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Sample records for helahf cells independently

  1. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang . E-mail: li@immusol.com

    2006-04-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties.

  2. Cell death independent of caspases: a review.

    PubMed

    Bröker, Linda E; Kruyt, Frank A E; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2005-05-01

    Patterns of cell death have been divided into apoptosis, which is actively executed by specific proteases, the caspases, and accidental necrosis. However, there is now accumulating evidence indicating that cell death can occur in a programmed fashion but in complete absence and independent of caspase activation. Alternative models of programmed cell death (PCD) have therefore been proposed, including autophagy, paraptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and the descriptive model of apoptosis-like and necrosis-like PCD. Caspase-independent cell death pathways are important safeguard mechanisms to protect the organism against unwanted and potential harmful cells when caspase-mediated routes fail but can also be triggered in response to cytotoxic agents or other death stimuli. As in apoptosis, the mitochondrion can play a key role but also other organelles such as lysosomes and the endoplasmic reticulum have an important function in the release and activation of death factors such as cathepsins, calpains, and other proteases. Here we review the various models of PCD and their death pathways at molecular and organelle level and discuss the relevance of the growing knowledge of caspase-independent cell death pathways for cancer. PMID:15867207

  3. GRID INDEPENDENT FUEL CELL OPERATED SMART HOME

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Mohammad S. Alam

    2003-12-07

    A fuel cell power plant, which utilizes a smart energy management and control (SEMaC) system, supplying the power need of laboratory based ''home'' has been purchased and installed. The ''home'' consists of two rooms, each approximately 250 sq. ft. Every appliance and power outlet is under the control of a host computer, running the SEMaC software package. It is possible to override the computer, in the event that an appliance or power outage is required. Detailed analysis and simulation of the fuel cell operated smart home has been performed. Two journal papers has been accepted for publication and another journal paper is under review. Three theses have been completed and three additional theses are in progress.

  4. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Techung

    2012-12-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in two animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a progressive autoimmune disorder caused by damage to the myelin sheath and loss of oligodendrocytes. Although current MS therapies are directed toward attenuation of the immune response, robust repair of myelin sheath likely requires a regenerative approach focusing on long-term replacement of the lost oligodendrocytes. This approach appears feasible because adult organs contain various populations of multipotent resident stem/progenitor cells that may be activated by MSC trophic factors as demonstrated by Bai et al This commentary highlights and discusses the major findings of their studies, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory function and trophic cross-talk mechanisms mediated by HGF and other MSC-derived trophic factors in sustaining the treatment benefits. Identification of multiple functionally synergistic trophic factors, such as HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor, can eventually lead to the development of efficacious cell-free therapeutic regimens targeting a broad spectrum of degenerative conditions. PMID:23516128

  5. Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence

    SciTech Connect

    Storey, Robson, F.; Mauritz, Kenneth, A.; Patton, Derek, L.; Savin, Daniel, A.

    2012-12-18

    The overall objective of this project was the development and evaluation of novel hydrocarbon fuel cell (FC) membranes that possess high temperature performance and long term chemical/mechanical durability in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC). The major research theme was synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon polymers of the poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) type containing sulfonic acid groups tethered to the backbone via perfluorinated alkylene linkages and in some cases also directly attached to the phenylene groups along the backbone. Other research themes were the use of nitrogen-based heterocyclics instead of acid groups for proton conduction, which provides high temperature, low relative humidity membranes with high mechanical/thermal/chemical stability and pendant moieties that exhibit high proton conductivities in the absence of water, and synthesis of block copolymers consisting of a proton conducting block coupled to poly(perfluorinated propylene oxide) (PFPO) blocks. Accomplishments of the project were as follows: 1) establishment of a vertically integrated program of synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of FC membranes, 2) establishment of benchmark membrane performance data based on Nafion for comparison to experimental membrane performance, 3) development of a new perfluoroalkyl sulfonate monomer, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl) pentafluoropropanesulfonate (HPPS), 4) synthesis of random and block copolymer membranes from HPPS, 5) synthesis of block copolymer membranes containing high-acid-concentration hydrophilic blocks consisting of HPPS and 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (sDCDPS), 6) development of synthetic routes to aromatic polymer backbones containing pendent 1H-1,2,3-triazole moieties, 7) development of coupling strategies to create phase-separated block copolymers between hydrophilic sulfonated prepolymers and commodity polymers such as PFPO, 8) establishment of basic performance

  6. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The price of independence: cell separation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Santos, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal of cell division is to give rise to two viable independent daughter cells. A tight spatial and temporal regulation between chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensures the viability of the daughter cells. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, commonly known as fission yeast, has become a leading model organism for studying essential and conserved mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell division process. Like many other eukaryotic cells it divides by binary fission and the cleavage furrow undergoes ingression due to the contraction of an actomyosin ring. In contrast to mammalian cells, yeasts as cell-walled organisms, also need to form a division septum made of cell wall material to complete the process of cytokinesis. The division septum is deposited behind the constricting ring and it will constitute the new ends of the daughter cells. Cell separation also involves cell wall degradation and this process should be precisely regulated to avoid cell lysis. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the whole cytokinesis process in fission yeast, from the positioning and assembly of the contractile ring to the final step of cell separation, and the problems generated when these processes are not precise. PMID:26931605

  8. Na+-independent phosphate transport in Caco2BBE cells

    PubMed Central

    Candeal, Eduardo; Caldas, Yupanqui A.; Guillén, Natalia; Levi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Pi transport in epithelia has both Na+-dependent and Na+-independent components, but so far only Na+-dependent transporters have been characterized in detail and molecularly identified. Consequently, in the present study, we initiated the characterization and analysis of intestinal Na+-independent Pi transport using an in vitro model, Caco2BBE cells. Only Na+-independent Pi uptake was observed in these cells, and Pi uptake was dramatically increased when cells were incubated in high-Pi DMEM (4 mM) from 1 day to several days. No response to low-Pi medium was observed. The increased Pi transport was mainly caused by Vmax changes, and it was prevented by actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Pi transport in cells grown in 1 mM Pi (basal DMEM) decreased at pH > 7.5, and it was inhibited with proton ionophores. Pi transport in cells incubated with 4 mM Pi increased with alkaline pH, suggesting a preference for divalent phosphate. Pi uptake in cells in 1 mM Pi was completely inhibited only by Pi and partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, DIDS, SITS, SO42−, HCO3−, and arsenate. This inhibition pattern suggests that more than one Pi transporter is active in cells maintained with 1 mM Pi. Phosphate transport from cells maintained at 4 mM Pi was only partially inhibited by phosphonoformate, oxalate, and arsenate. Attempts to identify the responsible transporters showed that multifunctional anion exchangers of the Slc26 family as well as members of Slc17, Slc20, and Slc37 and the Pi exporter xenotropic and polytropic retrovirus receptor 1 are not involved. PMID:25298422

  9. Scaffold-independent Patterning of Cells using Magnetic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Suvojit; Biswas, Moanaro; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Puri, Ishwar

    2013-03-01

    Spatial patterning of cells in vitro relies on direct contact of cells on to solid surfaces. Scaffold independent patterning of cells has never been achieved so far. Patterning of cells has wide applications including stem cell biology, tissue architecture and regenerative medicine besides fundamental biology. Magnetized cells in a suspension can be manipulated using an externally applied magnetic field enabling directed patterning. We magnetized mammalian cells by internalization of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). A magnetic field is then used to arrange cells in a desired pattern on a substrate or in suspension. The control strategy is derived from the self-assembly of magnetic colloids in a liquid considering magnetostatic interactions. The range of achievable structural features promise novel experimental methods investigating the influence of tissue shape and size on cell population dynamics wherein Fickian diffusion of autocrine growth signals are known to play a significant role. By eliminating the need for a scaffold, intercellular adhesion mechanics and the effects of temporally regulated signals can be investigated. The findings can be applied to novel tissue engineering methods.

  10. Early Human Prostate Adenocarcinomas Harbor Androgen-Independent Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiñones, Rita R.; Yeargin, Jo; Lee, Melissa; Kaur, Aman Preet; Cheng, Clari; Sun, Paulina; Wu, Christopher; Nguyen, Catherine; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Meyer, April N.; Baird, Stephen M.; Donoghue, Daniel J.; Haas, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Although blockade of androgen receptor (AR) signaling represents the main treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PrCa), many patients progress to a lethal phenotype of “Castration-Resistant” prostate cancer (CR-PrCa). With the hypothesis that early PrCa may harbor a population of androgen-unresponsive cancer cells as precursors to CR-recurrent disease, we undertook the propagation of androgen-independent cells from PrCa-prostatectomy samples of early, localized (Stage-I) cases. A collection of 120 surgical specimens from prostatectomy cases was established, among which 54 were adenocarcinomas. Hormone-free cell culture conditions were developed allowing routine propagation of cells expressing prostate basal cell markers and stem/progenitor cell markers, and which proliferated as spheres/spheroids in suspension cultures. Colonies of androgen-independent epithelial cells grew out from 30/43 (70%) of the adenocarcinoma cases studied in detail. Fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry showed that CR-PrCa cells were positive for CD44, CD133, CK5/14, c-kit, integrin α2β1, SSEA4, E-Cadherin and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH). All 30 CR-PrCa cell cultures were also TERT-positive, but negative for TMPRSS2-ERG. Additionally, a subset of 22 of these CR-PrCa cell cultures was examined by orthotopic xenografting in intact and castrated SCID mice, generating histologically typical locally-invasive human PrCa or undifferentiated cancers, respectively, in 6–8 weeks. Cultured PrCa cells and orthotopically-induced in vivo cancers lacked PSA expression. We report here the propagation of Cancer Initiating Cells (CIC) directly from Stage I human PrCa tissue without selection or genetic manipulation. The propagation of stem/progenitor-like CR-PrCa cells derived from early human prostate carcinomas suggests the existence of a subpopulation of cells resistant to androgen-deprivation therapy and which may drive the subsequent emergence of disseminated CR-PrCa. PMID:24086346

  11. Independent stem cell lineages regulate adipose organogenesis and adipose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuwei; Berry, Daniel C.; Tang, Wei; Graff, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adipose tissues have striking plasticity, highlighted by childhood and adult obesity. Using adipose lineage analyses, smooth muscle actin (SMA)-mural cell fate mapping, and conditional PPARγ deletion to block adipocyte differentiation, we find two phases of adipocyte generation that emanate from two independent adipose progenitor compartments, Developmental and Adult. These two compartments are sequentially required for organ formation and maintenance. Although both Developmental and Adult progenitors are specified during the developmental period and express PPARγ, they have distinct micro-anatomical, functional, morphogenetic and molecular profiles. Further, the two compartments derive from different lineages, while adult adipose progenitors fate map from an SMA+ mural lineage, Developmental progenitors do not. Remarkably, the Adult progenitor compartment appears to be specified earlier than the Developmental cells, and then enters the already developmentally formed adipose depots. Thus, two distinct cell compartments control adipose organ development and organ homeostasis, which may provide discrete therapeutic target for childhood and adult obesity. PMID:25437556

  12. Independent rate and temporal coding in hippocampal pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Huxter, John; Burgess, Neil; O’Keefe, John

    2009-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal cells use temporal 1 as well as rate coding 2 to signal spatial aspects of the animal’s environment or behaviour. The temporal code takes the form of a phase relationship to the concurrent cycle of the hippocampal EEG theta rhythm (Figure 1​; 1). These two codes could each represent a different variable 3,4. However, this requires that rate and phase can vary independently, in contrast to recent suggestions 5,6 that they are tightly coupled: both reflecting the amplitude of the cell’s input. Here we show that the time of firing and firing rate are dissociable and can represent two independent variables, viz, the animal’s location within the place field and its speed of movement through the field, respectively. Independent encoding of location together with actions and stimuli occurring there may help to explain the dual roles of the hippocampus in spatial and episodic memory 7 8 or a more general role in relational/declarative memory9,10. PMID:14574410

  13. B-cell-independent sialylation of IgG.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark B; Oswald, Douglas M; Joshi, Smita; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Orlando, Ron; Cobb, Brian A

    2016-06-28

    IgG carrying terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids added to conserved N-glycans within the Fc domain by the sialyltransferase ST6Gal1 accounts for the anti-inflammatory effects of large-dose i.v. Ig (IVIg) in autoimmunity. Here, B-cell-specific ablation of ST6Gal1 in mice revealed that IgG sialylation can occur in the extracellular environment of the bloodstream independently of the B-cell secretory pathway. We also discovered that secreted ST6Gal1 is produced by cells lining central veins in the liver and that IgG sialylation is powered by serum-localized nucleotide sugar donor CMP-sialic acid that is at least partially derived from degranulating platelets. Thus, antibody-secreting cells do not exclusively control the sialylation-dependent anti-inflammatory function of IgG. Rather, IgG sialylation can be regulated by the liver and platelets through the corresponding release of enzyme and sugar donor into the cardiovascular circulation. PMID:27303031

  14. Diverse Hormone Response Networks in 41 Independent Drosophila Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Stoiber, Marcus; Celniker, Susan; Cherbas, Lucy; Brown, Ben; Cherbas, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones induce cascades of gene activation and repression with transformative effects on cell fate . Steroid transduction plays a major role in the development and physiology of nearly all metazoan species, and in the progression of the most common forms of cancer. Despite the paramount importance of steroids in developmental and translational biology, a complete map of transcriptional response has not been developed for any hormone . In the case of 20-hydroxyecdysone (ecdysone) in Drosophila melanogaster, these trajectories range from apoptosis to immortalization. We mapped the ecdysone transduction network in a cohort of 41 cell lines, the largest such atlas yet assembled. We found that the early transcriptional response mirrors the distinctiveness of physiological origins: genes respond in restricted patterns, conditional on the expression levels of dozens of transcription factors. Only a small cohort of genes is constitutively modulated independent of initial cell state. Ecdysone-responsive genes tend to organize into directional same-stranded units, with consecutive genes induced from the same strand. Here, we identify half of the ecdysone receptor heterodimer as the primary rate-limiting step in the response, and find that initial receptor isoform levels modulate the activated cohort of target transcription factors. This atlas of steroid response reveals organizing principles of gene regulation by a model type II nuclear receptor and lays the foundation for comprehensive and predictive understanding of the ecdysone transduction network in the fruit fly. PMID:26772746

  15. Diverse Hormone Response Networks in 41 Independent Drosophila Cell Lines

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stoiber, Marcus; Celniker, Susan; Cherbas, Lucy; Brown, Ben; Cherbas, Peter

    2016-01-15

    Steroid hormones induce cascades of gene activation and repression with transformative effects on cell fate . Steroid transduction plays a major role in the development and physiology of nearly all metazoan species, and in the progression of the most common forms of cancer. Despite the paramount importance of steroids in developmental and translational biology, a complete map of transcriptional response has not been developed for any hormone . In the case of 20-hydroxyecdysone (ecdysone) in Drosophila melanogaster, these trajectories range from apoptosis to immortalization. We mapped the ecdysone transduction network in a cohort of 41 cell lines, the largest suchmore » atlas yet assembled. We found that the early transcriptional response mirrors the distinctiveness of physiological origins: genes respond in restricted patterns, conditional on the expression levels of dozens of transcription factors. Only a small cohort of genes is constitutively modulated independent of initial cell state. Ecdysone-responsive genes tend to organize into directional same-stranded units, with consecutive genes induced from the same strand. Here, we identify half of the ecdysone receptor heterodimer as the primary rate-limiting step in the response, and find that initial receptor isoform levels modulate the activated cohort of target transcription factors. In conclusion, this atlas of steroid response reveals organizing principles of gene regulation by a model type II nuclear receptor and lays the foundation for comprehensive and predictive understanding of the ecdysone transduction network in the fruit fly.« less

  16. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  17. Chloroquine sensitizes breast cancer cells to chemotherapy independent of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Maycotte, Paola; Aryal, Suraj; Cummings, Christopher T; Thorburn, Jacqueline; Morgan, Michael J; Thorburn, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a 4-aminoquinoline drug used for the treatment of diverse diseases. It inhibits lysosomal acidification and therefore prevents autophagy by blocking autophagosome fusion and degradation. In cancer treatment, CQ is often used in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation because it has been shown to enhance the efficacy of tumor cell killing. Since CQ and its derivatives are the only inhibitors of autophagy that are available for use in the clinic, multiple ongoing clinical trials are currently using CQ or hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for this purpose, either alone, or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here we show that in the mouse breast cancer cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, autophagy is induced by the DNA damaging agent cisplatin or by drugs that selectively target autophagy regulation, the PtdIns3K inhibitor LY294002, and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In combination with these drugs, CQ sensitized to these treatments, though this effect was more evident with LY294002 and rapamycin treatment. Surprisingly, however, in these experiments CQ sensitization occurred independent of autophagy inhibition, since sensitization was not mimicked by Atg12, Beclin 1 knockdown or bafilomycin treatment, and occurred even in the absence of Atg12. We therefore propose that although CQ might be helpful in combination with cancer therapeutic drugs, its sensitizing effects can occur independently of autophagy inhibition. Consequently, this possibility should be considered in the ongoing clinical trials where CQ or HCQ are used in the treatment of cancer, and caution is warranted when CQ treatment is used in cytotoxic assays in autophagy research. PMID:22252008

  18. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  19. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  20. Protective Vaccine-Induced CD4+ T Cell-Independent B Cell Responses against Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dorfmeier, Corin L.; Lytle, Andrew G.; Dunkel, Amber L.; Gatt, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in rabies virus (RV) research is to develop a single-dose postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) that would simplify vaccination protocols, reduce costs associated with rabies prevention in humans, and save lives. Live replication-deficient RV-based vaccines are emerging as promising single-dose vaccines to replace currently licensed inactivated RV-based vaccines. Nonetheless, little is known about how effective B cells develop in response to live RV-based vaccination. Understanding this fundamental property of rabies immunology may help in developing a single-dose RV vaccine. Typically, vaccines induce B cells secreting high-affinity, class-switched antibodies during germinal center (GC) reactions; however, there is a lag time between vaccination and the generation of GC B cells. In this report, we show that RV-specific antibodies are detected in mice immunized with live but not inactivated RV-based vaccines before B cells displaying a GC B cell phenotype (B220+GL7hiCD95hi) are formed, indicating a potential role for T cell-independent and early extrafollicular T cell-dependent antibody responses in the protection against RV infection. Using two mouse models of CD4+ T cell deficiency, we show that B cells secreting virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) are induced via T cell-independent mechanisms within 4 days postimmunization with a replication-deficient RV-based vaccine. Importantly, mice that are completely devoid of T cells (B6.129P2-Tcrβtm1Mom Tcrδtm1Mom/J) show protection against pathogenic challenge shortly after immunization with a live replication-deficient RV-based vaccine. We show that vaccines that can exploit early pathways of B cell activation and development may hold the key for the development of a single-dose RV vaccine wherein the rapid induction of VNA is critical. PMID:22896601

  1. Interleukin 7 independent development of human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Prieyl, J A; LeBien, T W

    1996-01-01

    Mammalian hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) commitment and differentiation into lymphoid lineage cells proceed through a series of developmentally restricted progenitor compartments. A complete understanding of this process, and how it differs from HSC commitment and differentiation into cells of the myeloid/erythroid lineages, requires the development of model systems that support HSC commitment to the lymphoid lineages. We now describe a human bone marrow stromal cell culture that preferentially supports commitment and differentiation of human HSC to CD19+ B-lineage cells. Fluorescence activated cell sorterpurified CD34++/lineage-cells were isolated from fetal bone marrow and cultured on human fetal bone marrow stromal cells in serum-free conditions containing no exogenous cytokines. Over a period of 3 weeks, CD34++/lineage- cells underwent commitment, differentiation, and expansion into the B lineage. Progressive changes included: loss of CD34, acquisition of and graded increases in the level of cell surface CD19, and appearance of immature B cells expressing mu/kappa or mu/lambda cell surface Ig receptors. The tempo and phenotype of B-cell development was not influenced by the addition of IL-7 (10 ng/ml), or by the addition of goat anti-IL-7 neutralizing antibody. These results indicate a profound difference between mouse and human in the requirement for IL-7 in normal B-cell development, and provide an experimental system to identify and characterize human bone marrow stromal cell-derived molecules crucial for human B lymphopoiesis. PMID:8816803

  2. Magnolol induces apoptosis via caspase-independent pathways in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jong-Rung; Chong, Inn-Wen; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Yin, Wei-Hsian; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Chou, Shah-Hwa; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Liu, Po-Len

    2014-04-01

    Magnolol, a hydroxylated biphenyl agent isolated from herbal planet Magnolia officinalis, is a component of traditional Asian herbal teas. It has been reported to have anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer activity. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549, H441 and H520) and normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) were used to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of magnolol. We show that magnolol inhibited cellular proliferation, increased DNA fragmentation, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in all NSCLC cells, but had no cytotoxic effect on HBECs. Magnolol triggered the release of pro-apoptotic proteins: Bid, Bax and cytochrome c from mitochondria, but did not activate the caspase-3, -8, and -9, suggesting that magnolol induces apoptosis of NSCLC cell lines via a caspase-independent pathway. The caspase-independent pathway is mediated through the activation of nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor, endonuclease G and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, which played important roles in mediating cell death. Furthermore, magnolol inhibited PI3K/AKT and ERK1/2 activity, but up-regulated p38 and JNK activity in A549 cell lines. The results of this study provided a basis for understanding and developing magnolol as a novel treatment of NSCLC. PMID:23943503

  3. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  4. IL12-mediated sensitizing of T-cell receptor-dependent and -independent tumor cell killing.

    PubMed

    Braun, Matthias; Ress, Marie L; Yoo, Young-Eun; Scholz, Claus J; Eyrich, Matthias; Schlegel, Paul G; Wölfl, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL12) is a key inflammatory cytokine critically influencing Th1/Tc1-T-cell responses at the time of initial antigen encounter. Therefore, it may be exploited for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we investigated how IL12, and other inflammatory cytokines, shape effector functions of human T-cells. Using a defined culture system, we followed the gradual differentiation and function of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells from their initial activation as naïve T cells through their expansion phase as early memory cells to full differentiation as clonally expanded effector T cells. The addition of IL12 8 days after the initial priming event initiated two mechanistically separate events: First, IL12 sensitized the T-cell receptor (TCR) for antigen-specific activation, leading to an approximately 10-fold increase in peptide sensitivity and, in consequence, enhanced tumor cell killing. Secondly, IL12 enabled TCR/HLA-independent activation and cytotoxicity: this "non-specific" effect was mediated by the NK cell receptor DNAM1 (CD226) and dependent on ligand expression of the target cells. This IL12 regulated, DNAM1-mediated killing is dependent on src-kinases as well as on PTPRC (CD45) activity. Thus, besides enhancing TCR-mediated activation, we here identified for the first time a second IL12 mediated mechanism leading to activation of a receptor-dependent killing pathway via DNAM1. PMID:27622043

  5. Cell-cycle-independent transitions in temporal identity of mammalian neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Miyata, Takaki; Konno, Daijiro; Ueda, Hiroki R.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Ayano

    2016-01-01

    During cerebral development, many types of neurons are sequentially generated by self-renewing progenitor cells called apical progenitors (APs). Temporal changes in AP identity are thought to be responsible for neuronal diversity; however, the mechanisms underlying such changes remain largely unknown. Here we perform single-cell transcriptome analysis of individual progenitors at different developmental stages, and identify a subset of genes whose expression changes over time but is independent of differentiation status. Surprisingly, the pattern of changes in the expression of such temporal-axis genes in APs is unaffected by cell-cycle arrest. Consistent with this, transient cell-cycle arrest of APs in vivo does not prevent descendant neurons from acquiring their correct laminar fates. Analysis of cultured APs reveals that transitions in AP gene expression are driven by both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms. These results suggest that the timing mechanisms controlling AP temporal identity function independently of cell-cycle progression and Notch activation mode. PMID:27094546

  6. Cell-cycle-independent transitions in temporal identity of mammalian neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Miyata, Takaki; Konno, Daijiro; Ueda, Hiroki R; Kasukawa, Takeya; Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Ayano

    2016-01-01

    During cerebral development, many types of neurons are sequentially generated by self-renewing progenitor cells called apical progenitors (APs). Temporal changes in AP identity are thought to be responsible for neuronal diversity; however, the mechanisms underlying such changes remain largely unknown. Here we perform single-cell transcriptome analysis of individual progenitors at different developmental stages, and identify a subset of genes whose expression changes over time but is independent of differentiation status. Surprisingly, the pattern of changes in the expression of such temporal-axis genes in APs is unaffected by cell-cycle arrest. Consistent with this, transient cell-cycle arrest of APs in vivo does not prevent descendant neurons from acquiring their correct laminar fates. Analysis of cultured APs reveals that transitions in AP gene expression are driven by both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms. These results suggest that the timing mechanisms controlling AP temporal identity function independently of cell-cycle progression and Notch activation mode. PMID:27094546

  7. Cell-cycle quiescence maintains Caenorhabditis elegans germline stem cells independent of GLP-1/Notch

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Hannah S; Kimble, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Many types of adult stem cells exist in a state of cell-cycle quiescence, yet it has remained unclear whether quiescence plays a role in maintaining the stem cell fate. Here we establish the adult germline of Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for facultative stem cell quiescence. We find that mitotically dividing germ cells—including germline stem cells—become quiescent in the absence of food. This quiescence is characterized by a slowing of S phase, a block to M-phase entry, and the ability to re-enter M phase rapidly in response to re-feeding. Further, we demonstrate that cell-cycle quiescence alters the genetic requirements for stem cell maintenance: The signaling pathway required for stem cell maintenance under fed conditions—GLP-1/Notch signaling—becomes dispensable under conditions of quiescence. Thus, cell-cycle quiescence can itself maintain stem cells, independent of the signaling pathway otherwise essential for such maintenance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10832.001 PMID:26551561

  8. Coibamide A Induces mTOR-Independent Autophagy and Cell Death in Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Andrew M.; Greenwood, Jeffrey A.; Löhr, Christiane V.; Serrill, Jeffrey D.; Proteau, Philip J.; Ganley, Ian G.; McPhail, Kerry L.; Ishmael, Jane E.

    2013-01-01

    Coibamide A is an N-methyl-stabilized depsipeptide that was isolated from a marine cyanobacterium as part of an International Cooperative Biodiversity Groups (ICBG) program based in Panama. Previous testing of coibamide A in the NCI in vitro 60 cancer cell line panel revealed a potent anti-proliferative response and “COMPARE-negative” profile indicative of a unique mechanism of action. We report that coibamide A is a more potent and efficacious cytotoxin than was previously appreciated, inducing concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity (EC50<100 nM) in human U87-MG and SF-295 glioblastoma cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). This activity was lost upon linearization of the molecule, highlighting the importance of the cyclized structure for both anti-proliferative and cytotoxic responses. We show that coibamide A induces autophagosome accumulation in human glioblastoma cell types and MEFs via an mTOR-independent mechanism; no change was observed in the phosphorylation state of ULK1 (Ser-757), p70 S6K1 (Thr-389), S6 ribosomal protein (Ser-235/236) and 4EBP-1 (Thr-37/46). Coibamide A also induces morphologically and biochemically distinct forms of cell death according to cell type. SF-295 glioblastoma cells showed caspase-3 activation and evidence of apoptotic cell death in a pattern that was also seen in wild-type and autophagy-deficient (ATG5-null) MEFs. In contrast, cell death in U87-MG glioblastoma cells was characterized by extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and lacked clear apoptotic features. Cell death was attenuated, but still triggered, in Apaf-1-null MEFs lacking a functional mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway. From the study of ATG5-null MEFs we conclude that a conventional autophagy response is not required for coibamide A-induced cell death, but likely occurs in dying cells in response to treatment. Coibamide A represents a natural product scaffold with potential for the study of mTOR-independent signaling and cell death

  9. Calcium regulates independently ciliary beat and cell contraction in Paramecium cells.

    PubMed

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is a well-known signal regulator for various physiological activities. In many cases, Ca(2+) simultaneously regulates individual functions in single cells. How can Ca(2+) regulate these functions independently? In Paramecium cells, the contractile cytoskeletal network and cilia are located close to each other near the cell surface. Cell body contraction, ciliary reversal, and rises in ciliary beat frequency are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, they are not always triggered simultaneously. We injected caged calcium into Paramecium caudatum cells and continuously applied weak ultraviolet light to the cells to slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The cell bodies began to contract just after the start of ultraviolet light application, and the degree of contraction increased gradually thereafter. On the other hand, cilia began to reverse 1.4s after the start of ultraviolet application and reversed completely within 100ms. Ciliary beat frequency in the reverse direction was significantly higher than in the normal direction. These results indicate that cell body contraction is regulated by Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner in living P. caudatum. On the other hand, ciliary reversal and rise in ciliary beat frequency are triggered by Ca(2+) in an all-or-none manner. PMID:18179819

  10. Independent Tumor Origin in Two Cases of Synchronous Bilateral Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jialu; Zhao, Tian; Han, Yuying; Zhang, Yujun; Ye, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) pose a challenge for clinical treatment and management. Most bilateral RCCs are sporadic, and do not show a hereditary pattern indicative of VHL syndrome or other inherited cancers. The origin and evolution of these sporadic bilateral RCCs remains elusive. We obtained normal and tumor samples from two male patients suffering from early stage synchronous bilateral clear cell RCC (ccRCC), and analyzed genomic DNA using whole exome sequencing and bisulfite pyrosequencing. We detected distinct 3p loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in both tumors in each patient. Two tumors within the same patient harbored distinct driver mutations and different CpG hypermethylation sites in the VHL promoter. Moreover, tumors exhibit independent evolutionary trajectories. Therefore, distinct 3p LOH, combined with contingent driver gene mutations and independent VHL hypermethylation, led to independent tumor origin and parallel evolution of bilateral ccRCC in these two patients. Our results indicate that tumors in these two cases were not due to common germline oncogenic mutations. They were results of multiple de novo mutations in each kidney, rather than primary ccRCC with contralateral renal metastasis. Therefore, histopathologic and genetic profiling from single tumor specimen may underestimate the mutational burden and somatic heterogeneity of bilateral ccRCCs. PMID:27383411

  11. Independent Tumor Origin in Two Cases of Synchronous Bilateral Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jialu; Zhao, Tian; Han, Yuying; Zhang, Yujun; Ye, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) pose a challenge for clinical treatment and management. Most bilateral RCCs are sporadic, and do not show a hereditary pattern indicative of VHL syndrome or other inherited cancers. The origin and evolution of these sporadic bilateral RCCs remains elusive. We obtained normal and tumor samples from two male patients suffering from early stage synchronous bilateral clear cell RCC (ccRCC), and analyzed genomic DNA using whole exome sequencing and bisulfite pyrosequencing. We detected distinct 3p loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in both tumors in each patient. Two tumors within the same patient harbored distinct driver mutations and different CpG hypermethylation sites in the VHL promoter. Moreover, tumors exhibit independent evolutionary trajectories. Therefore, distinct 3p LOH, combined with contingent driver gene mutations and independent VHL hypermethylation, led to independent tumor origin and parallel evolution of bilateral ccRCC in these two patients. Our results indicate that tumors in these two cases were not due to common germline oncogenic mutations. They were results of multiple de novo mutations in each kidney, rather than primary ccRCC with contralateral renal metastasis. Therefore, histopathologic and genetic profiling from single tumor specimen may underestimate the mutational burden and somatic heterogeneity of bilateral ccRCCs. PMID:27383411

  12. Identification of DNA Methylation-Independent Epigenetic Events Underlying Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Becket, Elinne; Chopra, Sameer; Duymich, Christopher E; Lin, Justin J; You, Jueng Soo; Pandiyan, Kurinji; Nichols, Peter W; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Charlet, Jessica; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Jones, Peter A; Liang, Gangning

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in chromatin accessibility independent of DNA methylation can affect cancer-related gene expression, but are often overlooked in conventional epigenomic profiling approaches. In this study, we describe a cost-effective and computationally simple assay called AcceSssIble to simultaneously interrogate DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility alterations in primary human clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). Our study revealed significant perturbations to the ccRCC epigenome and identified gene expression changes that were specifically attributed to the chromatin accessibility status whether or not DNA methylation was involved. Compared with commonly mutated genes in ccRCC, such as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor, the genes identified by AcceSssIble comprised distinct pathways and more frequently underwent epigenetic changes, suggesting that genetic and epigenetic alterations could be independent events in ccRCC. Specifically, we found unique DNA methylation-independent promoter accessibility alterations in pathways mimicking VHL deficiency. Overall, this study provides a novel approach for identifying new epigenetic-based therapeutic targets, previously undetectable by DNA methylation studies alone, that may complement current genetic-based treatment strategies. Cancer Res; 76(7); 1954-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26759245

  13. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  14. Identification of Cell Surface Molecules Involved in Dystroglycan-Independent Lassa Virus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry. PMID:22156524

  15. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells.

    PubMed

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Madden, Victoria; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T; Eron, Joseph J; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-04-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell-only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  16. Doppel Induces Degeneration of Cerebellar Purkinje Cells Independently of Bax

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jiaxin; Li, Aimin; Yamaguchi, Naohiro; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Harris, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Doppel (Dpl) is a prion protein paralog that causes neurodegeneration when expressed ectopically in the brain. To investigate the cellular mechanism underlying this effect, we analyzed Dpl-expressing transgenic mice in which the gene for the proapoptotic protein Bax had been deleted. We found that Bax deletion does not alter either clinical symptoms or Purkinje cell degeneration in Dpl transgenic mice. In addition, we observed that degenerating Purkinje cells in these animals do not display DNA fragmentation or caspase-3 activation. Our results suggest that non-Bax-dependent pathways mediate the toxic effects of Dpl in Purkinje cells, highlighting a possible role for nonapoptotic mechanisms in the death of these neurons. PMID:17569776

  17. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  18. Size-independent symmetric division in extraordinarily long cells

    PubMed Central

    Pende, Nika; Leisch, Nikolaus; Gruber-Vodicka, Harald R.; Heindl, Niels R.; Ott, Jörg; den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Bulgheresi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Two long-standing paradigms in biology are that cells belonging to the same population exhibit little deviation from their average size and that symmetric cell division is size limited. Here, ultrastructural, morphometric and immunocytochemical analyses reveal that two Gammaproteobacteria attached to the cuticle of the marine nematodes Eubostrichus fertilis and E. dianeae reproduce by constricting a single FtsZ ring at midcell despite being 45 μm and 120 μm long, respectively. In the crescent-shaped bacteria coating E. fertilis, symmetric FtsZ-based fission occurs in cells with lengths spanning one order of magnitude. In the E. dianeae symbiont, formation of a single functional FtsZ ring makes this the longest unicellular organism in which symmetric division has ever been observed. In conclusion, the reproduction modes of two extraordinarily long bacterial cells indicate that size is not the primary trigger of division and that yet unknown mechanisms time the localization of both DNA and the septum. PMID:25221974

  19. Connexin 36 and rod bipolar cell independent rod pathways drive retinal ganglion cells and optokinetic reflexes.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Cameron S; Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad; van der Heijden, Meike; Lo, Eric M; Paul, David; Bramblett, Debra E; Lem, Janis; Simons, David L; Wu, Samuel M

    2016-02-01

    Rod pathways are a parallel set of synaptic connections which enable night vision by relaying and processing rod photoreceptor light responses. We use dim light stimuli to isolate rod pathway contributions to downstream light responses then characterize these contributions in knockout mice lacking rod transducin-α (Trα), or certain pathway components associated with subsets of rod pathways. These comparisons reveal that rod pathway driven light sensitivity in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is entirely dependent on Trα, but partially independent of connexin 36 (Cx36) and rod bipolar cells. Pharmacological experiments show that rod pathway-driven and Cx36-independent RGC ON responses are also metabotropic glutamate receptor 6-dependent. To validate the RGC findings in awake, behaving animals we measured optokinetic reflexes (OKRs), which are sensitive to changes in ON pathways. Scotopic OKR contrast sensitivity was lost in Trα(-/-) mice, but indistinguishable from controls in Cx36(-/-) and rod bipolar cell knockout mice. Mesopic OKRs were also altered in mutant mice: Trα(-/-) mice had decreased spatial acuity, rod BC knockouts had decreased sensitivity, and Cx36(-/-) mice had increased sensitivity. These results provide compelling evidence against the complete Cx36 or rod BC dependence of night vision's ON component. Further, the findings suggest the parallel nature of rod pathways provides considerable redundancy to scotopic light sensitivity but distinct contributions to mesopic responses through complicated interactions with cone pathways. PMID:26718442

  20. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells. PMID:18469090

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms Biofilms in Acute InfectionIndependent of Cell-to-Cell Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Schaber, J. Andy; Triffo, W.J.; Suh, Sang J.; Oliver, Jeffrey W.; Hastert, Mary C.; Griswold, John A.; Auer, Manfred; Hamood, Abdul N.; Rumbaugh, Kendra P.

    2006-09-20

    Biofilms are bacterial communities residing within a polysaccharide matrix that are associated with persistence and antibiotic resistance in chronic infections. We show that the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms within 8 hours of infection in thermally-injured mice, demonstrating that biofilms contribute to bacterial colonization in acute infections. P. aeruginosa biofilms were visualized within burned tissue surrounding blood vessels and adipose cells. Although quorum sensing (QS), a bacterial signaling mechanism, coordinates differentiation of biofilms in vitro, wild type and QS-deficient P. aeruginosa formed similar biofilms in vivo. Our findings demonstrate that P. aeruginosa forms biofilms on specific host tissues independent of QS.

  2. Cell Wall Invertase Promotes Fruit Set under Heat Stress by Suppressing ROS-Independent Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Offler, Christina E; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Reduced cell wall invertase (CWIN) activity has been shown to be associated with poor seed and fruit set under abiotic stress. Here, we examined whether genetically increasing native CWIN activity would sustain fruit set under long-term moderate heat stress (LMHS), an important factor limiting crop production, by using transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) with its CWIN inhibitor gene silenced and focusing on ovaries and fruits at 2 d before and after pollination, respectively. We found that the increase of CWIN activity suppressed LMHS-induced programmed cell death in fruits. Surprisingly, measurement of the contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde and the activities of a cohort of antioxidant enzymes revealed that the CWIN-mediated inhibition on programmed cell death is exerted in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner. Elevation of CWIN activity sustained Suc import into fruits and increased activities of hexokinase and fructokinase in the ovaries in response to LMHS Compared to the wild type, the CWIN-elevated transgenic plants exhibited higher transcript levels of heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp100 in ovaries and HspII17.6 in fruits under LMHS, which corresponded to a lower transcript level of a negative auxin responsive factor IAA9 but a higher expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene ToFZY6 in fruits at 2 d after pollination. Collectively, the data indicate that CWIN enhances fruit set under LMHS through suppression of programmed cell death in a reactive oxygen species-independent manner that could involve enhanced Suc import and catabolism, HSP expression, and auxin response and biosynthesis. PMID:27462084

  3. Recoverable hybrid enzymatic biofuel cell with molecular oxygen-independence.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Xu, Miao; Bai, Lu; Han, Lei; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-01-15

    Enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs) have drawn great attentions because of its potential in energy conversion. However, designing of highly efficient EBFCs which can adapt to the anaerobic system is still a great challenge. In this study, we propose a novel hybrid enzymatic biofuel cell (HEBFC) which was fabricated by a glucose dehydrogenase modified bioanode and a solid-state silver oxide/silver (Ag2O/Ag) cathode. The as-assembled HEBFC exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.59V and a maximum power output of 0.281mWcm(-2) at 0.34V in air saturated buffer. Especially, due to the introduction of Ag2O/Ag, our HEBFC could also operate under anaerobic condition, while the maximum power output would reach to 0.275mWcm(-2) at 0.34V. Furthermore, our HEBFC had stable cycle operation and could keep high power output for a certain time as the result of the regeneration of Ag2O. Our work provides a new concept to develop EBFCs for efficient energy conversion in the future. PMID:26283586

  4. Survival Advantage of AMPK Activation to Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells During Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Wu, Yue; Mohler, James L.; Ip, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Androgen-independent prostate cancer usually develops as a relapse following androgen ablation therapy. Removing androgen systemically causes vascular degeneration and nutrient depletion of the prostate tumor tissue. The fact that the malignancy later evolves to androgen-independence suggests that some cancer cells are able to survive the challenge of energy/nutrient deprivation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important manager of energy stress. The present study was designed to investigate the role of AMPK in contributing to the survival of the androgen-independent phenotype. Most of the experiments were carried out in the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells and the androgen-independent C4-2 cells. These two cell lines have the same genetic background, since the C4-2 line is derived from the LNCaP line. Glucose deprivation (GD) was instituted to model energy stress encountered by these cells. The key findings are as follows. First, the activation of AMPK by GD was much stronger in C4-2 cells than in LNCaP cells, and the robustness of AMPK activation was correlated favorably with cell viability. Second, the response of AMPK was specific to energy deficiency rather than to amino acid deficiency. The activation of AMPK by GD was functional, as demonstrated by appropriate phosphorylation changes of mTOR and mTOR downstream substrates. Third, blocking AMPK activation by chemical inhibitor or dominant negative AMPK led to increased apoptotic cell death. The observation that similar results were found in other androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, including CW22Rv1 abd VCaP, provided further assurance that AMPK is a facilitator on the road to androgen-independence of prostate cancer cells. PMID:20570728

  5. ANTXR-1 and -2 independent modulation of a cytotoxicity mediated by anthrax toxin in human cells.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Daisuke; Toyomane, Kochi; Kamiya, Kozue; Mutoh, Memi; Mifune, Etsuko; Ohnuma, Miyuki; Higashi, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    Several animal models have shown that anthrax toxin (ATX) elicits a cytotoxic effect on host cells through anthrax toxin receptor (ANTXR) function. In this study, compared with mouse cells, cells obtained from humans exhibited low sensitivity to ATX-mediated cytotoxicity, and the sensitivity was not correlated with expression levels of ANTXRs. ATX treatment also induced a cytotoxic effect in other cultured human cells, human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells, that express ANTXRs at undetectable levels. Furthermore, ectopic expression of ANTXRs in HEK293 cells did not affect the sensitivity to ATX treatment. These findings suggest that there is an ANTXR-independent cytotoxic mechanism in human cells. PMID:27170489

  6. Acquisition of Estrogen Independence Induces TOB1-Related Mechanisms Supporting Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nasto, Rochelle E.; Varghese, Rency; Jablonski, Sandra A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Surana, Rishi; Calvert, Valerie S.; Bebu, Ionut; Murray, Joseph; Jin, Lu; Johnson, Michael; Riggins, Rebecca; Ressom, Habtom; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Clarke, Robert; Golemis, Erica A.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of siRNAs targeting an estrogen receptor- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells, and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mTOR inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  7. Acquisition of estrogen independence induces TOB1-related mechanisms supporting breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-W; Nasto, R E; Varghese, R; Jablonski, S A; Serebriiskii, I G; Surana, R; Calvert, V S; Bebu, I; Murray, J; Jin, L; Johnson, M; Riggins, R; Ressom, H; Petricoin, E; Clarke, R; Golemis, E A; Weiner, L M

    2016-03-31

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of small interfering RNAs targeting an estrogen receptor (ER)- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent ER-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mammalian target of rapmycin (mTOR) inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not in estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse-phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  8. Serum Adiponectin Level May be an Independent Predictor of Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongkai; Wu, Junlong; Gu, Weijie; Wang, Beihe; Wan, Fangning; Dai, Bo; Zhang, Hailiang; Shi, Guohai; Shen, Yijun; Zhu, Yiping; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Dingwei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether serum adiponectin or leptin level has the ability to differentiate clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) from other subtypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a Chinese population. Patients and methods: We recruited 198 consecutive patients who were treated with radical or partial nephrectomy in our department from September 2011 to June 2013. Their histological types were all malignant, including clear cell, papillary, chromophobe and unclassified RCC. We also enrolled 86 people with no cancer or cancer-related diseases as normal controls. We measured patients' preoperative blood samples for plasma adiponectin and leptin concentrations using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Statistical methods were used to analyze ccRCC and other subtypes as they relate to serum adiponectin/leptin level and other factors such as body mass index or visceral fat area. Results: In our database, normal controls had significantly higher circulating adiponectin (p < 0.001) and leptin levels (p < 0.001) than patients with RCC. Among the 198 RCC patients, 156 patients had ccRCC while 42 patients had other histological types. Serum adiponectin levels were lower in ccRCC patients than in non-clear-cell RCC patients (p = 0.004). However, the plasma leptin level was not differently distributed between ccRCC and non-ccRCC patients (p = 0.940). In multivariate analysis, we found that serum adiponectin level may be an independent predictor for discriminating ccRCC patients from others (p = 0.004). Furthermore, in the ccRCC subgroup, we observed that men with ccRCC had lower leptin (p < 0.001) and adiponectin (p = 0.002) levels, and diabetic patients had lower plasma adiponectin levels (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Lower plasma adiponectin concentration was related to an increased incidence of ccRCC and may act as an independent predictor for ccRCC. Our study may help define the process from obesity to adipose tissue, to cytokines and finally to ccRCC. PMID

  9. TAR-independent replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in glial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bagasra, O; Khalili, K; Seshamma, T; Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R J

    1992-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in the replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) may differ in various cell types and with various exogenous stimuli. Astrocytic glial cells, which can support HIV-1 replication in cell cultures and may be infected in vivo, are demonstrated to provide a cellular milieu in which TAR mutant HIV-1 viruses may replicate. Using transfections of various TAR mutant HIV-1 proviral constructs, we demonstrate TAR-independent replication in unstimulated astrocytic cells. We further demonstrate, using viral constructs with mutations in the tat gene and in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B)-binding sites (enhancer) of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, that TAR-independent HIV-1 replication in astrocytic cells requires both intact NF-kappa B moiety-binding motifs in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat and Tat expression. We measured HIV-1 p24 antigen production, syncytium formation, and levels and patterns of viral RNA expression by Northern (RNA) blotting to characterize TAR-independent HIV-1 expression in astrocytic glial cells. This alternative regulatory pathway of TAR-independent, Tat-responsive viral production may be important in certain cell types for therapies which seek to perturb Tat-TAR binding as a strategy to interrupt the viral lytic cycle. Images PMID:1433528

  10. Cell-autonomous cytokinin-independent growth of tobacco cells transformed by Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains lacking the cytokinin biosynthesis gene.

    PubMed Central

    Black, R C; Binns, A N; Chang, C F; Lynn, D G

    1994-01-01

    Mutations at the cytokinin biosynthesis locus (tmr) of Agrobacterium tumefaciens usually result in strains that induce tumors exhibiting the rooty phenotype associated with high auxin-to-cytokinin ratios. However, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Havana 425) leaf disc explants responded to tmr- mutant strain A356 by producing rapidly growing, unorganized tumors, indicating that these lines can grow in a cytokinin-independent fashion despite the absence of a functional tmr gene. Several methods have been used to characterize the physiological and cellular basis of this phenotype. The results indicate that tmr- tumors have a physiologically distinct mechanism for cytokinin-independent growth in comparison to tumors induced by wild-type bacteria. The cytokinin-independent phenotype of the tmr- transformants appears to be cell autonomous in nature: only the transformed cells and their progeny were capable of cytokinin-independent growth. Specifically, the tmr- tumors did not accumulate cytokinin, and clonal analysis indicated the tmr- transformed cells were not capable of stimulating the growth of neighboring nontransformed cells. Finally, the cytokinin-independent phenotype of the tmr- transformants was shown to be cold sensitive, whereas the wild-type tumors exhibited a cold-resistant cytokinin-independent phenotype. Potential mechanisms for this novel form of cytokinin-independent growth, including the role of the dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucosides found in both tumor types, are discussed. PMID:8058843

  11. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell-mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4-producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4-deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4-deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell-derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  12. Global Ca2+ Signaling Drives Ribbon-Independent Synaptic Transmission at Rod Bipolar Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bhupesh; Ke, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Lei; Baden, Alexander D.; Markowitz, Alexander L.; Nayak, Subhashree; Briggman, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    Ribbon-type presynaptic active zones are a hallmark of excitatory retinal synapses, and the ribbon organelle is thought to serve as the organizing point of the presynaptic active zone. Imaging of exocytosis from isolated retinal neurons, however, has revealed ectopic release (i.e., release away from ribbons) in significant quantities. Here, we demonstrate in an in vitro mouse retinal slice preparation that ribbon-independent release from rod bipolar cells activates postsynaptic AMPARs on AII amacrine cells. This form of release appears to draw on a unique, ribbon-independent, vesicle pool. Experimental, anatomical, and computational analyses indicate that it is elicited by a significant, global elevation of intraterminal [Ca2+] arising following local buffer saturation. Our observations support the conclusion that ribbon-independent release provides a read-out of the average behavior of all of the active zones in a rod bipolar cell's terminal. PMID:24790194

  13. Global Ca2+ signaling drives ribbon-independent synaptic transmission at rod bipolar cell synapses.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Bhupesh; Ke, Jiang-Bin; Zhang, Lei; Baden, Alexander D; Markowitz, Alexander L; Nayak, Subhashree; Briggman, Kevin L; Zenisek, David; Singer, Joshua H

    2014-04-30

    Ribbon-type presynaptic active zones are a hallmark of excitatory retinal synapses, and the ribbon organelle is thought to serve as the organizing point of the presynaptic active zone. Imaging of exocytosis from isolated retinal neurons, however, has revealed ectopic release (i.e., release away from ribbons) in significant quantities. Here, we demonstrate in an in vitro mouse retinal slice preparation that ribbon-independent release from rod bipolar cells activates postsynaptic AMPARs on AII amacrine cells. This form of release appears to draw on a unique, ribbon-independent, vesicle pool. Experimental, anatomical, and computational analyses indicate that it is elicited by a significant, global elevation of intraterminal [Ca(2+)] arising following local buffer saturation. Our observations support the conclusion that ribbon-independent release provides a read-out of the average behavior of all of the active zones in a rod bipolar cell's terminal. PMID:24790194

  14. Effect of AQP9 Expression in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cell PC3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiwei; Zhu, Liang; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Jinliang; Song, Xishuang; Zheng, Wei; Wang, Lina; Yang, Deyong; Wang, Jianbo

    2016-01-01

    It is known that aquaporin 9 (AQP9) in the prostate was strictly upregulated by androgen and may represent a novel therapeutic target for several cancers, but whether AQP9 plays a role in the regulation of androgen-independent prostate cancer still remains unclear. In the present study, AQP9 was determined in prostate cancer and adjacent cancer tissues; AQP9-siRNA was applied to silencing AQP9 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell PC3 cell line. Western blot and flow cytometry analysis were employed to detect changes in related-function of control and AQP9-siRNA groups. The results showed that AQP9 is significantly induced in cancer tissues than that in adjacent cancer tissues. Moreover, knockdown of AQP9 in PC3 androgen-independent prostate cancer cell prostate cancer cells increased inhibition rates of proliferation. In addition, knockdown of AQP9 resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Bcl-2 and with a notable increase in the expression of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, indicated that AQP9 knockdown promoted apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. From wound healing assay and matrigel invasion, we suggested that AQP9 expression affects the motility and invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. Moreover, In order to explore the pathway may be involved in AQP9-mediated motility and invasion of prostate cancer cells, the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was significant suppressed in AQP9 siRNA-transfected cells compared with that in control cells, suggesting that AQP9 is involved in the activation of the ERK pathway in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. PMID:27187384

  15. Adult human mesenchymal stem cells enhance breast tumorigenesis and promote hormone independence

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lyndsay V.; Muir, Shannon E.; Elliott, Steven; Guillot, Lori M.; Antoon, James W.; Penfornis, Patrice; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Salvo, Virgilio A.; Fonseca, Juan P.; Lacey, Michelle R.; Beckman, Barbara S.; McLachlan, John A.; Rowan, Brian G.; Pochampally, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been shown to home to sites of breast cancer and integrate into the tumor stroma. We demonstrate here the effect of hMSCs on primary breast tumor growth and the progression of these tumors to hormone independence. Co-injection of bone marrow-derived hMSCs enhances primary tumor growth of the estrogen receptor-positive, hormone-dependent breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 in the presence or absence of estrogen in SCID/beige mice. We also show hormone-independent growth of MCF-7 cells when co-injected with hMSCs. These effects were found in conjunction with increased immunohistochemical staining of the progesterone receptor in the MCF-7/hMSC tumors as compared to MCF-7 control tumors. This increase in PgR expression indicates a link between MCF-7 cells and MSCs through ER-mediated signaling. Taken together, our data reveal the relationship between tumor microenvironment and tumor growth and the progression to hormone independence. This tumor stroma-cell interaction may provide a novel target for the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive, hormone-independent, and endocrine-resistant breast carcinoma. PMID:19597705

  16. Alpha-Particle Emitting 213Bi-Anti-EGFR Immunoconjugates Eradicate Tumor Cells Independent of Oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Gaertner, Florian C.; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is a central problem in tumor treatment because hypoxic cells are less sensitive to chemo- and radiotherapy than normoxic cells. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is due to reduced sensitivity towards low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) radiation. High LET α-emitters are thought to eradicate tumor cells independent of cellular oxygenation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate that cell-bound α-particle emitting 213Bi immunoconjugates kill hypoxic and normoxic CAL33 tumor cells with identical efficiency. For that purpose CAL33 cells were incubated with 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb or irradiated with photons with a nominal energy of 6 MeV both under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. Oxygenation of cells was checked via the hypoxia-associated marker HIF-1α. Survival of cells was analysed using the clonogenic assay. Cell viability was monitored with the WST colorimetric assay. Results were evaluated statistically using a t-test and a Generalized Linear Mixed Model (GLMM). Survival and viability of CAL33 cells decreased both after incubation with increasing 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb activity concentrations (9.25 kBq/ml–1.48 MBq/ml) and irradiation with increasing doses of photons (0.5–12 Gy). Following photon irradiation survival and viability of normoxic cells were significantly lower than those of hypoxic cells at all doses analysed. In contrast, cell death induced by 213Bi-anti-EGFR-MAb turned out to be independent of cellular oxygenation. These results demonstrate that α-particle emitting 213Bi-immunoconjugates eradicate hypoxic tumor cells as effective as normoxic cells. Therefore, 213Bi-radioimmunotherapy seems to be an appropriate strategy for treatment of hypoxic tumors. PMID:23724085

  17. Human memory B cells originate from three distinct germinal center-dependent and -independent maturation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Berkowska, Magdalena A.; Driessen, Gertjan J. A.; Bikos, Vasilis; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Cerutti, Andrea; He, Bing; Biermann, Katharina; Lange, Johan F.; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple distinct memory B-cell subsets have been identified in humans, but it remains unclear how their phenotypic diversity corresponds to the type of responses from which they originate. Especially, the contribution of germinal center-independent responses in humans remains controversial. We defined 6 memory B-cell subsets based on their antigen-experienced phenotype and differential expression of CD27 and IgH isotypes. Molecular characterization of their replication history, Ig somatic hypermutation, and class-switch profiles demonstrated their origin from 3 different pathways. CD27−IgG+ and CD27+IgM+ B cells are derived from primary germinal center reactions, and CD27+IgA+ and CD27+IgG+ B cells are from consecutive germinal center responses (pathway 1). In contrast, natural effector and CD27−IgA+ memory B cells have limited proliferation and are also present in CD40L-deficient patients, reflecting a germinal center-independent origin. Natural effector cells at least in part originate from systemic responses in the splenic marginal zone (pathway 2). CD27−IgA+ cells share low replication history and dominant Igλ and IgA2 use with gut lamina propria IgA+ B cells, suggesting their common origin from local germinal center-independent responses (pathway 3). Our findings shed light on human germinal center-dependent and -independent B-cell memory formation and provide new opportunities to study these processes in immunologic diseases. PMID:21690558

  18. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shweta; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Agrewala, Javed N

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB) cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID), signifying class switch recombination (CSR). Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response. PMID:21674065

  19. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation. PMID:26898161

  20. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter silencing potentiates caspase-independent cell death in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, Merril C.; Peters, Amelia A.; Kenny, Paraic A.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Monteith, Gregory R.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Some clinical breast cancers are associated with MCU overexpression. •MCU silencing did not alter cell death initiated with the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263. •MCU silencing potentiated caspase-independent cell death initiated by ionomycin. •MCU silencing promoted ionomycin-mediated cell death without changes in bulk Ca{sup 2+}. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) transports free ionic Ca{sup 2+} into the mitochondrial matrix. We assessed MCU expression in clinical breast cancer samples using microarray analysis and the consequences of MCU silencing in a breast cancer cell line. Our results indicate that estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers are characterized by elevated levels of MCU. Silencing of MCU expression in the basal-like MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line produced no change in proliferation or cell viability. However, distinct consequences of MCU silencing were seen on cell death pathways. Caspase-dependent cell death initiated by the Bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-263 was not altered by MCU silencing; whereas caspase-independent cell death induced by the calcium ionophore ionomycin was potentiated by MCU silencing. Measurement of cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels showed that the promotion of ionomycin-induced cell death by MCU silencing occurs independently of changes in bulk cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} levels. This study demonstrates that MCU overexpression is a feature of some breast cancers and that MCU overexpression may offer a survival advantage against some cell death pathways. MCU inhibitors may be a strategy to increase the effectiveness of therapies that act through the induction of caspase-independent cell death pathways in estrogen receptor negative and basal-like breast cancers.

  1. Adaptation of mammalian auditory hair cell mechanotransduction is independent of calcium entry

    PubMed Central

    Peng, A.W.; Effertz, T.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation is a hallmark of hair cell mechanotransduction, extending the sensory hair bundle dynamic range while providing mechanical filtering of incoming sound. In hair cells responsive to low frequencies, two distinct adaptation mechanisms exist, a fast component of debatable origin and a slow myosin-based component. It is generally believed that Ca2+ entry through mechano-electric transducer channels is required for both forms of adaptation. This study investigates the calcium dependence of adaptation in the mammalian auditory system. Recordings from rat cochlear hair cells, demonstrate that altering Ca2+ entry or internal Ca2+ buffering has little effect on either adaptation kinetics or steady state adaptation responses. Two additional findings include a voltage dependent process and an extracellular Ca2+ binding site both modulating the resting open probability independent of adaptation. These data suggest that slow motor adaptation is negligible in mammalian auditory cells and that the remaining adaptation process is independent of calcium entry. PMID:24267652

  2. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  3. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase

  4. High Myeloperoxidase Positive Cell Infiltration in Colorectal Cancer Is an Independent Favorable Prognostic Factor

    PubMed Central

    Eppenberger-Castori, Serenella; Zlobec, Inti; Viehl, Carsten T.; Frey, Daniel M.; Nebiker, Christian A.; Rosso, Raffaele; Zuber, Markus; Amicarella, Francesca; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Sconocchia, Giuseppe; Heberer, Michael; Lugli, Alessandro; Tornillo, Luigi; Oertli, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) infiltration by adaptive immune system cells correlates with favorable prognosis. The role of the innate immune system is still debated. Here we addressed the prognostic impact of CRC infiltration by neutrophil granulocytes (NG). Methods A TMA including healthy mucosa and clinically annotated CRC specimens (n = 1491) was stained with MPO and CD15 specific antibodies. MPO+ and CD15+ positive immune cells were counted by three independent observers. Phenotypic profiles of CRC infiltrating MPO+ and CD15+ cells were validated by flow cytometry on cell suspensions derived from enzymatically digested surgical specimens. Survival analysis was performed by splitting randomized data in training and validation subsets. Results MPO+ and CD15+ cell infiltration were significantly correlated (p<0.0001; r = 0.76). However, only high density of MPO+ cell infiltration was associated with significantly improved survival in training (P = 0.038) and validation (P = 0.002) sets. In multivariate analysis including T and N stage, vascular invasion, tumor border configuration and microsatellite instability status, MPO+ cell infiltration proved an independent prognostic marker overall (P = 0.004; HR = 0.65; CI:±0.15) and in both training (P = 0.048) and validation (P = 0.036) sets. Flow-cytometry analysis of CRC cell suspensions derived from clinical specimens showed that while MPO+ cells were largely CD15+/CD66b+, sizeable percentages of CD15+ and CD66b+ cells were MPO−. Conclusions High density MPO+ cell infiltration is a novel independent favorable prognostic factor in CRC. PMID:23734221

  5. Studies on culture and osteogenic induction of human mesenchymal stem cells under CO2-independent conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Cui; Feng, Yiding; Zong, Chen; Chen, Jiarong; Tang, Zihua; Jia, Bingbing; Tong, Xiangming; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Jinfu

    2013-04-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the important factors that regulate bone anabolism. Osteoporosis resulting from microgravity during spaceflight may possibly be due to a decrease in osteogenesis mediated by hMSCs. This speculation should be verified through culture and osteogenic induction of hMSCs in a microgravity environment during spaceflight. Control of CO2 is a key component in current experimental protocols for growth, survival, and proliferation of in vitro cultured cells. However, carrying CO2 tanks on a spaceflight and devoting space/mass allowances for classical CO2 control protocols make experimentation on culture and osteogenesis difficult during most missions. Therefore, an experimental culture and osteogenic medium was developed through modifying the components of buffer salts in conventional culture medium. This experimental medium was used to culture and induce hMSCs under CO2-independent conditions. The results showed that culture and induction of hMSCs with conventional culture medium and conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions resulted in an increase of pH in medium. The proliferation of hMSCs was also inhibited. hMSCs cultured with experimental culture medium under CO2-independent conditions showed a proliferation potential that was the same as those cultured with conventional culture medium under CO2-dependent conditions. The experimental osteogenic medium could promote hMSCs to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells under CO2-independent conditions. Cells induced by this induction system showed high alkaline phosphatase activity. The expression levels of osteogenic genes in cells induced with experimental osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions were not significantly different from those cells induced with conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-dependent conditions. These results suggest that the experimental culture and induction system could be used to culture hMSCs and induce the

  6. Attenuation of natural killer cell functions by capsaicin through a direct and TRPV1-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Gye Eun; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Davies, Alexander J; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, Heuiran; Cho, Young Keol; Joo, Chul Hyun; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Yoo Kyum

    2014-07-01

    The assessment of the biological activity of capsaicin, the compound responsible for the spicy flavor of chili pepper, produced controversial results, showing either carcinogenicity or cancer prevention. The innate immune system plays a pivotal role in cancer pathology and prevention; yet, the effect of capsaicin on natural killer (NK) cells, which function in cancer surveillance, is unclear. This study found that capsaicin inhibited NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production (interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α). Capsaicin impaired the cytotoxicity of NK cells, thereby inhibiting lysis of standard target cells and gastric cancer cells by modulating calcium mobilization in NK cells. Capsaicin also induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, but that effect required higher concentrations and longer exposure times than those required to trigger NK cell dysfunction. Furthermore, capsaicin inhibited the cytotoxicity of isolated NK cells and of an NK cell line, suggesting a direct effect on NK cells. Antagonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), a cognate capsaicin receptor, or deficiency in TRPV1 expression failed to prevent the defects induced by capsaicin in NK cells expressing functional TRPV1. Thus, the mechanism of action of capsaicin on NK cells is largely independent of TRPV1. Taken together, capsaicin may have chemotherapeutic potential but may impair NK cell function, which plays a central role in tumor surveillance. PMID:24743513

  7. PRK1/PKN1 controls migration and metastasis of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jilg, Cordula A; Ketscher, Anett; Metzger, Eric; Hummel, Barbara; Willmann, Dominica; Rüsseler, Vanessa; Drendel, Vanessa; Imhof, Axel; Jung, Manfred; Franz, Henriette; Hölz, Stefanie; Krönig, Malte; Müller, Judith M; Schüle, Roland

    2014-12-30

    The major threat in prostate cancer is the occurrence of metastases in androgen-independent tumor stage, for which no causative cure is available. Here we show that metastatic behavior of androgen-independent prostate tumor cells requires the protein-kinase-C-related kinase (PRK1/PKN1) in vitro and in vivo. PRK1 regulates cell migration and gene expression through its kinase activity, but does not affect cell proliferation. Transcriptome and interactome analyses uncover that PRK1 regulates expression of migration-relevant genes by interacting with the scaffold protein sperm-associated antigen 9 (SPAG9/JIP4). SPAG9 and PRK1 colocalize in human cancer tissue and are required for p38-phosphorylation and cell migration. Accordingly, depletion of either ETS domain-containing protein Elk-1 (ELK1), an effector of p38-signalling or p38 depletion hinders cell migration and changes expression of migration-relevant genes as observed upon PRK1-depletion. Importantly, a PRK1 inhibitor prevents metastases in mice, showing that the PRK1-pathway is a promising target to hamper prostate cancer metastases in vivo. Here we describe a novel mechanism controlling the metastatic behavior of PCa cells and identify PRK1 as a promising therapeutic target to treat androgen-independent metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:25504435

  8. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells are independent of the estrogen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Sunga; Lim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Ki Mo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Won O.; Kim, Tae Woong

    2011-12-15

    Cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine), found in Cordyceps spp., has been known to have many therapeutic effects including immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-aging effects. Moreover, anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of cordycepin have been reported, but the mechanism causing cancer cell death is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to investigate whether the mechanisms of cordycepin-induced cell death were associated with estrogen receptor in breast cancer cells. Exposure of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to cordycepin resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of cell growth and reduction in cell viability. The cordycepin-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with several specific features of the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL, and biochemical assays. Cordycepin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, triggering cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases-9 and -3. Interestingly, MCF-7 cells showed autophagy-associated cell death, as observed by the detection of an autophagosome-specific protein and large membranous vacuole ultrastructure morphology in the cytoplasm. Cordycepin-induced autophagic cell death has applications in treating MCF-7 cells with apoptotic defects, irrespective of the ER response. Although autophagy has a survival function in tumorigenesis of some cancer cells, autophagy may be important for cordycepin-induced MCF-7 cell death. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that cordycepin effectively kills MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines in culture. Hence, further studies should be conducted to determine whether cordycepin will be a clinically useful, ER-independent, chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the mechanism which cordycepin-induced cell death association with

  9. Nfil3-independent lineage maintenance and antiviral response of natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Firth, Matthew A; Madera, Sharline; Beaulieu, Aimee M; Gasteiger, Georg; Castillo, Eliseo F; Schluns, Kimberly S; Kubo, Masato; Rothman, Paul B; Vivier, Eric; Sun, Joseph C

    2013-12-16

    Development of the natural killer (NK) cell lineage is dependent on the transcription factor Nfil3 (or E4BP4), which is thought to act downstream of IL-15 signaling. Nfil3-deficient mice lack NK cells, whereas other lymphocyte lineages (B, T, and NKT cells) remain largely intact. We report the appearance of Ly49H-expressing NK cells in Nfil3(-/-) mice infected with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) or recombinant viruses expressing the viral m157 glycoprotein. Nfil3(-/-) NK cells at the peak of antigen-driven expansion were functionally similar to NK cells from infected wild-type mice with respect to IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity, and could comparably produce long-lived memory NK cells that persisted in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues for >60 d. We demonstrate that generation and maintenance of NK cell memory is an Nfil3-independent but IL-15-dependent process. Furthermore, specific ablation of Nfil3 in either immature NK cells in the bone marrow or mature peripheral NK cells had no observable effect on NK cell lineage maintenance or homeostasis. Thus, expression of Nfil3 is crucial only early in the development of NK cells, and signals through activating receptors and proinflammatory cytokines during viral infection can bypass the requirement for Nfil3, promoting the proliferation and long-term survival of virus-specific NK cells. PMID:24277151

  10. TSC2 epigenetic defect in primary LAM cells. Evidence of an anchorage-independent survival

    PubMed Central

    Lesma, Elena; Ancona, Silvia; Sirchia, Silvia M; Orpianesi, Emanuela; Grande, Vera; Colapietro, Patrizia; Chiaramonte, Eloisa; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Gorio, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in TSC1 or TSC2 genes. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) can be sporadic or associated with TSC and is characterized by widespread pulmonary proliferation of abnormal α-smooth muscle (ASM)-like cells. We investigated the features of ASM cells isolated from chylous thorax of a patient affected by LAM associated with TSC, named LAM/TSC cells, bearing a germline TSC2 mutation and an epigenetic defect causing the absence of tuberin. Proliferation of LAM/TSC cells is epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent and blockade of EGF receptor causes cell death as we previously showed in cells lacking tuberin. LAM/TSC cells spontaneously detach probably for the inactivation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/Akt/mTOR pathway and display the ability to survive independently from adhesion. Non-adherent LAM/TSC cells show an extremely low proliferation rate consistent with tumour stem-cell characteristics. Moreover, LAM/TSC cells bear characteristics of stemness and secrete high amount of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Anti-EGF receptor antibodies and rapamycin affect proliferation and viability of non-adherent cells. In conclusion, the understanding of LAM/TSC cell features is important in the assessment of cell invasiveness in LAM and TSC and should provide a useful model to test therapeutic approaches aimed at controlling their migratory ability. PMID:24606538

  11. The copper chelator ATN-224 induces caspase-independent cell death in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    LEE, KRISTY; HART, MATTHEW R.; BRIEHL, MARGARET M.; MAZAR, ANDREW P.; TOME, MARGARET E.

