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Sample records for helianthus annuus

  1. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Radonic, Laura M; Lewi, Dalia M; López, Nilda E; Hopp, H Esteban; Escandón, Alejandro S; Bilbao, Marisa López

    2015-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is still considered as a recalcitrant species to in vitro culture and transformation in spite of the publication of different protocols. Here we describe a routine transformation system of this crop which requires mature HA89 genotype seeds and Agrobacterium tumefaciens EHA105 strain for gene delivery, being both easily available. Selection of transformed shoots depends on root development in kanamycin-selective media, instead of shoot color, avoiding selection of escapes. The establishment of this protocol proved successful for the incorporation of both reporter and agronomic important genes and also for the evaluation of the specific expression patterns of different promoters in transgenic sunflower plants. Stable expression of the incorporated transgenes was confirmed by RT-PCR and GUS reporter gene visualization. Stable inheritance of transgenes was successfully followed until T2 generation in several independent lines. PMID:25416248

  2. Phenotypic characterization of biodiversity in wild Helianthus annuus from Argentina and North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild Helianthus annuus populations naturalized in central Argentina have spread since their introduction from the center of origin in North America. Phenotypic characterization based on 45 morphological and phenological descriptors of nine populations from different geographic regions of Argentina a...

  3. Ecological characterization of wild Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris germplasm in Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris (Asteraceae) are wild sunflowers native to North America but have become naturalized in central Argentina covering an area of about 5 million hectares. Wild H. annuus has been recognized as invader species in several countries, but no research has been done to stu...

  4. Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus has chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal RNA genes of Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius.

    PubMed Central

    Rieseberg, L H; Beckstrom-Sternberg, S; Doan, K

    1990-01-01

    Heiser [Heiser, C. B. (1951) Evolution 5, 42-51] hypothesized that Helianthus annuus ssp. texanus was derived by the introduction of H. annuus into Texas and subsequent introgression of genes from Helianthus debilis ssp. cucumerifolius into H. annuus. Although often considered to be one of the best cases of introgression in plants, alternative hypotheses to introgression, such as convergence or the joint retention of the ancestral condition, could not be ruled out in the original study. To test for the occurrence of introgression we examined 14 populations of H. annuus ssp. texanus, 14 allopatric populations of H. annuus, and three populations of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius with reference to diagnostic chloroplast DNA and nuclear ribosomal DNA markers. Thirteen of the 14 populations of H. annuus ssp. texanus had chloroplast DNA and/or ribosomal DNA markers of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius. In contrast, no chloroplast DNA or ribosomal DNA markers of H. debilis ssp. cucumerifolius were found in the 14 allopatric populations of H. annuus. Our findings provide strong support, therefore, for the hypothesized introgressive origin of H. annuus ssp. texanus. PMID:11607056

  5. Phytoremediation potential of Helianthus annuus L in sewage-irrigated Indo-Gangetic alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Sharma, Bechan; Kumar, Chitranjan; Pathak, Niraj; Balak, Shiv

    2012-03-01

    The study of phytoremediation potential of Helianthus annuus L was conducted in the sewage-irrigated Indo-Gangetic alluvial soils, India. Calcium @ 1.0% and Zn @ 40 ppm enhanced the yield of H. annuus L and minimized the toxicity of Cr in the investigated soils. The study indicated that H. annuus L is highly sensitive to Cr and Zn in terms of metallic pollution; and may be used as indicator plant. For Cr-phytoremediation, humic acid treatment @ 500 mL/acre induced the Cr-accumulation in roots (p < 0.007) and in shoots (p < 0.015), which was recorded 3.21 and 3.16 mg/kg in root and shoot of H. annuus L, respectively. We suggest that H. annuus L fulfils the necessary condition for efficiently increasing species bioaccumulation after soil treatment with humic acid in Cr-polluted sewage-irrigated soils through soil- plant rhizospheric processes. PMID:22567708

  6. Effect of wild Helianthus cytoplasms on agronomic and oil characteristics of cultivated sunflower (H. annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) productions reliance on a single source of cytoplasmic male-sterility, PET1, derived from H. petiolaris Nutt., makes the crop genetically vulnerable. Twenty diverse cytoplasmic substitution lines from annual and perennial wild species were compared with the inbred li...

  7. Molecular mapping of an apical branching gene of cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercial hybrids of cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) are obtained by crossing a cytoplasmic male-sterile line (A-line) with a restorer pollinator (R-line). The incorporation of a recessive branching trait to extend the pollination period of R-lines during hybrid seed production is labor...

  8. Abscisic acid content of a nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mutant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mutant was observed in the progeny of a cross between the sunflower cultivar HA 89 and an amphiploid of a H. divaricatus L. x P21 cross that exhibited loss of dormancy induction in the developing embryo. Seeds of this mutant frequently germinate on the head about 4...

  9. Alternaria roseogrisea, a new species from achenes of Helianthus annuus (sunflower)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternaria roseogrisea was isolated from the achenes of Helianthus annuus L. during studies conducted in 1983-85 to document the diversity of fungi occurring in sunflower seeds and the possible role these fungi play in degradation of oilseed quality. A. roseogrisea was reported as "Alternaria sp. 2...

  10. Molecular mapping of three nuclear male sterility mutant genes in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nuclear male sterility (NMS) trait is a useful tool for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) breeding and genetic programs. Previously, we induced NMS mutants in cultivated line HA 89. The mutants possessed single recessive genes, ms6, ms7, and ms8, respectively, in NMS HA 89-872, NMS HA 89-552, and...

  11. Characterization of a green nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mutant ndg

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mutant was observed in the progeny of a cross between the sunflower cultivar HA 89 and an amphiploid of a H. divaricatus L. x P21 cross that exhibited loss of dormancy induction in the developing embryo. Seeds of this mutant frequently germinate on the head about 4...

  12. A Novel Biodiversity of Wild Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) Naturally Developed in Central Argentina

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower's wild relative, Helianthus annuus L., is a non-native invader in several regions of the world. It was introduced as experimental forage in central Argentina six decades ago where it probably escaped and developed extended populations coexisting with the sunflower crop. If the invasive...

  13. Phomopsis stem canker: a re-emerging threat to sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phomopsis stem canker frequently causes yield reductions on sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) on several continents, including Australia, Russia, Europe and North America. Between 2001 and 2012, the incidence of Phomopsis stem canker has increased 16 fold in the Northern Great Plains of the United...

  14. Molecular mapping of R11, a novel rust resistance gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower production in North America has recently been threatened by the evolution of new virulent pathotypes of sunflower rust caused by the fungus Puccinia helianthi Schwein. Rf ANN-1742, an ‘HA 89’ backcross restorer line derived from wild annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus L), was identified a...

  15. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Kantar, Michael B; Sosa, Chrystian C; Khoury, Colin K; Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P; Achicanoy, Harold A; Bernau, Vivian; Kane, Nolan C; Marek, Laura; Seiler, Gerald; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and niche occupancy in 36 taxa closely related to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Taxa lacking comprehensive ex situ conservation were identified. The predicted distributions for 36 Helianthus taxa identified substantial range overlap, range asymmetry and niche conservatism. Specific taxa (e.g., Helianthus deblis Nutt., Helianthus anomalus Blake, and Helianthus divaricatus L.) were identified as targets for traits of interest, particularly for abiotic stress tolerance, and adaptation to extreme soil properties. The combination of techniques demonstrates the potential for publicly available ecogeographic and phylogenetic data to facilitate the identification of possible sources of abiotic stress traits for plant breeding programs. Much of the primary genepool (wild H. annuus) occurs in extreme environments indicating that introgression of targeted traits may be relatively straightforward. Sister taxa in Helianthus have greater range overlap than more distantly related taxa within the genus. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that in plants (unlike some animal groups), geographic isolation may not be necessary for speciation. PMID:26500675

  16. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Kantar, Michael B.; Sosa, Chrystian C.; Khoury, Colin K.; Castañeda-Álvarez, Nora P.; Achicanoy, Harold A.; Bernau, Vivian; Kane, Nolan C.; Marek, Laura; Seiler, Gerald; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2015-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and niche occupancy in 36 taxa closely related to sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Taxa lacking comprehensive ex situ conservation were identified. The predicted distributions for 36 Helianthus taxa identified substantial range overlap, range asymmetry and niche conservatism. Specific taxa (e.g., Helianthus deblis Nutt., Helianthus anomalus Blake, and Helianthus divaricatus L.) were identified as targets for traits of interest, particularly for abiotic stress tolerance, and adaptation to extreme soil properties. The combination of techniques demonstrates the potential for publicly available ecogeographic and phylogenetic data to facilitate the identification of possible sources of abiotic stress traits for plant breeding programs. Much of the primary genepool (wild H. annuus) occurs in extreme environments indicating that introgression of targeted traits may be relatively straightforward. Sister taxa in Helianthus have greater range overlap than more distantly related taxa within the genus. This adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that in plants (unlike some animal groups), geographic isolation may not be necessary for speciation. PMID:26500675

  17. Identification and mapping of tRNA genes on the Helianthus annuus mitochondrial genome.

    PubMed

    Ceci, L R; Veronico, P; Gallerani, R

    1996-01-01

    The physical map for seventeen tRNA genes on the mitochondrial genome of the dicotyledonous plant Helianthus annuus has been established. Eleven are genuine mitochondrial genes, while the other six show a high degree of similarity with the chloroplast counterparts. The genes, with the exception of the genuine trnS(GCT) and of the chloroplast-like trnV and trnP, are expressed. The comparison of the organization of some tRNA genes in the H. annuus mitochondrial genome with that of similar genes detectable in other plants reveals that their association is common to several dicotyledons. PMID:8722570

  18. The tolerance efficiency of Panicum maximum and Helianthus annuus in TNT-contaminated soil and nZVI-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Jiamjitrpanich, Waraporn; Parkpian, Preeda; Polprasert, Chongrak; Laurent, François; Kosanlavit, Rachain

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to compare the initial method for phytoremediation involving germination and transplantation. The study was also to determine the tolerance efficiency of Panicum maximum (Purple guinea grass) and Helianthus annuus (Sunflower) in TNT-contaminated soil and nZVI-contaminated soil. It was found that the transplantation of Panicum maximum and Helianthus annuus was more suitable than germination as the initiate method of nano-phytoremediation potting test. The study also showed that Panicum maximum was more tolerance than Helianthus annuus in TNT and nZVI-contaminated soil. Therefore, Panicum maximum in the transplantation method should be selected as a hyperaccumulated plant for nano-phytoremediation potting tests. Maximum tolerance dosage of Panicum maximum to TNT-concentration soil was 320 mg/kg and nZVI-contaminated soil was 1000 mg/kg in the transplantation method. PMID:22702809

  19. A morphometric analysis of cellular differentiation in caps of primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    In order to determine if patterns of cell differentiation are similar in primary and lateral roots, I performed a morphometric analysis of the ultrastructure of calyptrogen, columella, and peripheral cells in primary and lateral roots of Helianthus annuus. Each cell type is characterized by a unique ultrastructure, and the ultrastructural changes characteristic of cellular differentiation in root caps are organelle specific. No major structural differences exist in the structures of the composite cell types, or in patterns of cell differentiation in caps of primary vs. lateral roots.

  20. Toward a molecular cytogenetic map for cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by landed BAC/BIBAC clones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n=34). However, the relationship between linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown and has considerable relevance for the sunflower research community. Rec...

  1. Identification of molecular markers linked to a new nuclear male-sterility gene ms7 in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nuclear male sterility (NMS) is an important alternative system to the cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) in hybrid breeding programs because of its stable male sterility and abundant available restorer resources. For sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), NMS 89-552, a nuclear male-sterile mutant induced by...

  2. Phytoaccumulation of lead by sunflower (Helianthus annuus), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and vetiver (Vetiveria zizanioides).

