups existed based on the sampling times, which were 3, 7, and 14 days) and 1 group of non-OVX rats (not OVX; n?=?5). Tendon injury was induced by trauma using a 208-g mass placed at 20 cm from the right tendon of each animal with energy of 0.70 J. The animals were treated 12 h after tendonitis with LED therapy and every 48 h thereafter until euthanasia (at 3, 7, or 14 days). The tendons were dissected and stored in liquid nitrogen at -196 °C, thawed only at the time of immunoenzymatic testing (ELISA). Groups treated with LED showed a decrease in the number of pro-inflammatory cells, IL-6, and TNF-? (p <0.05), and an increase in IL-10 (p?

  6. Pain in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Sneddon, Lynne U

    2015-04-01

    Recent developments in the study of pain in animals have demonstrated the potential for pain perception in a variety of wholly aquatic species such as molluscs, crustaceans and fish. This allows us to gain insight into how the ecological pressures and differential life history of living in a watery medium can yield novel data that inform the comparative physiology and evolution of pain. Nociception is the simple detection of potentially painful stimuli usually accompanied by a reflex withdrawal response, and nociceptors have been found in aquatic invertebrates such as the sea slug Aplysia. It would seem adaptive to have a warning system that allows animals to avoid life-threatening injury, yet debate does still continue over the capacity for non-mammalian species to experience the discomfort or suffering that is a key component of pain rather than a nociceptive reflex. Contemporary studies over the last 10?years have demonstrated that bony fish possess nociceptors that are similar to those in mammals; that they demonstrate pain-related changes in physiology and behaviour that are reduced by painkillers; that they exhibit higher brain activity when painfully stimulated; and that pain is more important than showing fear or anti-predator behaviour in bony fish. The neurophysiological basis of nociception or pain in fish is demonstrably similar to that in mammals. Pain perception in invertebrates is more controversial as they lack the vertebrate brain, yet recent research evidence confirms that there are behavioural changes in response to potentially painful events. This review will assess the field of pain perception in aquatic species, focusing on fish and selected invertebrate groups to interpret how research findings can inform our understanding of the physiology and evolution of pain. Further, if we accept these animals may be capable of experiencing the negative experience of pain, then the wider implications of human use of these animals should be considered. PMID:25833131

  7. An equine pain face

    PubMed Central

    Gleerup, Karina B; Forkman, Björn; Lindegaard, Casper; Andersen, Pia H

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the existence of an equine pain face and to describe this in detail. Study design Semi-randomized, controlled, crossover trial. Animals Six adult horses. Methods Pain was induced with two noxious stimuli, a tourniquet on the antebrachium and topical application of capsaicin. All horses participated in two control trials and received both noxious stimuli twice, once with and once without an observer present. During all sessions their pain state was scored. The horses were filmed and the close-up video recordings of the faces were analysed for alterations in behaviour and facial expressions. Still images from the trials were evaluated for the presence of each of the specific pain face features identified from the video analysis. Results Both noxious challenges were effective in producing a pain response resulting in significantly increased pain scores. Alterations in facial expressions were observed in all horses during all noxious stimulations. The number of pain face features present on the still images from the noxious challenges were significantly higher than for the control trial (p = 0.0001). Facial expressions representative for control and pain trials were condensed into explanatory illustrations. During pain sessions with an observer present, the horses increased their contact-seeking behavior. Conclusions and clinical relevance An equine pain face comprising ‘low’ and/or ‘asymmetrical’ ears, an angled appearance of the eyes, a withdrawn and/or tense stare, mediolaterally dilated nostrils and tension of the lips, chin and certain facial muscles can be recognized in horses during induced acute pain. This description of an equine pain face may be useful for improving tools for pain recognition in horses with mild to moderate pain. PMID:25082060

  8. Pain management in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Malec, Monica; Shega, Joseph W

    2015-03-01

    Persistent pain in older adults is common, and associated with substantial morbidity. Optimal management starts with assessment, including pain presence, intensity, characteristics, and interference; painful conditions; pain behaviors; pain-related morbidity; pain treatments; and coping style. Treatment incorporates analgesics demonstrated to decrease pain and improve a patient's sense of well-being. The World Health Organization's 3-step pain ladder is widely accepted and adopted for selecting analgesics among patients with non-cancer pain. Shared decision making is essential to balance the benefits and burdens of analgesics. This article reviews pain assessment/management for older adults, focusing on commonly used analgesics. PMID:25700587

  9. REMOVING SLUDGE HEELS FROM SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE TANKS BY OXALIC ACID DISSOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; David Herman, D; Fernando Fondeur, F; John Pareizs, J; Michael Hay, M; Bruce Wiersma, B; Kim Crapse, K; Thomas Peters, T; Samuel Fink, S; Donald Thaxton, D

    2009-03-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) will remove sludge as part of waste tank closure operations. Typically the bulk sludge is removed by mixing it with supernate to produce a slurry, and transporting the slurry to a downstream tank for processing. Experience shows that a residual heel may remain in the tank that cannot be removed by this conventional technique. In the past, SRS used oxalic acid solutions to disperse or dissolve the sludge heel to complete the waste removal. To better understand the actual conditions of oxalic acid cleaning of waste from carbon steel tanks, the authors developed and conducted an experimental program to determine its effectiveness in dissolving sludge, the hydrogen generation rate, the generation rate of other gases, the carbon steel corrosion rate, the impact of mixing on chemical cleaning, the impact of temperature, and the types of precipitates formed during the neutralization process. The test samples included actual SRS sludge and simulated SRS sludge. The authors performed the simulated waste tests at 25, 50, and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge over seven days. They conducted the actual waste tests at 50 and 75 C by adding 8 wt % oxalic acid to the sludge as a single batch. Following the testing, SRS conducted chemical cleaning with oxalic acid in two waste tanks. In Tank 5F, the oxalic acid (8 wt %) addition occurred over seven days, followed by inhibited water to ensure the tank contained enough liquid to operate the mixer pumps. The tank temperature during oxalic acid addition and dissolution was approximately 45 C. The authors analyzed samples from the chemical cleaning process and compared it with test data. The conclusions from the work are: (1) Oxalic acid addition proved effective in dissolving sludge heels in the simulant demonstration, the actual waste demonstration, and in SRS Tank 5F. (2) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 100% of the iron, and {approx} 40% of the manganese during a single contact in the simulant demonstration. (The iron dissolution may be high due to corrosion of carbon steel coupons.) (3) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 80% of the uranium, {approx} 70% of the iron, {approx} 50% of the manganese, and {approx} 90% of the aluminum in the actual waste demonstration for a single contact. (4) The oxalic acid dissolved {approx} 100% of the uranium, {approx} 15% of the iron, {approx} 40% of the manganese, and {approx} 80% of the aluminum in Tank 5F during the first contact cycle. Except for the iron, these results agree well with the demonstrations. The data suggest that a much larger fraction of the iron in the sludge dissolved, but it re-precipitated with the oxalate added to Tank 5F. (5) The demonstrations produced large volumes (i.e., 2-14 gallons of gas/gallon of oxalic acid) of gas (primarily carbon dioxide) by the reaction of oxalic acid with sludge and carbon steel. (6) The reaction of oxalic acid with carbon steel produced hydrogen in the simulant and actual waste demonstrations. The volume produced varied from 0.00002-0.00100 ft{sup 3} hydrogen/ft{sup 2} carbon steel. The hydrogen production proved higher in unmixed tanks than in mixed tanks.

  10. The genetics of pain and pain inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Mogil, J S; Sternberg, W F; Marek, P; Sadowski, B; Belknap, J K; Liebeskind, J C

    1996-01-01

    The present review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the genetics of pain-related phenomena and illustrates the scope and power of genetic approaches to the study of pain. We focus on work performed in our laboratories in Jastrzebiec, Poland; Portland, OR; and Los Angeles, which we feel demonstrates the continuing usefulness of classical genetic approaches, especially when used in combination with newly available molecular genetic techniques. PMID:8610166

  11. Mixing of process heels, process solutions, and recycle streams: Results of the small-scale radioactive tests

    SciTech Connect

    GJ Lumetta; JP Bramson; OT Farmer III; LR Greenwood; FV Hoopes; MA Mann; MJ Steele; RT Steele; RG Swoboda; MW Urie

    2000-05-17

    Various recycle streams will be combined with the low-activity waste (LAW) or the high-level waste (HLW) feed solutions during the processing of the Hanford tank wastes by BNFL, Inc. In addition, the LAW and HLW feed solutions will also be mixed with heels present in the processing equipment. This report describes the results of a test conducted by Battelle to assess the effects of mixing specific process streams. Observations were made regarding adverse reactions (mainly precipitation) and effects on the Tc oxidation state (as indicated by K{sub d} measurements with SuperLig{reg_sign} 639). The work was conducted according to test plan BNFL-TP-29953-023, Rev. 0, Small Scale Mixing of Process Heels, Solutions, and Recycle Streams. The test went according to plan, with only minor deviations from the test plan. The deviations from the test plan are discussed in the experimental section.

  12. Management of sickle pain.

    PubMed

    Ballas, S K

    1997-03-01

    Sickle cell disease is characterized by recurrent episodes of acute pain. Some patients also suffer from chronic pain syndromes including avascular necrosis, leg ulcers, and intractable pain. Approaches to rational therapy of sickle pain include pharmacologic, nonpharmacologic, and preventive therapeutic interventions. Pharmacologic treatment of sickle pain entails the use of nonopioid analgesics, opioid analgesics, and adjuvants singly or in combination depending on the severity of pain. Meticulous evaluation and assessment of painful episodes should precede and accompany all approaches to management. The choice of the opioid analgesic, its route of administration, dose, and frequency of administration should be individualized on a case-by-case basis. Meperidine should be avoided whenever possible. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, meperidine, and morphine are contraindicated in the presence of renal failure. Administration of opioids on a fixed schedule or by patient-controlled analgesia is ideal for effective therapy. Nonpharmacologic approaches to manage sickle pain are underutilized and more studies are needed to determine their role in sickle pain. Preventive therapy of sickle pain is best achieved with hydroxyurea, which was found to decrease the frequency of crises significantly, decrease the incidence of acute chest syndrome, and decrease the need for blood transfusion. PMID:9107526

  13. Pain Management in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Richard W.; Anand, Kanwaljeet J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Effective pain management is a desirable standard of care for preterm and term newborns and may potentially improve their clinical and neurodevelopmental outcomes. Neonatal pain should be assessed routinely using context-specific, validated and objective pain methods, despite the limitations of currently available tools. Reducing invasive procedures, and using pharmacological, behavioral or environmental measures can be used to manage neonatal pain. Non-pharmacologic approaches include kangaroo care, facilitated tucking, non-nutritive sucking, sucrose and other sweeteners, massage and acupuncture therapy. They are used for procedures causing acute, transient, or mild pain, or as adjunctive therapy for moderate or severe pain. Local and topical anesthetics can reduce the acute pain caused by skin-breaking or mucosa-injuring procedures. Opioids form the mainstay for treatment of severe pain; morphine and fentanyl are the most commonly used drugs, although other opioids are also available. Non-opioid drugs include various sedatives and anesthetic agents, mostly used as adjunctive therapy in ventilated neonates. Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and other drugs are used for neonates, although their efficacy and safety remains unproven. Approaches for implementing an effective pain management program in the Neonatal ICU are summarized, together with practical protocols for procedural, postoperative, and mechanical ventilation-associated neonatal pain and stress. PMID:25459780

  14. Pain in cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Glare, Paul A; Davies, Pamela S; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Paice, Judith A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Syrjala, Karen L

    2014-06-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  15. Pain in Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Glare, Paul A.; Davies, Pamela S.; Finlay, Esmé; Gulati, Amitabh; Lemanne, Dawn; Moryl, Natalie; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Paice, Judith A.; Stubblefield, Michael D.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pain is a common problem in cancer survivors, especially in the first few years after treatment. In the longer term, approximately 5% to 10% of survivors have chronic severe pain that interferes with functioning. The prevalence is much higher in certain subpopulations, such as breast cancer survivors. All cancer treatment modalities have the potential to cause pain. Currently, the approach to managing pain in cancer survivors is similar to that for chronic cancer-related pain, pharmacotherapy being the principal treatment modality. Although it may be appropriate to continue strong opioids in survivors with moderate to severe pain, most pain problems in cancer survivors will not require them. Moreover, because more than 40% of cancer survivors now live longer than 10 years, there is growing concern about the long-term adverse effects of opioids and the risks of misuse, abuse, and overdose in the nonpatient population. As with chronic nonmalignant pain, multimodal interventions that incorporate nonpharmacologic therapies should be part of the treatment strategy for pain in cancer survivors, prescribed with the aim of restoring functionality, not just providing comfort. For patients with complex pain issues, multidisciplinary programs should be used, if available. New or worsening pain in a cancer survivor must be evaluated to determine whether the cause is recurrent disease or a second malignancy. This article focuses on patients with a history of cancer who are beyond the acute diagnosis and treatment phase and on common treatment-related pain etiologies. The benefits and harms of the various pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic options for pain management in this setting are reviewed. PMID:24799477

  16. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  17. Nonpharmacologic treatment of pain.

    PubMed

    Titler, M G; Rakel, B A

    2001-06-01

    Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain treatment are important complementary therapies but are not substitutes for pharmacologic management of pain. Use of nonpharmacologic pain treatments in critical care settings is helpful to decrease pain, but the challenge remains for nurses to have the knowledge, time, and skill to use these interventions in a busy daily practice with severely ill patients. Although numerous studies testing the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management are available, the varying methods and interventions used in these studies make it difficult to draw conclusions. Further research on the use of these interventions for pain reduction is necessary to determine the most effective treatments and the conditions under which they should be used. PMID:11866404

  18. Neonatal pain management

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Tarun; Shepherd, Ed; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    The past 2-3 decades have seen dramatic changes in the approach to pain management in the neonate. These practices started with refuting previously held misconceptions regarding nociception in preterm infants. Although neonates were initially thought to have limited response to painful stimuli, it was demonstrated that the developmental immaturity of the central nervous system makes the neonate more likely to feel pain. It was further demonstrated that untreated pain can have long-lasting physiologic and neurodevelopmental consequences. These concerns have resulted in a significant emphasis on improving and optimizing the techniques of analgesia for neonates and infants. The following article will review techniques for pain assessment, prevention, and treatment in this population with a specific focus on acute pain related to medical and surgical conditions. PMID:25538531

  19. Pain and functional imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvar, M

    1999-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has fundamentally changed our knowledge about the cerebral representation of pain. For the first time it has been possible to delineate the functional anatomy of different aspects of pain in the medial and lateral pain systems in the brain. The rapid developments in imaging methods over the past years have led to a consensus in the description of the central pain responses between different studies and also to a definition of a central pain matrix with specialized subfunctions in man. In the near future we will see studies where a systems perspective allows for a better understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the higher-order frontal and parietal cortices. Also, pending the development of experimental paradigms, the functional anatomy of the emotional aspects of pain will become better known. PMID:10466155

  20. EM-31 ALTERNATIVE AND ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL - 11220

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.; Hay, M.; Wiersma, B.; Pennebaker, F.

    2010-12-10

    Mixtures of oxalic acid with nitric acid have been shown to be superior to oxalic acid alone for the dissolution of iron-rich High Level Waste sludge heels. Optimized conditions resulting in minimal oxalate usage and stoichiometric iron dissolution (based on added oxalate ion) have been determined for hematite (a primary sludge iron phase) in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures. The acid mixtures performed better than expected based on the solubility of hematite in the individual acids through a synergistic effect in which the preferred 1:1 Fe:oxalate complex is formed. This allows for the minimization of oxalate additions to the waste stream. Carbon steel corrosion rates were measured in oxalic/nitric acid mixtures to evaluate the impacts of chemical cleaning with these solutions on waste tank integrity. Manageable corrosion rates were observed in the concentration ranges of interest for an acid contact timescale of 1 month. Kinetics tests involving hematite and gibbsite (a primary sludge aluminum phase) have confirmed that {ge}90% solids dissolution occurs within 3 weeks. Based on these results, the chemical cleaning conditions recommended to promote minimal oxalate usage and manageable corrosion include: 0.5 wt. % oxalic acid/0.175 M nitric acid mixture, 50 C, 2-3 week contact time with agitation.

  1. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection.

    PubMed

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems' Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article. PMID:26005438

  2. EM-21 ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING PROGRAM FOR SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.; King, W.; Martino, C.

    2009-12-18

    Preliminary studies in the EM-21 Alternative Chemical Cleaning Program have focused on understanding the dissolution of Hematite (a primary sludge heel phase) in oxalic acid, with a focus on minimizing oxalic acid usage. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control, preferably using a supplemental proton source, is critical to oxalate minimization. With pH control, iron concentrations as high as 0.103 M have been obtained in 0.11 M oxalic acid. This is consistent with the formation of a 1:1 (iron:oxalate) complex. The solubility of Hematite in oxalic acid has been confirmed to increase by a factor of 3 when the final solution pH decreases from 5 to below 1. This is consistent with literature predictions of a shift in speciation from a 1:3 to 1:1 as the pH is lowered. Above a solution pH of 6, little Hematite dissolves. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid.

  3. Pain management of wound care.

    PubMed

    Senecal, S J

    1999-12-01

    Children and adults still suffer pain during wound dressing changes despite national guidelines. Assessing and managing pain are essential components of comprehensive wound care. Developmentally sensitive pain assessment tools are available to measure verbal, behavioral, and physiologic responses to pain. Holistic pain assessment includes pain intensity, location, description, relief measures, cultural background, and the patient's developmental level and anxiety. Pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions should be combined to manage pain based upon patient's response and nursing assessment. Nurses with a fundamental knowledge of pain assessment and management provide their patients with pain and symptom relief during wound care. PMID:10523438

  4. Tinnitus and pain.

    PubMed

    Møller, A R

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus has many similarities with the symptoms of neurological disorders such as paresthesia and central neuropathic pain. There is considerable evidence that the symptoms and signs of some forms of tinnitus and central neuropathic pain are caused by functional changes in specific parts of the central nervous system and that these changes are caused by expression of neural plasticity. The changes in the auditory nervous system that cause tinnitus and the changes in the somatosensory systems that cause central neuropathic pain may have been initiated from the periphery, i.e. the ear or the auditory nerve for tinnitus and receptors and peripheral nerves in the body for pain. In the chronic condition of tinnitus and pain, abnormalities in the periphery may no longer play a role in the pathology, but the tinnitus is still referred to the ear and central neuropathic pain is still referred to the location on the body of the original pathology. In this chapter we will discuss specific similarities between tinnitus and pain, and compare tinnitus with other phantom disorders. Since much more is known about pain than about tinnitus, it is valuable to take advantage of the knowledge about pain in efforts to understand the pathophysiology of tinnitus and find treatments for tinnitus. PMID:17956770

  5. Managing Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Jones, Robert Carter Wellford; Lawson, Erin; Backonja, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) arises from injuries or diseases affecting the somatosensory component of the nervous system at any level of the peripheral or central nervous system. NP is diagnosed based on common neurologic signs and symptoms. NP is best treated with a combination of multiple therapeutic approaches, and treatments include conservative, complementary, medical, interventional, and surgical treatment modalities. Goals of treatment are the same as in pain management and include improvement in pain control and in coping skills as well as restoration of functional status. Most patients with NP benefit most from an individualized, multimodal approach that emphasizes both pain and function. PMID:26614725

  6. TelePain: A Community of Practice for Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Meins, Alexa R.; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.; Eaton, Linda; Gordon, Debra; Theodore, Brian; Tauben, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Comprehensive pain management services are primarily located in urban areas, limiting specialist consultation opportunities for community healthcare providers. A community of practice (CoP) for pain management could create opportunities for consultation by establishing professional relationships between community healthcare providers and pain management specialists. A CoP is a group of people with a common concern, set of problems, or a passion for something they do. Members of a CoP for pain management increase their knowledge of evidence-based pain management strategies in a way that is meaningful and relevant. In this article, we provide evidence that TelePain, an interdisciplinary, case-based pain management teleconference consultation program through the University of Washington, qualifies as a CoP and present preliminary evidence of TelePain's effectiveness as a CoP for pain management. Methods Specific behaviors and conversations gathered through participant observation during TelePain sessions were analyzed based on the 14 indicators Wegner developed to evaluate the presence of a CoP. To demonstrate preliminary effectiveness of TelePain as a CoP for pain management, descriptive statistics were used to summarize TelePain evaluation forms. Results TelePain is an example of a successful CoP for pain management as demonstrated by the presence of Wegner's 14 indicators. Additionally, evaluation forms showed that TelePain enhanced community healthcare providers' knowledge of pain management strategies and that continued participation in TelePain lead to community healthcare providers' increased confidence in their ability to provide pain management. Conclusion TelePain, a CoP for pain management, facilitates multidisciplinary collaboration and allows members to develop interdisciplinary care plans for complex pain patients through case study discussions. Evidence-based pain management strategies gained through CoP membership could be disseminated to other healthcare providers in members' clinics, which has the potential of improving the care of chronic pain patients. PMID:25964869

  7. Post surgical pain treatment - adults

    MedlinePLUS

    Postoperative pain relief ... can push a button to give yourself more pain relief when you need it. This is called patient ... or given as a shot may provide enough pain relief. You may receive this medicine right away after ...

  8. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain, including recurrent abdominal pain, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) was originally defined ... or constipation alternating with diarrhea) is the classic irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Causes The trigger for functional abdominal ...

  9. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Narcotics are strong drugs that are sometimes used to treat pain. They are also called opioids. You ... types of pain medicine do not relieve pain. Narcotics can provide short-term relief of severe back ...

  10. Chronic Pain Medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to take, ask your doctor or your pharmacist. Acetaminophen Acetaminophen (one brand name: Tylenol) helps many kinds of chronic pain. Remember, many over-the-counter and prescription pain medicines have acetaminophen in them. If you're not careful, you ...

  11. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... works, it may be repeated. Physical therapy and psychological counseling are also helpful. However, a treatment that ... my pain? If my injury has healed, why am I still in pain? Do I need any tests? What is the best treatment option for me? ...

  12. Pseudoachondroplasia and painful sequelae.

    PubMed

    Gamble, Candace; Nguyen, Joanne; Hashmi, S Shahrukh; Hecht, Jacqueline T

    2015-11-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a well-described autosomal dominant short limb dwarfing condition caused by mutations in the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein gene (COMP). The most debilitating complication of the disorder is joint pain starting in childhood, the extent and severity of which is poorly defined. The aim of this study was to fully assess the pain and identify additional clinical complications affecting those with PSACH. An online survey was distributed to individuals with PSACH. Of the 77 surveys analyzed, 83% reported chronic pain starting as early as the newborn period. Pain was most frequently reported in weight bearing joints including the knees, hips, and back, and significantly interfered with their overall quality of life. For pain relief, patients with PSACH used a wide variety of treatments. However, patients reported only a 60% resolution of pain with their current treatments. An increase in other comorbidities was not found, specifically osteoporosis was not increased. This study documents for the first time that pain is the most common presenting symptom in PSACH and is often overlooked until short stature becomes obvious. The recognition of chronic pain as one of the earliest manifestations of PSACH is important to allow for prompt diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26177939

  13. Recurrent Abdominal Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banez, Gerard A.; Gallagher, Heather M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an empirically informed but clinically oriented overview of behavioral treatment of recurrent abdominal pain. The epidemiology and scope of recurrent abdominal pain are presented. Referral process and procedures are discussed, and standardized approaches to assessment are summarized. Treatment protocols…

  14. Chemical Interventions for Pain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronoff, Gerald M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews properties and pharmacological effects of medications for pain, including peripherally acting analgesics, centrally acting narcotics, and adjuvant analgesics including antidepressants. Discusses the role of the endogenous opioid system in pain and depression. Explores clinical management issues in both inpatient and outpatient settings,…

  15. Preliminary study report: topological texture features extracted from standard radiographs of the heel bone are correlated with femoral bone mineral density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, H. F.; Lutz, J.; Koerner, M.; Notohamiprodjo, M.; Reiser, M.