    2014-01-01

    Bcl-2 and other anti-apoptotic proteins are associated with defective caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways, resulting in chemoresistance. We have previously shown that ATN-224, a copper chelator drug, induces cell death in murine thymic lymphoma cells transfected with Bcl-2. In the current study, we tested whether ATN-224 was effective in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cells, which have increased anti-apoptotic proteins through translocation or amplification. We found that nanomolar concentrations of ATN-224 induced cell death in DLBCL cells independent of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL or Mcl-1 status. ATN-224 treatment resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction, release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and induction of caspase-independent cell death. In addition, ATN-224 degraded Mcl-1 and enhanced the effect of the BH3 mimetic ABT-263. These findings indicate that ATN-224 has potential as a therapeutic for the treatment of DLBCL. Induction of caspase-independent cell death in apoptosis-resistant DLBCL would provide a therapeutic alternative for the treatment of refractory disease. PMID:24788952

  12. AMID Mediates Adenosine-Induced Caspase-Independent HuH-7 Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongqin; Yaguchi, Takahiro; Nagata, Tetsu; Gotoh, Akinobu; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: The mechanism underlying extracellular adenosine-induced caspase-independent apoptosis in HuH-7 human hepatoma cells is not fully understood. The present study investigated the role for apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF)-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death (AMID) in the pathway. Methods: To see the implication of AMID in adenosine-induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescent cytochemistry, time-laps GFP monitoring, cell cycle analysis, flow cytometry, Western blotting, cell viability assay, and TUNEL staining were carried out. Results: Adenosine upregulated AMID expression in HuH-7 cells, and translocated AMID from the cytosol into the nucleus. Adenosine induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, and the effect was further enhanced by overexpressing AMID. Adenosine-induced HuH-7 cell apoptosis, alternatively, was inhibited by knocking-down AMID. Conclusion: The results of the present study provide evidence for AMID as a critical factor for adenosine-induced caspase-independent HuH-7 cell apoptosis. PMID:21325820

  13. Localization-dependent and -independent roles of numb contribute to cell-fate specification in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bhalerao, Sheetal; Berdnik, Daniela; Török, Tibor; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2005-09-01

    During asymmetric cell division, protein determinants are segregated into one of the two daughter cells. The Numb protein acts as a segregating determinant during both mouse and Drosophila development. In flies, Numb localizes asymmetrically and is required for cell-fate specification in the central and peripheral nervous systems, as well as during muscle and heart development. Whether its asymmetric segregation is important to the performance of these functions is not firmly established. Here, we demonstrate that Numb acts both in a localization-dependent and in a localization-independent manner. We have generated numb mutants that affect only the asymmetric localization of the protein during mitosis. We demonstrate that asymmetric segregation of Numb into one of the two daughter cells is absolutely essential for cell-fate specification in the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. Numb localization is also essential in MP2 neuroblasts in the central nervous system and during muscle development. Surprisingly, in dividing ganglion mother cells or during heart development, Numb function is independent of its ability to segregate asymmetrically in mitosis. Our results suggest that two classes of asymmetric cell division exist, each with different requirements for asymmetric inheritance of cell-fate determinants. PMID:16139215

  14. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Modell, Joshua W.; Kambara, Tracy K.; Perchuk, Barrett S.; Laub, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  15. A DNA damage-induced, SOS-independent checkpoint regulates cell division in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Modell, Joshua W; Kambara, Tracy K; Perchuk, Barrett S; Laub, Michael T

    2014-10-01

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the transcriptional repressor LexA induces a division inhibitor. However, in Caulobacter crescentus, cells lacking the primary SOS-regulated inhibitor, sidA, can often still delay division post-damage. Here we identify didA, a second cell division inhibitor that is induced by DNA damage, but in an SOS-independent manner. Together, DidA and SidA inhibit division, such that cells lacking both inhibitors divide prematurely following DNA damage, with lethal consequences. We show that DidA does not disrupt assembly of the division machinery and instead binds the essential division protein FtsN to block cytokinesis. Intriguingly, mutations in FtsW and FtsI, which drive the synthesis of septal cell wall material, can suppress the activity of both SidA and DidA, likely by causing the FtsW/I/N complex to hyperactively initiate cell division. Finally, we identify a transcription factor, DriD, that drives the SOS-independent transcription of didA following DNA damage. PMID:25350732

  16. AICAR induces AMPK-independent programmed necrosis in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Liu, Shuang-Qing; Gao, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Long-Yang

    2016-05-27

    AICAR (5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide riboside or acadesine) is an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) agonist, which induces cytotoxic effect to several cancer cells. Its potential activity in prostate cancer cells and the underlying signaling mechanisms have not been extensively studied. Here, we showed that AICAR primarily induced programmed necrosis, but not apoptosis, in prostate cancer cells (LNCaP, PC-3 and PC-82 lines). AICAR's cytotoxicity to prostate cancer cells was largely attenuated by the necrosis inhibitor necrostatin-1. Mitochondrial protein cyclophilin-D (CYPD) is required for AICAR-induced programmed necrosis. CYPD inhibitors (cyclosporin A and sanglifehrin A) as well as CYPD shRNAs dramatically attenuated AICAR-induced prostate cancer cell necrosis and cytotoxicity. Notably, AICAR-induced cell necrosis appeared independent of AMPK, yet requiring reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. ROS scavengers (N-acetylcysteine and MnTBAP), but not AMPKα shRNAs, largely inhibited prostate cancer cell necrosis and cytotoxicity by AICAR. In summary, the results of the present study demonstrate mechanistic evidences that AMPK-independent programmed necrosis contributes to AICAR's cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells. PMID:27103440

  17. Cancer Exosomes Perform Cell-Independent MicroRNA Biogenesis and Promote Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Sonia A.; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O’Connell, Joyce T.; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T.; Melo, Carlos A.; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A.; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate non-tumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  18. Cancer exosomes perform cell-independent microRNA biogenesis and promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Melo, Sonia A; Sugimoto, Hikaru; O'Connell, Joyce T; Kato, Noritoshi; Villanueva, Alberto; Vidal, August; Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Perelman, Lev T; Melo, Carlos A; Lucci, Anthony; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George A; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-11-10

    Exosomes are secreted by all cell types and contain proteins and nucleic acids. Here, we report that breast cancer associated exosomes contain microRNAs (miRNAs) associated with the RISC-Loading Complex (RLC) and display cell-independent capacity to process precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) into mature miRNAs. Pre-miRNAs, along with Dicer, AGO2, and TRBP, are present in exosomes of cancer cells. CD43 mediates the accumulation of Dicer specifically in cancer exosomes. Cancer exosomes mediate an efficient and rapid silencing of mRNAs to reprogram the target cell transcriptome. Exosomes derived from cells and sera of patients with breast cancer instigate nontumorigenic epithelial cells to form tumors in a Dicer-dependent manner. These findings offer opportunities for the development of exosomes based biomarkers and therapies. PMID:25446899

  19. Anergy and exhaustion are independent mechanisms of peripheral T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rocha, B; Grandien, A; Freitas, A A

    1995-03-01

    We studied the interactions of male-specific T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/beta-transgenic (TG) cells with different concentrations of male antigen in vivo. We constructed mouse chimeras expressing different amounts of male antigen by injecting thymectomized, lethally irradiated mice with various ratios of male (immunoglobulin [Ig] Ha) and female (IgHb) bone marrow. These chimeras were injected with male-specific TCR-alpha/beta-trangenic cells. These experiments allowed us to monitor antigen persistence and characterize antigen-specific T cells in terms of their frequency, reactivity, and effector functions (as tested by elimination of male B cells in vivo). In the absence of antigen, virgin TG cells persisted but did not expand. Transient exposure to antigen resulted in cell expansion, followed by the persistence of increased numbers of antigen-reactive T cells. In contrast, antigen persistence was followed by two independent mechanisms of tolerance induction: anergy (at high antigen concentrations), where T cells did not differentiate into effector functions but persisted in vivo as unresponsive T cells, and exhaustion (at lower antigen concentrations), where differentiation into effector functions (B cell elimination) occurred but was followed by the disappearance of antigen-specific T cells. PMID:7869056

  20. Polarization independent beam fanning using a multi-domain liquid crystal cell.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hongwen; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2009-07-01

    Polarization independent beam fanning using a multi-domain liquid crystal (LC) cell is demonstrated experimentally. In the neighboring domains, the LC directors are aligned in orthogonal directions. To prove concepts, two hybrid-aligned LC cells with four and six domains were fabricated. Applying a voltage across the LC layer will change the phase difference between the neighboring domains. When the phase difference is 2mpi (m is an integer), the LC cell will not disturb the incident beam. However, if the phase shift is (2m + 1)pi, the outgoing beam will fan out into several beams; the number of fanout beams is equal to the domain number. PMID:19582068

  1. Erythroid differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells is independent of donor cell type of origin

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Isabel; Klich, Katharina; Arauzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Radstaak, Martina; Santourlidis, Simeon; Ghanjati, Foued; Radke, Teja F.; Psathaki, Olympia E.; Hargus, Gunnar; Kramer, Jan; Einhaus, Martin; Kim, Jeong Beom; Kögler, Gesine; Wernet, Peter; Schöler, Hans R.; Schlenke, Peter; Zaehres, Holm

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic memory in induced pluripotent stem cells, which is related to the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, might lead to variations in the differentiation capacities of the pluripotent stem cells. In this context, induced pluripotent stem cells from human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells might be more suitable for hematopoietic differentiation than the commonly used fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells. To investigate the influence of an epigenetic memory on the ex vivo expansion of induced pluripotent stem cells into erythroid cells, we compared induced pluripotent stem cells from human neural stem cells and human cord blood-derived CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells and evaluated their potential for differentiation into hematopoietic progenitor and mature red blood cells. Although genome-wide DNA methylation profiling at all promoter regions demonstrates that the epigenetic memory of induced pluripotent stem cells is influenced by the somatic cell type of origin of the stem cells, we found a similar hematopoietic induction potential and erythroid differentiation pattern of induced pluripotent stem cells of different somatic cell origin. All human induced pluripotent stem cell lines showed terminal maturation into normoblasts and enucleated reticulocytes, producing predominantly fetal hemoglobin. Differences were only observed in the growth rate of erythroid cells, which was slightly higher in the induced pluripotent stem cells derived from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells. More detailed methylation analysis of the hematopoietic and erythroid promoters identified similar CpG methylation levels in the induced pluripotent stem cell lines derived from CD34+ cells and those derived from neural stem cells, which confirms their comparable erythroid differentiation potential. PMID:25326431

  2. Bupivacaine induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways in canine mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Shu; Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Lin, Sui-Wen; Chang, Te-Sheng; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2015-06-01

    Local anesthetics have been reported to induce apoptosis in various cell lines. In this study, we showed that bupivacaine also induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells, a vimentin(+)/AE1(+)/CK7(+)/HSP27(+), tumorigenic, immortalized, canine mammary tumor cell line. Bupivacaine induced apoptosis in DTK-SME cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Apoptosis-associated morphological changes, including cell shrinkage and rounding, chromatin condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies, were observed in the bupivacaine-treated DTK-SME cells. Apoptosis was further confirmed with annexin V staining, TUNEL staining, and DNA laddering assays. At the molecular level, the activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9 corresponded well to the degree of DNA fragmentation triggered by bupivacaine. We also demonstrated that the pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, only partially inhibited the apoptosis induced by bupivacaine. Moreover, treated cells increased expression of endonuclease G, a death effector that acts independently of caspases. Our data suggested that bupivacaine-induced apoptosis occurs through both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways. PMID:25843897

  3. p120-catenin regulates microtubule dynamics and cell migration in a cadherin-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Ichii, Tetsuo; Takeichi, Masatoshi

    2007-07-01

    p120-catenin (p120) has been shown to be essential for cadherin stability. Here, we show that p120 is capable of regulating microtubule (MT) dynamics in a cadherin-independent manner. When p120 was depleted in cadherin-deficient Neuro-2a (N2a) cells, MT stability was reduced, as assessed by the nocodazole sensitivity of MTs. On the contrary, over-expression of p120 caused MTs to become resistant to nocodazole. Time-lapse recording of GFP-tagged EB1, a protein which binds the growing plus-ends of MTs, introduced into these cells demonstrated that the plus ends underwent more frequent catastrophe in p120-depleted cells. In addition, p120 knockdown up-regulated the motility of isolated cells, whereas it down-regulated the directional migration of cells from wound edges; and these migratory behaviors of cells were mimicked by nocodazole-induced MT depolymerization. These results suggest that p120 has the ability to regulate MT dynamics and that this activity, in turn, affects cell motility independently of the cadherin adhesion system. PMID:17584295

  4. T Cell Receptor (TCR) Antagonism without a Negative Signal: Evidence from T Cell Hybridomas Expressing Two Independent TCRs

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Sabine H.; Bolliger, Luca; Carbone, Francis R.; Palmer, Ed

    1999-01-01

    Antagonist peptides inhibit T cell responses by an unknown mechanism. By coexpressing two independent T cell receptors (TCRs) on a single T cell hybridoma, we addressed the question of whether antagonist ligands induce a dominant-negative signal that inhibits the function of a second, independent TCR. The two receptors, Vα2Vβ5 and Vα2Vβ10, restricted by H-2Kb and specific for the octameric peptides SIINFEKL and SSIEFARL, respectively, were coexpressed on the same cell. Agonist stimulation demonstrated that the two receptors behaved independently with regard to antigen-induced TCR downregulation and intracellular biochemical signaling. The exposure of one TCR (Vα2Vβ5) to antagonist peptides could not inhibit a second independent TCR (Vα2Vβ10) from responding to its antigen. Thus, our data clearly demonstrate that these antagonist ligands do not generate a dominant-negative signal which affects the responsiveness of the entire cell. In addition, a kinetic analysis showed that even 12 h after engagement with their cognate antigen and 10 h after reaching a steady-state of TCR internalization, T cells were fully inhibited by the addition of antagonist peptides. The window of susceptibility to antagonist ligands correlated exactly with the time required for the responding T cells to commit to interleukin 2 production. The data support a model where antagonist ligands can competitively inhibit antigenic peptides from productively engaging the TCR. This competitive inhibition is effective during the entire commitment period, where sustained TCR engagement is essential for full T cell activation. PMID:9892608

  5. Studies on Culture and Osteogenic Induction of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells under CO2-Independent Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Zhang, Cui; Feng, Yiding; Zong, Chen; Chen, Jiarong; Tang, Zihua; Jia, Bingbing; Tong, Xiangming; Zheng, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the important factors that regulate bone anabolism. Osteoporosis resulting from microgravity during spaceflight may possibly be due to a decrease in osteogenesis mediated by hMSCs. This speculation should be verified through culture and osteogenic induction of hMSCs in a microgravity environment during spaceflight. Control of CO2 is a key component in current experimental protocols for growth, survival, and proliferation of in vitro cultured cells. However, carrying CO2 tanks on a spaceflight and devoting space/mass allowances for classical CO2 control protocols make experimentation on culture and osteogenesis difficult during most missions. Therefore, an experimental culture and osteogenic medium was developed through modifying the components of buffer salts in conventional culture medium. This experimental medium was used to culture and induce hMSCs under CO2-independent conditions. The results showed that culture and induction of hMSCs with conventional culture medium and conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions resulted in an increase of pH in medium. The proliferation of hMSCs was also inhibited. hMSCs cultured with experimental culture medium under CO2-independent conditions showed a proliferation potential that was the same as those cultured with conventional culture medium under CO2-dependent conditions. The experimental osteogenic medium could promote hMSCs to differentiate into osteoblast-like cells under CO2-independent conditions. Cells induced by this induction system showed high alkaline phosphatase activity. The expression levels of osteogenic genes in cells induced with experimental osteogenic medium under CO2-independent conditions were not significantly different from those cells induced with conventional osteogenic medium under CO2-dependent conditions. These results suggest that the experimental culture and induction system could be used to culture hMSCs and induce

  6. A spindle-independent cleavage pathway controls germ cell formation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Cinalli, Ryan M; Lehmann, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    The primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the first cells to form during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. Whereas the process of somatic cell formation has been studied in detail, the mechanics of PGC formation are poorly understood. Here, using four-dimensional multi-photon imaging combined with genetic and pharmacological manipulations, we find that PGC formation requires an anaphase spindle-independent cleavage pathway. In addition to using core regulators of cleavage, including the small GTPase RhoA (Drosophila rho1) and the Rho-associated kinase, ROCK (Drosophila drok), we show that this pathway requires Germ cell-less (GCL), a conserved BTB-domain protein not previously implicated in cleavage mechanics. This alternative form of cell formation suggests that organisms have evolved multiple molecular strategies for regulating the cytoskeleton during cleavage. PMID:23728423

  7. MHCII-independent CD4+ T cells protect injured CNS neurons via IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Hendrix, Sven; Boato, Francesco; Smirnov, Igor; Zheng, Jingjing; Lukens, John R.; Gadani, Sachin; Hechler, Daniel; Gölz, Greta; Rosenberger, Karen; Kammertöns, Thomas; Vogt, Johannes; Vogelaar, Christina; Siffrin, Volker; Radjavi, Ali; Fernandez-Castaneda, Anthony; Gaultier, Alban; Gold, Ralf; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Nitsch, Robert; Zipp, Frauke; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A body of experimental evidence suggests that T cells mediate neuroprotection following CNS injury; however, the antigen specificity of these T cells and how they mediate neuroprotection are unknown. Here, we have provided evidence that T cell–mediated neuroprotection after CNS injury can occur independently of major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) signaling to T cell receptors (TCRs). Using two murine models of CNS injury, we determined that damage-associated molecular mediators that originate from injured CNS tissue induce a population of neuroprotective, IL-4–producing T cells in an antigen-independent fashion. Compared with wild-type mice, IL-4–deficient animals had decreased functional recovery following CNS injury; however, transfer of CD4+ T cells from wild-type mice, but not from IL-4–deficient mice, enhanced neuronal survival. Using a culture-based system, we determined that T cell–derived IL-4 protects and induces recovery of injured neurons by activation of neuronal IL-4 receptors, which potentiated neurotrophin signaling via the AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these findings demonstrate that damage-associated molecules from the injured CNS induce a neuroprotective T cell response that is independent of MHCII/TCR interactions and is MyD88 dependent. Moreover, our results indicate that IL-4 mediates neuroprotection and recovery of the injured CNS and suggest that strategies to enhance IL-4–producing CD4+ T cells have potential to attenuate axonal damage in the course of CNS injury in trauma, inflammation, or neurodegeneration. PMID:25607842

  8. Cordycepin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in breast cancer cells are independent of the estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunga; Lim, Mi-Hee; Kim, Ki Mo; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Song, Won O; Kim, Tae Woong

    2011-12-01

    Cordycepin (3-deoxyadenosine), found in Cordyceps spp., has been known to have many therapeutic effects including immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anti-aging effects. Moreover, anti-tumor and anti-metastatic effects of cordycepin have been reported, but the mechanism causing cancer cell death is poorly characterized. The present study was designed to investigate whether the mechanisms of cordycepin-induced cell death were associated with estrogen receptor in breast cancer cells. Exposure of both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells to cordycepin resulted in dose-responsive inhibition of cell growth and reduction in cell viability. The cordycepin-induced cell death in MDA-MB-231 cells was associated with several specific features of the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, which was confirmed by DNA fragmentation, TUNEL, and biochemical assays. Cordycepin also caused a dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial translocation of Bax, triggering cytosolic release of cytochrome c and activation of caspases-9 and -3. Interestingly, MCF-7 cells showed autophagy-associated cell death, as observed by the detection of an autophagosome-specific protein and large membranous vacuole ultrastructure morphology in the cytoplasm. Cordycepin-induced autophagic cell death has applications in treating MCF-7 cells with apoptotic defects, irrespective of the ER response. Although autophagy has a survival function in tumorigenesis of some cancer cells, autophagy may be important for cordycepin-induced MCF-7 cell death. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrate that cordycepin effectively kills MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines in culture. Hence, further studies should be conducted to determine whether cordycepin will be a clinically useful, ER-independent, chemotherapeutic agent for human breast cancer. PMID:21933677

  9. Ligand-independent requirements of steroid receptors EcR and USP for cell survival.

    PubMed

    Mansilla, A; Martín, F A; Martín, D; Ferrús, A

    2016-03-01

    The active form of the Drosophila steroid hormone ecdysone, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E), binds the heterodimer EcR/USP nuclear receptor to regulate target genes that elicit proliferation, cell death and differentiation during insect development. Although the 20E effects are relatively well known, the physiological relevance of its receptors remains poorly understood. We show here that the prothoracic gland (PG), the major steroid-producing organ of insect larvae, requires EcR and USP to survive in a critical period previous to metamorphosis, and that this requirement is 20E-independent. The cell death induced by the downregulation of these receptors involves the activation of the JNK-encoding basket gene and it can be rescued by upregulating EcR isoforms which are unable to respond to 20E. Also, while PG cell death prevents ecdysone production, blocking hormone synthesis or secretion in normal PG does not lead to cell death, demonstrating further the ecdysone-independent nature of the receptor-deprivation cell death. In contrast to PG cells, wing disc or salivary glands cells do not require these receptors for survival, revealing their cell and developmental time specificity. Exploring the potential use of this feature of steroid receptors in cancer, we assayed tumor overgrowth induced by altered yorkie signaling. This overgrowth is suppressed by EcR downregulation in PG, but not in wing disc, cells. The mechanism of all these cell death features is based on the transcriptional regulation of reaper. These novel and context-dependent functional properties for EcR and USP receptors may help to understand the heterogeneous responses to steroid-based therapies in human pathologies. PMID:26250909

  10. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibits Apoptosis in Cancer Cells Through Simultaneous and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    DUDEJA, VIKAS; MUJUMDAR, NAMEETA; PHILLIPS, PHOEBE; CHUGH, ROHIT; BORJA–CACHO, DANIEL; DAWRA, RAJINDER K.; VICKERS, SELWYN M.; SALUJA, ASHOK K.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved and serve a multitude of functions that mediate cell survival. HSP70, the only inducible form of the 70-kilodalton subfamily of HSPs, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has been shown to inhibit caspase-dependent apoptosis. We aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which HSP70 inhibits apoptosis in cancer cells. Methods HSP70 expression was down-regulated in cultured pancreatic cancer cells by exposure to quercetin, triptolide, or short interfering RNAs. Intracellular Ca2+, cytosolic cathepsin B activity, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, and lysosome integrity were measured using colorimetric assays. Immunofluorescence assays were used to localize cathepsin B and Lamp2. BAPTA-AM was used to chelate intracellular Ca2+. Results Inhibition of HSP70 increased intracellular Ca2+ levels in pancreatic and colon cancer cell lines and led to loss of lysosome integrity in pancreatic cancer cells. The release of intracellular Ca2+ and lysosomal enzymes activated caspase-dependent apoptosis independently and simultaneously. Conclusions HSP70 inhibits apoptosis in cancer cells by 2 mechanisms: attenuation of cytosolic calcium and stabilization of lysosomes. HSP70-mediated cell survival might occur in other types of cancer cells. PMID:19208367

  11. Core exosome-independent roles for Rrp6 in cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Graham, Amy C; Kiss, Daniel L; Andrulis, Erik D

    2009-04-01

    Exosome complexes are 3' to 5' exoribonucleases composed of subunits that are critical for numerous distinct RNA metabolic (ribonucleometabolic) pathways. Several studies have implicated the exosome subunits Rrp6 and Dis3 in chromosome segregation and cell division but the functional relevance of these findings remains unclear. Here, we report that, in Drosophila melanogaster S2 tissue culture cells, dRrp6 is required for cell proliferation and error-free mitosis, but the core exosome subunit Rrp40 is not. Micorarray analysis of dRrp6-depleted cell reveals increased levels of cell cycle- and mitosis-related transcripts. Depletion of dRrp6 elicits a decrease in the frequency of mitotic cells and in the mitotic marker phospho-histone H3 (pH3), with a concomitant increase in defects in chromosome congression, separation, and segregation. Endogenous dRrp6 dynamically redistributes during mitosis, accumulating predominantly but not exclusively on the condensed chromosomes. In contrast, core subunits localize predominantly to MTs throughout cell division. Finally, dRrp6-depleted cells treated with microtubule poisons exhibit normal kinetochore recruitment of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 without restoring pH3 levels, suggesting that these cells undergo premature chromosome condensation. Collectively, these data support the idea that dRrp6 has a core exosome-independent role in cell cycle and mitotic progression. PMID:19225159

  12. Non-cell autonomous control of apoptosis by ligand-independent Hedgehog signaling in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, A E; Ding, T; Fan, Y; Graves, H K; Herz, H-M; Lindblad, J L; Bergmann, A

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is important for development and homeostasis in vertebrates and invertebrates. Ligand-independent, deregulated Hh signaling caused by loss of negative regulators such as Patched causes excessive cell proliferation, leading to overgrowth in Drosophila and tumors in humans, including basal-cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma. We show that in Drosophila deregulated Hh signaling also promotes cell survival by increasing the resistance to apoptosis. Surprisingly, cells with deregulated Hh activity do not protect themselves from apoptosis; instead, they promote cell survival of neighboring wild-type cells. This non-cell autonomous effect is mediated by Hh-induced Notch signaling, which elevates the protein levels of Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (Diap-1), conferring resistance to apoptosis. In summary, we demonstrate that deregulated Hh signaling not only promotes proliferation but also cell survival of neighboring cells. This non-cell autonomous control of apoptosis highlights an underappreciated function of deregulated Hh signaling, which may help to generate a supportive micro-environment for tumor development. PMID:23018595

  13. Drp1 Mediates Caspase-Independent Type III Cell Death in Normal and Leukemic Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Marlène; Yuste, Victor J.; Roué, Gaël; Barbier, Sandrine; Sancho, Patricia; Virely, Clémence; Rubio, Manuel; Baudet, Sylvie; Esquerda, Josep E.; Merle-Béral, Hélène; Sarfati, Marika; Susin, Santos A.

    2007-01-01

    Ligation of CD47 triggers caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) in normal and leukemic cells. Here, we characterize the morphological and biochemical features of this type of death and show that it displays the hallmarks of type III PCD. A molecular and biochemical approach has led us to identify a key mediator of this type of death, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). CD47 ligation induces Drp1 translocation from cytosol to mitochondria, a process controlled by chymotrypsin-like serine proteases. Once in mitochondria, Drp1 provokes an impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, which results in dissipation of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species generation, and a drop in ATP levels. Surprisingly, neither the activation of the most representative proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bax or Bak, nor the release of apoptogenic proteins AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), cytochrome c, endonuclease G (EndoG), Omi/HtrA2, or Smac/DIABLO from mitochondria to cytosol is observed. Responsiveness of cells to CD47 ligation increases following Drp1 overexpression, while Drp1 downregulation confers resistance to CD47-mediated death. Importantly, in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, mRNA levels of Drp1 strongly correlate with death sensitivity. Thus, this previously unknown mechanism controlling caspase-independent type III PCD may provide the basis for novel therapeutic approaches to overcome apoptotic avoidance in malignant cells. PMID:17682056

  14. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence.

    PubMed

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E; Mitchell, Timothy J; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  15. NLRP3 protects alveolar barrier integrity by an inflammasome-independent increase of epithelial cell adherence

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinova, Elena; Chaput, Catherine; Gutbier, Birgitt; Lippmann, Juliane; Sander, Leif E.; Mitchell, Timothy J.; Suttorp, Norbert; Witzenrath, Martin; Opitz, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pneumonia is a major cause of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, characterized by alveolar barrier disruption. NLRP3 is best known for its ability to form inflammasomes and to regulate IL-1β and IL-18 production in myeloid cells. Here we show that NLRP3 protects the integrity of the alveolar barrier in a mouse model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced pneumonia, and ex vivo upon treatment of isolated perfused and ventilated lungs with the purified bacterial toxin, pneumolysin. We reveal that the preserving effect of NLRP3 on the lung barrier is independent of inflammasomes, IL-1β and IL-18. NLRP3 improves the integrity of alveolar epithelial cell monolayers by enhancing cellular adherence. Collectively, our study uncovers a novel function of NLRP3 by demonstrating that it protects epithelial barrier function independently of inflammasomes. PMID:27476670

  16. Fluorescent labelling of intestinal epithelial cells reveals independent long-lived intestinal stem cells in a crypt

    SciTech Connect

    Horita, Nobukatsu; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Hayashi, Ryohei; Fukushima, Keita; Hibiya, Shuji; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Kano, Yoshihito; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Yui, Shiro; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • Lentivirus mixed with Matrigel enables direct infection of intestinal organoids. • Our original approach allows the marking of a single stem cell in a crypt. • Time-lapse imaging shows the dynamics of a single stem cell. • Our lentivirus transgene system demonstrates plural long-lived stem cells in a crypt. - Abstract: Background and aims: The dynamics of intestinal stem cells are crucial for regulation of intestinal function and maintenance. Although crypt stem cells have been identified in the intestine by genetic marking methods, identification of plural crypt stem cells has not yet been achieved as they are visualised in the same colour. Methods: Intestinal organoids were transferred into Matrigel® mixed with lentivirus encoding mCherry. The dynamics of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using time-lapse imaging, and the localisation of mCherry-positive cells was analysed using 3D immunofluorescence. Results: We established an original method for the introduction of a transgene into an organoid generated from mouse small intestine that resulted in continuous fluorescence of the mCherry protein in a portion of organoid cells. Three-dimensional analysis using confocal microscopy showed a single mCherry-positive cell in an organoid crypt that had been cultured for >1 year, which suggested the presence of long-lived mCherry-positive and -negative stem cells in the same crypt. Moreover, a single mCherry-positive stem cell in a crypt gave rise to both crypt base columnar cells and transit amplifying cells. Each mCherry-positive and -negative cell contributed to the generation of organoids. Conclusions: The use of our original lentiviral transgene system to mark individual organoid crypt stem cells showed that long-lived plural crypt stem cells might independently serve as intestinal epithelial cells, resulting in the formation of a completely functional villus.

  17. A comparative study of glycoproteomes in androgen-sensitive and -independent prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Anna; Ciołczyk-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Bodzoń-Kułakowska, Anna; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy; Laidler, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies in men and is predicted to be the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. After 6-18 months, hormone ablation treatment results in androgen-independent growth of cancer cells, metastasis and progression. The mechanism of androgen-independent growth of prostatic carcinoma cells is still unknown. Identification of factors that facilitate the transition from androgen-dependent to independent states is crucial in designing future diagnostics and medication strategies. To understand the biochemical meaning of hormone dependency deprivation, glycoproteins enriched profiles were compared between DU145 (hormone non-responding) and LNCaP (hormone responding) prostate cancer cells. These results allow for anticipation on the important role of glycosylation in malignant transformation. Both Tn antigen and complex antennary N-oligosaccharides were recognized. Their occurrence might be involved in the development and progression of tumor, and failure of hormone ablation therapy. Among identified proteins in androgen-sensitive cells nucleolin (P19338) was found that is widely described as apoptosis inhibitor, and also transporter of molecules from the membrane to the cytoplasm or nucleus. In addition, 14-3-3 protein family (P27348, P31946, P61981, P63104, P62258, Q04917, and P31947) was investigated across available databases as it forms stable complexes with glycoproteins. Our studies indicate that isoforms: sigma and eta were found in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells, while other isoforms were present in androgen non-responding cells. 14-3-3 binding partners are involved in cancer pathogenesis. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of prostate cancer tumorigenesis and to a more efficient prognosis and individual therapy in a future. However, it still remains to be revealed how important those changes are for androgen dependency loss in prostate cancer patients carried out on clinically

  18. Intrathymic lymphopoiesis: stromal cell-associated proliferation of T cells is independent of lymphocyte genotype.

    PubMed

    Kyewski, B A; Travis, M; Kaplan, H S

    1984-09-01

    We analyzed the genetic restriction of direct cell-cell interactions between thymocytes and a) cortical epithelial cells, b) macrophages, and c) medullary dendritic cells in the mouse thymus. Thymectomized (C3H X C57BL/Ka)F1 hybrid mice were doubly grafted with P1 and P2 neonatal thymus grafts, were lethally irradiated, and were reconstituted with a mixture of P1 and P2 bone marrow cells which differed in the Thy-1 locus. The contributions of both parental inocula to the composition of the free and stromal cell-associated T cell compartments were analyzed separately in thymic grafts of each parental strain. The lymphoid composition in both compartments essentially reflected the peripheral T cell-chimerism in the host. The development of lymphostromal complexes was not restricted by the genotype of the partner cells. Statistical analysis of the distributions of P1 and P2 T cells among free thymocytes and within individual lymphostromal complexes, however, suggests that the T cells of an individual complex are the progeny of oligoclonal proliferation. Thus, both epithelial cells and bone marrow-derived stromal cells seem to be involved in different stages of intrathymic lymphopoiesis. PMID:6611364

  19. Two Independent Functions of Collier/Early B Cell Factor in the Control of Drosophila Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Krzemień, Joanna; Morin-Poulard, Ismaël; Vincent, Alain; Crozatier, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Blood cell production in the Drosophila hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, is controlled by intrinsic factors and extrinsic signals. Initial analysis of Collier/Early B Cell Factor function in the lymph gland revealed the role of the Posterior Signaling Center (PSC) in mounting a dedicated cellular immune response to wasp parasitism. Further, premature blood cell differentiation when PSC specification or signaling was impaired, led to assigning the PSC a role equivalent to the vertebrate hematopoietic niche. We report here that Collier is expressed in a core population of lymph gland progenitors and cell autonomously maintains this population. The PSC contributes to lymph gland homeostasis by regulating blood cell differentiation, rather than by maintaining core progenitors. In addition to PSC signaling, switching off Collier expression in progenitors is required for efficient immune response to parasitism. Our data show that two independent sites of Collier/Early B Cell Factor expression, hematopoietic progenitors and the PSC, achieve control of hematopoiesis. PMID:26866694

  20. Derivation of LIF-independent mouse iPS cells with modified Oct4

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Firpo, Meri; Kikyo, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    It has been very difficult, if not impossible, to establish mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated cells, such as fibroblasts, without leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). We have established and maintained LIF-independent iPSCs for longer than 120 days with modified Oct4 along with Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. The iPSCs will provide a novel tool to investigate the roles of the LIF-Stat3 signaling pathway in mouse pluripotent stem cells. Resource TableBiological reagent: induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cellName of Stem Cell constructM3O-lenti-iPSC-LIF(−)InstitutionUniversity of MinnesotaPerson who created resourceHiroyuki HiraiContact person and emailNobuaki Kikyo, kikyo001@umn.eduDate archived/stock date2014–2015OriginMouse embryonic fibroblastsType of resourceBiological reagent: induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cellSub-typeCell lineKey transcription factorsM3O, Sox2, Klf4, c-MycAuthenticationIdentity and purity of cell line confirmed (Figure 1)Link to related literature (direct URL links and full references)Hirai H., et al. In press, Stem Cell ResearchInformation in public databases PMID:26318720

  1. Snail controls proliferation of Drosophila ovarian epithelial follicle stem cells, independently of E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chen-Yuan; Kao, Shih-Han; Hsu, Hwei-Jan

    2016-06-15

    Epithelial stem cells undergo constant self-renewal and differentiation to maintain the homeostasis of epithelial tissues that undergo rapid turnover. Recent studies have shown that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is primarily mediated by Snail via the suppression of E-cadherin, is able to generate cells with stem cell properties. However, the role of Snail in epithelial stem cells remains unclear. Here, we report that Snail directly controls proliferation of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in Drosophila females. Disruption of Snail expression in FSCs compromises their proliferation, but not their maintenance. Conversely, FSCs with excessive Snail expression display increased proliferation and lifespan, which is accompanied by a moderate decrease in the expression of E-cadherin (required for adhesion of FSCs to their niche) at the junction between their adjacent cells, indicating a conserved role of Snail in E-cadherin inhibition, which promote epithelial cell proliferation. Interestingly, a decrease in E-cadherin in snail-knock down FSCs does not restore the decreased proliferation of snail-knock down FSCs, suggesting that adhesion strength of FSCs to their niche is dispensable for Snail-mediated FSC division. Our results demonstrate that Snail controls epithelial stem cell division independently of its known role in the EMT, which contributes to induction of cancer stem cells. PMID:27141871

  2. Parthenolide reduces the frequency of ABCB5-positive cells and clonogenic capacity of melanoma cells from anchorage independent melanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Malgorzata; Koprowska, Kamila; Sztiller-Sikorska, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the cancer stem cell phenotype in melanoma is dynamically regulated. Therefore, effective therapies have to target simultaneously bulk tumor cells and melanoma stem-like cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of parthenolide on heterogeneous cancer cell populations from anchorage-independent melanospheres. Cells derived from nodular melanoma specimens were grown under serum-free sphere-forming conditions. The effects of parthenolide on cellular viability, immunophenotype and self-renewing capacity were assessed with cells from dissociated melanospheres. Its penetration capacity was evaluated with intact melanospheres. In melanoma cells that survived treatment with parthenolide, a different immunophenotype than that in untreated control was found. The frequency of cells expressing the ABCB5 transporter was markedly reduced. Most importantly, melanoma cells that survived parthenolide treatment lost their self-renewing capacity. Significantly lower influence of drug on cellular viability and frequency of ABCB5-positive cells was observed in intact melanospheres. The potential clinical significance of our findings is based on the ability of parthenolide to affect both bulk and melanoma stem-like cells with clonogenic capacity and high expression of the ABCB5 transporter. Its low penetration capacity, however, may limit its action to easily accessible melanoma cells, either circulating in the blood or those in the vicinity to blood vessels within the tumor. Because of limited penetration capacity of parthenolide, this drug should be further explored as a part of multimodal therapies rather than as a stand-alone therapeutic agent. PMID:23192276

  3. Substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T-cell-independent antibody responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingyue; Yi, Junyang; Wan, Zhengpeng; Liu, Kai; Song, Ping; Chau, Alicia; Wang, Fei; Chang, Zai; Han, Weidong; Zheng, Wenjie; Chen, Ying-Hua; Xiong, Chunyang; Liu, Wanli

    2015-06-01

    B cells use B-cell receptors (BCRs) to sense antigens that are usually presented on substrates with different stiffness. However, it is not known how substrate stiffness affects B-cell proliferation, class switch, and in vivo antibody responses. We addressed these questions using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with different stiffness (20 or 1100 kPa). Live cell imaging experiments suggested that antigens on stiffer substrates more efficiently trigger the synaptic accumulation of BCR and phospho-Syk molecules compared with antigens on softer substrates. In vitro expansion of mouse primary B cells shows different preferences for substrate stiffness when stimulated by different expansion stimuli. LPS equally drives B-cell proliferation on stiffer or softer substrates. Anti-CD40 antibodies enhance B-cell proliferation on stiffer substrates, while antigens enhance B-cell proliferation on softer substrates through a mechanism involving the enhanced phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, and FoxO1. In vitro class switch differentiation of B cells prefers softer substrates. Lastly, NP67-Ficoll on softer substrates accounted for an enhanced antibody response in vivo. Thus, substrate stiffness regulates B-cell activation, proliferation, class switch, and T cell independent antibody responses in vivo, suggesting its broad application in manipulating the fate of B cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25756957

  4. A Cell-Permeant Amiloride Derivative Induces Caspase-Independent, AIF-Mediated Programmed Necrotic Death of Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Leonardo J.; Pasupuleti, Nagarekha; Gorin, Fredric; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2013-01-01

    Amiloride is a potassium-sparing diuretic that has been used as an anti-kaliuretic for the chronic management of hypertension and heart failure. Several studies have identified a potential anti-cancer role for amiloride, however the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor effects remain to be fully delineated. Our group previously demonstrated that amiloride triggers caspase-independent cytotoxic cell death in human glioblastoma cell lines but not in primary astrocytes. To delineate the cellular mechanisms underlying amiloride’s anti-cancer cytotoxicity, cell permeant and cell impermeant derivatives of amiloride were synthesized that exhibit markedly different potencies in cancer cell death assays. Here we compare the cytotoxicities of 5-benzylglycinyl amiloride (UCD38B) and its free acid 5-glycinyl amiloride (UCD74A) toward human breast cancer cells. UCD74A exhibits poor cell permeability and has very little cytotoxic activity, while UCD38B is cell permeant and induces the caspase-independent death of proliferating and non-proliferating breast cancer cells. UCD38B treatment of human breast cancer cells promotes autophagy reflected in LC3 conversion, and induces the dramatic swelling of the endoplasmic reticulum, however these events do not appear to be the cause of cell death. Surprisingly, UCD38B but not UCD74A induces efficient AIF translocation from the mitochondria to the nucleus, and AIF function is necessary for the efficient induction of cancer cell death. Our observations indicate that UCD38B induces programmed necrosis through AIF translocation, and suggest that its cytosolic accessibility may facilitate drug action. PMID:23646172

  5. PAK4 promotes kinase-independent stabilization of RhoU to modulate cell adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Dart, Anna E.; Box, Gary M.; Court, William; Gale, Madeline E.; Brown, John P.; Pinder, Sarah E.; Eccles, Suzanne A.

    2015-01-01

    P21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is a Cdc42 effector protein thought to regulate cell adhesion disassembly in a kinase-dependent manner. We found that PAK4 expression is significantly higher in high-grade human breast cancer patient samples, whereas depletion of PAK4 modifies cell adhesion dynamics of breast cancer cells. Surprisingly, systematic analysis of PAK4 functionality revealed that PAK4-driven adhesion turnover is neither dependent on Cdc42 binding nor kinase activity. Rather, reduced expression of PAK4 leads to a concomitant loss of RhoU expression. We report that RhoU is targeted for ubiquitination by the Rab40A–Cullin 5 complex and demonstrate that PAK4 protects RhoU from ubiquitination in a kinase-independent manner. Overexpression of RhoU rescues the PAK4 depletion phenotype, whereas loss of RhoU expression reduces cell adhesion turnover and migration. These data support a new kinase-independent mechanism for PAK4 function, where an important role of PAK4 in cellular adhesions is to stabilize RhoU protein levels. Thus, PAK4 and RhoU cooperate to drive adhesion turnover and promote cell migration. PMID:26598620

  6. TIMP-1 inhibits microvascular endothelial cell migration by MMP-dependent and MMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Takemi; Akahane, Manabu; Shah, Amy; Connor, Christine M; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P

    2004-12-10

    It was reported over a decade ago that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) suppresses angiogenesis in experimental models but the mechanism is still incompletely understood. This in vitro study focused on the molecular basis of TIMP-1-mediated inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration, a key step in the angiogenic process. Both recombinant human TIMP-1 and the synthetic MMP inhibitors, GM6001 and MMP-2-MMP-9 Inhibitor III, suppressed migration of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) in a dose-dependent fashion. The MMP-dependent inhibition of migration was associated with increased expression of the junctional adhesion proteins, VE-cadherin and PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell junctions. TIMP-1 also caused MMP-independent dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (pY397) and paxillin, which was associated with reduced number of F-actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. Moreover, TIMP-1 stimulated expression of PTEN that has been shown to reduce phosphorylation of FAK and inhibit cell migration. Our data suggest that TIMP-1 inhibits HDMVEC migration through MMP-dependent stimulation of VE-cadherin and MMP-independent stimulation of PTEN with subsequent dephosphorylation of FAK and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:15530852

  7. BGP-15 inhibits caspase-independent programmed cell death in acetaminophen-induced liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Gabor; Szarka, Andras; Lotz, Gabor; Doczi, Judit; Wunderlich, Livius; Kiss, Andras; Jemnitz, Katalin; Veres, Zsuzsa; Banhegyi, Gabor; Schaff, Zsuzsa; Suemegi, Balazs; Mandl, Jozsef

    2010-02-15

    It has been recently shown that acute acetaminophen toxicity results in endoplasmic reticulum redox stress and an increase in cells with apoptotic phenotype in liver. Since activation of effector caspases was absent, the relevance of caspase-independent mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death was investigated. BGP-15, a drug with known protective actions in conditions involving redox imbalance, has been co-administered with a single sublethal dose of acetaminophen. Proapoptotic events and outcome of the injury were investigated. ER redox alterations and early ER-stress-related signaling events induced by acetaminophen, such as ER glutathione depletion, phosphorylation of eIF2alpha and JNK and induction of the transcription factor GADD153, were not counteracted by co-treatment with BGP-15. However, BGP-15 prevented AIF mitochondria-to-nucleus translocation and mitochondrial depolarization. BGP-15 co-treatment attenuated the rate of acetaminophen-induced cell death as assessed by apoptotic index and enzyme serum release. These results reaffirm that acute acetaminophen toxicity involves oxidative stress-induced caspase-independent cell death. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of AIF translocation may effectively protect against or at least delay acetaminophen-induced programmed cell death.

  8. Jak2-Independent Activation of Stat3 by Intracellular Angiotensin II in Human Mesangial Cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rekha

    2011-01-01

    Ang II is shown to mediate the stimulatory effect of high glucose on TGF-b1 and extracellular matrix proteins in glomerular mesangial cells. Also inhibition of Ang II formation in cell media (extracellular) and lysates (intracellular) blocks high-glucose effects on TGF-b1 and matrix more effectively compared to inhibition of extracellular Ang II alone. To investigate whether intracellular Ang II can stimulate TGF-b1 and matrix independent of extracellular Ang II, cultured human mesangial cells were transfected with Ang II to increase intracellular Ang II levels and its effects on TGF-b1 and matrix proteins were determined. Prior to transfection, cells were treated with candesartan to block extracellular Ang II-induced responses via cell membrane AT1 receptors. Transfection of cells with Ang II resulted in increased levels of intracellular Ang II which was accompanied by increased production of TGF-b1, collagen IV, fibronectin, and cell proliferation as well. On further examination, intracellular Ang II was found to activate Stat3 transcription factor including increased Stat3 protein expression, tyrosine 705 phosphorylation, and DNA-binding activity. Treatment with AG-490, an inhibitor of Jak2, did not block intracellular Ang II-induced Stat3 phosphorylation at tyrosine 705 residue indicating a Jak2-independent mechanism used by intracellular Ang II for Stat3 phosphorylation. In contrast, extracellular Ang II-induced tyrosine 705 phosphorylation of Stat3 was inhibited by AG-490 confirming the presence of a Jak2-dependent pathway. These findings suggest that intracellular Ang II increases TGF-b1 and matrix in human mesangial cells and also activates Stat3 transcription factor without involvement of the extracellular Ang II signaling pathway. PMID:21915376

  9. Indirubin 3'-Epoxide Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Human Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Masahiro; Hanada, Satoshi; Ichimaru, Yoshimi; Saito, Hiroaki; Tabata, Keiichi; Asami, Satoru; Miyairi, Shinichi; Suzuki, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Indirubin inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases by binding to their ATP-binding site, thereby exerting potent cytotoxicity on some tumor cells. We examined the anti-tumor effect of indirubin 3'-epoxide on human neuroblastoma cell lines (IMR-32, SK-N-SH, and NB-39). The results revealed potent cytotoxicity of indirubin 3'-epoxide against the IMR-32 (IC50: 0.16 µM) and SK-N-SH (IC50: 0.07 µM) cells. Furthermore, it also induced an increase of the sub-G1 population in the IMR-32 cells. Examination by Hoechst 33342 staining revealed apoptosis characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation and nuclear fragmentation in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, annexin V-propidium iodide (PI) double-staining revealed an increase in the percentage of early apoptotic cells following treatment of the cells with indirubin 3'-epoxide without activation of caspases. In addition, significant decreases in the protein level of survivin and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP), and increase in that of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were found in the nuclei of the cells. These results suggest that indirubin 3'-epoxide induced caspase-independent apoptosis through mechanisms involving DNA fragmentation and inhibition of DNA repair. PMID:27251501

  10. Anchorage Independent Growth of Breast Carcinoma Cells is Mediated by Serum Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Josiah; Pratap, Siddharth; Khatua, Atanu K.; Sakwe., Amos M.

    2009-01-01

    We hereby report studies that suggest a role for serum exosomes in the anchorage independent growth (AIG) of tumor cells. In AIG assays, fetal bovine serum is one of the critical ingredients. We therefore purified exosomes from fetal bovine serum and examined their potential to promote growth of breast carcinoma cells in soft agar and Matrigel after reconstituting them into growth medium (EEM). In all the assays, viable colonies were formed only in the presence of exosomes. Some of the exosomal proteins we identified, have been documented by others and could be considered exosomal markers. Labeled purified exosomes were up-taken by the tumor cells, a process that could be competed out with excess unlabeled vesicles. Our data also suggested that once endocytosed by a cell, the exosomes could be recycled back to the conditioned medium from where they can be up-taken by other cells. We also demonstrated that low concentrations of exosomes activate MAP kinases, suggesting a mechanism by which they maintain the growth of the tumor cells in soft agar. Taken together, our data demonstrate that serum exosomes form a growth promoting platform for AIG of tumor cells and may open a new vista into cancer cell growth in vivo. PMID:19327352

  11. Simvastatin induces caspase-independent apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Mi Hee; Kang, Kwang Il; Lee, Hayyoung; Paik, Sang-Gi; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Kim, Young Sang . E-mail: young@cnu.ac.kr

    2006-01-20

    Macrophages participate in several inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. We examined the effect of simvastatin on the LPS-induced proinflammatory macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Co-treatment of LPS and a non-toxic dose of simvastatin induced cell death in RAW264.7 cells. The cell death was accompanied by disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), genomic DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3 activation. Surprisingly, despite caspase-dependent apoptotic cascade being completely blocked by Z-VAD-fmk, a pan-caspase inhibitor, the cell death was only partially repressed. In the presence of Z-VAD-fmk, DNA fragmentation was blocked, but DNA condensation, disruption of MMP, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis inducing factor were obvious. The cell death by simvastatin and LPS was effectively decreased by both the FPP and GGPP treatments as well as mevalonate. Our findings indicate that simvastatin triggers the cell death of LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways, suggesting a novel mechanism of statins for the severe inflammatory disease therapy.

  12. 31P MAS-NMR of human erythrocytes: independence of cell volume from angular velocity.