    PubMed

    Boonyapookana, Benjaporn; Parkpian, Preeda; Techapinyawat, Sombun; DeLaune, R D; Jugsujinda, Aroon

    2005-01-01

    The ability of three plant species: Helianthus annuus, Nicotiana tabacum, and Vetiveria zizanioides for phytoaccumulation of Pb was studied. Plants were grown in hydroponic solution containing Pb(NO3)2 at concentration of 0.25 and 2.5 mM Pb in the presence or absence of chelating agents (EDTA or DTPA). Lead (Pb) transport and localization within the tissues of the plant species was determined using scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers (SEM-EDS). The addition of chelators increased Pb uptake as compared to plants grown in solution containing Pb alone. Lead taken up by the plant species were concentrated in both leaf and stem at the region of vascular bundles with greater amounts in the leaf portion. Lead granules were also found in the H. annuus root tissue from the epidermis layer to the central axis. After four weeks of growth a 23-fold increase in shoot Pb content for H. annuus and N. tabacum and 17-fold increase in shoot Pb for V. zizanioides resulted from plants grown in the 2.5 mM Pb-EDTA treatment. The higher Pb treatment (2.5 mM Pb containing EDTA) resulted in higher concentrations of Pb in plant tissue at the fourth week of exposure as compared to Pb treatment containing DTPA. Overall, Pb accumulation potential of H. annuus was greater than that of N. tabacum and V. zizanioides as indicated by the bioconcentration factor (171, 70, and 88, respectively). The highest measured Pb concentrations were found in H. annuus roots, stems, and leaves (2668, 843, and 3611 microg/g DW, respectively) grown in the 2.5 mM Pb-EDTA treatment. The addition of chelators caused some reduction in plant growth and biomass. Results showed that the three plant species tested have potential for use in phytoaccumulation of Pb since the Pb was concentrated in leaf and stem as compared to control plants. H. annuus however best meet the prerequisites for a hyperaccumulator plant and would have the potential for use in the restoration of

  3. Lipid, polyamide, and flavonol phagostimulants for adult western corn rootworm from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pollen.

    PubMed

    Lin, S; Mullin, C A

    1999-03-01

    Adult Diabroticites including western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, consume pollen of corn, squash, sunflower, and other species. Short-chain neutral amino acids in methanol-water extracts of pollen have been previously identified in our laboratory as strong phagostimulants for Diabrotica. Bioassay-driven fractionation was used to characterize the interacting lipid and midpolarity phagostimulants for adult WCR in Giant Gray Stripe sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., pollen. Lipids rich in omega3-linolenic acid including triglycerides, free fatty acids, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidic acids, and phosphatidylcholines were highly phagostimulatory. Other important phagostimulatory components included a hydroxycinnamic acid-polyamine amide, N(1),N(5),N(10)-tri[(E)-p-coumaroyl]spermidine, and a flavonol, quercetin beta-3-O-glucoside. The structural characteristics of these phagoactive compounds and their role in the pollinivory specialization of rootworm beetles are discussed. PMID:10552441

  4. Data on mass spectrometry based identification of allergens from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pollen proteome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nandini; Sircar, Gaurab; Saha, Bodhisattwa; Pandey, Naren; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta

    2016-06-01

    Allergy is a type of abnormal immune reactions, which is triggered by environmental antigens or allergens and mediated by IgE antibodies. Now-a-days mass spectrometry is the method of choice for allergen identification based on homology searching. Here, we provide the mass spectrometry dataset associated with our previously published research article on identification of sunflower pollen allergens (Ghosh et al., 2015 [1]). In this study allergenicity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollen grains were primarily investigated by clinical studies followed by detailed immunobiochemical and immunoproteomic analyses. The mass spectrometry data for the identification of allergens were deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002397. PMID:27054187

  5. Isolation of Bioactive Compounds from Sunflower Leaves (Helianthus annuus L.) Extracted with Supercritical Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    El Marsni, Zouhir; Torres, Ascension; Varela, Rosa M; Molinillo, José M G; Casas, Lourdes; Mantell, Casimiro; Martinez de la Ossa, Enrique J; Macias, Francisco A

    2015-07-22

    The work described herein is a continuation of our initial studies on the supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with CO2 of bioactive substances from Helianthus annuus L. var. Arianna. The selected SFE extract showed high activity in the wheat coleoptile bioassay, in Petri dish phytotoxicity bioassays, and in the hydroponic culture of tomato seeds. Chromatographic fractionations of the extracts and a spectroscopic analysis of the isolated compounds showed 52 substances belonging to 10 different chemical classes, which were mainly sesquiterpene lactones, diterpenes, and flavonoids. Heliannuol M (31), helivypolides K and L (36, 37), and helieudesmanolide B (38) are described for the first time in the literature. Metabolites have been tested in the etiolated wheat coleoptile bioassay with good results in a noteworthy effect on germination. The most active compounds were also tested on tomato seeds, heliannuol A (30) and leptocarpin (45) being the most active, with values similar to those of the commercial herbicide. PMID:26151222

  6. Data on mass spectrometry based identification of allergens from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) pollen proteome

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nandini; Sircar, Gaurab; Saha, Bodhisattwa; Pandey, Naren; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Allergy is a type of abnormal immune reactions, which is triggered by environmental antigens or allergens and mediated by IgE antibodies. Now-a-days mass spectrometry is the method of choice for allergen identification based on homology searching. Here, we provide the mass spectrometry dataset associated with our previously published research article on identification of sunflower pollen allergens (Ghosh et al., 2015 [1]). In this study allergenicity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollen grains were primarily investigated by clinical studies followed by detailed immunobiochemical and immunoproteomic analyses. The mass spectrometry data for the identification of allergens were deposited to ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002397. PMID:27054187

  7. Localization of sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis in cells of capitate glandular trichomes of Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Amrehn, Evelyn; Aschenbrenner, Anna-Katharina; Heller, Annerose; Spring, Otmar

    2016-03-01

    Capitate glandular trichomes (CGT) of sunflower, Helianthus annuus, synthesize bioactive sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) within a short period of only a few days during trichome development. In the current project, the subcellular localization of H. annuus germacrene A monooxygenase (HaGAO), a key enzyme of the STL biosynthesis in sunflower CGT, was investigated. A polyclonal antibody raised against this enzyme was used for immunolabelling. HaGAO was found in secretory and stalk cells of CGT. This correlated with the appearance of smooth endoplasmic reticulum in both cell types. Stalk cells and secretory cells differed in form, size and types of plastids, but both had structures necessary for secretion. No HaGAO-specific immunoreaction was found in sunflower leaf tissue outside of CGT or in developing CGT before the secretory phase had started. Our results indicated that not only secretory cells but also nearly all cells of the CGT were involved in the biosynthesis of STL and that this process was not linked to the presence or absence of a specific type of plastid. PMID:25956500

  8. Can arsenic-phytochelatin complex formation be used as an indicator for toxicity in Helianthus annuus?

    PubMed

    Raab, Andrea; Ferreira, Katia; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The formation of arsenic-phytochelatin (As-PC) complexes is thought to be part of the plant detoxification strategy for arsenic. This work examines (i) the arsenic (As) concentration-dependent formation of As-PC complex formation and (ii) redistribution and metabolism of As after arrested As uptake in Helianthus annuus. HPLC with parallel ICP-MS/ES-MS detection was used to identify and quantify the species present in plant extracts exposed to arsenate (As(V)) (between 0 and 66.7 micromol As l-1 for 24 h). At As concentrations below the EC50 value for root growth (22 micromol As l-1) As uptake is exponential, but it is reduced at concentrations above. Translocation between root and shoot seemed to be limited to the uptake phase of arsenic. No redistribution of As between root and shoot was observed after arresting As exposure. The formation of As-PC complexes was concentration-dependent. The amount and number of As-PC complexes increased exponentially with concentration up to 13.7 micromol As l-1. As(III)-PC3 and GS-As(III)-PC2 complexes were the dominant species in all samples. The ratio of PC-bound As to unbound As increased up to 1.3 micromol As l-1 and decreased at higher concentrations. Methylation of inorganic As was only a minor pathway in H. annuus with about 1% As methylated over a 32 d period. The concentration dependence of As-PC complex formation, amount of unbound reduced and oxidized PC2, and the relative uptake rate showed that As starts to influence the cellular metabolism of H. annuus negatively at As concentrations well below the EC50 value determined by more traditional means. Generally, As-PC complexes and PC-synthesis rate seem to be the more sensitive parameters to be studied when As toxicity values are to be estimated. PMID:17283372

  9. Response of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Leaf Surface Defenses to Exogenous Methyl Jasmonate

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Heather C.; Ro, Dae-kyun; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Helianthus annuus, the common sunflower, produces a complex array of secondary compounds that are secreted into glandular trichomes, specialized structures found on leaf surfaces and anther appendages of flowers. The primary components of these trichome secretions are sesquiterpene lactones (STL), a diverse class of compounds produced abundantly by the plant family Compositae and believed to contribute to plant defense against herbivory. We treated wild and cultivated H. annuus accessions with exogenous methyl jasmonate, a plant hormone that mediates plant defense against insect herbivores and certain classes of fungal pathogens. The wild sunflower produced a higher density of glandular trichomes on its leaves than the cultivar. Comparison of the profiles of glandular trichome extracts obtained by liquid chromatography–mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) showed that wild and cultivated H. annuus were qualitatively similar in surface chemistry, although differing in the relative size and proportion of various compounds detected. Despite observing consistent transcriptional responses to methyl jasmonate treatment, we detected no significant effect on glandular trichome density or LC-MS profile in cultivated or wild sunflower, with wild sunflower exhibiting a declining trend in overall STL production and foliar glandular trichome density of jasmonate-treated plants. These results suggest that glandular trichomes and associated compounds may act as constitutive defenses or require greater levels of stimulus for induction than the observed transcriptional responses to exogenous jasmonate. Reduced defense investment in domesticated lines is consistent with predicted tradeoffs caused by selection for increased yield; future research will focus on the development of genetic resources to explicitly test the ecological roles of glandular trichomes and associated effects on plant growth and fitness. PMID:22623991

  10. Biologically active antimicrobial and antioxidant substances in the Helianthus annuus L. bee pollen.

    PubMed

    Fatrcová-Šramková, Katarína; Nôžková, Janka; Máriássyová, Magda; Kačániová, Miroslava

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the content of flavonoids, polyphenols, and carotenoids in the Helianthus annuus L. bee pollen. It was also to evaluate the ability of the dried, frozen, and freeze-dried extracts of sunflower (H. annuus) pollen, its scavenged free radicals and reducing action. Another aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial in vitro action of the H. annuus pollen extracts against the Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. All pollen extracts showed medium antiradical activity and reductive ability. The most effective was the freeze-dried extract in both evaluation systems. The evaluation of the protective effects of DNA using a biosensor showed an opposite trending-frozen ˃ dried ˃ freeze-dried pollen. For the evaluation of antiradical activity, the DPPH method was used, and reductive ability was assessed by means of phosphomolybdic complex formation. The comparison of the polyphenols content shows higher values in freeze-dried bee pollen than in the dried and frozen pollen. The highest content of flavonoids was found in the frozen samples and the most carotenoids were present in the dried samples. In our study, the best antibacterial effects of the dried sunflower bee pollen extracts were found against Paenibacillus larvae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococcus raffinosus. The best inhibitory properties of the frozen sunflower bee pollen extracts were found against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Paenibacillus larvae. Very good inhibitory effects of freeze-dried sunflower bee pollen were found against Paenibacillus larvae, Brochotrix thermosphacta, and Enterococcus raffinosus. The best antifungal activity of the sunflower bee pollen was found in the frozen bee pollen extracts against Aspergillus ochraceus and freeze-dried bee pollen extracts against Aspergillus niger. PMID:26674447