    2009-02-01

    With the growing number of eldery patients in industrialized nations the incidence of geriatric, i.e. osteoporotic fractures is steadily on the rise. It is of great importance to understand the characteristics of hip fractures and to provide diagnostic tests for the assessment of an individual's fracture-risk that allow to take preventive action and give therapeutic advice. At present, bone-mineral-density (BMD) obtained from DXA (dual-energy x-ray-absorptiometry) is the clinical standard of reference for diagnosis and follow-up of osteoporosis. Since availability of DXA - other than that of clinical X-ray imaging - is usually restricted to specialized medical centers it is worth trying to implement alternative methods to estimate an individual's BMD. Radiographs of the peripheral skeleton, e.g. the ankle, range among the most ordered diagnostic procedures in surgery for exclusion or confirmation of fracture. It would be highly beneficial if - as a by-product of conventional imaging - one could obtain a quantitative parameter that is closely correlated with femoral BMD in addition to the original diagnostic information, e.g. fracture status at the peripheral site. Previous studies could demonstrate a correlation between calcaneal BMD and osteoporosis. The objective of our study was to test the hypothesis that topological analysis of calcaneal bone texture depicted by a lateral x-ray projection of the ankle allows to estimate femoral BMD. Our analysis on 34 post-menopausal patients indicate that texture properties based on graylevel topology in calcaneal x-ray-films are closely correlated with BMD at the hip and may qualify as a substitute indicator of femoral fracture risk.

  16. Postoperative pain management

    PubMed Central

    Kolettas, Alexandros; Lazaridis, George; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Lampaki, Sofia; Karavergou, Anastasia; Pataka, Athanasia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Mpakas, Andreas; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Fassiadis, Nikolaos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a very important issue for several patients. Indifferent of the surgery type or method, pain management is very necessary. The relief from suffering leads to early mobilization, less hospital stay, reduced hospital costs, and increased patient satisfaction. An individual approach should be applied for pain control, rather than a fix dose or drugs. Additionally, medical, psychological, and physical condition, age, level of fear or anxiety, surgical procedure, personal preference, and response to agents given should be taken into account. The major goal in the management of postoperative pain is minimizing the dose of medications to lessen side effects while still providing adequate analgesia. Again a multidisciplinary team approach should be pursued planning and formulating a plan for pain relief, particularly in complicated patients, such as those who have medical comorbidities. These patients might appear increase for analgesia-related complications or side effects. PMID:25774311

  17. [Groin pain in athletes].

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rick J M; Kokshoorn, Arjan P J; Kolkman, Karel A; van der Wal, Wybren A; van Loon, Corné J M

    2014-01-01

    Groin pain in young athletes is a common problem, accounting for significant downtime in sports participation. It can be difficult to make the correct diagnosis as groin pain has a wide differential diagnosis, which encompasses acute as well as chronic causative factors. In this article this is illustrated by presenting three cases of patients who attended our hospital. In all three cases the main complaint was sports-related groin pain, and the patients presented with very similar symptoms. However, after further investigation the patients were diagnosed with three very different types of injury: sportsman's hernia; hip labral tear; and pubic osteitis. This emphasises the need for every general practitioner and medical specialist to understand that there is a wide differential diagnosis for groin pain in athletes, in order to be able to implement specific therapy targeting the actual cause of groin pain. PMID:25315329

  18. On Heels and Toes: How Ants Climb with Adhesive Pads and Tarsal Friction Hair Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Endlein, Thomas; Federle, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Ants are able to climb effortlessly on vertical and inverted smooth surfaces. When climbing, their feet touch the substrate not only with their pretarsal adhesive pads but also with dense arrays of fine hairs on the ventral side of the 3rd and 4th tarsal segments. To understand what role these different attachment structures play during locomotion, we analysed leg kinematics and recorded single-leg ground reaction forces in Weaver ants (Oecophylla smaragdina) climbing vertically on a smooth glass substrate. We found that the ants engaged different attachment structures depending on whether their feet were above or below their Centre of Mass (CoM). Legs above the CoM pulled and engaged the arolia (‘toes’), whereas legs below the CoM pushed with the 3rd and 4th tarsomeres (‘heels’) in surface contact. Legs above the CoM carried a significantly larger proportion of the body weight than legs below the CoM. Force measurements on individual ant tarsi showed that friction increased with normal load as a result of the bending and increasing side contact of the tarsal hairs. On a rough sandpaper substrate, the tarsal hairs generated higher friction forces in the pushing than in the pulling direction, whereas the reverse effect was found on the smooth substrate. When the tarsal hairs were pushed, buckling was observed for forces exceeding the shear forces found in climbing ants. Adhesion forces were small but not negligible, and higher on the smooth substrate. Our results indicate that the dense tarsal hair arrays produce friction forces when pressed against the substrate, and help the ants to push outwards during horizontal and vertical walking. PMID:26559941

  19. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management.

    PubMed

    Doody, S B; Smith, C; Webb, J

    1991-03-01

    Managing pain is a complex and inexact science. Acute and chronic pain physically and psychologically affects and disables an overwhelming number of people. Nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management have been reviewed. These methods can be used independently or in combination with other nonpharmacologic or pharmacologic methods of pain control. The goals of nonpharmacologic interventions for pain management include the reduction of pain, minimal adverse effects, and allowing patients to become active participants in their own care. Nurses are called on many times to comfort patients in pain. It is through their expertise and intervention that the goals of pain management succeed. PMID:2043331

  20. Cancer treatment: dealing with pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in addition to medicines or other types of pain relief. ... Guideline : no. 3. World Health Organization (WHO). WHO's pain relief ladder. World Health Organization: Programmes and projects: Cancer. ...

  1. Breast Pain: Engorgement, Nipple Pain, and Mastitis.

    PubMed

    Berens, Pamela D

    2015-12-01

    This review explores current concepts surrounding breastfeeding complications including nipple pain and trauma, breast engorgement, mastitis, and breast abscess. The review discusses possible etiologies, risk factors, incidence, differential diagnosis, and suggested treatment strategies. The evidence that supports these management options is discussed. PMID:26512442

  2. Pain Catastrophising Affects Cortical Responses to Viewing Pain in Others

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Pain catastrophising is an exaggerated cognitive attitude implemented during pain or when thinking about pain. Catastrophising was previously associated with increased pain severity, emotional distress and disability in chronic pain patients, and is also a contributing factor in the development of neuropathic pain. To investigate the neural basis of how pain catastrophising affects pain observed in others, we acquired EEG data in groups of participants with high (High-Cat) or low (Low-Cat) pain catastrophising scores during viewing of pain scenes and graphically matched pictures not depicting imminent pain. The High-Cat group attributed greater pain to both pain and non-pain pictures. Source dipole analysis of event-related potentials during picture viewing revealed activations in the left (PHGL) and right (PHGR) paraphippocampal gyri, rostral anterior (rACC) and posterior cingulate (PCC) cortices. The late source activity (600–1100 ms) in PHGL and PCC was augmented in High-Cat, relative to Low-Cat, participants. Conversely, greater source activity was observed in the Low-Cat group during the mid-latency window (280–450 ms) in the rACC and PCC. Low-Cat subjects demonstrated a significantly stronger correlation between source activity in PCC and pain and arousal ratings in the long latency window, relative to high pain catastrophisers. Results suggest augmented activation of limbic cortex and higher order pain processing cortical regions during the late processing period in high pain catastrophisers viewing both types of pictures. This pattern of cortical activations is consistent with the distorted and magnified cognitive appraisal of pain threats in high pain catastrophisers. In contrast, high pain catastrophising individuals exhibit a diminished response during the mid-latency period when attentional and top-down resources are ascribed to observed pain. PMID:26186545

  3. Postoperative Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Veerabhadram; Cellini, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The effective relief of pain is of the utmost importance to anyone treating patients undergoing surgery. Pain relief has significant physiological benefits; hence, monitoring of pain relief is increasingly becoming an important postoperative quality measure. The goal for postoperative pain management is to reduce or eliminate pain and discomfort with a minimum of side effects. Various agents (opioid vs. nonopioid), routes (oral, intravenous, neuraxial, regional) and modes (patient controlled vs. “as needed”) for the treatment of postoperative pain exist. Although traditionally the mainstay of postoperative analgesia is opioid based, increasingly more evidence exists to support a multimodal approach with the intent to reduce opioid side effects (such as nausea and ileus) and improve pain scores. Enhanced recovery protocols to reduce length of stay in colorectal surgery are becoming more prevalent and include multimodal opioid sparing regimens as a critical component. Familiarity with the efficacy of available agents and routes of administration is important to tailor the postoperative regimen to the needs of the individual patient. PMID:24436674

  4. Low back pain.

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, George E.

    2003-01-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability. It occurs in similar proportions in all cultures, interferes with quality of life and work performance, and is the most common reason for medical consultations. Few cases of back pain are due to specific causes; most cases are non-specific. Acute back pain is the most common presentation and is usually self-limiting, lasting less than three months regardless of treatment. Chronic back pain is a more difficult problem, which often has strong psychological overlay: work dissatisfaction, boredom, and a generous compensation system contribute to it. Among the diagnoses offered for chronic pain is fibromyalgia, an urban condition (the diagnosis is not made in rural settings) that does not differ materially from other instances of widespread chronic pain. Although disc protrusions detected on X-ray are often blamed, they rarely are responsible for the pain, and surgery is seldom successful at alleviating it. No single treatment is superior to others; patients prefer manipulative therapy, but studies have not demonstrated that it has any superiority over others. A WHO Advisory Panel has defined common outcome measures to be used to judge the efficacy of treatments for studies. PMID:14710509

  5. The Painful Face Pain Expression Recognition Using Active Appearance Models

    E-print Network

    Chen, Tsuhan

    The Painful Face ­ Pain Expression Recognition Using Active Appearance Models Ahmed Bilal Ashraf-John Theobald ¶ b.theobald@uea.ac.uk ABSTRACT Pain is typically assessed by patient self-report. Self-reported pain, however, is difficult to interpret and may be impaired or not even possible, as in young children

  6. Low Pain vs No Pain Multi-core Haskells

    E-print Network

    Trinder, Phil

    Chapter 1 Low Pain vs No Pain Multi-core Haskells M. KH. Aswad , P. W. Trinder, A. D. Al Zain, G. J uses 15 'typical' programs to compare a 'no pain', i.e. entirely implicit, parallel language with three 'low pain', i.e. semi-explicit languages. The parallel Haskell implementations use different versions

  7. Over-the-counter pain relievers

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Analgesics; Acetaminophen; NSAID; Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug; Pain medicine - over-the-counter; Pain medicine - OTC ... Pain medicines are also called analgesics. Each kind of pain medicine has benefits and risks. Some types of pain ...

  8. Nonopioid medications for pain.

    PubMed

    Tauben, David

    2015-05-01

    Evidence of nonopioid analgesic effectiveness exceeds that for long-term opioids in chronic noncancer pain (CNCP), most with lower risk. Non-drug therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy and physical activation are safer and also effective. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs are useful for inflammatory and nociceptive pain, share renal and variable gastrointestinal, bleeding and cardiovascular side effects. Antidepressants with noradrenergic activity (such as tricyclics and seroton-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) and neuromodulating anticonvulsant drugs (gabapentinoids and sodium-channel blockers) are proven to be effective for neuropathic and centralized pain. Ketamine and cannabinoids are other studied analgesics but have a less well-proven role in CNCP. PMID:25952062

  9. Subcalcaneal Bursitis With Plantar Fasciitis Treated by Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    We report the successful arthroscopic treatment of a case of subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis. To our knowledge, this is the first report on arthroscopic excision of a subcalcaneal bursa. Right heel pain developed in a 50-year-old woman, without any obvious cause. She reported that the heel pain occurred immediately after waking and that the heel ached when she walked. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an extra-articular, homogeneous, high-intensity lesion in the fat pad adjacent to the calcaneal tubercle on T2-weighted sagittal and coronal images and thickening of the plantar fascia on T2-weighted sagittal images. A diagnosis of a recalcitrant subcalcaneal bursitis with plantar fasciitis was made, and surgery was performed. The arthroscope was placed between the calcaneus and the plantar fascia. With the surgeon viewing from the lateral portal and working from the medial portal, the dorsal surface of the degenerative plantar fascia was debrided and the medial half of the plantar fascia was released, followed by debridement of the subcalcaneal bursal cavity through the incised plantar fascia. Full weight bearing and gait were allowed immediately after the operation. At the latest follow-up, the patient had achieved complete resolution of heel pain without a recurrence of the mass, confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:23875139

  10. Exercise-induced pain intensity predicted by pre-exercise fear of pain and pain sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D; Horn, Maggie E; George, Steven Z

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Our primary goals were to determine whether pre-existing fear of pain and pain sensitivity contributed to post-exercise pain intensity. Methods Delayed onset muscle pain was induced in the trunk extensors of 60 healthy volunteers using an exercise paradigm. Levels of fear of pain and experimental pain sensitivity were measured before exercise. Pain intensity in the low back was collected at 24 and 48 hours post-exercise. Participants were grouped based on pain intensity. Group membership was used as the dependent variable in separate regression models for 24 and 48 hours. Predictor variables included fear, pain sensitivity, torque lost during the exercise protocol, and demographic variables. Results The final models predicting whether a participant reported clinically meaningful pain intensity at 24 hours only included baseline fear of pain at each level of pain intensity tested. The final model at 48 hours included average baseline pain sensitivity and the loss of muscle performance during the exercise protocol for one level of pain intensity tested (greater than 35mm out of 100). Discussion Combined, these findings suggest that the initial reports of pain after injury maybe more strongly influenced by fear while the inflammatory process and pain sensitivity may play a larger role for later pain intensity reports. PMID:21415719

  11. Managing Chronic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may lead to depression. With the help of occupational therapy, people with chronic pain can learn to manage ... distributed without prior written consent. Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assis- tants are trained in helping both adults ...

  12. Managing pain during labor

    MedlinePLUS

    Keep in mind that a plan is just a plan. Be flexible when you are planning for your labor and delivery. ... to have natural childbirth. Later, they change their mind and decide they want pain medicine after all. ...

  13. Mechanism of Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Brian L.; Hamamoto, Darryl T.; Simone, Donald A.; Wilcox, George L.

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing and breakthrough pain is a primary concern for the cancer patient. Although the etiology of cancer pain remains unclear, animal models of cancer pain have allowed investigators to unravel some of the cancer-induced neuropathologic processes that occur in the region of tumor growth and in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Within the cancer microenvironment, cancer and immune cells produce and secrete mediators that activate and sensitize primary afferent nociceptors. Pursuant to these peripheral changes, nociceptive secondary neurons in spinal cord exhibit increased spontaneous activity and enhanced responsiveness to three modes of noxious stimulation: heat, cold, and mechanical stimuli. As our understanding of the peripheral and central mechanisms that underlie cancer pain improves, targeted analgesics for the cancer patient will likely follow. PMID:20539035

  14. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NINDS Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome, Causalgia Condensed from Complex Regional ... Tel: 813-907-2312 Fax: 813-830-7446 Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association (RSDSA) P.O. Box ...

  15. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a specific diagnosis What you should know: The pelvic floor muscles act as a muscular sling that supports ... causes Chronic constipation or diarrhea can lead to pelvic floor dysfunction and pelvic pain can become very debilitating ...

  16. Pain and your emotions

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stress -- are often a result. These feelings and emotions can worsen your back pain. ... you are having a hard time controlling your emotions, talk with your ... medicines to help with your feelings of stress or sadness.

  17. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... pain and mild or dramatic changes in skin color, temperature, and/or swelling in the affected area. ... experience constant or intermittent changes in temperature, skin color, and swelling of the affected limb. This is ...

  18. Pain in Bali.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, M R; Ito, Kurnia

    2015-12-01

    There is a lot of unrelieved pain in developing countries. Here is a story from Bali, Indonesia, about a woman with advanced malignancy, who is in unbelievable agony. Expensive chemotherapy is available to her. But although the necessary medications for relieving her pain are available in hospitals, they do not reach the patient, in her home, or even when she is admitted to the hospital, because of ignorance of the medical profession about pain management and because of unnecessary regulatory restrictions. The woman's pain affects the whole family, endangering the family's income and the future of her children. The intervention of palliative care during part of her life gives her some relief, only for the agony to be repeated by pointless chemotherapy and neglect of the suffering during admission to the hospital. Whatever relief could be given to her was because of the intervention of a volunteer with no schooling in medicine or palliative care. PMID:26654417

  19. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePLUS

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  20. Eldercare at Home: Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... bookstores. Provide pleasant activities. Being active takes the mind off the pain. Distractions such as pleasant visits with friends and grandchildren should be encouraged. Watching television, reading, and listening to music may also decrease a ...

  1. Treating Low Back Pain

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  2. Employees with Chronic Pain

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    ... but seldom develop all of them. Also, the degree of limitation will vary among individuals. Be aware that not all people with chronic pain will need accommodations to perform their jobs and many others may only need a few ...

  3. Painful menstrual periods

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  4. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

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  5. Migraines: What a Pain!

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    ... like cola drinks) certain foods (cheese, pizza, chocolate, ice cream, fatty or fried food, lunch meats, hot dogs, ... Do Pain Relievers Work? Oooh, Your Aching Head! Ice Cream Headaches Caffeine Confusion Contact Us Print Additional resources ...

  6. PDST: Pain Decision Support Tool

    PubMed Central

    Brixey, Juliana; Gainer, Aaron

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Develop a decision support tool that guides the health care professional in the pain medication process. Background: An increased focus on the need for adequate pain management and the development of national standards was the impetus behind the development of a computerized pain management tool. Design: A rule-based program was used to develop PDST, based on the problem analysis for pain. PDST steps the nurse through the pain medication process and will suggest an appropriate type of pain medication or intervention. Conclusion: This pilot study demonstrates that a decision support program could be adapted to finding a solution to a pain management problem.

  7. Perioperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Srinivas; Gan, Tong J

    2007-01-01

    The under-treatment of postoperative pain has been recognised to delay patient recovery and discharge from hospital. Despite recognition of the importance of effective pain control, up to 70% of patients still complain of moderate to severe pain postoperatively. The mechanistic approach to pain management, based on current understanding of the peripheral and central mechanisms involved in nociceptive transmission, provides newer options for clinicians to manage pain effectively. In this article we review the rationale for a multimodal approach with combinations of analgesics from different classes and different sites of analgesic administration. The pharmacological options of commonly used analgesics, such as opioids, NSAIDs, paracetamol, tramadol and other non-opioid analgesics, and their combinations is discussed. These analgesics have been shown to provide effective pain relief and their combinations demonstrate a reduction in opioid consumption. The basis for using non-opioid analgesic adjuvants is to reduce opioid consumption and consequently alleviate opioid-related adverse effects. We review the evidence on the opioid-sparing effect of ketamine, clonidine, gabapentin and other novel analgesics in perioperative pain management. Most available data support the addition of these adjuvants to routine analgesic techniques to reduce the need for opioids and improve quality of analgesia by their synergistic effect. Local anaesthetic infiltration, epidural and other regional techniques are also used successfully to enhance perioperative analgesia after a variety of surgical procedures. The use of continuous perineural techniques that offer prolonged analgesia with local anaesthetic infusion has been extended to the care of patients beyond hospital discharge. The use of nonpharmacological options such as acupuncture, relaxation, music therapy, hypnosis and transcutaneous nerve stimulation as adjuvants to conventional analgesia should be considered and incorporated to achieve an effective and successful perioperative pain management regimen. PMID:17338592

  8. Buprenorphine for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Raul; Copenhaver, David

    2013-12-01

    Questions from patients about pain conditions, analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The use of transdermal buprenorphine for chronic pain management is discussed. A brief history of the medication is provided. The use of the medication in opioid maintenance, and withdrawal and other concerns are discussed. Possible side effects are described. PMID:24245573

  9. Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reuler, James B.

    1985-01-01

    Low back pain is one of the most common and costly afflictions of our Society. The majority of adults will have at least one episode of acute low back pain that will likely resolve regardless of treatment. Lumbar spine radiographs are overused and there is little scientific support for many of the therapeutic interventions advocated. Even for those patients with symptomatic herniated disc, only a small fraction will ultimately require surgical intervention. PMID:2930949

  10. Subclinical hypothyroidism is related to lower heel QUS in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Mutsuko; Suzuki, Atsushi; Sekiguchi, Sahoko; Ono, Yasunaga; Nishiwaki-Yasuda, Keiko; Itoi, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Sakura; Imamura, Shigeo; Katoh, Taiya; Hayakawa, Nobuki; Oda, Naohisa; Hashimoto, Shuji; Itoh, Mitsuyasu

    2007-08-01

    Recent findings suggest that thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) is a negative regulator of skeletal remodeling by reducing both differentiation of osteoblasts and formation of osteoclasts. In addition, increased fracture risk in untreated hypothyroid patients has been reported to begin up to 8 years before diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of subclinical hypothyroidism on bone structure by using the heel QUS. Subjects were outpatients without any past or present history of thyroid disease. Among 210 postmenopausal women, 22 of 33 patients (Hypo), who had elevated serum TSH concentration (TSH>or=4 microU/ml) with normal serum free thyroxine (FT4) concentration, agreed to join to this study. We also randomly selected 24 control subjects (Cont) from 176 postmenopausal women with normal thyroid status. Calcaneus osteo sono assessment indices (OSI) of right feet were measured using the ultrasound bone densitometry AOS-100. Serum TSH concentrations in Hypo patients (5.31 +/- 1.3 microU/ml) were higher than those in Cont patients (2.05 +/- 1.1 microU/ml), and there was significant difference of FT(4) concentrations (Cont 1.33 +/- 0.15 ng/dl; Hypo 1.19 +/- 0.17 ng/dl). OSI and its Z-score in Hypo subjects (OSI, 2.138 +/- 0.152; Z-Score -0.322 +/- 0.504 SD, Mean SD) were significantly lower than those in Cont subjects (OSI, 2.347 +/- 0.243; Z-Score 0.322 +/- 0.91 SD, Mean +/- SD). Simple regression statistical analysis showed that OSI decreased according to the increase of serum TSH concentration (n = 47, P<0.037). In addition, multiple regression analysis showed that the elevation of serum TSH concentration was associated with the decrease of OSI. These results suggest that the elevation of serum TSH concentration in subclinical hypothyroidism affects not bone turnover but bone structure as assessed by QUS. PMID:17641439

  11. SOLID PHASE CHARACTERIZATION OF HEEL SAMPLES FROM TANK 241-C-110

    SciTech Connect

    PAGE JS; COOKE GA; PESTOVICH JA; HUBER HJ

    2011-12-01

    During sluicing operations of tank 241-C-110, a significant amount of solids were unable to be retrieved. These solids (often referred to as the tank 'heel') were sampled in 2010 and chemically and mineralogically analyzed in the 222-S Laboratory. Additionally, dissolution tests were performed to identify the amount of undissolvable material after using multiple water contacts. This report covers the solid phase characterization of six samples from these tests using scanning electron microscopy, polarized light microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The chemical analyses, particle size distribution analysis, and dissolution test results are reported separately. Two of the samples were from composites created from as-received material - Composite A and Composite B. The main phase in these samples was sodium-fluoride-phosphate hydrate (natrophosphate) - in the X-ray diffraction spectra, this phase was the only phase identifiable. Polarized light microscopy showed the presence of minor amounts of gibbsite and other phases. These phases were identified by scanning electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy as sodium aluminosilicates, sodium diuranate, and sodium strontium phosphate hydrate (nastrophite) crystals. The natrophosphate crystals in the scanning electron microscopy analysis showed a variety of erosive and dissolution features from perfectly shaped octahedral to well-rounded appearance. Two samples were from water-washed Composites A and B, with no change in mineralogy compared to the as-received samples. This is not surprising, since the water wash had only a short period of water contact with the material as opposed to the water dissolution tests. The last two samples were residual solids from the water dissolution tests. These tests included multiple additions of water at 15 C and 45 C. The samples were sieved to separate a coarser fraction of > 710 {mu}m and a finer fraction of < 710 {mu}m. These two fractions were analyzed separately. The coarser fraction contained mostly gibbsite with minor amounts of sodium aluminosilicates (cancrinite) and bismuth aluminum-rich phases. The finer fraction was mostly composed of gibbsite, the sodium alumino silicate phase, cancrinite, and a poorly crystalline to non-crystalline phase containing varying amounts of iron, bismuth, aluminum, and phosphorus.