    PubMed

    Kuchel, P W; Bubb, W A; Ramadan, S; Chapman, B E; Philp, D J; Coen, M; Gready, J E; Harvey, P J; McLean, A J; Hook, J

    2004-09-01

    31P magic angle spinning NMR (MAS-NMR) spectra were obtained from suspensions of human red blood cells (RBCs) that contained the cell-volume-sensitive probe molecule, dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A mathematical representation of the spectral-peak shape, including the separation and width-at-half-height in the 31P NMR spectra, as a function of rotor speed, enabled us to explore the extent to which a change in cell volume would be reflected in the spectra if it occurred. We concluded that a fractional volume change in excess of 3% would have been detected by our experiments. Thus, the experiments indicated that the mean cell volume did not change by this amount even at the highest spinning rate of 7 kHz. The mean cell volume and intracellular 31P line-width were independent of the packing density of the cells and of the initial cell volume. The relationship of these conclusions to other non-NMR studies of pressure effects on cells is noted. PMID:15334588

  13. A rigorous multiple independent binding site model for determining cell-based equilibrium dissociation constants.

    PubMed

    Drake, Andrew W; Klakamp, Scott L

    2007-01-10

    A new 4-parameter nonlinear equation based on the standard multiple independent binding site model (MIBS) is presented for fitting cell-based ligand titration data in order to calculate the ligand/cell receptor equilibrium dissociation constant and the number of receptors/cell. The most commonly used linear (Scatchard Plot) or nonlinear 2-parameter model (a single binding site model found in commercial programs like Prism(R)) used for analysis of ligand/receptor binding data assumes only the K(D) influences the shape of the titration curve. We demonstrate using simulated data sets that, depending upon the cell surface receptor expression level, the number of cells titrated, and the magnitude of the K(D) being measured, this assumption of always being under K(D)-controlled conditions can be erroneous and can lead to unreliable estimates for the binding parameters. We also compare and contrast the fitting of simulated data sets to the commonly used cell-based binding equation versus our more rigorous 4-parameter nonlinear MIBS model. It is shown through these simulations that the new 4-parameter MIBS model, when used for cell-based titrations under optimal conditions, yields highly accurate estimates of all binding parameters and hence should be the preferred model to fit cell-based experimental nonlinear titration data. PMID:17141800

  14. Induction of endocycles represses apoptosis independently of differentiation and predisposes cells to genome instability

    PubMed Central

    Hassel, Christiane; Zhang, Bingqing; Dixon, Michael; Calvi, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    The endocycle is a common developmental cell cycle variation wherein cells become polyploid through repeated genome duplication without mitosis. We previously showed that Drosophila endocycling cells repress the apoptotic cell death response to genotoxic stress. Here, we investigate whether it is differentiation or endocycle remodeling that promotes apoptotic repression. We find that when nurse and follicle cells switch into endocycles during oogenesis they repress the apoptotic response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation, and that this repression has been conserved in the genus Drosophila over 40 million years of evolution. Follicle cells defective for Notch signaling failed to switch into endocycles or differentiate and remained apoptotic competent. However, genetic ablation of mitosis by knockdown of Cyclin A or overexpression of fzr/Cdh1 induced follicle cell endocycles and repressed apoptosis independently of Notch signaling and differentiation. Cells recovering from these induced endocycles regained apoptotic competence, showing that repression is reversible. Recovery from fzr/Cdh1 overexpression also resulted in an error-prone mitosis with amplified centrosomes and high levels of chromosome loss and fragmentation. Our results reveal an unanticipated link between endocycles and the repression of apoptosis, with broader implications for how endocycles may contribute to genome instability and oncogenesis. PMID:24284207

  15. Gene profiling of growth factor independence 1B gene (Gfi-1B) in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, Michael; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beelen, Dietrich W; Elmaagacli, Ahmet H

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular effects of growth factor independence 1B (Gfi-1B), a transcription factor essential for the development of hematopoietic cells and differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, the naturally Gfi-1B overexpressing cell line K562 was cultured in the presence of Gfi-1B target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). SiRNA treatment significantly knocked down Gfi-1B expression with an efficiency of nearly 90%. Analysis of the siRNA silencing protocol by colony-forming units ensured that it was not cytotoxic. Samples from Gfi-1B overexpressing cells and cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B were analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data; relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by reserve transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, including MYC/MYCBP and CDKN1A. Interestingly, transcripts within components of the signalling cascade of immune cells (PLD1, LAMP1, HSP90, IL6ST), of the tyrosine kinase pathway (TPR, RAC3) and of the transcription factors (RAC3, CEP290, JEM-1, ATR, MYC, SMC3, RARA, RBBP6) were found to be differentially expressed in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells compared to controls. Individual genes such as ZDHHC17, DMXL1, ZNF292 were found to be upregulated in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells. In addition, down-regulated transcripts showed cell signaling transcripts for several chemokine gene members including GNAL, CXCL5, GNL3L, GPR65, TMEM30, BCL11B and transcription factors (GTF2H3, ATXN3). In conclusion, several essential cell signalling factors, as well as transcriptional and post-translational regulation genes were differentially expressed in cells that overexpressed Gfi-1B compared to control cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B. Our data indicate that Gfi-1B signalling is important for commitment and maturation of hematopoietic cell populations. PMID:18224412

  16. Increased Th22 cells are independently associated with Th17 cells in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xinyu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Shi, Yun; Gu, Yong; Chen, Heng; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is perceived as an autoimmune disease caused by T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. However, the number of inflammatory T cells in blood, as well as the relative importance of each cell type is unclear. Forty-two patients with T1D and 30 controls were enrolled. Circulating primary CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells were quantified with 5-color flow cytometry. Serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels were examined by ELISA. Serum autoantibodies were measured by radio-binding assays, using (35)S-labeled glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65), protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (IA-2), and zinc transporter 8 (ZnT8). Th17-Th22 and Tc1-Tc17 were significantly elevated in patients with T1D compared to control subjects, while there were no significant differences in Th1 cells. The levels of these T cells in different stages of T1D were investigated. Th22 cells showed a positive correlation with Th17 cells in T1D patients. However, we did not find any correlation between IL-17 and IL-22 in sera. Autoantibodies were not significantly different between patients with early T1D and those who have had it for a longer duration. This study indicates that Th22 may contribute to the pathogenesis of T1D. Blockade of Th22 cells might be of clinical profit in T1D patients. PMID:23928796

  17. Cyclin D1-CDK4 Controls Glucose Metabolism Independently of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjin; Dominy, John E.; Choi, Yoon Jong; Jurczak, Michael; Tolliday, Nicola; Camporez, Joao Paulo; Chim, Helen; Lim, Ji-Hong; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Vazquez, Francisca; Sicinski, Piotr; Shulman, Gerald I.; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Insulin constitutes a major evolutionarily conserved hormonal axis for maintaining glucose homeostasis1-3; dysregulation of this axis causes diabetes2,4. PGC-1α links insulin signaling to the expression of glucose and lipid metabolic genes5-7. GCN5 acetylates PGC-1α and suppresses its transcriptional activity, whereas SIRT1 deacetylates and activates PGC-1α8,9. Although insulin is a mitogenic signal in proliferative cells10,11, whether components of the cell cycle machinery contribute to insulin’s metabolic action is poorly understood. Herein, we report that insulin activates cyclin D1-CDK4, which, in turn, increases GCN5 acetyltransferase activity and suppresses hepatic glucose production independently of cell cycle progression. Through a cell-based high throughput chemical screen, we identified a CDK4 inhibitor that potently decreases PGC-1α acetylation. Insulin/GSK3β signaling induces cyclin D1 protein stability via sequestering cyclin D1 in the nucleus. In parallel, dietary amino acids increase hepatic cyclin D1 mRNA transcripts. Activated cyclin D1-CDK4 kinase phosphorylates and activates GCN5, which then acetylates and inhibits PGC-1α activity on gluconeogenic genes. Loss of hepatic cyclin D1 results in increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. In diabetic models, cyclin D1-CDK4 is chronically elevated and refractory to fasting/feeding transitions; nevertheless further activation of this kinase normalizes glycemia. Our findings show that insulin uses components of the cell cycle machinery in post-mitotic cells to control glucose homeostasis independently of cell division. PMID:24870244

  18. Cyclin D1-Cdk4 controls glucose metabolism independently of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjin; Dominy, John E; Choi, Yoon Jong; Jurczak, Michael; Tolliday, Nicola; Camporez, Joao Paulo; Chim, Helen; Lim, Ji-Hong; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Vazquez, Francisca; Sicinski, Piotr; Shulman, Gerald I; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-06-26

    Insulin constitutes a principal evolutionarily conserved hormonal axis for maintaining glucose homeostasis; dysregulation of this axis causes diabetes. PGC-1α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α) links insulin signalling to the expression of glucose and lipid metabolic genes. The histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (general control non-repressed protein 5) acetylates PGC-1α and suppresses its transcriptional activity, whereas sirtuin 1 deacetylates and activates PGC-1α. Although insulin is a mitogenic signal in proliferative cells, whether components of the cell cycle machinery contribute to its metabolic action is poorly understood. Here we report that in mice insulin activates cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), which, in turn, increases GCN5 acetyltransferase activity and suppresses hepatic glucose production independently of cell cycle progression. Through a cell-based high-throughput chemical screen, we identify a Cdk4 inhibitor that potently decreases PGC-1α acetylation. Insulin/GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta) signalling induces cyclin D1 protein stability by sequestering cyclin D1 in the nucleus. In parallel, dietary amino acids increase hepatic cyclin D1 messenger RNA transcripts. Activated cyclin D1-Cdk4 kinase phosphorylates and activates GCN5, which then acetylates and inhibits PGC-1α activity on gluconeogenic genes. Loss of hepatic cyclin D1 results in increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycaemia. In diabetic models, cyclin D1-Cdk4 is chronically elevated and refractory to fasting/feeding transitions; nevertheless further activation of this kinase normalizes glycaemia. Our findings show that insulin uses components of the cell cycle machinery in post-mitotic cells to control glucose homeostasis independently of cell division. PMID:24870244

  19. Kremen1 and Dickkopf1 control cell survival in a Wnt-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Causeret, F; Sumia, I; Pierani, A

    2016-02-01

    In multicellular organisms, a tight control of cell death is required to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis. Improper function of apoptotic or survival pathways can not only affect developmental programs but also favor cancer progression. Here we describe a novel apoptotic signaling pathway involving the transmembrane receptor Kremen1 and its ligand, the Wnt-antagonist Dickkopf1. Using a whole embryo culture system, we first show that Dickkopf1 treatment promotes cell survival in a mouse model exhibiting increased apoptosis in the developing neural plate. Remarkably, this effect was not recapitulated by chemical Wnt inhibition. We then show that Dickkopf1 receptor Kremen1 is a bona fide dependence receptor, triggering cell death unless bound to its ligand. We performed Wnt-activity assays to demonstrate that the pro-apoptotic and anti-Wnt functions mediated by Kremen1 are strictly independent. Furthermore, we combined phylogenetic and mutagenesis approaches to identify a specific motif in the cytoplasmic tail of Kremen1, which is (i) specifically conserved in the lineage of placental mammals and (ii) strictly required for apoptosis induction. Finally, we show that somatic mutations of kremen1 found in human cancers can affect its pro-apoptotic activity, supporting a tumor suppressor function. Our findings thus reveal a new Wnt-independent function for Kremen1 and Dickkopf1 in the regulation of cell survival with potential implications in cancer therapies. PMID:26206087

  20. Imperatorin sensitizes anoikis and inhibits anchorage-independent growth of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choochuay, Kanuengnit; Chunhacha, Preedakorn; Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Luechapudiporn, Rataya; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2013-07-01

    The anoikis-sensitization activity of imperatorin, an active furanocoumarin component of Angelica dahurica root, is reported herein for the first time. The present study demonstrated that the imperatorin treatment at sub-toxic concentrations enhanced human lung cancer H23 cell apoptosis after detachment. A Western blot analysis showed that imperatorin significantly enhanced the p53 protein level, which subsequently down-regulated Mcl-1 protein and up-regulated Bax, while it had a minimal effect on Bcl-2 expression. In addition, an anchorage-independent growth assay was performed to support the anti-metastasis potential of imperatorin. Consistent with anoikis assay, imperatorin exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on the anchorage-independent growth of the cells. Further, this study demonstrated that imperatorin sensitizes anoikis in other lung cancer cells, namely, H292 and A549. Because anoikis was shown to be a critical hindrance in preventing cancer cell metastasis, the knowledge regarding such an activity and an underlying mechanism may lead to the development of this compound for a cancer therapy. PMID:23108812

  1. LIF independent JAK signalling to chromatin in embryonic stem cells uncovered from an adult stem cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Dean S.; Li, Juan; Dawson, Mark A.; Trotter, Matthew W.B.; Cheng, Yi-Han; Smith, Aileen M.; Mansfield, William; Liu, Pentao; Kouzarides, Tony; Nichols, Jennifer; Bannister, Andrew J.; Green, Anthony R; Göttgens, Berthold

    2010-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase JAK2 cause myeloproliferative neoplasms, clonal blood stem cell disorders with a propensity for leukaemic transformation. LIF signalling through JAK-STAT enables ES cell self-renewal. Here we show that mouse ES cells carrying the human JAK2V617F mutation could self-renew in chemically defined conditions without cytokines or small molecule inhibitors independently of JAK signalling through STAT3 or PI3K pathways. Phosphorylation of histone H3Y41 by JAK2 was recently shown to interfere with HP1α binding. Chromatin bound HP1α was lower in JAK2V617F ES cells but increased following JAK2 inhibition, coincident with a global reduction in H3Y41ph. JAK2 inhibition reduced Nanog, with a reduction in H3Y41ph and concomitant increase in HP1α at the Nanog promoter. Furthermore, Nanog was required for factor-independence of JAK2V617F ES cells. Taken together, these results uncover a previously unrecognised role for direct signalling to chromatin by JAK2 as an important mediator of ES cell self-renewal. PMID:21151131

  2. LIF-independent JAK signalling to chromatin in embryonic stem cells uncovered from an adult stem cell disease.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Dean S; Li, Juan; Dawson, Mark A; Trotter, Matthew W B; Cheng, Yi-Han; Smith, Aileen M; Mansfield, William; Liu, Pentao; Kouzarides, Tony; Nichols, Jennifer; Bannister, Andrew J; Green, Anthony R; Göttgens, Berthold

    2011-01-01

    Activating mutations in the tyrosine kinase Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) cause myeloproliferative neoplasms, clonal blood stem cell disorders with a propensity for leukaemic transformation. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) signalling through the JAK-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway enables self-renewal of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we show that mouse ES cells carrying the human JAK2V617F mutation were able to self-renew in chemically defined conditions without cytokines or small-molecule inhibitors, independently of JAK signalling through the STAT3 or phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathways. Phosphorylation of histone H3 tyrosine 41 (H3Y41) by JAK2 was recently shown to interfere with binding of heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α). Levels of chromatin-bound HP1α were lower in JAK2V617F ES cells but increased following inhibition of JAK2, coincident with a global reduction in histone H3Y41 phosphorylation. JAK2 inhibition reduced levels of the pluripotency regulator Nanog, with a reduction in H3Y41 phosphorylation and concomitant increase in HP1α levels at the Nanog promoter. Furthermore, Nanog was required for factor independence of JAK2V617F ES cells. Taken together, these results uncover a previously unrecognized role for direct signalling to chromatin by JAK2 as an important mediator of ES cell self-renewal. PMID:21151131

  3. Hemolysin-producing Listeria monocytogenes affects the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Hage-Chahine, C M; Del Giudice, G; Lambert, P H; Pechere, J C

    1992-01-01

    A murine experimental infection with a hemolysin-producing (Hly+) strain of Listeria monocytogenes and a non-hemolysin-producing (Hly-) mutant was used as an in vivo model to evaluate the role of hemolysin production in the immune response. No antilisterial antibodies were detectable following sublethal infection with Hly+ bacteria, but consistent antilisterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM antibody production was observed following sublethal infection with the Hly- mutant. Hly+ but not Hly- L. monocytogenes induced transient inhibition of antibody response to Hly- bacteria and to unrelated T-cell-dependent (tetanus toxoid) and T-cell-independent (pneumococcal polysaccharide 3) antigens. Transient inhibition of the activation of an antigen-specific T-cell clone was also observed following Hly+ infection of antigen-presenting cells but not following Hly- infection. These results suggest that hemolysin production by L. monocytogenes is an important factor in modulating the immune response to T-cell-dependent and T-cell-independent antigens in infected individuals. Images PMID:1548067

  4. TGF-{beta}'s delay skeletal muscle progenitor cell differentiation in an isoform-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Schabort, Elske J.; Merwe, Mathilde van der; Loos, Benjamin; Moore, Frances P.; Niesler, Carola U.

    2009-02-01

    Satellite cells are a quiescent heterogenous population of mononuclear stem and progenitor cells which, once activated, differentiate into myotubes and facilitate skeletal muscle repair or growth. The Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) superfamily members are elevated post-injury and their importance in the regulation of myogenesis and wound healing has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Most studies suggest a negative role for TGF-{beta} on satellite cell differentiation. However, none have compared the effect of these three isoforms on myogenesis in vitro. This is despite known isoform-specific effects of TGF-{beta}1, -{beta}2 and -{beta}3 on wound repair in other tissues. In the current study we compared the effect of TGF-{beta}1, -{beta}2 and -{beta}3 on proliferation and differentiation of the C2C12 myoblast cell-line. We found that, irrespective of the isoform, TGF-{beta} increased proliferation of C2C12 cells by changing the cellular localisation of PCNA to promote cell division and prevent cell cycle exit. Concomitantly, TGF-{beta}1, -{beta}2 and -{beta}3 delayed myogenic commitment by increasing MyoD degradation and decreasing myogenin expression. Terminal differentiation, as measured by a decrease in myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression, was also delayed. These results demonstrate that TGF-{beta} promotes proliferation and delays differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts in an isoform-independent manner.

  5. A Cilia Independent Role of Ift88/Polaris during Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Christoph; Powelske, Christian; Mergen, Miriam; Herbst, Henriette; Kotsis, Fruzsina; Nitschke, Roland; Kuehn, E. Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Ift88 is a central component of the intraflagellar transport (Ift) complex B, essential for the building of cilia and flagella from single cell organisms to mammals. Loss of Ift88 results in the absence of cilia and causes left-right asymmetry defects, disordered Hedgehog signaling, and polycystic kidney disease, all of which are explained by aberrant ciliary function. In addition, a number of extraciliary functions of Ift88 have been described that affect the cell-cycle, mitosis, and targeting of the T-cell receptor to the immunological synapse. Similarly, another essential ciliary molecule, the kinesin-2 subunit Kif3a, which transports Ift-B in the cilium, affects microtubule (MT) dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells independently of cilia. We now show that loss of Ift88 impairs cell migration irrespective of cilia. Ift88 is required for the polarization of migrating MDCK cells, and Ift88 depleted cells have fewer MTs at the leading edge. Neither MT dynamics nor MT nucleation are dependent on Ift88. Our findings dissociate the function of Ift88 from Kif3a outside the cilium and suggest a novel extraciliary function for Ift88. Future studies need to address what unifying mechanism underlies the different extraciliary functions of Ift88. PMID:26465598

  6. IL-4/IL-13 independent goblet cell hyperplasia in experimental helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Marillier, Reece G; Michels, Chesney; Smith, Elizabeth M; Fick, Lizette CE; Leeto, Mosiuoa; Dewals, Benjamin; Horsnell, William GC; Brombacher, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Background Intestinal mucus production by hyperplasic goblet cells is a striking pathological feature of many parasitic helminth infections and is related to intestinal protection and worm expulsion. Induction of goblet cell hyperplasia is associated with TH2 immune responses, which in helminth infections are controlled primarily by IL-13, and also IL-4. In the study presented here we examine the goblet cell hyperplasic response to three experimental parasitic helminth infections; namely Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, Syphacia obvelata and Schistosoma mansoni. Results As expected N. brasiliensis infection induced a strong goblet cell hyperplasia dependent on IL-4/IL-13/IL-4Rα expression. In contrast, and despite previously published transiently elevated IL-4/IL-13 levels, S. obvelata infections did not increase goblet cell hyperplasia in the colon. Furthermore, induction of goblet cell hyperplasia in response to S. mansoni eggs traversing the intestine was equivalent between BALB/c, IL-4/IL-13-/- and IL-4Rα-/- mice. Conclusion Together these data demonstrate that intestinal goblet cell hyperplasia can be independent of TH2 immune responses associated with parasitic helminth infections. PMID:18373844

  7. Caveolae-Dependent and -Independent Uptake of Albumin in Cultured Rodent Pulmonary Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui-Hua; Li, Jin; Wasserloos, Karla J.; Wallace, Callen; Sullivan, Mara G.; Bauer, Philip M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Lee, Janet S.; Watkins, Simon C.; St Croix, Claudette M.; Pitt, Bruce R.; Zhang, Li-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although a critical role for caveolae-mediated albumin transcytosis in pulmonary endothelium is well established, considerably less is known about caveolae-independent pathways. In this current study, we confirmed that cultured rat pulmonary microvascular (RPMEC) and pulmonary artery (RPAEC) endothelium endocytosed Alexa488-labeled albumin in a saturable, temperature-sensitive mode and internalization resulted in co-localization by fluorescence microscopy with cholera B toxin and caveolin-1. Although siRNA to caveolin-1 (cav-1) in RPAEC significantly inhibited albumin uptake, a remnant portion of albumin uptake was cav-1-independent, suggesting alternative pathways for albumin uptake. Thus, we isolated and cultured mouse lung endothelial cells (MLEC) from wild type and cav-1-/- mice and noted that ~ 65% of albumin uptake, as determined by confocal imaging or live cell total internal reflectance fluorescence microscopy (TIRF), persisted in total absence of cav-1. Uptake of colloidal gold labeled albumin was evaluated by electron microscopy and demonstrated that albumin uptake in MLEC from cav-1-/- mice was through caveolae-independent pathway(s) including clathrin-coated pits that resulted in endosomal accumulation of albumin. Finally, we noted that albumin uptake in RPMEC was in part sensitive to pharmacological agents (amiloride [sodium transport inhibitor], Gö6976 [protein kinase C inhibitor], and cytochalasin D [inhibitor of actin polymerization]) consistent with a macropinocytosis-like process. The amiloride sensitivity accounting for macropinocytosis also exists in albumin uptake by both wild type and cav-1-/- MLEC. We conclude from these studies that in addition to the well described caveolar-dependent pulmonary endothelial cell endocytosis of albumin, a portion of overall uptake in pulmonary endothelial cells is cav-1 insensitive and appears to involve clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis-like process. PMID:24312378

  8. RNase III-independent microRNA biogenesis in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Maurin, Thomas; Cazalla, Demián; Yang, Jr-Shiuan; Bortolamiol-Becet, Diane; Lai, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    RNase III enzymes are fundamental to the biogenesis of microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in all species studied. Although alternative miRNA pathways independent of Drosha or Dicer exist, each still requires one RNase III-type enzyme. Here, we describe two strategies that marry either RNase Z or the Integrator complex with the slicing activity of Argonaute2 to generate highly functional mature miRNAs. We provide stringent validation of their RNase III independence by demonstrating efficient miRNA biogenesis and activity in Drosha and Dicer knockout cells. These data provide proof-of-principle evidence for additional mechanistic possibilities for efficient generation of small regulatory RNAs, and represent novel silencing triggers that may be exploited for technical purposes. PMID:23097423

  9. Thrombospondin 2 Inhibits Microvascular Endothelial Cell Proliferation by a Caspase-independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Lucas C.; Björkblom, Benny; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Siadak, Anthony W.; Stiles, Charlotte E.; Bornstein, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The matricellular protein thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) regulates a variety of cell–matrix interactions. A prominent feature of TSP2-null mice is increased microvascular density, particularly in connective tissues synthesized after injury. We investigated the cellular basis for the regulation of angiogenesis by TSP2 in cultures of murine and human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibroblasts isolated from murine and human dermis synthesize TSP2 mRNA and secrete significant amounts of immunoreactive TSP2, whereas endothelial cells from mouse lung and human dermis did not synthesize TSP2 mRNA or protein. Recombinant mouse TSP2 inhibited growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) mediated by basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HMVECs exposed to TSP2 in the presence of these growth factors had a decreased proportion of cells in S and G2/M phases. HMVECs cultured with a combination of basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor displayed an increased proportion of nonviable cells in the presence of TSP2, but the addition of VEGF blocked this TSP2-mediated impairment of cell viability. TSP2-mediated inhibition of DNA synthesis by HMVECs in the presence of VEGF was not affected by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Similar findings were obtained with TSP1. Taken together, these observations indicate that either TSP2 or TSP1 can inhibit HMVEC proliferation by inhibition of cell cycle progression and induction of cell death, but the mechanisms responsible for TSP2-mediated inhibition of cell cycle progression are independent from those leading to cell death. PMID:12058057

  10. Circulating Tumour Cells as an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Po-Jung; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lee, Chia-Lin; Huang, Wen-Kuan; Wu, Chiao-En; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Chao, Yin-Kai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Lin, Nina Ming-Jung; Ye, Siou-Ru; Lee, Jane Ying-Chieh; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The role of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in advanced oesophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) remains uncertain. A negative selection protocol plus flow cytometry was validated to efficiently identify CTCs. The CTC number was calculated and analysed for survival impact. The protocol’s efficacy in CTC identification was validated with a recovery rate of 44.6 ± 9.1% and a coefficient of variation of 20.4%. Fifty-seven patients and 20 healthy donors were enrolled. Initial staging, first response to CRT, and surgery after CRT were prognostic for overall survival, with P values of <0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively. The CTC number of EC patients is significantly higher (P = 0.04) than that of healthy donors. Multivariate analysis for disease-specific progression-free survival showed that surgery after response to CCRT, initial stage, and CTC number (≥21.0 cells/mL) played independent prognostic roles. For overall survival, surgery after CCRT, performance status, initial stage, and CTC number were significant independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, a negative selection plus flow cytometry protocol efficiently detected CTCs. The CTC number before CCRT was an independent prognostic factor in patients with unresectable oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Further large-scale prospective studies for validation are warranted. PMID:27530152

  11. Circulating Tumour Cells as an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Oesophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Su, Po-Jung; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lee, Chia-Lin; Huang, Wen-Kuan; Wu, Chiao-En; Chang, Hsien-Kun; Chao, Yin-Kai; Tseng, Chen-Kan; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Lin, Nina Ming-Jung; Ye, Siou-Ru; Lee, Jane Ying-Chieh; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    The role of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in advanced oesophageal cancer (EC) patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) remains uncertain. A negative selection protocol plus flow cytometry was validated to efficiently identify CTCs. The CTC number was calculated and analysed for survival impact. The protocol's efficacy in CTC identification was validated with a recovery rate of 44.6 ± 9.1% and a coefficient of variation of 20.4%. Fifty-seven patients and 20 healthy donors were enrolled. Initial staging, first response to CRT, and surgery after CRT were prognostic for overall survival, with P values of <0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively. The CTC number of EC patients is significantly higher (P = 0.04) than that of healthy donors. Multivariate analysis for disease-specific progression-free survival showed that surgery after response to CCRT, initial stage, and CTC number (≥21.0 cells/mL) played independent prognostic roles. For overall survival, surgery after CCRT, performance status, initial stage, and CTC number were significant independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, a negative selection plus flow cytometry protocol efficiently detected CTCs. The CTC number before CCRT was an independent prognostic factor in patients with unresectable oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Further large-scale prospective studies for validation are warranted. PMID:27530152

  12. Clarifying CB2 receptor-dependent and independent effects of THC on human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarafian, Theodore Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-09-15

    , did not increase cell migration. Moreover, CB2R-transduced cells displayed higher {psi}{sub m} than did control cells. Since both {psi}{sub m} and chemotaxis are regulated by intracellular signaling, we investigated the effects of THC on the activation of multiple signaling pathways. Serum exposure activated several signaling events of which phosphorylation of I{kappa}B-{alpha} and JNK was regulated in a CB2R- and THC-dependent manner. We conclude that airway epithelial cells are sensitive to both CB2R-dependent and independent effects mediated by THC.

  13. MTOR-independent induction of autophagy in trabecular meshwork cells subjected to biaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kristine M; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Liton, Paloma B

    2014-06-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) is part of a complex tissue that controls the exit of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye, and therefore helps maintaining intraocular pressure (IOP). Because of variations in IOP with changing pressure gradients and fluid movement, the TM and its contained cells undergo morphological deformations, resulting in distention and stretching. It is therefore essential for TM cells to continuously detect and respond to these mechanical forces and adapt their physiology to maintain proper cellular function and protect against mechanical injury. Here we demonstrate the activation of autophagy, a pro-survival pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and organelles, in TM cells when subjected to biaxial static stretch (20% elongation), as well as in high-pressure perfused eyes (30mmHg). Morphological and biochemical markers for autophagy found in the stretched cells include elevated LC3-II levels, increased autophagic flux, and the presence of autophagic figures in electron micrographs. Furthermore, our results indicate that the stretch-induced autophagy in TM cells occurs in an MTOR- and BAG3-independent manner. We hypothesize that activation of autophagy is part of the physiological response that allows TM cells to cope and adapt to mechanical forces. PMID:24583119

  14. Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cells for NASA's LOX-CH4 Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Abigail C.; Araghi, Koorosh R.; Farmer, Serene C.

    2013-01-01

    Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle used fuel cells as main power source for vehicle and water source for life support and thermal PEM (Gemini) and Alkaline (Apollo, Shuttle) fuel cells were used Ideal for short (less than 3 weeks) missions when the required O2 and H2 can be launched with the vehicle. New missions that might require long-duration stays in orbit or at a habitat, cannot rely on the availability of pure reactants but should also aim to be sun-independent - a problem for which Solid Oxide Fuel Cells might be the answer. Recently, NASA has investigated & developed LOX/CH4-propelled landers (Altair, MORPHEUS). In order to preserve mission flexibility, fuel cells are being studied as a potential power source. Much of NASA's fuel cell development has been focused on creating a dead-headed, non-flow through PEM fuel cells which would weigh less and be more reliable than the existing Alkaline and PEM technology; however, LOX/CH4 as a propellant introduces SOFCs as a power option due to their ability to accept those reactants without much reforming.

  15. Methylsulfonylmethane Induces p53 Independent Apoptosis in HCT-116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Karabay, Arzu Zeynep; Koc, Asli; Ozkan, Tulin; Hekmatshoar, Yalda; Sunguroglu, Asuman; Aktan, Fugen; Buyukbingol, Zeliha

    2016-01-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an organic sulfur-containing compound which has been used as a dietary supplement for osteoarthritis. MSM has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and inflammation, as well as exhibit apoptotic or anti-apoptotic effects depending on the cell type or activating stimuli. However, there are still a lot of unknowns about the mechanisms of actions of MSM. In this study, MSM was tested on colon cancer cells. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that MSM inhibited cell viability and increased apoptotic markers in both HCT-116 p53 +/+ and HCT-116 p53 −/− colon cancer cells. Increased poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) fragmentation and caspase-3 activity by MSM also supported these findings. MSM also modulated the expression of various apoptosis-related genes and proteins. Moreover, MSM was found to increase c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation in both cell lines, dose-dependently. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that MSM induces apoptosis in HCT-116 colon cancer cells regardless of their p53 status. Since p53 is defective in >50% of tumors, the ability of MSM to induce apoptosis independently of p53 may offer an advantage in anti-tumor therapy. Moreover, the remarkable effect of MSM on Bim, an apoptotic protein, also suggests its potential use as a novel chemotherapeutic agent for Bim-targeted anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27428957

  16. Parasitophorous vacuoles of Leishmania mexicana acquire macromolecules from the host cell cytosol via two independent routes.

    PubMed

    Schaible, U E; Schlesinger, P H; Steinberg, T H; Mangel, W F; Kobayashi, T; Russell, D G

    1999-03-01

    The intracellular parasite Leishmania survives and proliferates in host macrophages. In this study we show that parasitophorous vacuoles of L. mexicana gain access to cytosolic material via two different routes. (1) Small anionic molecules such as Lucifer Yellow are rapidly transported into the vacuoles by an active transport mechanism that is sensitive to inhibitors of the host cell's organic anion transporter. (2) Larger molecules such as fluorescent dextrans introduced into the host cell cytosol are also delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles. This transport is slower and sensitive to modulators of autophagy. Infected macrophages were examined by two novel assays to visualize and quantify this process. Immunoelectron microscopy of cells loaded with digoxigenin-dextran revealed label in multivesicular endosomes, which appeared to fuse with parasitophorous vacuoles. The inner membranes of the multivesicular vesicles label strongly with antibodies against lysobisphosphatidic acid, suggesting that they represent a point of confluence between the endosomal and autophagosomal pathways. Although the rate of autophagous transfer was comparable in infected and uninfected cells, infected cells retained hydrolyzed cysteine proteinase substrate to a greater degree. These data suggest that L. mexicana-containing vacuoles have access to potential nutrients in the host cell cytosol via at least two independent mechanisms. PMID:9973603

  17. A Cell Type Independent Binary Grading System Does Not Significantly Improve Endometrial Biopsy Interpretation.

    PubMed

    Nastic, Denis; Kahlin, Frida; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Carlson, Joseph W

    2016-05-01

    The revised International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) grading system is widely accepted as the standard in evaluating endometrial carcinoma on biopsy. Determination of tumor cell type [using the World Health Organization (WHO) diagnostic criteria] and grade (using FIGO) guides surgical approach. Several studies have highlighted discrepancies between biopsy and hysterectomy diagnosis. Recently, a binary grading system was proposed, yielding a low-risk and high-risk assessment but in a cell type independent (CTI) way. No study has assessed its utility in biopsy grading, a situation where this system may be particularly useful. Archived endometrial biopsies from 70 cases of endometrial carcinoma were graded by 3 independent observers using the WHO/FIGO and the CTI grading systems. The overall accuracy, interobserver agreement, and ease of use were assessed. This study found comparable substantial accuracy between the WHO/FIGO and CTI grading systems (κ=0.71 vs. κ=0.69), with the same setbacks in overgrading of 20.9% versus 25.6% of low-risk tumors. The CTI grading system was not superior to the WHO/FIGO grading system in accuracy of subtyping and grading and interobserver reproducibility. Although determination of cell type is difficult, it does not appear that the proposed CTI system confers any significant advantages over existing grading. PMID:26863477

  18. Expression-independent gene trap vectors for random and targeted mutagenesis in embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsakiridis, Anestis; Tzouanacou, Elena; Rahman, Afifah; Colby, Douglas; Axton, Richard; Chambers, Ian; Wilson, Valerie; Forrester, Lesley; Brickman, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Promoterless gene trap vectors have been widely used for high-efficiency gene targeting and random mutagenesis in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unfortunately, such vectors are only effective for genes expressed in ES cells and this has prompted the development of expression-independent vectors. These polyadenylation (poly A) trap vectors employ a splice donor to capture an endogenous gene's polyadenylation sequence and provide transcript stability. However, the spectrum of mutations generated by these vectors appears largely restricted to the last intron of target loci due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) making them unsuitable for gene targeting applications. Here, we present novel poly A trap vectors that overcome the effect of NMD and also employ RNA instability sequences to improve splicing efficiency. The set of random insertions generated with these vectors show a significantly reduced insertional bias and the vectors can be targeted directly to a 5′ intron. We also show that this relative positional independence is linked to the human β-actin promoter and is most likely a result of its transcriptional activity in ES cells. Taken together our data indicate that these vectors are an effective tool for insertional mutagenesis that can be used for either gene trapping or gene targeting. PMID:19692586

  19. A method for multiprotein assembly in cells reveals independent action of kinesins in complex

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Stephen R.; Soppina, Virupakshi; Dizaji, Aslan S.; Schimert, Kristin I.; Sept, David; Cai, Dawen; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2014-01-01

    Teams of processive molecular motors are critical for intracellular transport and organization, yet coordination between motors remains poorly understood. Here, we develop a system using protein components to generate assemblies of defined spacing and composition inside cells. This system is applicable to studying macromolecular complexes in the context of cell signaling, motility, and intracellular trafficking. We use the system to study the emergent behavior of kinesin motors in teams. We find that two kinesin motors in complex act independently (do not help or hinder each other) and can alternate their activities. For complexes containing a slow kinesin-1 and fast kinesin-3 motor, the slow motor dominates motility in vitro but the fast motor can dominate on certain subpopulations of microtubules in cells. Both motors showed dynamic interactions with the complex, suggesting that motor–cargo linkages are sensitive to forces applied by the motors. We conclude that kinesin motors in complex act independently in a manner regulated by the microtubule track. PMID:25365993

  20. Model and cell membrane partitioning of perfluorooctanesulfonate is independent of the lipid chain length.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Ludewig, Gabriele; Wang, Kai; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2010-03-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) is a persistent environmental pollutant that may cause adverse health effects in humans and animals by interacting with and disturbing of the normal properties of biological lipid assemblies. To gain further insights into these interactions, we investigated the effect of PFOS potassium salt on dimyristoyl- (DMPC), dipalmitoyl- (DPPC) and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) model membranes using fluorescence anisotropy measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and on the cell membrane of HL-60 human leukemia cells and freshly isolated rat alveolar macrophages using fluorescence anisotropy measurements. PFOS produced a concentration-dependent decrease of the main phase transition temperature (T(m)) and an increased peak width (DeltaT(w)) in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the DSC experiments, with a rank order DMPC>DPPC>DSPC. PFOS caused a fluidization of the gel phase of all phosphatidylcholines investigated, but had the opposite effect on the liquid-crystalline phase. The apparent partition coefficients of PFOS between the phosphatidylcholine bilayer and the bulk aqueous phase were largely independent of the phosphatidylcholine chain length and ranged from 4.4x10(4) to 8.8x10(4). PFOS also significantly increased the fluidity of membranes of cells. These findings suggest that PFOS readily partitions into lipid assemblies, independent of their composition, and may cause adverse biological effects by altering their fluidity in a manner that depends on the membrane cooperativity and state (e.g., gel versus liquid-crystalline phase) of the lipid assembly. PMID:19932010

  1. MODEL AND CELL MEMBRANE PARTITIONING OF PERFLUOROOCTANESULFONATE IS INDEPENDENT OF THE LIPID CHAIN LENGTH

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Ludewig, Gabriele; Wang, Kai; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) is a persistent environmental pollutant that may cause adverse health effects in humans and animals by interacting with and disturbing of the normal properties of biological lipid assemblies. To gain further insights into these interactions, we investigated the effect of PFOS potassium salt on dimyristoyl- (DMPC), dipalmitoyl- (DPPC) and distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC) model membranes using fluorescence anisotropy measurements and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and on the cell membrane of HL-60 human leukemia cells and freshly isolated rat alveolar macrophages using fluorescence anisotropy measurements. PFOS caused a concentration-dependent decrease of the main phase transition temperature (Tm) and an increased peak width (ΔTw) in both the fluorescence anisotropy and the DSC experiments, with a rank order DMPC > DPPC > DSPC. PFOS caused a fluidization of the gel phase of all phosphatidylcholines investigated, but had the opposite effect on the liquid crystalline phase. The apparent partition coefficients of PFOS between the phosphatidylcholine bilayer and the bulk aqueous phase were largely independent of the phosphatidylcholine chain length and ranged from 4.4 × 104 to 8.8 × 104. PFOS also significantly increased the fluidity of membranes of cells. These findings suggest that PFOS readily partitions into lipid assemblies, independent of their composition, and may cause adverse biological effects by altering their fluidity in a manner that depends on the membrane cooperativity and state (e.g., gel versus liquid crystalline phase) of the lipid assembly. PMID:19932010

  2. Mitochondria mediates caspase-dependent and independent retinal cell death in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, P K; Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision-threatening complication of ocular surgery or trauma, is characterized by increased intraocular inflammation and retinal tissue damage. Although significant vision loss in endophthalmitis has been linked to retinal cell death, the underlying mechanisms of cell death remain elusive. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis and cultured human retinal Müller glia (MIO-M1 cell line), we demonstrate that S. aureus caused significant apoptotic cell death in the mouse retina and Müller glia, as evidenced by increased number of terminal dUTP nick end labeling and Annexin V and propidium iodide-positive cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot studies revealed the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1 staining), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 in S. aureus-infected retina/retinal cells. In addition, the activation of PARP-1 and the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria was also observed in S. aureus-infected retinal cells. Inhibition studies using pan-caspase (Q-VD-OPH) and PARP-1 (DPQ) inhibitors showed significant reduction in S. aureus-induced retinal cell death both in vivo and in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that in bacterial endophthalmitis, retinal cells undergo apoptosis in the both caspase-dependent and independent manners, and mitochondria have a central role in this process. Hence, targeting the identified signaling pathways may provide the rationale to design therapeutic interventions to prevent bystander retinal tissue damage in bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:27551524

  3. Inflammasome-independent NLRP3 is required for epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Yajing; Du, Qianming; Lu, Ping; Fan, Huimin; Lu, Jinrong; Hu, Rong

    2016-03-15

    Inflammasome NLRP3 plays a crucial role in the process of colitis and colitis--associated colon cancer. Even though much is known regarding the NLRP3 inflammasome that regulates pro-inflammatory cytokine release in innate immune cells, the role of NLRP3 in non-immune cells is still unclear. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 was highly expressed in mesenchymal-like colon cancer cells (SW620), and was upregulated by tumor necrosis factors-α (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) respectively, during EMT in colon cancer epithelial cells HCT116 and HT29. Knockdown of NLRP3 retained epithelial spindle-like morphology of HCT116 and HT29 cells and reversed the mesenchymal characteristic of SW620 cells, indicated by the decreased expression of vimentin and MMP9 and increased expression of E-cadherin. In addition, knockdown of NLRP3 in colorectal carcinoma cells displayed diminished cell migration and invasion. Interestingly, during the EMT process induced by TNF-α or TGF-β1, the cleaved caspase-1 and ASC speck were not detected, indicating that NLRP3 functions in an inflammasome-independent way. Further studies demonstrated that NLRP3 protein expression was regulated by NF-κB signaling in TNF-α or TGF-β1-induced EMT, as verified by the NF-κB inhibitor Bay 11-7082. Moreover, NLRP3 knockdown reduced the expression of Snail1, indicating that NLRP3 may promote EMT through regulating Snail1. In summary, our results showed that the NLRP3 expression, not the inflammasome activation, was required for EMT in colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26968633

  4. Mitochondria mediates caspase-dependent and independent retinal cell death in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision-threatening complication of ocular surgery or trauma, is characterized by increased intraocular inflammation and retinal tissue damage. Although significant vision loss in endophthalmitis has been linked to retinal cell death, the underlying mechanisms of cell death remain elusive. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis and cultured human retinal Müller glia (MIO-M1 cell line), we demonstrate that S. aureus caused significant apoptotic cell death in the mouse retina and Müller glia, as evidenced by increased number of terminal dUTP nick end labeling and Annexin V and propidium iodide-positive cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot studies revealed the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1 staining), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 in S. aureus-infected retina/retinal cells. In addition, the activation of PARP-1 and the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria was also observed in S. aureus-infected retinal cells. Inhibition studies using pan-caspase (Q-VD-OPH) and PARP-1 (DPQ) inhibitors showed significant reduction in S. aureus-induced retinal cell death both in vivo and in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that in bacterial endophthalmitis, retinal cells undergo apoptosis in the both caspase-dependent and independent manners, and mitochondria have a central role in this process. Hence, targeting the identified signaling pathways may provide the rationale to design therapeutic interventions to prevent bystander retinal tissue damage in bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:27551524

  5. Riluzole mediates anti-tumor properties in breast cancer cells independent of metabotropic glutamate receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Speyer, Cecilia L; Nassar, Mahdy A; Hachem, Ali H; Bukhsh, Miriam A; Jafry, Waris S; Khansa, Rafa M; Gorski, David H

    2016-06-01

    Riluzole, the only drug approved by the FDA for treating amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inhibits melanoma proliferation through its inhibitory effect on glutamatergic signaling. We demonstrated that riluzole also inhibits the growth of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and described a role for metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 (GRM1) in regulating TNBC cell growth and progression. However, the role of GRM1 in mediating riluzole's effects in breast cancer has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we seek to determine how much of riluzole's action in breast cancer is mediated through GRM1. We investigated anti-tumor properties of riluzole in TNBC and ER+ cells using cell growth, invasion, and soft-agar assays and compared riluzole activity with GRM1 levels. Using Lentiviral vectors expressing GRM1 or shGRM1, these studies were repeated in cells expressing high or low GRM1 levels where the gene was either silenced or overexpressed. Riluzole inhibited proliferation, invasion, and colony formation in both TNBC and ER+ cells. There was a trend between GRM1 expression in TNBC cells and their response to riluzole in both cell proliferation and invasion assays. However, silencing and overexpression studies had no effect on cell sensitivity to riluzole. Our results clearly suggest a GRM1-independent mechanism through which riluzole mediates its effects on breast cancer cells. Understanding the mechanism by which riluzole mediates breast cancer progression will be useful in identifying new therapeutic targets for treating TNBC and in facilitating stratification of patients in clinical trials using riluzole in conjunction with conventional therapy. PMID:27146584

  6. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  7. Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Suparji, Noor Shahirah; Chan, Gomathi; Sapili, Hani; Arshad, Norhafiza M.; In, Lionel L. A.; Awang, Khalijah; Hasima Nagoor, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could

  8. Stool-fermented Plantago ovata husk induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells independently of molecular phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Vanessa R; Giros, Anna; Xicola, Rosa M; Fluvià, Lourdes; Grzybowski, Mike; Anguera, Anna; Llor, Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Several studies have suggested that the partially fermentable fibre Plantago ovata husk (PO) may have a protective effect on colorectal cancer (CRC). We studied the potentially pro-apoptotic effect of PO and the implicated mechanisms in CRC cells with different molecular phenotypes (Caco-2, HCT116, LoVo, HT-29, SW480) after PO anaerobic fermentation with colonic bacteria as it occurs in the human colon. The fermentation products of PO induced apoptosis in all primary tumour and metastatic cell lines, independent of p53, adenomatous polyposis coli, β-catenin or cyclo-oxygenase-2 status. Apoptosis was caspase-dependent and both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways were implicated. The intrinsic pathway was activated through a shift in the balance towards a pro-apoptotic environment with an up-regulation of B-cell lymphoma protein 2 homologous antagonist killer (BAK) and a down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xL) seen in HCT116 and LoVo cells. This resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarisation, increased expression of caspase activators second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac)/Diablo, death effector apoptosis-inducing factor, apoptosome member apoptotic protease activating factor 1 and down-regulation of inhibitors of apoptosis Survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis in most cells. The extrinsic pathway was activated presumably through the up-regulation of death receptor (DR5). Some important differences were seen between primary tumour and metastatic CRC cells. Thus, metastatic PO-treated LoVo cells had a remarkable up-regulation of TNF-α ligand along with death-inducing signalling complex components receptor interacting protein and TNF-α receptor 1-associated death domain protein. The extrinsic pathway modulator FCICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), an inhibitor of both spontaneous death ligand-independent and death receptor-mediated apoptosis, was significantly down-regulated after PO treatment in all primary tumour cells, but not

  9. Ceramide and glutathione define two independently regulated pathways of cell death initiated by p53 in Molt-4 leukaemia cells.

    PubMed Central

    El-Assaad, Wissal; Kozhaya, Lina; Araysi, Sawsan; Panjarian, Shoghag; Bitar, Fadi F; Baz, Elizabeth; El-Sabban, Marwan E; Dbaibo, Ghassan S

    2003-01-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 induces cell death by launching several pathways that are either dependent on or independent of gene transcription. Accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and reactive oxygen species are among these pathways. Crossregulation of these two pathways is possible owing to the demonstrated inhibition of neutral sphingomyelinase by glutathione, the predominant cellular antioxidant, and has been observed in some cytokine-dependent cell-death models. In a model of irradiation-induced cell death of Molt-4 leukaemia cells, it was found that ceramide accumulation and glutathione depletion were dependent on p53 up-regulation. The loss of p53 owing to expression of the papilloma virus E6 protein inhibited both pathways after irradiation. However, in this model, these two pathways appeared to be independently regulated on the basis of the following observations: (1) glutathione supplementation or depletion did not alter irradiation-induced ceramide accumulation, (2) exogenous ceramide treatment did not induce glutathione depletion, (3) glutathione depletion was dependent on new protein synthesis, whereas ceramide accumulation was independent of it and (4) caspase activation was required for ceramide accumulation but not for glutathione depletion. Furthermore, caspase 9 activation, which is dependent on the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, was not required for ceramide accumulation. This suggested that a caspase, other than caspase 9, was necessary for ceramide accumulation. Interestingly, Bcl-2 expression inhibited these pathways, indicating a possible role for mitochondria in regulating both pathways. These findings indicate that these two pathways exhibit cross-regulation in cytokine-dependent, but not in p53-dependent, cell-death models. PMID:12967322

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  11. Cell Density Sensing Alters TGF-β Signaling in a Cell-Type-Specific Manner, Independent from Hippo Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nallet-Staub, Flore; Yin, Xueqian; Gilbert, Cristèle; Marsaud, Véronique; Ben Mimoun, Saber; Javelaud, Delphine; Leof, Edward B.; Mauviel, Alain

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-cell contacts inhibit cell growth and proliferation in part by activating the Hippo pathway that drives the phosphorylation and nuclear exclusion of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ. Cell density and Hippo signaling have also been reported to block transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) responses, based on the ability of phospho-YAP/TAZ to sequester TGF-β-activated SMAD complexes in the cytoplasm. Herein, we provide evidence that epithelial cell polarization interferes with TGF-β signaling well upstream and independent of cytoplasmic YAP/TAZ. Rather, polarized basolateral presentation of TGF-β receptors I and II deprives apically delivered TGF-β of access to its receptors. Basolateral ligand delivery nonetheless remains entirely effective to induce TGF-β responses. These data demonstrate that cell-type-specific inhibition of TGF-β signaling by cell density is restricted to polarized epithelial cells and reflects the polarized distribution of TGF-β receptors, which thus affects SMAD activation irrespective of Hippo pathway activation. PMID:25758862

  12. Dnd knockout ablates germ cells and demonstrates germ cell independent sex differentiation in Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Wargelius, Anna; Leininger, Sven; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Kleppe, Lene; Andersson, Eva; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Schulz, Rüdiger W; Edvardsen, Rolf B

    2016-01-01

    Introgression of farmed salmon escapees into wild stocks is a major threat to the genetic integrity of wild populations. Using germ cell-free fish in aquaculture may mitigate this problem. Our study investigated whether it is possible to produce germ cell-free salmon in F0 by using CRISPR-Cas9 to knock out dnd, a factor required for germ cell survival in vertebrates. To avoid studying mosaic animals, sgRNA targeting alb was simultaneously used as a visual tracer since the phenotype of alb KO is complete loss of pigmentation. Induced mutations for the tracer (alb) and the target (dnd) genes were highly correlated and produced germ cell-less fish lacking pigmentation, underlining the suitability of alb KO to serve as tracer for targeted double allelic mutations in F0 animals in species with prohibitively long generation times. This is also the first report describing dnd knockout in any fish species. Analyzing gene expression and histology of dnd KO fish revealed that sex differentiation of the somatic compartment does not depend on the presence of germ cells. However, the organization of the ovarian somatic compartment seems compromised in mutant fish. PMID:26888627

  13. An Abscisic Acid-Activated and Calcium-Independent Protein Kinase from Guard Cells of Fava Bean.

    PubMed

    Li, J.; Assmann, S. M.

    1996-12-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of stomatal aperture is known to involve both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent signal transduction pathways. Electrophysiological studies suggest that protein phosphorylation is involved in ABA action in guard cells. Using biochemical approaches, we identified an ABA-activated and Ca2+- independent protein kinase (AAPK) from guard cell protoplasts of fava bean. Autophosphorylation of AAPK was rapidly (~1 min) activated by ABA in a Ca2+- independent manner. ABA-activated autophosphorylation of AAPK occurred on serine but not on tyrosine residues and appeared to be guard cell specific. AAPK phosphorylated histone type III-S on serine and threonine residues, and its activity toward histone type III-S was markedly stimulated in ABA-treated guard cell protoplasts. Our results suggest that AAPK may play an important role in the Ca2+-independent ABA signaling pathways of guard cells. PMID:12239380

  14. An Abscisic Acid-Activated and Calcium-Independent Protein Kinase from Guard Cells of Fava Bean.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J.; Assmann, S. M.

    1996-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) regulation of stomatal aperture is known to involve both Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent signal transduction pathways. Electrophysiological studies suggest that protein phosphorylation is involved in ABA action in guard cells. Using biochemical approaches, we identified an ABA-activated and Ca2+- independent protein kinase (AAPK) from guard cell protoplasts of fava bean. Autophosphorylation of AAPK was rapidly (~1 min) activated by ABA in a Ca2+- independent manner. ABA-activated autophosphorylation of AAPK occurred on serine but not on tyrosine residues and appeared to be guard cell specific. AAPK phosphorylated histone type III-S on serine and threonine residues, and its activity toward histone type III-S was markedly stimulated in ABA-treated guard cell protoplasts. Our results suggest that AAPK may play an important role in the Ca2+-independent ABA signaling pathways of guard cells. PMID:12239380

  15. Protein disulfide isomerases in the endoplasmic reticulum promote anchorage-independent growth of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Randi; Duhachek-Muggy, Sara; Qi, Yue; Zolkiewski, Michal; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    Metastatic breast cancer cells are exposed to stress of detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cultured breast cancer cells that survive this stress and are capable of anchorage-independent proliferation form mammospheres. The purpose of this study was to explore a link between mammosphere growth, ECM gene expression, and the protein quality control system in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We compared the mRNA and protein levels of ER folding factors in SUM159PT and MCF10DCIS.com breast cancer cells grown as mammospheres versus adherent conditions. Publicly available gene expression data for mammospheres formed by primary breast cancer cells and for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were analyzed to assess the status of ECM/ER folding factor genes in clinically relevant samples. Knock-down of selected protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family members was performed to examine their roles in SUM159PT mammosphere growth. We found that cells grown as mammospheres had elevated expression of ECM genes and ER folding quality control genes. CTC gene expression data for an index patient indicated that upregulation of ECM and ER folding factor genes occurred at the time of acquired therapy resistance and disease progression. Knock-down of PDI, ERp44, or ERp57, three members of the PDI family with elevated protein levels in mammospheres, in SUM159PT cells partially inhibited the mammosphere growth. Thus, breast cancer cell survival and growth under detachment conditions require enhanced assistance of the ER protein folding machinery. Targeting ER folding factors, in particular members of the PDI family, may improve the therapeutic outcomes in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27161215

  16. Induction of p53-independent growth inhibition in lung carcinoma cell A549 by gypenosides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jung-Sen; Chiang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Li-Ju; Chao, Wei-Chih; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-07-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate antiproliferative effect and mechanisms of bioactive compounds from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum) on lung carcinoma cell A549. Saponins, carotenoids and chlorophylls were extracted and fractionated by column chromatography, and were subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The saponin fraction, which consisted mainly of gypenoside (Gyp) XXII and XXIII, rather than the carotenoid and chlorophyll ones, was effective in inhibiting A549 cell growth in a concentration- and a time-dependent manner as evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The estimated half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 ) of Gyp on A549 cells was 30.6 μg/ml. Gyp was further demonstrated to induce an apparent arrest of the A549 cell cycle at both the S phase and the G2/M phase, accompanied by a concentration- and a time-dependent increase in the proportions of both the early and late apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Gyp down-regulated cellular expression of cyclin A and B as well as BCL-2, while up-regulated the expression of BAX, DNA degradation factor 35 KD, poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1, p53, p21 and caspase-3. Nevertheless, both the treatment of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, and the small hairpin RNA-mediated p53 knockdown in the A549 cells did not alter the growth inhibition effect induced by Gyp. As a result, the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells induced by Gyp would most likely proceed through p53-independent pathway(s). PMID:25781909

  17. Induction of p53-independent growth inhibition in lung carcinoma cell A549 by gypenosides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Sen; Chiang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Jinn-Shyan; Lin, Li-Ju; Chao, Wei-Chih; Inbaraj, Baskaran Stephen; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Chen, Bing-Huei

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to investigate antiproliferative effect and mechanisms of bioactive compounds from Gynostemma pentaphyllum (G. pentaphyllum) on lung carcinoma cell A549. Saponins, carotenoids and chlorophylls were extracted and fractionated by column chromatography, and were subjected to high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. The saponin fraction, which consisted mainly of gypenoside (Gyp) XXII and XXIII, rather than the carotenoid and chlorophyll ones, was effective in inhibiting A549 cell growth in a concentration- and a time-dependent manner as evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The estimated half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of Gyp on A549 cells was 30.6 μg/ml. Gyp was further demonstrated to induce an apparent arrest of the A549 cell cycle at both the S phase and the G2/M phase, accompanied by a concentration- and a time-dependent increase in the proportions of both the early and late apoptotic cells. Furthermore, Gyp down-regulated cellular expression of cyclin A and B as well as BCL-2, while up-regulated the expression of BAX, DNA degradation factor 35 KD, poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1, p53, p21 and caspase-3. Nevertheless, both the treatment of a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, and the small hairpin RNA-mediated p53 knockdown in the A549 cells did not alter the growth inhibition effect induced by Gyp. As a result, the cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of A549 cells induced by Gyp would most likely proceed through p53-independent pathway(s). PMID:25781909

  18. Adiponectin Regulation of Stellate Cell Activation via PPARγ-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Mahnoush S.; Shetty, Shoba; Scherer, Philipp E.; Rockey, Don C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we elucidated the mechanism by which adiponectin modulates hepatic stellate cell activation and fibrogenesis. Adiponectin-overexpressing transgenic mice receiving thioacetamide were resistant to fibrosis, compared with controls. In contrast, adiponectin-null animals developed severe fibrosis. Expression of collagen α1(I) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs were significantly lower in adiponectin-overexpressing mice, compared with controls. In wild-type stellate cells exposed to a lentivirus encoding adiponectin, expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), SREBP1c, and CEBPα mRNAs was significantly increased (3.2-, 4.1-, and 2.2-fold, respectively; n = 3; P < 0.05, adiponectin virus versus control), consistent with possible activation of an adipogenic transcriptional program. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, strongly suppressed up-regulation of collagen α1(I) and α-SMA mRNA in stellate cells isolated from wild-type mice; however, stellate cells from adiponectin-null animals failed to respond to troglitazone. Furthermore, in isolated stellate cells in which PPARγ was depleted using an adenovirus-Cre-recombinase system and in which adiponectin was also overexpressed, collagen α1(I) and α-SMA were significantly inhibited. We conclude that the PPARγ effect on stellate cell activation and the fibrogenic cascade appears to be adiponectin-dependent; however, the inhibitory effect of adiponectin on stellate cell activation was not dependent on PPARγ, suggesting the presence of PPARγ-dependent as well as independent pathways in stellate cells. PMID:21641391

  19. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Generation (EPG)/Fuel Cell Powerplant (FCP) hardware. The EPG/FCP hardware is required for performing functions of electrical power generation and product water distribution in the Orbiter. Specifically, the EPG/FCP hardware consists of the following divisions: (1) Power Section Assembly (PSA); (2) Reactant Control Subsystem (RCS); (3) Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS); and (4) Water Removal Subsystem (WRS). The IOA analysis process utilized available EPG/FCP hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  20. Phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by carbon nanotube agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Hoshikawa, Kazue; Hirose, Akihiko; Sato, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used in many fields, including energy, healthcare, environmental technology, materials, and electronics, the adverse effects of CNTs in the brain are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of CNTs on cultured microglia, as microglia are the first responders to foreign materials. We compared the effects of sonicated suspensions of 5 kinds of CNTs and their flow-through filtered with a 0.22 µm membrane filter on microglial viability. We found that sonicated suspensions caused microglial cell damage, but their flow-through did not. The number of microglial aggregates was well correlated with the extent of the damage. We also determined that the CNT agglomerates consisted of two groups: one was phagocytosed by microglia and caused microglial cell damage, and the other caused cell damage without phagocytosis. These results suggest that phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by CNT agglomerates and it is important to conduct studies about the relationships between physical properties of nanomaterial-agglomerates and cell damage. PMID:27432236

  1. Agarol, an ergosterol derivative from Agaricus blazei, induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takamitsu; Kawai, Junya; Ouchi, Kenji; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Osima, Yoshiteru; Hidemi, Rikiishi

    2016-04-01

    Agaricus blazei (A. blazei) is a mushroom with many biological effects and active ingredients. We purified a tumoricidal substance from A. blazei, an ergosterol derivative, and named it 'Agarol'. Cytotoxic effects of Agarol were determined by the MTT assay using A549, MKN45, HSC-3, and HSC-4 human carcinoma cell lines treated with Agarol. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry analysis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondria membrane potential (∆ψm) were also determined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to quantify the expression of apoptosis-related proteins. Agarol predominantly induced apoptosis in two p53-wild cell lines (A549 and MKN45) compared to the other p53-mutant cell lines (HSC-3 and HSC-4). Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of ROS, reduced ∆ψm, release of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the cytosol, upregulation of Bax, and downregulation of Bcl-2. Caspase-3 activities did not increase, and z-VAD-fmk, a caspase inhibitor, did not inhibit the Agarol-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that Agarol induces caspase-independent apoptosis in human carcinoma cells through a mitochondrial pathway. The in vivo anticancer activity of Agarol was confirmed in a xenograft murine model. This study suggests a molecular mechanism by which Agarol induces apoptosis in human carcinoma cells and indicates the potential use of Agarol as an anticancer agent. PMID:26893131

  2. Immunosuppression-Independent Role of Regulatory T Cells against Hypertension-Driven Renal Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Fabbiano, Salvatore; Menacho-Márquez, Mauricio; Robles-Valero, Javier; Pericacho, Miguel; Matesanz-Marín, Adela; García-Macías, Carmen; Sevilla, María A.; Montero, M. J.; Alarcón, Balbino; López-Novoa, José M.; Martín, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension-associated cardiorenal diseases represent one of the heaviest burdens for current health systems. In addition to hemodynamic damage, recent results have revealed that hematopoietic cells contribute to the development of these diseases by generating proinflammatory and profibrotic environments in the heart and kidney. However, the cell subtypes involved remain poorly characterized. Here we report that CD39+ regulatory T (TREG) cells utilize an immunosuppression-independent mechanism to counteract renal and possibly cardiac damage during angiotensin II (AngII)-dependent hypertension. This mechanism relies on the direct apoptosis of tissue-resident neutrophils by the ecto-ATP diphosphohydrolase activity of CD39. In agreement with this, experimental and genetic alterations in TREG/TH cell ratios have a direct impact on tissue-resident neutrophil numbers, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiorenal fibrosis, and, to a lesser extent, arterial pressure elevation during AngII-driven hypertension. These results indicate that TREG cells constitute a first protective barrier against hypertension-driven tissue fibrosis and, in addition, suggest new therapeutic avenues to prevent hypertension-linked cardiorenal diseases. PMID:26240279

  3. Distinct P-glycoprotein precursors are overproduced in independently isolated drug-resistant cell lines.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, L M; Lothstein, L; Williams, S S; Horwitz, S B

    1988-06-01

    A family of P-glycoproteins are overproduced in multidrug-resistant cells derived from the murine macrophage-like line J774.2. To determine whether individual family members are overproduced in response to different drugs, the P-glycoprotein precursors in several independently isolated cell lines, which were selected for resistance to vinblastine or taxol, were compared. Individual cell lines selected with vinblastine overproduced P-glycoprotein precursors of either 120 or 125 kDa. Taxol-selected cell lines overproduced either the 125-kDa precursor or both precursors simultaneously. Two similar but distinct peptide maps for the mature P-glycoproteins were observed. These maps corresponded to each precursor regardless of the drug used for selection. One vinblastine-resistant cell line switched from the 125- to the 120-kDa precursor when grown in increasing concentrations of drug. This change coincided with the overexpression of a distinct subset of mRNA species that code for P-glycoprotein. It is concluded that precursor expression is not drug-specific. These data suggest that individual overproduced P-glycoprotein family members are translated as distinct polypeptides. The results may help to explain the diversity in the multidrug-resistant phenotype. PMID:2897689

  4. CFTR-independent ATP release from epithelial cells triggered by mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Grygorczyk, R; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated ATP efflux has been proposed as an autocrine mechanism for regulating chloride secretion through other types of chloride channels. Although we found in previous studies that wild-type CFTR channels bathed with high-ATP solutions do not conduct ATP at rates that can be measured with the patch-clamp technique, those experiments would not have detected very small or electroneutral ATP fluxes through CFTR or ATP efflux through other pathways that might be regulated by CFTR. To examine these possibilities, we have now used a sensitive luciferase luminometric assay to measure ATP efflux from epithelial and nonepithelial cell lines. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) stimulation did not raise external ATP concentration above the background noise in any of the cell lines tested [T84, Calu-3, 9HTEo- and sigma CFTE29o- (colonic and airway human epithelial cells, respectively), NIH/3T3 fibroblasts, and Chinese hamster ovary cells], and variations in ATP release were not correlated with CFTR expression. The rate of ATP release was unaffected by cAMP but was exquisitely sensitive to mechanical perturbations in both CFTR expressing and nonexpressing cells. Mechanically induced, CFTR-independent ATP release may be a physiologically relevant mechanism of epithelial regulation, which has not previously been fully appreciated. PMID:9124508

  5. Fast neutrons-induced apoptosis is Fas-independent in lymphoblastoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Barbara; Benzina, Sami; Jeannequin, Pierre; Dufour, Patrick; Bergerat, Jean-Pierre; Denis, Jean-Marc; Gueulette, John; Bischoff, Pierre L. . E-mail: Pierre.Bischoff@ircad.u-strasbg.fr

    2005-08-26

    We have previously shown that ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblastoid cells differs according to their p53 status, and that caspase 8-mediated cleavage of BID is involved in the p53-dependent pathway. In the present study, we investigated the role of Fas signaling in caspase 8 activation induced by fast neutrons irradiation in these cells. Fas and FasL expression was assessed by flow cytometry and by immunoblot. We also measured Fas aggregation after irradiation by fluorescence microscopy. We found a decrease of Fas expression after irradiation, but no change in Fas ligand expression. We also showed that, in contrast to the stimulation of Fas by an agonistic antibody, Fas aggregation did not occur after irradiation. Altogether, our data strongly suggest that fast neutrons induced-apoptosis is Fas-independent, even in p53-dependent apoptosis.

  6. Downregulation of MTSS1 expression is an independent prognosticator in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, G; Csanadi, A; Kakanou, S; Prasse, A; Kassem, A; Stickeler, E; Passlick, B; zur Hausen, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: The metastasis suppressor 1 (MTSS1) is a newly discovered protein putatively involved in tumour progression and metastasis. Material and Methods: Immunohistochemical expression of MTSS1 was analysed in 264 non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Results: The metastasis suppressor 1 was significantly overexpressed in NSCLC compared with normal lung (P=0.01). Within NSCLC, MTSS1 expression was inversely correlated with pT-stage (P=0.019) and histological grading (P<0.001). NSCLC with MTSS1 downregulation (<20%) showed a significantly worse outcome (P=0.007). This proved to be an independent prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; P=0.041), especially in early cancer stages (P=0.006). Conclusion: The metastasis suppressor 1 downregulation could thus serve as a stratifying marker for adjuvant therapy in early-stage SCC of the lung. PMID:25625275

  7. Polymer Solar Cell Device Characteristics Are Independent of Vertical Phase Separation in Active Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2013-03-01

    Preferential segregation of organic semiconductor constituents in multicomponent thin-film active layers has long been speculated to affect the characteristics of bulk-heterojunction polymer solar cells. Using soft-contact lamination and delamination schemes - with which we have been able to remove compositionally well characterized polymer thin films, flip them over so as to reverse their composition profiles, and then transfer them onto existing device platforms - we showed unambiguously that the device performance of P3HT:PCBM solar cells are independent of the interfacial segregation characteristics of the active layers. Temperature-dependent single-carrier diode measurements of the organic semiconductor constituents suggest that the origin of this invariance stems from the fact that P3HT comprises a high density of mid-gap states. Hole carriers in these mid-gap states can in turn recombine with electrons at the electron-collecting interface, effectively promoting electron transfer from the cathode to the active layer.