  11. Helikaurolides A-D with a Diterpene-Sesquiterpene Skeleton from Supercritical Fluid Extracts of Helianthus annuus L. var. Arianna.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ascensión; Molinillo, José M G; Varela, Rosa M; Casas, Lourdes; Mantell, Casimiro; Martínez de la Ossa, Enrique J; Macías, Francisco A

    2015-10-01

    Four novel compounds (1-4) with an unprecedented skeleton that combines a sesquiterpene lactone and a kaurane diterpene acid were isolated from Helianthus annuus L. var. Arianna extract, which was obtained under supercritical conditions. The structures of 1-4 were elucidated by NMR and MS analyses. The biosynthetic routes involve sesquiterpene lactones and kauranic acid, both of which were previously isolated from this species. PMID:26368065

  12. Light intensity alters the extent of arsenic toxicity in Helianthus annuus L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Geeta; Srivastava, Prabhat Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Prasad, Sheo Mohan

    2014-06-01

    The present study is aimed at assessing the extent of arsenic (As) toxicity under three different light intensities-optimum (400 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), sub-optimum (225 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1)), and low (75 μmole photon m(-2) s(-1))-exposed to Helianthus annuus L. var. DRSF-113 seedlings by examining various physiological and biochemical parameters. Irrespective of the light intensities under which H. annuus L. seedlings were grown, there was an As dose (low, i.e., 6 mg kg(-1) soil, As1; and high, i.e., 12 mg kg(-1) soil, As2)-dependent decrease in all the growth parameters, viz., fresh mass, shoot length, and root length. Optimum light-grown seedlings exhibited better growth performance than the sub-optimum and low light-grown seedlings; however, low light-grown plants had maximum root and shoot lengths. Accumulation of As in the plant tissues depended upon its concentration used, proximity of the plant tissue, and intensity of the light. Greater intensity of light allowed greater assimilation of photosynthates accompanied by more uptake of nutrients along with As from the medium. The levels of chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids declined with increasing concentrations of As. Seedlings acquired maximum Chl a and b under optimum light which were more compatible to face As1 and As2 doses of As, also evident from the overall status of enzymatic (SOD, POD, CAT, and GST) and non-enzymatic antioxidant (Pro). PMID:24699829

  13. Bioaugmentation with cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria to assist cadmium phytoextraction by Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Chanprasert, Maesinee; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2013-07-01

    Micrococcus sp. MU1 and Klebsiella sp. BAM1, the cadmium-resistant plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), produce high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) during the late stationary phase of their growth. The ability of PGPR to promote root elongation, plant growth and cadmium uptake in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated. Both species of bacteria were able to remove cadmium ions from an aqueous solution and enhanced cadmium mobilization in contaminated soil. Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. use aminocyclopropane carboxylic acid as a nitrogen source to support their growth, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cadmium for Micrococcus sp. and Klebsiella sp. were 1000 and 800mM, respectively. These bacteria promoted root elongation in H. annuus seedlings in both the absence and presence of cadmium compared to uninoculated seedlings. Inoculation with these bacteria was found to increase the root lengths of H. annuus that had been planted in cadmium-contaminated soil. An increase in dry weight was observed for H. annuus inoculated with Micrococcus sp. Moreover, Micrococcus sp. enhanced the accumulation of cadmium in the root and leaf of H. annuus compared to untreated plants. The highest cadmium accumulation in the whole plant was observed when the plants were treated with EDTA following the treatment with Micrococcus sp. In addition, the highest translocation of cadmium from root to the above-ground tissues of H. annuus was found after treatment with Klebsiella sp. in the fourth week after planting. Our results show that plant growth and cadmium accumulation in H. annuus was significantly enhanced by cadmium-resistant PGPRs, and these bacterial inoculants are excellent promoters of phytoextraction for the rehabilitation of heavy metal-polluted environments. PMID:23478127

  14. Phomopsis Stem Canker: A Reemerging Threat to Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Febina M; Alananbeh, Kholoud M; Jordahl, James G; Meyer, Scott M; Castlebury, Lisa A; Gulya, Thomas J; Markell, Samuel G

    2015-07-01

    Phomopsis stem canker causes yield reductions on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on several continents, including Australia, Europe, and North America. In the United States, Phomopsis stem canker incidence has increased 16-fold in the Northern Great Plains between 2001 and 2012. Although Diaporthe helianthi was assumed to be the sole causal agent in the United States, a newly described species, D. gulyae, was found to be the primary cause of Phomopsis stem canker in Australia. To determine the identity of Diaporthe spp. causing Phomopsis stem canker in the Northern Great Plains, 275 infected stems were collected between 2010 and 2012. Phylogenetic analyses of sequences of the ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer region, elongation factor subunit 1-α, and actin gene regions of representative isolates, in comparison with those of type specimens, confirmed two species (D. helianthi and D. gulyae) in the United States. Differences in aggressiveness between the two species were determined using the stem-wound method in the greenhouse; overall, D. helianthi and D. gulyae did not vary significantly (P≤0.05) in their aggressiveness at 10 and 14 days after inoculation. These findings indicate that both Diaporthe spp. have emerged as sunflower pathogens in the United States, and have implications on the management of this disease. PMID:26121367

  15. Cr localization and speciation in roots of chromate fed Helianthus annuus L. seedlings using synchrotron techniques.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Guadalupe; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Cruz-Jiménez, Gustavo; Bernal-Alvarado, Jesús; Córdova-Fraga, Teodoro; López-Moreno, Laura; Cotte, Marine

    2014-01-01

    In order to gain knowledge on the potential use of Helianthus annuus L. for the remediation of Cr(VI) polluted waters, hydroponics experiments were set up to determine Cr uptake and tolerance in different Cr(VI)-sulfate conditions, and Cr biotransformations. Results indicated that Cr(VI) promoted seed germination, and plant tolerance was higher at younger plant stages. Cr uptake was dependent on sulfate concentrations. The highest Cr levels in roots and shoots (13,700 and 2,500 mg kg(-1) dry weight (DW), respectively) were obtained in 1 mM sulfate. The lowest Cr uptake in roots (10,600 mg kg(-1) DW) was observed in seedlings treated with no sulfate. In shoots, Cr concentration was of 1,500 mg kg(-1)DW for the 1 mM sulfate treatment, indicating a different level of interaction between chromate and sulfate in both tissues. For the first time, using micro X-ray florescence (muXRF), we demonstrated Cr reaches the root stele and is located in the walls of xylem vessels. Bulk and micro X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (muXANES) results showed that Cr in the roots is mostly in the form of Cr(III) phosphate (80%), with the remainder complexed to organic acids. Our results suggest this plant species may serve for Cr(VI) rhizofiltration purposes. PMID:24933903

  16. Catalase degradation in sunflower cotyledons during peroxisome transition from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function. [Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Eising, R.; Gerhardt, B.

    1987-06-01

    First order rate constant for the degradation (degradation constants) of catalase in the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were determined by measuring the loss of catalase containing /sup 14/C-labeled heme. During greening of the cotyledons, a period when peroxisomes change from glyoxysomal to leaf peroxisomal function, the degradation of glyoxysomal catalase is significantly slower than during all other stages of cotyledon development in light or darkness. The degradation constant during the transition stage of peroxisome function amounts to 0.205 day/sup -1/ in contrast to the constants ranging from 0.304 day/sup -1/ to 0.515 day/sup -1/ during the other developmental stages. Density labeling experiments comprising labeling of catalase with /sup 2/H/sub 2/O and its isopycnic centrifugation on CsCl gradients demonstrated that the determinations of the degradation constants were not substantially affected by reutilization of /sup 14/C-labeled compounds for catalase synthesis. The degradation constants for both glyoxysomal catalase and catalase synthesized during the transition of peroxisome function do not differ. This was shown by labeling the catalases with different isotopes and measuring the isotope ratio during the development of the cotyledons. The results are inconsistent with the concept that an accelerated and selective degradation of glyoxysomes underlies the change in peroxisome function. The data suggest that catalase degradation is at least partially due to an individual turnover of catalase and does not only result from a turnover of the whole peroxisomes.

  17. Effects of salinity, temperature, and polyethylene glycol on the seed germination of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Luan, Zhihui; Xiao, Moxin; Zhou, Daowei; Zhang, Hongxiang; Tian, Yu; Wu, Yi; Guan, Bo; Song, Yantao

    2014-01-01

    Salinization has severe influences on agriculture in the whole world. The main aims of this work were to evaluate osmotic effect and ion effect of NaCl on seed germination of three sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars interacting with three alternating temperature regimes and to select the most salt tolerant cultivars to plant in the saline region. Seeds were germinated in the isotonic NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions of -0.45, -0.90, -1.34, -1.79, and -2.24 MPa at 10:20, 15:25, and 20:30 °C temperature regimes. Both NaCl and PEG inhibited germination, but the effects of NaCl were less as compared to that of PEG, which means that adverse effects of PEG on germination were due to osmotic effect rather than specific ion accumulation. For the three cultivars, higher germination occurred at 10:20 °C in NaCl treatments and at 20:30 °C in the isotonic PEG treatments. Among the three cultivars, Sandaomei (SDM) is the most tolerant to salt and PEG stress. PMID:25610896

  18. Effects of Salinity, Temperature, and Polyethylene Glycol on the Seed Germination of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Zhihui; Xiao, Moxin; Zhou, Daowei; Tian, Yu; Wu, Yi; Guan, Bo; Song, Yantao

    2014-01-01

    Salinization has severe influences on agriculture in the whole world. The main aims of this work were to evaluate osmotic effect and ion effect of NaCl on seed germination of three sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultivars interacting with three alternating temperature regimes and to select the most salt tolerant cultivars to plant in the saline region. Seeds were germinated in the isotonic NaCl and polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions of −0.45, −0.90, −1.34, −1.79, and −2.24 MPa at 10 : 20, 15 : 25, and 20 : 30°C temperature regimes. Both NaCl and PEG inhibited germination, but the effects of NaCl were less as compared to that of PEG, which means that adverse effects of PEG on germination were due to osmotic effect rather than specific ion accumulation. For the three cultivars, higher germination occurred at 10 : 20°C in NaCl treatments and at 20 : 30°C in the isotonic PEG treatments. Among the three cultivars, Sandaomei (SDM) is the most tolerant to salt and PEG stress. PMID:25610896

  19. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as a pre-Columbian domesticate in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lentz, David L; Pohl, Mary DeLand; Alvarado, José Luis; Tarighat, Somayeh; Bye, Robert

    2008-04-29

    Mexico has long been recognized as one of the world's cradles of domestication with evidence for squash (Cucurbita pepo) cultivation appearing as early as 8,000 cal B.C. followed by many other plants, such as maize (Zea mays), peppers (Capsicum annuum), common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). We present archaeological, linguistic, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric data demonstrating that sunflower (Helianthus annuus) had entered the repertoire of Mexican domesticates by ca. 2600 cal B.C., that its cultivation was widespread in Mexico and extended as far south as El Salvador by the first millennium B.C., that it was well known to the Aztecs, and that it is still in use by traditional Mesoamerican cultures today. The sunflower's association with indigenous solar religion and warfare in Mexico may have led to its suppression after the Spanish Conquest. The discovery of ancient sunflower in Mexico refines our knowledge of domesticated Mesoamerican plants and adds complexity to our understanding of cultural evolution. PMID:18443289

  20. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as a pre-Columbian domesticate in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, David L.; Pohl, Mary DeLand; Alvarado, José Luis; Tarighat, Somayeh; Bye, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Mexico has long been recognized as one of the world's cradles of domestication with evidence for squash (Cucurbita pepo) cultivation appearing as early as 8,000 cal B.C. followed by many other plants, such as maize (Zea mays), peppers (Capsicum annuum), common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). We present archaeological, linguistic, ethnographic, and ethnohistoric data demonstrating that sunflower (Helianthus annuus) had entered the repertoire of Mexican domesticates by ca. 2600 cal B.C., that its cultivation was widespread in Mexico and extended as far south as El Salvador by the first millennium B.C., that it was well known to the Aztecs, and that it is still in use by traditional Mesoamerican cultures today. The sunflower's association with indigenous solar religion and warfare in Mexico may have led to its suppression after the Spanish Conquest. The discovery of ancient sunflower in Mexico refines our knowledge of domesticated Mesoamerican plants and adds complexity to our understanding of cultural evolution. PMID:18443289