  12. Mechanisms of Myofascial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Jafri, M. Saleet

    2014-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is an important health problem. It affects a majority of the general population, impairs mobility, causes pain, and reduces the overall sense of well-being. Underlying this syndrome is the existence of painful taut bands of muscle that contain discrete, hypersensitive foci called myofascial trigger points. In spite of the significant impact on public health, a clear mechanistic understanding of the disorder does not exist. This is likely due to the complex nature of the disorder which involves the integration of cellular signaling, excitation-contraction coupling, neuromuscular inputs, local circulation, and energy metabolism. The difficulties are further exacerbated by the lack of an animal model for myofascial pain to test mechanistic hypothesis. In this review, current theories for myofascial pain are presented and their relative strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Based on new findings linking mechanoactivation of reactive oxygen species signaling to destabilized calcium signaling, we put forth a novel mechanistic hypothesis for the initiation and maintenance of myofascial trigger points. It is hoped that this lays a new foundation for understanding myofascial pain syndrome and how current therapies work, and gives key insights that will lead to the improvement of therapies for its treatment. PMID:25574501

  13. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pascal; Szadek, Karolina; Cohen, Steven P; De Witte, Jan; Lataster, Arno; Patijn, Jacob; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten; Van Zundert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower limb(s). Because sacroiliac joint pain is difficult to distinguish from other forms of low back pain based on history, different provocative maneuvers have been advocated. Individually, they have weak predictive value, but combined batteries of tests can help ascertain a diagnosis. Radiological imaging is important to exclude "red flags" but contributes little in the diagnosis. Diagnostic blocks are the diagnostic gold standard but must be interpreted with caution, because false-positive as well as false-negative results occur frequently. Treatment of sacroiliac joint pain is best performed in the context of a multidisciplinary approach. Conservative treatments address the underlying causes (posture and gait disturbances) and consist of exercise therapy and manipulation. Intra-articular sacroiliac joint infiltrations with local anesthetic and corticosteroids hold the highest evidence rating (1 B+). If the latter fail or produce only short-term effects, cooled radiofrequency treatment of the lateral branches of S1 to S3 (S4) is recommended (2 B+) if available. When this procedure cannot be used, (pulsed) radiofrequency procedures targeted at L5 dorsal ramus and lateral branches of S1 to S3 may be considered (2 C+). PMID:20667026

  14. [Pain management in dentistry].

    PubMed

    Kandreli, M G; Vadachkoriia, N R; Gumberidze, N Sh; Mandzhavidze, N A

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the most effective dose of Ibuprofen - one of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs frequently used in dental practice for pain management. According to our observations, Ibuprofen markedly softens and quickly reduces procedural pain in 55 (91.67%) patients and post-procedural pain in 44 (73.33%) patients, reduces the post-procedural need for or the amount of the drug, removes the fear of anesthesia and endodontic treatment; with irreversible pulpits significantly increases the efficiency of the inferior alveolar nerve block by local anesthetics. Our clinical observation of taking ibuprofen pre-procedurally demonstrates its effectiveness not only as a means for the relief of pain episodes, but also as an excellent anti-inflammatory treatment for chronic toothache Based on our research, the appointment of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs before dental interventions, in this case - Ibuprofen turned out to be the key to the success of effective pain management. We suggest that administration of analgesics in order to relieve and effectively pre-empt pain before, during or after treatment should start before surgery and furthermore, this treatment should be extended into the postoperative period. Premedication with ibuprofen significantly increased the success rates of inferior alveolar nerve block anesthesia in teeth with irreversible pulpitis. PMID:24423675

  15. Three-dimensional morphology and strain of the human Achilles free tendon immediately following eccentric heel drop exercise.

    PubMed

    Obst, Steven J; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the immediate effects of exercise on Achilles free tendon transverse morphology is limited to single site measurements acquired at rest using 2D ultrasound. The purpose of this study was to provide a detailed 3D description of changes in Achilles free tendon morphology immediately following a single clinical bout of exercise. Freehand 3D ultrasound was used to measure Achilles free tendon length, and regional cross-sectional area (CSA), medio-lateral (ML) diameter and antero-posterior (AP) diameter in healthy young adults (N=14) at rest and during isometric muscle contraction, immediately before and after 3×15 eccentric heel drops. Post-exercise reductions in transverse strain were limited to CSA and AP diameter in the mid-proximal region of the Achilles free tendon during muscle contraction. The change in CSA strain during muscle contraction was significantly correlated to the change in longitudinal strain (r=-0.72) and the change in AP diameter strain (r=0.64). Overall findings suggest the Achilles free tendon experiences a complex change in 3D morphology following eccentric heel drop exercise that manifests under contractile but not rest conditions, is most pronounced in the mid-proximal tendon and is primarily driven by changes in AP diameter strain and not ML diameter strain. PMID:26519510

  16. Evaluation of pain in healthy newborns and in newborns with developmental problems (Down syndrome).

    PubMed

    Aguilar Cordero, Maria José; Mur Villar, Norma; García García, Inmaculada

    2015-06-01

    Newborns are often subjected to invasive and painful medical procedures. This happens even more frequently when they require hospitalization. The aim of this paper was to evaluate pain in healthy newborns and in newborns with Down syndrome (DS). We performed a prospective cohort study in the neonatal service of the San Cecilio University Hospital in Granada (Spain) from January 2008 to September 2013. The universe of our study comprised a study group of 20 newborns with DS and a control group of 20 newborns without DS. All of the infants were hospitalized, and thus had to undergo painful medical procedures. The variables studied were basal recovery time (as reflected in crying and the normalization of biological constants), number of punctures, oxygen saturation, heartbeat, blood pressure, response to skin-to-skin contact, and gestational age. The evaluation was performed during blood extraction, vein canalization, and heel puncture. The significant differences in the basal recovery time between the two groups of newborns indicated that those with DS were slower to express pain, and when they did, their response was not as clearly defined as that of babies without DS. The oxygen saturation in babies with DS after the puncture was found to be significantly lower than that of the control group (p < .001). The results of this study revealed that babies with DS were not as quick to perceive pain after a puncture. However, when pain was finally perceived, it persisted for a longer time. This situation should be taken into account in the design of pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic therapies. PMID:25439126

  17. 15. Amygdala pain mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Volker

    2015-01-01

    A limbic brain area the amygdala plays a key role in emotional responses and affective states and disorders such as learned fear, anxiety and depression. The amygdala has also emerged as an important brain center for the emotional-affective dimension of pain and for pain modulation. Hyperactivity in the laterocapsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC, also termed the “nociceptive amygdala”) accounts for pain-related emotional responses and anxiety-like behavior. Abnormally enhanced output from the CeLC is the consequence of an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms. Impaired inhibitory control mediated by a cluster of GABAergic interneurons in the intercalated cell masses (ITC) allows the development of glutamate- and neuropeptide-driven synaptic plasticity of excitatory inputs from the brainstem (parabrachial area) and from the lateral-basolateral amygdala network (LA-BLA, site of integration of polymodal sensory information). BLA hyperactivity also generates abnormally enhanced feedforward inhibition of principal cells in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a limbic cortical area that is strongly interconnected with the amygdala. Pain-related mPFC deactivation results in cognitive deficits and failure to engage cortically driven ITC-mediated inhibitory control of amygdala processing. Impaired cortical control allows the uncontrolled persistence of amygdala pain mechanisms. PMID:25846623

  18. Ocular neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Perry; Borsook, David

    2016-01-01

    As the biological alarm of impending or actual tissue damage, pain is essential for our survival. However, when it is initiated and/or sustained by dysfunctional elements in the nociceptive system, it is itself a disease known as neuropathic pain. While the critical nociceptive system provides a number of protective functions, it is unique in its central role of monitoring, preserving and restoring the optical tear film in the face of evaporative attrition without which our vision would be non-functional. Meeting this existential need resulted in the evolution of the highly complex, powerful and sensitive dry eye alarm system integrated in the peripheral and central trigeminal sensory network. The clinical consequences of corneal damage to these nociceptive pathways are determined by the type and location of its pathological elements and can range from the spectrum known as dry eye disease to the centalised oculofacial neuropathic pain syndrome characterised by a striking disparity between the high intensity of symptoms and paucity of external signs. These changes parallel those observed in somatic neuropathic pain. When seen through the neuroscience lens, diseases responsible for inadequately explained chronic eye pain (including those described as dry eye) can take on new meanings that may clarify long-standing enigmas and point to new approaches for developing preventive, symptomatic and disease-modifying interventions for these currently refractory disorders. PMID:25943558

  19. Positive Traits Linked to Less Pain through Lower Pain Catastrophizing

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Anna; Pulvers, Kim; Carrillo, Janet; Merchant, Gina; Thomas, Marie

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between positive traits, pain catastrophizing, and pain perceptions. We hypothesized that pain catastrophizing would mediate the relationship between positive traits and pain. First, participants (n = 114) completed the Trait Hope Scale, the Life Orientation Test- Revised, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. Participants then completed the experimental pain stimulus, a cold pressor task, by submerging their hand in a circulating water bath (0º Celsius) for as long as tolerable. Immediately following the task, participants completed the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ-SF). Pearson correlation found associations between hope and pain catastrophizing (r = ?.41, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = ?.20, p < .05). Optimism was significantly associated with pain catastrophizing (r = ?.44, p < .01) and MPQ-SF scores (r = ?.19, p < .05). Bootstrapping, a non-parametric resampling procedure, tested for mediation and supported our hypothesis that pain catastrophizing mediated the relationship between positive traits and MPQ-SF pain report. To our knowledge, this investigation is the first to establish that the protective link between positive traits and experimental pain operates through lower pain catastrophizing. PMID:22199416

  20. Pain Symptomatology and Pain Medication Use in Civilian PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Phifer, Justine; Skelton, Kelly; Weiss, Tamara; Schwartz, Ann; Wingo, Aliza; Gillespie, Charles F.; Sands, Lauren; Sayyar, Saleem; Bradley, Bekh; Jovanovic, Tanja; Ressler, Kerry

    2011-01-01

    The comorbidity of pain syndromes and trauma related syndromes has been shown to be high. However, there have been limited data, especially in civilian medical populations, on the role of trauma related disorders such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) on chronic pain and pain medication use. We analyzed 647 general hospital patients in primary care and obstetrics and gynecological waiting rooms for the experience of trauma and PTSD related stress disorders. PTSD symptoms were found to be significantly positively correlated with pain ratings (r=.282, p<.001) and pain related function impairment (r=.303, p<.001). Those with a current PTSD diagnosis had significantly higher subjective pain and pain related-impairment ratings than those with no PTSD. Furthermore, those with a current diagnosis of PTSD were significantly more likely to have used opioid analgesics for pain control compared to those without a diagnosis of PTSD (?2=8.98, p=.011). When analyzing the separate PTSD symptom subclusters, (re-experiencing, avoidance and hyper-arousal), all symptom clusters were significantly related to pain and pain-related impairment ratings, but only the avoidance cluster was significantly related to prior opioid pain medication use. We conclude that PTSD and trauma-related disorders are common in impoverished medical populations and that their presence should be examined in patients with pain syndromes. Furthermore, these data suggest that PTSD and pain may share a vulnerability pathway including the endogenous opioid neurotransmission systems. PMID:21665366

  1. Cognitive behavioral therapy for back pain

    MedlinePLUS

    Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help many people deal with chronic back pain. ... Nonspecific back pain - cognitive behavioral; Backache - chronic - ... - back - chronic - cognitive behavioral; Chronic back pain - low - ...

  2. Pain pharmacology: focus on opioids

    PubMed Central

    Fornasari, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Summary The incidence of chronic pain is estimated to be 20–25% worldwide. Although major improvements in pain control have been obtained, more than 50% of the patients reports inadequate relief. It is accepted that chronic pain, if not adequately and rapidly treated, can become a disease in itself, often intractable and maybe irreversible. This is mainly due to neuroplasticity of pain pathways. In the present review I will discuss about pain depicting the rational for the principal pharmacological interventions and finally focusing on opioids, that represent a primary class of drug to treat pain. PMID:25568646

  3. Pain and immunity.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Xavier; Semerano, Luca; Decker, Patrice; Falgarone, Géraldine; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2012-05-01

    Chronic neuropathic and inflammatory pain is a major public health problem. Nociceptors undergo sensitization, first in peripheral tissues then in the central nervous sytem, via neuroimmune interactions linking neurons, glial cells (microglia and astrocytes), and immune cells. These interactions may either exacerbate or attenuate the pain and inflammation, which normally reach a state of equilibrium. With more powerful or longer lasting stimuli, specific profiles of microglial and, subsequently, astrocytic activation in the dorsal horn play a key role in neuronal plasticity and transition to chronic pain. Recent insights into the interactions between the nervous system and the immune system suggest a large number of potential therapeutic targets that could be influenced either by targeted inhibition or by directing the neuroimmune response toward the antiinflammatory and analgesic end of its spectrum. PMID:22119349

  4. Back Pain Patients Seek Pain Relief First, Mobility Second

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_154732.html Back Pain Patients Seek Pain Relief First, Mobility Second Nearly 80 percent of patients chose easing discomfort over greater movement, research shows ...

  5. [Pain and Christianity. A symbol for overcoming pain?].

    PubMed

    Markschies, C

    2007-08-01

    Pain and Christianity appear to belong together: Christ's pain stands at the centre of God's healing; his pain leads to the salvation of mankind. We can learn from Jesus' example how to bear suffering and pain. In early Christian times, the belief that Jesus Christ suffered pain on the cross was usually not accepted. In line with the "apathy axiom", freedom from emotion was something to strive for at that time. Only after the acceptance of Christianity as the state religion of the Roman Empire in 380 AD did the pain of Christ again stand in the centre of the Christian doctrine of salvation. The memory of the fact that Jesus himself had to undergo the worst pain can still help people to overcome their pain and comfort them. PMID:17674055

  6. Pain Management: Part 1: Managing Acute and Postoperative Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Safe and effective management of acute dental pain can be accomplished with nonopioid and opioid analgesics. To formulate regimens properly, it is essential to appreciate basic pharmacological principles and appropriate dosage strategies for each of the available analgesic classes. This article will review the basic pharmacology of analgesic drug classes, including their relative efficacy for dental pain, and will suggest appropriate regimens based on pain intensity. Management of chronic pain will be addressed in the second part of this series. PMID:20553137

  7. Pressure distribution between the deep digital flexor tendon and the navicular bone, and the effect of raising the heels in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weaver, M P; Shaw, D J; Munaiwa, G; Fitzpatrick, D P; Bellenger, C R

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to topographically map pressure distribution across the palmar surface of the navicular bone in response to forces applied by the deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT), and evaluate the effect of raising the heels in vitro . A rig was constructed to hold an equine cadaver limb and apply controlled pressure to the navicular bone from the DDFT. Pressure-sensitive paper was used to quantify and map the resultant pressure. Changes in response to heel wedges (5 degrees and 10 degrees ) were recorded. The areas subject to maximum pressure from the DDFT were: the central ridge, the paired symmetrical areas adjacent to the ridge and the distal edge of the palmar bone surface. These regions correspond to the known sites of navicular pathology. Heel wedges redistributed the pressure exerted on the palmar surface of the navicular bone, with measurements varying depending on fetlock angle and wedge angle. These in vitro results support the hypothesis that inappropriate forces exerted via the DDFT on the bone cause navicular disease. However, they throw doubt on the practice of shoeing such horses with heel wedges as the redistribution of pressure may increase the force exerted on regions predisposed to disease. PMID:19597630

  8. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Alt?ndas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  9. Comparison between extracorporeal shockwave therapy, placebo ESWT and endoscopic plantar fasciotomy for the treatment of chronic plantar heel pain in the athlete

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Amol; Fournier, Magali; Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Summary Plantar fasciitis can be a chronic and debilitating condition affecting athletes of all levels. The aim of this study is to compare treatment outcomes for the treatment of chronic plantar fasciitis in athletes, comparing focused extra corporeal sound wave therapy (ESWT) and the surgical endoscopic plantar fasciotomy (EPF). A total of 37 eligible patients were enrolled in the study between May 2006 and December 2008 at a single institution. Patients were either enrolled in the surgical group, or to the ESWT group which included a placebo controlled, randomized group (P-ESWT). Pre and post Visual Analog Scores (VAS) and Roles and Maudlsey (RM) scores were recorded and compared between the three groups. The patient’s return to activity (RTA) was also documented. The results showed statistical improvement within the EPF and ESWT groups with both VAS & RM scores, with EPF being significantly better than both ESWT and P-ESWT in terms of treatment outcomes. Patients enrolled in the ESWT were able though to continue with their exercise regimen, while the EPF group was able to return to their athletic activity in an average of 2.8 months. In conclusion, EPF and ESWT are both effective forms of treatment for chronic plantar fasciitis; EPF being superior in outcomes yet ESWT treatment could be preferable since the athlete can remain active during treatment. Level of Evidence: II PMID:23738317

  10. Emotional pain without sensory pain--dream on?

    PubMed

    Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino

    2009-01-29

    The article by Danziger and colleagues in this issue of Neuron evaluates empathy in a unique population--individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain. As such, it provides insights into the brain's ability to evaluate others' feeling to observed pain without having a specific sensory experience of pain itself. PMID:19186157

  11. Acute pain medicine in anesthesiology

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Anastacia P.; Tighe, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Pain Medicine and the American Society for Regional Anesthesia have recently focused on the evolving practice of acute pain medicine. There is increasing recognition that the scope and practice of acute pain therapies must extend beyond the subacute pain phase to include pre-pain and pre-intervention risk stratification, resident and fellow education in regional anesthesia and multimodal analgesia, as well as a deeper understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms that are integral to the variability observed among individual responses to nociception. Acute pain medicine is also being established as a vital component of successful systems-level acute pain management programs, inpatient cost containment, and patient satisfaction scores. In this review, we discuss the evolution and practice of acute pain medicine and we aim to facilitate further discussion on the evolution and advancement of this field as a subspecialty of anesthesiology. PMID:24381730

  12. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain More than 40 million people in the ... bones that puts them at risk for spine fractures (broken bones). Thinning of the bones can occur ...

  13. How Is Pelvic Pain Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... mechanisms Peer Review Review of the scientific & technical merit of grant applications Contacts for NICHD Funding Information ... her pain can help her health care provider figure out the pain type and what might be ...

  14. Cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Gary; Johnson, Aimee; Fisher, William

    2012-04-01

    Pain is a serious health care problem and there is growing evidence to support the use of hypnosis and cognitive-behavioral interventions for pain management. This article reviews clinical techniques and methods of cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management. Current research with emphasis given to randomized, controlled trials is presented and the efficacy of hypnotherapy for pain management is discussed. Evidence for cognitive hypnotherapy in the treatment in chronic pain, cancer, osteoarthritis, sickle cell disease, temporomandibular disorder, fibromyalgia, non-cardiac chest pain, and disability related chronic pains are identified. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in light of the accumulating evidence in support of the efficacy and effectiveness of cognitive hypnotherapy for pain management. PMID:22655332

  15. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... functional pain. Your doctor will also follow your child to see if any changes take place which would suggest a different problem. Functional Abdominal Pain in Children NASPGHAN • PO Box 6 • Flourtown, PA 19031 • 215-233-0808 • ...

  16. Pain Management Following Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of nerve root pain that is but an effective pain management program can lessen described as a burning feeling ... an increased loss of sensory and motor function. effective pain management program depends on the type of pain you ...

  17. Spinal cord plasticity in peripheral inflammatory pain 

    E-print Network

    Dickie, Allen Charles

    2014-06-28

    Inflammatory pain is a debilitating condition that can occur following tissue injury or inflammation and results in touch evoked pain (allodynia), exaggerated pain (hyperalgesia) and spontaneous pain, yet the neural ...

  18. Abdominal pain - children under age 12

    MedlinePLUS

    Stomach pain in children; Pain - abdomen - children; Abdominal cramps in children; Belly ache in children ... When your child complains of abdominal pain, see if they can describe it to you. Here are different kinds of pain: ...

  19. The Neuromodulation of Neuropathic Pain by Measuring Pain Response Rate and Pain Response Duration in Animal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinhyung; Lee, Sung Eun; Shin, Jaewoo; Jung, Hyun Ho; Kim, Sung June

    2015-01-01

    Objective Neuropathic pain causes patients feel indescribable pain. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is one of the treatment methods in neuropathic pain but the action mechanism is still unclear. To study the effect and mechanism of analgesic effects from DBS in neuropathic pain and to enhance the analgesic effect of DBS, we stimulated the ventral posterolateral nucleus (VPL) in rats. Methods To observe the effect from VPL stimulation, we established 3 groups : normal group (Normal group), neuropathic pain group (Pain group) and neuropathic pain+DBS group (DBS group). Rats in DBS group subjected to electrical stimulation and the target is VPL. Results We observed the behavioral changes by DBS in VPL (VPL-DBS) on neuropathic pain rats. In our study, the pain score which is by conventional test method was effectively decreased. In specific, the time of showing withdrawal response from painful stimulation which is not used measuring method in our animal model was also decreased by DBS. Conclusion The VPL is an effective target on pain modulation. Specifically we could demonstrate changes of pain response duration which is not used, and it was also significantly meaningful. We thought that this study would be helpful in understanding the relation between VPL-DBS and neuropathic pain. PMID:25674337

  20. Complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Greta

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex regional pain syndrome is an uncommon chronic pain condition. It develops spontaneously or following an injury. The features are limb pain, allodynia, hypersensitivity, hyperalgesia, abnormalities of the vasomotor, sudomotor and motor systems, and trophic changes, with reduced use of the affected limb. The diagnosis is clinical and one of exclusion. The emphasis of therapy is graded rehabilitation and movement of the limb with physiotherapy and occupational therapy. Psychological therapies should be offered if a patient is making no or slow progress in the acute phase, and to all patients in the chronic phase as depression can occur. The goal of pharmacotherapy is to assist functional improvement. The early phase may be managed with simple analgesia. Antineuropathic drugs including tricyclic antidepressants and antiepileptic drugs may be added. Other treatments with some evidence of effectiveness include corticosteroids, calcitonin and bisphosphonates. Vitamin C has been used for primary prevention after wrist fracture and upper and lower limb surgery. There is no evidence that it is effective for treating established complex regional pain syndrome. PMID:26648626

  1. Pain Management Programs

    MedlinePLUS

    ... things: Qualities of a Well-Functioning Interdisciplinary Pain Team Share the same beliefs and mission The program is patient and family centered Work together for common, agreed upon goals Develop treatment plans based on ... communication between primary provider and team members ...

  2. Pain in childbirth.

    PubMed Central

    Kitzinger, S

    1978-01-01

    Sheila Kitzinger describes pain and its control throughout the various stages of childbirth. She stresses the value of antenatal preparation as well as the need for a supportive environment during the labour stages. All concerned--the porspective parents, doctors, midwives and any other personnel in a maternity unit should be educated to be able to provide such an environment. PMID:357724

  3. Scalp pain and hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, P D; Lloyd-Mostyn, R H

    2000-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis and eruptive xanthomata are the only recognised direct complications of severe hypertriglyceridaemia, although peripheral neuropathy has been described in patients with hyperlipidaemia. We describe a patient with mixed hyperlipidaemia presenting with severe scalp pain and eruptive xanthomata. Both resolved with treatment. We suspect that high triglyceride concentration can affect the function of sensory nerve fibres. PMID:11070577

  4. American Chronic Pain Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 *NEW* Veterans In Pain Events Events for December 2015: View All Events Su M Tu W Th ... Next Week 12/1/2015 SAVE THE DATE - December 1, 2015 #GivingTuesday 12/5/2015 American Headache Society Comprehensive ...