  8. Nuclear AURKA acquires kinase-independent transactivating function to enhance breast cancer stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Feimeng; Yue, Caifeng; Li, Guohui; He, Bin; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Xi; Yan, Min; Long, Zijie; Qiu, Wanshou; Yuan, Zhongyu; Xu, Jie; Liu, Bing; Shi, Qian; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Liu, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome-localized mitotic Aurora kinase A (AURKA) facilitates G2/M events. Here we show that AURKA translocates to the nucleus and causes distinct oncogenic properties in malignant cells by enhancing breast cancer stem cell (BCSC) phenotype. Unexpectedly, this function is independent of its kinase activity. Instead, AURKA preferentially interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) in the nucleus and acts as a transcription factor in a complex that induces a shift in MYC promoter usage and activates the MYC promoter. Blocking AURKA nuclear localization inhibits this newly discovered transactivating function of AURKA, sensitizing resistant BCSC to kinase inhibition. These findings identify a previously unknown oncogenic property of the spatially deregulated AURKA in tumorigenesis and provide a potential therapeutic opportunity to overcome kinase inhibitor resistance. PMID:26782714

  9. Paclitaxel promotes differentiation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells into dendritic cells in vitro in a TLR4-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Tillmann; Shurin, Galina V.; Naiditch, Hiam; Sevko, Alexandra; Umansky, Viktor; Shurin, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid cells play a key role in the outcome of anti-tumor immunity and response to anti-cancer therapy, since in the tumor microenvironment they may exert both stimulatory and inhibitory pressures on the proliferative, angiogenic, metastatic, and immunomodulating potential of tumor cells. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of myeloid regulatory cell differentiation is critical for developing strategies for the therapeutic reversal of myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) accumulation in the tumor-bearing hosts. Here, using an in vitro model system, several potential mechanisms of the direct effect of paclitaxel on MDSC were tested, which might be responsible for the anti-tumor potential of low-dose paclitaxel therapy in mice. It was hypothesized that a decreased level of MDSC in vivo after paclitaxel administration might be due to (i) the blockage of MDSC generation, (ii) an induction of MDSC apoptosis, or (iii) the stimulation of MDSC differentiation. The results revealed that paclitaxel in ultra-low concentrations neither increased MDSC apoptosis nor blocked MDSC generation, but stimulated MDSC differentiation towards dendritic cells. This effect of paclitaxel was TLR4-independent since it was not diminished in cell cultures originated from TLR4−/− mice. These results support a new concept that certain chemotherapeutic agents in ultra-low non-cytotoxic doses may suppress tumor progression by targeting several cell populations in the tumor microenvironment, including MDSC. PMID:22283566

  10. P53 dependent and independent apoptosis induced by lidamycin in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihui; Jiang, Jianming; Cheng, Chunlei; Yang, Ajing; He, Qiyang; Li, Diandong; Wang, Zhen

    2007-06-01

    Enediyne compound is one class of antibiotics with very potent anti-cancer activity. However, the role of p53 in enediyne antibiotic-induced cell killing remains elusive. Here we reported the involvement of p53 signaling pathway in apoptosis induction by lidamycin (LDM), a member of the enediyne antibiotic family. We found that LDM at low drug concentration of 10 nmol/L induces apoptotic cell death much more effectively in human colorectal cancer cells with wild type p53 than those with mutant or deleted p53. p53 is functionally activated as an early event in response to low dose LDM that precedes the significant apoptosis induction. The primarily activation of mitochondria as well as the activation of p53 transcriptional targets such as Puma, Bad and Bax in HCT116 p53 wild type cells further demonstrates the key role of p53 in mediating the compound-induced apoptosis. This is further supported by the observation that the absence of Bax or Puma decreases apoptosis dramatically while Bcl-2 overexpression confers partially resistance after drug treatment. Activation of p53 signaling pathway leads to activation of caspases and caspases inhibitor VAD-fmk completely blocks low dose LDM induced apoptosis through the inhibition of mitochondria pathway. In contrast, LDM at higher concentration causes rapid apoptosis through more direct DNA damaging mechanism that is independent of activation of p53 and caspases and cannot be blocked by caspase inhibitor. Taken together, LDM induces apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner when given at low doses, but in a p53-independent manner when given at high doses. This dosage-dependent regimen can be applied to cancer clinic based upon the p53 status of cancer patients. PMID:17534142

  11. Independent Synchronized Control and Visualization of Interactions between Living Cells and Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Rouger, Vincent; Bordet, Guillaume; Couillault, Carole; Monneret, Serge; Mailfert, Sébastien; Ewbank, Jonathan J.; Pujol, Nathalie; Marguet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the early stages of cell-cell interactions occurring between living biological samples, imaging methods with appropriate spatiotemporal resolution are required. Among the techniques currently available, those based on optical trapping are promising. Methods to image trapped objects, however, in general suffer from a lack of three-dimensional resolution, due to technical constraints. Here, we have developed an original setup comprising two independent modules: holographic optical tweezers, which offer a versatile and precise way to move multiple objects simultaneously but independently, and a confocal microscope that provides fast three-dimensional image acquisition. The optical decoupling of these two modules through the same objective gives users the possibility to easily investigate very early steps in biological interactions. We illustrate the potential of this setup with an analysis of infection by the fungus Drechmeria coniospora of different developmental stages of Caenorhabditis elegans. This has allowed us to identify specific areas on the nematode’s surface where fungal spores adhere preferentially. We also quantified this adhesion process for different mutant nematode strains, and thereby derive insights into the host factors that mediate fungal spore adhesion. PMID:24853738

  12. Nrf2-dependent and -independent Responses to Nitro-fatty Acids in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kansanen, Emilia; Jyrkkänen, Henna-Kaisa; Volger, Oscar L.; Leinonen, Hanna; Kivelä, Annukka M.; Häkkinen, Sanna-Kaisa; Woodcock, Steven R.; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Horrevoets, Anton J.; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Freeman, Bruce A.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa

    2009-01-01

    Electrophilic fatty acid derivatives, including nitrolinoleic acid and nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2), can mediate anti-inflammatory and pro-survival signaling reactions. The transcription factor Nrf2, activated by electrophilic fatty acids, suppresses redox-sensitive pro-inflammatory gene expression and protects against vascular endothelial oxidative injury. It was therefore postulated that activation of Nrf2 by OA-NO2 accounts in part for its anti-inflammatory actions, motivating the characterization of Nrf2-dependent and -independent effects of OA-NO2 on gene expression using genome-wide transcriptional profiling. Control and Nrf2-small interfering RNA-transfected human endothelial cells were treated with vehicle, oleic acid, or OA-NO2, and differential gene expression profiles were determined. Although OA-NO2 significantly induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes, including heme oxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, the majority of OA-NO2-regulated genes were regulated by Nrf2-independent pathways. Moreover, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that the heat shock response is the major pathway activated by OA-NO2, with robust induction of a number of heat shock genes regulated by the heat shock transcription factor. Inasmuch as the heat shock response mediates anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective actions, this mechanism is proposed to contribute to the protective cell signaling functions of nitro-fatty acids and other electrophilic fatty acid derivatives. PMID:19808663

  13. Two Cell Lineages, myf5 and myf5-Independent, Participate in Mouse Skeletal Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Malay; Karan, Goutam; Tvrdik, Petr; Capecchi, Mario R.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In skeletal muscle development, the myogenic regulatory factors myf5 and myoD play redundant roles in the specification and maintenance of myoblasts, whereas myf6 has a downstream role in differentiating myocytes and myofibers. It is not clear whether the redundancy between myf5 and myoD is within the same cell lineage or between distinct lineages. Using lineage tracing and conditional cell ablation in mice, we demonstrate the existence of two distinct lineages in myogenesis: a myf5 lineage and a myf5-independent lineage. Ablating the myf5 lineage is compatible with myogenesis sustained by myf5-independent, myoD-expressing myoblasts, whereas ablation of the myf6 lineage leads to an absence of all differentiated myofibers, although early myogenesis appears to be unaffected. We also demonstrate here the existence of a significant myf5 lineage within ribs that has an important role in rib development, suggested by severe rib defects upon ablating the myf5 lineage. PMID:18331721

  14. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression.

    PubMed

    Horton, Julie K; Gassman, Natalie R; Dunigan, Brittany D; Stefanick, Donna F; Wilson, Samuel H

    2015-02-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1(+/+) and Xrcc1(-/-) mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  15. DNA polymerase β-dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Julie K.; Gassman, Natalie R.; Dunigan, Brittany B.; Stefanick, Donna F.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2014-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is a primary mechanism for repair of base lesions in DNA such as those formed by exposure to the DNA methylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Both DNA polymerase β (pol β)- and XRCC1-deficient mouse fibroblasts are hypersensitive to MMS. This is linked to a repair deficiency as measured by accumulation of strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The interaction between pol β and XRCC1 is important for recruitment of pol β to sites of DNA damage. Endogenous DNA damage can substitute for MMS-induced damage such that BER deficiency as a result of either pol β- or XRCC1-deletion is associated with sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Pol β shRNA was used to knock down pol β in Xrcc1+/+ and Xrcc1−/− mouse fibroblasts. We determined whether pol β-mediated cellular resistance to MMS and PARP inhibitors resulted entirely from coordination with XRCC1 within the same BER sub-pathway. We find evidence for pol β- dependent cell survival independent of XRCC1 expression for both types of agents. The results suggest a role for pol β-dependent, XRCC1-independent repair. PAR immunofluorescence data are consistent with the hypothesis of a decrease in repair in both pol β knock down cell variants. PMID:25541391

  16. Spinigerin induces apoptotic like cell death in a caspase independent manner in Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Sardar, A H; Das, S; Agnihorti, S; Kumar, M; Ghosh, A K; Abhishek, K; Kumar, A; Purkait, B; Ansari, M Y; Das, P

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are multifunctional components of the innate immune system. Chemotherapeutic agents used for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are now threatened due to the emergence of acquired drug resistance and toxicity. AMPs are attractive alternative to conventional pharmaceuticals. In this study, first time we explored the antileishmanial activity of spinigerin originally derived from Pseudacanthotermes spiniger. Leishmania donovani promastigotes present apoptosis-like cell death upon exposure to spinigerin (IC50, 150 μM). The infection rate was reduced by 20% upon exposure to 150 μM spinigerin but no cytotoxicity on host macrophages was observed. Elevation of intracellular ROS level and down-regulation of two ROS detoxifying enzymes, ascorbate peroxidase (APx) and trypanothione reductase (TR) suggested essential role of ROS machinery during spinigerin mediated cell death. About 97% cell population was found to be Annexin-V positive; 44% cells being highly Annexin-V positive. Moreover, we observed morphological changes like cell rounding, nuclear condensation, oligonucleosomal DNA degradation and TUNEL positive cells without loss of membrane integrity upon spinigerin exposure, suggests apoptosis-like death. Interestingly, collapse in mitochondrial membrane potential and increased level of intracellular ROS and calcium were not associated with caspase like activity. Computational analysis suggests spiningerin interacts with trypanothione reductase and thus probably interferes its function to detoxify the toxic ROS level. Therefore, spinigerin induces apoptosis-like cell death in L. donovani in a caspase-independent manner. The study elucidates the antileishmanial property of spinigerin that may be considered for future chemotherapeutic option alone or adjunct with other drug regimens for improved treatment of visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:24184774

  17. Stromal fibroblasts facilitate cancer cell invasion by a novel invadopodia-independent matrix degradation process.

    PubMed

    Cao, H; Eppinga, R D; Razidlo, G L; Krueger, E W; Chen, J; Qiang, L; McNiven, M A

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic invasion of tumors into peripheral tissues is known to rely upon protease-mediated degradation of the surrounding stroma. This remodeling process uses complex, actin-based, specializations of the plasma membrane termed invadopodia that act both to sequester and release matrix metalloproteinases. Here we report that cells of mesenchymal origin, including tumor-associated fibroblasts, degrade substantial amounts of surrounding matrix by a mechanism independent of conventional invadopodia. These degradative sites lack the punctate shape of conventional invadopodia to spread along the cell base and are reticular and/or fibrous in character. In marked contrast to invadopodia, this degradation does not require the action of Src kinase, Cdc42 or Dyn2. Rather, inhibition of Dyn2 causes a marked upregulation of stromal matrix degradation. Further, expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinases are differentially regulated between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts. This matrix remodeling by fibroblasts increases the invasive capacity of tumor cells, thereby illustrating how the tumor microenvironment can contribute to metastasis. These findings provide evidence for a novel matrix remodeling process conducted by stromal fibroblasts that is substantially more effective than conventional invadopodia, distinct in structural organization and regulated by disparate molecular mechanisms. PMID:25982272

  18. T cell–independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K.; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D.; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M.M.; Schoen, Carolin T.; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A.; Madaio, Michael P.; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell–dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell–independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity. PMID:23979161

  19. Exosomes mediate cell contact-independent ephrin-Eph signaling during axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jingyi; Körner, Roman; Gaitanos, Louise; Klein, Rüdiger

    2016-07-01

    The cellular release of membranous vesicles known as extracellular vesicles (EVs) or exosomes represents a novel mode of intercellular communication. Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their membrane-tethered ephrin ligands have very important roles in such biologically diverse processes as neuronal development, plasticity, and pathological diseases. Until now, it was thought that ephrin-Eph signaling requires direct cell contact. Although the biological functions of ephrin-Eph signaling are well understood, our mechanistic understanding remains modest. Here we report the release of EVs containing Ephs and ephrins by different cell types, a process requiring endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) activity and regulated by neuronal activity. Treatment of cells with purified EphB2(+) EVs induces ephrinB1 reverse signaling and causes neuronal axon repulsion. These results indicate a novel mechanism of ephrin-Eph signaling independent of direct cell contact and proteolytic cleavage and suggest the participation of EphB2(+) EVs in neural development and synapse physiology. PMID:27354374

  20. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  1. Discovery of New Cargo Proteins that enter Cells through Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Eyster, Craig A.; Higginson, Jason D.; Huebner, Robert; Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Weigert, Roberto; Wu, Wells W.; Shen, Rong-Fong; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2010-01-01

    Clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE) allows internalization of plasma membrane proteins lacking clathrin-targeting sequences, such as the major histocompatibility complex Class I protein (MHCI), into cells. After internalization, vesicles containing MHCI fuse with transferrin-containing endosomes generated from clathrin-dependent endocytosis. In HeLa cells, MHCI is subsequently routed to late endosomes or recycled back out to the plasma membrane (PM) in distinctive tubular carriers. Arf6 is associated with endosomal membranes carrying CIE cargo and expression of an active form of Arf6 leads to the generation of vacuolar structures that trap CIE cargo immediately after endocytosis, blocking the convergence with transferrin-containing endosomes. We isolated these trapped vacuolar structures and analyzed their protein composition by mass spectrometry. Here we identify and validate six new endogenous cargo proteins (CD44, CD55, CD98, CD147, Glut1 and ICAM1) that use CIE to enter cells. CD55 and Glut1 appear to closely parallel the trafficking of MHCI, merging with transferrin endosomes before entering the recycling tubules. In contrast, CD44, CD98 and CD147 appear to directly enter the recycling tubules and by-pass the merge with EEA1-positive, transferrin-containing endosomes. This divergent itinerary suggests that sorting may occur along this CIE pathway. Furthermore, the identification of new cargo proteins will assist others studying CIE in different cell types and tissues. PMID:19302270

  2. BRD4-targeted therapy induces Myc-independent cytotoxicity in Gnaq/11-mutatant uveal melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosini, Grazia; Sawle, Ashley D.; Musi, Elgilda; Schwartz, Gary K.

    2015-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is an aggressive intraocular malignancy with limited therapeutic options. Both primary and metastatic UM are characterized by oncogenic mutations in the G-protein alpha subunit q and 11. Furthermore, nearly 40% of UM has amplification of the chromosomal arm 8q and monosomy of chromosome 3, with consequent anomalies of MYC copy number. Chromatin regulators have become attractive targets for cancer therapy. In particular, the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) inhibitor JQ1 has shown selective inhibition of c-Myc expression with antiproliferative activity in hematopoietic and solid tumors. Here we provide evidence that JQ1 had cytotoxic activity in UM cell lines carrying Gnaq/11 mutations, while in cells without the mutations had little effects. Using microarray analysis, we identified a large subset of genes modulated by JQ1 involved in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Further analysis of selected genes determined that the concomitant silencing of Bcl-xL and Rad51 represented the minimal requirement to mimic the apoptotic effects of JQ1 in the mutant cells, independently of c-Myc. In addition, administration of JQ1 to mouse xenograft models of Gnaq-mutant UM resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth. Collectively, our results define BRD4 targeting as a novel therapeutic intervention against UM with Gnaq/Gna11 mutations. PMID:26397223

  3. BRD4-targeted therapy induces Myc-independent cytotoxicity in Gnaq/11-mutatant uveal melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ambrosini, Grazia; Sawle, Ashley D; Musi, Elgilda; Schwartz, Gary K

    2015-10-20

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is an aggressive intraocular malignancy with limited therapeutic options. Both primary and metastatic UM are characterized by oncogenic mutations in the G-protein alpha subunit q and 11. Furthermore, nearly 40% of UM has amplification of the chromosomal arm 8q and monosomy of chromosome 3, with consequent anomalies of MYC copy number. Chromatin regulators have become attractive targets for cancer therapy. In particular, the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) inhibitor JQ1 has shown selective inhibition of c-Myc expression with antiproliferative activity in hematopoietic and solid tumors. Here we provide evidence that JQ1 had cytotoxic activity in UM cell lines carrying Gnaq/11 mutations, while in cells without the mutations had little effects. Using microarray analysis, we identified a large subset of genes modulated by JQ1 involved in the regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. Further analysis of selected genes determined that the concomitant silencing of Bcl-xL and Rad51 represented the minimal requirement to mimic the apoptotic effects of JQ1 in the mutant cells, independently of c-Myc. In addition, administration of JQ1 to mouse xenograft models of Gnaq-mutant UM resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth.Collectively, our results define BRD4 targeting as a novel therapeutic intervention against UM with Gnaq/Gna11 mutations. PMID:26397223

  4. Ionizing Irradiation Protection and Mitigation of Murine Cells by Carbamazepine Is p53 and Autophagy Independent

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun; Bernard, Mark E.; Farkas, Amy; Goff, Julie; Kalash, Ronny; Houghton, Frank; Shields, Donna; Franicola, Darcy; Dixon, Tracy; Zhang, Xichen; Epperly, Michael; Wang, Hong; Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Greenberger, Joel S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Carbamazepine, a sodium channel blocker and pro-autophagy agent used in the treatment of epilepsy and trigeminal neuralgia, is also an ionizing radiation mitigator and protector. Materials and Methods We measured the effect of carbamazepine, compared to other pro-autophagy drugs (i.e. lithium and valproic acid), on irradiation of autophagy incompetent (Atg5−/−) and competent (Atg5+/+) mouse embryonic fibroblasts, p53−/− and p53+/+ bone marrow stromal cells, and human IB3, KM101, HeLa, and umbilical cord blood cells, and in total body-irradiated or orthotopic tumor-bearing mice. Results Carbamazepine, but not other pro-autophagy drugs, was a radiation protector and mitigator for mouse cell lines, independent of apoptosis, autophagy, p53, antioxidant store depletion, and class I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but was ineffective with human cells. Carbamazepine was effective when delivered 24 hours before or 12 hours after total body irradiation of C57BL/6HNsd mice and did not protect orthotopic Lewis lung tumors. Conclusion Carbamazepine is a murine radiation protector and mitigator. PMID:22523285

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces ligand-independent TNFR1-mediated necroptosis in L929 cells

    PubMed Central

    Saveljeva, S; Mc Laughlin, S L; Vandenabeele, P; Samali, A; Bertrand, M J M

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced cellular dysfunction and death is associated with several human diseases. It has been widely reported that ER stress kills through activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Here we demonstrate that ER stress can also induce necroptosis, an receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)/RIPK3/mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL)-dependent form of necrosis. Remarkably, we observed that necroptosis induced by various ER stressors in L929 cells is dependent on tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1), but occurs independently of autocrine TNF or lymphotoxin α production. Moreover, we found that repression of either TNFR1, RIPK1 or MLKL did not protect the cells from death but instead allowed a switch to ER stress-induced apoptosis. Interestingly, while caspase inhibition was sufficient to protect TNFR1- or MLKL-deficient cells from death, rescue of the RIPK1-deficient cells additionally required RIPK3 depletion, indicating a switch back to RIPK3-dependent necroptosis in caspase-inhibited conditions. The finding that ER stress also induces necroptosis may open new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of pathologies resulting from unresolved ER stress. PMID:25569104

  6. Highly polarized Th17 cells induce EAE via a T-bet-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M.; Lalor, Stephen J.; Segal, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the MOG35-55 induced EAE model, autoreactive Th17 cells that accumulate in the central nervous system (CNS) acquire Th1 characteristics via a T-bet dependent mechanism. It remains to be determined whether Th17 plasticity and encephalitogenicity are causally related to each other. Here we show that IL-23 polarized Tbet−/− Th17 cells are unimpaired in either activation or proliferation, and induce higher quantities of the chemokines RANTES and CXCL2 than wildtype (WT) Th17 cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, they retain an IL-17hiIFNγneg-lo cytokine profile following adoptive transfer into syngeneic hosts. This population of highly polarized Th17 effectors is capable of mediating EAE, albeit with a milder clinical course. It has previously been reported that the signature Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, IFNγ and IL-17, are dispensable for the development of autoimmune demyelinating disease. The current study demonstrates that the “master regulator” transcription factor, T-bet, is also not universally required for encephalitogenicity. Our results contribute to a growing body of data showing heterogeneity of myelin-reactive T cells and the independent mechanisms they employ to inflict damage to CNS tissues, complicating the search for therapeutic targets relevant across the spectrum of individuals with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23878008

  7. Recognition of apoptotic cells by viable cells is specific, ubiquitous, and species independent: analysis using photonic crystal biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Goutham; Lidstone, Erich A.; Palasiewicz, Karol; Cunningham, Brian T.; Ucker, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic recognition is innate and linked to a profound immune regulation (innate apoptotic immunity [IAI]) involving anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses. Many of the molecular and mechanistic details of this response remain elusive. Although immune outcomes can be quantified readily, the initial specific recognition events have been difficult to assess. We developed a sensitive, real-time method to detect the recognition of apoptotic cells by viable adherent responder cells, using a photonic crystal biosensor approach. The method relies on characteristic spectral shifts resulting from the specific recognition and dose-dependent interaction of adherent responder cells with nonadherent apoptotic targets. Of note, the biosensor provides a readout of early recognition-specific events in responder cells that occur distal to the biosensor surface. We find that innate apoptotic cell recognition occurs in a strikingly species-independent manner, consistent with our previous work and inferences drawn from indirect assays. Our studies indicate obligate cytoskeletal involvement, although apoptotic cell phagocytosis is not involved. Because it is a direct, objective, and quantitative readout of recognition exclusively, this biosensor approach affords a methodology with which to dissect the early recognition events associated with IAI and immunosuppression. PMID:24694594

  8. A NPxY-independent {beta}5 integrin activation signal regulates phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Sukhwinder; D'mello, Veera; Henegouwen, Paul van Bergen en; Birge, Raymond B.

    2007-12-21

    Integrin receptors are heterodimeric transmembrane receptors with critical functions in cell adhesion and migration, cell cycle progression, differentiation, apoptosis, and phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Integrins are activated by intracellular signaling that alter the binding affinity for extracellular ligands, so-called inside to outside signaling. A common element for integrin activation involves binding of the cytoskeletal protein talin, via its FERM domain, to a highly conserved NPxY motif in the {beta} chain cytoplasmic tails, which is involved in long-range conformation changes to the extracellular domain that impinges on ligand affinity. When the human beta-5 ({beta}5) integrin cDNA was expressed in {alpha}v positive, {beta}5 and {beta}3 negative hamster CS-1 cells, it promoted NPxY-dependent adhesion to VTN-coated surfaces, phosphorylation of FAK, and concomitantly, {beta}5 integrin-EGFP protein was recruited into talin and paxillin-containing focal adhesions. Expression of a NPxY destabilizing {beta}5 mutant (Y750A) abrogated adhesion and {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP was excluded from focal adhesions at the tips of stress fibers. Surprisingly, expression of {beta}5 Y750A integrin had a potent gain-of-function effect on apoptotic cell phagocytosis, and further, a {beta}5-Y750A-EGFP fusion integrin readily bound MFG-E8-coated 10 {mu}m diameter microspheres developed as apoptotic cell mimetics. The critical sequences in {beta}5 integrin were mapped to a YEMAS motif just proximal to the NPxY motif. Our studies suggest that the phagocytic function of {beta}5 integrin is regulated by an unconventional NPxY-talin-independent activation signal and argue for the existence of molecular switches in the {beta}5 cytoplasmic tail for adhesion and phagocytosis.

  9. MUC1-C confers EMT and KRAS independence in mutant KRAS lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kharbanda, Akriti; Rajabi, Hasan; Jin, Caining; Alam, Maroof; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that harbor an oncogenic KRAS mutation are often associated with resistance to targeted therapies. The MUC1-C transmembrane protein is aberrantly overexpressed in NSCLCs and confers a poor outcome; however, the functional role for MUC1-C in mutant KRAS NSCLC cells has remained unclear. The present studies demonstrate that silencing MUC1-C in A549/KRAS(G12S) and H460/KRAS(Q61H) NSCLC cells is associated with downregulation of AKT signaling and inhibition of growth. Overexpression of a MUC1-C(CQC→AQA) mutant, which inhibits MUC1-C homodimerization and function, suppressed both AKT and MEK activation. Moreover, treatment with GO-203, an inhibitor of MUC1-C homodimerization, blocked AKT and MEK signaling and decreased cell survival. The results further demonstrate that targeting MUC1-C suppresses expression of the ZEB1 transcriptional repressor by an AKT-mediated mechanism, and in turn induces miR-200c. In concert with these effects on the ZEB1/miR-200c regulatory loop, targeting MUC1-C was associated with reversal of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and inhibition of self-renewal capacity. Loss of MUC1-C function also attenuated KRAS independence and inhibited growth of KRAS mutant NSCLC cells as tumors in mice. These findings support a model in which targeting MUC1-C inhibits mutant KRAS signaling in NSCLC cells and thereby reverses the EMT phenotype and decreases self-renewal. PMID:25245423

  10. Biomechanics of P-selectin PSGL-1 bonds: Shear threshold and integrin-independent cell adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Zhihua; Goldsmith, Harry L.; MacIntosh, Fiona A.; Shankaran, Harish; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-leukocyte adhesion may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation. We examined the heterotypic interaction between unactivated neutrophils and either thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stimulated platelets or P-selectin bearing beads (Ps-beads) in suspension. Cone-plate viscometers were used to apply controlled shear rates from 14-3000/s. Platelet-neutrophil and bead-neutrophil adhesion analysis was performed using both flow cytometry and high-speed videomicroscopy. We observed that while blocking antibodies against either P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) alone inhibited platelet-neutrophil adhesion by ~60% at 140/s, these reagents completely blocked adhesion at 3000/s. Anti-Mac-1 alone did not alter platelet-neutrophil adhesion rates at any shear rate, though in synergy with selectin antagonists it abrogated cell binding. Unstimulated neutrophils avidly bound Ps-beads and activated platelets in an integrin-independent manner, suggesting that purely selectin-dependent cell adhesion is possible. In support of this, antagonists against P-selectin or PSGL-1 dissociated previously formed platelet-neutrophil and Ps-bead neutrophil aggregates under shear in a variety of experimental systems, including in assays performed with whole blood. In studies where medium viscosity and shear rate were varied, a subtle shear threshold for P-selectin PSGL-1 binding was also noted at shear rates<100/s and at force loading rates of ~300pN/sec. Results are discussed in light of biophysical computations that characterize the collision between unequal size particles in linear shear flow. Overall, our studies reveal an integrin-independent regime for cell adhesion that may be physiologically relevant.

  11. CXCR7 Mediates Neural Progenitor Cells Migration to CXCL12 Independent of CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuju; Xu, Dongsheng; Wang, Yi; Song, Aihong; Zhu, Bing; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin C.

    2016-01-01

    Neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration is an essential process for brain development, adult neurogenesis, and neuroregeneration after brain injury. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1, CXCL12) and its traditional receptor CXCR4 are well known to regulate NPC migration. However, the discovery of CXCR7, a newly identified CXCL12 receptor, adds to the dynamics of the existing CXCL12/CXCR4 pair. Antagonists for either CXCR4 or CXCR7 blocked CXCL12-mediated NPC migration in a transwell chemotaxis assay, suggesting that both receptors are required for CXCL12 action. We derived NPC cultures from Cxcr4 knockout (KO) mice and used transwell and stripe assays to determine the cell migration. NPCs derived from Cxcr4 KO mice polarized and migrated in response to CXCL12 gradient, suggesting that CXCR7 could serve as an independent migration receptor. Furthermore, Cxcr4 KO NPCs transplanted into the adult mouse striatum migrated in response to the adjacent injection of CXCL12, an effect that was blocked by a CXCR7 antagonist, suggesting that CXCR7 also mediates NPC migration in vivo. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that CXCR7 interact with Rac1 in the leading edge of the polarized NPCs in the absence of CXCR4. Both CXCR7 and Rac1 are required for extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 activation and subsequent NPC migration, indicating that CXCR7 could serve as a functional receptor in CXCL12-mediated NPC migration independent of CXCR4. Together these results reveal an essential role of CXCR7 for CXCL12-mediated NPC migration that will be important to understand neurogenesis during development and in adulthood. PMID:25833331

  12. IL-17A induces signal transducers and activators of transcription-6-independent airway mucous cell metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Dawn C; Boswell, Madison G; Sherrill, Taylor P; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V; Boyd, Kelli L; Goleniewska, Kasia; Brody, Steven L; Kolls, Jay K; Adler, Kenneth B; Peebles, R Stokes

    2013-06-01

    Mucous cell metaplasia is a hallmark of asthma, and may be mediated by signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)-6 signaling. IL-17A is increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients with severe asthma, and IL-17A also increases mucus production in airway epithelial cells. Asthma therapeutics are being developed that inhibit STAT6 signaling, but the role of IL-17A in inducing mucus production in the absence of STAT6 remains unknown. We hypothesized that IL-17A induces mucous cell metaplasia independent of STAT6, and we tested this hypothesis in two murine models in which increased IL-17A protein expression is evident. In the first model, ovalbumin (OVA)-specific D011.10 Th17 cells were adoptively transferred into wild-type (WT) or STAT6 knockout (KO) mice, and the mice were challenged with OVA or PBS. WT-OVA and STAT6 KO-OVA mice demonstrated increased airway IL-17A and IL-13 protein expression and mucous cell metaplasia, compared with WT-PBS or STAT6 KO-PBS mice. In the second model, WT, STAT1 KO, STAT1/STAT6 double KO (DKO), or STAT1/STAT6/IL-17 receptor A (RA) triple KO (TKO) mice were challenged with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or mock viral preparation, and the mucous cells were assessed. STAT1 KO-RSV mice demonstrated increased airway mucous cell metaplasia compared with WT-RSV mice. STAT1 KO-RSV and STAT1/STAT6 DKO-RSV mice also demonstrated increased mucous cell metaplasia, compared with STAT1/STAT6/IL17RA TKO-RSV mice. We also treated primary murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs) from WT and STAT6 KO mice. STAT6 KO mTECs showed increased periodic acid-Schiff staining with IL-17A but not with IL-13. Thus, asthma therapies targeting STAT6 may increase IL-17A protein expression, without preventing IL-17A-induced mucus production. PMID:23392574

  13. Exome Sequencing of Bilateral Testicular Germ Cell Tumors Suggests Independent Development Lineages12

    PubMed Central

    Brabrand, Sigmund; Johannessen, Bjarne; Axcrona, Ulrika; Kraggerud, Sigrid M.; Berg, Kaja G.; Bakken, Anne C.; Bruun, Jarle; Fosså, Sophie D.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Lehne, Gustav; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    Intratubular germ cell neoplasia, the precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), is hypothesized to arise during embryogenesis from developmentally arrested primordial germ cells (PGCs) or gonocytes. In early embryonal life, the PGCs migrate from the yolk sac to the dorsal body wall where the cell population separates before colonizing the genital ridges. However, whether the malignant transformation takes place before or after this separation is controversial. We have explored the somatic exome-wide mutational spectra of bilateral TGCT to provide novel insight into the in utero critical time frame of malignant transformation and TGCT pathogenesis. Exome sequencing was performed in five patients with bilateral TGCT (eight tumors), of these three patients in whom both tumors were available (six tumors) and two patients each with only one available tumor (two tumors). Selected loci were explored by Sanger sequencing in 71 patients with bilateral TGCT. From the exome-wide mutational spectra, no identical mutations in any of the three bilateral tumor pairs were identified. Exome sequencing of all eight tumors revealed 87 somatic non-synonymous mutations (median 10 per tumor; range 5-21), some in already known cancer genes such as CIITA, NEB, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA), and WHSC1. SUPT6H was found recurrently mutated in two tumors. We suggest independent development lineages of bilateral TGCT. Thus, malignant transformation into intratubular germ cell neoplasia is likely to occur after the migration of PGCs. We reveal possible drivers of TGCT pathogenesis, such as mutated PDGFRA, potentially with therapeutic implications for TGCT patients. PMID:25748235

  14. Exome sequencing of bilateral testicular germ cell tumors suggests independent development lineages.

    PubMed

    Brabrand, Sigmund; Johannessen, Bjarne; Axcrona, Ulrika; Kraggerud, Sigrid M; Berg, Kaja G; Bakken, Anne C; Bruun, Jarle; Fosså, Sophie D; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Lehne, Gustav; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2015-02-01

    Intratubular germ cell neoplasia, the precursor of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), is hypothesized to arise during embryogenesis from developmentally arrested primordial germ cells (PGCs) or gonocytes. In early embryonal life, the PGCs migrate from the yolk sac to the dorsal body wall where the cell population separates before colonizing the genital ridges. However, whether the malignant transformation takes place before or after this separation is controversial. We have explored the somatic exome-wide mutational spectra of bilateral TGCT to provide novel insight into the in utero critical time frame of malignant transformation and TGCT pathogenesis. Exome sequencing was performed in five patients with bilateral TGCT (eight tumors), of these three patients in whom both tumors were available (six tumors) and two patients each with only one available tumor (two tumors). Selected loci were explored by Sanger sequencing in 71 patients with bilateral TGCT. From the exome-wide mutational spectra, no identical mutations in any of the three bilateral tumor pairs were identified. Exome sequencing of all eight tumors revealed 87 somatic non-synonymous mutations (median 10 per tumor; range 5-21), some in already known cancer genes such as CIITA, NEB, platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA), and WHSC1. SUPT6H was found recurrently mutated in two tumors. We suggest independent development lineages of bilateral TGCT. Thus, malignant transformation into intratubular germ cell neoplasia is likely to occur after the migration of PGCs. We reveal possible drivers of TGCT pathogenesis, such as mutated PDGFRA, potentially with therapeutic implications for TGCT patients. PMID:25748235

  15. Nitric oxide decreases intestinal haemorrhagic lesions in rat anaphylaxis independently of mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, J. Carvalho; Moreno, A.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the intestinal lesions of passive anaphylaxis, since this experimental model resembles necrotizing enterocolitis. Sprague-Dawley rats were sensitized with IgE anti-dinitrophenol monoclonal antibody. Extravasation of protein-rich plasma and haemorrhagia were measured in the small intestine. Plasma histamine was measured to assess mast cell activation. The effect of exogenous NO on the lesions was assessed by using two structurally unrelated NO-donors: sodium nitroprusside and S-nitroso-Nacetyl-penicillamine (SNAP). An increased basal production of NO was observed in cells taken after anaphylaxis, associated with a reduced response to platelet-activating factor, interleukin 1beta, and IgE/DNP-bovine serum albumin complexes. The response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) was enhanced 24 h after challenge, but at earlier times was not significantly different from that observed in controls. Treatment with either sodium nitroprusside or SNAP produced a significant reduction of the haemorrhagic lesions, which are a hallmark of rat anaphylaxis. The extravasation of protein-rich plasma was not influenced by NO-donors. The increase of plasma histamine elicited by the anaphylactic challenge was not influenced by SNAP treatment. NO-donors protect intestinal haemorrhagic lesions of rat anaphylaxis by a mechanism apparently independent of mast cell histamine release. PMID:18472830

  16. TRIM31 promotes Atg5/Atg7-independent autophagy in intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Eun A.; Lee, Taeyun A.; Won Kim, Seung; Park, Areum; Choi, Hyun jin; Jang, Insook; Kang, Sujin; Hee Cheon, Jae; Cho, Jin Won; Eun Lee, Ji; Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is responsible for the bulk degradation of cytosolic constituents and plays an essential role in the intestinal epithelium by controlling beneficial host–bacterial relationships. Atg5 and Atg7 are thought to be critical for autophagy. However, Atg5- or Atg7-deficient cells still form autophagosomes and autolysosomes, and are capable of removing proteins or bacteria. Here, we report that human TRIM31 (tripartite motif), an intestine-specific protein localized in mitochondria, is essential for promoting lipopolysaccharide-induced Atg5/Atg7-independent autophagy. TRIM31 directly interacts with phosphatidylethanolamine in a palmitoylation-dependent manner, leading to induction of autolysosome formation. Depletion of endogenous TRIM31 significantly increases the number of intestinal epithelial cells containing invasive bacteria. Crohn's disease patients display TRIM31 downregulation. Human cytomegalovirus-infected intestinal cells show a decrease in TRIM31 expression as well as a significant increase in bacterial load, reversible by the introduction of wild-type TRIM31. We provide insight into an alternative autophagy pathway that protects against intestinal pathogenic bacterial infection. PMID:27216961

  17. Celecoxib exerts antitumor effects in canine mammary tumor cells via COX‑2‑independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Dai; Saito, Teruyoshi; Murata, Kanae; Kawashima, Masafumi; Asano, Ryuji

    2015-03-01

    Celecoxib plays antitumor roles via multiple mechanisms in a variety of human cancers. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism of action of celecoxib in canine mammary tumors. We examined the antitumor effects of celecoxib in AZACB canine mammary tumor cells expressing low levels of cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) to minimize the effect of COX‑2 on its activity. Our data revealed that celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation mainly via COX‑2‑independent mechanisms. Specifically, celecoxib decreased the proportion of cells in S phase and increased G2/M arrest, which was associated with increased expression of the cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p21 and p27. In addition, treatment with celecoxib downregulated COX‑2 expression, and induced apoptosis via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. These findings suggest that celecoxib might be a useful agent for the treatment of canine mammary tumors, regardless of COX‑2 expression. In the future, it might be possible to use a combination of celecoxib and other antitumor agents to treat canine mammary tumors. PMID:25571853

  18. Tuning 3D Collagen Matrix Stiffness Independently of Collagen Concentration Modulates Endothelial Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Brooke N.; Starchenko, Alina; Williams, Rebecca M.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have described the effects of matrix stiffening on cell behavior using two dimensional (2D) synthetic surfaces; however less is known about the effects of matrix stiffening on cells embedded in three dimensional (3D) in vivo-like matrices. A primary limitation in investigating the effects of matrix stiffness in 3D is the lack of materials that can be tuned to control stiffness independently of matrix density. Here, we use collagen-based scaffolds where the mechanical properties are tuned using non-enzymatic glycation of the collagen in solution, prior to polymerization. Collagen solutions glycated prior to polymerization result in collagen gels with a 3-fold increase in compressive modulus without significant changes to the collagen architecture. Using these scaffolds, we show that endothelial cell spreading increases with matrix stiffness, as does the number and length of angiogenic sprouts and the overall spheroid outgrowth. Differences in sprout length are maintained even when the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts is inhibited. Our results demonstrate the ability to de-couple matrix stiffness from matrix density and structure in collagen gels, and that increased matrix stiffness results in increased sprouting and outgrowth. PMID:22902816

  19. Release of nitric oxide during the T cell-independent pathway of macrophage activation

    SciTech Connect

    Beckerman, K.P.; Rogers, H.W.; Corbett, J.A.; Schreiber, R.D.; McDaniel, M.L.; Unanue, E.R. )

    1993-02-01

    Immunodeficient mice are remarkably resistant to Listeria monocytogenes (LM) infection. The authors examined the role that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the CB-17/lcr SCID (SCID) response to LM. SCID spleen cells produced large quantities of NO (as measured by nitrite formation) when incubated in the presence of heat-killed LM. NO produced large quantities of nitrite in response to LM, but only in the presence of IFN-[gamma]. The production of NO induced by LM was not affected by neutralizing antibodies to TNF or IL-1. The production of NO was inhibited by addition of either of two inhibitors of NO synthase, N[sup G]-monomethyl arginine, or aminoguanidine. In a different situation, NK cells that were stimulated by TNF and Listeria products to release IFN-[gamma] did not produce NO. Macrophages cultured with IFN-[gamma] killed live LM. This increased killing of LM was significantly inhibited by amino-guanidine. In vivo, administration of aminoguanidine resulted in a marked increase in the mortality and spleen bacterial loads of LM-infected SCID or immunocompetent control mice. It is concluded that NO is a critical effector molecule of T cell-independent natural resistence of LM as studied in the SCID mouse, and that the NO-mediated response is essential for both SCID and immunocompetent host to survive after LM infection. 37 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Prolonged Induction Activates Cebpα Independent Adipogenesis in NIH/3T3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hsiao-Yun; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Wu, Kuan-Sju; Hee, Siow-Wey; Chuang, Lee-Ming; Yeh, Jih-I

    2013-01-01

    Background 3T3-L1 cells are widely used to study adipogenesis and insulin response. Their adipogenic potential decreases with time in the culture. Expressing exogenous genes in 3T3-L1 cells can be challenging. This work tries to establish and characterize an alternative model of cultured adipocytes that is easier to work with than the 3T3-L1 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Induced cells were identified as adipocytes based on the following three characteristics: (1) Accumulation of triglyceride droplets as demonstrated by oil red O stain. (2) Transport rate of 2-deoxyglucose increased after insulin stimulation. (3) Expression of fat specific genes such as Fabp4 (aP2), Slc2a4 (Glut4) and Pparg (PPARγ). Among the cell lines induced under different conditions in this study, only NIH/3T3 cells differentiated into adipocytes after prolonged incubation in 3T3-L1 induction medium containing 20% instead of 10% fetal bovine serum. Rosiglitazone added to the induction medium shortened the incubation period from 14 to 7 days. The PI3K/AKT pathway showed similar changes upon insulin stimulation in these two adipocytes. C/EBPα mRNA was barely detectable in NIH/3T3 adipocytes. NIH/3T3 adipocytes induced in the presence of rosiglitazone showed higher 2-deoxyglucose transport rate after insulin stimulation, expressed less Agt (angiotensinogen) and more PPARγ. Knockdown of C/EBPα using shRNA blocked 3T3-L1 but not NIH/3T3 cell differentiation. Mouse adipose tissues from various anatomical locations showed comparable levels of C/EBPα mRNA. Conclusions/Significance NIH/3T3 cells were capable of differentiating into adipocytes without genetic engineering. They were an adipocyte model that did not require the reciprocal activation between C/EBPα and PPARγ to differentiate. Future studies in the C/EBPα independent pathways leading to insulin responsiveness may reveal new targets to diabetes treatment. PMID:23326314

  1. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    PubMed

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F; Bendall, Linda J

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  2. mTOR Inhibition by Everolimus in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Induces Caspase-Independent Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Baraz, Rana; Cisterne, Adam; Saunders, Philip O.; Hewson, John; Thien, Marilyn; Weiss, Jocelyn; Basnett, Jordan; Bradstock, Kenneth F.; Bendall, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis. PMID:25014496

  3. Matrine inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of the androgen‑independent prostate cancer cell line PC-3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Ziming; Chong, Tie; Ji, Zongzheng

    2012-03-01

    Current strategies to treat androgen-independent prostate cancer are associated with a number of challenges and are not yet curative. Matrine is a naturally occurring alkaloid extracted from the Chinese herb Sophora flavescens. Matrine has shown anti-proliferative properties in a number of types of cancer, including breast, gastric, lung and pancreatic tumors. Matrine was also found to promote apoptosis and inhibit invasion of cancer cells. We evaluated the antitumor effects of matrine on androgen-independent PC-3 prostate cancer cells. The effects of matrine on cell cycle progression and apoptosis of PC-3 cells were tested. Matrine-treated PC-3 cells underwent G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. There was a significant reduction in the number of S phase and G2/M phase cells in the treated group when compared to untreated cells. Flow cytometry, as well as Annexin-V/PI staining, showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in the number of early, as well as late, stage apoptotic cells in matrine-treated cells compared to untreated cells. There was also an increase in the number of necrotic cells in the matrine-treated group when compared to untreated cells. Matrine treatment resulted in increased levels of caspase-3 and Bax and decreased levels of Bcl-2. Our data suggest that matrine inhibits the proliferation of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells by causing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptosis. Matrine‑induced apoptosis was mediated by downregulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratios and upregulation of caspase-3 levels. Based on our data, we suggest that matrine may be a novel addition to the current arsenal of strategies used to treat androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:22159447

  4. Spiralin, a mycoplasmal membrane lipoprotein, induces T-cell-independent B-cell blastogenesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, C; Wróblewski, H; Le Henaff, M; Montagnier, L; Blanchard, A

    1997-01-01

    Mycoplasmas are bacteria which can cause respiratory, arthritic, and urogenital diseases. During the early phase of infection, mycoplasmas usually induce an inflammatory response and a humoral response preferentially directed against their membrane-bound, surface-exposed lipoproteins. In this report, we describe the effects on immune cells of spiralin, a well-characterized mycoplasmal lipoprotein. Purified spiralin stimulated the in vitro proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and murine splenocytes. The stimulation pathway was probably different from that followed by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide because the effect of spiralin was not abolished by polymyxin B. Comparison of the effects of whole, native spiralin with those induced by proteinase K-digested spiralin or by the C-terminal half of spiralin (peptide p[13.5]T) revealed that the first half of the protein, which contains the lipoylated N terminus, is responsible for the mitogenic activity. In contrast to whole spiralin, proteinase K-digested spiralin did not trigger murine B-cell differentiation and immunoglobulin G and M secretion. Stimulation of human or murine immune cells led to early secretion of proinflammatory cytokines (human tumor necrosis factor alpha and murine interleukin 1 or 6). Spiralin induced the T-cell-independent blastogenesis of murine B cells but did not stimulate T cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that spiralin possesses potent immunostimulating activity, similar to that reported for lipoproteins of pathogenic gracilicutes (gram-negative eubacteria; e.g., Borrelia burgdorferi OspA and E. coli Braun lipoprotein), and are consistent with the fact that lipoproteins are major antigens during mycoplasma infections. PMID:9317043

  5. CXCL12 induces hepatic stellate cell contraction through a calcium-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Saiman, Yedidya; Agarwal, Ritu; Hickman, DaShawn A; Fausther, Michel; El-Shamy, Ahmed; Dranoff, Jonathan A; Friedman, Scott L; Bansal, Meena B

    2013-09-01

    Liver fibrosis, with subsequent development of cirrhosis and ultimately portal hypertension, results in the death of patients with end-stage liver disease if liver transplantation is not performed. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), central mediators of liver fibrosis, resemble tissue pericytes and regulate intrahepatic blood flow by modulating pericapillary resistance. Therefore, HSCs can contribute to portal hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). We have previously demonstrated that activated HSCs express functional chemokine receptor, CXCR4, and that receptor engagement by its ligand, CXCL12, which is increased in patients with CLD, leads to further stellate cell activation in a CXCR4-specific manner. We therefore hypothesized that CXCL12 promotes HSC contraction in a CXCR4-dependent manner. Stimulation of HSCs on collagen gel lattices with CXCL12 led to gel contraction and myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, which was blocked by addition of AMD3100, a CXCR4 small molecule inhibitor. These effects were further mediated by the Rho kinase pathway since both Rho kinase knockdown or Y-27632, a Rho kinase inhibitor, blocked CXCL12 induced phosphorylation of MLC and gel contraction. BAPTA-AM, a calcium chelator, had no effect, indicating that this pathway is calcium sensitive but not calcium dependent. In conclusion, CXCL12 promotes stellate cell contractility in a predominantly calcium-independent fashion. Our data demonstrates a novel role of CXCL12 in stellate cell contraction and the availability of small molecule inhibitors of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis justifies further investigation into its potential as therapeutic target for portal hypertension. PMID:23812037

  6. T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin-3 Crystal Structure Reveals a Galectin-9-Independent Ligand-Binding Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Cao,E.; Zang, X.; Ramagopal, U.; Mukhopadhaya, A.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Zencheck, W.; Lary, J.; Cole, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (Tim) family of receptors regulates effector CD4+ T cell functions and is implicated in autoimmune and allergic diseases. Tim-3 induces immunological tolerance, and engagement of the Tim-3 immunoglobulin variable (IgV) domain by galectin-9 is important for appropriate termination of T helper 1-immune responses. The 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Tim-3 IgV domain demonstrated that four cysteines, which are invariant within the Tim family, form two noncanonical disulfide bonds, resulting in a surface not present in other immunoglobulin superfamily members. Biochemical and biophysical studies demonstrated that this unique structural feature mediates a previously unidentified galectin-9-independent binding process and suggested that this structural feature is conserved within the entire Tim family. The current work provided a graphic example of the relationship between sequence, structure, and function and suggested that the interplay between multiple Tim-3-binding activities contributes to the regulated assembly of signaling complexes required for effective Th1-mediated immunity.

  7. CCK independently activates intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB in rat pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Han, B; Ji, B; Logsdon, C D

    2001-03-01

    In the cholecystokinin (CCK) hyperstimulation model of acute pancreatitis, two early intracellular events, activation of trypsinogen and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), are thought to be important in the development of the disease. In this study, the relationship between these two events was investigated. NF-kappaB activity was monitored by using a DNA binding assay and mob-1 chemokine gene expression. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. Protease inhibitors including FUT-175, Pefabloc, and E-64d prevented CCK stimulation of intracellular trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation. Likewise, the NF-kappaB inhibitors pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited CCK stimulation of NF-kappaB and intracellular trypsinogen activation. These results suggested a possible codependency of these two events. However, CCK stimulated NF-kappaB activation in Chinese hamster ovary-CCK(A) cells, which do not express trypsinogen, indicating that trypsin is not necessary for CCK activation of NF-kappaB. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression in acinar cells of active p65 subunits to stimulate NF-kappaB, or of inhibitory kappaB-alpha molecules to inhibit NF-kappaB, did not affect either basal or CCK-mediated trypsinogen activation. Thus trypsinogen and NF-kappaB activation are independent events stimulated by CCK. PMID:11171565

  8. A pH-independent DNA nanodevice for quantifying chloride transport in organelles of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sonali; Prakash, Ved; Halder, Saheli; Chakraborty, Kasturi; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2015-07-01

    The concentration of chloride ions in the cytoplasm and subcellular organelles of living cells spans a wide range (5-130 mM), and is tightly regulated by intracellular chloride channels or transporters. Chloride-sensitive protein reporters have been used to study the role of these chloride regulators, but they are limited to a small range of chloride concentrations and are pH-sensitive. Here, we show that a DNA nanodevice can precisely measure the activity and location of subcellular chloride channels and transporters in living cells in a pH-independent manner. The DNA nanodevice, called Clensor, is composed of sensing, normalizing and targeting modules, and is designed to localize within organelles along the endolysosomal pathway. It allows fluorescent, ratiometric sensing of chloride ions across the entire physiological regime. We used Clensor to quantitate the resting chloride concentration in the lumen of acidic organelles in Drosophila melanogaster. We showed that lumenal lysosomal chloride, which is implicated in various lysosomal storage diseases, is regulated by the intracellular chloride transporter DmClC-b.

  9. Glucose-independent glutamine metabolism via TCA cycling for proliferation and survival in B-cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anne; Lane, Andrew N.; Hamaker, Max; Bose, Sminu; Gouw, Arvin; Barbi, Joseph; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Rojas, Camilio J.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Zhang, Haixia; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Slebos, Robbert J.C.; Lorkiewicz, Pawel K.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W. M.; Dang, Chi V.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Because MYC plays a causal role in many human cancers, including those with hypoxic and nutrient-poor tumor microenvironments, we have determined the metabolic responses of a MYC-inducible human Burkitt lymphoma model P493 cell line to aerobic and hypoxic conditions, and to glucose deprivation, using Stable Isotope Resolved Metabolomics. Using [U-13C]-glucose as the tracer, both glucose consumption and lactate production were increased by MYC expression and hypoxia. Using [U-13C,15N]-glutamine as the tracer, glutamine import and metabolism through the TCA cycle persisted under hypoxia, and glutamine contributed significantly to citrate carbons. Under glucose deprivation, glutamine-derived fumarate, malate, and citrate were significantly increased. Their 13C labeling patterns demonstrate an alternative energy-generating glutaminolysis pathway involving a glucose-independent TCA cycle. The essential role of glutamine metabolism in cell survival and proliferation under hypoxia and glucose deficiency, makes them susceptible to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES, and hence could be targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:22225880

  10. Calcium dependent and independent cytokine synthesis by air pollution particle-exposed human bronchial epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Noriho; Hayashi, Shizu; Gosselink, John; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Mukae, Hiroshi; Hogg, James C.; Eeden, Stephan F. van

    2007-12-01

    Exposure to ambient air pollution particles with a diameter of < 10 {mu}m (PM{sub 10}) has been associated with increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. We have shown that human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) exposed to PM{sub 10} produce pro-inflammatory mediators that contribute to a local and systemic inflammatory response. Changes in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) have been demonstrated to regulate several functions of the airway epithelium including the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. The aim of the present study was to determine the nature and mechanism of calcium responses induced by PM{sub 10} in HBECs and its relationship to cytokine synthesis. Methods: Primary HBECs were exposed to urban air pollution particles (EHC-93) and [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} responses were measured using the fluoroprobe (Fura-2). Cytokine levels were measured at mRNA and protein levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results: PM{sub 10} increased [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} in a dose-dependent manner. This calcium response was reduced by blocking the influx of calcium into cells (i.e. calcium-free medium, NiCl{sub 2}, LaCl{sub 3}). PM{sub 10} also decreased the activity of calcium pumps. PM{sub 10} increased the production of IL-1{beta}, IL-8, GM-CSF and LIF. Preincubation with intracellular calcium chelator (BAPTA-AM) attenuated IL-1{beta} and IL-8 production, but not GM-CSF and LIF production. Conclusion: We conclude that exposure to PM{sub 10} induces an increase in cytosolic calcium and cytokine production in bronchial epithelial cells. Our results also suggest that PM{sub 10} induces the production of pro-inflammatory mediators via either intracellular calcium-dependent (IL-1{beta}, IL-8) or -independent (GM-CSF, LIF) pathways.

  11. A feeder-cell independent subpopulation of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line capable of long-term growth and extensive expansion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A method for the feeder-independent culture of PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line was recently devised, but the cell line’s growth was finite and the cells essentially ceased dividing after approximately 20 passages over a one year culture period. Here we report the isolation, continuous culture, and...

  12. Stable Ectopic Expression of ST6GALNAC5 Induces Autocrine MET Activation and Anchorage-Independence in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chia; Bottaro, Donald P.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Shiloach, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex cancer progression that can boost the metastatic potential of transformed cells by inducing migration, loss of cell adhesion, and promoting proliferation under anchorage-independent conditions. A DNA microarray analysis was performed comparing parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells and anchorage-independent MDCK cells that were engineered to express human siat7e (ST6GALNAC5). The comparison identified several genes involved in the EMT process that were differentially expressed between the anchorage-dependent and the anchorage-independent MDCK cell lines. The hepatocyte growth factor gene (hgf) was found to be over-expressed in the engineered MDCK-siat7e cells at both transcription and protein expression levels. Phosphorylation analysis of the MET receptor tyrosine kinase confirmed the activation of an autocrine loop of the HGF/ MET signaling pathway in the MDCK-siat7e cells. When MET activities were suppressed by using the small-molecular inhibitor drug PF-02341066 (Crizotinib), the anchorage-independent MDCK-siat7e cells reverted to the cellular morphology of the parental anchorage-dependent MDCK cells. These observations indicate that the MET receptor plays a central role in the growth properties of the MDCK cells and its phosphorylation status is likely dependent on sialylation. Further investigation of the downstream signaling targets in the MET network showed that the degree of MDCK cell adhesion correlated with secretion levels of a matrix metalloproteinase, MMP1, suggesting a role of metalloproteinases in the EMT process. These results demonstrate that in addition to its application in biotechnology processes, MDCK-siat7e may serve as a model cell for metastasis studies to decipher the sequence of events leading up to the activation of EMT. PMID:26848584

  13. Human Papillomavirus as an Independent Predictor in Oral Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dan; Xu, Qin-gan; Chen, Xin-ming; Fan, Ming-wen

    2009-01-01

    Aim There is an increasing evidence for the role of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relevance of HPV infection to the survival and prognosis of OSCC. Methodology Fifty-two patients with OSCC were followed from 4 to 88 months with a median of 50.7 months. HPV DNA was identified in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor specimens by nested PCR with MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+ primer pairs and the HPV genotype was determined by direct DNA sequencing. Association between the HPV status and risk factors for cancer as well as tumor-host characteristics were analyzed. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method and analyzed using the log-rank test. Results HPV was found in 40.4% of the tumors with HPV16 accounting for 63.5%, HPV18 for 30.8%, HPV6 for 3.9% and HPV11 for 1.8%. No infection with more than one HPV genotype was detected. HPV infection was significantly associated with poor histological grade, TNM stage I–II, alcohol usage and no smoking status. Multi-variate analysis showed that HPV had an independent prognostic effect on the overall survival after adjusting other confounding factors such as histological grade, TNM stage and tobacco usage. The presence of HPV was significantly correlated with a better survival in patients with OSCC. Conclusion HPV infection can act as an independent predictor for the survival and prognosis of OSCC. PMID:20695077

  14. Cisplatin modulates B-cell translocation gene 2 to attenuate cell proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells in both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the cell cycle transition regulation. We evaluated the cisplatin effects on prostate cancer cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2, p53, androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma, p53 wild-type LNCaP or p53-null PC-3, cells. Cisplatin treatments attenuated cell prostate cancer cell growth through inducing Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in lower concentration and apoptosis at higher dosage. Cisplatin treatments enhanced p53 and BTG2 expression, repressed AR and PSA expression, and blocked the activation of androgen on the PSA secretion in LNCaP cells. BTG2 knockdown in LNCaP cells attenuated cisplatin-mediated growth inhibition. Cisplatin enhanced BTG2 gene expression dependent on the DNA fragment located within -173 to -82 upstream of BTG2 translation initiation site in prostate cancer cells. Mutation of the p53 response element from GGGCAGAGCCC to GGGCACC or mutation of the NFκB response element from GGAAAGTCC to GGAAAGGAA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of cisplatin on the BTG2 promoter activity in LNCaP or PC-3 cells, respectively. Our results indicated that cisplatin attenuates prostate cancer cell proliferation partly mediated by upregulation of BTG2 through the p53-dependent pathway or p53-independent NFκB pathway. PMID:24981574

  15. Cisplatin modulates B-cell translocation gene 2 to attenuate cell proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells in both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Feng, Tsui-Hsia; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chiang, Hou-Yu; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the cell cycle transition regulation. We evaluated the cisplatin effects on prostate cancer cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2, p53, androgen receptor (AR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma, p53 wild-type LNCaP or p53-null PC-3, cells. Cisplatin treatments attenuated cell prostate cancer cell growth through inducing Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in lower concentration and apoptosis at higher dosage. Cisplatin treatments enhanced p53 and BTG2 expression, repressed AR and PSA expression, and blocked the activation of androgen on the PSA secretion in LNCaP cells. BTG2 knockdown in LNCaP cells attenuated cisplatin-mediated growth inhibition. Cisplatin enhanced BTG2 gene expression dependent on the DNA fragment located within -173 to -82 upstream of BTG2 translation initiation site in prostate cancer cells. Mutation of the p53 response element from GGGCAGAGCCC to GGGCACC or mutation of the NFκB response element from GGAAAGTCC to GGAAAGGAA by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of cisplatin on the BTG2 promoter activity in LNCaP or PC-3 cells, respectively. Our results indicated that cisplatin attenuates prostate cancer cell proliferation partly mediated by upregulation of BTG2 through the p53-dependent pathway or p53-independent NFκB pathway. PMID:24981574

  16. The SOCS3-independent expression of IDO2 supports the homeostatic generation of T regulatory cells by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Trabanelli, Sara; Očadlíková, Darina; Ciciarello, Marilena; Salvestrini, Valentina; Lecciso, Mariangela; Jandus, Camilla; Metz, Richard; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa; Romero, Pedro; Prendergast, George C; Curti, Antonio; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2014-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional APCs that have a role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses and tolerance. Among the tolerogenic mechanisms, the expression of the enzyme IDO1 represents an effective tool to generate T regulatory cells. In humans, different DC subsets express IDO1, but less is known about the IDO1-related enzyme IDO2. In this study, we found a different pattern of expression and regulation between IDO1 and IDO2 in human circulating DCs. At the protein level, IDO1 is expressed only in circulating myeloid DCs (mDCs) and is modulated by PGE2, whereas IDO2 is expressed in both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs and is not modulated by PGE2. In healthy subjects, IDO1 expression requires the presence of PGE2 and needs continuous transcription and translation, whereas IDO2 expression is constitutive, independent from suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 activity. Conversely, in patients suffering from inflammatory arthritis, circulating DCs express both IDO1 and IDO2. At the functional level, both mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs generate T regulatory cells through an IDO1/IDO2-dependent mechanism. We conclude that, in humans, whereas IDO1 provides an additional mechanism of tolerance induced by proinflammatory mediators, IDO2 is stably expressed in steady-state conditions and may contribute to the homeostatic tolerogenic capacity of DCs. PMID:24391212

  17. Coordinated Regulation of Two Independent Cell-Cell Signaling Systems and Swarmer Differentiation in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wook; Surette, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    Almost all members of the genus Salmonella differentiate and migrate on semisolid surfaces in a coordinated population behavior known as swarming. Important virulence determinants are coupled to swarmer differentiation in several other pathogenic organisms, collectively suggesting that conditions that trigger swarming in the laboratory may fortuitously promote the cells to enter a robust physiological state relevant to the host environment. Here, we present evidence that expression of two independent cell-cell signaling systems are also coupled to swarmer differentiation in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Expression of both pfs and sdiA genes was up-regulated in the actively migrating swarmers compared to their vegetative counterparts propagated in broth or spread plated on the surface of swim, swarm, and solid media. Accordingly, swarmers produced elevated levels of a universally recognized signaling molecule, autoinducer-2, and exhibited increased sensitivity to N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), signaling molecules that Salmonella does not produce. Expression of the rck operon was concomitantly up-regulated in the swarmers in an SdiA-dependent manner only in the presence of exogenous AHLs. In addition to the previously reported adaptive antibiotic resistance phenotype and global shift in metabolism, this work presents another component of the physiological changes that are specifically associated with swarmer differentiation in serovar Typhimurium and not simply due to growth on a surface. PMID:16385032

  18. Hop/STI1 modulates retinal proliferation and cell death independent of PrP{sup C}

    SciTech Connect

    Arruda-Carvalho, Maithe; Njaine, Brian; Silveira, Mariana S.; Linden, Rafael; Chiarini, Luciana B. . E-mail: chiarini@biof.ufrj.br

    2007-09-21

    Hop/STI1 is a co-chaperone adaptor protein for Hsp70/Hsp90 complexes. Hop/STI1 is found extracellularly and modulates cell death and differentiation through interaction with the prion protein (PrP{sup C}). Here, we investigated the expression of hop/STI1 and its role upon cell proliferation and cell death in the developing retina. Hop/STI1 is more expressed in developing rat retina than in the mature tissue. Hop/STI1 blocks retinal cell death in the neuroblastic layer (NBL) in a PrP{sup C} dependent manner, but failed to protect ganglion cells against axotomy-induced cell death. An antibody raised against hop/STI1 ({alpha}-STI1) blocked both ganglion cell and NBL cell death independent of PrP{sup C}. cAMP/PKA, ERK, PI3K and PKC signaling pathways were not involved in these effects. Hop/STI1 treatment reduced proliferation, while {alpha}-STI1 increased proliferation in the developing retina, both independent of PrP{sup C}. We conclude that hop/STI1 can modulate both proliferation and cell death in the developing retina independent of PrP{sup C}.

  19. High expression of interleukin-11 is an independent indicator of poor prognosis in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Deng; Xu, Le; Liu, Haiou; Zhang, Weijuan; Liu, Weisi; Liu, Yidong; Fu, Qiang; Xu, Jiejie

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11), a member of the IL-6 family of cytokines, exerts pleiotropic oncogenic activities by stimulating angiogenesis and metastasis in many cancer types. The present study aims to evaluate the impact of IL-11 expression on recurrence and mortality of patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We retrospectively enrolled 193 ccRCC patients undergoing nephrectomy at a single center. Clinicopathologic features, recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were recorded. IL-11 intensity was assessed by immunohistochemistry in tumor specimens. The Kaplan–Meier method was applied to compare survival curves. Cox regression models were used to analyze the impact of prognostic factors on RFS and OS. The concordance index (C-index) was calculated to assess predictive accuracy. High IL-11 expression is associated with increased risk of recurrence and poor survival for ccRCC patients (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively), especially those with early-stage disease (TNM stage I + II). Multivariate analyses confirmed that IL-11 expression was an independent prognostic factor for RFS and OS (P = 0.006 and P = 0.008, respectively). The predictive accuracy of well-established prognostic models was improved when IL-11 expression was integrated. In conclusion, high IL-11 expression is an independent predictor of poor prognosis in ccRCC patients. It may help identify patients who could benefit from additional treatments and closer follow up. PMID:25702890

  20. Retention of prolyl hydroxylase PHD2 in the cytoplasm prevents PHD2-induced anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Jokilehto, Terhi; Hoegel, Heidi; Heikkinen, Pekka; Rantanen, Krista; Elenius, Klaus; Sundstroem, Jari; Jaakkola, Panu M.