  1. Effect of chromium on growth attributes in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Fozia, Andaleeb; Muhammad, Anjum Zia; Muhammad, Ashraf; Zafar, Mahmood Khalid

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal soil pollution takes place when the metal concentration of soil exceeds natural background level and causes ecological destruction and deterioration of the environment. In the present study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of chromium-contaminated soil in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) growth attributes. Three different levels of chromium (Cr) i.e., 20, 40, and 60 mg/kg were applied to three varieties of sunflower (G-3, G-9, and G-59). The results of morphological, chemical, and yield parameters were recorded at crop maturity. The result showed that germination, root, and shoot lengths were decreased with increase in Cr concentrations. A gradual decrease was observed for various morphological parameters like root fresh and dry weights, shoot fresh and dry weights, and plant height with increase in Cr levels. A comparison among Cr treatments obtained a significant decrease in yield parameters as achenes/capitulum, achenes/plant, and 100 achenes weight in three varieties. Cr was significantly absorbed by roots but its transport to other parts of plants was slow, and uptake in seeds was much lower than in roots and shoots. PMID:19209635

  2. Pre-dawn stomatal opening does not substantially enhance early-morning photosynthesis in Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Auchincloss, Lisa; Easlon, Hsien M; Levine, Diedre; Donovan, Lisa; Richards, James H

    2014-06-01

    Most C3 plant species have partially open stomata during the night especially in the 3-5 h before dawn. This pre-dawn stomatal opening has been hypothesized to enhance early-morning photosynthesis (A) by reducing diffusion limitations to CO2 at dawn. We tested this hypothesis in cultivated Helianthus annuus using whole-shoot gas exchange, leaf level gas exchange and modelling approaches. One hour pre-dawn low-humidity treatments were used to reduce pre-dawn stomatal conductance (g). At the whole-shoot level, a difference of pre-dawn g (0.40 versus 0.17 mol m(-2) s(-1)) did not significantly affect A during the first hour after dawn. Shorter term effects were investigated with leaf level gas exchange measurements and a difference of pre-dawn g (0.10 versus 0.04 mol m(-2) s(-1)) affected g and A for only 5 min after dawn. The potential effects of a wider range of stomatal apertures were explored with an empirical model of the relationship between A and intercellular CO2 concentration during the half-hour after dawn. Modelling results demonstrated that even extremely low pre-dawn stomatal conductance values have only a minimal effect on early-morning A for a few minutes after dawn. Thus, we found no evidence that pre-dawn stomatal opening enhances A. PMID:24895756

  3. Ectopic expression of the HAM59 gene causes homeotic transformations of reproductive organs in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Shulga, O A; Neskorodov, Ya B; Shchennikova, A V; Gaponenko, A K; Skryabin, K G

    2015-01-01

    The function of the HAM59 MADS-box gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) was studied to clarify homeotic C activity in the Asteraceae plant family. For the first time, transgenic sunflower plants with a modified pattern of HAM59 expression were obtained. It was shown that the HAM59 MADS-box transcription factor did mediate C activity in sunflower. In particular, it participated in termination of the floral meristem, repression of the cadastral function of A-activity, and together with other C-type sunflower protein HAM45-in the specification of the identity of stamens and pistils. PMID:25937227

  4. stem fasciated, a Recessive Mutation in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus), Alters Plant Morphology and Auxin Level

    PubMed Central

    FAMBRINI, MARCO; BONSIGNORI, ELISA; RAPPARINI, FRANCESCA; CIONINI, GIULIANO; MICHELOTTI, VANIA; BERTINI, DANIELE; BARALDI, RITA; PUGLIESI, CLAUDIO

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Plant lateral organs such as leaves arise from a group of initial cells within the flanks of the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Alterations in the initiation of lateral organs are often associated with changes in the dimension and arrangement of the SAM as well as with abnormal hormonal homeostasis. A mutation named stem fasciated (stf) that affects various aspects of plant development, including SAM shape and auxin level, was characterized in sunflower (Helianthus annuus). • Methods F1, F2 and F3 generations were obtained through reciprocal crosses between stf and normal plants. For the genetic analysis, a χ2 test was used. Phenotypic observations were made in field-grown and potted plants. A histological analysis of SAM, hypocotyl, epicotyl, stem and root apical meristem was also conducted. To evaluate the level of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry–selected ion monitoring analysis was performed. • Key Results stf is controlled by a single nuclear recessive gene. stf plants are characterized by a dramatically increased number of leaves and vascular bundles in the stem, as well as by a shortened plastochron and an altered phyllotaxis pattern. By histological analysis, it was demonstrated that the stf phenotype is related to an enlarged vegetative SAM. Microscopy analysis of the mutant's apex also revealed an abnormal enlargement of nuclei in both central and peripheral zones and a disorganized distribution of cells in the L2 layer of the central zone. The stf mutant showed a high endogenous free IAA level, whereas auxin perception appeared normal. • Conclusions The observed phenotype and the high level of auxin detected in stf plants suggest that the STF gene is necessary for the proper initiation of primordia and for the establishment of a phyllotactic pattern through control of both SAM arrangement and hormonal homeostasis. PMID:16845141

  5. Transport and Metabolism of 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic Acid in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Finlayson, Scott A.; Foster, Kenneth R.; Reid, David M.

    1991-01-01

    Transport and metabolism of [2,3-14C] 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) from roots to shoots in 4-day-old sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings were studied. [14C]ACC was detected in, and 14C2H4 was evolved from, shoots 0.5 hours after [14C]ACC was supplied to roots. Ethylene emanation from the shoots returned to normal levels after 6 hours. The roots showed a similar pattern, although at 24 hours ethylene emanation was still slightly higher than in those plants that did not receive ACC. [14C]N-malonyl-ACC (MACC) was detected in both tissues at all times sampled. [14C]MACC levels surpassed [14C]ACC levels in the shoot at 2 hours, whereas [14C]MACC levels in the root remained below [14C]ACC levels until 6 hours, after which they were higher. Thin-layer chromatography analysis identified [14C] ACC in 1-hour shoot extracts, and [14C]MACC was identified in root tissues at 1 and 12 hours after treatment. [14C]ACC and [14C] MACC in the xylem sap of treated seedlings were identified by thin-layer chromatography. Xylem transport of [14C]ACC in treated seedlings, and transport of ACC in untreated seedlings, was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Some evidence for the presence of [14C]MACC in xylem sap in [14C]ACC-treated seedlings is presented. A substantial amount of radioactivity in both ACC and MACC fractions was detected leaking from the roots over 24 hours. A second radiolabeled volatile compound was trapped in a CO2-trapping solution but not in mercuric perchlorate. Levels of this compound were highest after the peak of ACC levels and before peak MACC levels in both tissues, suggesting that an alternate pathway of ACC metabolism was operating in this system. PMID:16668342

  6. Ethylene-mediated regulation of gibberellin content and growth in helianthus annuus L

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, D.W.; Reid, D.M.; Pharis, R.P. )

    1991-04-01

    Elongation of hypocotyls of sunflower can be promoted by gibberellins (GAs) and inhibited by ethylene. The role of these hormones in regulating elongation was investigated by measuring changes in both endogenous GAs and in the metabolism of exogenous ({sup 3}H)- and ({sup 2}H{sub 2})GA{sub 20} in the hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Delgren 131) seedlings exposed to ethylene. The major biologically active GAs identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were GA{sub 1}, GA{sub 19}, GA{sub 20}, and GA{sub 44}. In hypocotyls of seedlings exposed to ethylene, the concentration of GA{sub 1}, known to be directly active in regulating shoot elongation in a number of species, was reduced. Ethylene treatment reduced the metabolism of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} and less ({sup 2}H{sub 2})GA{sub 1} was found in the hypocotyls of those seedlings exposed to the higher ethylene concentrations. However, it is not known if the effect of ethylene on GA{sub 20} metabolism was direct or indirect. In seedlings treated with exogenous GA{sub 1} or GA{sub 3}, the hypocotyls elongated faster than those of controls, but the GA treatment only partially overcame the inhibitory effect of ethylene on elongation. The authors conclude that GA content is a factor which may limit elongation in hypocotyls of sunflower, and that while exposure to ethylene results in reduced concentration of GA{sub 1} this is not sufficient per se to account for the inhibition of elongation caused by ethylene.

  7. Etiolation Symptoms in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Cotyledons Partially Covered by the Pericarp of the Achene

    PubMed Central

    Solymosi, Katalin; Vitányi, Beáta; Hideg, Éva; Böddi, Béla

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Etiolation symptoms and the greening process are usually studied on dark-germinated seedlings and this raises the question – can these results be generalized for plants growing under field conditions? This work examines various aspects of the plastid differentiation under the covering of the achene wall, which often remains attached to the cotyledons of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedlings grown under light. Methods Cotyledons of 7- to 10-d-old sunflower seedlings grown in the dark and on light were examined. The partially covered cotyledons were sectioned into light-exposed, covered and transition zones. Pigment contents, 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy, electron microscopy and fluorescence imaging, along with fluorescence kinetic methods, were used. Key Results The light-exposed zone of the partially covered cotyledons was similar to cotyledons developed without achene covering. However, some of the plastids had prolamellar bodies among the granal thylakoid membranes; despite this no protochlorophyllide was detected. The fully covered, yellowish sections contained protochlorophyllide forms emitting at 633 and 655 nm and well-developed prolamellar bodies, similar to those of etiolated cotyledons. In addition, reduced amounts of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and stacked thylakoid membrane pairs were found in this region. The transitional sections showed a mixture of the characteristics of the covered and exposed sections. Various, but significantly different values of the photosynthetic activity parameters were found in each sector of the partially covered cotyledons. Conclusions The partial covering of the achene wall shades the cotyledon tissues effectively, enough to provoke the appearance of etiolation phenomena, i.e. the permanent presence of flash-photoactive protochlorophyllide complexes and prolamellar bodies (with or without protochlorophyllide), which proves that these phenomena may appear under natural illumination conditions. PMID

  8. Effects of Boron on Proton Transport and Membrane Properties of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Cell Microsomes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrol, N.; Belver, A.; Roldan, M.; Rodriguez-Rosales, M. P.; Donaire, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Boron deficiency and toxicity inhibit ATP-dependent H+ pumping and vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity in sunflower roots and cell suspensions. The effects of boron on H+ pumping and on passive H+ conductance, as well as on fluorescence anisotropy in KI-washed microsomes isolated from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Enano) cell suspensions, have been investigated. Boron deficiency reduced the total and vanadate-sensitive ATPase activities as well as the vanadate-sensitive ATP-dependent H+ pumping without affecting the amount of antigenic ATPase protein as measured by immunoblotting with an Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane anti-H+-ATPase polyclonal antibody. Kinetic studies revealed that boron deficiency reduced Vmax of vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity with little change in the apparent Km for Mg2+-ATP. Proton leakage was greater in microsomal vesicles isolated from cells grown without boron and incubated in reaction medium without added boron, and this effect was reversed by addition of boron to the reaction medium. Fluorescence anisotropy indicated that diphenyl hexatriene and 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene probes were immobilized to a greater extent in microsomes from cells grown without boron than in those from cells grown with 100 [mu]M H3BO3. The apparent decrease of membrane fluidity in microsomes from cells grown without boron was reversed by the addition of boron to the reaction medium. Taken together these data suggest that inhibition of H+ gradient formation in microsomes from sunflower cells grown in the absence of boron could be due to the combined effects of reduced H+-ATPase activity and increased passive conductance across the membrane, possibly resulting from increased membrane rigidity. PMID:12231978

  9. Impact of the Stem Borer, Dectes texanus, on Yield of the Cultivated Sunflower, Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, J.P.; Grant, Angela K.; Jyoti, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Foliar and soil-drench insecticide treatments were used in attempts to manipulate infestation of cultivated sunflower plants, Helianthus annuus LeConte (Asterales: Asteraceae) by Dectes texanus LeConte, (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) a serious pest of sunflowers in the High Plains of the USA. Seed yields were assessed on a per-plant basis for both oilseed and confection type sunflower hybrids in two years. Both insecticide treatments (foliar ë-cyhalothrin and soil-drench carbofuran) improved yield of oilseed sunflowers in 2004, but not in 2005. Yield of confection hybrids was improved by a systemic fungicide (thiophanate methyl) in 2005, but insecticides did not improve yield in either year. Both insecticide treatments gave good control of various stalk-boring insects such as Cylindrocopturus adspersus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), Mordellistena sp. (Coleoptera: Mordellidae), and Pelochrista womanana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), but neither gave better than 50% control of D. texanus. Plants were sorted according to the presence or absence of D. texanus larvae and no reduction was found in total seed weight, seed size, or oil content as a result of infestation. However, mature larvae of D. texanus girdle stalks at the base in preparation for overwintering, a behavior that reduced stalk breakage force by 34–40%, leading to yield losses through lodging. At harvest in 2005, there were differences between cultivars and among treatments in the proportions of D. texanus larvae that had girdled their plants at harvest. It was concluded that further research aimed at reducing crop losses to D. texanus should focus on means of delaying stalk desiccation and/or deterioration, factors that appear to trigger girdling behavior. PMID:20307233

  10. Ent-Kaurene Biosynthesis in Extracts of Helianthus annuus L. Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Shen-Miller, Jane; West, Charles A.