  5. Complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bruehl, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by autonomic and inflammatory features. It occurs acutely in about 7% of patients who have limb fractures, limb surgery, or other injuries. Many cases resolve within the first year, with a smaller subset progressing to the chronic form. This transition is often paralleled by a change from "warm complex regional pain syndrome," with inflammatory characteristics dominant, to "cold complex regional pain syndrome" in which autonomic features dominate. Multiple peripheral and central mechanisms seem to be involved, the relative contributions of which may differ between individuals and over time. Possible contributors include peripheral and central sensitization, autonomic changes and sympatho-afferent coupling, inflammatory and immune alterations, brain changes, and genetic and psychological factors. The syndrome is diagnosed purely on the basis of clinical signs and symptoms. Effective management of the chronic form of the syndrome is often challenging. Few high quality randomized controlled trials are available to support the efficacy of the most commonly used interventions. Reviews of available randomized trials suggest that physical and occupational therapy (including graded motor imagery and mirror therapy), bisphosphonates, calcitonin, subanesthetic intravenous ketamine, free radical scavengers, oral corticosteroids, and spinal cord stimulation may be effective treatments. Multidisciplinary clinical care, which centers around functionally focused therapies is recommended. Other interventions are used to facilitate engagement in functional therapies and to improve quality of life. PMID:26224572

  6. [Suffering, pain and care].

    PubMed

    Perrin-Niquet, Annick

    2012-01-01

    While psychic pain is linked to melancholy, to the loss of an object, psychological suffering indicates difficult affective phenomena, which are not necessarily connected to a personality structure or to a particular pathology, but which can be explained by the very nature of our humanity. PMID:23050357

  7. Differential diagnostic validation: acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Simon, J M; Baumann, M A; Nolan, L

    1995-01-01

    The authors sought to validate the defining characteristics of acute pain and chronic pain and to compare the differences between them. Expert nurses (N = 125) rated the importance of 55 clinical indicators for each diagnosis (acute pain and chronic pain). Differential diagnostic validity (DDV) scores were calculated for each clinical indicator for both diagnoses. Only acute pain had a DDV score greater than .80, indicating that the characteristic "communication of pain descriptors" was a critical indicator for acute pain. A majority of defining characteristics differentiated between acute pain and chronic pain, thereby supporting the identification of acute pain and chronic pain as separate nursing diagnoses. PMID:7619605

  8. Low-pressure, single-point grout injection for tank heel sludge mixing and in-situ immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Whyatt, G.A.; Hymas, C.R.

    1998-09-01

    This report describes tests conducted in an approximately 9-ft diameter test tank situated outside the 336 building in Hanford`s 300 area. The tests were performed to measure the ability of jets of grout slurry to mobilize and mix simulated tank sludge. The technique is intended for in situ immobilization of tank waste heels. The current approach uses a single, rotated, larger-diameter nozzle driven at lower pressure. Due to the larger diameter, the potential for plugging is reduced and the effective radius around an injection point over which the jet is effective in mobilizing sludge from the tank bottom can be made larger. A total of three grout injection tests were conducted in a 9-ft diameter tank. In each case, a 2-in. layer of kaolin clay paste was placed on a dry tank floor to simulate a sludge heel. The clay was covered with 4 inches of water. The grout slurry, consisting of Portland cement, class F fly ash, and eater, was prepared and delivered by an offsite vendor. In the third test, the sludge in half of the tank was replaced by a layer of 20x50 mesh zeolite, and bentonite clay was added to the grout formulation. After injection, the grout was allowed to set and then the entire grout monolith was manually broken up and excavated using a jack hammer. Intact pieces of clay were visually apparent due to a sharp color contrast between the grout and clay. Remaining clay deposits were collected and weighed and suspended clay pieces within the monolith were photographed. The mobilization performance of the grout jets exceeded expectations.

  9. Back pain during growth.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Carol C

    2013-01-01

    It is wrong to believe that back pain only burdens adults: the yearly incidence during growth ranges from 10-20%, continuously increasing from childhood to adolescence. Rapid growth-related muscular dysbalance and insufficiency, poor physical condition in an increasingly sedentary adolescent community or - vice versa - high level sports activities, account for the most prevalent functional pain syndromes. In contrast to adults the correlation of radiographic findings with pain is high: the younger the patient, the higher the probability to establish a rare morphologic cause such as benign or malignant tumours, congenital malformations and infections. In children younger than 5 years old, the likelihood is more than 50%. The following red flags should lower the threshold for a quick in-depth analysis of the problem: Age of the patient <5 years, acute trauma, functional limitation for daily activities, irradiating pain, loss of weight, duration >4 weeks, history of tumour, exposition to tuberculosis, night pain and fever. High level sport equals a biomechanical field test which reveals the biologic individual response of the growing spine to the sports-related forces. Symptomatic or asymptomatic inhibitory or stimulatory growth disturbances like Scheuermann disease, scoliosis or fatigue fractures represent the most frequent pathomorphologies. They usually occur at the disk-growth plate compound: intraspongious disk herniation, diminuition of anterior growth with vertebral wedging and apophyseal ring fractures often occur when the biomechanical impacts exceed the mechanical resistance of the cartilaginous endplates. Spondylolysis is a benign condition which rarely becomes symptomatic and responds well to conservative measures. Associated slippage of L5 on S1 is frequent but rarely progresses. The pubertal spinal growth spurt is the main risk factor for further slippage, whereas sports activity - even at a high level - is not. Therefore, the athlete should only be precluded from training if pain persists or in case of high grade slips. Perturbance of the sagittal profile with increase of lumbar lordosis, flattening of the thoracic spine and retroflexion of the pelvis with hamstrings contractures are strong signs for a grade IV olisthesis or spondyloptosis with subsequent lumbosacral kyphosis. Idiopathic scoliosis is not related to pain unless it is a marked (thoraco-) lumbar curve or if there is an underlying spinal cord pathology. Chronic back pain is an under recognised entity characterised by its duration (>3 months or recurrence within 3 months) and its social impacts such as isolation and absence from school or work. It represents an independent disease, uncoupled from any initial trigger. Multimodal therapeutic strategies are more successful than isolated, somatising orthopaedic treatment. Primary and secondary preventive active measures for the physically passive adolescents, regular sports medical check-up's for the young high level athletes, the awareness for the rare but potentially disastrous pathologies and the recognition of chronic pain syndromes are the cornerstones for successful treatment of back pain during growth. PMID:23299906

  10. The Paradox of Painful Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smuts, Aaron

    2007-01-01

    Many of the most popular genres of narrative art are designed to elicit negative emotions: emotions that are experienced as painful or involving some degree of pain, which people generally avoid in their daily lives. Traditionally, the question of why people seek out such experiences of painful art has been presented as the paradox of tragedy, and…

  11. Cortical pathophysiology of chronic pain

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Cortical pathophysiology of chronic pain A. Vania Apkarian Department of Physiology multiple non-invasive brain imaging techniques to study the characteristics of patients with chronic pain in chronic pain are summarized, emphasizing the unique role of the prefrontal cortex in chronic, especially

  12. Scrotal pain: Evaluation and management

    PubMed Central

    Gordhan, Chirag G

    2015-01-01

    Scrotal pain is a common complaint in a urological practice. Its diagnosis can prove challenging in both acute and chronic forms and requires a thorough and complete history and physical examination. This article discusses the evaluation and management of several entities of scrotal pain, including testicular torsion, epididymitis, postvasectomy pain, varicocele, and chronic orchialgia. PMID:25598931

  13. Spiritual Coping with Chronic Pain 

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Kevin

    2008-06-26

    and Pain interference (PI) (p?.05). Despite SP correlating well with R/S coping, neither the positive nor negative R/S coping subscales accounted for any of the variance in pain outcomes. Three of the CSQ coping subscales correlated with pain outcomes...

  14. Dyspareunia: Painful Sex for Women

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Dyspareunia Overview What is dyspareunia? Dyspareunia (say: "dis-par-oon-ya") is painful sexual intercourse for women. The pain can be in the genital area or deep inside the pelvis. The pain is often described as sharp, burning or similar to menstrual cramps. It can have ...

  15. A multidisciplinary approach to nonpharmacologic pain management.

    PubMed

    Golden, Barbara A

    2002-09-01

    The multidisciplinary pain management team is the optimal method for delivery of comprehensive treatment to patients in pain. The biopsychosocial model of pain considers multiple factors for assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of pain. A structured approach to nonpharmacologic pain management includes medical and psychological interventions to educate and to empower patients to manage pain. Relaxation training, biofeedback, hypnosis, imagery, and cognitive-behavioral therapy are nonpharmacologic treatment modalities recommended by multidisciplinary pain management teams for effective pain control. PMID:12356034

  16. Pain Treatment in Arthritis-Related Pain: Beyond NSAIDs

    PubMed Central

    van Laar, Mart; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Mellinghoff, Hans-Ulrich; Merchante, Ignacio Morón; Nalamachu, Srinivas; O'Brien, Joanne; Perrot, Serge; Raffa, Robert B

    2012-01-01

    Managing pain from chronic conditions, such as, but not limited to, osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, requires the clinician to balance the need for effective analgesia against safety risks associated with analgesic agents. Osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis pain is incompletely understood but involves both nociceptive and non-nociceptive mechanisms, including neuropathic mechanisms. Prevailing guidelines for arthritis-related pain do not differentiate between nociceptive and non-nociceptive pain, sometimes leading to recommendations that do not fully address the nature of pain. NSAIDs are effective in treating the nociceptive arthritis-related pain. However, safety concerns of NSAIDs may cause clinicians to undertreat arthritis-related pain. In this context, combination therapy may be more appropriate to manage the different pain mechanisms involved. A panel convened in November 2010 found that among the currently recommended analgesic products for arthritis-related pain, fixed-low-dose combination products hold promise for pain control because such products allow lower doses of individual agents resulting in decreased toxicity and acceptable efficacy due to synergy between the individual drugs. Better evidence and recommendations are required to improve treatment of chronic arthritis-related pain. PMID:23264838

  17. Altered pain modulation in patients with persistent postendodontic pain.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Feng, Changyong; Yarnitsky, David; Kuo, Fengshen; Hirschberg, Craig; Hartwell, Gary; Huang, Ching-Yu; Heir, Gary; Korczeniewska, Olga; Diehl, Scott R; Eliav, Eli

    2015-10-01

    Persistent pain may follow nerve injuries associated with invasive therapeutic interventions. About 3% to 7% of the patients remain with chronic pain after endodontic treatment, and these are described as suffering from painful posttraumatic trigeminal neuropathy (PTTN). Unfortunately, we are unable to identify which patients undergoing such procedures are at increased risk of developing PTTN. Recent findings suggest that impaired endogenous analgesia may be associated with the development of postsurgical chronic pain. We hypothesized that patients with PTTN display pronociceptive pain modulation, in line with other chronic pain disorders. Dynamic (conditioned pain modulation, temporal summation) and static (response to mechanical and cold stimulation) psychophysical tests were performed intraorally and in the forearm of 27 patients with PTTN and 27 sex- and age-matched controls. The dynamic sensory testing demonstrated less efficient conditioned pain modulation, suggesting reduced function of the inhibitory endogenous pain-modulatory system, in patients with PTTN, mainly in those suffering from the condition for more than a year. The static sensory testing of patients with PTTN demonstrated forearm hyperalgesia to mechanical stimulation mainly in patients suffering from the condition for less than a year and prolonged painful sensation after intraoral cold stimulus mainly in patients suffering from the condition for more than a year. These findings suggest that PTTN is associated more with the inhibitory rather than the facilitatory arm of pain modulation and that the central nervous system has a role in PTTN pathophysiology, possibly in a time-dependent fashion. PMID:26098442

  18. Acculturation and Cancer Pain Experience

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eun-Ok; Ho, Tsung-Han; Brown, Adama; Chee, Wonshik

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Using a feminist perspective, the relationship between acculturation and cancer pain experience was explored. Design: This was a cross-sectional, correlational Internet study among 104 Hispanic and 114 Asian cancer patients. The instruments included both unidimensional and multidimensional cancer pain measures. Findings: There were significant differences in cancer pain scores by country of birth. Yet, there was no significant association of acculturation to cancer pain scores. Discussion and Conclusions: This study indicated inconsistent findings. Implications for Practice: To provide directions for adequate cancer pain management, further studies with a larger number of diverse groups of immigrant cancer patients are needed. PMID:19376965

  19. [Pain medication during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Pereira, Miozzari Anne Catherine; Senhaji, Selim; Rollason, Gumprecht Victoria; Jungo, Nançoz Carol; Luthy, Christophe; Piguet, Valérie

    2012-06-27

    To treat pain that does not respond to non-pharmacological approaches in a pregnant woman represents a challenge for the primary care physician. He is often the first health professional to be consulted and finds himself confronted to not only one but two patients:the motherand the fetus. His knowledge on pain treatment and the practical approach that he is used to, will have to be adapted to this new equation. He will have to weigh the benefit for the mother against the risk for the fetus, while creating a true relationship with his patient. Although only a few drugs are considered compatible with pregnancy, the data available from the literature allow nowadays to better understand the nature of the risk when exposing the fetus to a given drug and to elaborate evidence-based recommendations. PMID:22872938

  20. Buprenorphine in cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P

    2005-11-01

    Buprenorphine is a broad spectrum, highly lipophilic, and long-acting partial mu opioid receptor agonist that is noncross tolerant to other opioids. Buprenorphine can be given by several routes. Metabolism is through CYP3A4 and CYP2C8 and by conjugases. Constipation and sexual dysfunction appear to be less with buprenorphine than with other opioids. The recent development of a polymer matrix patch delivery system for buprenorphine prevents "dose dumping" and facilitates pain management in those unable to take oral analgesics. Sublingual buprenorphine has been combined with naloxone to prevent illicit conversion to parenteral administration. Buprenorphine has been used extensively to control cancer pain. In certain clinical situations, buprenorphine may have particular advantages over other opioids. PMID:16010532

  1. Anterior knee pain.

    PubMed

    LLopis, Eva; Padrón, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complain in all ages athletes. It may be caused by a large variety of injuries. There is a continuum of diagnoses and most of the disorders are closely related. Repeated minor trauma and overuse play an important role for the development of lesions in Hoffa's pad, extensor mechanism, lateral and medial restrain structures or cartilage surface, however usually an increase or change of activity is referred. Although the direct relation of cartilage lesions, especially chondral, and pain is a subject of debate these lesions may be responsible of early osteoarthrosis and can determine athlete's prognosis. The anatomy and biomechanics of patellofemoral joint is complex and symptoms are often unspecific. Transient patellar dislocation has MR distinct features that provide evidence of prior dislocation and rules our complication. However, anterior knee pain more often is related to overuse and repeated minor trauma. Patella and quadriceps tendon have been also implicated in anterior knee pain, as well as lateral or medial restraint structures and Hoffa's pad. US and MR are excellent tools for the diagnosis of superficial tendons, the advantage of MR is that permits to rule out other sources of intraarticular derangements. Due to the complex anatomy and biomechanic of patellofemoral joint maltracking is not fully understood; plain films and CT allow the study of malalignment, new CT and MR kinematic studies have promising results but further studies are needed. Our purpose here is to describe how imaging techniques can be helpful in precisely defining the origin of the patient's complaint and thus improve understanding and management of these injuries. PMID:17350782

  2. Genetic determinants of heel bone properties: genome-wide association meta-analysis and replication in the GEFOS/GENOMOS consortium

    PubMed Central

    Moayyeri, Alireza; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Karasik, David; Estrada, Karol; Xiao, Su-Mei; Nielson, Carrie; Srikanth, Priya; Giroux, Sylvie; Wilson, Scott G.; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Smith, Albert V.; Pye, Stephen R.; Leo, Paul J.; Teumer, Alexander; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ohlsson, Claes; McGuigan, Fiona; Minster, Ryan L.; Hayward, Caroline; Olmos, José M.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Lewis, Joshua R.; Swart, Karin M.A.; Masi, Laura; Oldmeadow, Chris; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Cheng, Sulin; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Harvey, Nicholas C.; Kruk, Marcin; del Greco M, Fabiola; Igl, Wilmar; Trummer, Olivia; Grigoriou, Efi; Luben, Robert; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhou, Yanhua; Oei, Ling; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Zmuda, Joseph; Tranah, Greg; Brown, Suzanne J.; Williams, Frances M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Jakobsdottir, Johanna; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Holliday, Kate L.; Hannemann, Anke; Go, Min Jin; Garcia, Melissa; Polasek, Ozren; Laaksonen, Marika; Zhu, Kun; Enneman, Anke W.; McEvoy, Mark; Peel, Roseanne; Sham, Pak Chung; Jaworski, Maciej; Johansson, Åsa; Hicks, Andrew A.; Pludowski, Pawel; Scott, Rodney; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A.M.; van der Velde, Nathalie; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Sievänen, Harri; Raitakari, Olli T.; González-Macías, Jesús; Hernández, Jose L.; Mellström, Dan; Ljunggren, Östen; Cho, Yoon Shin; Völker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Homuth, Georg; Völzke, Henry; Haring, Robin; Brown, Matthew A.; McCloskey, Eugene; Nicholson, Geoffrey C.; Eastell, Richard; Eisman, John A.; Jones, Graeme; Reid, Ian R.; Dennison, Elaine M.; Wark, John; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Wu, Frederick C.W.; Aspelund, Thor; Richards, J. Brent; Bauer, Doug; Hofman, Albert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Dedoussis, George; Obermayer-Pietsch, Barbara; Gyllensten, Ulf; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lorenc, Roman S.; Cooper, Cyrus; Kung, Annie Wai Chee; Lips, Paul; Alen, Markku; Attia, John; Brandi, Maria Luisa; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Riancho, José A.; Campbell, Harry; Liu, Yongmei; Harris, Tamara B.; Akesson, Kristina; Karlsson, Magnus; Lee, Jong-Young; Wallaschofski, Henri; Duncan, Emma L.; O'Neill, Terence W.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Spector, Timothy D.; Rousseau, François; Orwoll, Eric; Cummings, Steven R.; Wareham, Nick J.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Prince, Richard L.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Reeve, Jonathan; Kaptoge, Stephen K.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound of the heel captures heel bone properties that independently predict fracture risk and, with bone mineral density (BMD) assessed by X-ray (DXA), may be convenient alternatives for evaluating osteoporosis and fracture risk. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) studies to assess the genetic determinants of heel broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; n = 14 260), velocity of sound (VOS; n = 15 514) and BMD (n = 4566) in 13 discovery cohorts. Independent replication involved seven cohorts with GWA data (in silico n = 11 452) and new genotyping in 15 cohorts (de novo n = 24 902). In combined random effects, meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts, nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) had genome-wide significant (P < 5 × 10?8) associations with heel bone properties. Alongside SNPs within or near previously identified osteoporosis susceptibility genes including ESR1 (6q25.1: rs4869739, rs3020331, rs2982552), SPTBN1 (2p16.2: rs11898505), RSPO3 (6q22.33: rs7741021), WNT16 (7q31.31: rs2908007), DKK1 (10q21.1: rs7902708) and GPATCH1 (19q13.11: rs10416265), we identified a new locus on chromosome 11q14.2 (rs597319 close to TMEM135, a gene recently linked to osteoblastogenesis and longevity) significantly associated with both BUA and VOS (P < 8.23 × 10?14). In meta-analyses involving 25 cohorts with up to 14 985 fracture cases, six of 10 SNPs associated with heel bone properties at P < 5 × 10?6 also had the expected direction of association with any fracture (P < 0.05), including three SNPs with P < 0.005: 6q22.33 (rs7741021), 7q31.31 (rs2908007) and 10q21.1 (rs7902708). In conclusion, this GWA study reveals the effect of several genes common to central DXA-derived BMD and heel ultrasound/DXA measures and points to a new genetic locus with potential implications for better understanding of osteoporosis pathophysiology. PMID:24430505

  3. A journey to pain.

    PubMed

    Kogan, I

    1990-01-01

    This paper explored the restoration of the capacity to feel pain and guilt as a result of the emotional experience in analysis. This was illustrated by the first part of an analysis of a woman who lost her four-month-old baby in a car accident. Analysis revealed in this case a fragmented self unable to deal with unbearable feelings of pain and guilt which threatened to annihilate it. She connected the accident to a series of events which appeared to her to be the realization of her aggressive wishes towards primary objects throughout her life. The perception of the impairment and loss of loved objects as due to her destructiveness led to the inability to differentiate self from object, the impairment in the work of mourning, and aggression turned against the self. The analyst's survival of the destructive attack without retaliation enabled the differentiation, a better adaptation to reality and the restoration of the capacity to feel pain and guilt. PMID:2074150

  4. [Congenital insensitivity to pain].

    PubMed

    Popko, Janusz; Karpi?ski, Micha?; Guszczyn, Tomasz

    2014-02-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain belongs to rare diseases called hereditary sensory neuropathy (HSN). The disturbance of sense and secondary harms are creating clinical picture. The aim of this report was to describe therapeutic problems with which we met with a three siblings with congenital insensitivity to pain. The authors have described three children with congenital insensitivity to pain. The disease was diagnosed at the age of 3-5. These children painlessly have broken their lower limbs. These fractures were late diagnosed what resulted in a badly healed deformation of legs. For this reason, the right knee of the oldest boy had to be stiffened. This boy had also late diagnosed the left hip luxation, and hematomas had arisen, which become filled with pus. The boy was in sepsis and a dramatic life-and-death struggle was performed. A purulent focuses were removed from abdomen and femoral head was also resected. The other two siblings had fractures and infections, but not such severe as the oldest boy. It is well known that a causal treatment of this disease in unknown. Patients must learn to avoid mechanical and thermal trauma. It is the only way to prevent complications of this disease. PMID:24720108

  5. The Zero Acceptance of Pain (ZAP) Quality Improvement Project: evaluation of pain severity, pain interference, global quality of life, and pain-related costs.