    2010-04-15

    Cellular oxygen tension is sensed by a family of prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3) that regulate the degradation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1{alpha} and -2{alpha}). The PHD2 isoform is considered as the main downregulator of HIF in normoxia. Our previous results have shown that nuclear translocation of PHD2 associates with poorly differentiated tumor phenotype implying that nuclear PHD2 expression is advantageous for tumor growth. Here we show that a pool of PHD2 is shuttled between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In line with this, accumulation of wild type PHD2 in the nucleus was detected in human colon adenocarcinomas and in cultured carcinoma cells. The PHD2 isoforms showing high nuclear expression increased anchorage-independent carcinoma cell growth. However, retention of PHD2 in the cytoplasm inhibited the anchorage-independent cell growth. A region that inhibits the nuclear localization of PHD2 was identified and the deletion of the region promoted anchorage-independent growth of carcinoma cells. Finally, the cytoplasmic PHD2, as compared with the nuclear PHD2, less efficiently downregulated HIF expression. Forced HIF-1{alpha} or -2{alpha} expression decreased and attenuation of HIF expression increased the anchorage-independent cell growth. However, hydroxylase-inactivating mutations in PHD2 had no effect on cell growth. The data imply that nuclear PHD2 localization promotes malignant cancer phenotype.

  1. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. PMID:24720912

  2. Circulating Tumor Cell Analyses in Patients With Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Epithelial Marker-Dependent and -Independent Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Song, Pingping; Zou, Benkui; Liu, Min; Cui, Kai; Zhou, Pengfei; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Baijiang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In several epithelial malignancies, detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. However, the clinical relevance of CTCs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has not yet been ascertained. The study was conducted with the aim of determining the clinical significance of CTCs in patients with ESCC by using 2 CTC detection systems, one epithelial marker-dependent and the other epithelial marker-independent. Paired peripheral blood samples were prospectively obtained from 61 ESCC patients before treatment and were analyzed for CTCs isolated by the CellSearchTM system (CS) and the method of isolation by size of epithelial tumor (ISET). Blood samples from 22 healthy volunteers were used as controls. Out of 61 study subjects, CTCs were detected in 20 patients (32.8%) by the ISET method and in only 1 patient (1.6%) by the CS method. Circulating tumor microemboli (CTM) were observed in 3 of 61 (4.9%) patients using ISET, but were undetectable in any of the patient by CS method. No CTCs/CTM were detected by either method in control groups. By ISET method, the presence of CTCs appeared to correlate with the stage of ESCC and with the baseline median platelet levels. No correlation with any other relevant clinicopathological variables was observed. Our results clearly indicate the ability of both CS and ISET methods to detect CTCs in peripheral blood samples from ESCC patients. However, the CellSearchTM system appears to have a poorer sensitivity as compared with the ISET method. Further studies are essential for assessing the role of such technologies in ESCC. PMID:26402816

  3. Influence of cations and anions on the induction of cell density-independent luminescence in Photorhabdus luminescens.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Ogawa, Akane; Era, Mariko; Ninomiya, Junko; Morita, Hiroshi

    2013-03-01

    Bioluminescence is emitted by various living organisms, including bacteria. While the induction mechanism in marine luminescent bacteria, such as Vibrio fischeri and V. harveyi, has been well characterized, this mechanism has not been studied in detail in the non-marine luminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of cations and anions on the induction of luminescence by P. luminescens. Cultivation of cells in an inorganic salts solution (ISS) containing KCl, CaCl2 , MgCl2 , NaHCO3 , and MgSO4 resulted in a rapid increase in luminescence intensity. Moreover, the induction of luminescence in the ISS medium was not dependent on cell density, since cell densities remained unchanged during 48 h. Furthermore, we found that compounds containing K(+) , Mg(2+) , and HCO3(-) were necessary to induce cell density-independent luminescence. The intensity of luminescence per cell cultured in medium containing KCl, MgCl2 , and NaHCO3 was approximately 100-fold higher than that cultured in NB. In contrast, when cells actively grew in normal growth condition, the intensity of luminescence per cell was not increased even in the presence of K(+) , Mg(2+) , and HCO3(-) . Thus, these results suggest that the luminescence of P. luminescens is regulated by 2 independent cell density-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:22733631

  4. Investigation of low temperature solid oxide fuel cells for air-independent UUV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moton, Jennie Mariko

    Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs) will benefit greatly from high energy density (> 500 Wh/L) power systems utilizing high-energy-density fuels and air-independent oxidizers. Current battery-based systems have limited energy densities (< 400 Wh/L), which motivate development of alternative power systems such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). SOFC-based power systems have the potential to achieve the required UUV energy densities, and the current study explores how SOFCs based on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolytes with operating temperatures of 650°C and lower may operate in the unique environments of a promising UUV power plant. The plant would contain a H 2O2 decomposition reactor to supply humidified O2 to the SOFC cathode and exothermic aluminum/H2O combustor to provide heated humidified H2 fuel to the anode. To characterize low-temperature SOFC performance with these unique O2 and H2 source, SOFC button cells based on nickel/GDC (Gd0.1Ce0.9O 1.95) anodes, GDC electrolytes, and lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ or LSCF)/GDC cathodes were fabricated and tested for performance and stability with humidity on both the anode and the cathode. Cells were also tested with various reactant concentrations of H2 and O2 to simulate gas depletion down the channel of an SOFC stack. Results showed that anode performance depended primarily on fuel concentration and less on the concentration of the associated increase in product H2O. O 2 depletion with humidified cathode flows also caused significant loss in cell current density at a given voltage. With the humidified flows in either the anode or cathode, stability tests of the button cells at 650 °C showed stable voltage is maintained at low operating current (0.17 A/cm2) at up to 50 % by mole H2O, but at higher current densities (0.34 A/cm2), irreversible voltage degradation occurred at rates of 0.8-3.7 mV/hour depending on exposure time. From these button cell results, estimated average

  5. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate inhibit glucose uptake and metabolism by breast cancer cells by an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Liliana; Araújo, Isabel; Costa, Tito; Correia-Branco, Ana; Faria, Ana; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2013-07-15

    In this study we characterized {sup 3}H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 3}H -DG) uptake by the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 and the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines and investigated the effect of quercetin (QUE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) upon {sup 3}H-DG uptake, glucose metabolism and cell viability and proliferation. In both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells {sup 3}H-DG uptake was (a) time-dependent, (b) saturable with similar capacity (V{sub max}) and affinity (K{sub m}), (c) potently inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), (d) sodium-independent and (e) slightly insulin-stimulated. This suggests that {sup 3}H-DG uptake by both cell types is mediated by members of the GLUT family, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4 or GLUT12, while being independent of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). QUE and EGCG markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited {sup 3}H-DG uptake by MCF7 and by MDA-MB-231 cells, and both compounds blocked lactate production by MCF7 cells. Additionally, a 4 h-treatment with QUE or EGCG decreased MCF7 cell viability and proliferation, an effect that was more potent when glucose was available in the extracellular medium. Our results implicate QUE and EGCG as metabolic antagonists in breast cancer cells, independently of estrogen signalling, and suggest that these flavonoids could serve as therapeutic agents/adjuvants even for ER-negative breast tumors. -- Highlights: • Glucose uptake by MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is mainly mediated by GLUT1. • QUE and EGCG inhibit cellular glucose uptake thus abolishing the Warburg effect. • This process induces cytotoxicity and proliferation arrest in MCF7 cells. • The flavonoids’ effects are independent of estrogen receptor signalling.

  6. Cell Length Independent PBRB Model for Simulations of HE Reaction Initiation, Growth, and Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sunil

    2015-06-01

    It has been our focus to use the Physics Based Reaction Burn (PBRB) model to simulate reaction initiation, growth, and detonation of HE composites at the mesoscale. The idealization of hot spots as planar surfaces reduces the 3D model to a 1D hot spot cell (1DHSC) model. The idealization also renders the model dependent on the 1DHSC length and mesh size. New developments are presented making the PBRB model 1DHSC length independent. First, the accurate prediction of the gas-solid interface temperature and thermal gradient are essential, achieved through a finite difference scheme with 500-2000 thermal grid points. Second, keeping the burn mass constant while varying the 1DHSC length is essential, achieved by varying the hot spot specific surface area. 1D and 2D simulation results are presented for shock response of RDX at 1 km/s and 2 km/s impact velocities. The 5, 10, and 50 micro meters 1DHSC lengths yield near identical run-to-detonation, time-to-detonation, and detonation velocity in agreement with experimental data. It is concluded that the new developments make the PBRB model well suited as a generic EOS model for HE composites. - Dr. John Brennan, ARL is acknowledged for his interactions and support. This work is supported in part by ARL Grant W911NF-12-2-0053 and DTRA Grant HDTRA1-12-1-0004.

  7. Acute Pain and Depressive Symptoms: Independent Predictors of Insomnia Symptoms among Adults with Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn; Kozachik, Sharon; Smith, Michael T; Budhathoki, Chakra; Haywood, Carlton

    2016-02-01

    No studies to date have systematically investigated insomnia symptoms among adults with sickle cell disease (SCD). The purpose of this study was to (1) describe the prevalence of insomnia symptoms and (2) identify biopsychosocial predictors in community-dwelling adults with SCD. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from 263 African American adults with SCD (aged 18 years or older). Measures included the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), Center for Epidemiologic Studies in Depression scale, Urban Life Stress Scale, Brief Pain Inventory, and a chronic pain item. SCD genotype was extracted from the medical record. A slight majority (55%) of the sample reported clinically significant insomnia symptomatology (ISI ≥ 10), which suggests that insomnia symptoms are prevalent among community-dwelling African American adults with SCD. While insomnia symptoms were associated with a number of biopsychosocial characteristics, depressive symptoms and acute pain were the only independent predictors. Given the high number of participants reporting clinically significant insomnia symptoms, nurses should screen for insomnia symptoms and explore interventions to promote better sleep among adults with SCD, with an emphasis on recommending treatment for pain and depression. In addition, current pain and depression interventions in this population could add insomnia measures and assess the effect of the intervention on insomnia symptomatology as a secondary outcome. PMID:26673730

  8. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  9. Phosphoproteome analysis demonstrates the potential role of THRAP3 phosphorylation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth.

    PubMed

    Ino, Yoko; Arakawa, Noriaki; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Uemura, Hiroji; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Hirano, Hisashi; Toda, Tosifusa

    2016-04-01

    Elucidating the androgen-independent growth mechanism is critical for developing effective treatment strategies to combat androgen-independent prostate cancer. We performed a comparative phosphoproteome analysis using a prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, and an LNCaP-derived androgen-independent cell line, LNCaP-AI, to identify phosphoproteins involved in this mechanism. We performed quantitative comparisons of the phosphopeptide levels in tryptic digests of protein extracts from these cell lines using MS. We found that the levels of 69 phosphopeptides in 66 proteins significantly differed between LNCaP and LNCaP-AI. In particular, we focused on thyroid hormone receptor associated protein 3 (THRAP3), which is a known transcriptional coactivator of the androgen receptor. The phosphorylation level of THRAP3 was significantly lower at S248 and S253 in LNCaP-AI cells. Furthermore, pull-down assays showed that 32 proteins uniquely bound to the nonphosphorylatable mutant form of THRAP3, whereas 31 other proteins uniquely bound to the phosphorylation-mimic form. Many of the differentially interacting proteins were identified as being involved with RNA splicing and processing. These results suggest that the phosphorylation state of THRAP3 at S248 and S253 might be involved in the mechanism of androgen-independent prostate cancer cell growth by changing the interaction partners. PMID:26841317

  10. The Human NK Cell Response to Yellow Fever Virus 17D Is Primarily Governed by NK Cell Differentiation Independently of NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Nicole; Ivarsson, Martin A; Blom, Kim; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Braun, Monika; Falconer, Karolin; Gustafsson, Rasmus; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Sandberg, Johan K; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    NK cells play an important role in the defense against viral infections. However, little is known about the regulation of NK cell responses during the first days of acute viral infections in humans. In this study, we used the live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D as a human in vivo model to study the temporal dynamics and regulation of NK cell responses in an acute viral infection. YFV induced a robust NK cell response in vivo, with an early activation and peak in NK cell function at day 6, followed by a delayed peak in Ki67 expression, which was indicative of proliferation, at day 10. The in vivo NK cell response correlated positively with plasma type I/III IFN levels at day 6, as well as with the viral load. YFV induced an increased functional responsiveness to IL-12 and IL-18, as well as to K562 cells, indicating that the NK cells were primed in vivo. The NK cell responses were associated primarily with the stage of differentiation, because the magnitude of induced Ki67 and CD69 expression was distinctly higher in CD57(-) NK cells. In contrast, NK cells expressing self- and nonself-HLA class I-binding inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors contributed, to a similar degree, to the response. Taken together, our results indicate that NK cells are primed by type I/III IFN in vivo early after YFV infection and that their response is governed primarily by the differentiation stage, independently of killer cell Ig-like receptor/HLA class I-mediated inhibition or education. PMID:26283480

  11. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells

    PubMed Central

    OGURA, TAKEHARU; TANAKA, YOSHIYUKI; TAMAKI, HIROKI; HARADA, MAMORU

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemo-resistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  12. Docetaxel induces Bcl-2- and pro-apoptotic caspase-independent death of human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Takeharu; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Tamaki, Hiroki; Harada, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Docetaxel is a useful chemotherapeutic agent for the first-line treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Abnormal expression of Bcl-2 is commonly found in cancer cells, which increases their anti-apoptotic potency and chemoresistance. We investigated the effects of Bcl-2 expression status on the susceptibility of DU145 cells, an androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell line, to docetaxel and other anticancer agents. A panel of Bcl-2-expressing DU145 cell lines was established. Bcl-2 expression levels were unrelated to the susceptibility of DU145 cells to docetaxel. The sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin fluctuated, and the sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was decreased by Bcl-2 overexpression. In a xenograft mouse model, overexpression of Bcl-2 drastically decreased the sensitivity of DU145 cells to cisplatin and TNF-α; however, there was no change in the response to docetaxel. Fluorescent microscopy revealed that Bcl-2-overexpression had no effect on the docetaxel-induced death of DU145 cells, but significantly decreased DU145 cell death induced by cisplatin or TNF-α. Interestingly, docetaxel hardly induced caspase-3/7 activation in control or Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells, but did at a low level in LNCaP cells, another prostate cancer cell line. Moreover, in contrast to LNCaP cells, the reduced viabilities of docetaxel-treated control and Bcl-2-overexpressing DU145 cells were not restored by the addition of either a Bid inhibitor or a panel of pro-apoptotic caspase inhibitors. These findings indicate that the antitumor effects of docetaxel on DU145 cells are independent of both Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic caspases. PMID:27082738

  13. Neuregulin Promotes Incomplete Autophagy of Prostate Cancer Cells That Is Independent of mTOR Pathway Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Schmukler, Eran; Shai, Ben; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Background Growth factors activating the ErbB receptors have been described in prostate tumors. The androgen dependent prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, expresses the ErbB-1, ErbB-2 and ErbB-3 receptor tyrosine kinases. Previously, it was demonstrated that NRG activates ErbB-2/ErbB-3 heterodimers to induce LNCaP cell death, whereas, EGF activates ErbB-1/ErbB-1 or ErbB-1/ErbB-2 dimers to induce cell growth and survival. It was also demonstrated that PI3K inhibitors repressed this cell death suggesting that in androgen deprived LNCaP cells, NRG activates a PI3K-dependent pathway associated with cell death. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we demonstrate that NRG induces autophagy in LNCaP cells, using LC3 as a marker. However, the autophagy induced by NRG may be incomplete since p62 levels elevate. We also demonstrated that NRG- induced autophagy is independent of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition since NRG induces Akt and S6K activation. Interestingly, inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), inhibited NRG-induced autophagy and cell death. Our study also identified JNK and Beclin 1 as important components in NRG-induced autophagy and cell death. NRG induced elevation in JNK phosphorylation that was inhibited by NAC. Moreover, inhibitor of JNK inhibited NRG-induced autophagy and cell death. Also, in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 or cells expressing sh-RNA against Beclin 1, the effects of NRG, namely induction of autophagy and cell death, were inhibited. Conclusions/Significance Thus, in LNCaP cells, NRG-induces incomplete autophagy and cell death that depend on ROS levels. These effects of NRG are mediated by signaling pathway that activates JNK and Beclin 1, but is independent of mTOR inhibition. PMID:22606295

  14. Prostaglandin I2 Suppresses Proinflammatory Chemokine Expression, CD4 T Cell Activation, and STAT6-Independent Allergic Lung Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weisong; Zhang, Jian; Goleniewska, Kasia; Dulek, Daniel E; Toki, Shinji; Newcomb, Dawn C; Cephus, Jacqueline Y; Collins, Robert D; Wu, Pingsheng; Boothby, Mark R; Peebles, R Stokes

    2016-09-01

    Allergic airway diseases are immune disorders associated with heightened type 2 immune responses and IL-5 and IL-13 production at the site of inflammation. We have previously reported that cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by indomethacin augmented allergic airway inflammation in a STAT6-independent manner. However, the key COX product(s) responsible for restraining indomethacin-mediated STAT6-independent allergic inflammation is unknown. In this study, using the mouse model of OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation, we identified that PGI2 receptor (IP) signaling was critical for indomethacin-induced, STAT6-independent proallergic effects. We demonstrated that IP deficiency increased inflammatory cell infiltration, eosinophilia, and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in the lung in a STAT6-independent manner. The augmented STAT6-independent allergic inflammation correlated with enhanced primary immune responses to allergic sensitization and elevated production of multiple inflammatory chemokines (CCL11, CCL17, CCL22, and CXCL12) in the lung after allergen challenge. We also showed that the PGI2 analogue cicaprost inhibited CD4 T cell proliferation and IL-5 and IL-13 expression in vitro, and IP deficiency diminished the stimulatory effect of indomethacin on STAT6-independent IL-5 and IL-13 responses in vivo. The inhibitory effects of PGI2 and the IP signaling pathway on CD4 T cell activation, inflammatory chemokine production, and allergic sensitization and airway inflammation suggest that PGI2 and its analogue iloprost, both Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, may be useful in treating allergic diseases and asthma. In addition, inhibiting PGI2 signaling by drugs that either block PGI2 production or restrain IP signaling may augment STAT6-independent pathways of allergic inflammation. PMID:27456482

  15. Discovery and optimization of new benzofuran derivatives against p53-independent malignant cancer cells through inhibition of HIF-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying-Rui; Wei, Jin-Lian; Mo, Xiao-Fei; Yuan, Zhen-Wei; Wang, Jia-Lin; Zhang, Chao; Xie, Yi-Yue; You, Qi-Dong; Sun, Hao-Peng

    2016-06-01

    p53-independent malignant cancer is still severe health problem of human beings. HIF-1 pathway is believed to play an important role in the survival and developing progress of such cancers. In the present study, with the aim to inhibit the proliferation of p53-independent malignant cells, we disclose the optimization of 6a, the starting compound which is discovered in the screening of in-house compound collection. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) is summarized. The most potent derivative 8d, inhibits the proliferation of both p53-null and p53-mutated cells through inhibition of HIF-1 pathway. Our findings here provide a new chemotype in designing potent anticancer agent especially against those p53-independent malignant tumors. PMID:27101893

  16. Sarcopenia is an independent prognostic factor in male patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Nobuhiko; Hara, Takeshi; Shibata, Yuhei; Matsumoto, Takuro; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Soranobu; Kito, Yusuke; Kitagawa, Junichi; Kanemura, Nobuhiro; Goto, Naoe; Shiraki, Makoto; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Shimizu, Masahito; Tsurumi, Hisashi

    2015-12-01

    Sarcopenia reportedly predicts poor outcomes in elderly patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). However, because previous studies only involved elderly patients, it is difficult to generalize these results to all patients with DLBCL. We retrospectively analyzed 207 patients with DLBCL who received the R-CHOP or R-THP-COP regimen between June 2004 and May 2014. Sarcopenia was measured by the analysis of CT images at the L3 level before treatment. The surface of muscular tissues was selected according to the CT Hounsfield unit. This value was normalized for stature in order to calculate the L3 skeletal muscle index (L3 SMI, cm(2)/m(2)). Median age at diagnosis in the 121 males and 86 females was 67 years (range, 19-86 years). The sex-specific cutoffs for the L3 SMI were determined by receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis. Sarcopenic patients were older than non-sarcopenic patients, with a median age of 70 and 65 years, respectively (p < 0.001). Other International Prognostic Index factors were not significantly different when comparing sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients. With a median follow-up of 50.4 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS) was 70 % in the sarcopenic group and 85 % in the non-sarcopenic group (p = 0.0260). In a subgroup analysis by gender, there was a significant difference in the OS when comparing sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients in males but not in females (p = 0.0003, p = 0.4440, respectively). Sarcopenia is an independent prognostic factor in male patients with DLBCL. PMID:26385388

  17. Serum HE4: An Independent Prognostic Factor in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Plassot, Carine; Pujol, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    Human epididymis secretory protein 4 (HE4) is a secreted glycosylated protein encoded by the WAP four-disulfide core domain 2 (WFDC2) gene, located on a chromosome 20 segment that is frequently amplified in many cancers. This study aimed at determining serum HE4 prognostic value in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), following the REMARK guidelines. Serum samples from 346 consecutive patients with histologically proven and previously untreated NSCLC and 41 patients with benign pulmonary disease were collected at the Montpellier-Nimes Academic Hospital. Work-up investigations performed to determine the disease characteristics and treatment algorithms were congruent with international guidelines. HE4 levels in serum were measured with an ELISA test (Fujirebio Diagnostics) that uses two monoclonal antibodies, 2H5 and 3D8, against the C-WFDC domain of HE4. The area under the ROC curve (i.e., overall ability of HE4 to discriminate between controls and patients) was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.738–0.821; z test P <0.0001). Serum HE4 levels were significantly higher in patients with worse performance status, advanced TNM stage and positive nodal status. In the Cox model, overall survival was shorter in patients with high pretreatment serum HE4 (above 140 pmol/L) than in patients with serum H4 level ≤ 140 pmol/L [median survival: 17.7 weeks (95% CI, 11.9 to 24.9) and 46.4 weeks (95% CI, 38.6 to 56.3), respectively; hazard ratio: 1.48 (95% CI, 1.12 to 1.95) for high HE4; adjusted P = 0.0057]. High serum HE4 level at diagnosis is an independent determinant of poor prognosis in NSCLC. PMID:26030627

  18. Neuron-independent Ca(2+) signaling in glial cells of snail's brain.

    PubMed

    Kojima, S; Ogawa, H; Kouuchi, T; Nidaira, T; Hosono, T; Ito, E

    2000-01-01

    To directly monitor the glial activity in the CNS of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, we optically measured the electrical responses in the cerebral ganglion and median lip nerve to electrical stimulation of the distal end of the median lip nerve. Using a voltage-sensitive dye, RH155, we detected a composite depolarizing response in the cerebral ganglion, which consisted of a fast transient depolarizing response corresponding to a compound action potential and a slow depolarizing response. The slow depolarizing response was observed more clearly in an isolated median lip nerve and also detected by extracellular recording. In the median lip nerve preparation, the slow depolarizing response was suppressed by an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, nifedipine, and was resistant to tetrodotoxin and Na(+)-free conditions. Together with the fact that a delay from the compound action potential to the slow depolarizing response was not constant, these results suggested that the slow depolarizing response was not a postsynaptic response. Because the signals of the action potentials appeared on the saturated slow depolarizing responses during repetitive stimulation, the slow depolarizing response was suggested to originate from glial cells. The contribution of the L-type Ca(2+) current to the slow depolarizing response was confirmed by optical recording in the presence of Ba(2+) and also supported by intracellular Ca(2+) measurement. Our results suggested that electrical stimulation directly triggers glial Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels, providing evidence for the generation of glial depolarization independent of neuronal activity in invertebrates. PMID:11036223

  19. Feeder-independent continuous culture of the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line is a bipotent cell line, i.e., capable of forming either bile ductules or hepatocyte monolayers in vitro, that was derived from the primary culture of pig embryonic stem cells. The cell line has been strictly feeder-dependent in that cell replication morphology,...

  20. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

    PubMed Central

    Costales, Jaime A; Daily, Johanna P; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-01-01

    Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value < 0.01) 24 hours post-invasion. A prominent type I interferon response was observed in each cell type, reflecting a secondary response to secreted cytokine in infected cultures. To identify a core cytokine-independent response in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at

  1. MEK1-independent activation of MAPK and MEK1-dependent activation of p70 S6 kinase by stem cell factor (SCF) in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Lian; Zhang, Xin; Du, Chao; Zhang, Xiaoning; Hou, Nan; Zhao, Di; Sun, Jianzhi; Li, Li; Wang, Xiuwen; Ma, Chunhong

    2009-05-01

    We discovered a stem cell factor (SCF)-triggered, MEK1-independent, and PI3K-dependent MAPK activation pathway in the Kit-expressing ovarian cancer cell line HEY. When we knocked down MEK1 with RNA interference (RNAi) to study the function of MEK1 on the proliferation and survival of ovarian cancer cells, we found that impaired cell growth still occurred after MEK1 expression had been suppressed, although MAPK activation remained intact. This suggests that there is MEK1-independent activation of MAPK in the SCF-induced ovarian cancer cell growth process, and that MEK1 still plays a crucial role in maintaining the malignant properties of ovarian cancer cells even when it fails to activate MAPK as expected.

  2. Quinazoline-derived alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists induce prostate cancer cell apoptosis via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action.

    PubMed

    Benning, Cynthia M; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2002-01-15

    Recent evidence suggests that the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin, exhibit a potent apoptotic effect against prostate tumor epithelial cells, whereas tamsulosin, a sulfonamide-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist, was ineffective in inducing a similar apoptotic effect against prostate cells (Cancer Res., 60: 4550-4555, 2000). In this study, to identify the precise molecular mechanism underlying this apoptosis induction, we examined whether doxazosin and terazosin (both piperazinyl quinazolines) affect prostate growth via an alpha1-adrenoceptor-independent action. Transfection-mediated overexpression of alpha1-adrenoceptor in human prostate cancer cells, DU-145 (that lack alpha1-adrenoceptor), did not alter the ability of prostate cancer cells to undergo apoptosis in response to quinazolines. Significantly enough, there was no modification of the apoptotic threshold of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells, LNCaP, to either quinazoline-based alpha1-agonist by androgens. Furthermore, human normal prostate epithelial cells exhibited a very low sensitivity to the apoptotic effects of doxazosin compared with that observed for the malignant prostate cells. These findings provide the first evidence that the apoptotic activity of the quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (doxazosin and terazosin) against prostate cancer cells is independent of: (a) their capacity to antagonize alpha1-adrenoceptors; and (b) the hormone sensitivity status of the cells. This may have potential therapeutic significance in the use of quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists (already in clinical use for the treatment of hypertension and benign prostate hyperplasia) for the treatment of androgen-independent human prostate cancer. PMID:11809715

  3. Uptake of fluorescent nano beads into BY2-cells involves clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bandmann, Vera; Müller, Jasmin Daniela; Köhler, Tim; Homann, Ulrike

    2012-10-19

    To follow endocytosis in BY-2 cells we made use of fluorescent nano beads. Beads with 20nm in diameter were internalised rapidly and accumulated partially in compartments also labelled by the endocytic marker FM4-64. Studies in BY-2 cells and protoplasts revealed that larger beads (100nm) were excluded from uptake into turgescent and plasmolysed cells while protoplasts were able to internalise beads with a diameter of up to 1000nm. Endocytosis of beads was only partially inhibited by the clathrin-specific inhibitor Ikarugamycin and strongly blocked by wortmannin. These results imply that uptake of beads involves clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytic mechanisms and supports the hypothesis that clathrin-independent endocytosis plays a general role in plants. PMID:23046971

  4. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  5. Calf thymus DNA polymerase delta independent of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA).

    PubMed Central

    Focher, F; Gassmann, M; Hafkemeyer, P; Ferrari, E; Spadari, S; Hübscher, U

    1989-01-01

    DNA polymerase delta from calf thymus was purified under conditions that minimized proteolysis to a specific activity of 27,000 units/mg. The four step isolation procedure included phosphocellulose, hydroxyapatite, heparin-Sepharose and FPLC-MonoS. This enzyme consists of four polypeptides with Mr of 140, 125, 48 and 40 kilodaltons. Velocity gradient sedimentation in glycerol removed the 48 kDa polypeptide while the other three sedimented with the DNA polymerase activity. The biochemical properties of the three subunit enzyme and the copurification of 3'----5' exonuclease activity were typical for a bona fide DNA polymerase delta. Tryptic peptide analysis showed that the 140 kDa polypeptide was different from the catalytic 180 kDa polypeptide of calf thymus DNA polymerase alpha. Both high Mr polypeptides (140 and 125 kDa) were catalytically active as analysed in an activity gel. Four templates were used by DNA polymerase delta with different preferences, namely poly(dA)/oligo(dT)12-18 much much greater than activated DNA greater than poly(dA-dT) greater than primed single-stranded M13DNA. Calf thymus proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) could not stimulated this DNA polymerase delta in any step of the isolation procedure. If tested on poly(dA)/oligo(dT)12-18 (base ratio 10:1), PCNA had no stimulatory effect on DNA polymerase delta when tested with low enzyme DNA ratio nor did it change the kinetic behaviour of the enzyme. DNA polymerase delta itself did not contain PCNA. The enzyme had an intrinsic processivity of several thousand bases, when tested either on the homopolymer poly(dA)/oligo(dT)12-18 (base ratio 64:1) or on primed single-stranded M13DNA. Contrary to DNA polymerase alpha, no pausing sites were seen with DNA polymerase delta. Under optimal in vitro replication conditions the enzyme could convert primed single-stranded circular M13 DNA of 7,200 bases to its double-stranded form in less than 10 min. This supports that a PCNA independent DNA

  6. p53 independent G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis induced by a novel retinoid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Z M; Dawson, M I; Li, X S; Rishi, A K; Sheikh, M S; Han, Q X; Ordonez, J V; Shroot, B; Fontana, J A

    1995-08-01

    The biological activity of a novel synthetic retinoid 6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid (AHPN) was investigated in human breast carcinoma (HBC) cells. Although capable of selective binding to the RAR gamma nuclear receptor, AHPN inhibited the growth of a number of HBC cell lines via RAR- or RXR-independent pathways. AHPN also inhibited the growth of the human leukemia cell line HL-60R which does not possess functional RARs. RA significantly inhibited AP-1 mediated gene activation in MCF-7 cells while AHPN displayed no such anti-AP-1 activity. Retinoids normally are cytostatic in their inhibition of breast carcinoma growth and permit cell proliferation upon their removal, wher as AHPN induced G0/G1 arrest within 6h followed by apoptosis. In MCF-7 cells that harbor wild type p53, AHPN-induced G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis was accompanied by p53-independent regulation of WAF1/CIP1 as well as bax mRNA levels while bcl-2 mRNA levels were decreased. In MDA-MB-231 cells which possess a mutant p53, AHPN-mediated G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis was also associated with a concomitant up regulation of WAF1/CIP1 mRNA while these cells did not express bax or bcl-2 messages. Thus AHPN represents a novel retinoid that induces G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis via a unique pathway which appears to involve activation of known downstream effectors of p53 in a p53-independent manner. PMID:7630633

  7. 2-Phenylacetylenesulfonamide (PAS) induces p53-independent apoptotic killing of B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells.

    PubMed

    Steele, Andrew J; Prentice, Archibald G; Hoffbrand, A Victor; Yogashangary, Birunthini C; Hart, Stephen M; Lowdell, Mark W; Samuel, Edward R; North, Janet M; Nacheva, Elisabeth P; Chanalaris, Anastasios; Kottaridis, Panagiotis; Cwynarski, Kate; Wickremasinghe, R Gitendra

    2009-08-01

    We studied the actions of 2-phenylacetylenesulfonamide (PAS) on B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. PAS (5-20 microM) initiated apoptosis within 24 hours, with maximal death at 48 hours asassessed by morphology, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), caspase 3 activation, and annexin V staining. PAS treatment induced Bax proapoptotic conformational change, Bax movement from the cytosol to the mitochondria, and cytochrome c release, indicating that PAS induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. PAS induced approximately 3-fold up-regulation of proapoptotic Noxa protein and mRNA levels. In addition, Noxa was found unexpectedly to be bound to Bcl-2 in PAS-treated cells. PAS treatment of CLL cells failed to up-regulate p53, suggesting that PAS induced apoptosis independently of p53. Furthermore, PAS induced apoptosis in CLL isolates with p53 gene deletion in more than 97% of cells. Normal B lymphocytes were as sensitive to PAS-induced Noxa up-regulation and apoptosis as were CLL cells. However, both T lymphocytes and bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells were relatively resistant to PAS. Our data suggest that PAS may represent a novel class of drug that induces apoptosis in CLL cells independently of p53 status by a mechanism involving Noxa up-regulation. PMID:19515722

  8. Cell death is induced by ciglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, independently of PPAR{gamma} in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung Woo; Kim, Dae Seong; Kim, Hye Ryung; Kim, Hye Jin; Yang, Jin Mo; Ryu, Somi; Noh, Yoo Hun; Lee, Soo Hyun; Son, Meong Hi; Jung, Hye Lim; Yoo, Keon Hee; Koo, Hong Hoe; Sung, Ki Woong

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Greater than 30 {mu}M ciglitazone induces cell death in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death by ciglitazone is independent of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CGZ induces cell death by the loss of MMP via decreased Akt. -- Abstract: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) regulates multiple signaling pathways, and its agonists induce apoptosis in various cancer cells. However, their role in cell death is unclear. In this study, the relationship between ciglitazone (CGZ) and PPAR{gamma} in CGZ-induced cell death was examined. At concentrations of greater than 30 {mu}M, CGZ, a synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonist, activated caspase-3 and induced apoptosis in T98G cells. Treatment of T98G cells with less than 30 {mu}M CGZ effectively induced cell death after pretreatment with 30 {mu}M of the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662, although GW9662 alone did not induce cell death. This cell death was also observed when cells were co-treated with CGZ and GW9662, but was not observed when cells were treated with CGZ prior to GW9662. In cells in which PPAR{gamma} was down-regulated cells by siRNA, lower concentrations of CGZ (<30 {mu}M) were sufficient to induce cell death, although higher concentrations of CGZ ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 30 {mu}M) were required to induce cell death in control T98G cells, indicating that CGZ effectively induces cell death in T98G cells independently of PPAR{gamma}. Treatment with GW9662 followed by CGZ resulted in a down-regulation of Akt activity and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), which was accompanied by a decrease in Bcl-2 expression and an increase in Bid cleavage. These data suggest that CGZ is capable of inducing apoptotic cell death independently of PPAR{gamma} in glioma cells, by down-regulating Akt activity and inducing MMP collapse.

  9. Androgen-independent proliferation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells infected by xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kakoki, Katsura; Kamiyama, Haruka; Izumida, Mai; Yashima, Yuka; Hayashi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Naoki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Igawa, Tsukasa; Sakai, Hideki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • XMRV infection induces androgen-independent growth in LNCaP cells. • XMRV infection reduces expression of androgen receptor. • XMRV promotes appearance of androgen blocker-resistant prostate cancer cells. - Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a novel gammaretrovirus that was originally isolated from human prostate cancer. It is now believed that XMRV is not the etiologic agent of prostate cancer. An analysis of murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection in various human cell lines revealed that prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected by XMRV, and this suggested that XMRV infection may confer some sort of growth advantage to prostate cancer cell lines. To examine this hypothesis, androgen-dependent LNCaP cells were infected with XMRV and tested for changes in certain cell growth properties. We found that XMRV-infected LNCaP cells can proliferate in the absence of the androgen dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, androgen receptor expression is significantly reduced in XMRV-infected LNCaP cells. Such alterations were not observed in uninfected and amphotropic MLV-infected LNCaP cells. This finding explains why prostate cancer cell lines are preferentially infected with XMRV.

  10. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration.

    PubMed

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W Marie; Gonias, Steven L

    2015-09-15

    NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  11. Inhibition of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activity prevents anchorage-independent ovarian carcinoma cell growth and tumor progression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Kristy K.; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lawson, Christine; Miller, Nichol L.G.; Jean, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Uryu, Sean; Kim, Josephine; Tarin, David; Stupack, Dwayne G.; Plaxe, Steven C.; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence and spread of ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of death for women in the United States. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase located on chromosome 8q24.3 (gene is Ptk2), a site commonly amplified in serous ovarian cancer. Elevated FAK mRNA levels in serous ovarian carcinoma are associated with decreased (logrank P = 0.0007, hazard ratio 1.43) patient overall survival, but how FAK functions in tumor progression remains undefined. We have isolated aggressive ovarian carcinoma cells termed ID8-IP after intraperitoneal (IP) growth of murine ID8 cells in C57Bl6 mice. Upon orthotopic implantation within the periovarian bursa space, ID8-IP cells exhibit greater tumor growth, local and distant metastasis, and elevated numbers of ascites-associated cells compared to parental ID8 cells. ID8-IP cells exhibit enhanced growth under non-adherent conditions with elevated FAK and c-Src tyrosine kinase activation compared to parental ID8 cells. In vitro, the small molecule FAK inhibitor (Pfizer, PF562,271, PF-271) at 0.1 uM selectively prevented anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell growth with the inhibition of FAK tyrosine (Y)397 but not c-Src Y416 phosphorylation. Oral PF-271 administration (30 mg/kg, twice daily) blocked FAK but not c-Src tyrosine phosphorylation in ID8-IP tumors. This was associated with decreased tumor size, prevention of peritoneal metastasis, reduced tumor-associated endothelial cell number, and increased tumor cell-associated apoptosis. FAK knockdown and re-expression assays showed that FAK activity selectively promoted anchorage-independent ID8-IP cell survival. These results support the continued evaluation of FAK inhibitors as a promising clinical treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:23275034

  12. The role of mesenchymal stem cells in promoting the transformation of androgen-dependent human prostate cancer cells into androgen-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiwen; Yang, Keqin; Zhang, Qingyun; Yu, Yang; Meng, Qinggui; Mo, Ning; Zhou, Yang; Yi, Xianlin; Ma, Chengzhong; Lei, Aming; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play an important role in the development of human prostate cancer (PCa). However, the role of MSCs in the transformation of androgen-dependent human PCa cells into androgen-independent manner has been poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanism of MSCs in promoting PCa cells from androgen-dependent into androgen-independent manner. Firstly, we demonstrated that MSCs could affect the transformation of androgen-dependent human PCa cells into androgen-independent manner in vivo and in vitro. Then we found a substantial expression of TGF-β in MSCs. TGF-β blockade could significantly inhibit the promotive function of MSCs in PCa cells. Besides that, we also demonstrated androgen might inhibit the expression of TGF-β in MSCs. Furthermore, we found that either overexpression of SSEA-4 or the number of SSEA-4 positive MSCs in PCa tissues was associated with a shorter cancer-free survival interval (CFSI) and a worse overall survival (OS). Our results suggest that androgen blockade treatment in clinical PCa therapy may elicit the expression of TGF-β in MSCs, which will result in the transformation of androgen-dependent human PCa cells into androgen-independent manner. PMID:26787499

  13. Nucleoside transport in human colonic epithelial cell lines: evidence for two Na+-independent transport systems in T84 and Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ward, J L; Tse, C M

    1999-06-01

    RT-PCR of RNA isolated from monolayers of the human colonic epithelial cell lines T84 and Caco-2 demonstrated the presence of mRNA for the two cloned Na+-independent equilibrative nucleoside transporters, ENT1 and ENT2, but not for the cloned Na+-dependent concentrative nucleoside transporters, CNT1 and CNT2. Uptake of [3H]uridine by cell monolayers in balanced Na+-containing and Na+-free media confirmed the presence of only Na+-independent nucleoside transport mechanisms. This uptake was decreased by 70-75% in the presence of 1 microM nitrobenzylthioinosine, a concentration that completely inhibits ENT1, and was completely blocked by the addition of 10 microM dipyridamole, a concentration that inhibits both ENT1 and ENT2. These findings indicate the presence in T84 and Caco-2 cells of two functional Na+-independent equilibrative nucleoside transporters, ENT1 and ENT2. PMID:10366666

  14. Design of highly immunogenic liposomal constructs combining structurally independent B cell and T helper cell peptide epitopes.

    PubMed

    Boeckler, C; Dautel, D; Schelté, P; Frisch, B; Wachsmann, D; Klein, J P; Schuber, F

    1999-07-01

    We have designed liposomal diepitope constructs that allow the physical combination, within the same vesicle, of B and Th epitopes as structurally separate entities. The immune response against such constructs was explored using TPEDPTDPTDPQDPSS (TPE), a B cell epitope originating from a Streptococcus mutans surface adhesin and QYIKANSKFIGITEL (QYI), a "universal" Th epitope from tetanus toxin. The two peptides were linked to the outer surface of small (diameter approximately 100 nm) unilamellar liposomes by covalent conjugation to two different anchors. To that end we have developed a strategy that allows the controlled chemical coupling of TPE and QYI, functionalized at their N terminus with a thiol, to preformed liposomes containing thiol-reactive derivatives of phosphatidylethanolamine and the lipopeptide S-[2,3-bis (palmitoyloxy)-(2-RS)-propyl]-N-palmitoyl-(R)-cysteinyl-alanyl-gly cine (Pam3CAG), respectively. This synthetic construct (administered i.p. to BALB/c mice) induced highly intense (titers > 20,000), anamnestic and long-lasting (over 2 years) immune responses, indicating that this strategy is successful. Two parameters were of prime importance to elicit this response with our liposomal diepitope constructs: (1) the simultaneous expression of B and Th epitopes on the same vesicle, and (2) the lipopeptide Pam3CAG anchor of the Th epitope QYI could not be replaced by a phosphatidylethanolamine anchor (a lesser immune response was observed). Analysis of the antibody response revealed a complex pattern; thus, besides the humoral response (production of IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) a superposition of a T-independent (TI-2 type) response was also found (IgM and IgG3). These results indicate that liposomal diepitope constructs could be attractive in the development of synthetic peptide-based vaccines. PMID:10427993

  15. Reduced Number of Transitional and Naive B Cells in Addition to Decreased BAFF Levels in Response to the T Cell Independent Immunogen Pneumovax®23

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Alena; Glaesener, Stephanie; Schütz, Katharina; Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunity against T cell independent (TI) antigens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae is characterized by antibody production of B cells induced by the combined activation of T cell independent type 1 and type 2 antigens in the absence of direct T cell help. In mice, the main players in TI immune responses have been well defined as marginal zone (MZ) B cells and B-1 cells. However, the existence of human equivalents to these B cell subsets and the nature of the human B cell compartment involved in the immune reaction remain elusive. We therefore analyzed the effect of a TI antigen on the B cell compartment through immunization of healthy individuals with the pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnPS)-based vaccine Pneumovax®23, and subsequent characterization of B cell subpopulations. Our data demonstrates a transient decrease of transitional and naïve B cells, with a concomitant increase of IgA+ but not IgM+ or IgG+ memory B cells and a predominant generation of PnPS-specific IgA+ producing plasma cells. No alterations could be detected in T cells, or proposed human B-1 and MZ B cell equivalents. Consistent with the idea of a TI immune response, antigen-specific memory responses could not be observed. Finally, BAFF, which is supposed to drive class switching to IgA, was unexpectedly found to be decreased in serum in response to Pneumovax®23. Our results demonstrate that a characteristic TI response induced by Pneumovax®23 is associated with distinct phenotypical and functional changes within the B cell compartment. Those modulations occur in the absence of any modulations of T cells and without the development of a specific memory response. PMID:27031098

  16. Bifurcate effects of glucose on caspase-independent cell death during hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Aki, Toshihiko; Nara, Akina; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Uemura, Koichi

    2010-06-04

    We investigated the effect of glucose on hypoxic death of rat cardiomyocyte-derived H9c2 cells and found that there is an optimal glucose concentration for protection against hypoxic cell death. Hypoxic cell death in the absence of glucose is accompanied by rapid ATP depletion, release of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria, and nuclear chromatin condensation, all of which are inhibited by glucose in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, excessive glucose also induces hypoxic cell death that is not accompanied by these events, suggesting a change in the mode of cell death between hypoxic cells with and without glucose supplementation.

  17. Ras-induced reactive oxygen species promote growth factor-independent proliferation in human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hole, Paul S; Pearn, Lorna; Tonks, Amanda J; James, Philip E; Burnett, Alan K; Darley, Richard L; Tonks, Alex

    2010-02-11

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a feature of human malignancy and is often triggered by activation of oncogenes such as activated Ras. ROS act as second messengers and can influence a variety of cellular process including growth factor responses and cell survival. We have examined the contribution of ROS production to the effects of N-Ras(G12D) and H-Ras(G12V) on normal human CD34(+) progenitor cells. Activated Ras strongly up-regulated the production of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide through the stimulation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, without affecting the expression of endogenous antioxidants or the production of mitochondrially derived ROS. Activated Ras also promoted both the survival and the growth factor-independent proliferation of CD34(+) cells. Using oxidase inhibitors and antioxidants, we found that excessive ROS production by these cells did not contribute to their enhanced survival; rather, ROS promoted their growth factor-independent proliferation. Although Ras-induced ROS production specifically activated the p38(MAPK) oxidative stress response, this failed to induce expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor, p16(INK4A); instead, ROS promoted the expression of D cyclins. These data are the first to show that excessive ROS production in the context of oncogene activation can promote proliferative responses in normal human hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:20007804

  18. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number

    PubMed Central

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion. PMID:27031233

  19. CD275-Independent IL-17-Producing T Follicular Helper-like Cells in Lymphopenic Autoimmune-Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher; Buhlmann, Janet E; Wang, Xiaogan; Bartlett, Amber; Lim, Bing; Barrington, Robert A

    2016-06-15

    T cells undergo homeostatic expansion and acquire an activated phenotype in lymphopenic microenvironments. Restoration of normal lymphocyte numbers typically re-establishes normal homeostasis, and proinflammatory cytokine production returns to baseline. Mice deficient in guanine nucleotide exchange factor RasGRP1 exhibit dysregulated homeostatic expansion, which manifests as lymphoproliferative disease with autoantibody production. Our previous work revealed that autoreactive B cells lacking RasGRP1 break tolerance early during development, as well as during germinal center responses, suggesting that T cell-independent and T cell-dependent mechanisms are responsible. Examination of whether a particular T cell subset is involved in the breach of B cell tolerance revealed increased Th17 cells in Rasgrp1-deficient mice relative to control mice. Rasgrp1-deficient mice lacking IL-17R had fewer germinal centers, and germinal centers that formed contained fewer autoreactive B cells, suggesting that IL-17 signaling is required for a break in B cell tolerance in germinal centers. Interestingly, a fraction of Th17 cells from Rasgrp1-deficient mice were CXCR5(+) and upregulated levels of CD278 coordinate with their appearance in germinal centers, all attributes of T follicular helper cells (Tfh17). To determine whether CD278-CD275 interactions were required for the development of Tfh17 cells and for autoantibody, Rasgrp1-deficient mice were crossed with CD275-deficient mice. Surprisingly, mice deficient in RasGRP1 and CD275 formed Tfh17 cells and germinal centers and produced similar titers of autoantibodies as mice deficient in only RasGRP1. Therefore, these studies suggest that requirements for Tfh cell development change in lymphopenia-associated autoimmune settings. PMID:27183569

  20. NF-κB dependent and independent mechanisms of quartz-induced proinflammatory activation of lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the initiation and progression of pulmonary inflammation, macrophages have classically been considered as a crucial cell type. However, evidence for the role of epithelial type II cells in pulmonary inflammation has been accumulating. In the current study, a combined in vivo and in vitro approach has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of quartz-induced proinflammatory activation of lung epithelial cells. In vivo, enhanced expression of the inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes HO-1 and iNOS was found on the mRNA level in rat lungs after instillation with DQ12 respirable quartz. Activation of the classical NF-κB pathway in macrophages and type II pneumocytes was indicated by enhanced immunostaining of phospho-IκBα in these specific lung cell types. In vitro, the direct, particle-mediated effect on proinflammatory signalling in a rat lung epithelial (RLE) cell line was compared to the indirect, macrophage product-mediated effect. Treatment with quartz particles induced HO-1 and COX-2 mRNA expression in RLE cells in an NF-κB independent manner. Supernatant from quartz-treated macrophages rapidly activated the NF-κB signalling pathway in RLE cells and markedly induced iNOS mRNA expression up to 2000-fold compared to non-treated control cells. Neutralisation of TNFα and IL-1β in macrophage supernatant did not reduce its ability to elicit NF-κB activation of RLE cells. In addition the effect was not modified by depletion or supplementation of intracellular glutathione. The results from the current work suggest that although both oxidative stress and NF-κB are likely involved in the inflammatory effects of toxic respirable particles, these phenomena can operate independently on the cellular level. This might have consequences for in vitro particle hazard testing, since by focusing on NF-κB signalling one might neglect alternative inflammatory pathways. PMID:20492675

  1. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. PMID:24565564

  2. KU-0060648 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and DNA-PKcs-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mu-Xin; Tang, Min; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Xu, Jun-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-zhong; Chen, Gang; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Here we tested anti-tumor activity of KU-0060648 in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models. Our results demonstrated that KU-0060648 was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic in established (HepG2, Huh-7 and KYN-2 lines) and primary human HCC cells, but was non-cytotoxic to non-cancerous HL-7702 hepatocytes. DNA-PKcs (DNA-activated protein kinase catalytic subunit) is an important but not exclusive target of KU-0060648. DNA-PKcs knockdown or dominant negative mutation inhibited HCC cell proliferation. On the other hand, overexpression of wild-type DNA-PKcs enhanced HepG2 cell proliferation. Importantly, KU-0060648 was still cytotoxic to DNA-PKcs-silenced or -mutated HepG2 cells, although its activity in these cells was relatively weak. Further studies showed that KU-0060648 inhibited PI3K-AKT-mTOR activation, independent of DNA-PKcs. Introduction of constitutively-active AKT1 (CA-AKT1) restored AKT-mTOR activation after KU-0060648 treatment in HepG2 cells, and alleviated subsequent cytotoxicity. In vivo, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of KU-0060648 significantly inhibited HepG2 xenograft growth in nude mice. AKT-mTOR activation was also inhibited in xenografted tumors. Finally, we showed that DNA-PKcs expression was significantly upregulated in human HCC tissues. Yet miRNA-101, an anti-DNA-PKcs miRNA, was downregulated. Over-expression of miR-101 in HepG2 cells inhibited DNA-PKcs expression and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that KU-0060648 inhibits HCC cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:26933997

  3. Cavin-1 and Caveolin-1 are both required to support cell proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent cell growth in rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Faggi, Fiorella; Chiarelli, Nicola; Colombi, Marina; Mitola, Stefania; Ronca, Roberto; Madaro, Luca; Bouche, Marina; Poliani, Pietro L; Vezzoli, Marika; Longhena, Francesca; Monti, Eugenio; Salani, Barbara; Maggi, Davide; Keller, Charles; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a childhood soft tissue tumor with broad expression of markers that are typically found in skeletal muscle. Cavin-1 is a recently discovered protein actively cooperating with Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) in the morphogenesis of caveolae and whose role in cancer is drawing increasing attention. Using a combined in silico and in vitro analysis here we show that Cavin-1 is expressed in myogenic RMS tumors as well as in human and primary mouse RMS cultures, exhibiting a broad subcellular localization, ranging from nuclei and cytosol to plasma membrane. In particular, the coexpression and plasma membrane interaction between Cavin-1 and Cav-1 characterized the proliferation of human and mouse RMS cell cultures, while a downregulation of their expression levels was observed during the myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of Cavin-1 or Cav-1 in the human RD and RH30 cells led to impairment of cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, loss of Cavin-1 in RD cells impaired the anchorage-independent cell growth in soft agar. While the loss of Cavin-1 did not affect the Cav-1 protein levels in RMS cells, Cav-1 overexpression and knockdown triggered a rise or depletion of Cavin-1 protein levels in RD cells, respectively, in turn reflecting on increased or decreased cell proliferation, migration and anchorage-independent cell growth. Collectively, these data indicate that the interaction between Cavin-1 and Cav-1 underlies the cell growth and migration in myogenic tumors. PMID:25822667

  4. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals after high-LET radiation in mutated p53 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Yosuke

    Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses the activities of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signals were analyzed with Western blotting analysis 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis.Akt-related protein levels were decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G _{2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and depresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signals, even in the mp53 cells.

  5. Macrophage-mediated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell survival is independent of APRIL signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Attekum, MHA; Terpstra, S; Reinen, E; Kater, AP; Eldering, E

    2016-01-01

    Survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells is mainly driven by interactions within the lymph node (LN) microenvironment with bystander cells such as T cells or cells from the monocytic lineage. Although the survival effect by T cells is largely governed by the TNFR ligand family member CD40L, the exact mechanism of monocyte-derived cell-induced survival is not known. An important role has been attributed to the TNFR ligand, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), although the exact mechanism remained unclear. Since we detected that APRIL was expressed by CD68+ cells in CLL LN, we addressed its relevance in various aspects of CLL biology, using a novel APRIL overexpressing co-culture system, recombinant APRIL, and APRIL reporter cells. Unexpectedly, we found, that in these various systems, APRIL had no effect on survival of CLL cells, and activation of NF-κB was not enhanced on APRIL stimulation. Moreover, APRIL stity mulation did not affect CLL proliferation, neither as single stimulus nor in combination with known CLL proliferation stimuli. Furthermore, the survival effect conveyed by macrophages to CLL cells was not affected by transmembrane activator and CAML interactor-Fc, an APRIL decoy receptor. We conclude that the direct role ascribed to APRIL in CLL cell survival might be overestimated due to application of supraphysiological levels of recombinant APRIL. PMID:27551513

  6. Microparticles induce multifactorial resistance through oncogenic pathways independently of cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paloma Silva; Cruz, André LS; Viola, João PB; Maia, Raquel C

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is considered a multifactorial event that favors cancer cells becoming resistant to several chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous mechanisms contribute to MDR, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1) activity that promotes drug efflux, overexpression of inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAP) that contribute to evasion of apoptosis, and oncogenic pathway activation that favors cancer cell survival. MDR molecules have been identified in membrane microparticles (MP) and can be transferred to sensitive cancer cells. By co-culturing MP derived from MDR-positive cells with recipient cells, we showed that sensitive cells accumulated Pgp, IAP proteins and mRNA. In addition, MP promoted microRNA transfer and NFκB and Yb-1 activation. Therefore, our results indicate that MP can induce a multifactorial phenotype in sensitive cancer cells. PMID:25457412

  7. CD4-independent infection of human neural cells by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Harouse, J M; Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Laughlin, M A; Hoxie, J A; Wigdahl, B; Gonzalez-Scarano, F

    1989-01-01

    A number of studies have indicated that central nervous system-derived cells can be infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To determine whether CD4, the receptor for HIV-1 in lymphoid cells, was responsible for infection of neural cells, we characterized infectable human central nervous system tumor lines and primary fetal neural cells and did not detect either CD4 protein or mRNA. We then attempted to block infection with anti-CD4 antibodies known to block infection of lymphoid cells; we noted no effect on any of these cultured cells. The results indicate that CD4 is not the receptor for HIV-1 infection of the glioblastoma line U373-MG, medulloblastoma line MED 217, or primary human fetal neural cells. Images PMID:2786088

  8. Enhancer repertoires are reshaped independently of early priming and heterochromatin dynamics during B cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Choukrallah, Mohamed-Amin; Song, Shuang; Rolink, Antonius G; Burger, Lukas; Matthias, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A widely accepted model posits that activation of enhancers during differentiation goes through a priming step prior to lineage commitment. To investigate the chronology of enhancer repertoire establishment during hematopoiesis, we monitored epigenome dynamics during three developmental stages representing hematopoietic stem cells, B-cell progenitors and mature B-cells. We find that only a minority of enhancers primed in stem cells or progenitors become active at later stages. Furthermore, most enhancers active in differentiated cells were not primed in earlier stages. Thus, the enhancer repertoire is reshaped dynamically during B-cell differentiation and enhancer priming in early stages does not appear to be an obligate step for enhancer activation. Furthermore, our data reveal that heterochromatin and Polycomb-mediated silencing have only a minor contribution in shaping enhancer repertoires during cell differentiation. Together, our data revisit the prevalent model about epigenetic reprogramming during hematopoiesis and give insights into the formation of gene regulatory networks. PMID:26477271

  9. Breast Cancer Cell Lines Exhibit Differential Sensitivities to Microtubule-targeting Drugs Independent of Doubling Time

    PubMed Central

    RISINGER, APRIL L.; DYBDAL-HARGREAVES, NICHOLAS F.; MOOBERRY, SUSAN L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Microtubule-targeting agents (MTAs) are a mainstay in breast cancer treatment, yet patient responses differ. The underlying mechanisms of these differences are unknown. While MTAs are mitotic inhibitors, recent evidence highlights that non-mitotic effects of these drugs can contribute to their anticancer effects. It is critical to identify the non-mitotic mechanisms that could contribute to differences among MTAs. However, it is not clear whether rapidly dividing cells in culture are optimal tools to address these mechanistic questions in interphase cells. Materials and Methods Detailed concentration response curves for five MTAs in a panel of diverse breast cancer cell lines were generated. Results Substantial differences among both drugs and cell lines, consistent with the clinical scenario, were observed. Importantly, these differences do not correlate with cell doubling time. Conclusion The interphase actions of MTAs are critical to the full spectrum of their effects in cancer cells, even in cell culture models. PMID:26504006

  10. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: A novel mechanism for improving bone material properties

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Maxime A.; Brown, Drew M.; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M.; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Stock, Stuart R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (−OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle x-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  11. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: a novel mechanism for improving bone material properties.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, Jonathan D; Stock, Stuart R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B

    2014-04-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle X-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  12. Bystander Activation and Anti-Tumor Effects of CD8+ T Cells Following Interleukin-2 Based Immunotherapy Is Independent of CD4+ T Cell Help

    PubMed Central

    Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Hsiao, Hui-Hua; Zamora, Anthony E.; Mirsoian, Annie; Koehn, Brent; Blazar, Bruce R.; Weiss, Jonathan M.; Wiltrout, Robert H.; Sckisel, Gail D.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that immunotherapy combining agonistic anti-CD40 and IL-2 (IT) results in synergistic anti-tumor effects. IT induces expansion of highly cytolytic, antigen-independent “bystander-activated” (CD8+CD44high) T cells displaying a CD25−NKG2D+ phenotype in a cytokine dependent manner, which were responsible for the anti-tumor effects. While much attention has focused on CD4+ T cell help for antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, little is known regarding the role of CD4+ T cells in antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cell expansion. Utilizing CD4 deficient mouse models, we observed a significant expansion of bystander-memory T cells following IT which was similar to the non-CD4 depleted mice. Expanded bystander-memory CD8+ T cells upregulated PD-1 in the absence of CD4+ T cells which has been published as a hallmark of exhaustion and dysfunction in helpless CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, compared to CD8+ T cells from CD4 replete hosts, these bystander expanded cells displayed comparable (or enhanced) cytokine production, lytic ability, and in vivo anti-tumor effects suggesting no functional impairment or exhaustion and were enriched in an effector phenotype. There was no acceleration of the post-IT contraction phase of the bystander memory CD8+ response in CD4-depleted mice. The response was independent of IL-21 signaling. These results suggest that, in contrast to antigen-specific CD8+ T cell expansion, CD4+ T cell help is not necessary for expansion and activation of antigen-nonspecific bystander-memory CD8+ T cells following IT, but may play a role in regulating conversion of these cells from a central memory to effector phenotype. Additionally, the expression of PD-1 in this model appears to be a marker of effector function and not exhaustion. PMID:25119341

  13. The potassium–chloride cotransporter 2 promotes cervical cancer cell migration and invasion by an ion transport-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Akerman, Colin J; Newey, Sarah E; Pan, Jiliu; Clinch, Nicholas W V; Jacob, Yves; Shen, Meng-Ru; Wilkins, Robert J; Ellory, J Clive

    2011-01-01

    Abstract K+–Cl− cotransporters (KCCs) play a fundamental role in epithelial cell function, both in the context of ionic homeostasis and also in cell morphology, cell division and locomotion. Unlike other ubiquitously expressed KCC isoforms, expression of KCC2 is widely considered to be restricted to neurons, where it is responsible for maintaining a low intracellular chloride concentration to drive hyperpolarising postsynaptic responses to the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. Here we report a novel finding that KCC2 is widely expressed in several human cancer cell lines including the cervical cancer cell line (SiHa). Membrane biotinylation assays and immunostaining showed that endogenous KCC2 is located on the cell membrane of SiHa cells. To elucidate the role of KCC2 in cervical tumuorigenesis, SiHa cells with stable overexpression or knockdown of KCC2 were employed. Overexpression of KCC2 had no significant effect on cell proliferation but dramatically suppressed cell spreading and stress fibre organization, while knockdown of KCC2 showed opposite effects. In addition, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-induced cell migration and invasiveness were significantly increased by overexpression of KCC2. KCC2-induced cell migration and invasion were not dependent on KCC2 transport function since overexpression of an activity-deficient mutant KCC2 still increased IGF-1-induced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, overexpression of KCC2 significantly diminished the number of focal adhesions, while knockdown of KCC2 increased their number. Taken together, our data establish that KCC2 expression and function are not restricted to neurons and that KCC2 serves to increase cervical tumourigenesis via an ion transport-independent mechanism. PMID:21911617

  14. Kaempferol inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF expression through both HIF dependent and independent pathways in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haitao; Rankin, Gary O; Liu, Lingzhi; Daddysman, Matthew K; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Chen, Yi Charlie

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is 1 of the most significant malignancies in the Western world, and the antiangiogenesis strategy has been postulated for prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. Kaempferol is a natural flavonoid present in many fruits and vegetables. The antiangiogenesis potential of kaempferol and its underlying mechanisms were investigated in two ovarian cancer cell lines, OVCAR-3 and A2780/CP70. Kaempferol mildly inhibits cell viability but significantly reduces VEGF gene expression at mRNA and protein levels in both ovarian cancer cell lines. In chorioallantoic membranes of chicken embryos, kaempferol significantly inhibits OVCAR-3-induced angiogenesis and tumor growth. HIF-1alpha, a regulator of VEGF, is downregulated by kaempferol treatment in both ovarian cancer cell lines. Kaempferol also represses AKT phosphorylation dose dependently at 5 to 20 muM concentrations. ESRRA is a HIF-independent VEGF regulator, and it is also downregulated by kaempferol in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, this study demonstrated that kaempferol is low in cytotoxicity but inhibits angiogenesis and VEGF expression in human ovarian cancer cells through both HIF-dependent (Akt/HIF) and HIF-independent (ESRRA) pathways and deserves further studies for possible application in angio prevention and treatment of ovarian cancers. PMID:19838928

  15. CD4-independent, CCR5-dependent infection of brain capillary endothelial cells by a neurovirulent simian immunodeficiency virus strain

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Margulies, Barry J.; Lee, Benhur; Rucker, Joseph; Sharron, Matthew; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Berson, Joanne F.; Zink, M. Christine; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Clements, Janice E.; Doms, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are targets of CD4-independent infection by HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains in vitro and in vivo. Infection of BCECs may provide a portal of entry for the virus into the central nervous system and could disrupt blood–brain barrier function, contributing to the development of AIDS dementia. We found that rhesus macaque BCECs express chemokine receptors involved in HIV and SIV entry including CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4, and STRL33, but not CCR2b, GPR1, or GPR15. Infection of BCECs by the neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr was completely inhibited by aminooxypentane regulation upon activation, normal T cell expression and secretion in the presence or absence of ligands, but not by eotaxin or antibodies to CD4. We found that the envelope (env) proteins from SIV/17E-Fr and several additional SIV strains mediated cell–cell fusion and virus infection with CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells. In contrast, fusion with cells expressing the coreceptors STRL33, GPR1, and GPR15 was CD4-dependent. These results show that CCR5 can serve as a primary receptor for SIV in BCECs and suggest a possible CD4-independent mechanism for blood–brain barrier disruption and viral entry into the central nervous system. PMID:9405683