    1982-01-01

    Kaurene synthetase B activity (conversion of copalyl pyrophosphate to ent-kaurene) is readily detectable in crude cell-free extracts of 3- to 4-day old dark-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus cv. Mammoth) seedlings, whereas little or no kaurene synthetase AB activity (conversion of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate to ent-kaurene) can be found in these extracts under comparable assay conditions. A low amount of AB activity is evident only if an extensively dialyzed extract is used in low concentrations as the enzyme source. One factor which may contribute to the low apparent levels of AB activity is the presence of inhibitory factors in the crude sunflower extract since these extracts can be shown to act as a potent inhibitor of Marah macrocarpus endosperm kaurene synthetase AB activity. Heat treatment (100°C) or dialysis of the sunflower extract reduces the amount of its inhibitory activity. Also, it was observed that low concentrations of extensively dialyzed sunflower extracts act to stimulate M. macrocarpus AB activity. There is no evidence for the presence of an inhibitory factor for M. macrocarpus kaurene synthetase B activity in sunflower extracts. However, there does appear to be present in the crude preparation of sunflower extract a dialyzable factor(s) that impedes its own B activity. There is little information to date on the nature of these inhibitory and stimulatory factors for kaurene synthetase activity or their possible roles in physiological regulation. The possible presence of such factors should be considered, however, when attempting to evaluate kaurene synthetase activities in extracts of vegetative plants. PMID:16662264

  11. Root water transport of Helianthus annuus L. under iron oxide nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, Domingo; Barroso, Didac; Komárek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The application of nanomaterials in commercially available products is increasing rapidly for agriculture, phytoremediation and biotechnology. Since plants suppose the first sink for the accumulation of nanoparticles from the environment, emerging studies have focused on the general consequences for plants and their effects on the biomass production. However, effects on the root surface, as well as blockage of nutrients and water uptake by the roots, may also occur. This experiment was designed to prove if the plant water relations can be affected by the adsorption of nanoparticles on the root surface, causing a consequent stress for the plants. With this goal, plants of Helianthus annuus were previously grown in a hydroponic culture, and at age of 55 days, their roots were exposed to three different concentrations of nanomaghemite (NM) in the hydroponic solution for 5 days: control without NM; 50 and 100 mg l(-1) NM. The main effect was related to the reduction of the root hydraulic conductivity (Lo) and the nutrients uptake. The concentrations of the macronutrients Ca, K, Mg and S in the shoot were reduced relative to the control plants, which resulted in lower contents of chlorophyll pigments. Although stress was not detected in the plants, after the analysis of stress markers like the accumulation of proline or ascorbate in the tissues, reduction of the root functionality by nanoparticles has been identified here, manifested as the effect of NM on Lo. The treatment with 50 mg l(-1) NM significantly reduced the Lo, by up to 57% of its control value, and it was reduced by up to 26% at 100 mg l(-1) NM. These results will be an important factor to take into account with regard to the applicability of NM for long-term use in crops, particularly during privative water conditions. PMID:26396006

  12. Candidate gene association mapping of Sclerotinia stalk rot resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) uncovers the importance of COI1 homologs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sclerotinia stalk rot is one of the most destructive diseases of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) worldwide. Markers based on the Sclerotinia disease resistance gene will enable efficient marker-assisted selection (MAS). We sequenced eight candidate genes homologus to Arabidopsis thaliana defense ge...

  13. DNA markers linked to the R2 rust resistance gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) facilitate anticipatory breeding for this disease variant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pre-emptive breeding for host disease resistance is an effective strategy for combating and managing devastating incursions of plant pathogens. Comprehensive, long term studies have revealed that virulence to the R2 sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) rust resistance gene in the line, MC29, does not ex...

  14. Evaluating an interspecific Helianthus annuus x Helianthus tuberosus population for use in a perennial sunflower breeding program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perennial crops show promise as a sustainable production tool that provides ecosystem services (maintaining healthy soil, controlling erosion, improving water quality, enhancing wild-life habitat), while also contributing an economically viable cropping option to farmers. Sunflower (Helianthus annuu...

  15. [Adaptability of Helianthus annuus seedlings to crude oil pollution in soil and its improvement measures under salinization stress].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-lei; Ci, Hua-cong; He, Xing-dong; Liang, Yu-ting; Zhao, Xuan; Sun, Hui-ting; Xie, Hong-tao

    2015-11-01

    To explore the adaptability of plant under salt stress to crude oil pollution of soil and improvement measures, a pot experiment of Helianthus annuus seedlings was conducted using orthogonal experiment method with crude oil-sodium chloride-desulfurization gypsum and cinder-zeolite-desulfurization gypsum-sawdust. The results showed that, with the increase of soil crude oil concentration, the relative growth rate (RGR) of plant height, RGR of aboveground biomass and root N: P ratios of H. annuus seedlings decreased significantly, while the activity of SOD and CAT increased at first and then decreased significantly. The RGR of plant height and aboveground biomass significantly increased (P < 0.05), while the activity of SOD decreased gradually with the increase of the volume fraction of sawdust, indicating that sawdust had the most significant effect in comparison with cinder, zeolite, desulfurization gypsum under salinization condition. The crude oil pollution of soil could decrease the relative growth rate of H. annuus seedling, and sawdust could reduce the influence of crude oil pollution on plant growth under salt stress. PMID:26915209

  16. Detection of herbicide effects on pigment composition and PSII photochemistry in Helianthus annuus by Raman spectroscopy and chlorophyll a fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Vítek, Petr; Novotná, Kateřina; Hodaňová, Petra; Rapantová, Barbora; Klem, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The effects of herbicides from three mode-of-action groups - inhibitors of protoporphyrinogen oxidase (carfentrazone-ethyl), inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (mesotrione, clomazone, and diflufenican), and inhibitors of acetolactate synthase (amidosulfuron) - were studied in sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus). Raman spectroscopy, chlorophyll fluorescence (ChlF) imaging, and UV screening of ChlF were combined to evaluate changes in pigment composition, photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry, and non-photochemical quenching in plant leaves 6d after herbicide application. The Raman signals of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and chlorophyll were evaluated and differences in their intensity ratios were observed. Strongly augmented relative content of phenolic compounds was observed in the case of amidosulfuron-treated plants, with a simultaneous decrease in the chlorophyll/carotenoid intensity ratio. The results were confirmed by in vivo measurement of flavonols using UV screening of ChlF. Herbicides from the group of carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitors significantly decreased both the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII and non-photochemical quenching as determined by ChlF. Resonance Raman imaging (mapping) data with high resolution (150,000-200,000 spectra) are presented, showing the distribution of carotenoids in H. annuus leaves treated by two of the herbicides acting as inhibitors of carotenoid biosynthesis (clomazone or diflufenican). Clear signs were observed that the treatment induced carotenoid depletion within sunflower leaves. The depletion spatial pattern registered differed depending on the type of herbicide applied. PMID:27450121

  17. Modeled hydraulic redistribution by Helianthus annuus L. matches observed data only after model modification to include nighttime transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, R. B.; Cardon, Z. G.; Rockwell, F. E.; Teshera-Levye, J.; Zwieniecki, M.; Holbrook, N. M.

    2013-12-01

    The movement of water from moist to dry soil layers through the root systems of plants, referred to as hydraulic redistribution (HR), occurs throughout the world and is thought to influence carbon and water budgets and ecosystem functioning. The realized hydrologic, biogeochemical, and ecological consequences of HR depend on the amount of redistributed water, while the ability to assess these impacts requires models that correctly capture HR magnitude and timing. Using several soil types and two eco-types of Helianthus annuus L. in split-pot experiments, we examined how well the widely used HR modeling formulation developed by Ryel et al. (2002) could match experimental determination of HR across a range of water potential driving gradients. H. annuus carries out extensive nighttime transpiration, and though over the last decade it has become more widely recognized that nighttime transpiration occurs in multiple species and many ecosystems, the original Ryel et al. (2002) formulation does not include the effect of nighttime transpiration on HR. We developed and added a representation of nighttime transpiration into the formulation, and only then was the model able to capture the dynamics and magnitude of HR we observed as soils dried and nighttime stomatal behavior changed, both influencing HR.

  18. Enhanced Pb Absorption by Hordeum vulgare L. and Helianthus annuus L. Plants Inoculated with an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Consortium.

    PubMed

    Arias, Milton Senen Barcos; Peña-Cabriales, Juan José; Alarcón, Alejandro; Maldonado Vega, María

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) consortium conformed by (Glomus intraradices, Glomus albidum, Glomus diaphanum, and Glomus claroideum) on plant growth and absorption of Pb, Fe, Na, Ca, and (32)P in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants was evaluated. AMF-plants and controls were grown in a substrate amended with powdered Pb slag at proportions of 0, 10, 20, and 30% v/v equivalent to total Pb contents of 117; 5,337; 13,659, and 19,913 mg Pb kg(-1) substrate, respectively. Mycorrhizal root colonization values were 70, 94, 98, and 90%, for barley and 91, 97, 95, and 97%, for sunflower. AMF inoculum had positive repercussions on plant development of both crops. Mycorrhizal barley absorbed more Pb (40.4 mg Pb kg(-1)) shoot dry weight than non-colonized controls (26.5 mg Pb kg(-1)) when treated with a high Pb slag dosage. This increase was higher in roots than shoots (650.0 and 511.5 mg Pb kg(-1) root dry weight, respectively). A similar pattern was found in sunflower. Plants with AMF absorbed equal or lower amounts of Fe, Na and Ca than controls. H. vulgare absorbed more total P (1.0%) than H. annuus (0.9%). The arbuscular mycorrizal consortium enhanced Pb extraction by plants. PMID:25495930