    PubMed

    Fortner, Barry V; Okon, Theodore A; Ashley, Jeri; Kepler, Ginney; Chavez, Jana; Tauer, Kurt; Clements-Thompson, Michele; Schwartzberg, Lee; Demarco, Gail; Houts, Arthur C

    2003-04-01

    The Zero Acceptance of Pain (ZAP) Quality Improvement Project was a multi-site effort to improve the lives of outpatients with cancer pain by enhancing the clinical practice of pain assessment and management. Independent samples of patients completed self-report measures of severity of pain, pain interference, global quality of life, pain treatment satisfaction, general medical treatment satisfaction, pain attitudes, and pain-related medical costs before and after the implementation of ZAP. Results suggested that ZAP decreased the severity of recent pain, decreased interference of pain on daily functioning, and improved satisfaction with pain treatment and attitudes about addiction to opioid medication. Direct medical costs consisting of pain-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and physician office visits were greatly reduced. In summary, the findings of this study support the idea that clinic-based efforts to improve the practice of pain management are effective in improving the lives of cancer patients who are experiencing pain. PMID:12691685

  6. PAIN INTENSITY MODERATES THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN AGE AND PAIN INTERFERENCE IN CHRONIC OROFACIAL PAIN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Boggero, Ian A.; Geiger, Paul J.; Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Carlson, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Study Context Chronic pain is associated with increased interference in daily functioning that becomes more pronounced as pain intensity increases. Based on previous research showing that older adults maintain well-being in the face of pain as well as or better than their younger counterparts, the current study examined the interaction of age and pain intensity on interference in a sample of chronic orofacial pain patients. Methods Data were obtained from the records of 508 chronic orofacial pain patients being seen for an initial evaluation from 2008 to 2012. Collected data included age (range: 18–78) and self-reported measures of pain intensity and pain interference. Bivariate correlations and regression models were used to assess for statistical interactions. Results Regression analyses revealed that pain intensity positively predicted pain interference (R2 = .35, B = 10.40, SE = 0.62, t(507) = 16.70, p < .001). A significant interaction supported the primary hypothesis that aging was associated with reduced interference at high levels of pain intensity (?R2 = .01, B = ?1.31, SE = 0.63, t(505) = ?2.90, p = .04). Conclusion At high levels of pain intensity, interference decreased with age, although the age by pain intensity interaction effect was small. This evidence converges with aging theories, including socioemotional selectivity theory, which posits that as people age, they become more motivated to maximize positive emotions and minimize negative ones. The results highlight the importance of studying the mechanisms older adults use to successfully cope with pain. PMID:26214102

  7. Pain: history, culture and philosophy.

    PubMed

    Khan, Murad Ahmad; Raza, Fauzia; Khan, Iqbal Akhtar

    2015-01-01

    Pain, one of the universals of existence, has a long and venerable history, its origin initially attributed to godly punishment for disbelievers; and, with improved understanding, to physical and psycho-social factors. "Pain is emotion or sensation?" has been a debatable issue. Razes developed pleasure-pain theory, founded on the theories of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and Epicurus. Descartes' Dualism shifted the centre of pain from the heart to the brain but negated the psychological contribution to its pathogenesis. Gate Control Theory, fascinated with the idea of "neurological gates", highlighted the important role of the brain in dealing with the messages received. The International Association of the Study of Pain, in 1979, coined a definition of pain which is currently in use and was last updated on 6th October 2014. Its validity has been challenged and a new definition has been suggested. Whereas the experience is personalized, immeasurable and unsharable, different cultural groups react differently to pain from relative tolerance to over-reaction. Gender and ethnic differences in the perception of pain are well proven and the effects of various religious beliefs adequately scored. Despite extensive research over centuries, understanding of pain mechanisms is still far from optimal. Untiring efforts to identify a paincentre in the brain have been futile. Had it been possible, millions of pain sufferers would have been relieved of their physical agony and mental anguish by the prick of needle. PMID:26203543

  8. Cancer pain and current theory for pain control.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    This article discusses current trends in managing cancer pain, with specific regard to opioid transmission, descending pathway inhabitation, and ways to facilitate the endogenous antinociceptive chemicals in the human body. Various techniques for opioid and nonopioid control of potential pain situations of patients with cancer are discussed. The benefits of using pharmacogenetics to assess the appropriate medications are addressed. Finally, specific treatment of abdominal cancer pain using radiofrequency lesioning is discussed. PMID:24787342

  9. Chronic pain management: nonpharmacological therapies for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-Lang; Fillingim, Roger; Hurley, Robert W; Schmidt, Siegfried

    2015-05-01

    Nonpharmacologic therapies have become a vital part of managing chronic pain (CP). Although these can be used as stand-alone therapies, nonpharmacologic treatments often are used to augment and complement pharmacologic treatments (ie, multimodal therapy). Nonpharmacologic approaches can be classified as behavioral, cognitive, integrative, and physical therapies. Core principles in developing a treatment plan are explaining the nature of the CP condition, setting appropriate goals, and developing a comprehensive treatment approach and plan for adherence. Clinicians should become familiar with these interventions so that they can offer patients flexibility in the pain management approach. Effective noninvasive treatment modalities for CP include behavioral therapy for short-term pain relief; cognitive behavioral therapy for reducing long-term pain and disability; hypnosis as adjunctive therapy; guided imagery, diaphragmatic breathing, and muscle relaxation, especially for cancer-related pain; mindfulness-based stress reduction for patients with chronic low back pain; acupuncture for multiple pain conditions; combination manipulation, manual therapy, endurance exercise, stretching, and strengthening for chronic neck pain; animal-assisted therapy; and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for joint pain. Guidelines for use of these treatment modalities are based on expert panel recommendations in combination with data from randomized controlled trials. PMID:25970869

  10. Pain without Nociceptors? Nav1.7-Independent Pain Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Minett, Michael S.; Falk, Sarah; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Bogdanov, Yury D.; Nassar, Mohammed A.; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Wood, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Nav1.7, a peripheral neuron voltage-gated sodium channel, is essential for pain and olfaction in mice and humans. We examined the role of Nav1.7 as well as Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in different mouse models of chronic pain. Constriction-injury-dependent neuropathic pain is abolished when Nav1.7 is deleted in sensory neurons, unlike nerve-transection-related pain, which requires the deletion of Nav1.7 in sensory and sympathetic neurons for pain relief. Sympathetic sprouting that develops in parallel with nerve-transection pain depends on the presence of Nav1.7 in sympathetic neurons. Mechanical and cold allodynia required distinct sets of neurons and different repertoires of sodium channels depending on the nerve injury model. Surprisingly, pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin and cancer-induced bone pain do not require the presence of Nav1.7 sodium channels or Nav1.8-positive nociceptors. Thus, similar pain phenotypes arise through distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms. Therefore, rational analgesic drug therapy requires patient stratification in terms of mechanisms and not just phenotype. PMID:24440715

  11. Imaging the pain of low back pain: functional magnetic resonance imaging in combination with monitoring subjective pain perception

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Imaging the pain of low back pain: functional magnetic resonance imaging in combination with monitoring subjective pain perception allows the study of clinical pain states A. Vania Apkariana,*, Beth R December 2000 Abstract Most brain imaging studies of pain are done using a two-state subtraction design

  12. Gynecological Management of Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    TU, Frank F.; HELLMAN, Kevin; BACKONJA, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Obstetrician/gynecologists often are the initial management clinicians for pelvic neuropathic pain. While treatment may require comprehensive team management and consultation with other specialists, there a few critical and basic steps that can be performed on an office visit that offer the opportunity to significantly improve quality of life in this patient population. A key first step is a thorough clinical examination to physically map the pain site and identify potentially involved nerves. Only limited evidence exists on how best to manage neuropathic pain, but generally a combination of surgical, manipulative or pharmacological methods should be considered. Experimental methods for more precisely characterizing the nature of the nerve dysfunction exist to diagnose and treat neuropathic pain, but additional scientific evidence is needed to unanimously recommend these options. In the meantime, an approach adopted from guidelines of the International Association for Study of Pain tailored for gynecological pain is suggested. PMID:21777899

  13. Pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gachago, Cathia; Draganov, Peter V

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a major clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The cause of pain is usually multifactorial with a complex interplay of factors contributing to a varying degree to the pain in an individual patient and, therefore, a rigid standardized approach for pain control tends to lead to suboptimal results. Pain management usually proceeds in a stepwise approach beginning with general lifestyle recommendations. Low fat diet, alcohol and smoking cessation are encouraged. Analgesics alone are needed in almost all patients. Maneuvers aimed at suppression of pancreatic secretion are routinely tried. Patients with ongoing symptoms may be candidates for more invasive options such as endoscopic therapy, and resective or drainage surgery. The role of pain modifying agents (antidepressants, gabapentin, pregabalin), celiac plexus block, antioxidants, octreotide and total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto transplantation remains to be determined. PMID:18506917

  14. Pain Catastrophizing: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Pain catastrophizing has been described for more than half a century which adversely affects the pain coping behavior and overall prognosis in susceptible individuals when challenged by painful conditions. It is a distinct phenomenon which is characterized by feelings of helplessness, active rumination and excessive magnification of cognitions and feelings toward the painful situation. Susceptible subjects may have certain demographic or psychological predisposition. Various models of pain catastrophizing have been proposed which include attention-bias, schema-activation, communal-coping and appraisal models. Nevertheless, consensus is still lacking as to the true nature and mechanisms for pain catastrophizing. Recent advances in population genomics and noninvasive neuroimaging have helped elucidate the known determinants and neurophysiological correlates behind this potentially disabling behavior. PMID:23441031

  15. Tai chi and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Peng, Philip W H

    2012-01-01

    In the last 2 decades, a growing body of research aimed at investigating the health benefits of Tai Chi in various chronic health conditions has been recognized in the literature. This article reviewed the history, the philosophy, and the evidence for the role of Tai Chi in a few selected chronic pain conditions. The ancient health art of Tai Chi contributes to chronic pain management in 3 major areas: adaptive exercise, mind-body interaction, and meditation. Trials examining the health benefit of Tai Chi in chronic pain conditions are mostly low quality. Only 5 pain conditions were reviewed: osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, low back pain, and headache. Of these, Tai Chi seems to be an effective intervention in osteoarthritis, low back pain, and fibromyalgia. The limitations of the Tai Chi study design and suggestions for the direction of future research are also discussed. PMID:22609642

  16. Effect of pain chronification and chronic pain on an endogenous pain modulation circuit in rats.

    PubMed

    Miranda, J; Lamana, S M S; Dias, E V; Athie, M; Parada, C A; Tambeli, C H

    2015-02-12

    We tested the hypothesis that chronic pain development (pain chronification) and ongoing chronic pain (chronic pain) reduce the activity and induce plastic changes in an endogenous analgesia circuit, the ascending nociceptive control. An important mechanism mediating this form of endogenous analgesia, referred to as capsaicin-induced analgesia, is its dependence on nucleus accumbens ?-opioid receptor mechanisms. Therefore, we also investigated whether pain chronification and chronic pain alter the requirement for nucleus accumbens ?-opioid receptor mechanisms in capsaicin-induced analgesia. We used an animal model of pain chronification in which daily subcutaneous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) injections into the rat's hind paw for 14 days, referred to as the induction period of persistent hyperalgesia, induce a long-lasting state of nociceptor sensitization referred to as the maintenance period of persistent hyperalgesia, that lasts for at least 30 days following the cessation of the PGE2 treatment. The nociceptor hypersensitivity was measured by the shortening of the time interval for the animal to respond to a mechanical stimulation of the hind paw. We found a significant reduction in the duration of capsaicin-induced analgesia during the induction and maintenance period of persistent mechanical hyperalgesia. Intra-accumbens injection of the ?-opioid receptor selective antagonist Cys(2),Tyr(3),Orn(5),Pen(7)amide (CTOP) 10 min before the subcutaneous injection of capsaicin into the rat's fore paw blocked capsaicin-induced analgesia. Taken together, these findings indicate that pain chronification and chronic pain reduce the duration of capsaicin-induced analgesia, without affecting its dependence on nucleus accumbens ?-opioid receptor mechanisms. The attenuation of endogenous analgesia during pain chronification and chronic pain suggests that endogenous pain circuits play an important role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain. PMID:25451282

  17. Tradeoffs between impact loading rate, vertical impulse and effective mass for walkers and heel strike runners wearing footwear of varying stiffness.

    PubMed

    Addison, Brian J; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2015-05-01

    Humans experience repetitive impact forces beneath the heel during walking and heel strike running that cause impact peaks characterized by high rates and magnitudes of loading. Impact peaks are caused by the exchange of momentum between the ground and a portion of the body that comes to a full stop (the effective mass) during the period of the impact peak. A number of factors can influence this exchange of momentum, including footwear stiffness. This study presents and tests an impulse-momentum model of impact mechanics which predicts that effective mass and vertical impulse is greater in walkers and heel strike runners wearing less stiff footwear. The model also predicts a tradeoff between impact loading rate and effective mass, and between impact loading rate and vertical impulse among individuals wearing footwear of varying stiffness. We tested this model using 19 human subjects walking and running in minimal footwear and in two experimental footpads. Subjects walked and ran on an instrumented treadmill and 3D kinematic data were collected. As predicted, both vertical impulse (walking: F(2,54)=52.0, p=2.6E-13; running: F(2,54)=25.2, p=1.8E-8) and effective mass (walking: F(2,54)=12.1, p=4.6E-5; running: F(2,54)=15.5, p=4.7E-6) increase in less stiff footwear. In addition, there is a significant inverse relationship between impact loading rate and vertical impulse (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.78, p<0.0001) and between impact loading rate and effective mass (walking: r=-0.88, p<0.0001; running: r=-0.82, p<0.0001). The tradeoff relationships documented here raise questions about how and in what ways the stiffness of footwear heels influence injury risk during human walking and running. PMID:25814181

  18. [Treatment of acute postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Langlade, A; Kriegel, I

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a subjective experience involving sensations and perceptions, which may be the result of tissue damage after surgery. Various analgesic drugs and techniques can be used to relief postoperative pain. They must be adapted to the surgery and to the patient. Moreover, adequate management of postoperative pain need to be organized. This include medical attitudes, clinical orientations, disciplinary involvements, consultative protocols and program education. PMID:10868044

  19. Surgical Treatment of Upper Extremity Pain.

    PubMed

    Dellon, Arnold Lee

    2016-02-01

    If the patient with hand pain remains without significant relief and without recovery of function after appropriate pharmaceutical and physical modality treatments, it is appropriate to consider a surgical approach to the pain. Categories of pain amenable to a surgical approach are pain caused by nerve compression, pain caused by a neuroma, and joint pain of neural origin. Compressed nerve should be decompressed and depending on the intraoperative findings a neurolysis also should be performed. Painful neuroma must be resected to stop the pain generator. For a painful joint, the biomechanics of that joint must first be stable before denervation. PMID:26611391

  20. Nonpharmacologic pain management in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J A; Repp, E C

    1984-12-01

    This article has presented the critical elements of arthritic pain, the role of nonpharmacologic pain management, and a selection of techniques for therapeutic pain management. The author believes that these techniques are particularly suited to nursing intervention. Nursing is concerned with the total person and nonpharmacological techniques involve the total person in developing self-help coping strategies. The nurse interested in pursuing nonpharmacologic pain management techniques will find the outline, with explanation of "Skill Training: Summary of Training for Role Playing" to be particularly helpful. Further reading will enable the nurse to become familiar with and to pursue interventions of particular interest. PMID:6393064

  1. Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition which significantly deteriorates health-related quality of life. The most commonly identified causes of pain in the pelvic region are gynaecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal. However, in up to 33% of patients the source of this symptom is not identified, frustrating both patients and health-care professionals. Pelvic pain may involve both the somatic and visceral systems, making the differential diagnosing challenging. This paper aimed to review the mechanisms involved in pelvic pain perception by analyzing the neural plasticity and molecules which are involved in these complex circuits. PMID:25110704

  2. Complementary therapies for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, Barrie; Trevisan, Carrie; Gubili, Jyothirmai

    2007-08-01

    Pharmacologic treatment of pain does not always meet patients' needs and may produce difficult side effects. Complementary therapies, which are safe, noninvasive, and generally considered to be relatively free of toxicity, may be used adjunctively with standard pain management techniques to improve outcome and reduce the need for prescription medication. Approaches such as acupuncture, massage therapy, mind-body interventions, and music therapy effectively reduce pain, enhance quality of life, and provide patients with the opportunity to participate in their own care. Such therapies have an important role in modern pain management. PMID:17686389

  3. Postdoctoral Fellowship and Research Associate Positions in Neuroimaging in Pain Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab

    E-print Network

    Pillow, Jonathan

    Postdoctoral Fellowship and Research Associate Positions in Neuroimaging in Pain Research Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab Division of Pain Medicine, Department of Anesthesia Stanford University School of Medicine Program Description: Dr. Sean Mackey's Systems Neuroscience and Pain

  4. Exertional Leg Pain.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sathish; Finnoff, Jonathan T

    2016-02-01

    Exertional leg pain is a common condition seen in runners and the general population. Given the broad differential diagnosis of this complaint, this article focuses on the incidence, anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of common causes that include medial tibial stress syndrome, tibial bone stress injury, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, arterial endofibrosis, popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, and entrapment of the common peroneal, superficial peroneal, and saphenous nerves. Successful diagnosis of these conditions hinges on performing a thorough history and physical examination followed by proper diagnostic testing and appropriate management. PMID:26616179

  5. Pain mechanisma in causalgia.

    PubMed Central

    Sunderland, S

    1976-01-01

    A study of the clinical features of causalgia and the central neuronal effects of injuries to peripheral nerves suggests that causalgia is the functional expression of the intensity of the retrograde neuronal reaction in which pools of dorsal horn neurones become converted into foci of abnormal activity. These foci initiate a chain reaction along transmission pathways as far centrally as the cortex, causalgia being the terminal effect of this disorderly activity on the sensorium. This is the basis of the 'turbulance hypothesis' introduced to account for the pain. PMID:932766

  6. Intelligent back pain advisor

    SciTech Connect

    Bills, M.; Suh, Sang C.

    1996-12-31

    There is a great need for expert systems in the medical field for expert system applications in the field of medical diagnosis. There aren`t any expert systems available for diagnosing back pain, and this tool can be useful. In this paper, we present an expert system that was designed primarily for the diagnosis and treatment of herniated disks, which can occur in any part of the spine. This paper discusses the implementation of the system and some future improvements to the interface that would make this expert system more intelligent.

  7. The effect of lateral heel studs on the kinematics of the equine digit while cantering on grass.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alison M; Williams, Sarah B; Singer, Ellen R

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of lateral heel studs on foot-ground interaction in the horse by quantifying foot slip during stance whilst cantering on a grass surface. It was hypothesised that using studs would decrease foot slip distance on the ground conditions tested. Nine horses were ridden with and without a stud placed laterally in the shoe of each of the 4 feet. High speed video-analysis was used to track hoof markers and to provide data quantifying foot slip distance, slip duration and stance duration. Using studs resulted in a significant decrease in foot slip distance in all four limbs (all P values<0.004). The magnitude of the difference in slip distance with and without studs was greatest in the trailing limbs. The results supported the hypothesis that using studs will decrease foot slip distance in horses cantering on a grass surface, and additionally, highlights that stud efficacy may vary between limbs. The decrease in slip distance with studs demonstrated increased traction and a more stable foot-ground interaction, although this may cause a concomitant increase in the required energy dissipation, either within the limb or via surface deformation. The effect of repetitive usage of studs in the aetiology of musculoskeletal conditions should therefore be investigated further. PMID:21752677

  8. [Post-operative pain therapy of a chronic pain patient].

    PubMed

    Pawlik, Michael T; Ittner, Karl Peter

    2006-11-01

    Post-operative pain therapy of chronic pain patients poses a challenge. Here we report the perioperative management of a 39-year-old male under chronic therapy with oxycodon, gabapentin and tolperison. Particular the pharmacointeractions regarding premedication and postoperative dose finding of opioids with intravenous PCIA are discussed. PMID:17151986

  9. Arthritis and pain. Future targets to control osteoarthritis pain

    PubMed Central

    Dray, Andy; Read, Simon J

    2007-01-01

    Clinical presentation of osteoarthritis (OA) is dominated by pain during joint use and at rest. OA pain is caused by aberrant functioning of a pathologically altered nervous system with key mechanistic drivers from peripheral nerves and central pain pathways. This review focuses on symptomatic pain therapy exemplified by molecular targets that alter sensitization and hyperexcitability of the nervous system, for example, opioids and cannabinoids. We highlight opportunities for targeting inflammatory mediators and their key receptors (for example, prostanoids, kinins, cytokines and chemokines), ion channels (for example, NaV1.8, NaV1.7 and CaV2.2) and neurotrophins (for example, nerve growth factor), noting evidence that relates to their participation in OA etiology and treatment. Future neurological treatments of pain appear optimistic but will require the systematic evaluation of emerging opportunities. PMID:17561993

  10. Faces of Pain: Automated Measurement of Spontaneous Facial Expressions of Genuine and Posed Pain

    E-print Network

    Bartlett, Marian Stewart

    Faces of Pain: Automated Measurement of Spontaneous Facial Expressions of Genuine and Posed Pain to spontaneous facial expressions of pain. In this study, 26 participants were videotaped under three experimental conditions: baseline, posed pain, and real pain. In the real pain condition, subjects experienced

  11. Evaluation of skin surface hydration state and barrier function of stratum corneum of dorsa of hands and heels treated with PROTECT X2 skin protective cream.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    Skin roughness is a term commonly used in Japan to describe a poor skin condition related to a rough and dry skin surface that develops as a result of various damaging effects from the environment or skin inflammation. Recovery from skin roughness requires skin care for a long period, thus it is important to prevent development of such skin changes. PROTECT X2 contains agents used for a protective covering of the skin from frequent hand washing or use of alcohol-based disinfectants. These unique components are also thought to be effective to treat skin roughness of the dorsa of the hands and heels. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of PROTECT X2 to increase skin surface hydration state, as well as enhance the barrier function of the stratum corneum of the dorsa of the hands and heels in elderly individuals. A total of 8 elderly subjects and their caretakers without any skin diseases participated in the study. They applied PROTECT X2 by themselves to the dorsum area of 1 hand and heel 3 to 5 times daily for 1 month, while the opposite sides were left untreated. We measured stratum corneum (SC) hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) before beginning treatment, then 1 week and 1 month after the start of treatment to compare between the treated and untreated skin. SC hydration state after applications of PROTECT X2 was 1.5- to 3.0-fold higher than that of the untreated skin in the dorsa of both hands and heels, indicating that the moisturizing ingredients accompanied by water were replenished in those areas where the cream was applied. Also, TEWL in the dorsum of the hands was 17.0-27.9% lower on the treated side, indicating improvement in SC barrier function. On the basis of these findings, we concluded that PROTECT X2 enhances water-holding in the SC and aids the barrier function of the skin in the dorsum of the hands. In addition, we consider that this formulation is useful for not only protecting the hands from the effects of such agents as detergents and alcohol-based disinfectants, but also for protecting heel skin covered by a thick SC from dry and cold conditions such as those encountered in winter. However, since the SC in that area is much thicker than that of the hands, the barrier function was not significantly improved within 1 month of daily treatments. PMID:22890206

  12. Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pain Management Related Documents PDF Dealing with Persistent Pain in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults Tools and Tips Printer-friendly ...

  13. Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... R Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain PM&R Doctors Relieve Arthritis Pain Page Content Over 40 million Americans ... a physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist can help relieve pain and even slow some of the degenerative ...

  14. Pain - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Pain (Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Expressing Your Pain English (Arabic) ?????? ?? ????? - ... Vašem bolu - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (????) About Your Pain ?????? - ???? ( ...

  15. Pain's Impact on Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breau, L. M.; Camfield, C. S.; McGrath, P. J.; Finley, G. A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pain interferes with the functioning of typical children, but no study has examined its effect on children with pre-existing intellectual disabilities (ID). Methods: Caregivers of 63 children observed their children for 2-h periods and recorded in 1-week diaries: pain presence, cause, intensity and duration. Caregivers also recorded…

  16. Low back pain and yoga.

    PubMed

    Singh, Supreet

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT Questions from patients about pain conditions and analgesic pharmacotherapy and responses from authors are presented to help educate patients and make them more effective self-advocates. The topic addressed in this issue is chronic low back pain, one of the most common reasons to visit one's primary care doctor. Complementary approaches, including yoga, will be addressed. PMID:25295640

  17. Acute pain management in children

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Susan T; Hannallah, Raafat S

    2010-01-01

    The greatest advance in pediatric pain medicine is the recognition that untreated pain is a significant cause of morbidity and even mortality after surgical trauma. Accurate assessment of pain in different age groups and the effective treatment of postoperative pain is constantly being refined; with newer drugs being used alone or in combination with other drugs continues to be explored. Several advances in developmental neurobiology and pharmacology, knowledge of new analgesics and newer applications of old analgesics in the last two decades have helped the pediatric anesthesiologist in managing pain in children more efficiently. The latter include administering opioids via the skin and nasal mucosa and their addition into the neuraxial local anesthetics. Systemic opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and regional analgesics alone or combined with additives are currently used to provide effective postoperative analgesia. These modalities are best utilized when combined as a multimodal approach to treat acute pain in the perioperative setting. The development of receptor specific drugs that can produce pain relief without the untoward side effects of respiratory depression will hasten the recovery and discharge of children after surgery. This review focuses on the overview of acute pain management in children, with an emphasis on pharmacological and regional anesthesia in achieving this goal. PMID:21197314

  18. Orofacial pain management: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Uyanik, James M

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most prevalent and debilitating pain conditions arise from the structures innervated by the trigeminal system (head, face, masticatory musculature, temporomandibular joint and associated structures). Orofacial pain (OFP) can arise from different regions and etiologies. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most prevalent orofacial pain conditions for which patients seek treatment. Temporomandibular disorders include a number of clinical problems that involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. Trigeminal neuropathic pain conditions can arise from injury secondary to dental procedures, infection, neoplasias, or disease or dysfunction of the peripheral and/or central nervous system. Neurovascular disorders, such as primary headaches, can present as chronic orofacial pain, such as in the case of facial migraine, where the pain is localized in the second and third division of the trigeminal nerve. Together, these disorders of the trigeminal system impact the quality of life of the sufferer dramatically. A multidisciplinary pain management approach should be considered for the optimal treatment of orofacial pain disorders including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological modalities. PMID:24591846

  19. [Pain management and music therapy].