  16. Intracellular Distribution of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Gag Proteins Is Independent of Interaction with Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Isabelle; Blot, Vincent; Bouchaert, Isabelle; Salamero, Jean; Goud, Bruno; Rosenberg, Arielle R.; Dokhélar, Marie-Christine

    2002-01-01

    Retrovirus Gag proteins are synthesized on free ribosomes, and are sufficient to govern the assembly and release of virus particles. Like type C retroviruses, human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) assembles and buds at the plasma membrane. After immunofluorescence staining, HTLV-1 Gag proteins appear as punctuated intracellular clusters, which suggests that they are associated either with intracellular membranes or with the plasma membrane. However, colocalization experiments using a panel of markers demonstrated that Gag proteins were not associated with the membranes involved in the secretory or endocytosis pathway. Small amounts of Gag proteins were detected at the plasma membrane and colocalized with the envelope glycoproteins. Moreover, Gag proteins were excluded from streptolysin-O permeabilized cells and in this respect behaved like cytoplasmic proteins. This suggests that the trafficking of HTLV-1 Gag proteins through the cytoplasm of the host cell is independent of any cell membrane system. PMID:11752179

  17. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors

    PubMed Central

    Doorduijn, Elien M.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J.; Oliveira, Cláudia C.; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the “self” TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  18. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  19. hTERT promotes cell adhesion and migration independent of telomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haiying; Liu, Qianqian; Ge, Yuanlong; Zhao, Qi; Zheng, Xiaohui; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    hTERT, a catalytic component of human telomerase, is undetectable in normal somatic cells but up-regulated in cancer and stem cells where telomere length is maintained by telomerase. Accumulated evidence indicates that hTERT may have noncanonical functions beyond telomerase by regulating the expression of particular genes. However, comprehensive identification of the genes regulated by hTERT is unavailable. In this report, we expressed WT hTERT and hTERTmut which displays dysfunctional catalytic activity, in human U2OS cancer cells and VA-13 immortalized fibroblast cells, both of which lack endogenous hTERT and hTR expression. Changes in gene expression induced by hTERT and hTERT-mut expression were determined by genome-wide RNA-seq and verified by qPCR. Our results showed that hTERT affects different genes in two cell lines, implying that the regulation of gene expression by hTERT is indirect and cell type dependent. Moreover, functional analysis identifies cell adhesion-related genes that have been changed by hTERT in both cell lines. Adhesion experiments revealed that hTERT expression significantly increases cell adhesion. Monolayer wound healing and transwell assays demonstrated increased cell migration upon hTERT expression. These results provide new evidence to support a noncanonical function for hTERT in promoting tumorigenesis. PMID:26971878

  20. Independent and Cooperative Roles of Adaptor Molecules in Proximal Signaling during FcɛRI-Mediated Mast Cell Activation▿

    PubMed Central

    Kambayashi, Taku; Okumura, Mariko; Baker, Rebecca G.; Hsu, Chih-Jung; Baumgart, Tobias; Zhang, Weiguo; Koretzky, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Activation through FcɛRI, a high-affinity IgE-binding receptor, is critical for mast cell function during allergy. The formation of a multimolecular proximal signaling complex nucleated by the adaptor molecules SLP-76 and LAT1 is required for activation through this receptor. Based on previous T-cell studies, current dogma dictates that LAT1 is required for plasma membrane recruitment and function of SLP-76. Unexpectedly, we found that the recruitment and phosphorylation of SLP-76 were preserved in LAT1−/− mast cells and that SLP-76−/− and LAT1−/− mast cells harbored distinct functional and biochemical defects. The LAT1-like molecule LAT2 was responsible for the preserved membrane localization and phosphorylation of SLP-76 in LAT1−/− mast cells. Although LAT2 supported SLP-76 phosphorylation and recruitment to the plasma membrane, LAT2 only partially compensated for LAT1-mediated cell signaling due to its decreased ability to stabilize interactions with phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ). Comparison of SLP-76−/− LAT1−/− and SLP-76−/− mast cells revealed that some functions of LAT1 could occur independently of SLP-76. We propose that while SLP-76 and LAT1 depend on each other for many of their functions, LAT2/SLP-76 interactions and SLP-76-independent LAT1 functions also mediate a positive signaling pathway downstream of FcɛRI in mast cells. PMID:20606011

  1. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  2. Identification of Independent Primary Tumors and Intrapulmonary Metastases Using DNA Rearrangements in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Stephen J.; Aubry, Marie-Christine; Harris, Faye R.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Terra, Simone; Drucker, Travis M.; Asiedu, Michael K.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Yi, Eunhee S.; Peikert, Tobias; Yang, Ping; Vasmatzis, George; Wigle, Dennis A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Distinguishing independent primary tumors from intrapulmonary metastases in non–small-cell carcinoma remains a clinical dilemma with significant clinical implications. Using next-generation DNA sequencing, we developed a chromosomal rearrangement–based approach to differentiate multiple primary tumors from metastasis. Methods Tumor specimens from patients with known independent primary tumors and metastatic lesions were used for lineage test development, which was then applied to multifocal tumors. Laser capture microdissection was performed separately for each tumor. Genomic DNA was isolated using direct in situ whole-genome amplification methodology, and next-generation sequencing was performed using an Illumina mate-pair library protocol. Sequence reads were mapped to the human genome, and primers spanning the fusion junctions were used for validation polymerase chain reaction. Results A total of 41 tumor samples were sequenced (33 adenocarcinomas [ADs] and eight squamous cell carcinomas [SQCCs]), with a range of three to 276 breakpoints per tumor identified. Lung tumors predicted to be independent primary tumors based on different histologic subtype did not share any genomic rearrangements. In patients with lung primary tumors and paired distant metastases, shared rearrangements were identified in all tumor pairs, emphasizing the patient specificity of identified breakpoints. Multifocal AD and SQCC samples were reviewed independently by two pulmonary pathologists. Concordance between histology and genomic data occurred in the majority of samples. Discrepant tumor samples were resolved by genome sequencing. Conclusion A diagnostic lineage test based on genomic rearrangements from mate-pair sequencing demonstrates promise for distinguishing independent primary from metastatic disease in lung cancer. PMID:25385739

  3. Stromal CD4/CD25 positive T-cells are a strong and independent prognostic factor in non-small cell lung cancer patients, especially with adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Gian; Schulte-Uentrop, Luzie; Sienel, Wulf; Werner, Martin; Fisch, Paul; Passlick, Bernward; Zur Hausen, Axel; Stremmel, Christian

    2012-06-01

    Within the concert of immune reactions against tumour cells cytotoxic and regulatory T-cells are of utmost importance. Several studies revealed contradictory results on this issue. We therefore focused on functional expression patterns and localization of tumour-infiltrating T-lymphocytes in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and their impact on patient's survival. 232 curatively operated NSCLC patients were included. After histological reevaluation and construction of tissue-multi-arrays immunohistochemical doublestains for CD3/CD8 and CD4/CD25 were performed to evaluate the total number of T-cells and their subsets of cytotoxic and activated T-cells. Additionally, the localization of the lymphocytes was included in the analysis. Hereby, T-cells within the tumour stroma were regarded as stromal, those among cancer cells as intraepithelial. The number of lymphocytes differed significantly between the histological subtypes being most prominent in large cell carcinomas. Survival analysis showed that high numbers of stromal T-lymphocytes are of beneficial prognostic influence in NSCLC patients. This also proved to be an independent prognostic factor in adenocarcinomas. Thus, in a large and well characterized cohort of NSCLC this is the first study to determine the prognostic value of stromal T-lymphocytes, as these are an independent prognosticator in NSCLC especially in adenocarcinomas whereas intraepithelial T-cells are not. PMID:22300751

  4. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  5. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  6. Targeting CD9 produces stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects predominantly in activated endothelial cells during angiogenesis: A novel antiangiogenic therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kamisasanuki, Taro; Tokushige, Saori; Terasaki, Hiroto; Khai, Ngin Cin; Wang, Yuqing; Sakamoto, Taiji; Kosai, Ken-ichiro

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} CD9 plays stimulus-independent roles in angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression is effective in an angiogenic disease model. {yields} Targeting CD9 expression predominantly affects activated endothelial cells. {yields} CD9 is involved in endothelial cell proliferation, but not survival. {yields} CD9 is part of angiogenic machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. -- Abstract: The precise roles of tetraspanin CD9 are unclear. Here we show that CD9 plays a stimulus-independent role in angiogenesis and that inhibiting CD9 expression or function is a potential antiangiogenic therapy. Knocking down CD9 expression significantly inhibited in vitro endothelial cell migration and invasion induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Injecting CD9-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA-CD9) markedly inhibited HGF- or VEGF-induced subconjunctival angiogenesis in vivo. Both results revealed potent and stimulus-independent antiangiogenic effects of targeting CD9. Furthermore, intravitreous injections of siRNA-CD9 or anti-CD9 antibodies were therapeutically effective for laser-induced retinal and choroidal neovascularization in mice, a representative ocular angiogenic disease model. In terms of the mechanism, growth factor receptor and downstream signaling activation were not affected, whereas abnormal localization of integrins and membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed during angiogenesis, by knocking down CD9 expression. Notably, knocking down CD9 expression did not induce death and mildly inhibited proliferation of quiescent endothelial cells under conditions without an angiogenic stimulus. Thus, CD9 does not directly affect growth factor-induced signal transduction, which is required in angiogenesis and normal vasculature, but is part of the angiogenesis machinery in endothelial cells during angiogenesis. In conclusion, targeting CD9 produced stimulus-independent

  7. CD4+ T cell-dependent and CD4+ T cell-independent cytokine-chemokine network changes in the immune responses of HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kelly B; Szeto, Gregory L; Alter, Galit; Irvine, Darrell J; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-20

    A vital defect in the immune systems of HIV-infected individuals is the loss of CD4(+) T cells, resulting in impaired immune responses. We hypothesized that there were CD4(+) T cell-dependent and CD4(+) T cell-independent alterations in the immune responses of HIV-1(+) individuals. To test this, we analyzed the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) populations from HIV(+) donors, healthy donors, and healthy donors with CD4(+) T cells experimentally depleted. Multivariate analyses of 16 cytokines and chemokines at 6 and 72 hours after three stimuli (antibody-coated beads to stimulate T cells and R848 or lipopolysaccharide to stimulate innate immune cells) enabled integrative analysis of secreted profiles. Two major effects in HIV(+) PBMCs were not reproduced upon depletion of CD4(+) T cells in healthy PBMCs: (i) HIV(+) PBMCs maintained T cell-associated secreted profiles after T cell stimulation; (ii) HIV(+) PBMCs showed impaired interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion early after innate stimulation. These changes arose from hyperactive T cells and debilitated natural killer (NK) cell, respectively. Modeling and experiments showed that early IFN-γ secretion predicted later differences in secreted profiles in vitro. This effect was recapitulated in healthy PBMCs by blocking the IFN-γ receptor. Thus, we identified a critical deficiency in NK cell responses of HIV-infected individuals, independent of CD4(+) T cell depletion, which directs secreted profiles. Our findings illustrate a broad approach for identifying key disease-associated nodes in a multicellular, multivariate signaling network. PMID:26486173

  8. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  9. Antigen-dependent and –independent contributions to primary memory CD8 T cell activation and protection following infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T-cell activation, including expression of IFN-γ and granzymeB, can be induced by antigen (Ag)-dependent signals through the T-cell-receptor, or by pathogen-derived inflammatory cytokines in an Ag-independent manner. Recent studies have come to conflicting results regarding the contributions of Ag and/or inflammation to memory CD8 T-cell activation. Additionally, research has indicated that inflammation-driven CD8 T-cell responses during un-related infections (bystander activation) have the potential to provide protection, but whether protection occurs in immuno-competent hosts is unclear. To investigate these questions, we examined activation of virus-specific memory CD8 T-cells following infection with L. monocytogenes either expressing or not cognate Ag. We show that Ag and inflammation act synergistically in vitro to induce memory activation. In vivo, we found that when memory CD8 T-cells significantly contribute to clearance of infection, early activation and continued responses by these cells are enhanced by cognate Ag recognition. Mechanistically, we show that bystander responses by memory are dependent upon the dose of infection and the amount of inflammation elicited following infection and are able to provide protection in IFN-γ deficient mice, but not in immuno-competent hosts. The data elucidate the requirements for memory CD8 T-cell activation and the protective role of bystander responses. PMID:26658291

  10. Regulation of human epidermal stem cell proliferation and senescence requires polycomb- dependent and -independent functions of Cbx4.

    PubMed

    Luis, Nuno Miguel; Morey, Lluis; Mejetta, Stefania; Pascual, Gloria; Janich, Peggy; Kuebler, Bernd; Cozutto, Luca; Roma, Guglielmo; Nascimento, Elisabete; Frye, Michaela; Di Croce, Luciano; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2011-09-01

    Human epidermal stem cells transit from a slow cycling to an actively proliferating state to contribute to homeostasis. Both stem cell states differ in their cell cycle profiles but must remain guarded from differentiation and senescence. Here we show that Cbx4, a Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1)-associated protein, maintains human epidermal stem cells as slow-cycling and undifferentiated, while protecting them from senescence. Interestingly, abrogating the polycomb activity of Cbx4 impairs its antisenescent function without affecting stem cell differentiation, indicating that differentiation and senescence are independent processes in human epidermis. Conversely, Cbx4 inhibits stem cell activation and differentiation through its SUMO ligase activity. Global transcriptome and chromatin occupancy analyses indicate that Cbx4 regulates modulators of epidermal homeostasis and represses factors such as Ezh2, Dnmt1, and Bmi1 to prevent the active stem cell state. Our results suggest that distinct Polycomb complexes balance epidermal stem cell dormancy and activation, while continually preventing senescence and differentiation. PMID:21885019

  11. S6K1 controls pancreatic β cell size independently of intrauterine growth restriction.

    PubMed

    Um, Sung Hee; Sticker-Jantscheff, Melanie; Chau, Gia Cac; Vintersten, Kristina; Mueller, Matthias; Gangloff, Yann-Gael; Adams, Ralf H; Spetz, Jean-Francois; Elghazi, Lynda; Pfluger, Paul T; Pende, Mario; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; Tauler, Albert; Tschöp, Matthias H; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C

    2015-07-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide heath problem that is characterized by insulin resistance and the eventual loss of β cell function. As recent studies have shown that loss of ribosomal protein (RP) S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) increases systemic insulin sensitivity, S6K1 inhibitors are being pursued as potential agents for improving insulin resistance. Here we found that S6K1 deficiency in mice also leads to decreased β cell growth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and impaired placental development. IUGR is a common complication of human pregnancy that limits the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus, leading to diminished embryonic β cell growth and the onset of T2DM later in life. However, restoration of placental development and the rescue of IUGR by tetraploid embryo complementation did not restore β cell size or insulin levels in S6K1-/- embryos, suggesting that loss of S6K1 leads to an intrinsic β cell lesion. Consistent with this hypothesis, reexpression of S6K1 in β cells of S6K1-/- mice restored embryonic β cell size, insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and RPS6 phosphorylation, without rescuing IUGR. Together, these data suggest that a nutrient-mediated reduction in intrinsic β cell S6K1 signaling, rather than IUGR, during fetal development may underlie reduced β cell growth and eventual development of T2DM later in life. PMID:26075820

  12. S6K1 controls pancreatic β cell size independently of intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Um, Sung Hee; Sticker-Jantscheff, Melanie; Chau, Gia Cac; Vintersten, Kristina; Mueller, Matthias; Gangloff, Yann-Gael; Adams, Ralf H.; Spetz, Jean-Francois; Elghazi, Lynda; Pfluger, Paul T.; Pende, Mario; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto; Tauler, Albert; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a worldwide heath problem that is characterized by insulin resistance and the eventual loss of β cell function. As recent studies have shown that loss of ribosomal protein (RP) S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) increases systemic insulin sensitivity, S6K1 inhibitors are being pursued as potential agents for improving insulin resistance. Here we found that S6K1 deficiency in mice also leads to decreased β cell growth, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), and impaired placental development. IUGR is a common complication of human pregnancy that limits the supply of oxygen and nutrients to the developing fetus, leading to diminished embryonic β cell growth and the onset of T2DM later in life. However, restoration of placental development and the rescue of IUGR by tetraploid embryo complementation did not restore β cell size or insulin levels in S6K1–/– embryos, suggesting that loss of S6K1 leads to an intrinsic β cell lesion. Consistent with this hypothesis, reexpression of S6K1 in β cells of S6K1–/– mice restored embryonic β cell size, insulin levels, glucose tolerance, and RPS6 phosphorylation, without rescuing IUGR. Together, these data suggest that a nutrient-mediated reduction in intrinsic β cell S6K1 signaling, rather than IUGR, during fetal development may underlie reduced β cell growth and eventual development of T2DM later in life. PMID:26075820

  13. Ligand independent aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lung cancer cell invasion by degradation of Smad4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Yang, Wen-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2016-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent-activated transcriptional factor that regulates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Although AhR plays a crucial role in air toxicant-induced carcinogenesis, AhR expression was shown to negatively regulate tumorigenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of AhR without ligand treatment on cancer invasion in lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancer cells expressing lower levels of AhR showed higher invasion ability (H1299 cells) compared with cells expressing higher levels of AhR (A549 cells). Overexpression of AhR in H1299 cells inhibited the invasion ability. We found that vimentin expression was inhibited in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Additionally, the expression of EMT-related transcriptional factors Snail and ID-1 decreased. Interestingly, we found that Smad4 degradation was induced in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Our data showed that AhR could interact with Jun-activation domain binding protein (Jab1) and Smad4, which may cause degradation of Smad4 by the proteasome. Our data suggest that AhR affects the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway by inducing Smad4 degradation by the proteasome and suppressing tumor metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition reduction in lung cancer cells. PMID:27060206

  14. Immature B Cell Egress from Bone Marrow Is SOCS3 Independent

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, João P.

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-3 has been suggested to regulate CXCR4 signaling in a variety of human cell lines. In mice, conditional SOCS3 inactivation in hematopoietic cells including B-lineage lymphocytes has been reported to exacerbate CXCR4-signaling and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, which resulted in altered immature B cell distribution in bone marrow (BM) due to sustained α4β1 integrin-mediated adhesion to the extracellular matrix. However, a recent study examining conditional SOCS3 deletion specifically in B-lineage cells failed to detect significant roles in B-lineage cell retention in BM. In this study we carefully examined the role played by SOCS3 in CXCR4 signaling in developing B cell subsets. We show that in mice conditionally deficient in SOCS3 exclusively in B cells (Socs3fl/fl Mb1cre/+) there was no detectable difference in B cell development in BM and in periphery. We show that SOCS3 deficient and sufficient immature B cell subsets are similarly distributed between BM parenchyma and sinusoids, and are equally competent at exiting BM into peripheral blood. Furthermore, we found no significant differences in CXCR4 desensitization upon ligand exposure in developing B lymphocyte subsets. Consequently, SOCS3-deficient and sufficient B-lineage cell migration towards CXCL12 in vitro was undistinguishable, and B-lineage cell amoeboid motility within BM parenchyma was also unaffected by SOCS3-deficiency. Thus we conclude that SOCS3 has no detectable influence on biological processes known to be controlled by CXCR4 signaling. PMID:26274929

  15. RalGPS2 Is Essential for Survival and Cell Cycle Progression of Lung Cancer Cells Independently of Its Established Substrates Ral GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Parrini, Maria Carla; Camonis, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The human genome contains six genes coding for proteins validated in vitro as specific activators of the small GTPases “Ras-related protein Ral-A” and “Ras-related protein Ral-B”, generically named Ral-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RalGEF). Ral proteins are important contributors to Ras oncogenic signaling, and RAS oncogenes are important in human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC). Therefore in this work, RalGEF contribution to oncogenic and non-oncogenic features of human NSCLC cell lines, as anchorage-dependent and independent growth, cell survival, and proliferation, was investigated. Among all human RalGEF, silencing of RGL1 and RALGPS1 had no detectable effect. However, silencing of either RGL2, RGL3, RALGDS or, to a larger extent, RALGPS2 inhibited cell population growth in anchorage dependent and independent conditions (up to 90 and 80%, respectively). RALGPS2 silencing also caused an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, up to 45% of the cell population in transformed bronchial BZR cells. In H1299 and A549, two NSCLC cell lines, RALGPS2 silencing caused an arrest of cells in the G0/G1-phase of cell cycle. Furthermore, it was associated with the modulation of important cell cycle regulators: the E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) was strongly down-regulated (both at mRNA and protein levels), and its targets, the cell cycle inhibitors p27 and p21, were up-regulated. These molecular effects were not mimicked by silencing RALA, RALB, or both. However, RALB silencing caused a modest inhibition of cell cycle progression, which in H1299 cells was associated with Cyclin D1 regulation. In conclusion, RALGPS2 is implicated in the control of cell cycle progression and survival in the in vitro growth of NSCLC cell lines. This function is largely independent of Ral GTPases and associated with modulation of Skp2, p27 and p21 cell cycle regulators. PMID:27149377

  16. Capsaicin-Induced Death of Human Haematological Malignant Cell Lines Is Independent of TRPV1 Activation.

    PubMed

    Omari, Sofia A; Adams, Murray J; Kunde, Dale A; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2016-01-01

    The effect of the plant-derived vanilloid, capsaicin (CAP), on the metabolic activity of THP-1, U266B1 and U937 hematological malignancy cells was determined. CAP reduced metabolic activity in a concentration-dependent manner in the three cell lines. A biphasic effect was observed on THP-1 cells (EC50: IC50 (95% CI) 32.9 (19.9-54.3)/219 (144-246) µmol/l). U266B1 cells were more resistant to CAP than THP-1 and U937. Metabolic activity was significantly inhibited by CAP in U937 compared to U266B1 cells (IC50: 197 versus 431 µmol/l, respectively, p < 0.008). Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and CB1 antagonists (SB452533 and AM251, respectively) suppressed the CAP-induced increase in THP-1 cell metabolic activity (p < 0.001). AM251 and SB452533 appeared to act as partial agonists and displayed a synergistic effect with CAP in U937 cells. CAP inhibits the metabolic activity of malignant hematological cells through non-TRPV1-dependent mechanisms. PMID:27160991

  17. Capsule independent uptake of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans into brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sabiiti, Wilber; May, Robin C

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is a life-threatening fungal disease with a high rate of mortality among HIV/AIDS patients across the world. The ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is central to the pathogenesis of cryptococcosis, but the way in which this occurs remains unclear. Here we use both mouse and human brain derived endothelial cells (bEnd3 and hCMEC/D3) to accurately quantify fungal uptake and survival within brain endothelial cells. Our data indicate that the adherence and internalisation of cryptococci by brain microvascular endothelial cells is an infrequent event involving small numbers of cryptococcal yeast cells. Interestingly, this process requires neither active signalling from the fungus nor the presence of the fungal capsule. Thus entry into brain microvascular endothelial cells is most likely a passive event that occurs following 'trapping' within capillary beds of the BBB. PMID:22530025

  18. Antibody repertoire deep sequencing reveals antigen-independent selection in maturing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaplinsky, Joseph; Li, Anthony; Sun, Amy; Coffre, Maryaline; Koralov, Sergei B.; Arnaout, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    Antibody repertoires are known to be shaped by selection for antigen binding. Unexpectedly, we now show that selection also acts on a non–antigen-binding antibody region: the heavy-chain variable (VH)–encoded “elbow” between variable and constant domains. By sequencing 2.8 million recombined heavy-chain genes from immature and mature B-cell subsets in mice, we demonstrate a striking gradient in VH gene use as pre-B cells mature into follicular and then into marginal zone B cells. Cells whose antibodies use VH genes that encode a more flexible elbow are more likely to mature. This effect is distinct from, and exceeds in magnitude, previously described maturation-associated changes in heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3, a key antigen-binding region, which arise from junctional diversity rather than differential VH gene use. Thus, deep sequencing reveals a previously unidentified mode of B-cell selection. PMID:24927543

  19. Steep differences in wingless signaling trigger Myc-independent competitive cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Jean-Paul; Kolahgar, Golnar; Gagliardi, Maria; Piddini, Eugenia

    2011-08-16

    Wnt signaling is a key regulator of development that is often associated with cancer. Wingless, a Drosophila Wnt homolog, has been reported to be a survival factor in wing imaginal discs. However, we found that prospective wing cells survive in the absence of Wingless as long as they are not surrounded by Wingless-responding cells. Moreover, local autonomous overactivation of Wg signaling (as a result of a mutation in APC or axin) leads to the elimination of surrounding normal cells. Therefore, relative differences in Wingless signaling lead to competitive cell interactions. This process does not involve Myc, a well-established cell competition factor. It does, however, require Notum, a conserved secreted feedback inhibitor of Wnt signaling. We suggest that Notum could amplify local differences in Wingless signaling, thus serving as an early trigger of Wg signaling-dependent competition. PMID:21839923

  20. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  1. Leptin induces CYP1B1 expression in MCF-7 cells through ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Khanal, Tilak; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Do, Minh Truong; Choi, Jae Ho; Won, Seong Su; Kang, Wonku; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-05-15

    Leptin, a hormone with multiple biological actions, is produced predominantly by adipose tissue. Among its functions, leptin can stimulate tumour cell growth. Oestrogen receptor α (ERα), which plays an essential role in breast cancer development, can be transcriptionally activated in a ligand-independent manner. In this study, we investigated the effect of leptin on CYP1B1 expression and its mechanism in breast cancer cells. Leptin induced CYP1B1 protein, messenger RNA expression and promoter activity in ERα-positive MCF-7 cells but not in ERα-negative MDA-MB-231 cells. Additionally, leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 cells. Also, ERα knockdown by siRNA significantly blocked the induction of CYP1B1 expression by leptin, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression via an ERα-dependent mechanism. Transient transfection with CYP1B1 deletion promoter constructs revealed that the oestrogen response element (ERE) plays important role in the up-regulation of CYP1B1 by leptin. Furthermore, leptin stimulated phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167 and increased ERE-luciferase activity, indicating that leptin induced CYP1B1 expression by ERα activation. Finally, we found that leptin activated ERK and Akt signalling pathways, which are upstream kinases related to ERα phosphorylation induced by leptin. Taken together, our results indicate that leptin-induced CYP1B1 expression is mediated by ligand-independent activation of the ERα pathway as a result of the activation of ERK and Akt in MCF-7 cells. - Highlights: • Leptin increased 4-hydroxyoestradiol in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. • Leptin activated ERK and Akt kinases related to ERα phosphorylation. • Leptin induces phosphorylation of ERα at serine residues 118 and 167. • Leptin induces ERE-luciferase activity.

  2. Ligand-Independent Canonical Wnt Activity in Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines Associated with Aberrant LEF1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    van Wolferen, Monique E.; Rao, Nagesha A. S.; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand–independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  3. Alemtuzumab induces caspase-independent cell death in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells through a lipid raft-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mone, A P; Cheney, C; Banks, A L; Tridandapani, S; Mehter, N; Guster, S; Lin, T; Eisenbeis, C F; Young, D C; Byrd, J C

    2006-02-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized IgG1 kappa antibody directed against CD52, a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol linked cell-membrane protein of unknown function. Herein, we demonstrate that alemtuzumab promotes rapid death of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells in vitro, in a complement and accessory cell free system. Using minimal detergent solubilization of CLL membranes, we found that CD52 colocalizes with ganglioside GM-1, a marker of membrane rafts. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that upon crosslinking CD52 with alemtuzumab+anti-Fc IgG, large patches, and in many cases caps, enriched in CD52 and GM-1 formed upon the CLL cell plasma membrane. Depletion of membrane cholesterol or inhibition of actin polymerization significantly diminished the formation of alemtuzumab-induced caps and reduced alemtuzumab-mediated CLL cell death. We compared alemtuzumab-induced direct cytotoxicity, effector cell-mediated toxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity of CLL cells to normal T cells. The direct cytotoxicity and observed capping was significantly greater for CLL cells as compared to normal T cells. Cell-mediated and complement-mediated cytotoxicity did not significantly differ between the two cell types. In summary, our data support the hypothesis that alemtuzumab can initiate CLL cell death by crosslinking CD52-enriched lipid rafts. Furthermore, the differential direct cytotoxic effect suggests that CD52 directed antibodies could possibly be engineered to more specifically target CLL cells. PMID:16341049

  4. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    PASTOREK, MICHAL; SIMKO, VERONIKA; TAKACOVA, MARTINA; BARATHOVA, MONIKA; BARTOSOVA, MARIA; HUNAKOVA, LUBA; SEDLAKOVA, OLGA; HUDECOVA, SONA; KRIZANOVA, OLGA; DEQUIEDT, FRANCK; PASTOREKOVA, SILVIA; SEDLAK, JAN

    2015-01-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules. PMID:25955133

  5. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  6. Artesunate induces apoptosis through caspase-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways in human myelodysplastic syndrome SKM-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Jingci; Chen, Li; Wang, Jiamin; Wang, Yaqian; Luo, Jianmin; Pan, Ling; Zhang, Xuejun

    2014-08-01

    Artesunate (ART) is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin extracted from Artemisia annua (sweet wormwood) that is conventionally used in anti-malarial drugs and more recently in medications that induce tumor cell apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanistic pathways of ART in human myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a condition that commonly progresses to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Human MDS SKM-1 cells, primary bone marrow (PBM) mononuclear cells from patients with refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) or MDS-AML (MDS cell group), and PBM stromal cells from three patients without hematological diseases (non-MDS cell group) were cultured for 24, 48, or 72 h with or without various ART concentrations. CCK-8, western blot, JC-1 fluorescence, and Annexin-V/Propidium iodide (PI) labeling were used to assess cell proliferation, protein levels, mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMPs) and apoptosis, respectively. ART administration dose- and time-dependently inhibited SKM-1 proliferation. At 24, 48, and 72 h, ART IC₅₀ values were 89.92, 4.24, and 1.28 μmol/L, respectively. ART only significantly inhibited proliferation in the MDS cell group, but it has little impact on proliferation of non-MDS cells. ART decreased MMPs, and dose-dependently induced SKM-1 cell apoptosis, peaking at 82.9% when treated with 200 μmol/L ART for 24h. Caspase-3 and -9 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and apoptosis inducing factor nuclear localization were implicated in apoptosis. Our results indicate that ART effectively induces apoptosis in SKM-1 cells through both caspase-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways. PMID:24704559

  7. Cladribine induces apoptosis in human leukaemia cells by caspase-dependent and -independent pathways acting on mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, I; Pérez-Galán, P; Giraldo, P; Rubio-Félix, D; Anel, A; Naval, J

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the role of caspases and mitochondria in apoptosis induced by 2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine (cladribine) in several human leukaemic cell lines. Cladribine treatment induced mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) loss, phosphatidylserine exposure, caspase activation and development of typical apoptotic morphology in JM1 (pre-B), Jurkat (T) and U937 (promonocytic) cells. Western-blot analysis of cell extracts revealed the activation of at least caspases 3, 6, 8 and 9. Co-treatment with Z-VAD-fmk (benzyloxy-carbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone), a general caspase inhibitor, significantly prevented cladribine-induced death in JM1 and Jurkat cells for the first approximately 40 h, but not for longer times. Z-VAD-fmk also partly prevented some morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis in U937 cells, but not cell death. Co-incubation with selective caspase inhibitors Ac-DEVD-CHO (N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-aldehyde), Ac-LEHD-CHO (N-acetyl-Leu-Glu-His-Asp-aldehyde) or Z-IETD-fmk (benzyloxycarbonyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-fluoromethylketone), inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide or cell-cycle arrest with aphidicolin did not prevent cell death. Overexpression of Bcl-2, but not CrmA, efficiently prevented death in Jurkat cells. In all cell lines, death was always preceded by Delta Psi(m) loss and accompanied by the translocation of the protein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to the nucleus. These results suggest that caspases are differentially involved in induction and execution of apoptosis depending on the leukaemic cell lineage. In any case, Delta Psi(m) loss marked the point of no return in apoptosis and may be caused by two different pathways, one caspase-dependent and the other caspase-independent. Execution of apoptosis was always performed after Delta Psi(m) loss by a caspase-9-triggered caspase cascade and the action of AIF. PMID:11672427

  8. Silencing of protein kinase D2 induces glioma cell senescence via p53-dependent and -independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bernhart, Eva; Damm, Sabine; Heffeter, Petra; Wintersperger, Andrea; Asslaber, Martin; Frank, Saša; Hammer, Astrid; Strohmaier, Heimo; DeVaney, Trevor; Mrfka, Manuel; Eder, Hans; Windpassinger, Christian; Ireson, Christopher R.; Mischel, Paul S.; Berger, Walter; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive tumor of the central nervous system with a dismal prognosis for affected patients. Aberrant protein kinase C (PKC) signaling has been implicated in gliomagenesis, and a member of the PKC-activated protein kinase D (PRKD) family, PRKD2, was identified as mediator of GBM growth in vitro and in vivo. Methods The outcome of PRKD2 silencing and pharmacological inhibition on glioma cell proliferation was established with different glioma cell lines. Western blotting, senescence assays, co-immunoprecipitation, fluorescence activated cell sorting, quantitative PCR, and immunofluorescence microscopy were utilized to analyze downstream signaling. Results RNA-interference (21-mer siRNA) and pharmacological inhibition (CRT0066101) of PRKD2 profoundly inhibited proliferation of p53wt (U87MG, A172, and primary GBM2), and p53mut (GM133, T98G, U251, and primary Gli25) glioma cells. In a xenograft experiment, PRKD2 silencing significantly delayed tumor growth of U87MG cells. PRKD2 silencing in p53wt and p53mut cells was associated with typical hallmarks of senescence and cell cycle arrest in G1. Attenuated AKT/PKB phosphorylation in response to PRKD2 silencing was a common observation made in p53wt and p53mut GBM cells. PRKD2 knockdown in p53wt cells induced upregulation of p53, p21, and p27 expression, decreased phosphorylation of CDK2 and/or CDK4, hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRb), and reduced transcription of E2F1. In p53mut GM133 and primary Gli25 cells, PRKD2 silencing increased p27 and p15 and reduced E2F1 transcription but did not affect pRb phosphorylation. Conclusions PRKD2 silencing induces glioma cell senescence via p53-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:24463355

  9. Taxol induces caspase-independent cytoplasmic vacuolization and cell death through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) swelling in ASTC-a-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong-sheng; Wang, Xiao-ping; Sun, Lei; Wang, Long-xiang; Xing, Da; Mok, Martin

    2008-10-18

    High concentration of taxol was found to induce programmed cell death (PCD) and cytoplasm vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. To elucidate the relationship between the PCD and cytoplasm vacuolization, confocal fluorescence microscopy was performed on the cytoplasm vacuolization, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria swelling after taxol treatment in living cells. erRFP plasmid was used to probe the ER distribution, and SCAT3 plasmid was used to monitor the caspase-3 activation in living cells. Our results showed that taxol induced concentration-dependent and caspases-independent cytoplasm vacuolization and cell death through ER and mitochondria swelling. Live confocal imaging of ASTC-a-1 cells stably expressing SCAT3 further verified that taxol-induced cytoplasm vacuolization and cell death was caspase-3-independent. In conclusion, we found for the first time that taxol induces a paraptosis-like PCD in the ASTC-a-1 cells by cytoplasm vacuolization due to the swelling of both ER and mitochondria without activating the caspase enzymes. PMID:18547714

  10. Potential therapeutic role of Tridham in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line through induction of p53 independent apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . Conclusion These results suggest that TD induces apoptosis of Huh7 cells through activation of Bax and triggered caspase cascade, independent of p53 function. This study throws light on the mechanistic action of TD in triggering apoptosis in Huh 7 cells. PMID:24256980

  11. A Cytokine-Independent Approach To Identify Antigen-Specific Human Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells and Rare Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells in Blood.

    PubMed

    Dan, Jennifer M; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Weiskopf, Daniela; da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha M; Brigger, Matthew; Bothwell, Marcella; Sette, Alessandro; Crotty, Shane

    2016-08-01

    Detection of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells is central to the study of many human infectious diseases, vaccines, and autoimmune diseases. However, such cells are generally rare and heterogeneous in their cytokine profiles. Identification of Ag-specific germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells by cytokine production has been particularly problematic. The function of a GC Tfh cell is to selectively help adjacent GC B cells via cognate interaction; thus, GC Tfh cells may be stingy cytokine producers, fundamentally different from Th1 or Th17 cells in the quantities of cytokines produced. Conventional identification of Ag-specific cells by intracellular cytokine staining relies on the ability of the CD4(+) T cell to generate substantial amounts of cytokine. To address this problem, we have developed a cytokine-independent activation-induced marker (AIM) methodology to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in human lymphoid tissue. Whereas Group A Streptococcus-specific GC Tfh cells produced minimal detectable cytokines by intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM method identified 85-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. Intriguingly, these GC Tfh cells consistently expressed programmed death ligand 1 upon activation. AIM also detected non-Tfh cells in lymphoid tissue. As such, we applied AIM for identification of rare Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells in human peripheral blood. Dengue, tuberculosis, and pertussis vaccine-specific CD4(+) T cells were readily detectable by AIM. In summary, cytokine assays missed 98% of Ag-specific human GC Tfh cells, reflecting the biology of these cells, which could instead be sensitively identified by coexpression of TCR-dependent activation markers. PMID:27342848

  12. Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits ovarian cell growth through an Rb-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ha, T U; Segev, D L; Barbie, D; Masiakos, P T; Tran, T T; Dombkowski, D; Glander, M; Clarke, T R; Lorenzo, H K; Donahoe, P K; Maheswaran, S

    2000-11-24

    Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS), a transforming growth factor-beta family member, causes regression of the Müllerian duct in male embryos. MIS overexpression in transgenic mice ablates the ovary, and MIS inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro, suggesting a key role for this hormone in postnatal development of the ovary. This report describes a mechanism for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in both a human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and a cell line derived from normal ovarian surface epithelium, which is the origin of human epithelial ovarian cancers. MIS-treated cells accumulated in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle and subsequently underwent apoptosis. MIS up-regulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16 through an MIS type II receptor-mediated mechanism and inhibited growth in the absence of detectable or inactive Rb protein. Prolonged treatment with MIS down-regulated the Rb-related protein p130 and increased the Rb family-regulated transcription factor E2F1, overexpression of which inhibited growth. These findings demonstrate that p16 is required for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in ovarian epithelial cells and tumor cells and suggest that up-regulation of E2F1 also plays a role in this process. PMID:10958795

  13. The absence of a mitochondrial genome in rho0 yeast cells extends lifespan independently of retrograde regulation

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Dong Kyun; Poyton, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    The absence of mtDNA in rho0 yeast cells affects both respiration and mitochondrial-nuclear communication (e.g., retrograde regulation, intergenomic signaling, or pleiotropic drug resistance). Previously, it has been reported that some rho0 strains have increased replicative lifespans, attributable to the lack of respiration and retrograde regulation. Here, we have been able to confirm that rho0 cells exhibit increased replicative lifespans but have found that this is not associated with the lack of respiration or reduced oxidative stress but instead, is related to the lack of mtDNA per se in rho0 cells. Also, we find no correlation between the strength of retrograde regulation and lifespan. Furthermore, we find that pdr3- or rtg2- mutations are not responsible for lifespan extension in rho0 cells, ruling out a specific role for PDR3-pleiotropic drug resistance or RGT2-retrograde regulation pathways in the extended lifespans of rho0 cells. Surprisingly, Rtg3p, which acts downstream of Rtg2p, is required for lifespan increase in rho0 cells. Together, these findings indicate that the loss of mtDNA per se and not the lack of respiration lead to extended longevity in rho0 cells. They also suggest that Rtg3p, acting independently of retrograde regulation, mediates this effect, possibly via intergenomic signaling. PMID:19285548

  14. Chk2 and p53 Are Haploinsufficient with Dependent and Independent Functions to Eliminate Cells after Telomere Loss

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Heng B.; Golic, Kent G.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that cells use to monitor telomere integrity, and the array of responses that may be induced, are not fully defined. To date there have been no studies in animals describing the ability of cells to survive and contribute to adult organs following telomere loss. We developed assays to monitor the ability of somatic cells to proliferate and differentiate after telomere loss. Here we show that p53 and Chk2 limit the growth and differentiation of cells that lose a telomere. Furthermore, our results show that two copies of the genes encoding p53 and Chk2 are required for the cell to mount a rapid wildtype response to a missing telomere. Finally, our results show that, while Chk2 functions by activating the p53-dependent apoptotic cascade, Chk2 also functions independently of p53 to limit survival. In spite of these mechanisms to eliminate cells that have lost a telomere, we find that such cells can make a substantial contribution to differentiated adult tissues. PMID:21655087

  15. Restricted distribution of mrg-1 mRNA in C. elegans primordial germ cells through germ granule-independent regulation.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Takashi; Takasaki, Teruaki; Inoue, Kunio; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    The chromodomain protein MRG-1 is an essential maternal factor for proper germline development that protects germ cells from cell death in C. elegans. Unlike germ granules, which are exclusively segregated to the germline blastomeres at each cell division from the first cleavage of the embryo, MRG-1 is abundant in all cells in early embryos and is then gradually restricted to the primordial germ cells (PGCs) by the morphogenesis stage. Here, we show that this characteristic spatiotemporal expression pattern is dictated by the mrg-1 3'UTR and is differentially regulated at the RNA level between germline and somatic cells. Asymmetric segregation of germ granules is not necessary to localize MRG-1 to the PGCs. We found that MES-4, an essential chromatin regulator in germ cells, also accumulates in the PGCs in a germ granule-independent manner. We propose that C.elegans PGCs have a novel mechanism to accumulate at least some chromatin-associated proteins that are essential for germline immortality. PMID:26537333

  16. Assessing Cell Cycle Independent Function of the CDK Inhibitor p21(CDKN¹A) in DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Dutto, Ilaria; Tillhon, Micol; Prosperi, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21(CDKN1A) is a small protein that is able to regulate many important cell functions, often independently of its activity of CDK inhibitor. In addition to cell cycle, this protein regulates cell transcription, apoptosis, cell motility, and DNA repair. In particular, p21 may participate in different DNA repair processes, like the nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair (BER), and double-strand breaks (DSB) repair, because of its ability to interact with DNA repair proteins, such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a master regulator of many DNA transactions. Although this role has been debated for a long time, the influence of p21 in DNA repair has been now established. However, it remain to be clarified how this role is coupled to proteasomal degradation that has been shown to occur after DNA damage. This chapter describes procedures to study p21 protein recruitment to localized DNA damage sites in the cell nucleus. In particular, we describe a technique based on local irrradiation with UV light through a polycarbonate filter with micropores; an in situ lysis procedure to detect chromatin-bound proteins by immunofluorescence; a cell fractionation procedure to study chromatin association of p21 by Western blot analysis, and p21 protein-protein interactions by an immunoprecipitation assay. PMID:26231713

  17. Growth rate of late passage sarcoma cells is independent of epigenetic events but dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations

    SciTech Connect

    Becerikli, Mustafa; Jacobsen, Frank; Rittig, Andrea; Köhne, Wiebke; Nambiar, Sandeep; Mirmohammadsadegh, Alireza; Stricker, Ingo; Tannapfel, Andrea; Wieczorek, Stefan; Epplen, Joerg Thomas; Tilkorn, Daniel; Steinstraesser, Lars

    2013-07-15

    Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are characterized by co-participation of several epigenetic and genetic events during tumorigenesis. Having bypassed cellular senescence barriers during oncogenic transformation, the factors further affecting growth rate of STS cells remain poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of gene silencing (DNA promoter methylation of LINE-1, PTEN), genetic aberrations (karyotype, KRAS and BRAF mutations) as well as their contribution to the proliferation rate and migratory potential that underlies “initial” and “final” passage sarcoma cells. Three different cell lines were used, SW982 (synovial sarcoma), U2197 (malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH)) and HT1080 (fibrosarcoma). Increased proliferative potential of final passage STS cells was not associated with significant differences in methylation (LINE-1, PTEN) and mutation status (KRAS, BRAF), but it was dependent on the amount of chromosomal aberrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that these fairly differentiated/advanced cancer cell lines have still the potential to gain an additional spontaneous growth benefit without external influences and that maintenance of increased proliferative potential towards longevity of STS cells (having crossed senescence barriers) may be independent of overt epigenetic alterations. -- Highlights: Increased proliferative potential of late passage STS cells was: • Not associated with epigenetic changes (methylation changes at LINE-1, PTEN). • Not associated with mutation status of KRAS, BRAF. • Dependent on presence/absence of chromosomal aberrations.

  18. Galectin-9 suppresses Th17 cell development in an IL-2-dependent but Tim-3-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Oomizu, Souichi; Arikawa, Tomohiro; Niki, Toshiro; Kadowaki, Takeshi; Ueno, Masaki; Nishi, Nozomu; Yamauchi, Akira; Hirashima, Mitsuomi

    2012-04-01

    Galectin-9 (Gal-9) ameliorates autoimmune reactions by suppressing Th17 cells while augmenting Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact mechanism of Gal-9-mediated immune modulation has been elusive. In a MOG-induced experimental allergic encephalomyelitis model using Gal-9(-/-) mice, we observed exacerbated inflammation and an increase in IL-17-producing Th17 cells balanced by a decrease in Foxp3+ Tregs. During in vitro Th17 skewing using TGF-β1 and IL-6, exogenous Gal-9 suppressed Th17 cell development and expanded Foxp3(+) Tregs from naïve CD4 T cells in an IL-2-dependent manner. Although Gal-9 induced cell death in Tim3-expressing differentiated Th17 cells, Gal-9 suppressed Th17 development in a Tim-3-independent. Benzyl-α-GalNAc (an O-glycan biosynthesis inhibitor), but not swainsonine (a complex-type N-glycan biosynthesis inhibitor) abrogated Gal-9-mediated inhibition of Th17 development indicating that there is a linkage between Gal-9 and an unidentified glycoprotein(s) with O-linked β-galactosides that suppress Th17 development. PMID:22341088

  19. Three-dimensional spatial configuration of tumour cells confers resistance to chemotherapy independent of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pamela H S; Chia, Su Shin; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James C H; Nathan, Saminathan Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Anticancer drug discovery has been hampered by the lack of reliable preclinical models, which routinely use cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. However, many of the characteristics of cells in 2D culture do not translate into the findings in animal xenografts. Three-dimensional (3D) growth may be responsible for some of these changes, and models using cells grown in 3D may form a more representative step in tumouricidal validation prior to animal implantation and human testing. For the 3D model, we cultured 143.98.2, SaOS2 or U2OS osteosarcoma cells seeded in porous Bombyx mori silk sponges. We conducted real-time PCR on cells grown in 2D culture and 3D scaffolds for the proliferation markers cyclin B1 and E2F1 and the actin regulator RhoA, and found a significant decrease in expression levels for the 3D tumour models (p = 0.02, < 0.001 and 0.008 for cyclin B1, E2F1 and RhoA for 143.98.2; p = 0.02, 0.002 and 0.02 for cyclin B1, E2F1 and RhoA for U2OS, respectively). In contrast, p21 was upregulated when SaOS2 and U2OS were cultured in the 3D scaffolds (p < 0.001) and there was no increase in DNA quantity during the culture period. We correspondingly observed G1 arrest when cell cycle analysis was conducted. Cytotoxicity results for cells treated with serial dilutions of doxorubicin and cisplatin showed that cells in 3D scaffolds were less sensitive to drug treatment than in 2D culture, and the difference was more pronounced for cell cycle specific agents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24668783

  20. Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue–Derived Stem Cell Utility Is Independent of Anatomical Harvest Site

    PubMed Central

    Choudhery, Mahmood S.; Badowski, Michael; Muise, Angela; Pierce, John; Harris, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the challenges for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is to obtain suitably large cell numbers for therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can easily be expanded in vitro to obtain large numbers of cells, but this approach may induce cellular senescence. The characteristics of cells are dependent on variables like age, body mass index (BMI), and disease conditions, however, and in the case of adipose tissue–derived stem cells (ASCs), anatomical harvest site is also an important variable that can affect the regenerative potential of isolated cells. We therefore had kept the parameters (age, BMI, disease conditions) constant in this study to specifically assess influence of anatomical sites of individual donors on utility of ASCs. Adipose tissue was obtained from multiple anatomical sites in individual donors, and viability and nucleated cell yield were determined. MSC frequency was enumerated using colony forming unit assay and cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Growth characteristics were determined by long-term population doubling analysis of each sample. Finally, MSCs were induced to undergo adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic differentiation. To validate the findings, these results were compared with similar single harvest sites from multiple individual patients. The results of the current study indicated that MSCs obtained from multiple harvest sites in a single donor have similar morphology and phenotype. All adipose depots in a single donor exhibited similar MSC yield, viability, frequency, and growth characteristics. Equivalent differentiation capacity into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes was also observed. On the basis of results, we conclude that it is acceptable to combine MSCs obtained from various anatomical locations in a single donor to obtain suitably large cell numbers required for therapy, avoiding in vitro senescence and lengthy and expensive in vitro culturing and expansion steps. PMID:26309790

  1. TREK-1 Regulates Cytokine Secretion from Cultured Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells Independently of Cytoskeletal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Roan, Esra; Teng, Bin; Waters, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Background TREK-1 deficient alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) secrete less IL-6, more MCP-1, and contain less F-actin. Whether these alterations in cytokine secretion and F-actin content are related remains unknown. We now hypothesized that cytokine secretion from TREK-1-deficient AECs was regulated by cytoskeletal rearrangements. Methods We determined F-actin and α-tubulin contents of control, TREK-1-deficient and TREK-1-overexpressing human A549 cells by confocal microscopy and western blotting, and measured IL-6 and MCP-1 levels using real-time PCR and ELISA. Results Cytochalasin D decreased the F-actin content of control cells. Jasplakinolide increased the F-actin content of TREK-1 deficient cells, similar to the effect of TREK-1 overexpression in control cells. Treatment of control and TREK-1 deficient cells with TNF-α, a strong stimulus for IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion, had no effect on F-actin structures. The combination of TNF-α+cytochalasin D or TNF-α+jasplakinolide had no additional effect on the F-actin content or architecture when compared to cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide alone. Although TREK-1 deficient AECs contained less F-actin at baseline, quantified biochemically, they contained more α-tubulin. Exposure to nocodazole disrupted α-tubulin filaments in control and TREK-1 deficient cells, but left the overall amount of α-tubulin unchanged. Although TNF-α had no effect on the F-actin or α-tubulin contents, it increased IL-6 and MCP-1 production and secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells. IL-6 and MCP-1 secretions from control and TREK-1 deficient cells after TNF-α+jasplakinolide or TNF-α+nocodazole treatment was similar to the effect of TNF-α alone. Interestingly, cytochalasin D decreased TNF-α-induced IL-6 but not MCP-1 secretion from control but not TREK-1 deficient cells. Conclusion Although cytochalasin D, jasplakinolide and nocodazole altered the F-actin and α-tubulin structures of control and TREK-1 deficient AEC, the

  2. Negative Selection of Self-Reactive Chicken B Cells Requires B Cell Receptor Signaling and Is Independent of the Bursal Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Davani, Dariush; Pancer, Zeev; Cheroutre, Hilde; Ratcliffe, Michael J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Although the negative selection of self-reactive B cells in the bone marrow of mammals has been clearly demonstrated, it remains unclear in models of gut-associated B cell lymphopoiesis, such as that of the chicken (Gallus gallus). We have generated chicken surface IgM–related receptors in which the diversity region of the lamprey variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) has been fused to the C region of chicken surface IgM (Tμ). Expression of a VLR:Tμ receptor with specificity for PE supported normal development of B cells, whereas a VLR:Tμ receptor specific to hen egg lysozyme (a self-antigen with respect to chicken B cells) induced, in vivo, complete deletion of VLRHELTμ-expressing B cells. In ovo i.v. injection of PE resulted in deletion of VLRPETμ-expressing Β cells in the embryo spleen, demonstrating that negative selection was independent of the bursal microenvironment. Although chickens transduced with a murine CD8α:chicken Igα fusion protein contained B cells expressing mCD8α:chIgα, cotransfection of the mCD8α:chIgα construct, together with thymus leukemia Ag (a natural ligand for mCD8α), resulted in reduced levels of mCD8α:chIgα-expressing B cells in inverse proportion to the levels of thymus leukemia Ag–expressing cells. Deletion of mCD8a: chIga-expressing cells was specific for B cells and required active signaling downstream of the mCD8α:chIgα receptor. Ag-mediated negative selection of developing chicken B cells can therefore occur independently of the bursal microenvironment and is dependent on signaling downstream of the BCR. PMID:24516196

  3. Discriminating the Independent Influence of Cell Adhesion and Spreading Area on Stem Cell Fate Determination Using Micropatterned Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinlong; Hu, Xiaohong; Dulińska-Molak, Ida; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yang, Yingnan; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion and spreading are essential processes of anchorage dependent cells involved in regulation of cell functions. Cells interact with their extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in different degree of adhesion and spreading. However, it is not clear whether cell adhesion or cell spreading is more important for cell functions. In this study, 10 types of isotropical micropatterns that were composed of 2 μm microdots were prepared to precisely control the adhesion area and spreading area of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The respective influence of adhesion and spreading areas on stem cell functions was investigated. Adhesion area showed more significant influences on the focal adhesion formation, binding of myosin to actin fibers, cytoskeletal organization, cellular Young's modulus, accumulation of YAP/TAZ in nuclei, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs than did the spreading area. The results indicated that adhesion area rather than spreading area played more important roles in regulating cell functions. This study should provide new insight of the influence of cell adhesion and spreading on cell functions and inspire the design of biomaterials to process in an effective manner for manipulation of cell functions. PMID:27349298

  4. Discriminating the Independent Influence of Cell Adhesion and Spreading Area on Stem Cell Fate Determination Using Micropatterned Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinlong; Hu, Xiaohong; Dulińska-Molak, Ida; Kawazoe, Naoki; Yang, Yingnan; Chen, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion and spreading are essential processes of anchorage dependent cells involved in regulation of cell functions. Cells interact with their extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in different degree of adhesion and spreading. However, it is not clear whether cell adhesion or cell spreading is more important for cell functions. In this study, 10 types of isotropical micropatterns that were composed of 2 μm microdots were prepared to precisely control the adhesion area and spreading area of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The respective influence of adhesion and spreading areas on stem cell functions was investigated. Adhesion area showed more significant influences on the focal adhesion formation, binding of myosin to actin fibers, cytoskeletal organization, cellular Young’s modulus, accumulation of YAP/TAZ in nuclei, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs than did the spreading area. The results indicated that adhesion area rather than spreading area played more important roles in regulating cell functions. This study should provide new insight of the influence of cell adhesion and spreading on cell functions and inspire the design of biomaterials to process in an effective manner for manipulation of cell functions. PMID:27349298

  5. Planarian MBD2/3 is required for adult stem cell pluripotency independently of DNA methylation☆

    PubMed Central

    Jaber-Hijazi, Farah; Lo, Priscilla J.K.P.; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Foster, Jeremy M.; Benner, Jack S.; Tejada Romero, Belen; Chen, Chen; Malla, Sunir; Solana, Jordi; Ruzov, Alexey; Aziz Aboobaker, A.

    2013-01-01

    Planarian adult stem cells (pASCs) or neoblasts represent an ideal system to study the evolution of stem cells and pluripotency as they underpin an unrivaled capacity for regeneration. We wish to understand the control of differentiation and pluripotency in pASCs and to understand how conserved, convergent or divergent these mechanisms are across the Bilateria. Here we show the planarian methyl-CpG Binding Domain 2/3 (mbd2/3) gene is required for pASC differentiation during regeneration and tissue homeostasis. The genome does not have detectable levels of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and we find no role for a potential DNA methylase. We conclude that MBD proteins may have had an ancient role in broadly controlling animal stem cell pluripotency, but that DNA methylation is not involved in planarian stem cell differentiation. PMID:24063805

  6. Rapid generation of mitochondrial superoxide induces mitochondrion-dependent but caspase-independent cell death in hippocampal neuronal cells that morphologically resembles necroptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Masayuki; Choi, Hye Joung; Zhu, Bao Ting

    2012-07-15

    Studies in recent years have revealed that excess mitochondrial superoxide production is an important etiological factor in neurodegenerative diseases, resulting from oxidative modifications of cellular lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress causes neuronal death. In this study, the immortalized mouse hippocampal neuronal cells (HT22) in culture were used as a model and they were exposed to menadione (also known as vitamin K{sub 3}) to increase intracellular superoxide production. We found that menadione causes preferential accumulation of superoxide in the mitochondria of these cells, along with the rapid development of mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular ATP depletion. Neuronal death induced by menadione is independent of the activation of the MAPK signaling pathways and caspases. The lack of caspase activation is due to the rapid depletion of cellular ATP. It was observed that two ATP-independent mitochondrial nucleases, namely, AIF and Endo G, are released following menadione exposure. Silencing of their expression using specific siRNAs results in transient suppression (for ∼ 12 h) of mitochondrial superoxide-induced neuronal death. While suppression of the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression markedly sensitizes neuronal cells to mitochondrial superoxide-induced cytotoxicity, its over-expression confers strong protection. Collectively, these findings showed that many of the observed features associated with mitochondrial superoxide-induced cell death, including caspase independency, rapid depletion of ATP level, mitochondrial release of AIF and Endo G, and mitochondrial swelling, are distinctly different from those of apoptosis; instead they resemble some of the known features of necroptosis. -- Highlights: ► Menadione causes mitochondrial superoxide accumulation and injury. ► Menadione-induced cell death is caspase-independent, due to rapid depletion of

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem FMEA/CIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Generation/Fuel Cell Powerplant (EPG/FCP) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPG/FCP hardware.

  8. IL-13 Production by Regulatory T Cells Protects Against Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE) Independent of Auto-Antigen1

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Rynda, Agnieszka; Ascón, Miguel A.; Yang, Xinghong; Kochetkova, Irina; Riccardi, Carol; Callis, Gayle; Trunkle, Theresa; Pascual, David W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment with an anti-inflammatory Salmonella vaccine expressing enterotoxigenic E. coli colonization factor antigen 1 (CFA/I) proved effective in stimulating protective, potent CD25+ CD4+ T (Treg) cells in susceptible mice challenged with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Since the Salmonella vector was considerably less protective, we questioned whether altering the fimbrial subunit expression to resemble conventional Salmonella expression may impact Treg cell potency. The Salmonella-CFA/I vaccine was modified to limit the fimbrial subunit expression to the intracellular compartment (Salmonella-CFA/IIC). SJL mice were challenged with proteolipid protein (PLP)139–151 to induce EAE and orally treated with one of three Salmonella vaccines six days post-challenge. Treatment with Salmonella-CFA/IIC greatly reduced clinical disease, similar to Salmonella-CFA/I, by subduing IL-17 and IL-21; however, mechanisms of protection differed, as evident by increased IL-13 and IFN-γ, but diminished TGF-β production by Treg cells from Salmonella-CFA/IIC-treated mice. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from both CFA/I-expressing constructs was equivalent in protecting against EAE, showing minimal disease. While not as potent in its protection, CD25−CD4+ T cells from Salmonella-CFA/IIC showed minimal Th2 cells, but this vaccine did prime for Th2 cells subsequent EAE challenge. In vivo IL-13, but not IFN-γ neutralization, compromised protection conferred by adoptive transfer with Salmonella-CFA/IIC-induced Treg cells. Thus, the Salmonella-CFA/IIC vaccine elicits Treg cells with attributes from both the Salmonella vector and Salmonella-CFA/I vaccines. Importantly, these Treg cells can be induced to high potency by simply vaccinating against irrelevant Ags, offering a novel approach to treat autoimmune diseases independently of the auto-Ag. PMID:18606647

  9. Local RhoA activation induces cytokinetic furrows independent of spindle position and cell cycle stage.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Elizabeth; Glotzer, Michael

    2016-06-20

    The GTPase RhoA promotes contractile ring assembly and furrow ingression during cytokinesis. Although many factors that regulate RhoA during cytokinesis have been characterized, the spatiotemporal regulatory logic remains undefined. We have developed an optogenetic probe to gain tight spatial and temporal control of RhoA activity in mammalian cells and demonstrate that cytokinetic furrowing is primarily regulated at the level of RhoA activation. Light-mediated recruitment of a RhoGEF domain to the plasma membrane leads to rapid induction of RhoA activity, leading to assembly of cytokinetic furrows that partially ingress. Furthermore, furrow formation in response to RhoA activation is not temporally or spatially restricted. RhoA activation is sufficient to generate furrows at both the cell equator and cell poles, in both metaphase and anaphase. Remarkably, furrow formation can be initiated in rounded interphase cells, but not adherent cells. These results indicate that RhoA activation is sufficient to induce assembly of functional contractile rings and that cell rounding facilitates furrow formation. PMID:27298323

  10. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  11. Whole cell, label free protein quantitation with data independent acquisition: quantitation at the MS2 level.