  19. Molecular characterization of Helja, an extracellular jacalin-related protein from Helianthus annuus: Insights into the relationship of this protein with unconventionally secreted lectins.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Marcela; Orts, Facundo; Carvalho, André de Oliveira; Regente, Mariana; Soares, Julia Ribeiro; Gomes, Valdirene Moreira; de la Canal, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Jacalin-related lectins (JRLs) encompass cytosolic, nuclear and vacuolar members displaying the jacalin domain in one or more copies or in combination with unrelated domains. Helianthus annuus jacalin (Helja) is a mannose-specific JRL previously identified in the apoplast of Helianthus annuus seedlings, and this protein has been proposed to follow unconventional secretion. Here, we describe the full-length Helja cDNA sequence, which presents a unique jacalin domain (merolectin) and the absence of a signal peptide, confirming that the protein cannot follow the classical ER-dependent secretory pathway. Helja mRNA is present in seeds, cotyledons, roots and hypocotyls, but no transcripts were detected in the leaves. Searches for sequence similarity showed that Helja is barely similar to other JRLs present in H. annuus databases and less than 45% identical to other monocot or dicot JRLs. Strikingly, most of the merolectins recovered through data mining using Helja as a query were predicted as apoplastic, although most of these proteins lack the signal peptide required for classical secretion. Thus, Helja is the first bait identified to recover putative unconventionally secreted lectins. Because the recovered JRLs are widely distributed among the plant kingdom, an as yet unknown role for jacalin lectins in the apoplast is emerging. PMID:26140981

  20. Root biomass response to foliar application of imazapyr for two imidazolinone tolerant alleles of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Sala, Carlos A.; Bulos, Mariano; Altieri, Emiliano; Ramos, María Laura

    2012-01-01

    Imisun and CLPlus are two imidazolinone tolerance traits in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) determined by the expression of two alleles at the locus Ahasl1. Both traits differed in their tolerance level to imazapyr —a type of imidazolinone herbicide— when aboveground biomass is considered, but the concomitant herbicide effect over the root system has not been reported. The objective of this work was to quantify the root biomass response to increased doses of imazapyr in susceptible (ahasl1/ahasl1), Imisun (Ahasl1-1/Ahasl1-1) and CLPlus (Ahasl1-3/Ahasl1-3) homozygous sunflower genotypes. These materials were sprayed at the V2–V4 stage with increased doses of imazapyr (from 0 to 480 g active ingredient ha−1) and 14 days after treatment root biomass of each plant was assessed. Genotype at the Ahasl1 locus, dose of imazapyr and their interaction significantly contributed (P < 0.001) to explain the reduction in root biomass accumulation after herbicide application. Estimated dose of imazapyr required to reduce root biomass accumulation by fifty percent (GR50) differed statistically for the three genotypes under study (P < 0.001). CLPlus genotypes showed the highest values of GR50, 300 times higher on average than the susceptible genotypes, and almost 8 times higher than Imisun materials, demonstrating that both alleles differ in their root biomass response to foliar application of increased doses of imazapyr. PMID:23226083

  1. Cloning, heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of plastidial sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase from Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Payá-Milans, Miriam; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Salas, Joaquín J; Garcés, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The acyl-[acyl carrier protein]:sn-1-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT; E.C. 2.3.1.15) catalyzes the first step of glycerolipid assembly within the stroma of the chloroplast. In the present study, the sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L.) stromal GPAT was cloned, sequenced and characterized. We identified a single ORF of 1344base pairs that encoded a GPAT sharing strong sequence homology with the plastidial GPAT from Arabidopsis thaliana (ATS1, At1g32200). Gene expression studies showed that the highest transcript levels occurred in green tissues in which chloroplasts are abundant. The corresponding mature protein was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli for purification and biochemical characterization. In vitro assays using radiolabelled acyl-ACPs and glycerol-3-phosphate as substrates revealed a strong preference for oleic versus palmitic acid, and weak activity towards stearic acid. The positional fatty acid composition of relevant chloroplast phospholipids from sunflower leaves did not reflect the in vitro GPAT specificity, suggesting a more complex scenario with mixed substrates at different concentrations, competition with other acyl-ACP consuming enzymatic reactions, etc. In summary, this study has confirmed the affinity of this enzyme which would partly explain the resistance to cold temperatures observed in sunflower plants. PMID:25618244

  2. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered. PMID:26938582

  3. Spatio-temporal decoupling of stomatal and mesophyll conductance induced by vein cutting in leaves of Helianthus annuus

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, David T.; Green, Laura E.; Pockman, William T.

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of hydraulic conductance to the canopy has been shown to result in stomatal responses to limit transpiration. To test for similar responses to perturbations of the hydraulic network in leaves, we simultaneously measured leaf gas exchange with spatially explicit chlorophyll-a fluorescence and leaf temperature to examine the effects of cutting a primary leaf vein in Helianthus annuus. We repeated the leaf treatment at each of three different vapor pressure deficits and monitored the short-term dynamics of gas exchange following the treatment. Immediately after treatment, photosynthesis and stomatal conductance (gs) showed a transient “wrong way” response in which photosynthesis declined despite increased gs. Comparisons of fluorescence and temperature across the leaf showed that both photosynthesis and gs were transiently patchy across the measured leaf area, but that the patchiness of the two processes did not correspond in space or time. This suggests that photosynthesis and gs respond to vein cutting-induced cavitation via different mechanisms. Because the stomatal response varied by vapor pressure difference condition but photosynthesis did not, it is likely that gs, but not photosynthesis, responded to a hydraulic signal. In contrast, we hypothesize that photosynthesis declined due to a wound-induced electrical signal that has recently been shown to transiently decrease mesophyll conductance to CO2. The interaction of epidermal hydraulics and the electrical signal across the leaf likely created a patchy pattern of chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf temperature that cannot be explained through the action of a single signal. PMID:24065972

  4. Translatome profiling in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds highlights post-transcriptional regulation of germination.

    PubMed

    Layat, Elodie; Leymarie, Juliette; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Caius, José; Langlade, Nicolas; Bailly, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    Seed dormancy, which blocks germination in apparently favourable conditions, is a key regulatory control point of plant population establishment. As germination requires de novo translation, its regulation by dormancy is likely to be related to the association of individual transcripts to polysomes. Here, the polysome-associated mRNAs, that is, the translatome, were fractionated and characterized with microarrays in dormant and nondormant sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos during their imbibition at 10°C, a temperature preventing germination of dormant embryos. Profiling of mRNAs in polysomal complexes revealed that the translatome differs between germinating and nongerminating embryos. Association of transcripts with polysomes reached a maximum after 15 h of imbibition; at this time-point 194 polysome-associated transcripts were specifically found in nondormant embryos and 47 in dormant embryos only. The proteins corresponding to the polysomal mRNAs in nondormant embryos appeared to be very pertinent for germination and were involved mainly in transport, regulation of transcription or cell wall modifications. This work demonstrates that seed germination results from a timely regulated and selective recruitment of mRNAs to polysomes, thus opening novel fields of investigation for the understanding of this developmental process. PMID:25157915

  5. Pattern of cross-sensitivity between 4 Compositae plants, Parthenium hysterophorus, Xanthium strumarium, Helianthus annuus and Chrysanthemum coronarium, in Indian patients.

    PubMed

    Nandakishore, T; Pasricha, J S

    1994-03-01

    To assess the pattern of cross-sensitivity between 4 members of the Compositae family, namely Parthenium hysterophorus L., Xanthium strumarium L., Helanthus annuus L. and Chrysanthemum coronarium L., 63 patients clinically diagnosed to have airborne contact dermatitis, and 51 controls having well-defined patterns of contact dermatitis caused by agents other than plants, were patch tested with measured amounts of standardized aqueous extracts of these plants. Positive reactions were obtained in 62 patients and 13 controls with Parthenium hysterophorus, in 47 patients and 9 controls with Xanthium strumarium, in 7 patients and 2 controls with Helianthus annuus, and in 13 of the 57 patients and one out of 28 controls tested with Chrysanthemum coronarium. 2 patients were allergic to all 4 of the plants; 14 patients to 3 plants, namely Parthenium, Xanthium and Chrysanthemum in 9 cases and Parthenium, Xanthium and Helianthus in 5 cases; 32 patients to 2 plants, namely Parthenium and Xanthium in 30 cases, and Parthenium and Chrysanthemum, and Xanthium and Chrysanthemum in 1 case each; 15 patients were allergic to 1 plant only, that being Parthenium. All the 47 patients allergic to Xanthium, 13 patients allergic to Chrysanthemum and 7 patients allergic to Helianthus were positive with some other plant as well. There was 1 patient who was allergic to Xanthium and Chrysanthemum but not to Parthenium. The titre of contact hypersensitivity (TCH) determined in the patients allergic to Parthenium, Xanthium and Helianthus showed values that varied widely with each plant in different patients, and there was no parallelism between the TCH with various plants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8187516

  6. Effect of antioxidant butylated hydroxyl anisole on the thermal or oxidative stability of sunflower oil (Helianthus Annuus) by ultrasonic.

    PubMed

    Murari, Satish Kumar; Shwetha, M V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to evaluate the efficiency of butylated hydroxyl anisole (BHA) as an antioxidant in sunflower oil (Helianthus Annuus). The oxidation stability of sunflower oil have been investigated by the effects of varying amounts of BHA. The antioxidant incorporated sunflower oil system and control edible oil were subjected to heating at 180 ± 5 °C continuously for a period of 4 h per day for consecutive 4 days. The parameters used to assess the thermal degradation and oxidation properties of the oils include ultrasonic velocity, viscosity, density and peroxide value. The fatty acid compositions of the oils were measured by gas chromatography. Adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, relaxation time and acoustic impedance have been calculated from experimental data. Viscosity, density and ultrasonic velocity change in control oil is from 3.72 × 10(-2) to 13.2 × 10(-2) Nsm - 2, 918 to 994 kg/m3 and 1412 to 1484 m/s respectively and in sunflower oil with 200 ppm BHA is from 3.88 × 10(-2) to 7.52 × 10(-2) Nsm - 2, 926 to 962 kg/m3 and 1418 to 1463 m/s respectively for 16 h of heat treated oil. The ultrasonic results obtained have shown reduction in thermal degradation and improvement in oxidation stability of antioxidant loaded oil in comparison to base oil. Hence, it can be recommended that sunflower oil with 200 ppm BHA can be used for frying without adverse effect on physical properties. The ultrasonic velocity can be used for assessment of stability of frying oil. PMID:26788006

  7. Cloning, characterization and structural model of a FatA-type thioesterase from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Serrano-Vega, M J; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2005-08-01

    The substrate specificity of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases (EC 3.1.2.14) determines the fatty acids available for the biosynthesis of storage and membrane lipids in seeds. In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in sunflower seeds (Helianthus annuus L.), we isolated, cloned and sequenced a cDNA clone of acyl-ACP thioesterase from developing sunflower seeds, HaFatA1. Through the heterologous expression of HaFatA1 in Escherichia coli we have purified and characterized this enzyme, showing that sunflower HaFatA1 cDNA encodes a functional thioesterase with preference for monounsaturated acyl-ACPs. The HaFatA1 thioesterase was most efficient (kcat/K(m)) in catalyzing oleoyl-ACP, both in vivo and in vitro. By comparing this sequence with those obtained from public databases, we constructed a phylogenetic tree that included FatA and FatB thioesterases, as well as related prokaryotic proteins. The phylogenetic relationships support the endosymbiotic theory of the origin of eukaryotic cells and the suggestion that eubacteria from the delta-subdivision were the guest cells in the symbiosis with archaea. These prokaryotic proteins are more homologous to plant FatB, suggesting that the ancient thioesterases were more similar to FatB. Finally, using the available structure prediction methods, a 3D model of plant acyl-ACP thioesterases is proposed that reflects the combined data from direct mutagenesis and chimera studies. In addition, the model was tested by mutating the residues proposed to interact with the ACP protein in the FatA thioesterase by site-directed mutagenesis. The results indicate that this region is involved in the stabilization of the substrate at the active site. PMID:15841386