    PubMed

    Hoareau, Sophie Gwenaelle; De Diego, Emmanuelle; Guétin, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The benefit of music in the treatment of pain is now recognised. The U sequence is a music therapy technique specifically developed for this purpose. It improves the overall management of pain and facilitates patient support. Its standardised use by caregivers has been made possible thanks to the development of a digital application. PMID:26743370

  20. Pain Management and the Amputee

    MedlinePLUS

    Pain Management and the Amputee Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne, 2006 Health Literacy Consulting, www.healthliteracy.com ... Purdue Pharma L.P. A7158 6/03 Pain Management This Fact Sheet provides important—and practical—information ...

  1. Chronic Pain and Exercise Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raithel, Kathryn Simmons

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise are currently prescribed by physicians to treat chronic pain. However, patient fitness level must improve before he/she feels better. Pain management programs help patients become more active so they can function at work and home. (SM)

  2. Back Pain and Emotional Distress

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sleep problems, anxiety and depres- sion. Such comprehensive pain management pro- grams, when integrated with your medical care, ... provider can refer you to a psy- chological management program if it is ... a program does not mean the pain is “all in your head” - it is meant ...

  3. Management of Chronic Facial Pain

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher G.; Dellon, A. Lee; Rosson, Gedge D.

    2009-01-01

    Pain persisting for at least 6 months is defined as chronic. Chronic facial pain conditions often take on lives of their own deleteriously changing the lives of the sufferer. Although much is known about facial pain, it is clear that those physicians who treat these conditions should continue elucidating the mechanisms and defining successful treatment strategies for these life-changing conditions. This article will review many of the classic causes of chronic facial pain due to the trigeminal nerve and its branches that are amenable to surgical therapies. Testing of facial sensibility is described and its utility introduced. We will also introduce some of the current hypotheses of atypical facial pain and headaches secondary to chronic nerve compressions and will suggest possible treatment strategies. PMID:22110799

  4. How women view postepisiotomy pain.

    PubMed Central

    Reading, A E; Sledmere, C M; Cox, D N; Campbell, S

    1982-01-01

    Episiotomy is one of the most commonly performed operative procedures and yet little information is available on the subjective reactions in the puerperium to this procedure. The present study was designed to furnish information on the attitudes of patients, levels of pain, and of course recovery by studying a consecutive series of 101 Caucasian primiparea who received episiotomies at delivery. Women were interviewed within 24 hours of delivery and then, at three months after delivery, completed a questionnaire. The high level of pain experienced was noteworthy. Labour pain and episiotomy pain were uncorrelated, indicating the importance of distinguishing between them. Several women were experiencing problems at the three-month follow-up, with some attributing these to the episiotomy repair. The data are presented in the framework of providing women in the postpartum period with systematic information on the nature of postepisiotomy pain and subsequent recovery to facilitate their adjustment. PMID:6799123

  5. [Perioperative pain therapy in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Fikentscher, T; Grifka, J; Benditz, A

    2015-09-01

    A sufficient pain management forms the foundation for a successful operative treatment of orthopedic patients. Clinical guideline standards must be provided to ensure safe and immediate pain therapy. Training in these guidelines should be held for clinical personnel on a regular basis. The visual analog scale (VAS) and the numerical rating scale (NRS) are valid instruments used for assessment of pain intensity. A sufficient pain management includes basic analgesics, analgesics on demand as well as special features, such as regional nerve blocks and patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). The basic analgesics are primarily the groups of classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitors as well as stand by analgesics, such as metamizole. If there is further need for pain therapy, medium strong and strong opioids can be used but adverse events must be taken into consideration. PMID:26318345

  6. Management of Postoperative Abdominal Wall Pain.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Howard T

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative incisional pain is expected after surgery. However, when a patient is complaining of pain months after surgery, this can be a source of frustration and confusion to the patient and the surgeon. Whether the pain is a result of myofascial pain, incisional hernia, or nerve injury, understanding potential sources of abdominal wall pain can simplify this diagnostic dilemma. This chapter will focus on the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of postsurgical abdominal wall pain. PMID:26512441

  7. Myofascial pain syndrome: a treatment review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Saini, Vikramjeet; Saini, Shawnjeet

    2013-06-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The appropriate evaluation and management of myofascial pain is an important part of musculoskeletal rehabilitation, and regional axial and limb pain syndromes. This article reviews the current hypotheses regarding the treatment modalities for myofascial trigger points and muscle pain. Through a critical evidence-based review of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatments, the authors aim to provide clinicians with a more comprehensive knowledge of the interventions for myofascial pain. PMID:25135034

  8. Translational investigation and treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain develops from a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. Translational investigations of neuropathic pain by using different animal models reveal that peripheral sensitization, spinal and cortical plasticity may play critical roles in neuropathic pain. Furthermore, descending facilitatory or excitatory modulation may also act to enhance chronic pain. Current clinical therapy for neuropathic pain includes the use of pharmacological and nonpharmacological (psychological, physical, and surgical treatment) methods. However, there is substantial need to better medicine for treating neuropathic pain. Future translational researchers and clinicians will greatly facilitate the development of novel drugs for treating chronic pain including neuropathic pain. PMID:22400804

  9. Predictors of Genital Pain in Young Women

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Melissa A.; Meston, Cindy M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of genital pain in healthy young adult women, limited research has addressed genital pain during intercourse using contemporary models of multidimensional sexual function. The objectives of this study were threefold: (1) to identify differences in sexual functioning in women who experience genital pain compared to pain free women; (2) to identify predictors of sexual functioning in women with and without genital pain; and (3) to identify predictors of sexual satisfaction in women with and without genital pain. Sexually active female undergraduates (n = 651) were administered the Female Sexual Function Index and the Derogatis Sexual Functioning Inventory. We evaluated the sexual factors that impact the sexual function of women with any pain (including high and low pain groups) versus women with no history of pain. Women with genital pain reported greater rates of sexual dysfunction as compared to pain-free women; however, sexual functioning in the high versus low pain groups was distinguished primarily by vaginal lubrication. Women in the high pain group showed negative correlations between domains of sexual satisfaction and genital pain frequency and intensity that were not found in the low pain group. For pain-free women, intercourse played a strong role in sexual satisfaction, whereas non-intercourse sexual behavior was central to sexual satisfaction in women who reported pain. The evaluation of levels of genital pain may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the impairment of sexual function, sexual behavior, and sexual satisfaction. PMID:17674182

  10. Gut pain & visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a highly complex entity whose experience is variable in health and disease. It can occur in patients with organic disease and also in those without any readily identifiable structural or biochemical abnormality such as in the functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID). Despite considerable progress in our understanding of the culpable underlying mechanisms significant knowledge gaps remain, representing a significant unmet need in gastroenterology. A key, but not universal, pathological feature is that patients with FGID often display heightened sensitivity to experimental gut stimulation, termed visceral hypersensitivity. A plethora of factors have been proposed to account for this epiphenomenon including peripheral sensitization, central sensitization, aberrant central processing, genetic, psychological and abnormalities within the stress responsive systems. Further research is needed, bringing together complementary research themes from a diverse array of academic disciplines ranging from gastroenterology to nociceptive physiology to functional neuro-imaging, to address this unmet need. PMID:26516496

  11. Catastrophizing as a mediator of sex differences in pain: differential effects for daily pain versus laboratory-induced pain.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert R; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Sullivan, Michael J; Fillingim, Roger B

    2004-10-01

    Sex differences in the experience of pain have been widely reported, with females generally reporting more frequent clinical pain and demonstrating greater pain sensitivity. However, the mechanisms underpinning such differences, while subject to intense speculation, are not well-characterized. Catastrophizing is a cognitive and affective process that relates strongly to enhanced reports of pain and that varies as a function of sex. It is thus a prime candidate to explain sex differences; indeed, several prior studies offer evidence that controlling for catastrophizing eliminates the gap between men and women in reported pain. We recruited 198 healthy young adults (115 female) who took part in laboratory studies of pain responses, including thermal pain, cold pain, and ischemic pain, and who also completed questionnaires assessing catastrophizing, mood, and day-to-day painful symptoms (e.g. headache, backache). Women reported greater levels of catastrophizing, more recent painful symptoms, and demonstrated lower pain thresholds and tolerances for noxious heat and cold relative to men. Mediational analyses suggested that after controlling for negative mood, catastrophizing mediated the sex difference in recent daily pain but did not mediate the much larger sex differences in pain threshold and tolerance. These findings highlight the role of catastrophizing in shaping pain responses, as well as illuminating potentially important differences between experimental pain assessment and the clinical experience of pain. PMID:15363877

  12. Effects of long-term wearing of high-heeled shoes on the control of the body's center of mass motion in relation to the center of pressure during walking.

    PubMed

    Chien, Hui-Lien; Lu, Tung-Wu; Liu, Ming-Wei

    2014-04-01

    High-heeled shoes are associated with instability and falling, leading to injuries such as fracture and ankle sprain. This study investigated the effects of habitual wearing of high-heeled shoes on the body's center of mass (COM) motion relative to the center of pressure (COP) during gait. Fifteen female experienced wearers and 15 matched controls walked with high-heeled shoes (7.3cm) while kinematic and ground reaction force data were measured and used to calculate temporal-distance parameters, joint moments, COM-COP inclination angles (IA) and the rate of IA changes (RCIA). Compared with inexperienced wearers, experienced subjects showed significantly reduced frontal IA with increased ankle pronator moments during single-limb support (p<0.05). During double-limb support (DLS), they showed significantly increased magnitudes of the frontal RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike, and reduced DLS time (p<0.05) but unaltered mean RCIA over DLS. In the sagittal plane experienced wearers showed significantly increased mean RCIA (p<0.05) and significant differences in the RCIA at toe-off and contralateral heel-strike (p<0.05). Significantly increased hip flexor moments and knee extensor moments at toe-off (p<0.05) were needed for forward motion of the trailing limb. The current results identified the change in the balance control in females after long-term use of high-heeled shoes, providing a basis for future design of strategies to minimize the risk of falling during high-heeled gait. PMID:24508016

  13. Utilization of the MPI Process for in-tank solidification of heel material in large-diameter cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kauschinger, J.L.; Lewis, B.E.

    2000-01-01

    A major problem faced by the US Department of Energy is remediation of sludge and supernatant waste in underground storage tanks. Exhumation of the waste is currently the preferred remediation method. However, exhumation cannot completely remove all of the contaminated materials from the tanks. For large-diameter tanks, amounts of highly contaminated ``heel'' material approaching 20,000 gal can remain. Often sludge containing zeolite particles leaves ``sand bars'' of locally contaminated material across the floor of the tank. The best management practices for in-tank treatment (stabilization and immobilization) of wastes require an integrated approach to develop appropriate treatment agents that can be safely delivered and mixed uniformly with sludge. Ground Environmental Services has developed and demonstrated a remotely controlled, high-velocity jet delivery system termed, Multi-Point-Injection (MPI). This robust jet delivery system has been field-deployed to create homogeneous monoliths containing shallow buried miscellaneous waste in trenches [fiscal year (FY) 1995] and surrogate sludge in cylindrical (FY 1998) and long, horizontal tanks (FY 1999). During the FY 1998 demonstration, the MPI process successfully formed a 32-ton uniform monolith of grout and waste surrogates in about 8 min. Analytical data indicated that 10 tons of zeolite-type physical surrogate were uniformly mixed within a 40-in.-thick monolith without lifting the MPI jetting tools off the tank floor. Over 1,000 lb of cohesive surrogates, with consistencies similar to Gunite and Associated Tank (GAAT) TH-4 and Hanford tank sludges, were easily intermixed into the monolith without exceeding a core temperature of 100 F during curing.

  14. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hogan, P.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.

    2011-06-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  15. Native American lithic procurement along the international border in the boot heel region of southwestern New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeigler, K. E.; Hughes, C.; Kurota, A.; Hogan, P.

    2010-12-01

    Multidisciplinary field projects can be very useful to a more fundamental understanding of the world around us, though these projects are not as common as they should be. In particular, the combination of archeology and geology combines our understanding of human behavior and human use of the landscape with an intimate knowledge of geologic processes and the materials available for human use in order to gain a broader understanding of human-Earth interaction. Here we present data from a cross-disciplinary project that uses a common dataset, archeological artifacts, to explore the anthropological and geologic implications of useage patterns. Archeological excavations and surveys conducted by the Office of Contract Archeology in 2007 along the route of the proposed international border fence reveal patterns of use of geologic materials by Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric Native Americans in the Boot Heel of southwestern New Mexico. Thousands of artifacts were recorded in multiple sites from Guadalupe Pass in the southern Peloncillo Mountains to the Carrizalillo Hills west of Columbus. We identified the lithologies of artifacts, ranging from projectile points to groundstones, and then constructed material movement maps based on either known procurement sites ("quarries") or outcrops identified as the closest source to a given site for each lithology. Not unexpectedly, the majority of the rock types utilized by native peoples are local siliceous volcanic materials. However, several artifacts constructed from obsidian were transported into the region from northern Mexico and eastern Arizona, indicating long-distance travel and/or trade routes. We also examine useage pattern difference between Archaic, Formative and Protohistoric sites. Additionally, a dramatic change in distribution of sources for geologic materials occurs between one pre-Spanish site and one post-Spanish site that are adjacent to one another.

  16. Evidence Based Practice of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Joshi, Saurabh; Mishra, Seema; Bhatnagar, Sushma

    2012-01-01

    The patients with chronic pain are increasingly reporting to the physicians for its management. Chronic pain are associated with head, neck and shoulder pain, spinal pain, pain in the joints and extremities, complex regional pain syndrome and phantom pain. The chronic pain is being managed worldwide. The different specialty of medicine is producing a lot of evidence through the published literature but the same is not being published in the field of chronic pain management. Though some evidence is being reported as to different aspects of pain management from different parts of the world but same is lacking from Indian subcontinent. This is in contrast to much done clinical work in this field as well. We present here the available evidence in relation to chronic pain management. PMID:23439674

  17. [Urethral and scrotal pain syndromes].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Cerdá, J L

    2007-04-01

    Painful diseases of the pelvis are not rare. Urethral and scrotal pains are part of the chronic pelvic pain syndromes along with chronic prostatitis and painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. The objective of this review is to update the current knowledge about epidimiology, etiology, diagnosis and best treatment for patients with urethral and scrotal pain syndromes. Epidemiological data for both syndromes are scant. We lack of uniform definition or readily available diagnostic marker and aetiology remains unclear. The pain could be a neuropathic without a specific stimulus or disproportionate to the stimulus intensity. Regarding diagnosis, there is no evidence to qualify or quantify the symptoms to include or exclude patients. Nevertheless, it is very important to know functional neuroanatomy in the evaluation of these patients. Treatment always should be primary conservatively. Surgery should be avoided if possible. As no specific treatment is available, decrease the pain is the main objective, therefore urologist should know how to manage analgesics, antidepressant and anticonvulsants. PMID:17633918

  18. Prevention of occupational Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Sultan T

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews scientific research on occupational back pain and focuses on prevention of this problem. It discusses some of the challenges of translating the evidence of this multi-factorial condition into policy. Medical science is currently unable to clearly distinguish between back pain caused by work and that possibly due to other causes but which affects the individual's capacity to work. Back pain affects the vast majority of people at some point in their lives and is very costly to both the health care system and the industry. Evidence suggests that heavy lifting, driving, and vibration of the whole body are linked to occupational back pain. Once the risk factors for occupational back pain are identified, an otherwise chronic and disabling condition can be prevented in the majority of patients. As explained in this article, three levels of prevention for occupational back pain have been reported as effective. Failure to implement preventive measures may lead to a high incidence of occupational back pain. PMID:25983601

  19. Theoretical Considerations for Chronic Pain Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lotze, Martin; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2015-09-01

    Conventional rehabilitation of patients with chronic pain is often not successful and is frustrating for the treatment team. However, theoretical developments and substantial advances in our understanding of the neurological aspects of chronic pain are changing these experiences. Modern theoretical models of pain consider pain to be a perceptual inference that reflects a "best guess" that protective action is required. This article argues that keen observation and open and respectful clinician-patient and scientist-clinician relationships have been critical for the emergence of effective rehabilitation approaches and will be critical for further improvements. The role in modern pain rehabilitation of reconceptualizing the pain itself-by "Explaining Pain," careful and intentional observation of the person in pain, and the strategic and constant communication of safety-is emphasized. It also is suggested that better understanding of the neural mechanisms underpinning chronic pain has directly informed the development of new therapeutic approaches, which are being further refined and tested. Conventional pain treatment (where the clinician strives to find the pain-relieving medication or exercise) or pain management (where the clinician helps the patient to manage life despite unabating pain) is being replaced by pain rehabilitation, where a truly biopsychosocial approach allows clinicians to provide patients with the knowledge, understanding, and skills to reduce both their pain and disability. A brief overview is provided of the key aspects of modern pain rehabilitation and the considerations that should lead our interaction with patients with chronic pain. PMID:25882484

  20. [Perception and attitude toward pain].

    PubMed

    Péoc'h, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    Traditionally, the pain sends back to the infringement of the flesh and the suffering on the infringement of the psyche. The relation of care and the accompanying are due to nature a social fact of relation. In the right line of a first study (Péoc'h et al., 2007) concerning professional representations of health care professionals with respect to the care of the pain, we studied in the context of the theoretical model of the "social thought" (Rouquette, 1973), attitudes, perceptions and the ideological positions of patients about their pain's living. 244 patients hospitalized within the Hospitals of Toulouse have completed a questionnaire included free associations tasks, attitude answers, and answers concerning the ideological dimension of pain (beliefs, religious or anthropological orientation), in fine, a fourth party entered into a phenomenological perspective. The object "pain" will be suspected under the angle of the consciousness and the lived of the patient by using the protocol of the "narrative story of life" (Le Grand, 1989), with a praxeological design. Results indicate that the conceptions of the pain proposed by the patient make references to two different areas: that of the body (evil, handicap) and that of the psyche (evil-being, suffering). The term suffering reveal the social face of the pain in a double constituent: existential (solitude, incomprehension) and ideological (" it is necessary to take its evil in patience ", P = 73,3 %; chi2 = 39,83, p. < .05). The representation universe of the pain comes along with a certain indecision between these two events of the disease : pain versus suffering. PMID:23091918

  1. Heightened cold pain and pressure pain sensitivity in young female adults with moderate-to-severe menstrual pain.

    PubMed

    Slater, Helen; Paananen, Markus; Smith, Anne J; O?Sullivan, Peter; Briggs, Andrew M; Hickey, Martha; Mountain, Jenny; Karppinen, Jaro; Beales, Darren

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the association between menstrual pain severity and psychophysical measures of cold and pressure pain sensitivity. A cross-sectional design was used with young women (n = 432) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Menstrual pain severity and oral contraception use was obtained from questionnaires at 20 and 22-year follow-ups. A visual analog scale (VAS; range from 0 [none] to 10 [unbearable]) was used to measure menstrual pain severity at both 20 and 22 years over the 3-year period, with 3 groups created: (1) no pain or mild pain (VAS 0-3), (2) at least moderate pain at a minimum of 1 of the 2 time points (hereafter named "mixed)", and (3) severe pain (VAS 8-10). Cold pain sensitivity (dorsal wrist) and pressure pain sensitivity (lumbar spine, upper trapezius, dorsal wrist, and tibialis anterior) were assessed using standardised quantitative sensory testing protocols. Confounding variables included number of musculoskeletal pain sites, oral contraceptive use, smoking, physical activity, body mass index, psychological distress, and sleep. Severe menstrual pain and mixed menstrual pain were positively associated with heightened cold pain sensitivity (distant from menstrual pain referral site) and pressure pain sensitivity (local to menstrual pain referral site). These associations remained significant after adjusting for potential confounding variables including multisite musculoskeletal pain. Our findings suggest peripheral and central neurophysiological mechanisms contributing to heightened pain sensitivity in young women with moderate and severe menstrual pain. These data highlight the need for innovative management approaches to attenuate the negative impact of severe menstrual pain in young women. PMID:26262827

  2. Effects of mood on pain responses and pain tolerance: an experimental study in chronic back pain patients.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nicole K Y; Salkovskis, Paul M; Hodges, Amy; Wright, Kelly J; Hanna, Magdi; Hester, Joan

    2008-08-31

    Although chronic pain and depression commonly co-occur, causal relationships have yet to be established. A reciprocal relationship, with depression increasing pain and vice versa, is most frequently suggested, but experimental evidence is needed to validate such a view. The most straightforward approach would be a demonstration that increasing or decreasing depressed mood predictably modifies pain responses. The current experiment tested whether experimentally induced depressed and happy mood have differential effects on pain ratings and tolerance in 55 patients suffering from chronic back pain. Participants were randomly assigned to depressed, neutral (control) or elated mood induction conditions. They completed a physically passive baseline task prior to receiving mood induction, then a clinically relevant physically active task (holding a heavy bag) to elicit pain responses and tolerance. Measures were taken immediately after the baseline task and immediately after the mood induction to assess the changes in mood, pain ratings and tolerance before and after the experimental manipulation. Results indicate that the induction of depressed mood resulted in significantly higher pain ratings at rest and lower pain tolerance, whilst induced happy mood resulted in significantly lower pain ratings at rest and greater pain tolerance. Correlations between changes in mood on the one hand and changes in pain response and pain tolerance on the other hand were consistent with these findings. It is concluded that, in chronic back pain patients, experimentally induced negative mood increases self-reported pain and decreases tolerance for a pain-relevant task, with positive mood having the opposite effect. PMID:18325674

  3. Multimodal Treatment of Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Dale, Rebecca; Stacey, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with chronic pain receive multimodal treatment. There is scant literature to guide us, but when approaching combination pharmacotherapy, the practitioner and patient must weigh the benefits with the side effects; many medications have modest effect yet carry significant side effects that can be additive. Chronic pain often leads to depression, anxiety, and deconditioning, which are targets for treatment. Structured interdisciplinary programs are beneficial but costly. Interventions have their place in the treatment of chronic pain and should be a part of a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Further research is needed to validate many common combination treatments. PMID:26614719

  4. Glia and pain: Is chronic pain a gliopathy?

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ru-Rong; Berta, Temugin; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-01-01