    PubMed

    McQueen, Peter; Spicer, Vic; Schellenberg, John; Krokhin, Oleg; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David; Wilkins, John A

    2015-01-01

    Label free quantitation by measurement of peptide fragment signal intensity (MS2 quantitation) is a technique that has seen limited use due to the stochastic nature of data dependent acquisition (DDA). However, data independent acquisition has the potential to make large scale MS2 quantitation a more viable technique. In this study we used an implementation of data independent acquisition--SWATH--to perform label free protein quantitation in a model bacterium Clostridium stercorarium. Four tryptic digests analyzed by SWATH were probed by an ion library containing information on peptide mass and retention time obtained from DDA experiments. Application of this ion library to SWATH data quantified 1030 proteins with at least two peptides quantified (∼ 40% of predicted proteins in the C. stercorarium genome) in each replicate. Quantitative results obtained were very consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.960). Protein quantitation by summation of peptide fragment signal intensities was also highly consistent between biological replicates (R(2) ∼ 0.930), indicating that this approach may have increased viability compared to recent applications in label free protein quantitation. SWATH based quantitation was able to consistently detect differences in relative protein quantity and it provided coverage for a number of proteins that were missed in some samples by DDA analysis. PMID:25348682

  12. CD38 Expression in a Subset of Memory T Cells Is Independent of Cell Cycling as a Correlate of HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Würsch, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Romero-Rodríguez, Dámaris P.; Olvera-García, Gustavo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Jiang, Wei; Pérez-Patrigeon, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In order to determine if the expression of the activation marker CD38 can correlate with HIV disease progression independently of cycling, we performed a cluster-based multivariate correlation analysis of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and viral loads with frequencies of CD38 and Ki67 expression on CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with untreated HIV infection, stratified in maturation subpopulations, and subpopulation subsets defined by the expression of CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR4. The frequencies of the activated phenotypes %CD38+ Ki67− and %CD38+ Ki67+ of the CXCR5− CXCR3− CCR4+ (“pre-Th2”) central memory (TCM) cell subset clustered together, comprising a significant negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and a positive correlate of viral load in multivariate analysis. Frequency of cycling-uncoupled CD38 expression in “pre-Th2” TCM cells was a negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts in univariate analysis, which was not the case of their %CD38+ Ki67+. CXCR5+ CXCR3− CCR4−  TCM cells were underrepresented in patients, and their absolute counts correlated negatively with their %CD38+ Ki67− but not with their % CD38+ Ki67+. Our results may imply that CD38 expression either reflects or participates in pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease independently of cell cycling. PMID:27064238

  13. SIAH ubiquitin ligases regulate breast cancer cell migration and invasion independent of the oxygen status

    PubMed Central

    Adam, M Gordian; Matt, Sonja; Christian, Sven; Hess-Stumpp, Holger; Haegebarth, Andrea; Hofmann, Thomas G; Algire, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Seven-in-absentia homolog (SIAH) proteins are evolutionary conserved RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for the degradation of key molecules regulating DNA damage response, hypoxic adaptation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and cell proliferation. Many studies suggest a tumorigenic role for SIAH2. In breast cancer patients SIAH2 expression levels correlate with cancer aggressiveness and overall patient survival. In addition, SIAH inhibition reduced metastasis in melanoma. The role of SIAH1 in breast cancer is still ambiguous; both tumorigenic and tumor suppressive functions have been reported. Other studies categorized SIAH ligases as either pro- or antimigratory, while the significance for metastasis is largely unknown. Here, we re-evaluated the effects of SIAH1 and SIAH2 depletion in breast cancer cell lines, focusing on migration and invasion. We successfully knocked down SIAH1 and SIAH2 in several breast cancer cell lines. In luminal type MCF7 cells, this led to stabilization of the SIAH substrate Prolyl Hydroxylase Domain protein 3 (PHD3) and reduced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF1α) protein levels. Both the knockdown of SIAH1 or SIAH2 led to increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation, with comparable effects. These results point to a tumor promoting role for SIAH1 in breast cancer similar to SIAH2. In addition, depletion of SIAH1 or SIAH2 also led to decreased cell migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. SIAH knockdown also controlled microtubule dynamics by markedly decreasing the protein levels of stathmin, most likely via p27Kip1. Collectively, these results suggest that both SIAH ligases promote a migratory cancer cell phenotype and could contribute to metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:26654769

  14. ING5 Is Phosphorylated by CDK2 and Controls Cell Proliferation Independently of p53

    PubMed Central

    Linzen, Ulrike; Lilischkis, Richard; Pandithage, Ruwin; Schilling, Britta; Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Lüscher, Bernhard; Vervoorts, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of growth (ING) proteins have multiple functions in the control of cell proliferation, mainly by regulating processes associated with chromatin regulation and gene expression. ING5 has been described to regulate aspects of gene transcription and replication. Moreover deregulation of ING5 is observed in different tumors, potentially functioning as a tumor suppressor. Gene transcription in late G1 and in S phase and replication is regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) in complex with cyclin E or cyclin A. CDK2 complexes phosphorylate and regulate several substrate proteins relevant for overcoming the restriction point and promoting S phase. We have identified ING5 as a novel CDK2 substrate. ING5 is phosphorylated at a single site, threonine 152, by cyclin E/CDK2 and cyclin A/CDK2 in vitro. This site is also phosphorylated in cells in a cell cycle dependent manner, consistent with it being a CDK2 substrate. Furthermore overexpression of cyclin E/CDK2 stimulates while the CDK2 inhibitor p27KIP1 represses phosphorylation at threonine 152. This site is located in a bipartite nuclear localization sequence but its phosphorylation was not sufficient to deregulate the subcellular localization of ING5. Although ING5 interacts with the tumor suppressor p53, we could not establish p53-dependent regulation of cell proliferation by ING5 and by phospho-site mutants. Instead we observed that the knockdown of ING5 resulted in a strong reduction of proliferation in different tumor cell lines, irrespective of the p53 status. This inhibition of proliferation was at least in part due to the induction of apoptosis. In summary we identified a phosphorylation site at threonine 152 of ING5 that is cell cycle regulated and we observed that ING5 is necessary for tumor cell proliferation, without any apparent dependency on the tumor suppressor p53. PMID:25860957

  15. Death Receptor-Induced Apoptosis Signalling Regulation by Ezrin Is Cell Type Dependent and Occurs in a DISC-Independent Manner in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iessi, Elisabetta; Zischler, Luciana; Etringer, Aurélie; Bergeret, Marion; Morlé, Aymeric; Jacquemin, Guillaume; Morizot, Alexandre; Shirley, Sarah; Lalaoui, Najoua; Elifio-Esposito, Selene L.; Fais, Stefano; Garrido, Carmen; Solary, Eric; Micheau, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Ezrin belongs to the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein family and has been demonstrated to regulate early steps of Fas receptor signalling in lymphoid cells, but its contribution to TRAIL-induced cell death regulation in adherent cancer cells remains unknown. In this study we report that regulation of FasL and TRAIL-induced cell death by ezrin is cell type dependant. Ezrin is a positive regulator of apoptosis in T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat, but a negative regulator in colon cancer cells. Using ezrin phosphorylation or actin-binding mutants, we provide evidence that negative regulation of death receptor-induced apoptosis by ezrin occurs in a cytoskeleton- and DISC-independent manner, in colon cancer cells. Remarkably, inhibition of apoptosis induced by these ligands was found to be tightly associated with regulation of ezrin phosphorylation on serine 66, the tumor suppressor gene WWOX and activation of PKA. Deficiency in WWOX expression in the liver cancer SK-HEP1 or the pancreatic Mia PaCa-2 cell lines as well as WWOX silencing or modulation of PKA activation by pharmacological regulators, in the colon cancer cell line SW480, abrogated regulation of TRAIL signalling by ezrin. Altogether our results show that death receptor pro-apoptotic signalling regulation by ezrin can occur downstream of the DISC in colon cancer cells. PMID:26010871

  16. Autophagy induction is a Tor- and Tp53-independent cell survival response in a zebrafish model of disrupted ribosome biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boglev, Yeliz; Badrock, Andrew P; Trotter, Andrew J; Du, Qian; Richardson, Elsbeth J; Parslow, Adam C; Markmiller, Sebastian J; Hall, Nathan E; de Jong-Curtain, Tanya A; Ng, Annie Y; Verkade, Heather; Ober, Elke A; Field, Holly A; Shin, Donghun; Shin, Chong H; Hannan, Katherine M; Hannan, Ross D; Pearson, Richard B; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Ess, Kevin C; Lieschke, Graham J; Stainier, Didier Y R; Heath, Joan K

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis underpins cell growth and division. Disruptions in ribosome biogenesis and translation initiation are deleterious to development and underlie a spectrum of diseases known collectively as ribosomopathies. Here, we describe a novel zebrafish mutant, titania (tti(s450)), which harbours a recessive lethal mutation in pwp2h, a gene encoding a protein component of the small subunit processome. The biochemical impacts of this lesion are decreased production of mature 18S rRNA molecules, activation of Tp53, and impaired ribosome biogenesis. In tti(s450), the growth of the endodermal organs, eyes, brain, and craniofacial structures is severely arrested and autophagy is up-regulated, allowing intestinal epithelial cells to evade cell death. Inhibiting autophagy in tti(s450) larvae markedly reduces their lifespan. Somewhat surprisingly, autophagy induction in tti(s450) larvae is independent of the state of the Tor pathway and proceeds unabated in Tp53-mutant larvae. These data demonstrate that autophagy is a survival mechanism invoked in response to ribosomal stress. This response may be of relevance to therapeutic strategies aimed at killing cancer cells by targeting ribosome biogenesis. In certain contexts, these treatments may promote autophagy and contribute to cancer cells evading cell death. PMID:23408911

  17. Replication of ONYX-015, a Potential Anticancer Adenovirus, Is Independent of p53 Status in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rothmann, Thomas; Hengstermann, Arnd; Whitaker, Noel J.; Scheffner, Martin; zur Hausen, Harald

    1998-01-01

    The 55-kDa E1B protein of adenovirus, which binds to and inactivates the tumor suppressor protein p53, is not expressed in the adenoviral mutant termed ONYX-015 (i.e., dl1520). It was reported that the mutant virus due to a deletion in E1B is able to replicate only in cells deficient for wild-type p53. Accordingly, dl1520 is currently being evaluated as a potential tool in the therapy of p53 deficient cancers. In contrast, we report here that dl1520 replicates independently of the p53 status in various tumor cell lines (U87, RKO, A549, H1299, and U373). In addition, the inhibition of p53-mediated transcriptional activation in wild-type p53 containing U2OS cells, by overexpression of a transdominant negative p53 mutant, did not render the cells permissive for dl1520 replication. Finally, we show that, depending on the multiplicity of infection, the deleted virus is able to replicate in and to kill primary human cells. Thus, the molecular basis for the growth differences of dl1520 within different cell types remains to be determined. PMID:9811680

  18. Caveolin- and clathrin-independent entry of BKPyV into primary human proximal tubule epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linbo; Marciano, Anthony T; Rivet, Courtney R; Imperiale, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is a human pathogen that causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis in transplant patients. Gangliosides and caveolin proteins have previously been reported to be required for BKPyV infection in animal cell models. Recent studies from our lab and others, however, have indicated that the identity of the cells used for infection studies can greatly influence the behavior of the virus. We therefore wished to re-examine BKPyV entry in a physiologically relevant primary cell culture model, human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. Using siRNA knockdowns, we interfered with expression of UDP-glucose ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG), and the endocytic vesicle coat proteins caveolin 1, caveolin 2, and clathrin heavy chain. The results demonstrate that while BKPyV does require gangliosides for efficient infection, it can enter its natural host cells via a caveolin- and clathrin-independent pathway. The results emphasize the importance of studying viruses in a relevant cell culture model. PMID:26901486

  19. Imatinib and Nilotinib increase glioblastoma cell invasion via Abl-independent stimulation of p130Cas and FAK signalling.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Antonina; Evans, Ian M; Li, Ningning; Sidlauskas, Kastytis; Paliashvili, Ketevan; Lockwood, Nicola; Barrett, Angela; Brandner, Sebastian; Zachary, Ian C; Frankel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor to be approved for clinical use, and remains first-line therapy for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+)-positive chronic myelogenous leukaemia. We show that treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumour cells with imatinib and the closely-related drug, nilotinib, strikingly increases tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the downstream adaptor protein paxillin (PXN), resulting in enhanced cell migration and invasion. Imatinib and nilotinib-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was dependent on expression of p130Cas and FAK activity and was independent of known imatinib targets including Abl, platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) and the collagen receptor DDR1. Imatinib and nilotinib treatment increased two dimensional cell migration and three dimensional radial spheroid invasion in collagen. In addition, silencing of p130Cas and inhibition of FAK activity both strongly reduced imatinib and nilotinib stimulated invasion. Importantly, imatinib and nilotinib increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, FAK, PXN and radial spheroid invasion in stem cell lines isolated from human glioma biopsies. These findings identify a novel mechanism of action in GBM cells for two well established front line therapies for cancer resulting in enhanced tumour cell motility. PMID:27293031

  20. Imatinib and Nilotinib increase glioblastoma cell invasion via Abl-independent stimulation of p130Cas and FAK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Frolov, Antonina; Evans, Ian M.; Li, Ningning; Sidlauskas, Kastytis; Paliashvili, Ketevan; Lockwood, Nicola; Barrett, Angela; Brandner, Sebastian; Zachary, Ian C.; Frankel, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib was the first targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor to be approved for clinical use, and remains first-line therapy for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph+)-positive chronic myelogenous leukaemia. We show that treatment of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumour cells with imatinib and the closely-related drug, nilotinib, strikingly increases tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the downstream adaptor protein paxillin (PXN), resulting in enhanced cell migration and invasion. Imatinib and nilotinib-induced tyrosine phosphorylation was dependent on expression of p130Cas and FAK activity and was independent of known imatinib targets including Abl, platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ) and the collagen receptor DDR1. Imatinib and nilotinib treatment increased two dimensional cell migration and three dimensional radial spheroid invasion in collagen. In addition, silencing of p130Cas and inhibition of FAK activity both strongly reduced imatinib and nilotinib stimulated invasion. Importantly, imatinib and nilotinib increased tyrosine phosphorylation of p130Cas, FAK, PXN and radial spheroid invasion in stem cell lines isolated from human glioma biopsies. These findings identify a novel mechanism of action in GBM cells for two well established front line therapies for cancer resulting in enhanced tumour cell motility. PMID:27293031

  1. Bcl-2 protein expression is the strongest independent prognostic factor of survival in primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Grange, Florent; Petrella, Tony; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Joly, Pascal; D'Incan, Michel; Delaunay, Michele; Machet, Laurent; Avril, Marie-Francoise; Dalac, Sophie; Bernard, Philippe; Carlotti, Agnes; Esteve, Eric; Vergier, Beatrice; Dechelotte, Pierre; Cassagnau, Elisabeth; Courville, Philippe; Saiag, Philippe; Laroche, Liliane; Bagot, Martine; Wechsler, Janine

    2004-05-15

    Bcl-2 protein expression has been associated with poor prognosis in patients with noncutaneous diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. In primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, the location on the leg, the round-cell morphology defined as the predominance of centroblasts and immunoblasts over large centrocytes, and multiple skin lesions were identified as adverse prognostic factors. The prognostic value of bcl-2 protein expression has not been studied in large series of patients. We evaluated 80 primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas collected by the French Study Group on Cutaneous Lymphomas. The prognostic value of age, sex, number of lesions, cutaneous extent, location, serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, B symptoms, morphology, and bcl-2 protein expression was studied. The overall 5-year specific survival rate was 65%. In univariate analysis, advanced age, multiple skin lesions (n = 48), location on the leg (n = 25), round-cell morphology (n = 32), and bcl-2 expression (n = 39) were significantly related to death from lymphoma. In multivariate analysis, bcl-2 expression (P =.0003), multiple skin lesions (P =.004), and age remained independent prognostic factors. The 5-year specific survival rates in bcl-2-positive and bcl-2-negative patients were 41% and 89%, respectively (P <.0001). A new prognostic classification of primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma should be based primarily on bcl-2 protein expression rather than the location of skin lesions. PMID:14726400

  2. Cell wall integrity controls root elongation via a general 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-dependent, ethylene-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Dat L; Edmond, Clare; Harrington, Jennifer L; Nühse, Thomas S

    2011-06-01

    Cell expansion in plants requires cell wall biosynthesis and rearrangement. During periods of rapid elongation, such as during the growth of etiolated hypocotyls and primary root tips, cells respond dramatically to perturbation of either of these processes. There is growing evidence that this response is initiated by a cell wall integrity-sensing mechanism and dedicated signaling pathway rather than being an inevitable consequence of lost structural integrity. However, the existence of such a pathway in root tissue and its function in a broader developmental context have remained largely unknown. Here, we show that various types of cell wall stress rapidly reduce primary root elongation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This response depended on the biosynthesis of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC). In agreement with the established ethylene signaling pathway in roots, auxin signaling and superoxide production are required downstream of ACC to reduce elongation. However, this cell wall stress response unexpectedly does not depend on the perception of ethylene. We show that the short-term effect of ACC on roots is partially independent of its conversion to ethylene or ethylene signaling and that this ACC-dependent pathway is also responsible for the rapid reduction of root elongation in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns. This acute response to internal and external stress thus represents a novel, noncanonical signaling function of ACC. PMID:21508182

  3. A forward genetic screen reveals novel independent regulators of ULBP1, an activating ligand for natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gowen, Benjamin G; Chim, Bryan; Marceau, Caleb D; Greene, Trever T; Burr, Patrick; Gonzalez, Jeanmarie R; Hesser, Charles R; Dietzen, Peter A; Russell, Teal; Iannello, Alexandre; Coscoy, Laurent; Sentman, Charles L; Carette, Jan E; Muljo, Stefan A; Raulet, David H

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and elimination of tumor cells by the immune system is crucial for limiting tumor growth. Natural killer (NK) cells become activated when the receptor NKG2D is engaged by ligands that are frequently upregulated in primary tumors and on cancer cell lines. However, the molecular mechanisms driving NKG2D ligand expression on tumor cells are not well defined. Using a forward genetic screen in a tumor-derived human cell line, we identified several novel factors supporting expression of the NKG2D ligand ULBP1. Our results show stepwise contributions of independent pathways working at multiple stages of ULBP1 biogenesis. Deeper investigation of selected hits from the screen showed that the transcription factor ATF4 drives ULBP1 gene expression in cancer cell lines, while the RNA-binding protein RBM4 supports ULBP1 expression by suppressing a novel alternatively spliced isoform of ULBP1 mRNA. These findings offer insight into the stress pathways that alert the immune system to danger. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08474.001 PMID:26565589

  4. The EBF transcription factor Collier directly promotes Drosophila blood cell progenitor maintenance independently of the niche

    PubMed Central

    Benmimoun, Billel; Polesello, Cédric; Haenlin, Marc; Waltzer, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of stem or progenitor cell fate relies on intrinsic factors as well as local cues from the cellular microenvironment and systemic signaling. In the lymph gland, an hematopoietic organ in Drosophila larva, a group of cells called the Posterior Signaling Centre (PSC), whose specification depends on the EBF transcription factor Collier (Col) and the HOX factor Antennapedia (Antp), has been proposed to form a niche required to maintain the pool of hematopoietic progenitors (prohemocytes). In contrast with this model, we show here that genetic ablation of the PSC does not cause an increase in blood cell differentiation or a loss of blood cell progenitors. Furthermore, although both col and Antp mutant larvae are devoid of PSC, the massive prohemocyte differentiation observed in col mutant is not phenocopied in Antp mutant. Interestingly, beside its expression in the PSC, Col is also expressed at low levels in prohemocytes and we show that this expression persists in PSC-ablated and Antp mutant larvae. Moreover, targeted knockdown and rescue experiments indicate that Col expression is required in the prohemocytes to prevent their differentiation. Together, our findings show that the PSC is dispensable for blood cell progenitor maintenance and reveal the key role of the conserved transcription factor Col as an intrinsic regulator of hematopoietic progenitor fate. PMID:26150488

  5. The structure of tissue on cell culture-extracted thyroglobulin is independent of its iodine content.

    PubMed

    Delain, E; Aouani, A; Vignal, A; Couture-Tosi, E; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1987-02-01

    The major protein synthesized in vitro by the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS 6H is the prothyroid hormone thyroglobulin. Purified from serum-free cell culture media using sucrose gradient centrifugation, the thyroglobulin dimer was analysed for iodine content and observed by electron microscopy. In their usual medium, the OVNIS 6H cells produce a very poorly iodinated thyroglobulin containing 0.05 I atom per molecule. When cultured with methimazole or propylthiouracil, two inhibitors of iodide organification, less than 0.007 I atom/molecules was found. These molecules purified from cell cultures were compared to those purified from ovine thyroid tissue containing 26 I atoms/mol. Despite large differences in iodine content, the three preparations all consist of 19 S thyroglobulin dimers with the classical ovoidal shape. The variability in size measurements remains in a 2% range for all thyroglobulin types. Consequently, no real significant variation can be found between the highly iodinated thyroglobulin isolated from tissue, and the poorly or non-iodinated thyroglobulins isolated from cells cultured with or without methimazole or propylthiouracil. PMID:3556752

  6. Methods for preclinical assessment of antipruritic agents and itch mechanisms independent of mast-cell histamine.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Itch is a sensation that provokes a desire to scratch. Mast-cell histamine was thought to be a key itch mediator. However, histamine and mast-cell degranulation were reported not to elicit scratching in animals. It was difficult to investigate the pathophysiology of itching and to evaluate the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents in the early 1990 s. We showed that hind-paw scratching and biting were elicited by stimulation with pruritogenic agents in mice. Those results demonstrated for the first time that cutaneous itching could be evaluated behaviorally in animals. We established various animal models of pathological itch of the skin (dry skin, mosquito allergy, surfactant-induced pruritus, and herpes zoster) and mucus membranes (pollen allergy). Mast-cell histamine did not play a key role in itching in any animal model examined except for the pollen allergy model. Histamine is not an exclusive itch mediator of mast cells; tryptase and leukotriene B4 released from mast cells also act as itch mediators. Epidermal keratinocytes release several itch mediators, such as leukotriene B4, sphingosylphosphorylcholine, thromboxane A2, nociceptin, nitric oxide, and histamine, which may play important roles in pathological itching. Appropriate animal models of pathological itching are needed for pharmacological evaluation of the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents. PMID:25947907

  7. Interleukin-32 is progressively expressed in Mycosis Fungoides independent of helper T-cell 2 and helper T-cell 9 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Ohmatsu, Hanako; Humme, Daniel; Gulati, Nicholas; Gonzalez, Juana; Möbs, Markus; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Cardinale, Irma; Mitsui, Hiroshi; Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Sterry, Wolfram; Krueger, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides (MF), the most common type of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) is characterized by a helper T cell 2 (Th2)-skewing with a mature CD4+ memory T-cell phenotype. Using skin samples from MF patients (n=21), healthy volunteers (n=17), individuals with atopic dermatitis (n=17) and psoriasis (n=9), we found interleukin (IL)-32 mRNA expression significantly higher in MF samples than in samples from benign inflammatory skin diseases, and its expression increases with disease progression. By immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, we confirmed IL-32 protein expression in many CD3+CD4+ T cells and some epidermotropic T cells in MF lesions. MyLa cells (a MF cell line) express IL-32, which in turn could promote cellular proliferation and viability in a dose-dependent fashion. IL-32-treated MyLa and CTCL HH cells up-regulated cell proliferation and survival genes. Of the major “polarizing” T-cell cytokines, only IFNγ mRNA increases with MF progression and positively correlates with IL-32 mRNA expression. Th2 cytokines do not positively correlate with IL-32 mRNA expression or MF progression. Furthermore, by flow cytometry, IL-32 production by circulating activated T-cells in healthy individuals was found in both IFNγ+ and IFNγ− cells but not in IL-4+ or IL-13+ cells. In conclusion, we have identified IL-32+ cells as the likely tumor cells in MF, and demonstrated that IL-32 mRNA expression increases with MF progression and is significantly higher than those in other skin diseases, and that some IL-32+ T cells are independent from the defined Th subsets. Thus IL-32 may play a unique role in MF progression as an autocrine cytokine. PMID:24938282

  8. Influenza Virus Induces Cholesterol-Enriched Endocytic Recycling Compartments for Budozone Formation via Cell Cycle-Independent Centrosome Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yoshimi; Osari, Suguru; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2015-01-01

    Influenza virus particles are assembled at the plasma membrane in concert with incorporation of the virus genome, but the details of its spatio-temporal regulation are not understood. Here we showed that influenza virus infection induces the assembly of pericentrosomal endocytic recycling compartment (ERC) through the activation of Rab11a GTPase and cell cycle-independent maturation of centrosome by YB-1, a multifunctional protein that is involved in mitotic division, RNA metabolism and tumorigenesis. YB-1 is recruited to the centrosome in infected cells and is required for anchoring microtubules to the centrosome. We also found that viral infection accumulates cholesterol in ERC and is dependent on YB-1. Depletion of YB-1 shows reduced cholesterol-enriched ERC and prevented budozone formation at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that cholesterol in recycling endosomes, which are emanated from ERC, may trigger the virus assembly concomitantly with the packaging of the virus genome. We propose that the virus genome is transported to the plasma membrane by cholesterol-enriched recycling endosomes through cell cycle-independent activation of the centrosome by YB-1. PMID:26575487

  9. TLR-Mediated Innate Production of IFN-γ by CD8+ T Cells Is Independent of Glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Fiamma; Guislain, Aurelie; Cansever, Dilay; Wolkers, Monika C

    2016-05-01

    CD8(+) T cells can respond to unrelated infections in an Ag-independent manner. This rapid innate-like immune response allows Ag-experienced T cells to alert other immune cell types to pathogenic intruders. In this study, we show that murine CD8(+) T cells can sense TLR2 and TLR7 ligands, resulting in rapid production of IFN-γ but not of TNF-α and IL-2. Importantly, Ag-experienced T cells activated by TLR ligands produce sufficient IFN-γ to augment the activation of macrophages. In contrast to Ag-specific reactivation, TLR-dependent production of IFN-γ by CD8(+) T cells relies exclusively on newly synthesized transcripts without inducing mRNA stability. Furthermore, transcription of IFN-γ upon TLR triggering depends on the activation of PI3K and serine-threonine kinase Akt, and protein synthesis relies on the activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin. We next investigated which energy source drives the TLR-induced production of IFN-γ. Although Ag-specific cytokine production requires a glycolytic switch for optimal cytokine release, glucose availability does not alter the rate of IFN-γ production upon TLR-mediated activation. Rather, mitochondrial respiration provides sufficient energy for TLR-induced IFN-γ production. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing that TLR-mediated bystander activation elicits a helper phenotype of CD8(+) T cells. It induces a short boost of IFN-γ production that leads to a significant but limited activation of Ag-experienced CD8(+) T cells. This activation suffices to prime macrophages but keeps T cell responses limited to unrelated infections. PMID:27016606

  10. EPO-independent functional EPO receptor in breast cancer enhances estrogen receptor activity and promotes cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Reinbothe, Susann; Larsson, Anna-Maria; Vaapil, Marica; Wigerup, Caroline; Sun, Jianmin; Jögi, Annika; Neumann, Drorit; Rönnstrand, Lars; Påhlman, Sven

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • New anti-human EPOR antibody confirms full-length EPOR expression in breast cancer cells. • Proliferation of breast cancer cells is not affected by rhEPO treatment in vitro. • EPOR knockdown impairs proliferation of ERa positive breast cancer cells. • EPOR knockdown reduces AKT phosphorylation and ERa activity. - Abstract: The main function of Erythropoietin (EPO) and its receptor (EPOR) is the stimulation of erythropoiesis. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is therefore used to treat anemia in cancer patients. However, clinical trials have indicated that rhEPO treatment might promote tumor progression and has a negative effect on patient survival. In addition, EPOR expression has been detected in several cancer forms. Using a newly produced anti-EPOR antibody that reliably detects the full-length isoform of the EPOR we show that breast cancer tissue and cells express the EPOR protein. rhEPO stimulation of cultured EPOR expressing breast cancer cells did not result in increased proliferation, overt activation of EPOR (receptor phosphorylation) or a consistent activation of canonical EPOR signaling pathway mediators such as JAK2, STAT3, STAT5, or AKT. However, EPOR knockdown experiments suggested functional EPO receptors in estrogen receptor positive (ERα{sup +}) breast cancer cells, as reduced EPOR expression resulted in decreased proliferation. This effect on proliferation was not seen in ERα negative cells. EPOR knockdown decreased ERα activity further supports a mechanism by which EPOR affects proliferation via ERα-mediated mechanisms. We show that EPOR protein is expressed in breast cancer cells, where it appears to promote proliferation by an EPO-independent mechanism in ERα expressing breast cancer cells.

  11. HDAC inhibitor treatment of hepatoma cells induces both TRAIL-independent apoptosis and restoration of sensitivity to TRAIL.

    PubMed

    Pathil, Anita; Armeanu, Sorin; Venturelli, Sascha; Mascagni, Paolo; Weiss, Thomas S; Gregor, Michael; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) displays a striking resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs or innovative tumor cell apoptosis-inducing agents such as tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Recently, we found 2 histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDAC-I), valproic acid and ITF2357, exhibiting inherent therapeutic activity against HCC. In TRAIL-sensitive cancer cells, the mechanism of HDAC-I-induced cell death has been identified to be TRAIL-dependent by inducing apoptosis in an autocrine fashion. In contrast, in HCC-derived cells, a prototype of TRAIL-resistant tumor cells, we found a HDAC-I-mediated apoptosis that works independently of TRAIL and upregulation of death receptors or their cognate ligands. Interestingly, TRAIL resistance could be overcome by a combinatorial application of HDAC-I and TRAIL, increasing the fraction of apoptotic cells two- to threefold compared with HDAC-I treatment alone, whereas any premature HDAC-I withdrawal rapidly restored TRAIL resistance. Furthermore, a tumor cell-specific downregulation of the FLICE inhibitory protein (FLIP) was observed, constituting a new mechanism of TRAIL sensitivity restoration by HDAC-I. In contrast, FLIP levels in primary human hepatocytes (PHH) from different donors were upregulated by HDAC-I. Importantly, combination HDAC-I/TRAIL treatment did not induce any cytotoxicity in nonmalignant PHH. In conclusion, HDAC-I compounds, exhibiting a favorable in vivo profile and inherent activity against HCC cells, are able to selectively overcome the resistance of HCC cells toward TRAIL. Specific upregulation of intracellular FLIP protein levels in nonmalignant hepatocytes could enhance the therapeutic window for clinical applications of TRAIL, opening up a highly specific new treatment option for advanced HCC. PMID:16583461

  12. Independence of buoyant cell density and growth rate in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Kubitchek, H.E.; Baldwin, W.W.; Schroeter, S.J.; Graetzer, R.

    1984-04-01

    The relationship between growth rate and buoyant density was determined for cells from exponential-phase cultures of Escherichia coli B/r NC32 by equilibrium centrifugation in Percoll gradients at growth rates ranging from 0.15 to 2.3 doublings per h. The mean buoyant density did not change significantly with growth rate in any of three sets of experiments in which different gradient conditions were used. In addition, when cultures were allowed to enter the stationary phase of growth, mean cell volumes and buoyant densities usually remained unchanged for extended periods. These and earlier results support the existence of a highly regulated, discrete state of buoyant density during steady-state growth of E. coli and other cells that divide by equatorial fission. 11 references, 3 figures.

  13. Fate tracing reveals hepatic stellate cells as dominant contributors to liver fibrosis independent of its aetiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Hsu, Christine C.; Troeger, Juliane S.; Huebener, Peter; Mu, Xueru; Dapito, Dianne H.; Pradere, Jean-Philippe; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2013-11-01

    Although organ fibrosis causes significant morbidity and mortality in chronic diseases, the lack of detailed knowledge about specific cellular contributors mediating fibrogenesis hampers the design of effective antifibrotic therapies. Different cellular sources, including tissue-resident and bone marrow-derived fibroblasts, pericytes and epithelial cells, have been suggested to give rise to myofibroblasts, but their relative contributions remain controversial, with profound differences between organs and different diseases. Here we employ a novel Cre-transgenic mouse that marks 99% of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), a liver-specific pericyte population, to demonstrate that HSCs give rise to 82-96% of myofibroblasts in models of toxic, cholestatic and fatty liver disease. Moreover, we exclude that HSCs function as facultative epithelial progenitor cells in the injured liver. On the basis these findings, HSCs should be considered the primary cellular target for antifibrotic therapies across all types of liver disease.

  14. Minocycline protects SH-SY5Y cells from 6-hydroxydopamine by inhibiting both caspase-dependent and -independent programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Lantto, Tiina A; Puttonen, Katja A; Tuominen, Raimo K; Raasmaja, Atso; Männistö, Pekka T

    2012-03-01

    Minocycline, a tetracyclic antibiotic, exerts both antiinflammation by acting on microglia and a direct protection on neurons by inhibiting the apoptotic machinery at various levels. However, we are not aware of any study investigating the effects of minocycline on caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. This study investigated these alternative pathways in SH-SY5Y cells, a human dopaminergic cell line, challenged with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Minocycline exhibited neuroprotection and inhibition of the toxin-induced caspase-3-like activity, DNA fragmentation, and chromatin condensation, hallmarks of apoptosis. Moreover, we revealed that 6-OHDA also activated caspase-independent PCDs (such as paraptosis), which required de novo protein synthesis. Additionally, by separately monitoring caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways, we showed that inhibition of apoptosis only partially explained the protective effect of minocycline. Moreover, we observed that minocycline reduced the protein content of cells but, unexpectedly, increased the protein synthesis. These findings suggest that minocycline may actually increase protein degradation, so it may also accelerate the clearance of aberrant proteins. In conclusion, we report for the first time evidence indicating that minocycline may inhibit PCD pathways that are additional to conventional apoptosis. PMID:22108958

  15. Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of murine endothelioma cells with targeted inactivation of fibrinolytic genes.

    PubMed

    Lijnen, H R; Wagner, E F; Collen, D

    1997-02-01

    Plasminogen-dependent and -independent proteolytic activity of marine endothelioma (End) cells that were derived from mice with targeted inactivation of the tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA-/-), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA-/-) or plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1-/-) genes was studied with the use of fibrin and extracellular matrix degradation assays. In a buffer milieu, the activation rate of plasminogen (final concentration 0.25 microM) with wild-type and t-PA-/- End cells (3 x 10(4) to 4 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was about 4-fold reduced with u-PA-/- End cells and 3-fold enhanced with PAI-1-/- End cells. Plasminogen activation was markedly reduced by addition of amiloride or of anti-murine u-PA antibodies but not by addition of anti-murine t-PA antibodies, and it was not stimulated by addition of fibrin. Lysis of 125I-fibrin labeled matrix in the presence of plasminogen was comparable with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (50% lysis in 3 h with 0.7 to 1.5 x 10(6) cells/ml), but was significantly reduced with u-PA-/- End cells (50% lysis in 20 h with 0.87 x 10(6) cells/ml). Lysis of 3H-proline labeled extracellular matrix in the presence of plasminogen with wild-type, t-PA-/- and PAI-1-/- End cells (20% lysis in 48 h with 3 to 5 x 10(6) cells/ml) was comparable, but it was virtually abolished with u-PA-/- End cells. In the absence of plasminogen, lysis of both the fibrin and the extracellular matrix by all four cell types was drastically reduced and was virtually abolished by addition of phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride or 1,10 phenanthroline. These data indicate that the proteolytic activity of the transformed murine endothelioma cells, measured in plasminogen activation or matrix degradation assays, is essentially u-PA-related and largely plasminogen-dependent. PMID:9157597

  16. TNF-α Induces Caspase-1 Activation Independently of Simultaneously Induced NLRP3 in 3T3-L1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Furuoka, Mana; Ozaki, Kei-Ichi; Sadatomi, Daichi; Mamiya, Sayaka; Yonezawa, Tomo; Tanimura, Susumu; Takeda, Kohsuke

    2016-12-01

    The intracellular cysteine protease caspase-1 is critically involved in obesity-induced inflammation in adipose tissue. A substantial body of evidence from immune cells, such as macrophages, has shown that caspase-1 activation depends largely on a protein complex, called the NLRP3 inflammasome, which consists of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family protein NLRP3, the adaptor protein ASC, and caspase-1 itself. However, it is not fully understood how caspase-1 activation is regulated within adipocytes upon inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we show that TNF-α-induced activation of caspase-1 is accompanied by robust induction of NLRP3 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes but that caspase-1 activation may not depend on the NLRP3 inflammasome. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with TNF-α induced mRNA expression and activation of caspase-1. Although the basal expression of NLRP3 and ASC was undetectable in unstimulated cells, TNF-α strongly induced NLRP3 expression but did not induce ASC expression. Interestingly, inhibitors of the ERK MAP kinase pathway strongly suppressed NLRP3 expression but did not suppress the expression and activation of caspase-1 induced by TNF-α, suggesting that NLRP3 is dispensable for TNF-α-induced caspase-1 activation. Moreover, we did not detect the basal and TNF-α-induced expression of other NLR proteins (NLRP1a, NLRP1b, and NLRC4), which do not necessarily require ASC for caspase-1 activation. These results suggest that TNF-α induces caspase-1 activation in an inflammasome-independent manner in 3T3-L1 cells and that the ERK-dependent expression of NLRP3 may play a role independently of its canonical role as a component of inflammasomes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2761-2767, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26989816

  17. DDT and its metabolites alter gene expression in human uterine cell lines through estrogen receptor-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Frigo, Daniel E; Burow, Matthew E; Mitchell, Kamron A; Chiang, Tung-Chin; McLachlan, John A

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting organochlorines, such as the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), bind to and activate estrogen receptors (ERs), thereby eliciting estrogen-like effects. Although ERs function predominantly through activation of transcription via estrogen-responsive elements, both ERs, alpha and ss, can interact with various transcription factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1). Additionally, estrogens may regulate early signaling events, suggesting that the biological effects of environmental estrogens may not be mediated through classic ER (alpha and ss) activity alone. We hypothesized that known environmental estrogens, such as DDT and its metabolites, activate AP-1-mediated gene transactivation through both ER-dependent and ER-independent means. Using two Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line variants that we confirmed to be estrogen responsive [Ishikawa(+)] and estrogen unresponsive [Ishikawa(-)], we generated stably transfected AP-1 luciferase cell lines to identify the role of an estrogen-responsive mechanism in AP-1-mediated gene expression by various stimuli. Our results demonstrate that DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) were the most potent activators of AP-1 activity; 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) acetic acid failed to activate. Although stimulated in both Ishikawa(+) and Ishikawa(-) cells by DDT and its congeners, AP-1 activation was more pronounced in the estrogen-unresponsive Ishikawa(-) cells. In addition, DDT, DDD, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) could also stimulate AP-1 activity in the estrogen-unresponsive human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a different promoter context. Thus, our data demonstrate that DDT and its metabolites activate the AP-1 transcription factor independent of ER (alpha or ss) status. PMID:12460804

  18. Trehalose, an mTOR-Independent Inducer of Autophagy, Inhibits Human Cytomegalovirus Infection in Multiple Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Belzile, Jean-Philippe; Sabalza, Maite; Craig, Megan; Clark, Elizabeth; Morello, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the major viral cause of birth defects and a serious problem in immunocompromised individuals and has been associated with atherosclerosis. Previous studies have shown that the induction of autophagy can inhibit the replication of several different types of DNA and RNA viruses. The goal of the work presented here was to determine whether constitutive activation of autophagy would also block replication of HCMV. Most prior studies have used agents that induce autophagy via inhibition of the mTOR pathway. However, since HCMV infection alters the sensitivity of mTOR kinase-containing complexes to inhibitors, we sought an alternative method of inducing autophagy. We chose to use trehalose, a nontoxic naturally occurring disaccharide that is found in plants, insects, microorganisms, and invertebrates but not in mammals and that induces autophagy by an mTOR-independent mechanism. Given the many different cell targets of HCMV, we proceeded to determine whether trehalose would inhibit HCMV infection in human fibroblasts, aortic artery endothelial cells, and neural cells derived from human embryonic stem cells. We found that in all of these cell types, trehalose induces autophagy and inhibits HCMV gene expression and production of cell-free virus. Treatment of HCMV-infected neural cells with trehalose also inhibited production of cell-associated virus and partially blocked the reduction in neurite growth and cytomegaly. These results suggest that activation of autophagy by the natural sugar trehalose or other safe mTOR-independent agents might provide a novel therapeutic approach for treating HCMV disease. IMPORTANCE HCMV infects multiple cell types in vivo, establishes lifelong persistence in the host, and can cause serious health problems for fetuses and immunocompromised individuals. HCMV, like all other persistent pathogens, has to finely tune its interplay with the host cellular machinery to replicate efficiently and evade

  19. Fish oil disrupts MHC class II lateral organization on the B-cell side of the immunological synapse independent of B-T cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Melton, Mark; Harris, Mitchel; Bridges, Lance C; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2013-11-01

    Fish oil-enriched long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids disrupt the molecular organization of T-cell proteins in the immunological synapse. The impact of fish oil derived n-3 fatty acids on antigen-presenting cells, particularly at the animal level, is unknown. We previously demonstrated B-cells isolated from mice fed with fish oil-suppressed naïve CD4(+) T-cell activation. Therefore, here we determined the mechanistic effects of fish oil on murine B-cell major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecular distribution using a combination of total internal reflection fluorescence, Förster resonance energy transfer and confocal imaging. Fish oil had no impact on presynaptic B-cell MHC II clustering. Upon conjugation with transgenic T-cells, fish-oil suppressed MHC II accumulation at the immunological synapse. As a consequence, T-cell protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) recruitment to the synapse was also diminished. The effects were independent of changes in B-T cell adhesion, as measured with microscopy, flow cytometry and static cell adhesion assays with select immune ligands. Given that fish oil can reorganize the membrane by lowering membrane cholesterol levels, we then compared the results with fish oil to cholesterol depletion using methyl-B-cyclodextrin (MβCD). MβCD treatment of B-cells suppressed MHC II and T-cell PKCθ recruitment to the immunological synapse, similar to fish oil. Overall, the results reveal commonality in the mechanism by which fish oil manipulates protein lateral organization of B-cells compared to T-cells. Furthermore, the data establish MHC class II lateral organization on the B-cell side of the immunological synapse as a novel molecular target of fish oil. PMID:23791516

  20. Cloning-independent expression and screening of enzymes using cell-free protein synthesis systems.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong-Chan; Song, Jae-Kwang; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2014-01-01

    We present a strategy for expression and screening of microbial enzymes without involving cloning procedures. Libraries of putative ω-transaminases (ω-TA) and mutated Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) are PCR-amplified from bacterial colonies and directly expressed in an Escherichia coli-based cell-free protein synthesis system. The open nature of cell-free protein synthesis system also allows streamlined analysis of the enzymatic activity of the expressed enzymes, which greatly shortens the time required for enzyme screening. We expect that the proposed strategy will provide a universal platform for bridging the information gap between nucleotide sequence and protein function, in order to accelerate the discovery of novel enzymes. The proposed strategy can also serve as a viable option for the rapid and precise tuning of enzyme molecules, not only for analytical purposes, but also for industrial applications. This is accomplished via large-scale production using microbial cells transformed with variant genes selected from the cell-free expression screening. PMID:24395411

  1. Hydroquinone induces DNA hypomethylation-independent overexpression of retroelements in human leukemia and hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Anastasia; Rota, Federica; Ragni, Enrico; Favero, Chiara; Motta, Valeria; Lazzari, Lorenza; Bollati, Valentina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Dieci, Giorgio

    2016-06-10

    Hydroquinone (HQ) is an important benzene-derived metabolite associated with acute myelogenous leukemia risk. Although altered DNA methylation has been reported in both benzene-exposed human subjects and HQ-exposed cultured cells, the inventory of benzene metabolite effects on the epigenome is only starting to be established. In this study, we used a monocytic leukemia cell line (THP-1) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from cord blood to investigate the effects of HQ treatment on the expression of the three most important families of retrotransposons in the human genome: LINE-1, Alu and Endogenous retroviruses (HERVs), that are normally subjected to tight epigenetic silencing. We found a clear tendency towards increased retrotransposon expression in response to HQ exposure, more pronounced in the case of LINE-1 and HERV. Such a partial loss of silencing, however, was generally not associated with HQ-induced DNA hypomethylation. On the other hand, retroelement derepression was also observed in the same cells in response to the hypomethylating agent decitabine. These observations suggest the existence of different types of epigenetic switches operating at human retroelements, and point to retroelement activation in response to benzene-derived metabolites as a novel factor deserving attention in benzene carcinogenesis studies. PMID:27154225

  2. Myosin light chain kinase regulates cell polarization independently of membrane tension or Rho kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Sunny S.; Diz-Muñoz, Alba; Weiner, Orion D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells polarize to a single front and rear to achieve rapid actin-based motility, but the mechanisms preventing the formation of multiple fronts are unclear. We developed embryonic zebrafish keratocytes as a model system for investigating establishment of a single axis. We observed that, although keratocytes from 2 d postfertilization (dpf) embryos resembled canonical fan-shaped keratocytes, keratocytes from 4 dpf embryos often formed multiple protrusions despite unchanged membrane tension. Using genomic, genetic, and pharmacological approaches, we determined that the multiple-protrusion phenotype was primarily due to increased myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. MLCK activity influences cell polarity by increasing myosin accumulation in lamellipodia, which locally decreases protrusion lifetime, limiting lamellipodial size and allowing for multiple protrusions to coexist within the context of membrane tension limiting protrusion globally. In contrast, Rho kinase (ROCK) regulates myosin accumulation at the cell rear and does not determine protrusion size. These results suggest a novel MLCK-specific mechanism for controlling cell polarity via regulation of myosin activity in protrusions. PMID:25918227

  3. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, Lianne E.; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L.; Minden, Mark D.; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  4. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rotin, Lianne E; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L; Minden, Mark D; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2016-01-19

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  5. Renal Cells Express Different Forms of Vimentin: The Independent Expression Alteration of these Forms is Important in Cell Resistance to Osmotic Stress and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Gerhard A.; Dihazi, Gry H.; Eltoweissy, Marwa; Kruegel, Jenny; Dihazi, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic stress has been shown to regulate cytoskeletal protein expression. It is generally known that vimentin is rapidly degraded during apoptosis by multiple caspases, resulting in diverse vimentin fragments. Despite the existence of the known apoptotic vimentin fragments, we demonstrated in our study the existence of different forms of vimentin VIM I, II, III, and IV with different molecular weights in various renal cell lines. Using a proteomics approach followed by western blot analyses and immunofluorescence staining, we proved the apoptosis-independent existence and differential regulation of different vimentin forms under varying conditions of osmolarity in renal cells. Similar impacts of osmotic stress were also observed on the expression of other cytoskeleton intermediate filament proteins; e.g., cytokeratin. Interestingly, 2D western blot analysis revealed that the forms of vimentin are regulated independently of each other under glucose and NaCl osmotic stress. Renal cells, adapted to high NaCl osmotic stress, express a high level of VIM IV (the form with the highest molecular weight), besides the three other forms, and exhibit higher resistance to apoptotic induction with TNF-α or staurosporin compared to the control. In contrast, renal cells that are adapted to high glucose concentration and express only the lower-molecular-weight forms VIM I and II, were more susceptible to apoptosis. Our data proved the existence of different vimentin forms, which play an important role in cell resistance to osmotic stress and are involved in cell protection against apoptosis. PMID:23874579

  6. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Balmer, Jasmin; Zulliger, Rahel; Roberti, Stefano; Enzmann, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3) both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg). Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC) cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1) was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3. PMID:26151844

  7. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by Mcl-1-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wolfsperger, F; Hogh-Binder, S A; Schittenhelm, J; Psaras, T; Ritter, V; Bornes, L; Huber, S M; Jendrossek, V; Rudner, J

    2016-01-01

    that USP9x can control survival and radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by Mcl-1-dependent and Mcl-1-independent mechanisms. PMID:26775694

  8. The PARP inhibitor PJ-34 sensitizes cells to UVA-induced phototoxicity by a PARP independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Petra; Hegedűs, Csaba; Salazar Ayestarán, Nerea; Juarranz, Ángeles; Kövér, Katalin E; Szabó, Éva; Virág, László

    2016-08-01

    A combination of a photosensitizer with light of matching wavelength is a common treatment modality in various diseases including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and tumors. DNA damage and production of reactive oxygen intermediates may impact pathological cellular functions and viability. Here we set out to investigate the role of the nuclear DNA nick sensor enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in photochemical treatment (PCT)-induced tumor cell killing. We found that silencing PARP-1 or inhibition of its enzymatic activity with Veliparib had no significant effect on the viability of A431 cells exposed to 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and UVA (2.5J/cm(2)) indicating that PARP-1 is not likely to be a key player in either cell survival or cell death of PCT-exposed cells. Interestingly, however, another commonly used PARP inhibitor PJ-34 proved to be a photosensitizer with potency equal to 8-MOP. Irradiation of PJ-34 with UVA caused changes both in the UV absorption and in the 1H NMR spectra of the compound with the latter suggesting UVA-induced formation of tautomeric forms of the compound. Characterization of the photosensitizing effect revealed that PJ-34+UVA triggers overproduction of reactive oxygen species, induces DNA damage, activation of caspase 3 and caspase 8 and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Cell death in this model could not be prevented by antioxidants (ascorbic acid, trolox, glutathione, gallotannin or cell permeable superoxide dismutase or catalase) but could be suppressed by inhibitors of caspase-3 and -8. In conclusion, PJ-34 is a photosensitizer and PJ-34+UVA causes DNA damage and caspase-mediated cell death independently of PARP-1 inhibition. PMID:27427773

  9. A novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide involves cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule protein.

    PubMed

    Liggett, Jason L; Min, Kyung-Won; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Baek, Seung Joon

    2014-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are extensively used over the counter to treat headaches and inflammation as well as clinically to prevent cancer among high-risk groups. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity by NSAIDs plays a role in their anti-tumorigenic properties. NSAIDs also have COX-independent activity which is not fully understood. In this study, we report a novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide (SS), which facilitates a previously uncharacterized cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) protein. EpCAM is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implemented as an over-expressed oncogene in many cancers including colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate. We found EpCAM to be down-regulated by SS in a manner that is independent of COX activity, transcription regulation, de novo protein synthesis, and proteasomal degradation pathway. Our findings clearly demonstrate that SS drives cleavage of the extracellular portion of EpCAM near the N-terminus. This SS driven cleavage is blocked by a deleting amino acids 55-81 as well as simply mutating arginine residues at positions 80 and 81 to alanine of EpCAM. Proteolysis of EpCAM by SS may provide a novel mechanism by which NSAIDs affect anti-tumorigenesis at the post-translational level. PMID:24859349

  10. BET inhibitors induce apoptosis through a MYC independent mechanism and synergise with CDK inhibitors to kill osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Emma K; Taylor, Scott; Gupte, Ankita; Sharp, Phillip P; Walia, Mannu; Walsh, Nicole C; Zannettino, Andrew CW; Chalk, Alistair M; Burns, Christopher J; Walkley, Carl R

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) survival rates have plateaued in part due to a lack of new therapeutic options. Here we demonstrate that bromodomain inhibitors (BETi), JQ1, I-BET151, I-BET762, exert potent anti-tumour activity against primary and established OS cell lines, mediated by inhibition of BRD4. Strikingly, unlike previous observations in long-term established human OS cell lines, the antiproliferative activity of JQ1 in primary OS cells was driven by the induction of apoptosis, not cell cycle arrest. In further contrast, JQ1 activity in OS was mediated independently of MYC downregulation. We identified that JQ1 suppresses the transcription factor FOSL1 by displacement of BRD4 from its locus. Loss of FOSL1 phenocopied the antiproliferative effects of JQ1, identifying FOSL1 suppression as a potential novel therapeutic approach for OS. As a monotherapy JQ1 demonstrated significant anti-tumour activity in vivo in an OS graft model. Further, combinatorial treatment approaches showed that JQ1 increased the sensitivity of OS cells to doxorubicin and induced potent synergistic activity when rationally combined with CDK inhibitors. The greater level of activity achieved with the combination of BETi with CDK inhibitors demonstrates the efficacy of this combination therapy. Taken together, our studies show that BET inhibitors are a promising new therapeutic for OS. PMID:25944566

  11. Celecoxib and LLW-3-6 reduce survival of human glioma cells independently and synergistically with sulfasalazine

    PubMed Central

    Yerokun, Tokunbo; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2016-01-01

    Gliomas are among the most commonly diagnosed central nervous system tumors. Celecoxib has been utilized with success in the treatment of several types of cancer, including gliomas. The present study examined the antiproliferative effects of celecoxib and its benzimidazole-based analog, LLW-3-6, when used as co-treatments with sulfasalazine against human glioma LN18 cells. At 48-hour treatment, the glioma cells maintained 60% viability in the presence of celecoxib or LLW-3-6 at the maximum concentration tested (40 μM). Co-treatment of the glioma cells with a non-lethal dose (50 μM) of sulfasalazine and either celecoxib or LLW-3-6 (administered at different concentrations) resulted in improved inhibition of cell viability. The concentration of the molecules needed to reduce cell growth in the combined treatments was significantly less than that needed when either molecule was administered independently. Based on computational values, LLW-3-6 has physiochemical characteristics that should allow for improved bioavailability in comparison to that of celecoxib. PMID:26637851

  12. Celecoxib and LLW-3-6 Reduce Survival of Human Glioma Cells Independently and Synergistically with Sulfasalazine.

    PubMed

    Yerokun, Tokunbo; Winfield, Leyte L

    2015-12-01

    Gliomas are among the most commonly diagnosed central nervous system tumors. Celecoxib has been utilized with success in the treatment of several types of cancer, including gliomas. The present study examined the antiproliferative effects of celecoxib and its benzimidazole-based analog, LLW-3-6, when used as co-treatment with sulfasalazine against human glioma LN18 cells. At 48-h treatment, the glioma cells maintained 60% viability in the presence of celecoxib or LLW-3-6 at the maximum concentration tested (40 μM). Co-treatment of glioma cells under a non-lethal dose (50 μM) of sulfasalazine and either celecoxib or LLW-3-6 (administered at different concentrations) resulted in improved inhibition of cell viability. The concentration of the molecules required to reduce cell growth in the combined treatment was significantly less than that needed when either molecule was administered independently. Based on computational values, LLW-3-6 has physiochemical characteristics that should allow for improved bioavailability in comparison to that of celecoxib. PMID:26637851

  13. Resistance of C58 mice to primary systemic herpes simplex virus infection: macrophage dependence and T-cell independence.

    PubMed Central

    Schlabach, A J; Martinez, D; Field, A K; Tytell, A A

    1979-01-01

    The relative contribution of thymus-derived lymphocytes (T-cells) and of macrophages to resistance to primary infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was studied in C58 mice. Resistance was dependent on macrophage competence, but was relatively independent of T-lymphocyte competence. Although aging mice became progressively more deficient in functional T-cells, as demonstrated by a decreasing resistance to transplanted line Ib leukemia and by declining responses to T-cell nitogens (concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin), their resistance to HSV-1 increased with increasing age. Moreover, in mice that were made selectively deficient in T-cells by the combination of adult thymectomy and treatment with anti-thymocyte serum, resistance to HSV-1 did not correlate spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. However, selective reduction of macrophages by intraperitoneal injection of silica resulted in enhanced susceptibility to HSV-1. Furthermore, in vitro suppression of HSV-1 plaque formation in mouse embryo fibroblast cells was obtained by cocultivation of infected fibroblast monolayers with peritoneal macrophages, but not with splenic lymphocytes, from adult mice. Macrophages from weanling mice failed to suppress the development of plaques, indicating that the increase in resistance to HSV-1 with age is a result of increased macrophage competence. PMID:232692

  14. Sargaquinoic acid supports the survival of neuronal PC12D cells in a nerve growth factor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Kamei, Yuto

    2004-03-19

    Sargaquinoic acid (designated previously as MC14) was isolated from a marine brown alga Sargassum macrocarpum, and has been found to possess a novel nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent neurite outgrowth promoting activity in PC12D cells. In this study, we explored the neuroprotective effects of MC14 in terms of its survival supporting, antioxidant and neurite-regenerating activities under NGF deficient or deprived conditions. Intriguingly, MC14 did not only promote the NGF-induced survival support on neuronal PC12D cells, but also significantly abated neuronal PC12D cell death even in the absence of NGF. The pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) by wortmannin significantly suppressed the survival supporting activity of MC14, whereas the NGF receptor (tyrosine kinase A or TrkA) inhibitor K252a showed no detectable effect on MC14 activity. These results demonstrate that MC14 supports survival of neuronal PC12D cells in an NGF-independent manner, and that PI3K may be required for the neuroprotective activity of MC14. In addition, we have shown that MC14 markedly enhanced neurite-regeneration and protected PC12D cells from hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative stress. These pharmacological features suggest that MC14 may be a potentially important neuroprotective agent. PMID:15044030

  15. NIK regulates MT1-MMP activity and promotes glioma cell invasion independently of the canonical NF-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Duran, C L; Lee, D W; Jung, J-U; Ravi, S; Pogue, C B; Toussaint, L G; Bayless, K J; Sitcheran, R

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates the noncanonical NF-κB pathway as a key driver of glioma invasiveness and a major factor underlying poor patient prognoses. Here, we show that NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK/MAP3K14), a critical upstream regulator of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, is both necessary and sufficient for cell-intrinsic invasion, as well as invasion induced by the cytokine TWEAK, which is strongly associated with tumor pathogenicity. NIK promotes dramatic alterations in glioma cell morphology that are characterized by extensive membrane branching and elongated pseudopodial protrusions. Correspondingly, NIK increases the phosphorylation, enzymatic activity and pseudopodial localization of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP14), which is associated with enhanced tumor cell invasion of three-dimensional collagen matrices. Moreover, NIK regulates MT1-MMP activity in cells lacking the canonical NF-κB p65 and cRel proteins. Finally, increased expression of NIK is associated with elevated MT1-MMP phosphorylation in orthotopic xenografts and co-expression of NIK and MT1-MMP in human tumors is associated with poor glioma patient survival. These data reveal a novel role of NIK to enhance pseudopodia formation, MT1-MMP enzymatic activity and tumor cell invasion independently of p65. Collectively, our findings underscore the therapeutic potential of approaches targeting NIK in highly invasive tumors. PMID:27270613

  16. NIK regulates MT1-MMP activity and promotes glioma cell invasion independently of the canonical NF-κB pathway.

    PubMed

    Duran, C L; Lee, D W; Jung, J-U; Ravi, S; Pogue, C B; Toussaint, L G; Bayless, K J; Sitcheran, R

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence implicates the noncanonical NF-κB pathway as a key driver of glioma invasiveness and a major factor underlying poor patient prognoses. Here, we show that NF-κB-inducing kinase (NIK/MAP3K14), a critical upstream regulator of the noncanonical NF-κB pathway, is both necessary and sufficient for cell-intrinsic invasion, as well as invasion induced by the cytokine TWEAK, which is strongly associated with tumor pathogenicity. NIK promotes dramatic alterations in glioma cell morphology that are characterized by extensive membrane branching and elongated pseudopodial protrusions. Correspondingly, NIK increases the phosphorylation, enzymatic activity and pseudopodial localization of membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP14), which is associated with enhanced tumor cell invasion of three-dimensional collagen matrices. Moreover, NIK regulates MT1-MMP activity in cells lacking the canonical NF-κB p65 and cRel proteins. Finally, increased expression of NIK is associated with elevated MT1-MMP phosphorylation in orthotopic xenografts and co-expression of NIK and MT1-MMP in human tumors is associated with poor glioma patient survival. These data reveal a novel role of NIK to enhance pseudopodia formation, MT1-MMP enzymatic activity and tumor cell invasion independently of p65. Collectively, our findings underscore the therapeutic potential of approaches targeting NIK in highly invasive tumors. PMID:27270613

  17. Estrogens decrease {gamma}-ray-induced senescence and maintain cell cycle progression in breast cancer cells independently of p53

    SciTech Connect

    Toillon, Robert-Alain . E-mail: robert.toillon@univ-lille1.fr; Magne, Nicolas; Laios, Ioanna; Castadot, Pierre; Kinnaert, Eric; Van Houtte, Paul; Desmedt, Christine B.Sc.; Leclercq, Guy; Lacroix, Marc

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Sequential administration of radiotherapy and endocrine therapy is considered to be a standard adjuvant treatment of breast cancer. Recent clinical reports suggest that radiotherapy could be more efficient in association with endocrine therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the estrogen effects on irradiated breast cancer cells (IR-cells). Methods and Materials: Using functional genomic analysis, we examined the effects of 17-{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}, a natural estrogen) on MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Results: Our results showed that E{sub 2} sustained the growth of IR-cells. Specifically, estrogens prevented cell cycle blockade induced by {gamma}-rays, and no modification of apoptotic rate was detected. In IR-cells we observed the induction of genes involved in premature senescence and cell cycle progression and investigated the effects of E{sub 2} on the p53/p21{sup waf1/cip1}/Rb pathways. We found that E{sub 2} did not affect p53 activation but it decreased cyclin E binding to p21{sup waf1/cip1} and sustained downstream Rb hyperphosphorylation by functional inactivation of p21{sup waf1/cip1}. We suggest that Rb inactivation could decrease senescence and allow cell cycle progression in IR-cells. Conclusion: These results may help to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the maintenance of breast cancer cell growth by E{sub 2} after irradiation-induced damage. They also offer clinicians a rational basis for the sequential administration of ionizing radiation and endocrine therapies.

  18. Claudin-2 Knockout by TALEN-Mediated Gene Targeting in MDCK Cells: Claudin-2 Independently Determines the Leaky Property of Tight Junctions in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Shinsaku; Furuse, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) regulate the movements of substances through the paracellular pathway, and claudins are major determinants of TJ permeability. Claudin-2 forms high conductive cation pores in TJs. The suppression of claudin-2 expression by RNA interference in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) II cells (a low-resistance strain of MDCK cells) was shown to induce a three-fold increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER), which, however, was still lower than in high-resistance strains of MDCK cells. Because RNA interference-mediated knockdown is not complete and only reduces gene function, we considered the possibility that the remaining claudin-2 expression in the knockdown study caused the lower TER in claudin-2 knockdown cells. Therefore, we investigated the effects of claudin-2 knockout in MDCK II cells by establishing claudin-2 knockout clones using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), a recently developed genome editing method for gene knockout. Surprisingly, claudin-2 knockout increased TER by more than 50-fold in MDCK II cells, and TER values in these cells (3000–4000 Ω·cm2) were comparable to those in the high-resistance strains of MDCK cells. Claudin-2 re-expression restored the TER of claudin-2 knockout cells dependent upon claudin-2 protein levels. In addition, we investigated the localization of claudin-1, -2, -3, -4, and -7 at TJs between control MDCK cells and their respective knockout cells using their TALENs. Claudin-2 and -7 were less efficiently localized at TJs between control and their knockout cells. Our results indicate that claudin-2 independently determines the ‘leaky’ property of TJs in MDCK II cells and suggest the importance of knockout analysis in cultured cells. PMID:25781928

  19. Sulfotransferase-independent genotoxicity of illudin S and its acylfulvene derivatives in bacterial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Glatt, Hansruedi; Pietsch, Kathryn E; Sturla, Shana J; Meinl, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Acylfulvenes are a class of antitumor agents derived from illudin S, a sesquiterpenoid toxin isolated from mushrooms of the genus Omphalotus. Although DNA appears to be their major target, no data concerning mutagenicity of acylfulvenes are available in the literature, and limited data have been published on illudin S. Enzyme-mediated biotransformations have been demonstrated to influence the cytotoxicity of acylfulvenes. Illudin S and some acylfulvenes [e.g., (-)-6-hydroxymethylacylfulvene (HMAF)] are allylic alcohols with potential for enhanced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity by means of metabolic sulfation. Therefore, we studied the influence of various heterologously expressed human sulfotransferases (SULTs) on biological activities of illudin S and HMAF in bacterial and mammalian cells. (-)-Acylfulvene (AF) was tested as a congener lacking an allylic hydroxyl group. We found: (1) all three compounds were mutagenic in standard Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98, TA100 and TA104; (2) they induced gene mutations (at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase locus) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in Chinese hamster V79 cells; (3) these effects were practically unaffected when human SULTs were expressed in the target bacteria or mammalian cells (using SCE as the endpoint); (4) illudin S demonstrated 40-600 times higher genotoxic activities than the semisynthetic acylfulvenes studied; it was positive in the SCE test even at a concentration of 0.3 nM; (5) genotoxicity in mammalian cells was observed at substantially lower concentrations of the compounds than required for a positive result in the bacterial test (400 nM with illudin S). We conclude that illudin S, HMAF and AF are potent genotoxicants and human SULTs do not play a significant role in their bioactivation. PMID:23881331

  20. MK3 Modulation Affects BMI1-Dependent and Independent Cell Cycle Check-Points

    PubMed Central

    Dahlmans, Vivian E. H.; Spaapen, Frank; Salvaing, Juliette; Vanhove, Jolien; Geijselaers, Claudia; Bartels, Stefanie J. J.; Partouns, Iris; Neumann, Dietbert; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Wouters, Bradly G.; Voncken, Jan Willem

    2015-01-01

    Although the MK3 gene was originally found deleted in some cancers, it is highly expressed in others. The relevance of MK3 for oncogenesis is currently not clear. We recently reported that MK3 controls ERK activity via a negative feedback mechanism. This prompted us to investigate a potential role for MK3 in cell proliferation. We here show that overexpression of MK3 induces a proliferative arrest in normal diploid human fibroblasts, characterized by enhanced expression of replication stress- and senescence-associated markers. Surprisingly, MK3 depletion evokes similar senescence characteristics in the fibroblast model. We previously identified MK3 as a binding partner of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) proteins. In the current study we show that MK3 overexpression results in reduced cellular EZH2 levels and concomitant loss of epigenetic H3K27me3-marking and PRC1/chromatin-occupation at the CDKN2A/INK4A locus. In agreement with this, the PRC1 oncoprotein BMI1, but not the PCR2 protein EZH2, bypasses MK3-induced senescence in fibroblasts and suppresses P16INK4A expression. In contrast, BMI1 does not rescue the MK3 loss-of-function phenotype, suggesting the involvement of multiple different checkpoints in gain and loss of MK3 function. Notably, MK3 ablation enhances proliferation in two different cancer cells. Finally, the fibroblast model was used to evaluate the effect of potential tumorigenic MK3 driver-mutations on cell proliferation and M/SAPK signaling imbalance. Taken together, our findings support a role for MK3 in control of proliferation and replicative life-span, in part through concerted action with BMI1, and suggest that the effect of MK3 modulation or mutation on M/SAPK signaling and, ultimately, proliferation, is cell context-dependent. PMID:25853770

  1. Cell death-independent functions of granzymes: hit viruses where it hurts.

    PubMed

    van Domselaar, Robert; Bovenschen, Niels

    2011-09-01

    Granule exocytosis by cytotoxic lymphocytes is the key mechanism of our immune response to eliminate virus-infected cells. These lytic granules contain the pore-forming protein perforin and a set of five serine proteases called granzymes (GrA, GrB, GrH, GrK, GrM) that display distinct substrate specificities. Granzymes have mostly been studied for their ability to induce cell death. However, viruses have evolved many inhibitors to effectively block apoptosis. Evidence is emerging that granzymes also use noncytotoxic strategies to inhibit viral replication and potential viral reactivation from latency. Granzymes directly cleave viral or host cell proteins that are required in the viral life cycle. Furthermore, granzymes induce a pro-inflammatory cytokine response to create an antiviral environment. In this review, we summarize and discuss these novel strategies by which the immune system counteracts viral infections, and we will address the potential therapeutic applications that could emerge from this intriguing mechanism. PMID:21714121

  2. Steam Methane Reformation Testing for Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mwara, Kamwana N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, NASA has been looking into utilizing landers that can be propelled by LOX-CH (sub 4), to be used for long duration missions. Using landers that utilize such propellants, also provides the opportunity to use solid oxide fuel cells as a power option, especially since they are able to process methane into a reactant through fuel reformation. One type of reformation, called steam methane reformation, is a process to reform methane into a hydrogen-rich product by reacting methane and steam (fuel cell exhaust) over a catalyst. A steam methane reformation system could potentially use the fuel cell's own exhaust to create a reactant stream that is hydrogen-rich, and requires less internal reforming of the incoming methane. Also, steam reformation may hold some advantages over other types of reforming, such as partial oxidation (PROX) reformation. Steam reformation does not require oxygen, while up to 25 percent can be lost in PROX reformation due to unusable CO (sub 2) reformation. NASA's Johnson Space Center has conducted various phases of steam methane reformation testing, as a viable solution for in-space reformation. This has included using two different types of catalysts, developing a custom reformer, and optimizing the test system to find the optimal performance parameters and operating conditions.