  8. Toward a Molecular Cytogenetic Map for Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by Landed BAC/BIBAC Clones

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiuhuan; Liu, Zhao; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n = 34). However, the relationship between linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown and has considerable relevance for the sunflower research community. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific bacterial /binary bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC/BIBAC) clones was identified from two complementary BAC and BIBAC libraries constructed for cultivated sunflower cv. HA89. In the present study, we used these linkage group-specific clones (∼100 kb in size) as probes to in situ hybridize to HA89 mitotic chromosomes at metaphase using the BAC- fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Because a characteristic of the sunflower genome is the abundance of repetitive DNA sequences, a high ratio of blocking DNA to probe DNA was applied to hybridization reactions to minimize the background noise. As a result, all sunflower chromosomes were anchored by one or two BAC/BIBAC clones with specific FISH signals. FISH analysis based on tandem repetitive sequences, such as rRNA genes, has been previously reported; however, the BAC-FISH technique developed here using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)−derived BAC/BIBAC clones as probes to apply genome-wide analysis is new for sunflower. As chromosome-specific cytogenetic markers, the selected BAC/BIBAC clones that encompass the 17 linkage groups provide a valuable tool for identifying sunflower cytogenetic stocks (such as trisomics) and tracking alien chromosomes in interspecific crosses. This work also demonstrates the potential of using a large-insert DNA library for the development of molecular cytogenetic resources. PMID:23316437

  9. Development, Characterization and Experimental Validation of a Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Gene Expression Oligonucleotide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  10. Development, characterization and experimental validation of a cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) gene expression oligonucleotide microarray.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Paula; Soria, Marcelo; Blesa, David; DiRienzo, Julio; Moschen, Sebastian; Rivarola, Maximo; Clavijo, Bernardo Jose; Gonzalez, Sergio; Peluffo, Lucila; Príncipi, Dario; Dosio, Guillermo; Aguirrezabal, Luis; García-García, Francisco; Conesa, Ana; Hopp, Esteban; Dopazo, Joaquín; Heinz, Ruth Amelia; Paniego, Norma

    2012-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarrays with accurate gene coverage represent a key strategy for transcriptional studies in orphan species such as sunflower, H. annuus L., which lacks full genome sequences. The goal of this study was the development and functional annotation of a comprehensive sunflower unigene collection and the design and validation of a custom sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray. A large scale EST (>130,000 ESTs) curation, assembly and sequence annotation was performed using Blast2GO (www.blast2go.de). The EST assembly comprises 41,013 putative transcripts (12,924 contigs and 28,089 singletons). The resulting Sunflower Unigen Resource (SUR version 1.0) was used to design an oligonucleotide-based Agilent microarray for cultivated sunflower. This microarray includes a total of 42,326 features: 1,417 Agilent controls, 74 control probes for sunflower replicated 10 times (740 controls) and 40,169 different non-control probes. Microarray performance was validated using a model experiment examining the induction of senescence by water deficit. Pre-processing and differential expression analysis of Agilent microarrays was performed using the Bioconductor limma package. The analyses based on p-values calculated by eBayes (p<0.01) allowed the detection of 558 differentially expressed genes between water stress and control conditions; from these, ten genes were further validated by qPCR. Over-represented ontologies were identified using FatiScan in the Babelomics suite. This work generated a curated and trustable sunflower unigene collection, and a custom, validated sunflower oligonucleotide-based microarray using Agilent technology. Both the curated unigene collection and the validated oligonucleotide microarray provide key resources for sunflower genome analysis, transcriptional studies, and molecular breeding for crop improvement. PMID:23110046

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of the interaction between Helianthus annuus and its obligate parasite Plasmopara halstedii shows single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRN sequences

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Downy mildew in sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) is caused by the oomycete Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.) Berlese et de Toni. Despite efforts by the international community to breed mildew-resistant varieties, downy mildew remains a major threat to the sunflower crop. Very few genomic, genetic and molecular resources are currently available to study this pathogen. Using a 454 sequencing method, expressed sequence tags (EST) during the interaction between H. annuus and P. halstedii have been generated and a search was performed for sites in putative effectors to show polymorphisms between the different races of P. halstedii. Results A 454 pyrosequencing run of two infected sunflower samples (inbred lines XRQ and PSC8 infected with race 710 of P. halstedii, which exhibit incompatible and compatible interactions, respectively) generated 113,720 and 172,107 useable reads. From these reads, 44,948 contigs and singletons have been produced. A bioinformatic portal, HP, was specifically created for in-depth analysis of these clusters. Using in silico filtering, 405 clusters were defined as being specific to oomycetes, and 172 were defined as non-specific oomycete clusters. A subset of these two categories was checked using PCR amplification, and 86% of the tested clusters were validated. Twenty putative RXLR and CRN effectors were detected using PSI-BLAST. Using corresponding sequences from four races (100, 304, 703 and 710), 22 SNPs were detected, providing new information on pathogen polymorphisms. Conclusions This study identified a large number of genes that are expressed during H. annuus/P. halstedii compatible or incompatible interactions. It also reveals, for the first time, that an infection mechanism exists in P. halstedii similar to that in other oomycetes associated with the presence of putative RXLR and CRN effectors. SNPs discovered in CRN effector sequences were used to determine the genetic distances between the four races of P. halstedii. This

  12. Uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L.): dependence on stomatal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, A.; Kley, D.; Wildt, J.; Segschneider, H. J.; Förstel, H.

    The uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers ( Helianthus annuus L. var. giganteus) and tobacco plants ( Nicotiana tabacum L. var. Bel W3), using concentrations representative for moderately polluted air, has been determined by gas exchange experiments. Conductivities for these trace gases were measured at different light fluxes ranging from 820 μEm -2s -1 to darkness. The conductivities to water vapor and the trace gases are highly correlated. It is concluded that the uptake of NO, NO 2 and O 3 by sunflowers and tobacco plants is linearly dependent on stomatal opening. While the uptake of NO is limited by the mesophyll resistance, the uptake of NO 2 is only by diffusion through the stomata. Loss processes by deposition to the leaf surfaces are more pronounced for O 3 than for NO and NO 2.

  13. Influence of Boron on the Membrane Potential in Elodea densa and Helianthus annuus Roots and H+ Extrusion of Suspension Cultured Daucus carota Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Blaser-Grill, Jürgen; Knoppik, Dietmar; Amberger, Anton; Goldbach, Heiner

    1989-01-01

    When following the membrane potential of Elodea densa leaf cells during a dark-light regime and analysing the different phases of the cycle, the pattern under boron deficiency resembled the one reported to occur after 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea application. The potential in the dark slowly decreased when transferring Elodea densa leaflets and Helianthus annuus roots to a B-free medium and increased in the same way after B was added again. Addition of vanadate to inhibit plasmalemma ATPases in part mimicked the effects of B deficiency. It is suggested that B directly or indirectly affects the formation of a proton gradient. The effect of B on proton secretion was observed in various experiments with Daucus carota cell cultures. The results are discussed with respect to the possible involvement of B in membrane function and transport processes. PMID:16666749

  14. Distribution and antifeedant associations of sesquiterpene lactones in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte).

    PubMed

    Chou, J C; Mullin, C A

    1993-07-01

    Seven antifeedant sesquiterpene lactones (STLs), 4,5-dihydroniveusin A, argophyllin B, argophyllin A, 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxytifruticin, niveusin B, 1,2-anhydridoniveusin A, and an unidentified epoxide, in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) have been quantified by a highperformance thin-layer chromatography and UV-reflectance scanning densitometry analysis. Age-related expression of STL content in sunflower reveals a heretofore undescribed pattern in which nonpolar STLs such as 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxytifruticin predominate up to an age of three weeks, but are subsequently displaced by polar STLs, especially argophyllin A, through later foliar stages and anthesis. This leaf pattern of STL ontogeny is maintained in three widely differentH. annuus cultivars (Giant Gray Stripe, Royal Hybrid 2141, Hybrid 7111), which in turn had similar total contents of STLs. Antifeedant activity for western corn rootworm was positively correlated with STL content, particularly with argophyllin A and its isomer argophyllin B, in respective tissue extracts. Enhanced amounts of highly antifeedant argophyllins, especially in newly grown leaf and floral tissues yielding sunflower progeny, strongly suggest that these epoxy-STLs are a chemical defense against insect herbivory. PMID:24249174

  15. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes.

    PubMed

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes--7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars--of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. PMID:26608057

  16. Repetitive DNA and Plant Domestication: Variation in Copy Number and Proximity to Genes of LTR-Retrotransposons among Wild and Cultivated Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mascagni, Flavia; Barghini, Elena; Giordani, Tommaso; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Cavallini, Andrea; Natali, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genome contains a very large proportion of transposable elements, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons. However, knowledge on the retrotransposon-related variability within this species is still limited. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to perform a quantitative and qualitative survey of intraspecific variation of the retrotransposon fraction of the genome across 15 genotypes—7 wild accessions and 8 cultivars—of H. annuus. By mapping the Illumina reads of the 15 genotypes onto a library of sunflower long terminal repeat retrotransposons, we observed considerable variability in redundancy among genotypes, at both superfamily and family levels. In another analysis, we mapped Illumina paired reads to two sets of sequences, that is, long terminal repeat retrotransposons and protein-encoding sequences, and evaluated the extent of retrotransposon proximity to genes in the sunflower genome by counting the number of paired reads in which one read mapped to a retrotransposon and the other to a gene. Large variability among genotypes was also ascertained for retrotransposon proximity to genes. Both long terminal repeat retrotransposon redundancy and proximity to genes varied among retrotransposon families and also between cultivated and wild genotypes. Such differences are discussed in relation to the possible role of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the domestication of sunflower. PMID:26608057

  17. Genetics and mapping of a novel downy mildew resistance gene, Pl18, introgressed from wild Helianthus argophyllus into cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower downy mildew is considered to be the most destructive foliar disease that has spread to every major sunflower-growing country of the world, except Australia. A new dominant downy mildew resistance gene (Pl18) transferred from wild Helianthus argophyllus (PI 494573) into cultivated sunflowe...

  18. Supplemental macronutrients and microbial fermentation products improve the uptake and transport of foliar applied zinc in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Studies utilizing micro X-ray florescence

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Xie, Ruohan; Zhang, Minzhe; Jernstedt, Judith A.; Hou, Dandi; Ramsier, Cliff; Brown, Patrick H.

    2015-01-21

    Enhancing nutrient uptake and the subsequent elemental transport from the sites of application to sites of utilization is of great importance to the science and practical field application of foliar fertilizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the mobility of various foliar applied zinc (Zn) formulations in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and to evaluate the effects of the addition of an organic biostimulant on phloem loading and elemental mobility. This was achieved by application of foliar formulations to the blade of sunflower (H. annuus L.) and high-resolution elemental imaging with micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) to visualize Zn withinmore » the vascular system of the leaf petiole. Although no significant increase of total Zn in petioles was determined by inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometer, μ-XRF elemental imaging showed a clear enrichment of Zn in the vascular tissues within the sunflower petioles treated with foliar fertilizers containing Zn. The concentration of Zn in the vascular of sunflower petioles was increased when Zn was applied with other microelements with EDTA (commercial product Kick-Off) as compared with an equimolar concentration of ZnSO₄ alone. The addition of macronutrients N, P, K (commercial product CleanStart) to the Kick-Off Zn fertilizer, further increased vascular system Zn concentrations while the addition of the microbially derived organic biostimulant “GroZyme” resulted in a remarkable enhancement of Zn concentrations in the petiole vascular system. The study provides direct visualized evidence for phloem transport of foliar applied Zn out of sites of application in plants by using μ-XRF technique, and suggests that the formulation of the foliar applied Zn and the addition of the organic biostimulant GroZyme increases the mobility of Zn following its absorption by the leaf of sunflower.« less

  19. Supplemental macronutrients and microbial fermentation products improve the uptake and transport of foliar applied zinc in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Studies utilizing micro X-ray florescence

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Xie, Ruohan; Zhang, Minzhe; Jernstedt, Judith A.; Hou, Dandi; Ramsier, Cliff; Brown, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancing nutrient uptake and the subsequent elemental transport from the sites of application to sites of utilization is of great importance to the science and practical field application of foliar fertilizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the mobility of various foliar applied zinc (Zn) formulations in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and to evaluate the effects of the addition of an organic biostimulant on phloem loading and elemental mobility. This was achieved by application of foliar formulations to the blade of sunflower (H. annuus L.) and high-resolution elemental imaging with micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) to visualize Zn within the vascular system of the leaf petiole. Although no significant increase of total Zn in petioles was determined by inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometer, μ-XRF elemental imaging showed a clear enrichment of Zn in the vascular tissues within the sunflower petioles treated with foliar fertilizers containing Zn. The concentration of Zn in the vascular of sunflower petioles was increased when Zn was applied with other microelements with EDTA (commercial product Kick-Off) as compared with an equimolar concentration of ZnSO4 alone. The addition of macronutrients N, P, K (commercial product CleanStart) to the Kick-Off Zn fertilizer, further increased vascular system Zn concentrations while the addition of the microbially derived organic biostimulant “GroZyme” resulted in a remarkable enhancement of Zn concentrations in the petiole vascular system. The study provides direct visualized evidence for phloem transport of foliar applied Zn out of sites of application in plants by using μ-XRF technique, and suggests that the formulation of the foliar applied Zn and the addition of the organic biostimulant GroZyme increases the mobility of Zn following its absorption by the leaf of sunflower. PMID:25653663

  20. Comparison of MP AES and ICP-MS for analysis of principal and selected trace elements in nitric acid digests of sunflower (Helianthus annuus).