    Activation of glial cells and neuro-glial interactions are emerging as key mechanisms underlying chronic pain. Accumulating evidence has implicated 3 types of glial cells in the development and maintenance of chronic pain: microglia and astrocytes of the central nervous system (CNS), and satellite glial cells of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. Painful syndromes are associated with different glial activation states: (1) glial reaction (ie, upregulation of glial markers such as IBA1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and/or morphological changes, including hypertrophy, proliferation, and modifications of glial networks); (2) phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways; (3) upregulation of adenosine triphosphate and chemokine receptors and hemichannels and downregulation of glutamate transporters; and (4) synthesis and release of glial mediators (eg, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases) to the extracellular space. Although widely detected in chronic pain resulting from nerve trauma, inflammation, cancer, and chemotherapy in rodents, and more recently, human immunodeficiency virus-associated neuropathy in human beings, glial reaction (activation state 1) is not thought to mediate pain sensitivity directly. Instead, activation states 2 to 4 have been demonstrated to enhance pain sensitivity via a number of synergistic neuro-glial interactions. Glial mediators have been shown to powerfully modulate excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission at presynaptic, postsynaptic, and extrasynaptic sites. Glial activation also occurs in acute pain conditions, and acute opioid treatment activates peripheral glia to mask opioid analgesia. Thus, chronic pain could be a result of “gliopathy,” that is, dysregulation of glial functions in the central and peripheral nervous system. In this review, we provide an update on recent advances and discuss remaining questions. PMID:23792284

  5. Future Directions for Pain Management: Lessons from the Institute of Medicine Pain Report and the National Pain Strategy.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Sean

    2016-02-01

    According to the Institute of Medicine Relieving Pain in America Report and the soon to be released National Pain Strategy, pain affects over 100 million Americans and costs our country in over $500 billion per year. We have a greater appreciation for the complex nature of pain and that it can develop into a disease in itself. As such, we need more efforts on prevention of chronic pain and for interdisciplinary approaches. For precision pain medicine to be successful, we need to link learning health systems with pain biomarkers (eg, genomics, proteomics, patient reported outcomes, brain markers) and its treatment. PMID:26611393

  6. Neuropathic pain referrals to a multidisciplinary pediatric cancer pain service.

    PubMed

    Anghelescu, Doralina L; Faughnan, Lane G; Popenhagen, Mark P; Oakes, Linda L; Pei, Deqing; Burgoyne, Laura L

    2014-03-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP) in children with cancer is not well characterized. In a retrospective review of patient data from a 3.5-year period, we describe the prevalence of NP and the characteristics, duration of follow-up, and interventions provided for NP among patients referred to a pediatric oncology center's pain management service. Fifteen percent (66/439) of all referrals to our pain service were for NP (56/323 patients [17%]; 34 male, 22 female). The NP patient group had 1,401 clinical visits (778 inpatient visits [55.5%] and 623 outpatient visits [44.5%]). Patients with NP had a significantly greater mean number of pain visits per consultation (p = .008) and significantly more days of pain service follow-up (p < .001) than did other patients. The most common cause of NP was cancer treatment rather than the underlying malignancy. Pharmacologic management of NP was complex, often comprising three medications. Nonpharmacologic approaches were used for 57.6% of NP referrals. Neuropathic pain is less frequently encountered than non-NP in children with cancer; nevertheless, it is more difficult to treat, requiring longer follow-up, more clinical visits, complex pharmacologic management, and the frequent addition of nonpharmacologic interventions. PMID:24602431

  7. The pain interactome: Connecting pain-specific protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jamieson, Daniel G.; Moss, Andrew; Kennedy, Michael; Jones, Sherrie; Nenadic, Goran; Robertson, David L.; Sidders, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms associated with disease is a central goal of modern medical research. As such, many thousands of experiments have been published that detail individual molecular events that contribute to a disease. Here we use a semi-automated text mining approach to accurately and exhaustively curate the primary literature for chronic pain states. In so doing, we create a comprehensive network of 1,002 contextualized protein–protein interactions (PPIs) specifically associated with pain. The PPIs form a highly interconnected and coherent structure, and the resulting network provides an alternative to those derived from connecting genes associated with pain using interactions that have not been shown to occur in a painful state. We exploit the contextual data associated with our interactions to analyse subnetworks specific to inflammatory and neuropathic pain, and to various anatomical regions. Here, we identify potential targets for further study and several drug-repurposing opportunities. Finally, the network provides a framework for the interpretation of new data within the field of pain. PMID:24978826

  8. Do photographic images of pain improve communication during pain consultations?

    PubMed Central

    Padfield, Deborah; Zakrzewska, Joanna M; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Visual images may facilitate the communication of pain during consultations. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether photographic images of pain enrich the content and/or process of pain consultation by comparing patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of the consultation experience. METHODS: Photographic images of pain previously co-created by patients with a photographer were provided to new patients attending pain clinic consultations. Seventeen patients selected and used images that best expressed their pain and were compared with 21 patients who were not shown images. Ten clinicians conducted assessments in each condition. After consultation, patients and clinicians completed ratings of aspects of communication and, when images were used, how they influenced the consultation. RESULTS: The majority of both patients and clinicians reported that images enhanced the consultation. Ratings of communication were generally high, with no differences between those with and without images (with the exception of confidence in treatment plan, which was rated more highly in the image group). However, patients’ and clinicians’ ratings of communication were inversely related only in consultations with images. Methodological shortcomings may underlie the present findings of no difference. It is also possible that using images raised patients’ and clinicians’ expectations and encouraged emotional disclosure, in response to which clinicians were dissatisfied with their performance. CONCLUSIONS: Using images in clinical encounters did not have a negative impact on the consultation, nor did it improve communication or satisfaction. These findings will inform future analysis of behaviour in the video-recorded consultations. PMID:25996763

  9. Pain rating schema: three distinct subgroups of individuals emerge when rating mild, moderate, and severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Frey-Law, Laura A; Lee, Jennifer E; Wittry, Alex M; Melyon, Myles

    2014-01-01

    Background While the validity of pain assessment has been well documented, the underlying schema (ie, organized, preconceived ideas) of how individuals interpret numerical pain ratings is not well understood. This study’s objectives were to examine numerical pain intensity ratings, from (0 to 10 cm on the visual analog scale [VAS]) across multiple severities of commonly experienced acute pain conditions to determine whether the ratings differed between these pain conditions and/or between individuals. Methods A community sample (N=365, 66% female) rated their anticipated pain intensity (VAS) for threshold, mild, moderate, severe, and tolerance level, using several common pain conditions: headache, toothache, joint injury, delayed-onset muscle soreness, burns, and “general pain.” Results Cluster analysis revealed three subgroups of individuals, suggesting three types of underlying pain rating schema: 1) Low Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories); 2) Low/High Rating subgroup (low VAS pain intensity rating for mild, but high VAS pain intensity rating for severe pain); and 3) High Rating subgroup (high VAS pain intensity ratings across all the pain severity categories). Overall, differences between pain conditions were small: muscle soreness pain intensity was consistently rated lower than the other pain types across severities. The highest pain ratings varied between joint injury and general pain, depending on severity level. No effects of sex or current experience of pain were noted. Conclusion The results indicate that: 1) three distinct pain schemas were present in this community-based sample, indicating significant variation in how pain scales are utilized and/or interpreted between clusters of individuals; 2) pain ratings vary by condition, but these differences are minor; and 3) pain rating schemas are not significantly different between males and females or between individuals with and without current pain. PMID:24379696

  10. Nurses' attitudes toward pain, pain assessment, and pain management practices in long-term care facilities.

    PubMed

    Mrozek, J E; Werner, J S

    2001-12-01

    This descriptive study was designed to identify attitudes regarding pain as well as pain assessment and management practices of nurses working with elderly residents in 10 long-term care facilities. Twenty-seven nurses from 10 facilities in the Midwest responded to a questionnaire. Findings indicate that more than half of the respondents reported that residents should be pain free; however, only 5 respondents defined pain free as no pain. Others defined it as being comfortable or able to perform activities of daily living. Nurses reported assessing the following aspects of pain more than three fourths of the time: onset, frequency, location, severity/intensity, facial expression, contortions, and medication effectiveness. Changes in weight, recreational activity, and concentration, as well as coping skills were assessed less than half of the time. When first learning residents were in pain, nurses reported doing further assessments, offering medication, giving emotional reassurance, and changing the resident's position. They reported substantial familiarity with basic nonpharmacologic practices but only asked residents to try these interventions (in addition to medication) an average of 38% of the time. PMID:11748550

  11. The non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 attenuates responses of C-fiber nociceptors in a murine model of cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Uhelski, Megan L.; Cain, David M.; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Simone, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Pain from cancer can be severe, difficult to treat, and greatly diminishes patients’ quality of life. It is therefore important to gain new information on the mechanisms of cancer pain and develop new treatment strategies. We have used a murine model of bone cancer pain to investigate underlying peripheral neural mechanisms and novel treatment approaches. In this model, implantation of fibrosarcoma cells into and around the calcaneous bone produces mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. C-fiber nociceptors in tumor-bearing mice develop spontaneous ongoing activity and sensitization to thermal stimuli. However, it is unclear whether sensitization of nociceptors to mechanical stimuli underlies the mechanical hyperalgesia seen in tumor-bearing mice. We therefore examined responses of C-fiber nociceptors to suprathreshold mechanical stimuli in tumor-bearing mice and found they did not differ from those of C-nociceptors in control mice. Thus, sensitization of C-fiber nociceptors to mechanical stimulation does not appear to underlie tumor-evoked mechanical hyperalgesia in this murine model of bone cancer pain. We also examined the effect of the non-selective cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55, 212-2, on spontaneous activity and responses evoked by mechanical stimuli of C-fiber nociceptors innervating the tumor-bearing paw. Selective CB1 and CB2 antagonists were administered to determine the contribution of each receptor subtype to the effects of WIN 55,212-2. Intraplantar administration of WIN 55,212-2 attenuated spontaneous discharge and responses evoked by mechanical stimulation of C-fiber nociceptors. These effects were inhibited by prior intraplantar administration of selective CB1 (AM281) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists but not by vehicle. These results indicate that activation of either CB1 or CB2 receptors reduced the spontaneous activity of C-fiber nociceptors associated with tumor growth as well as their evoked responses. Our results provide further evidence that activation of peripheral cannabinoid receptors may be a useful target for the treatment of cancer pain. PMID:23673278

  12. What Pain Asymbolia Really Shows Colin Klein

    E-print Network

    Klein, Colin

    What Pain Asymbolia Really Shows Colin Klein Macquarie University cvklein@gmail.com Abstract Pain asymbolics feel pain, but act as if they are indifferent to it. Nikola Grahek argues that such patients present a clear counterexample to motivationalism about pain. I argue that Grahek has mischaracterised

  13. Pain: CE Breakout Session May 2, 2015

    E-print Network

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    5/20/2015 1 Pain: CE Breakout Session May 2, 2015 Ken Hargreaves, DDS, PhD UT Health Science Center San Antonio The Challenge of Pain · Prevalence in U.S. ­ Chronic Pain ~100 million ­ Diabetes: 26 of Medicine 2010 #12;5/20/2015 2 Pain 156:569, 2015 · Analysis of 38 studies on >1,000,000 · 2119% rate

  14. What Are the Symptoms of Pelvic Pain?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... such as going to work, exercising, or having sex. Women describe pelvic pain in many ways. Pelvic pain ... some feel pain when lifting something heavy. Some women have pain in the vulva (the ... during sex or when inserting a tampon. 1 , 2 International ...

  15. Vertebral pain in helicopter pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auffret, R.; Delahaye, R. P.; Metges, P. J.; VICENS

    1980-01-01

    Pathological forms of spinal pain engendered by piloting helicopters were clinically studied. Lumbalgia and pathology of the dorsal and cervical spine are discussed along with their clinical and radiological signs and origins.

  16. Painful knee arthroplasty: current practice.

    PubMed

    Cottino, Umberto; Rosso, Federica; Pastrone, Antonio; Dettoni, Federico; Rossi, Roberto; Bruzzone, Matteo

    2015-12-01

    Primary total knee arthroplasty is the treatment for end-stage arthritis of the knee; in the last years, it is becoming more common and reliable, due to technical and implant improvement. With larger implant rates, the overall complications will increase and pain is the most common sign of implant failure. Pain can be related to a lot of different clinical findings, and the surgeon has to be aware of the various etiologies that can lead to failure. Pain does not always mean revision, and the patient has to be fully evaluated to have a correct diagnosis; if surgery is performed for the wrong reason, this will surely lead to a failure. In this paper, the authors revised the more common causes of failure that can have a painful onset proposing an approach for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26400422

  17. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  18. Medial collateral ligament pain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... until the pain and swelling subside. A hinged knee immobilizer should be used to protect the ligament as it heals. The extent of this type of injury is usually excessive stretching of the ligament causing ...

  19. Lateral collateral ligament pain (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... until the pain and swelling subside. A hinged knee immobilizer should be used to protect the ligament as it heals. The extent of this type of injury is usually excessive stretching of the ligament causing ...

  20. Dealing with Pain during Childbirth

    MedlinePLUS

    ... you. If you and your partner attend childbirth classes, you'll learn different techniques for handling pain, ... be empowered to approach it with confidence. Lamaze classes educate women about the ways they can decrease ...

  1. Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kids Deal With Bullies Pregnant? What to Expect Breastfeeding FAQs: Pain and Discomfort KidsHealth > Parents > Pregnancy & Newborn ... have. Is it normal to have cramps while nursing? Yes. During the first few days to weeks ...

  2. Abdominal Pain, Long-Term

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or do you alternate between loose and hard bowel movements? Yes Your pain may be from IRRITABLE BOWEL ... 6. Do you have soft or diarrhea-like bowel movements many times throughout the day and mucus or ...

  3. Epigenetic Mechanisms of Chronic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Descalzi, Giannina; Ikegami, Daigo; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Nestler, Eric; Zachariou, Venetia; Narita, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic and inflammatory pain promote a large number of persisting adaptations at the cellular and molecular level, allowing tissue or nerve damage, even if only transient, to elicit changes in cells that contribute to the development of chronic pain and associated symptoms. There is evidence that injury-induced changes in chromatin structure drive stable changes in gene expression and neural function, which may cause several symptoms, including allodynia, hyperalgesia, anxiety, and depression. Recent findings on epigenetic changes in the spinal cord and brain during chronic pain may guide fundamental advances in new treatments. In this review, we provide a brief overview of epigenetic regulation in the nervous system and then discuss the still-limited literature that directly implicates epigenetic modifications in chronic pain syndromes. PMID:25765319

  4. Visceral Pain and Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Rudolph, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A complex set of interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain modulate responses to visceral pain. These interactions occur at the level of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and via local neural, endocrine or immune activity; as well as by the production of factors transported through the circulatory system, like bacterial metabolites or hormones. Various psychological, infectious and other stressors can disrupt this harmonious relationship and alter both the microbiome and visceral pain responses. There are critical sensitive periods that can impact visceral pain responses in adulthood. In this review we provide a brief background of the intestinal microbiome and emerging concepts of the bidirectional interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain. We also discuss recent work in animal models, and human clinical trials using prebiotics and probiotics that alter the microbiome with resultant alterations in visceral pain responses. PMID:25829337

  5. How Is Pelvic Pain Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hormonal treatment. Hormones can help pain related to endometriosis and menstruation . 4 These include hormones that are ... surgery to remove adhesions, 6 fibroids , and/or endometriosis. In some cases, the surgery might also reduce ...

  6. [Pathophysiology of ischemic cardiac pain.].

    PubMed

    Münzel, T; Bassenge, E

    1988-09-01

    Cardiac pain is a conscious experience that can be explored only indirectly with experimental approaches. The exact machanisms eliciting cardiac pain still remain obscure. The afferent fibres running in the cardiac sympathetic nerves are regarded as the essential pathway for the transmission of cardiac pain. Atria and ventricle are abundantly supplied with sympathetic sensory innervation. In the spinal cord, impulses transmitted by the sympathetic pathway converge with impulses from somatic thoracic structures onto the same ascending spinothalamic neuron which probably explains the mechanism of referred pain (=projection of pain to another organ). Two hypotheses have been put forward to explain the peripheral mechanism for nociception. The intensity mechanism assumes that pain results from an excessive stimulation of receptive structures normally stimulated at lower levels whereas a specific sensation is considered to result from an excitation of a well defined nociceptive apparatus. Ventricular sympathetic afferent fibres whether myelinated or unmyelinated, always possess some mechanosensitivity and respond to normal chemical and mechanical stimuli, thus displaying properties of polymodal receptors. Afferent vagal fibres may contribute to the mechanisms of cardiac nociception by modulating the threshold and characteristics of pain. Experimental studies identified three main mechanisms, which may be responsible for eliciting cardiac pain during ischemic periods in humans: a) nonphysiological motion of the ischemic left ventricular wall (bulging) and an excitation of mechanical receptors by passive stretching. b) The excitation of free sensory nerve endings by chemicals such as bradykinin, PGE(2), adenosin, histamin or potassium. c) A combination of a and b: algogenic chemicals may sensitize mechanical receptors and therefore lower their threshold for nociception. PMID:18415323

  7. Nucleus accumbens responses to painful aversive and rewarding stimuli change in chronic pain

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    Nucleus accumbens responses to painful aversive and rewarding stimuli change in chronic pain M. N of Neurol. and Physiol., UCSF, San Francisco, CA Brain activity maps for perception of thermal pain 1 back pain (CBP) patients to acute thermal painful stimuli within the context of reward

  8. INTRODUCTION Dynamics of Pain perception: Distinctive Features of Ongoing Chronic Pain Ratings Revealed By Nonlinear Analysis

    E-print Network

    Apkarian, A. Vania

    INTRODUCTION Dynamics of Pain perception: Distinctive Features of Ongoing Chronic Pain Ratings.7 Approximately 10% of adults suffer from severe chronic pain. By definition, chronic pain is a state of ongoing pain for long periods after the healing of the initial inciting event. A fundamental property

  9. Pain in children with rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukiko; Walco, Gary A

    2006-12-01

    Pain is common in rheumatic diseases in children. Despite recent advances in arthritis treatment, pain continues to be a problem impacting daily functioning and quality of life, and no standard of care for pain management exists. The pathogenesis of pain in children with rheumatic diseases is multifactorial, and treatment of the disease alone may not be enough. Current pain treatment often includes acetaminophen, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and medications that treat arthritis such as methotrexate and etanercept. Nonpharmacologic interventions, such as exercise and cognitive-behavioral therapy as well as the use of analgesics such as opioids in patients whose pain is refractory to standard therapies, should also be considered. The use of systemic corticosteroids to treat pain in children with arthritis should be avoided. Idiopathic pain may coexist in children with rheumatic disease, but treatment of idiopathic pain is different than that of pain due to inflammatory disorders. PMID:17092447

  10. Smartphone applications for pain management.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Eccleston, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Smartphone applications (or apps) are becoming increasingly popular. The lack of regulation or guidance for health-related apps means that the validity and reliability of their content is unknown. We have conducted a review of available apps relating to the generic condition of pain. The official application stores for five major smartphone platforms were searched: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Nokia/Symbian and Windows Mobile. Apps were included if they reported a focus on pain education, management or relief, and were not solely aimed at health-care professionals (HCPs). A total of 111 apps met the inclusion criteria. The majority of apps reviewed claimed some information provision or electronic manual component. Diary tracking of pain variables was also a common feature. There was a low level of stated HCP involvement in app development and content. Despite an increasing number of apps being released, the frequency of HCP involvement is not increasing. Pain apps appear to be able to promise pain relief without any concern for the effectiveness of the product, or for possible adverse effects of product use. In a population often desperate for a solution to distressing and debilitating pain conditions, there is considerable risk of individuals being misled. PMID:21844177

  11. Mirror Therapy for Phantom Limb Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Young

    2012-01-01

    Phantom limb pain is a painful sensation that is perceived in a body part that no longer exists. To control this pain, many methods have been used such as medication, physical treatment, nerve block, neuromodulation, surgical treatment and mirror therapy. However, until now, there effects have been uncertain. We report the successful reduction of phantom limb pain using mirror therapy when other treatments initially failed to control the pain. PMID:23091690

  12. Factors Associated with Greater Pain Intensity.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Mariano E; Ring, David

    2016-02-01

    The intensity of pain reported for a given nociception is highly variable. Variation in pain intensity is best accounted for by stress, distress, and ineffective coping strategies. Among orthopedic surgery patients, greater intake of opioids is associated with greater pain intensity and decreased satisfaction with pain control, no matter the pathophysiology or nociception. The single most effective pain reliever is self-efficacy (the sense that one can manage and that everything will be okay). PMID:26611386

  13. Pain management in patients with hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Barbara; Janse, Ineke C; Sibbald, Gary R

    2015-11-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and painful inflammatory disease. HS patients' quality of life is severely impaired, and this impairment correlates strongly with their pain. Pain in HS can be acute or chronic and has both inflammatory and noninflammatory origins. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of the existing literature regarding pain management in patients with HS. While there are no formal studies investigating pain management in HS, existing recommendations are based on general pain guidelines and expert opinion. Documentation of pain requires an assessment of the severity and timing of the pain. Although anti-inflammatory drugs and surgery for HS can alleviate pain, adjunctive pain medications are typically necessary. Topical analgesics, oral acetaminophen, and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are considered first-line agents for the treatment of pain in patients with HS. If pain management is ineffective with those agents, oral opiates can be considered. In addition, anticonvulsants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors possess neuropathic pain-relieving properties that offer not only control of HS-associated pain but beneficial effects on itch and depression. There is clearly a need for additional studies on pain management in patients with HS. PMID:26470616

  14. Doubling Your Payoff: Winning Pain Relief Engages Endogenous Pain Inhibition1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Wiebke; Kwan, Saskia; Ahmed, Alysha-Karima; Schweinhardt, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract When in pain, pain relief is much sought after, particularly for individuals with chronic pain. In analogy to augmentation of the hedonic experience (“liking”) of a reward by the motivation to obtain a reward (“wanting”), the seeking of pain relief in a motivated state might increase the experience of pain relief when obtained. We tested this hypothesis in a psychophysical experiment in healthy human subjects, by assessing potential pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief “won” in a wheel of fortune game compared with pain relief without winning, exploiting the fact that the mere chance of winning induces a motivated state. The results show pain-inhibitory effects of pain relief obtained by winning in behaviorally assessed pain perception and ratings of pain intensity. Further, the higher participants scored on the personality trait novelty seeking, the more pain inhibition was induced. These results provide evidence that pain relief, when obtained in a motivated state, engages endogenous pain-inhibitory systems beyond the pain reduction that underlies the relief in the first place. Consequently, such pain relief might be used to improve behavioral pain therapy, inducing a positive, perhaps self-amplifying feedback loop of reduced pain and improved functionality. PMID:26464995

  15. Pain Sensitivity and Modulation in Primary Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Haack, Monika; Scott-Sutherland, Jennifer; Santangelo, Gabrielle; Simpson, Norah; Sethna, Navil; Mullington, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    Sleep of good quantity and quality is considered a biologically important resource necessary to maintain homeostasis of pain-regulatory processes. To assess the role of chronic sleep disturbances in pain processing, we conducted laboratory pain testing in subjects with primary insomnia. Seventeen participants with primary insomnia (mean±SEM 22.6±0.9 years, 11 women) were individually matched with 17 healthy participants. All participants completed daily sleep and pain diaries over a 2-week period. Laboratory pain testing was conducted in a controlled environment and included (1) warmth detection threshold testing, (2) pain sensitivity testing (threshold detection for heat and pressure pain), and (3) tests to access pain-modulatory mechanisms (temporal summation and pain inhibition). Primary insomnia subjects reported experiencing spontaneous pain on twice as many days as healthy controls during the at-home recording phase (p<0.05). During laboratory testing, primary insomnia subjects had lower pain thresholds than healthy controls (p<0.05 for heat pain detection threshold, p<0.08 for pressure pain detection threshold). Unexpectedly, pain facilitation, as assessed with temporal summation of pain responses, was reduced in primary insomnia compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Pain inhibition, as assessed with the diffuse noxious inhibitory control paradigm (DNIC), was attenuated in insomnia subjects when compared to controls (p<0.05). Based on these findings, we hypothesize that pain-inhibitory circuits in patients with insomnia are in a state of constant activation to compensate for ongoing subclinical pain. This constant activation ultimately results in a ceiling effect of pain-inhibitory efforts, as indicated by the inability of the system to adequately function during challenge. PMID:22396081

  16. [Pharmacological treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Yeng, Lin Tchia

    2009-10-01

    Neuropathic pain (NP), in view of its non-nociceptive component, is not caused by physiological lesions but by problems in the nervous system itself, whether in the central nervous system (CNS) or peripheral nervous system (PNS). This particular action mechanism makes NP a very difficult-to-treat condition, resistant to most of the commonly used analgesic drugs. A recent study stated that NP has an incidence of 1.24% over the general population, and this percentage increases if we consider acute radiculopathies and some recurrent neuropathies, frequently considered not only neuropathic pain but also nociceptive. Thus, the improvement of NP treatment has become a public health necessity. While WHO recommendations include a three-lined scale in pain treatment -including NSAIDs as the first-line drugs, soft opioids (tramadol or codein) as the second-line, and strong opioids (morphine, oxycodone, and phentanyl) as the third-line- some studies have found this rationale not useful in NP treatment. Based on several studies as STEP, Spanish Pain Society recommendations included antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs as the first line treatment. Pregabalin, a new neuromodulators class drug, provides a pharmacokinetic profile than its predecessors (phenytoin, carbamazepine, gabapentin, topiramate, oxcarbazepine, and lamotrigine), and showed effectiveness controlling peripheral neuropathic pain. Thus, pregabalin opened the door to a new approach to NP. Other pain societies, such as the Canada Pain Society, have also included pregabalin in the first line treatment of NP. In fact, gabapentin and pregabalin are the current standard care in most of NP-associated diseases. PMID:20087480

  17. Leg soft tissue position and velocity data from skin markers can be obtained with good to acceptable reliability following heel impacts.