  3. Conophylline protects cells in cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases by inducing mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sasazawa, Yukiko; Sato, Natsumi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Simizu, Siro

    2015-03-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular response that leads to the bulk, nonspecific degradation of cytosolic components, including organelles. In recent years, it has been recognized that autophagy is essential for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington disease (HD). Here, we show that conophylline (CNP), a vinca alkaloid, induces autophagy in an mammalian target of rapamycin-independent manner. Using a cellular model of PD, CNP suppressed protein aggregation and protected cells from cell death caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, a neurotoxin, by inducing autophagy. Moreover, in the HD model, CNP also eliminated mutant huntingtin aggregates. Our findings demonstrate the possible use of CNP as a therapeutic drug for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD and HD. PMID:25596530

  4. Conophylline Protects Cells in Cellular Models of Neurodegenerative Diseases by Inducing Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR)-independent Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Sasazawa, Yukiko; Sato, Natsumi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Simizu, Siro

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular response that leads to the bulk, nonspecific degradation of cytosolic components, including organelles. In recent years, it has been recognized that autophagy is essential for prevention of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson disease (PD) and Huntington disease (HD). Here, we show that conophylline (CNP), a vinca alkaloid, induces autophagy in an mammalian target of rapamycin-independent manner. Using a cellular model of PD, CNP suppressed protein aggregation and protected cells from cell death caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, a neurotoxin, by inducing autophagy. Moreover, in the HD model, CNP also eliminated mutant huntingtin aggregates. Our findings demonstrate the possible use of CNP as a therapeutic drug for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD and HD. PMID:25596530

  5. Molecular design and synthesis of a pH independent and cell permeant fluorescent dye and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaojie; Liu, Chang; Huang, Kun; Zhang, Siwen; He, Song; Zhao, Liancheng; Zeng, Xianshun

    2015-06-21

    Fluorescent dyes have played crucial roles in the field of molecular imaging as fluorescent fluorophores. In this work, a novel water-soluble and pH-independent fluorescent xanthene dye, a hydroxyl regioisomeric 3',4'-benzorhodol, has been designed and synthesized. Compared with those of rhodol dyes, the absorption (ca. 570 nm) and maximum emission (ca. 620 nm) of the dye are largely red-shifted. Due to its ring-opened zwitterion structure in water media, the dye showed good membrane permeability and distributed in the whole cell cytoplasm upon incubation with live cells. Meanwhile, the dye could be easily modified to probes. The hydrazide derivative of the dye exhibited an excellent Hg(2+) selectivity over other relevant metal ions with a detection limit down to 3 nM. Thus, the excellent fluorescence properties and chemical properties of the dye allow it to be designed as a fluorescent chemosensor and biomarker for biological applications. PMID:25990913

  6. NAMPT inhibition sensitizes pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to tumor-selective, PAR-independent metabolic catastrophe and cell death induced by β-lapachone

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Z; Chakrabarti, G; Luo, X; Ali, A; Hu, Z; Fattah, F J; Vemireddy, R; DeBerardinis, R J; Brekken, R A; Boothman, D A

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) inhibitors (e.g., FK866) target the most active pathway of NAD+ synthesis in tumor cells, but lack tumor-selectivity for use as a single agent. Reducing NAD+ pools by inhibiting NAMPT primed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells for poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP1)-dependent cell death induced by the targeted cancer therapeutic, β-lapachone (β-lap, ARQ761), independent of poly(ADP ribose) (PAR) accumulation. β-Lap is bioactivated by NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in a futile redox cycle that consumes oxygen and generates high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause extensive DNA damage and rapid PARP1-mediated NAD+ consumption. Synergy with FK866+β-lap was tumor-selective, only occurring in NQO1-overexpressing cancer cells, which is noted in a majority (∼85%) of PDA cases. This treatment strategy simultaneously decreases NAD+ synthesis while increasing NAD+ consumption, reducing required doses and treatment times for both drugs and increasing potency. These complementary mechanisms caused profound NAD(P)+ depletion and inhibited glycolysis, driving down adenosine triphosphate levels and preventing recovery normally observed with either agent alone. Cancer cells died through an ROS-induced, μ-calpain-mediated programmed cell death process that kills independent of caspase activation and is not driven by PAR accumulation, which we call NAD+-Keresis. Non-overlapping specificities of FK866 for PDA tumors that rely heavily on NAMPT-catalyzed NAD+ synthesis and β-lap for cancer cells with elevated NQO1 levels affords high tumor-selectivity. The concept of reducing NAD+ pools in cancer cells to sensitize them to ROS-mediated cell death by β-lap is a novel strategy with potential application for pancreatic and other types of NQO1+ solid tumors. PMID:25590809

  7. Mitochondrial biogenesis is required for the anchorage-independent survival and propagation of stem-like cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Peiris-Pagès, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Smith, Duncan L.; Sanchez-Alvarez, Rosa; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Cappello, Anna Rita; Pezzi, Vincenzo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Sotgia, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Here, we show that new mitochondrial biogenesis is required for the anchorage independent survival and propagation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). More specifically, we used the drug XCT790 as an investigational tool, as it functions as a specific inhibitor of the ERRα-PGC1 signaling pathway, which governs mitochondrial biogenesis. Interestingly, our results directly demonstrate that XCT790 efficiently blocks both the survival and propagation of tumor initiating stem-like cells (TICs), using the MCF7 cell line as a model system. Mechanistically, we show that XCT790 suppresses the activity of several independent signaling pathways that are normally required for the survival of CSCs, such as Sonic hedgehog, TGFβ-SMAD, STAT3, and Wnt signaling. We also show that XCT790 markedly reduces oxidative mitochondrial metabolism (OXPHOS) and that XCT790-mediated inhibition of CSC propagation can be prevented or reversed by Acetyl-L-Carnitine (ALCAR), a mitochondrial fuel. Consistent with our findings, over-expression of ERRα significantly enhances the efficiency of mammosphere formation, which can be blocked by treatment with mitochondrial inhibitors. Similarly, mammosphere formation augmented by FOXM1, a downstream target of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, can also be blocked by treatment with three different classes of mitochondrial inhibitors (XCT790, oligomycin A, or doxycycline). In this context, our unbiased proteomics analysis reveals that FOXM1 drives the expression of >90 protein targets associated with mitochondrial biogenesis, glycolysis, the EMT and protein synthesis in MCF7 cells, processes which are characteristic of an anabolic CSC phenotype. Finally, doxycycline is an FDA-approved antibiotic, which is very well-tolerated in patients. As such, doxycycline could be re-purposed clinically as a ‘safe’ mitochondrial inhibitor, to target FOXM1 and mitochondrial biogenesis in CSCs, to prevent tumor recurrence and distant metastasis, thereby avoiding patient relapse

  8. Impact of thiamine deficiency on T-cell dependent and T-cell independent antibody production in lake trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ottinger, Christopher A.; Honeyfield, Dale C.; Densmore, Christine L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.

    2012-01-01

    Lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on thiamine-replete and thiamine-depleted diets were evaluated for the effects of thiamine status on in vivo responses to the T-dependent antigen trinitophenol (TNP)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH), the T-independent antigen trinitrophenol-lipolysaccaharide (TNP-LPS), or Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (DPBS; negative control fish). Plasma antibody concentrations were evaluated for possible differences in total anti-TNP activity as well as differences in response kinetics. Associations between anti-TNP activity and muscle and liver thiamine concentrations as well as ratios of muscle-to-liver thiamine to anti-TNP activity were also examined. Thiamine-depleted lake trout that were injected with TNP-LPS exhibited significantly more anti-TNP activity than thiamine-replete fish. The depleted fish injected with TNP-LPS also exhibited significantly different response kinetics relative to thiamine-replete lake trout. No differences in activity or kinetics were observed between the thiamine-replete and -depleted fish injected with TNP-KLH or in the DPBS negative controls. Anti-TNP activity in thiamine-depleted lake trout injected with TNP-KLH was positively associated with muscle thiamine pyrophosphate (thiamine diphosphate; TPP) concentration. A negative association was observed between the ratio of muscle-to-liver TPP and T-independent responses. No significant associations between anti-TNP activity and tissue thiamine concentration were observed in the thiamine-replete fish. We demonstrated that thiamine deficiency leads to alterations in both T-dependent and T-independent immune responses in lake trout.

  9. Lysis of horse red blood cells mediated by antibody-independent activation of the alternative pathway of chicken complement.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, H; Yoshikawa, Y; Kai, C; Yamanouchi, K; Okada, H

    1984-01-01

    Horse red blood cells (HRBC) were found to be lysed when incubated with fresh normal chicken serum (NCS). By comparison of the properties of the lysis of HRBC with those of the complement-dependent lysis of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) sensitized with haemolytic antibody via the classical pathway, the following differences were observed between the two haemolytic phenomena. (i) The lysis of HRBC was independent on antibody in contrast to the antibody dependence of the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (ii) The lysis of HRBC was dependent on Mg but not on Ca ion, whereas the lysis of sensitized SRBC required both Mg and Ca ions. (iii) Treatment of NCS with carrageenan that acts as an inactivator of the first component of complement (C1) inhibited the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not the lysis of HRBC. (iv) C1 was consumed in the lysis of sensitized SRBC but not in the lysis of HRBC. (v) Cobra venom factor (CVF), C3 inactivator via the alternative complement pathway, inhibited the lysis of HRBC but not the lysis of sensitized SRBC. (vi) Minimal reaction times for the lysis of HRBC and for the lysis of sensitized SRBC were 90 and 60 min, respectively. These findings indicate that the lysis of HRBC was caused by the antibody-independent activation of complement via the alternative pathway. PMID:6430791

  10. Angiopoietin-1 induces neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in a Tie2-independent, β1-integrin dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xinyu; Fu, Wen; Tung, Christie E.; Ward, Nicole L.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of Angiopoietin (Ang) 1 in the brain results in increased vascularization and altered neuronal dendrite configuration. We hypothesized that Ang1 acts directly on neurons inducing neurite outgrowth. We stimulated PC12 cells with Ang1 and observed outgrowth levels comparable to nerve growth factor (NGF). Western blotting and RT-PCR demonstrated the absence of the Ang1 receptor, Tie2 and the presence of β1-integrin. Downstream of β1-integrin, Ang1 stimulation led to a ~2.6 fold increase in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation and no change in activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) nor c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Conversely, NGF stimulation had no effect on FAK phosphorylation but lead to a ~3.1 and ~2 fold increase in phosphorylation of MAPK and JNK. Ang1, but not NGF-mediated outgrowth was attenuated following functional inhibition of β1-integrin and FAK, and Wortmannin inhibited neurite outgrowth mediated by both. Our results suggest that Ang1 induces neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells in a Tie2-independent, β1-integrin-FAK-PI3K-Akt dependent manner and that NGF and Ang1 mediate neurite outgrowth via two independent signaling mechanisms. PMID:19379779

  11. HK2 is a radiation resistant and independent negative prognostic factor for patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xinqiong; Liu, Miaomiao; Sun, Hong; Wang, Fengjun; Xie, Xiaoxue; Chen, Xiang; Su, Juan; He, Yuxiang; Dai, Youyi; Wu, Haijun; Shen, Liangfang

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which overexpression of hexokinase 2 (HK2) indicates locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (LACSCC) with radio-resistance is still unknown despite being an independent biomarker of poor prognosis. Here, we retrospectively analyzed 132 female patients receiving radiotherapy for cervical squamous cell carcinoma including 85 radiation-sensitive cases and 47 radiation-resistant cases. The expression of HK2 was examined by immunohistochemistry. The percentage of high HK2 expression in the radiation-resistant group differed from the radiation-sensitive group with statistical significance (P < 0.001) even if divided into three subgroups including a lower 5-year progression free survival group (PFS) for comparison (P < 0.001). The Kaplan Meier curve analysis showed that there were differences between the two groups (P < 0.001). Therefore, this study proves a close relationship between HK2 expression and radio-resistance. Multivariate Cox regression analysis implied that HK2 was an independent prognostic indicator of cervical squamous carcinoma (HR (95% CI), 2.940 (1.609, 1.609); P = 0.002). PMID:26097593

  12. Cell Cycle-Independent Phospho-Regulation of Fkh2 during Hyphal Growth Regulates Candida albicans Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greig, Jamie A.; Sudbery, Ian M.; Richardson, Jonathan P.; Naglik, Julian R.; Wang, Yue; Sudbery, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    discovered a novel cell cycle-independent phospho-regulatory event that subverts a key component of the cell cycle machinery to a role in the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. PMID:25617770

  13. Peripheral blood CD4/CD19 cell ratio is an independent prognostic factor in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gaudio, Francesco; Perrone, Tommasina; Mestice, Anna; Curci, Paola; Giordano, Annamaria; Delia, Mario; Pastore, Domenico; Specchia, Giorgina

    2014-07-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by the presence of tumoral cells in a rich background of T and B cells, macrophages and other inflammatory cells. The contribution of these non-tumoral cells to the pathogenesis of HL is still poorly understood. In our study we evaluated the prognostic significance of peripheral blood B, T and natural killer (NK) cells at diagnosis in 118 immunocompetent patients with cHL treated at our institution between January 2006 and December 2010. Fifty-four (46%) were male and 64 (54%) female. Median age at diagnosis was 33 years (range 15-82), and 71 patients (60%) presented an advanced stage (IIB-IV), 54 (46%) had bulky disease and 55 (47%) presented B symptoms. At the end of treatment, 94 patients (80%) had a complete response (CR) and 24 (20%) had a partial response. After a median follow-up of 54 months, 18 patients (15%) had relapsed. The variables that had a negative impact on progression-free survival (PFS) at univariate analysis were advanced stage, bone marrow involvement, International Prognostic Score (IPS) ≥ 3, positive interim positron emission tomography (int-PET), NK cells < 200/μL, CD19 cells < 85/μL, CD3/CD19 ratio ≥ 13 and CD4/CD19 ratio ≥ 10. At multivariate analysis, advanced stage, positive int-PET and CD4/CD19 ratio ≥ 10 were independent prognostic factors of PFS. New biological markers could be predictive of the response to treatment and survival in cHL. A CD4/CD19 ratio ≥ 10 seems to be associated with a worse outcome. PMID:24164533

  14. Voltage-independent autocrine modulation of L-type channels mediated by ATP, opioids and catecholamines in rat chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Guijo, J M; Carabelli, V; Gandía, L; García, A G; Carbone, E

    1999-10-01

    The inhibition of L-type channels induced by either bath application of ATP, opioids and catecholamines or by endogenously released neurotransmitters was investigated in rat chromaffin cells with whole-cell recordings (5 mM Ba2+). In both cases, the L-type current, isolated pharmacologically using omega-toxin peptides and potentiated by Bay K 8644, was inhibited by approximately 50% with nearly no changes to the activation-inactivation kinetics. Inhibition was voltage independent at a wide range of potentials (-20 to +50 mV) and insensitive to depolarizing prepulses (+100 mV, 50 ms). Onset and offset of the inhibition were fast (time constants: tau(on) approximately 0.9 s, tau(off) approximately 3.6 s), indicating a rapid mechanism of channel modulation. Whether induced exogenously or from the released granules content in conditions of stopped cell superfusion, the neurotransmitter action was reversible and largely prevented by either intracellular GDP-beta-S, cell treatment with pertussis toxin or simultaneous application of P2y,2x delta/mu-opioidergic and alpha/beta-adrenergic antagonists. This suggests the existence of converging modulatory pathways by which autoreceptors-activated G-proteins reduce the activity of L-type channels through fast interactions. The autocrine inhibition of L-type currents, which was absent in superfused isolated cells, was effective on cell clusters, suggesting that L-type channels may be potently inhibited by cell exocytosis under physiological conditions resembling the intact adrenal glands. PMID:10564365

  15. Cytokine-Independent Detection of Antigen-Specific Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells in Immunized Nonhuman Primates Using a Live Cell Activation-Induced Marker Technique.

    PubMed

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha M; Carnathan, Diane G; Wu, Jennifer E; Kendric, Kayla; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Dan, Jennifer M; Bothwell, Marcella; Sanders, Rogier W; Pulendran, Bali; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-08-01

    A range of current candidate AIDS vaccine regimens are focused on generating protective HIV-neutralizing Ab responses. Many of these efforts rely on the rhesus macaque animal model. Understanding how protective Ab responses develop and how to increase their efficacy are both major knowledge gaps. Germinal centers (GCs) are the engines of Ab affinity maturation. GC T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4 T cells are required for GCs. Studying vaccine-specific GC Tfh cells after protein immunizations has been challenging, as Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are difficult to identify by conventional intracellular cytokine staining. Cytokine production by GC Tfh cells may be intrinsically limited in comparison with other Th effector cells, as the biological role of a GC Tfh cell is to provide help to individual B cells within the GC, rather than secreting large amounts of cytokines bathing a tissue. To test this idea, we developed a cytokine-independent method to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. RNA sequencing was performed using TCR-stimulated GC Tfh cells to identify candidate markers. Validation experiments determined CD25 (IL-2Rα) and OX40 to be highly upregulated activation-induced markers (AIM) on the surface of GC Tfh cells after stimulation. In comparison with intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM assay identified >10-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in HIV Env protein-immunized macaques (BG505 SOSIP). CD4 T cells in blood were also studied. In summary, AIM demonstrates that Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are intrinsically stingy producers of cytokines, which is likely an essential part of their biological function. PMID:27335502

  16. Overexpression of TDP-43 causes partially p53-dependent G2/M arrest and p53-independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kikyo; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Aiso, Sadakazu; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2012-01-11

    It has been hypothesized that the dysregulation of transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) in neurons is closely linked to the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions. However, it remains undefined whether the dysregulation of TDP-43 in non-neuronal cells, such as glial cells, contributes to the pathogenesis of these neurodegenerative diseases. Primarily using HeLa cells, we show that a low-grade overexpression of TDP-43, 2- to 5-fold greater than endogenous expression, which is thought to mimic the gain of function of TDP-43, induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and cell death in cultured non-neuronal cells. Since the activation of p53 may induce G2/M arrest and/or cell death in many abnormal situations, we examined the mechanism underlying G2/M arrest from the standpoint of p53 regulation. It was determined that the TDP-43-induced G2/M arrest was attenuated, while TDP-43-induced death was not attenuated, in cells in which the p53 function was compromised. These data collectively indicate that TDP-43 causes G2/M arrest in a partially p53-dependent manner and it causes cell death in a p53-independent manner in cycling cells. Because it is likely that the impaired proliferation in glial cells causes a decrease in the neuron-supporting ability, these findings further suggests that the gain of function of TDP-43 may cause neurotoxicity by inducing cell cycle arrest and death in glial cells. PMID:22133803

  17. Contact-dependent growth inhibition toxins exploit multiple independent cell-entry pathways.

    PubMed

    Willett, Julia L E; Gucinski, Grant C; Fatherree, Jackson P; Low, David A; Hayes, Christopher S

    2015-09-01

    Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems function to deliver toxins into neighboring bacterial cells. CDI+ bacteria export filamentous CdiA effector proteins, which extend from the inhibitor-cell surface to interact with receptors on neighboring target bacteria. Upon binding its receptor, CdiA delivers a toxin derived from its C-terminal region. CdiA C-terminal (CdiA-CT) sequences are highly variable between bacteria, reflecting the multitude of CDI toxin activities. Here, we show that several CdiA-CT regions are composed of two domains, each with a distinct function during CDI. The C-terminal domain typically possesses toxic nuclease activity, whereas the N-terminal domain appears to control toxin transport into target bacteria. Using genetic approaches, we identified ptsG, metI, rbsC, gltK/gltJ, yciB, and ftsH mutations that confer resistance to specific CdiA-CTs. The resistance mutations all disrupt expression of inner-membrane proteins, suggesting that these proteins are exploited for toxin entry into target cells. Moreover, each mutation only protects against inhibition by a subset of CdiA-CTs that share similar N-terminal domains. We propose that, following delivery of CdiA-CTs into the periplasm, the N-terminal domains bind specific inner-membrane receptors for subsequent translocation into the cytoplasm. In accord with this model, we find that CDI nuclease domains are modular payloads that can be redirected through different import pathways when fused to heterologous N-terminal "translocation domains." These results highlight the plasticity of CDI toxin delivery and suggest that the underlying translocation mechanisms could be harnessed to deliver other antimicrobial agents into Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:26305955

  18. Glycoform-independent prion conversion by highly efficient, cell-based, protein misfolding cyclic amplification

    PubMed Central

    Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Mekrouti, Mériem; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Sibille, Pierre; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier; Andréoletti, Olivier; Rezaei, Human; Dron, Michel; Béringue, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Prions are formed of misfolded assemblies (PrPSc) of the variably N-glycosylated cellular prion protein (PrPC). In infected species, prions replicate by seeding the conversion and polymerization of host PrPC. Distinct prion strains can be recognized, exhibiting defined PrPSc biochemical properties such as the glycotype and specific biological traits. While strain information is encoded within the conformation of PrPSc assemblies, the storage of the structural information and the molecular requirements for self-perpetuation remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the specific role of PrPC glycosylation status. First, we developed an efficient protein misfolding cyclic amplification method using cells expressing the PrPC species of interest as substrate. Applying the technique to PrPC glycosylation mutants expressing cells revealed that neither PrPC nor PrPSc glycoform stoichiometry was instrumental to PrPSc formation and strainness perpetuation. Our study supports the view that strain properties, including PrPSc glycotype are enciphered within PrPSc structural backbone, not in the attached glycans. PMID:27384922

  19. Nitric oxide influences red blood cell velocity independently of changes in the vascular tone.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Keymel, Stefanie; Kumara, Intan; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen; Kelm, Malte; Kleinbongard, Petra

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in regulation of vascular tone and blood flow. In the microcirculation blood flow is strongly dependent on red blood cells (RBC) deformability. In vitro NO increases RBC deformability. This study hypothesized that NO increases RBC velocity in vivo not only by regulating vascular tone, but also by modifying RBC deformability. The effects of NO on RBC velocity were analysed by intra-vital microscopy in the microcirculation of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the avian embryo at day 7 post-fertilization, when all vessels lack smooth muscle cells and vascular tone is not affected by NO. It was found that inhibition of enzymatic NO synthesis and NO scavenging decreased intracellular NO levels and avian RBC deformability in vitro. Injection of a NO synthase-inhibitor or a NO scavenger into the microcirculation of the CAM decreased capillary RBC velocity and deformation, while the diameter of the vessels remained constant. The results indicate that scavenging of NO and inhibition of NO synthesis decrease RBC velocity not only by regulating vascular tone but also by decreasing RBC deformability. PMID:21480762

  20. CD8 T Cell-Independent Antitumor Response and Its Potential for Treatment of Malignant Gliomas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Katherine A; Griffith, Thomas S

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors continue to represent a devastating diagnosis with no real chance for cure. Despite an increasing list of potential salvage therapies, standard-of-care for these patients has not changed in over a decade. Immunotherapy has been seen as an exciting option, with the potential to offer specific and long lasting tumor clearance. The "gold standard" in immunotherapy has been the development of a tumor-specific CD8 T cell response to potentiate tumor clearance and immunological memory. While many advances have been made in the field of immunotherapy, few therapies have seen true success. Many of the same principles used to develop immunotherapy in tumors of the peripheral organs have been applied to brain tumor immunotherapy. The immune-specialized nature of the brain should call into question whether this approach is appropriate. Recent results from our own experiments require a rethinking of current dogma. Perhaps a CD8 T cell response is not sufficient for an organ as immunologically unique as the brain. Examination of previously elucidated principles of the brain's immune-specialized status and known immunological preferences should generate discussion and experimentation to address the failure of current therapies. PMID:27472363

  1. Glycoform-independent prion conversion by highly efficient, cell-based, protein misfolding cyclic amplification.

    PubMed

    Moudjou, Mohammed; Chapuis, Jérôme; Mekrouti, Mériem; Reine, Fabienne; Herzog, Laetitia; Sibille, Pierre; Laude, Hubert; Vilette, Didier; Andréoletti, Olivier; Rezaei, Human; Dron, Michel; Béringue, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Prions are formed of misfolded assemblies (PrP(Sc)) of the variably N-glycosylated cellular prion protein (PrP(C)). In infected species, prions replicate by seeding the conversion and polymerization of host PrP(C). Distinct prion strains can be recognized, exhibiting defined PrP(Sc) biochemical properties such as the glycotype and specific biological traits. While strain information is encoded within the conformation of PrP(Sc) assemblies, the storage of the structural information and the molecular requirements for self-perpetuation remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the specific role of PrP(C) glycosylation status. First, we developed an efficient protein misfolding cyclic amplification method using cells expressing the PrP(C) species of interest as substrate. Applying the technique to PrP(C) glycosylation mutants expressing cells revealed that neither PrP(C) nor PrP(Sc) glycoform stoichiometry was instrumental to PrP(Sc) formation and strainness perpetuation. Our study supports the view that strain properties, including PrP(Sc) glycotype are enciphered within PrP(Sc) structural backbone, not in the attached glycans. PMID:27384922

  2. Dual PI-3 kinase/mTOR inhibition impairs autophagy flux and induces cell death independent of apoptosis and necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Button, Robert W.; Vincent, Joseph H.; Strang, Conor J.; Luo, Shouqing

    2016-01-01

    The PI-3 kinase (PI-3K)/mTOR pathway is critical for cell growth and proliferation. Strategies of antagonising this signaling have proven to be detrimental to cell survival. This observation, coupled with the fact many tumours show enhanced growth signaling, has caused dual inhibitors of PI-3K and mTOR to be implicated in cancer treatment, and have thus been studied across various tumour models. Since PI-3K (class-I)/mTOR pathway negatively regulates autophagy, dual inhibitors of PI-3K/mTOR are currently believed to be autophagy activators. However, our present data show that the dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibition (DKI) potently suppresses autophagic flux. We further confirm that inhibition of Vps34/PI3KC3, the class-III PI-3K, causes the blockade to autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Our data suggest that DKI induces cell death independently of apoptosis and necroptosis, whereas autophagy perturbation by DKI may contribute to cell death. Given that autophagy is critical in cellular homeostasis, our study not only clarifies the role of a dual PI-3K/mTOR inhibitor in autophagy, but also suggests that its autophagy inhibition needs to be considered if such an agent is used in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:26814436

  3. α5β1 integrin recycling promotes Arp2/3-independent cancer cell invasion via the formin FHOD3.

    PubMed

    Paul, Nikki R; Allen, Jennifer L; Chapman, Anna; Morlan-Mairal, Maria; Zindy, Egor; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Fernandez del Ama, Laura; Ferizovic, Nermina; Green, David M; Howe, Jonathan D; Ehler, Elisabeth; Hurlstone, Adam; Caswell, Patrick T

    2015-09-14

    Invasive migration in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to cancer metastasis, yet little is known of the molecular mechanisms that drive reorganization of the cytoskeleton as cancer cells disseminate in vivo. 2D Rac-driven lamellipodial migration is well understood, but how these features apply to 3D migration is not clear. We find that lamellipodia-like protrusions and retrograde actin flow are indeed observed in cells moving in 3D ECM. However, Rab-coupling protein (RCP)-driven endocytic recycling of α5β1 integrin enhances invasive migration of cancer cells into fibronectin-rich 3D ECM, driven by RhoA and filopodial spike-based protrusions, not lamellipodia. Furthermore, we show that actin spike protrusions are Arp2/3-independent. Dynamic actin spike assembly in cells invading in vitro and in vivo is regulated by Formin homology-2 domain containing 3 (FHOD3), which is activated by RhoA/ROCK, establishing a novel mechanism through which the RCP-α5β1 pathway reprograms the actin cytoskeleton to promote invasive migration and local invasion in vivo. PMID:26370503

  4. Retinoids induce cellular senescence in breast cancer cells by RAR-β dependent and independent pathways: Potential clinical implications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SHILKAITIS, ANNE; GREEN, ALBERT; CHRISTOV, KONSTANTIN

    2015-01-01

    Most studies on cellular senescence (CS) have been performed in vitro by employing cytotoxic agents, irradiation, chromatin and telomerase modulators or by activating certain oncogenes. All these approaches usually lead to DNA damage, gene instability and/or chromatin alterations that primarily affect p53-p21 signaling. Little is known on whether retinoids and rexinoids, which are cell differentiation agents, can also induce CS in vitro and in vivo, and which molecular mechanisms are involved in promoting the senescent phenotype. We reviewed the recent publications on CS induced by retinoids and rexinoids in ER+ and ER− breast cancer cell lines and in corresponding animal models of mammary carcinogenesis which simulate those of human breast cancer. The role of retinoic acid receptors β2 and 5 (RARβ2 and RARβ5) and of receptor independent genes involved in mediating the senescence program of retinoids and rexinoids in ER+ and ER− breast cancer cells is discussed. Potential strategists for clinical implication of CS as biomarker of prognosis and of response to treatment with retinoids, rexinoids and with other cell differentiation and antitumor agents are outlined. PMID:25997921

  5. WNT5A-mediated β-catenin-independent signalling is a novel regulator of cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasiya, Shivendra Kumar; Ekström, Elin J.; Guilmain, William; Andersson, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    WNT5A has been identified as an important ligand in the malignant progression of a number of tumours. Although WNT5A signalling is often altered in cancer, the ligand’s role as either a tumour suppressor or oncogene varies between tumour types and is a contemporary issue for investigators of β-catenin-independent WNT signalling in oncology. Here, we report that one of the initial effects of active WNT5A signalling in malignant melanoma cells is an alteration in cellular energy metabolism and specifically an increase in aerobic glycolysis. This was found to be at least in part due to an increase in active Akt signalling and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. The clinical relevance of these findings was strengthened by a strong correlation (P < 0.001) between the expression of WNT5A and LDH isoform V in a cohort of melanocytic neoplasms. We also found effects of WNT5A on energy metabolism in breast cancer cells, but rather than promoting aerobic glycolysis as it does in melanoma, WNT5A signalling increased oxidative phosphorylation rates in breast cancer cells. These findings support a new role for WNT5A in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells that is a context- dependent event. PMID:24293407

  6. Enhancement of Flow-Induced AP-1 Gene Expression by Cyclosporin A Requires NFAT-Independent Signaling in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    WORTON, LEAH E.; KWON, RONALD Y.; GARDINER, EDITH M.; GROSS, TED S.; SRINIVASAN, SUNDAR

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that aging compromises the ability of the skeleton to respond to anabolic mechanical stimuli. Recently, we reported that treating senescent mice with Cyclosporin A (CsA) rescued aging-related deficits in loading-induced bone formation. Given that the actions of CsA are often attributed to inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT axis, we hypothesized that CsA enhances gene expression in bone cells exposed to fluid flow, by inhibiting nuclear NFATc1 accumulation. When exposed to flow, MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells exhibited rapid nuclear accumulation of NFATc1 that was abolished by CsA treatment. Under differentiation conditions, intermittent CsA treatment enhanced gene expression of late osteoblastic differentiation markers and activator protein 1 (AP-1) family members. Superimposing flow upon CsA further enhanced expression of the AP-1 members Fra-1 and c-Jun. To delineate the contribution of NFAT in this response, cells were treated with VIVIT, a specific inhibitor of the calcineurin/NFAT interaction. Treatment with VIVIT blocked flow-induced nuclear NFATc1 accumulation but did not recapitulate the CsA-mediated enhancement of flow-induced AP-1 component gene expression. Taken together, our study is the first to demonstrate that CsA enhances mechanically-induced gene expression of AP-1 components in bone cells, and suggests that this response requires calcineurin-dependent mechanisms that are independent of inhibiting NFATc1 nuclear accumulation. PMID:25484988

  7. α5β1 integrin recycling promotes Arp2/3-independent cancer cell invasion via the formin FHOD3

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Nikki R.; Allen, Jennifer L.; Chapman, Anna; Morlan-Mairal, Maria; Zindy, Egor; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Fernandez del Ama, Laura; Ferizovic, Nermina; Green, David M.; Howe, Jonathan D.; Ehler, Elisabeth; Hurlstone, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Invasive migration in 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) is crucial to cancer metastasis, yet little is known of the molecular mechanisms that drive reorganization of the cytoskeleton as cancer cells disseminate in vivo. 2D Rac-driven lamellipodial migration is well understood, but how these features apply to 3D migration is not clear. We find that lamellipodia-like protrusions and retrograde actin flow are indeed observed in cells moving in 3D ECM. However, Rab-coupling protein (RCP)-driven endocytic recycling of α5β1 integrin enhances invasive migration of cancer cells into fibronectin-rich 3D ECM, driven by RhoA and filopodial spike-based protrusions, not lamellipodia. Furthermore, we show that actin spike protrusions are Arp2/3-independent. Dynamic actin spike assembly in cells invading in vitro and in vivo is regulated by Formin homology-2 domain containing 3 (FHOD3), which is activated by RhoA/ROCK, establishing a novel mechanism through which the RCP–α5β1 pathway reprograms the actin cytoskeleton to promote invasive migration and local invasion in vivo. PMID:26370503

  8. Conditional HIF-1 induction produces multistage neovascularization with stage-specific sensitivity to VEGFR inhibitors and myeloid cell independence

    PubMed Central

    Oladipupo, Sunday S.; Hu, Song; Santeford, Andrea C.; Yao, Junjie; Kovalski, Joanna R.; Shohet, Ralph V.; Maslov, Konstantin

    2011-01-01

    Neovascularization is a crucial component of tumor growth and ischemia. Although prior work primarily used disease models, delineation of neovascularization in the absence of disease can reveal intrinsic mechanisms of microvessel regulation amenable to manipulation in illness. We created a conditional model of epithelial HIF-1 induction in adult mice (TetON-HIF-1 mice). Longitudinal photoacoustic microscopy (L-PAM) was coincidentally developed for noninvasive, label-free serial imaging of red blood cell-perfused vasculature in the same mouse for weeks to months. TetON-HIF-1 mice evidenced 3 stages of neovascularization: development, maintenance, and transgene-dependent regression. Regression occurred despite extensive and tight pericyte coverage. L-PAM mapped microvascular architecture and quantified volumetric changes in neocapillary morphogenesis, arteriovenous remodeling, and microvessel regression. Developmental stage endothelial proliferation down-regulation was associated with a DNA damage checkpoint consisting of p53, p21, and endothelial γ-H2AX induction. The neovasculature was temporally responsive to VEGFR2 immuno-blockade, with the developmental stage sensitive, and the maintenance stage resistant, to DC101 treatment. L-PAM analysis also pinpointed microvessels ablated or resistant to VEGFR2 immuno-blockade. HIF-1–recruited myeloid cells did not mediate VEGFR2 inhibitor resistance. Thus, HIF-1 neovascularization in the absence of disease is self-regulated via cell autonomous endothelial checkpoints, and resistant to angiogenesis inhibitors independent of myeloid cells. PMID:21307392

  9. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  10. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  11. Impact of HIV-1 Membrane Cholesterol on Cell-Independent Lytic Inactivation and Cellular Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Kalyana Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat; Li, Huiyuan; Bailey, Lauren; Rashad, Adel A; Aneja, Rachna; Weiss, Karl; Huynh, James; Bastian, Arangaserry Rosemary; Papazoglou, Elisabeth; Abrams, Cameron; Wrenn, Steven; Chaiken, Irwin

    2016-01-26

    Peptide triazole thiols (PTTs) have been found previously to bind to HIV-1 Env spike gp120 and cause irreversible virus inactivation by shedding gp120 and lytically releasing luminal capsid protein p24. Since the virions remain visually intact, lysis appears to occur via limited membrane destabilization. To better understand the PTT-triggered membrane transformation involved, we investigated the role of envelope cholesterol on p24 release by measuring the effect of cholesterol depletion using methyl beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD). An unexpected bell-shaped response of PTT-induced lysis to [MβCD] was observed, involving lysis enhancement at low [MβCD] vs loss of function at high [MβCD]. The impact of cholesterol depletion on PTT-induced lysis was reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol and other sterols that support membrane rafts, while sterols that do not support rafts induced only limited reversal. Cholesterol depletion appears to cause a reduced energy barrier to lysis as judged by decreased temperature dependence with MβCD. Enhancement/replenishment responses to [MβCD] also were observed for HIV-1 infectivity, consistent with a similar energy barrier effect in the membrane transformation of virus cell fusion. Overall, the results argue that cholesterol in the HIV-1 envelope is important for balancing virus stability and membrane transformation, and that partial depletion, while increasing infectivity, also makes the virus more fragile. The results also reinforce the argument that the lytic inactivation and infectivity processes are mechanistically related and that membrane transformations occurring during lysis can provide an experimental window to investigate membrane and protein factors important for HIV-1 cell entry. PMID:26713837

  12. Independent replication of mitochondrial genes supports the transcriptional program in developing fiber cells of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Song, Xianliang; Naoumkina, Marina; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fang, David D

    2014-07-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants exist both as a "master circle" chromosome and as numerous subgenomic sublimons that are generated by intramolecular recombination. Differential stability or replication of these sublimons allows individual mitochondrial gene copy numbers to vary independently between different cell types and developmental stages. Our objective was to determine the relationship between mitochondrial gene copy number and transcript abundance in the elongating fiber cells of Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). We compared RNA and DNA from cotton fiber cells at five developmental time points from early elongation through secondary cell wall thickening from the Ligon-lintless 2 (Li2) short fiber mutant and its wild type near isogenic line (NIL) DP5690. Mitochondrial gene copy number decreased from 3 to 8-DPA in the developing cotton fiber cells while transcript levels remained low. As secondary cell wall biosynthesis began in developing fibers, the expression levels and copy numbers of mitochondrial genes involved in energy production and respiration were up-regulated in wild type cotton DP5690. However, the short fiber mutant Li2, failed to increase expression of these genes, which include three subunits of ATP synthase, atp1, atp8 and atp9 and two cytochrome genes cox1 and cob. At the same time, Li2 failed to increase the copy numbers of these highly expressed genes. Surprisingly, we found that when mitochondrial genes were highly transcribed, they also had very high copy numbers. This observation suggests that in developing cotton fibers, increased mitochondrial sublimon replication may support increases in gene transcription. PMID:24768176

  13. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R.; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R.; Matthews, Jeffrey B.

    2013-01-01

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-Isc). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-Isc by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-Isc. Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca2+]i induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  14. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Patrice G; Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-I(sc)). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-I(sc) by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-I(sc). Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  15. Prostasin induces protease-dependent and independent molecular changes in the human prostate carcinoma cell line PC-3

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mengqian; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Lin, Chen-Yong; Chen, Li-Mei; Chai, Karl X.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Expression of prostasin in the PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells inhibited in vitro invasion, but the molecular mechanisms are unknown. Wild-type human prostasin or a serine active-site mutant prostasin was expressed in the PC-3 cells. Molecular changes were measured at the mRNA and the protein levels. Cell signaling changes were evaluated by measuring phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk1/2) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment of the cells. Protein expression of the EGF receptor (EGFR) was differentially down-regulated by the wild-type and the active-site mutant prostasin. The mRNA expression of EGFR and the transcription repressor SLUG was reduced in cells expressing wild-type prostasin but not the active-site mutant. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2 in response to EGF was greatly reduced by the wild-type prostasin but not by the active-site mutant. The mRNA expression of the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), the uPA receptor (uPAR), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was decreased by the wild-type and the active-site mutant prostasin. The mRNA or protein expression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), matriptase, and E-cadherin was greatly increased by the active-site mutant prostasin. In conclusion, prostasin expression elicits both protease-dependent and independent molecular changes in the PC-3 cells. PMID:17532063

  16. Splenic B cells from Hymenolepis diminuta-infected mice ameliorate colitis independent of T cells and via cooperation with macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Wang, Arthur; Fernando, Maria R; Graepel, Rabea; Leung, Gabriella; van Rooijen, Nico; Sigvardsson, Mikael; McKay, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites provoke multicellular immune responses in their hosts that can suppress concomitant disease. The gut lumen-dwelling tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta, unlike other parasites assessed as helminth therapy, causes no host tissue damage while potently suppressing murine colitis. With the goal of harnessing the immunomodulatory capacity of infection with H. diminuta, we assessed the putative generation of anti-colitic regulatory B cells following H. diminuta infection. Splenic CD19(+) B cells isolated from mice infected 7 [HdBc(7(d))] and 14 d (but not 3 d) previously with H. diminuta and transferred to naive mice significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-, oxazolone-, and dextran-sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Mechanistic studies with the DNBS model, revealed the anti-colitic HdBc(7(d)) was within the follicular B cell population and its phenotype was not dependent on IL-4 or IL-10. The HdBc(7(d)) were not characterized by increased expression of CD1d, CD5, CD23, or IL-10 production, but did spontaneously, and upon LPS plus anti-CD40 stimulation, produce more TGF-β than CD19(+) B cells from controls. DNBS-induced colitis in RAG1(-/-) mice was inhibited by administration of HdBc(7(d)), indicating a lack of a requirement for T and B cells in the recipient; however, depletion of macrophages in recipient mice abrogated the anti-colitic effect of HdBc(7(d)). Thus, in response to H. diminuta, a putatively unique splenic CD19(+) B cell with a functional immunoregulatory program is generated that promotes the suppression of colitis dominated by TH1, TH2, or TH1-plus-TH2 events, and may do so via the synthesis of TGF-β and the generation of, or cooperation with, a regulatory macrophage. PMID:25452561

  17. (--)-Xanthatin selectively induces GADD45γ and stimulates caspase-independent cell death in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Matsuo, Kazumasa; Yaji, Kentaro; Okajima-Miyazaki, Shunsuke; Harada, Mari; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Shindo, Mitsuru; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Aramaki, Hironori

    2011-06-20

    exo-Methylene lactone group-containing compounds, such as (--)-xanthatin, are present in a large variety of biologically active natural products, including extracts of Xanthium strumarium (Cocklebur). These substances are reported to possess diverse functional activities, exhibiting anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, and anticancer potential. In this study, we synthesized six structurally related xanthanolides containing exo-methylene lactone moieties, including (--)-xanthatin and (+)-8-epi-xanthatin, and examined the effects of these chemically defined substances on the highly aggressive and farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI)-resistant MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. The results obtained demonstrate that (--)-xanthatin was a highly effective inhibitor of MDA-MB-231 cell growth, inducing caspase-independent cell death, and that these effects were independent of FTase inhibition. Further, our results show that among the GADD45 isoforms, GADD45γ was selectively induced by (--)-xanthatin and that GADD45γ-primed JNK and p38 signaling pathways are, at least in part, involved in mediating the growth inhibition and potential anticancer activities of this agent. Given that GADD45γ is becoming increasingly recognized for its tumor suppressor function, the results presented here suggest the novel possibility that (--)-xanthatin may have therapeutic value as a selective inducer of GADD45γ in human cancer cells, in particular in FTI-resistant aggressive breast cancers. PMID:21568272

  18. FK-16 Derived from the Anticancer Peptide LL-37 Induces Caspase-Independent Apoptosis and Autophagic Cell Death in Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Shun X.; Shen, Jin; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Lu, Lan; Chan, Ruby L. Y.; Li, Zhi J.; Wang, Xiao J.; Wong, Clover C. M.; Zhang, Lin; Ng, Simon S. M.; Chan, Franky L.; Chan, Francis K. L.; Yu, Jun; Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Wu, William K. K.; Cho, Chi H.

    2013-01-01

    Host immune peptides, including cathelicidins, have been reported to possess anticancer properties. We previously reported that LL-37, the only cathelicidin in humans, suppresses the development of colon cancer. In this study, the potential anticancer effect of FK-16, a fragment of LL-37 corresponding to residues 17 to 32, on cultured colon cancer cells was evaluated. FK-16 induced a unique pattern of cell death, marked by concurrent activation of caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy. The former was mediated by the nuclear translocation of AIF and EndoG whereas the latter was characterized by enhanced expression of LC3-I/II, Atg5 and Atg7 and increased formation of LC3-positive autophagosomes. Knockdown of Atg5 or Atg7 attenuated the cytotoxicity of FK-16, indicating FK-16-induced autophagy was pro-death in nature. Mechanistically, FK-16 activated nuclear p53 to upregulate Bax and downregulate Bcl-2. Knockdown of p53, genetic ablation of Bax, or overexpression of Bcl-2 reversed FK-16-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Importantly, abolition of AIF/EndoG-dependent apoptosis enhanced FK-16-induced autophagy while abolition of autophagy augmented FK-16-induced AIF−/EndoG-dependent apoptosis. Collectively, FK-16 induces caspase-independent apoptosis and autophagy through the common p53-Bcl-2/Bax cascade in colon cancer cells. Our study also uncovered previously unknown reciprocal regulation between these two cell death pathways. PMID:23700428

  19. (−)-Xanthatin Selectively Induces GADD45γ and Stimulates Caspase-Independent Cell Death in Human Breast Cancer MDA-MB-231 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuso; Matsuo, Kazumasa; Yaji, Kentaro; Okajima-Miyazaki, Shunsuke; Harada, Mari; Miyoshi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Shindo, Mitsuru; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    exo-Methylene lactone group-containing compounds, such as (−)-xanthatin, are present in a large variety of biologically active natural products, including extracts of Xanthium strumarium (Cocklebur). These substances are reported to possess diverse functional activities, exhibiting anti-inflammatory, antimalarial, and anticancer potential. In this study, we synthesized six structurally related xanthanolides containing exo-methylene lactone moieties, including (−)-xanthatin and (+)-8-epi-xanthatin, and examined the effects of these chemically defined substances on the highly aggressive and farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI)-resistant MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. The results obtained demonstrate that (−)-xanthatin was a highly effective inhibitor of MDA-MB-231 cell growth, inducing caspase-independent cell death, and that these effects were independent of FTase inhibition. Further, our results show that among the GADD45 isoforms, GADD45γ was selectively induced by (−)-xanthatin and that GADD45γ-primed JNK and p38 signaling pathways are, at least in part, involved in mediating the growth inhibition and potential anticancer activities of this agent. Given that GADD45γ is becoming increasingly recognized for its tumor suppressor function, the results presented here suggest the novel possibility that (−)-xanthatin may have therapeutic value as a selective inducer of GADD45γ in human cancer cells, in particular in FTI-resistant aggressive breast cancers. PMID:21568272

  20. HtrA3 is regulated by 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 independently of PPAR{gamma} in clear cell renal cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Theoleyre, Sandrine; Mottier, Stephanie; Masson, Damien; Denis, Marc G.

    2010-04-09

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) ligands have been shown to possess anti-proliferative effects in many types of cancer. In clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the targets involved in these effects are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that, in CCRCC cell lines, the endogenous PPAR{gamma} ligand 15-deoxy-{Delta}12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) induces the expression, both at the mRNA and the protein levels, of the HtrA3 gene. This gene belongs to the High-Temperature Requirement Factor A family of serine proteases that repress signaling by TGF-{beta} family members and inhibit cell migration. Rosiglitazone or ciglitazone, synthetic PPAR{gamma} agonists, did not induce HtrA3 expression, and the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 did not prevent 15dPGJ2 induction, suggesting that the up-regulation of HtrA3 by 15dPGJ2 is independent of PPAR{gamma}. The MEK/ERK inhibitor PD98059 dramatically repressed HtrA3 induction. Altogether, these data indicate that 15dPGJ2 is able to stimulate the expression of HtrA3 through an indirect mechanism involving the MEK/ERK pathway but independent of PPAR{gamma}. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of HtrA3, a potential tumor suppressor gene.

  1. Novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex Mono-Pt induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human ovarian carcinoma cells, distinct from cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wen-Jie; Zhang, Yang-Miao; Zhang, Li; Huang, Bin; Tao, Fei-Fei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Zi-Jian; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Failure to engage apoptosis appears to be a leading mechanism of resistance to traditional platinum drugs in patients with ovarian cancer. Therefore, an alternative strategy to induce cell death is needed for the chemotherapy of this apoptosis-resistant cancer. Here we report that autophagic cell death, distinct from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, is triggered by a novel monofunctional platinum (II) complex named Mono-Pt in human ovarian carcinoma cells. Mono-Pt-induced cell death has the following features: cytoplasmic vacuolation, caspase-independent, no nuclear fragmentation or chromatin condensation, and no apoptotic bodies. These characteristics integrally indicated that Mono-Pt, rather than cisplatin, initiated a nonapoptotic cell death in Caov-3 ovarian carcinoma cells. Furthermore, incubation of the cells with Mono-Pt but not with cisplatin produced an increasing punctate distribution of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and an increasing ratio of LC3-II to LC3-I. Mono-Pt also caused the formation of autophagic vacuoles as revealed by monodansylcadaverine staining and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, Mono-Pt-induced cell death was significantly inhibited by the knockdown of either BECN1 or ATG7 gene expression, or by autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine, chloroquine and bafilomycin A1. Moreover, the effect of Mono-Pt involved the AKT1-MTOR-RPS6KB1 pathway and MAPK1 (ERK2)/MAPK3 (ERK1) signaling, since the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased, while the MAPK1/3 inhibitor U0126 decreased Mono-Pt-induced autophagic cell death. Taken together, our results suggest that Mono-Pt exerts anticancer effect via autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant ovarian cancer. These findings lead to increased options for anticancer platinum drugs to induce cell death in cancer. PMID:23580233

  2. NAD+ regulates Treg cell fate and promotes allograft survival via a systemic IL-10 production that is CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells independent

    PubMed Central

    Elkhal, Abdallah; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Heinbokel, Timm; Uehara, Hirofumi; Quante, Markus; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Krenzien, Felix; Camacho, Virginia; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Ghiran, Ionita; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs have been shown to play a central role in immune homeostasis while preventing from fatal inflammatory responses, while Th17 cells have traditionally been recognized as pro-inflammatory mediators implicated in a myriad of diseases. Studies have shown the potential of Tregs to convert into Th17 cells, and Th17 cells into Tregs. Increasing evidence have pointed out CD25 as a key molecule during this transdifferentiation process, however molecules that allow such development remain unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of NAD+ on the fate of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs in-depth, dissected their transcriptional signature profile and explored mechanisms underlying their conversion into IL-17A producing cells. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ promotes Treg conversion into Th17 cells in vitro and in vivo via CD25 cell surface marker. Despite the reduced number of Tregs, known to promote homeostasis, and an increased number of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells, NAD+ was able to promote an impressive allograft survival through a robust systemic IL-10 production that was CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ independent. Collectively, our study unravels a novel immunoregulatory mechanism of NAD+ that regulates Tregs fate while promoting allograft survival that may have clinical applications in alloimmunity and in a wide spectrum of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26928119

  3. Treatment of PC-3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells by prenylflavonoids from hop (Humulus lupulus L.) induces a caspase-independent form of cell death.

    PubMed

    Delmulle, L; Vanden Berghe, T; Keukeleire, D De; Vandenabeele, P

    2008-02-01

    Xanthohumol (X), isoxanthohumol (IX), 8-prenylnaringenin (8PN) and 6-prenylnaringenin (6PN), prenylflavonoids from hop (Humulus lupulus L.), were investigated for their cytotoxicity and the mechanism by which they exert cell death when incubated with prostate cancer cell lines PC-3 and DU145. All compounds induced cell death in the absence of caspase-3 activation and typical apoptotic morphological features. The general pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk could not protect this form of cell death. In addition, the formation of vacuoles was observed in PC-3 cells treated with IX and 6PN, and in DU145 treated with IX, 8PN and 6PN, which could suggest the induction of autophagy and consequent cell death. The results indicate that hop-derived prenylflavanones (IX, 8PN, 6PN), but not prenylchalcones (X) induce a caspase-independent form of cell death, suggested to be autophagy. Therefore, IX, 8PN and 6PN appear to be promising candidates for further investigation in prostate anticancer therapy. PMID:17726738

  4. Hyponatraemia alters the biophysical properties of neuronal cells independently of osmolarity: a study on Ni(2+) -sensitive current involvement.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Luciani, Paola; Idrizaj, Eglantina; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Giuliani, Corinna; Fibbi, Benedetta; Peri, Alessandro; Francini, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Hyponatraemia, an electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, can cause neurological symptoms usually attributed to a reduction in plasma osmolarity. Here, we investigated whether low [Na(+) ] per se can cause neuronal changes independent of osmolarity, focusing on involvement of the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger. What is the main finding and its importance? We show that hyponatraemia per se causes alterations of neuronal properties. The novel finding of Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger involvement helps us to elucidate the volume regulation following hyponatraemia. This might have relevance in a translational perspective because Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger could be a target for novel therapies. Hyponatraemia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, and it can cause a wide variety of neurological symptoms. Most of the negative effects of this condition on neuronal cells are attributed to cell swelling because of the reduction of plasma osmolarity, although in hyponatraemia different membrane proteins are supposed to be involved in the conservation of neuronal volume. We have recently reported detrimental effects of hyponatraemia on two different neuronal cell lines, SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y, independent of osmotic alterations. In this study we investigated, in the same cell lines, whether hyponatraemic conditions per se can cause electrophysiological alterations and whether these effects vary over time. Accordingly, we carried out experiments in low-sodium medium in either hyposmotic [Osm(-)] or isosmotic [Osm(+)] conditions, for a short (24 h) or long time (7 days). Using a patch pipette in voltage-clamp conditions, we recorded possible modifications of cell capacitance (Cm ) and membrane conductance (Gm ). Our results indicate that in both Osm(-) and Osm(+) medium, Cm and Gm show a similar increase, but such effects are dependent on the time in culture in different ways. Notably

  5. The ABO Blood Group is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients With Resected Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Koichi; Taniguchi, Tetsuo; Usami, Noriyasu; Kawaguchi, Koji; Fukui, Takayuki; Ishiguro, Futoshi; Nakamura, Shota; Yokoi, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Background The ABO blood group is reported to be associated with the incidence and patient survival for several types of malignancies. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the prognostic significance of the ABO blood group in patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A total of 333 patients (218 men and 115 women) with resected NSCLC were included in this study. In addition to age, sex, smoking status, preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level, operative procedure, histology of tumors, pathological stage (p-stage), and adjuvant therapy, the association between the ABO blood group and survival was explored. Results The 5-year overall and disease-free survival rates were 83.0% and 71.6% for blood group O, 67.2% and 62.3% for blood group A, 68.8% and 68.8% for blood group B and 69.2% and 65.3% for blood group AB, respectively. A multivariate analysis for overall survival showed the ABO blood group (group A vs. group O: HR 2.47, group AB vs. group O: HR 3.62) to be an independent significant prognostic factor, in addition to age, sex, smoking status, p-stage, and serum CEA level. A multivariate analysis for disease-free survival also showed the ABO blood group to be an independent significant prognostic factor. Conclusions The ABO blood group is an independent prognostic factor in patients with resected NSCLC. Studies of other larger cohorts are therefore needed to confirm the relationship between the ABO blood group and the prognosis among patients with resected NSCLC. PMID:25483106

  6. Elimination of helminth infection restores HIV-1C vaccine specific T cell responses independent of helminth-induced IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Da’dara, Akram A.; Harn, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 prevalence is highest in developing countries; similarly helminth parasites are often highly endemic in these same areas. Helminths are strong immune modulators, and negatively impact the ability of the infected hosts to mount protective vaccine specific T cell immune responses for HIV-1 and other pathogens. Indeed, previously we found that Schistosoma mansoni infected mice had significantly impaired HIV-1C vaccine specific T cell responses. Anthelminthics are available and inexpensive; therefore, in this study, we evaluated whether elimination of schistosome infection prior to vaccination with an HIV-1C DNA vaccine would increase recipients vaccine specific responses. As expected, splenocytes from S. mansoni infected mice produced significantly elevated amounts of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10, and significantly lower amounts of interferon (IFN)-γ than splenocytes from naïve mice. Following elimination of parasites by praziquantel (PZQ) treatment, splenomegaly was significantly reduced, though splenocytes produced similar or higher levels of IL-10 than splenocytes from infected mice. However, we found that PZQ treatment significantly increased levels of IFN-γ in response to Concanavalin A or SEA compared to splenocytes from untreated mice. Importantly, PZQ treatment resulted in complete restoration of HIV-1C vaccine specific T cell responses at 8 weeks post PZQ treatment. Restoration of HIV-1C vaccine specific T cell responses following elimination of helminth infection was time dependent, but surprisingly independent of the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 induced by parasite antigens. Our study shows that elimination of worms offers an affordable and a simple means to restore immune responsiveness to T cell based vaccines for HIV-1 and other infectious diseases in helminth endemic settings. PMID:19941988

  7. MiR-378 is an independent prognostic factor and inhibits cell growth and invasion in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs(miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that participate in a variety of biologic processes, and dysregulation of miRNA is always associated with cancer development and progression. Aberrant expression of miR-378 has been found in some types of cancer. However, effects and potential mechanisms of miR-378 in colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been explored. Methods Quantitative RT-PCR was performed to evaluate miR-378 levels in CRC cell lines and 84 pairs of CRC cancer and normal adjacent mucosa. Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional regression analyses were utilized to determine the association of miR-378 expression with survival of patients. MTT and invasion assays were used to determine the role of miR-378 in regulation of CRC cancer cell growth and invasion, respectively. Tumor growth was assessed by subcutaneous inoculation of cells into BALB/c nude mice. Luciferase assay was performed to assess miR-378 binding to vimentin gene. Results In this study, we confirmed that miR-378 significantly down-regulated in CRC cancer tissues and cell lines. Moreover, patients with low miR-378 expression had significantly poorer overall survival, and miR-378 expression was an independent prognostic factor in CRC. Over-expression of miR-378 inhibited SW620 cell growth and invasion, and resulted in down-regulation of vimentin expression. However, miR-378 knock-down promoted these processes and enhanced the expression of vimentin. In addition, we further identified vimentin as the functional downstream target of miR-378 by directly targeting the 3′-UTR of vimentin. Conclusions In conclusion, miR-378 may function as a tumor suppressor and plays an important role in inhibiting tumor growth and invasion. Our present results implicate the potential effects of miR-378 on prognosis and treatment of CRC cancer. PMID:24555885

  8. TAR-independent transactivation by Tat in cells derived from the CNS: a novel mechanism of HIV-1 gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R; Bagasra, O; Chowdhury, M; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K; Amini, S

    1992-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for productive infection and is a potential target for antiviral therapy. Tat, a potent activator of HIV-1 gene expression, serves to greatly increase the rate of transcription directed by the viral promoter. This induction, which seems to be an important component in the progression of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), may be due to increased transcriptional initiation, increased transcriptional elongation, or a combination of these processes. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of Tat with a specific RNA target termed TAR (transactivation responsive) which is present in the leader sequence of all HIV-1 mRNAs. This interaction is believed to be an important component of the mechanism of transactivation. In this report we demonstrate that in certain CNS-derived cells Tat is capable of activating HIV-1 through a TAR-independent pathway. A Tat-responsive element is found upstream within the viral promoter that in glial-derived cell lines allows transactivation in the absence of TAR. Deletion mapping and hybrid promoter constructs demonstrate that the newly identified Tat-responsive element corresponds to a sequence within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) previously identified as the HIV-1 enhancer, or NF-kappa B domain. DNA band-shift analysis reveals NF-kappa B binding activity in glial cells that differs from that present in T lymphoid cells. Further, we observe that TAR-deleted mutants of HIV-1 demonstrate normal late gene expression in glial cells as evidenced by syncytia formation and production of viral p24 antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1505523

  9. TLR ligands upregulate RIG-I expression in human plasmacytoid dendritic cells in a type I IFN-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Attila; Magyarics, Zoltan; Pazmandi, Kitti; Gopcsa, Laszlo; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2014-09-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are professional type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play an essential role in antiviral immunity. In many cell types, detection of intracellular pathogens is mostly dependent on endosomal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytosolic sensors, such as retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I). However, the possible interplay between these two systems has not yet been elucidated. Here we aimed to study the collaboration of endosomal TLRs and RIG-I in primary human pDCs. We found that under steady-state conditions, pDCs express RIG-I at very low level, but the expression of this receptor is rapidly and dramatically upregulated upon stimulation by the TLR7 ligand imiquimod or the TLR9 ligand type A CpG. We also demonstrated that pDCs are able to sense and respond to 5'-triphosphate double-stranded RNA (5'-ppp-dsRNA) only following activation by endosomal TLRs. Experiments on primary pDCs with functionally blocked IFN-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) and those on human pDC leukemia (pDC-L) cells defective in type I IFN secretion indicated that the upregulation of RIG-I expression in pDCs upon stimulation by endosomal TLR occurs in a type I IFN-independent manner. Selective phosph