    PubMed

    Brydges, Evan A; Burkhart, Timothy A; Altenhof, William J; Andrews, David M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying soft tissue motion following impact is important in human motion analysis as soft tissues attenuate potentially injurious forces resulting from activities such as running and jumping. This study determined the reliability of leg soft tissue position and velocity following heel impacts. A grid of black dots was applied to the skin of the right leg and foot (n = 20). Dots were automatically detected (ProAnalyst(®)) from high-speed records of pendulum and drop impacts. Three trained measurers selected columns of dots on each participant for analysis; one measurer 6 months later. Between- and within-measurer differences in kinematic variables were all relatively small (<0.8 cm for position; <3.7 cm/s for velocity) between-measurers and (<0.5 cm for position; <2.6 cm/s for velocity) within-measurer. Good (coefficients of variation (CV) ? 10%) to acceptable (CV > 10% and ?20%) reliability was shown for 95% of the position measures, with mean CVs of 10% and 11% within-measurers and between-measures, respectively. Velocity measures were less reliable; 40% of the measures showed good to marginal (CV > 20% and ?30%) reliability. This study established that leg soft tissue position data from skin markers could be obtained with good to acceptable reliability following heel impacts. Velocity data were less reliable but still acceptable in many cases. PMID:25626597

  18. Feynman's Achilles' Heel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Lyndsay G. M.

    2011-12-01

    Feynman1 argued that a ratchet of the type used in heavy machinery could be used, in a scaled-down version, to show that the second law of thermodynamics is not just a statistical law, but has absolute status. Hidden is the assumption that this model represented the completely general example of this device—and that it remained so, across the complete range of magnitudes from macro- to micro-domains. It will be argued here, that Feynman's example is only one construct of a ratchet and cannot represent the general case. A mechanism, with sufficient difference and confined to the micro-domain, is the subject of the present discussion. Its unique feature is the compressible nature of the pawl as it librates in pawl-space. The motions of the gear and the pawl are governed by the energy exchanges between them and with the ambient gas. The average linear pressure on the pawl which varies with the magnitude of pawl-space is associated with the compressibility of the pawl. Feynman's objective was to show that the prototypal ratchet is incapable of converting heat into work in a manner contrary to the second law. The dubious nature of his examination is not due to an incorrect analysis of his thought experiment, but lies within the assumption that his example represented the general case. In contrast, the ratchet analyzed here does not conform to the principle of detailed balance and thereby the absolute status of the law remains an open question.

  19. Calcaneus (Heel Bone) Fractures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the calcaneus grow together and form one bone. Fusion also means that no more motion can occur ... some or all of the deformity along with fusion of the bones. These surgeries usually require several ...

  20. Borderline Personality and the Pain Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2007-01-01

    Clinical observations and empirical studies indicate that patients with borderline personality are both sensitive and insensitive to pain. This dichotomy may be explained by the context of the pain. For acute self-induced pain, borderline patients seem to experience attenuated pain responses. For chronic endogenous pain, borderline patients appear pain intolerant. In this paper, we explain this unusual paradox. We then discuss the psychiatric assessment of chronic pain, emphasizing the importance of initially determining the patient's status with regard to borderline personality disorder. For those chronic pain patients who have comorbid borderline personality disorder, we recommend a specific pain-management strategy that addresses the self-regulation difficulties of these patients and minimizes the risks of treatment. PMID:20711327

  1. Pain, decisions, and actions: a motivational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Wiech, Katja; Tracey, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Because pain signals potential harm to the organism, it immediately attracts attention and motivates decisions and action. However, pain is also subject to motivations—an aspect that has led to considerable changes in our understanding of (chronic) pain over the recent years. The relationship between pain and motivational states is therefore clearly bidirectional. This review provides an overview on behavioral and neuroimaging studies investigating motivational aspects of pain. We highlight recent insights into the modulation of pain through fear and social factors, summarize findings on the role of pain in fear conditioning, avoidance learning and goal conflicts and discuss evidence on pain-related cognitive interference and motivational aspects of pain relief. PMID:23565073

  2. Nursing's role in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Vallerand, April Hazard; Musto, Susan; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2011-08-01

    Nurses have advanced practice, research, and education in the field of cancer pain management. This paper highlights the contributions nurses have made to pain science and practice through literature published in the past 3 years. Work accomplished by nurses is examined in the areas of pain assessment, pain management, intervention-based research, evidence-based practice, patient education, and palliative care. Nurses serve as advocates for empowering patients to engage in self-management of their pain, and offer education and support to patients and families at their most vulnerable times. Nurse researchers have been at the forefront of work to develop and test new instruments and approaches to measure pain, elucidate pain experiences through quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and gauge the quality of pain care for patients and its impact on their caregivers. This research has uncovered many patient, health care professional, and systemic barriers to effective pain control, and has offered feasible solutions to overcoming these barriers. PMID:21538044

  3. Advances in cancer pain from bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Cui; Zhang, Jia-Li; Ge, Chen-Tao; Yu, Yuan-Yang; Wang, Pan; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2015-01-01

    With the technological advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, the survival rates for patients with cancer are prolonged. The issue of figuring out how to improve the life quality of patients with cancer has become increasingly prominent. Pain, especially bone pain, is the most common symptom in malignancy patients, which seriously affects the life quality of patients with cancer. The research of cancer pain has a breakthrough due to the development of the animal models of cancer pain in recent years, such as the animal models of mouse femur, humerus, calcaneus, and rat tibia. The establishment of several kinds of animal models related to cancer pain provides a new platform in vivo to investigate the molecular mechanisms of cancer pain. In this review, we focus on the advances of cancer pain from bone metastasis, the mechanisms involved in cancer pain, and the drug treatment of cancer pain in the animal models. PMID:26316696

  4. Nociception, Pain, Negative Moods, and Behavior Selection.

    PubMed

    Baliki, Marwan N; Apkarian, A Vania

    2015-08-01

    Recent neuroimaging studies suggest that the brain adapts with pain, as well as imparts risk for developing chronic pain. Within this context, we revisit the concepts for nociception, acute and chronic pain, and negative moods relative to behavior selection. We redefine nociception as the mechanism protecting the organism from injury, while acute pain as failure of avoidant behavior, and a mesolimbic threshold process that gates the transformation of nociceptive activity to conscious pain. Adaptations in this threshold process are envisioned to be critical for development of chronic pain. We deconstruct chronic pain into four distinct phases, each with specific mechanisms, and outline current state of knowledge regarding these mechanisms: the limbic brain imparting risk, and the mesolimbic learning processes reorganizing the neocortex into a chronic pain state. Moreover, pain and negative moods are envisioned as a continuum of aversive behavioral learning, which enhance survival by protecting against threats. PMID:26247858

  5. The pain of pain: challenges of animal behavior models.

    PubMed

    Barrett, James E

    2015-04-15

    Berend Olivier has had a long-standing interest in the utility of animal models for a wide variety of therapeutic indications. His work has spanned multiple types of models, blending ethological, or species typical and naturalistic behaviors, along with methodologies based on learned behavior. He has consistently done so, from an analytical as well as predictive perspective, and has made multiple contributions while working in both the pharmaceutical industry and within an academic institution. Although focused primarily on psychiatric disorders, Berend has conducted research in the area of pain in humans and in animals, demonstrating an expansive appreciation for the breadth, scope and significance of the science and applications of the discipline of pharmacology to these diverse areas. This review focuses on the use of animal models in pain research from the perspective of the long-standing deficiencies in the development of therapeutics in this area and from a preclinical perspective where the translational weaknesses have been quite problematic. The challenges confronting animal models of pain, however, are not unique to this area of research, as they cut across several therapeutic areas. Despite the deficiencies, failures and concerns, existing animal models of pain continue to be of widespread use and are essential to progress in pain research as well as in other areas. Although not focusing on specific animal models of pain, this paper seeks to examine general issues facing the use of these models. It does so by exploring alternative approaches which capture recent developments, which build upon principles and concepts we have learned from Berend's contributions, and which provide the prospect of helping to address the absence of novel therapeutics in this area. PMID:25583180

  6. Psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees.

    PubMed

    Saastamoinen, Peppiina; Laaksonen, Mikko; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Lahelma, Eero

    2009-01-01

    The study of psychosocial risk factors of pain among employees has typically focused on Karasek's job-demand-control model. The aim of the study was to examine the own and independent associations of job strain, organizational justice, workplace bullying, and work-home interface with pain. Data were collected through a postal survey to all 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki in 2001 and 2002 (response rate 66%, N=5819, 80% women). Pain was measured with a three category outcome: no pain, acute pain or chronic pain. Adjustment was made for age, education, physical working conditions, BMI, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Among women, all psychosocial variables were associated with both acute and chronic pain when adjusted for confounders only. When psychosocial factors were additionally adjusted for each other, high job strain and both dimensions of work-home interface remained associated with both types of pain and repeatedly occurring bullying at workplace showed association with acute pain. Among men, when adjusted for confounders only, all psychosocial variables were associated with acute and chronic pain, except for family-to-work conflicts among those with acute pain. When adjusted mutually for all psychosocial variables, only bullying was associated with acute pain. Job strain and organizational justice showed associations with chronic pain. Future studies would benefit from a broad psychosocial framework. Investments to healthier psychosocial working environments are needed to tackle pain related problems among employees. PMID:18440254

  7. Low Back Pain and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahimi-Kaçuri, Dafina; Murtezani, Ardiana; Rrecaj, Shkurta; Martinaj, Merita; Haxhiu, Bekim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Low back pain poses a significant problem in clinics and public health. It presents one of the main problems with adults, since 70-80% of adults experience it at least once in their lifetime. Causes of the low back pain are numerous and often unknown. Objectives: The aim of the study is to find the most prevalent age group, pain localisation, and the frequency of physical therapy sessions in obese and non-obese subjects with LBP. Materials and Methods: The study has been conducted by the Physical Rehabilitation Service of the Occupational Medicine Institute, during one year period. The total number of patients studied was 101 and all were Kosovo Energy Corporation (KEC) employees. The study was retrospective. Results: Looking at the body weight index, out of 101 patients, 69.3% are classified as non-obese and 30.7% as obese. Using T-Test we have found a difference of high statistical significance between the average number of the physical therapy sessions applied in relation to the examined groups (T-Test=2.78, P=0.0065, so, P<0.01). Conclusion: Obesity and age have no direct influence in back pain, but they could prolong healing. Professional occupation and binding position are factors that affect back pain. Physical workload can cause the manifestation of sciatica; whereas psycho-social factors can prolong the overall healing process. PMID:26005262

  8. Treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Petropoulos, Ioannis N.; Alam, Uazman; Malik, Rayaz A.

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) is a debilitating consequence of diabetes that may be present in as many as one in five patients with diabetes. The objective assessment of PDN is difficult, making it challenging to diagnose and assess in both clinical practice and clinical trials. No single treatment exists to prevent or reverse neuropathic changes or to provide total pain relief. Treatment of PDN is based on three major approaches: intensive glycaemic control and risk factor management, treatments based on pathogenetic mechanisms, and symptomatic pain management. Clinical guidelines recommend pain relief in PDN through the use of antidepressants such as amitriptyline and duloxetine, the ?-aminobutyric acid analogues gabapentin and pregabalin, opioids and topical agents such as capsaicin. Of these medications, duloxetine and pregabalin were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2004 and tapentadol extended release was approved in 2012 for the treatment of PDN. Proposed pathogenetic treatments include ?-lipoic acid (stems reactive oxygen species formation), benfotiamine (prevents vascular damage in diabetes) and aldose-reductase inhibitors (reduces flux through the polyol pathway). There is a growing need for studies to evaluate the most potent drugs or combinations for the management of PDN to maximize pain relief and improve quality of life. A number of agents are potential candidates for future use in PDN therapy, including Nav 1.7 antagonists, N-type calcium channel blockers, NGF antibodies and angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonists. PMID:25553239

  9. Pain behaviour and pain intensity in older persons with severe dementia: reliability of the MOBID Pain Scale by video uptake.

    PubMed

    Husebo, Bettina S; Strand, Liv I; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf; Husebo, Stein B; Ljunggren, Anne E

    2009-03-01

    Advancing age is associated with high prevalence of dementia, often combined with under-diagnosed and under-treated pain. A nurse-administered assessment tool has been developed to unmask pain during standardised, guided movements, called Mobilisation-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia (MOBID) Pain Scale. The aim was to examine intra- and inter-rater reliability of pain behaviour indicators, inferred pain intensity, and the overall MOBID Pain Score. Twenty-six nursing home patients with severe dementia and chronic pain, 11 primary caregivers and three external raters at the Red Cross Nursing Home, Bergen were included. During video uptake the patients were guided by their primary caregivers to standardised movements of different body parts. Pain behaviour indicators (pain noises, facial expression and defence) were registered for each movement with subsequent rating of pain intensity by external raters, who assessed and scored the videos concurrently and independently at day 1, 4 and 8. Facial expression was most commonly observed, followed by pain noises and defence. Repeated assessments increased the number of observed pain behaviours, but did not improve reliability. Inter-rater reliability was highest for noises, followed by defence and facial expression (kappa = 0.44-0.92, kappa = 0.10-0.76 and kappa = 0.05-0.76 respectively, at day 8). Mobilisation of arms and legs were rated most painful. Intra- and inter-rater reliability of overall pain were very good [intraclass correlation coefficient (1,1) ranging 0.92-0.97 and 0.94-0.96 respectively, at day 8]. Reliability of pain intensity scores tended to increase by repeated assessment. Using video uptake, MOBID Pain Scale was shown to be sufficiently reliable to assess pain in older persons with severe dementia. PMID:19192240

  10. Chronic pain: from theory to practical management.

    PubMed

    Rowbotham, M C

    1995-12-01

    The neurologist is an important part of the pain management team. Factors that can alter presentation and complicate establishing a diagnosis are reviewed. A multidisciplinary approach to evaluation is advocated, particularly the inclusion of independent psychiatric or psychological evaluation. Treatment planning consists of addressing potential sources of failure of pain management, setting appropriate goals, and using the diagnostic assessment to plan pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions based on pain mechanisms. Even if pharmacologic interventions do not alter pain, an education-oriented behavioral pain program integrated with physical therapy can improve function and foster self-reliance in controlling pain. PMID:8538884

  11. Nature and Nurture of Human Pain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Humans are very different when it comes to pain. Some get painful piercings and tattoos; others can not stand even a flu shot. Interindividual variability is one of the main characteristics of human pain on every level including the processing of nociceptive impulses at the periphery, modification of pain signal in the central nervous system, perception of pain, and response to analgesic strategies. As for many other complex behaviors, the sources of this variability come from both nurture (environment) and nature (genes). Here, I will discuss how these factors contribute to human pain separately and via interplay and how epigenetic mechanisms add to the complexity of their effects. PMID:24278778

  12. Non-Obstetric Pain in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Kate

    2008-01-01

    The hormonal and mechanical changes which result from pregnancy have the capacity to exacerbate existing chronic pain conditions as well as produce pain unique to this physiological and anatomical state. Pain in pregnancy is very common and can impact negatively on maternal satisfaction with the pregnancy. Management of pain requires a multidisciplinary, biopsychosocial approach. The possible presence of co-existing pathology and obstetric conditions must be borne in mind when assessing pain in pregnancy. Treatment of pain in pregnancy should focus on non-pharmacological interventions in the first instance with due consideration of the risk of medications to the mother, fetus and the course of the pregnancy. PMID:26527601

  13. Acute Pain Management/Regional Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tedore, Tiffany; Weinberg, Roniel; Witkin, Lisa; Giambrone, Gregory P; Faggiani, Susan L; Fleischut, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Effective and efficient acute pain management strategies have the potential to improve medical outcomes, enhance patient satisfaction, and reduce costs. Pain management records are having an increasing influence on patient choice of health care providers and will affect future financial reimbursement. Dedicated acute pain and regional anesthesia services are invaluable in improving acute pain management. In addition, nonpharmacologic and alternative therapies, as well as information technology, should be viewed as complimentary to traditional pharmacologic treatments commonly used in the management of acute pain. The use of innovative technologies to improve acute pain management may be worthwhile for health care institutions. PMID:26610627

  14. Autism Spectrum Disorder and Amplified Pain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Among the core features of ASD, altered sensitivities in all modalities have been accorded increasing importance. Heightened sensitivity to pain and unusual expressions of and reaction to pain have not hitherto been widely recognised as a presenting feature of ASD in general paediatrics. Failure to recognise ASD as a common cause of pain can lead to late diagnosis, inappropriate treatment, distress, and further disability. Two cases are presented which illustrate the late presentation of Autism Spectrum Disorder (Asperger's Syndrome subtype) with chronic unusual pain. Conclusion. Pain in autism can be atypical in its experience and expression and for this reason may go unrecognised by physicians treating chronic pain disorders. PMID:26064754

  15. Biofield therapies and cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joel G; Taylor, Ann Gill

    2012-02-01

    The public and healthcare professionals have become increasingly aware and accepting of the benefit in physical, psychological, social, and spiritual support for patients with cancer. Patients with cancer often seek nonpharmacologic interventions to complement conventional care and decrease the pain associated with cancer and its treatment. Most often referred to as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), these supportive therapies consist of a heterogeneous group of modalities used as adjuncts to allopathic health care. Biofield therapies are CAM modalities that involve the direction of healing energy through the hands to facilitate well-being by modifying the energy field of the body. This critical review of studies of biofield therapies emphasizes research using these modalities to decrease pain in patients with cancer. Although the therapies have demonstrated clinical efficacy, additional research is warranted. Oncology nurses should familiarize themselves with biofield therapies so they can offer informed recommendations to patients with cancer experiencing pain. PMID:22297006

  16. Pain management in ambulatory surgery.

    PubMed

    Kamming, Damon; Chung, Frances; Williams, Donna; McGrath, Brid M; Curti, Bruna

    2004-06-01

    Successful ambulatory surgery is dependent on analgesia that is effective, has minimal adverse effects, and can be safely managed by the patient at home after discharge. A number of studies have identified that the provision of effective postoperative analgesia is inadequate for a significant proportion of patients. The following discussion details the current available analgesic options for ambulatory surgery patients and the rationale for their use. Preemptive analgesia should be given to all patients unless there are specific contraindications. Consideration should be given to the use of long-acting oral COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and long-acting oral opioids to treat postoperative pain. A standardized multimodal postdischarge analgesic regimen tailored to the patient's expected postoperative pain levels should be prescribed. Patient follow-up by telephone questionnaire will confirm those surgical procedures that result in mild or moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the effectiveness of treatment plans. PMID:15195276

  17. Alzheimer patients report less pain intensity and pain affect than non-demented elderly.

    PubMed

    Scherder, E; Bouma, A; Borkent, M; Rahman, O

    1999-01-01

    Pain assessment for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is generally aimed at quantifying pain, i.e., the intensity and locations of pain. Based on the extensive neuropathology in limbic brain areas with this disorder, we hypothesized that, compared to control patients, AD patients would report an additional loss of qualitative aspects of pain, i.e., pain affect. This hypothesis was tested by administering specific parts of three pain questionnaires and comparing the use of analgesics in 19 AD patients with that of 18 elderly patients without dementia who were matched for the presence of painful conditions. Results reveal that AD patients, compared to controls, experience less intense pain and less pain affect. In contrast, the number of AD patients using analgesics did not differ from the number of controls. These findings suggest that pain assessment for patients with AD should be focused on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of pain. PMID:10612117

  18. Images of pain: Exploration of the characteristics and functions of pain-related mental imagery in chronic pain 

    E-print Network

    Gosden, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Introduction A recent study by Potter et al. (in submission) reported that many chronic pain sufferers experience a spontaneous mental image of their pain, and that these individuals also report higher levels of anxiety ...

  19. Parent perceptions of adolescent pain expression: The adolescent pain behavior questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Lynch-Jordan, Anne M.; Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Goldschneider, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    Pain behaviors provide meaningful information about adolescents in chronic pain, enhancing their verbal report of pain intensity with information about the global pain experience. Caregivers likely consider these expressions when making judgments about their adolescents’ medical or emotional needs. Current validated measures of pain behavior target acute or procedural pain and young or non-verbal children, while observation systems may be too cumbersome for clinical practice. The objective of this research was to design and evaluate the Adolescent Pain Behavior Questionnaire (APBQ), a parent-report measure of adolescent (11–19 years) pain expressions. This paper provides preliminary results on reliability and validity of the APBQ. Parent-adolescent dyads (N = 138) seen in a multidisciplinary pain management clinic completed the APBQ and questionnaires assessing pain characteristics, quality of life, functional disability, depressive symptoms, and pain catastrophizing. Principal components analysis of the APBQ supported a single component structure. The final APBQ scale contained 23 items with high internal consistency (?= 0.93). No relationship was found between parent-reported pain behaviors and adolescentreported pain intensity. However, significant correlations were found between parent-reported pain behaviors and parent- and adolescent-reported functional disability, pain catastrophizing, depressive symptoms, and poorer quality of life. The assessment of pain behaviors provides qualitatively different information than solely recording pain intensity and disability. It has clinical utility for use in behavioral treatments seeking to reduce disability, poor coping, and distress. PMID:20961688

  20. The Perception and Endogenous Modulation of Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ossipov, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Pain is often perceived an unpleasant experience that includes sensory and emotional/motivational responses. Accordingly, pain serves as a powerful teaching signal enabling an organism to avoid injury, and is critical to survival. However, maladaptive pain, such as neuropathic or idiopathic pain, serves no survival function. Genomic studies of individuals with congenital insensitivity to pain or paroxysmal pain syndromes considerable increased our understanding of the function of peripheral nociceptors, and especially of the roles of voltage-gated sodium channels and of nerve growth factor (NGF)/TrkA receptors in nociceptive transduction and transmission. Brain imaging studies revealed a “pain matrix,” consisting of cortical and subcortical regions that respond to noxious inputs and can positively or negatively modulate pain through activation of descending pain modulatory systems. Projections from the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and the rostroventromedial medulla (RVM) to the trigeminal and spinal dorsal horns can inhibit or promote further nociceptive inputs. The “pain matrix” can explain such varied phenomena as stress-induced analgesia, placebo effect and the role of expectation on pain perception. Disruptions in these systems may account for the existence idiopathic pan states such as fibromyalgia. Increased understanding of pain modulatory systems will lead to development of more effective therapeutics for chronic pain. PMID:24278716