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Stefan; Sjöberg, Viktor; Ogar, Anna

    2015-04-01

    The use of nitrogen as plasma gas for microwave plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (MP AES) is an interesting development in analytical science since the running cost can be significantly reduced in comparison to the inductively coupled argon plasma. Here, we evaluate the performance of the Agilent 4100 MP AES instrument for the analysis of principal metals (Ca, K, Mg, and Na), lithogenic metals (Al, Fe, and Mn) and selected trace metals (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, V, and Zn) in nitric acid plant digests. The digests were prepared by microwave-assisted dissolution of dry plant material from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in concentrated nitric acid. Comparisons are made with analysis of the same solutions with ICP-MS (Agilent 7500cx) using the octopole reaction system (ORS) in the collision mode for As, Fe, and V. The limits of detection were usually in the low µg L(-1) range and all principal and lithogenic metals were successfully determined with the MP AES and provided almost identical results with the ICP-MS. The same applies for the selected trace metals except for As, Co and Mo where the concentrations were below the detection limit with the MP AES. For successful analysis we recommend that (i) only atom lines are used, (ii) ionization is minimized (e.g. addition of CsNO3) and (iii) the use of internal standards should be considered to resolve spectral interferences. PMID:25640135

  1. Spatio-temporal mapping of variation potentials in leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ using multi-electrode array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan; Jia, Yong-Peng; Leng, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Damaging thermal stimuli trigger long-lasting variation potentials (VPs) in higher plants. Owing to limitations in conventional plant electrophysiological recording techniques, recorded signals are composed of signals originating from all of the cells that are connected to an electrode. This limitation does not enable detailed spatio-temporal distributions of transmission and electrical activities in plants to be visualised. Multi-electrode array (MEA) enables the recording and imaging of dynamic spatio-temporal electrical activities in higher plants. Here, we used an 8 × 8 MEA with a polar distance of 450 μm to measure electrical activities from numerous cells simultaneously. The mapping of the data that were recorded from the MEA revealed the transfer mode of the thermally induced VPs in the leaves of Helianthus annuus L. seedlings in situ. These results suggest that MEA can enable recordings with high spatio-temporal resolution that facilitate the determination of the bioelectrical response mode of higher plants under stress. PMID:24961469

  2. Influence of drought acclimation and CO sub 2 enrichment on osmotic adjustment and chlorophyll a fluorescence of sunflower during drought. [Helianthus annuus var Hyson 30

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, J.P.; Virgona, J.M.; Smillie, R.M.; Barlow, E.W. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, North Ryde )

    1988-04-01

    Osmotic adjustment occurred during drought in expanded leaves of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus var Hysun 30) which had been continuously exposed to 660 microliters CO{sub 2} per liter or had been previously acclimated to drought. The effect was greatest when the treatments were combined and was negligible in nonacclimated plants grown at 340 microliters CO{sub 2} per liter. The concentrations of ethanol soluble sugars and potassium increased during drought but they did not account for the osmotic adjustment. The delay in the decline in conductance and relative water content and in the loss of structural integrity with increasing drought was dependent on the degree of osmotic adjustment. The relative water content remained constant at 85% for three days and fell to 36% on the sixth day. There was no evidence of leaf desiccation even on the eighth day. In contrast, the conductance of leaves showing minimal adjustment fell rapidly after the first day of drought and was negligible after the fourth, at which time the relative water content was 36%. By the sixth day of drought, areas near the margins of the leaves were desiccating and the plants did not recover upon rewatering. Despite the differences in the rate of change of conductance and relative water content during drought, photosynthetic electron transport activity, remained functional until desiccation occurred.

  3. The ability of Helianthus annuus L. and Brassica juncea to uptake and translocate natural uranium and 226Ra under different milieu conditions.

    PubMed

    Vera Tomé, F; Blanco Rodríguez, P; Lozano, J C

    2009-01-01

    Seedlings of Helianthus annuus L. (HA) and Brassica juncea (BJ) were used to test the effect of the pH, the presence of phosphates, and the addition of ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA) or citrate on the uptake and the translocation of uranium isotopes ((238)U, (235)U, and (234)U) and (226)Ra. The results indicated that the presence of phosphates generally reduces the uptake and transfer of uranium from the roots to the shoots of HA. In the case of BJ, while phosphate enhanced the retention of uranium by roots, the translocation was poorer. Likewise, for (226)Ra, the best translocation was in the absence of phosphates for both species. The addition of citrate increased the translocation of uranium for both species, but had no clear effect on the transfer of (226)Ra. The effect of EDTA was much more moderate both for uranium and for (226)Ra, and for both plant species. Only noticeable was a slightly better uptake of (226)Ra by BJ at neutral pH, although the translocation was lower. PMID:18848715

  4. The effect of EDTA on Helianthus annuus uptake, selectivity, and translocation of heavy metals when grown in Ohio, New Mexico and Colombia soils.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Cafer; Pepe, M Katie; Cutright, Teresa J

    2005-02-01

    The use of two EDTA concentrations for enhancing the bioavailability of cadmium, chromium, and nickel in three natural soils (Ohio, New Mexico and Colombia) was investigated. The resulting uptake, translocation and selectivity with Helianthus annuus after mobilization were also examined. In general, plants grown in the sandy-loam Ohio soil had a higher uptake that resulted in a selectivity and total metal content of Cd>Cr>Ni and 0.73 mg and Cr>Cd>Ni and 0.32 mg for 0.1 and 0.3 g kg-1 EDTA, respectively. With the silty-loam New Mexico soil, although the total metal uptake was not statistically different the EDTA level did alter the selectivity; Cd>Cr>Ni (0.1 g kg-1 EDTA) and Cd>Cr>Ni (0.3 g kg-1 EDTA). Conversely, with the Colombian (sandy clay loam) soil increasing the EDTA level resulted in a higher total metal uptake (0.62 mg) than the 0.1 g kg-1 (0.59 mg) treatment. For all three soils, the translocation of Cd was limited. Evaluating the mobile metal fraction with and without EDTA determined that the chelator was capable of overcoming mass transfer limitations associated with the expandable clay fraction in the soils. Root wash results and root biomass concentrations indicated that Cd sorption was occurring. Therefore limited Cd translocation was attributed to insufficient phytochelatin levels. PMID:15664616

  5. Effects of untreated and treated oilfield-produced water on seed germination, seedling development, and biomass production of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    da Costa Marques, Mônica Regina; de Souza, Paulo Sérgio Alves; Rigo, Michelle Machado; Cerqueira, Alexandre Andrade; de Paiva, Julieta L; Merçon, Fábio; Perez, Daniel Vidal

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate possible toxic effects of oil and other contaminants from oilfield-produced water from oil exploration and production, on seed germination, and seedling development of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In comparison, as treated by electroflocculation, oilfield-produced water, with lower oil and organic matter content, was also used. Electroflocculation treatment of oilfield-produced water achieved significant removals of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (94 %), oil and grease (O&G) (96 %), color (97 %), and turbidity (99 %). Different O&G, COD, and salt levels of untreated and treated oilfield-produced water did not influence germination process and seedling biomass production. Normal seedlings percentage and vigor tended to decrease more intensely in O&G and COD levels, higher than 337.5 mg L(-1) and 1321 mg O2 L(-1), respectively, using untreated oilfield-produced water. These results indicate that this industrial effluent must be treated, in order to not affect adversely seedling development. This way, electroflocculation treatment appears as an interesting alternative to removing oil and soluble organic matter in excess from oilfield-produced water improving sunflower's seedling development and providing a friendly environmental destination for this wastewater, reducing its potential to harm water resources, soil, and biota. PMID:26059762

  6. Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus

    SciTech Connect

    Thiede, M.E.

    1988-05-25

    Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

  7. Greenhouse gas emissions and plant characteristics from soil cultivated with sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and amended with organic or inorganic fertilizers.

    PubMed

    López-Valdez, F; Fernández-Luqueño, F; Luna-Suárez, S; Dendooven, L

    2011-12-15

    Agricultural application of wastewater sludge has become the most widespread method of disposal, but the environmental effects on soil, air, and crops must be considered. The effect of wastewater sludge or urea on sunflower's (Helianthus annuus L.) growth and yield, the soil properties, and the resulting CO(2) and N(2)O emissions are still unknown. The objectives of this study were to investigate: i) the effect on soil properties of organic or inorganic fertilizer added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower, ii) how urea or wastewater sludge increases CO(2) and N(2)O emissions from agricultural soil over short time periods, and iii) the effect on plant characteristics and yield of urea or wastewater sludge added to agricultural soil cultivated with sunflower. The sunflower was fertilized with wastewater sludge or urea or grown in unamended soil under greenhouse conditions while plant and soil characteristics, yield, and greenhouse gas emissions were monitored. Sludge and urea modified some soil characteristics at the onset of the experiment and during the first two months but not thereafter. Some plant characteristics were improved by sludge. Urea and sludge treatments increased the yield at similar rates, while sludge-amended soil significantly increased N(2)O emissions but not CO(2) emissions compared to the other amended or unamended soils. This implies that wastewater sludge increased the biomass and/or the yield; however, from a holistic point of view, using wastewater sludge as fertilizer should be viewed with concern. PMID:22033361

  8. The effect of subambient to elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration on vascular function in Helianthus annuus: implications for plant response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Rico, Christopher; Pittermann, Jarmila; Polley, H Wayne; Aspinwall, Michael J; Fay, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    Plant gas exchange is regulated by stomata, which coordinate leaf-level water loss with xylem transport. Stomatal opening responds to internal concentrations of CO₂ in the leaf, but changing CO₂ can also lead to changes in stomatal density that influence transpiration. Given that stomatal conductance increases under subambient concentrations of CO₂ and, conversely, that plants lose less water at elevated concentrations, can downstream effects of atmospheric CO₂ be observed in xylem tissue? We approached this problem by evaluating leaf stomatal density, xylem transport, xylem anatomy and resistance to cavitation in Helianthus annuus plants grown under three CO₂ regimes ranging from pre-industrial to elevated concentrations. Xylem transport, conduit size and stomatal density all increased at 290 ppm relative to ambient and elevated CO₂ concentrations. The shoots of the 290-ppm-grown plants were most vulnerable to cavitation, whereas xylem cavitation resistance did not differ in 390- and 480-ppm-grown plants. Our data indicate that, even as an indirect driver of water loss, CO₂ can affect xylem structure and water transport by coupling stomatal and xylem hydraulic functions during plant development. This plastic response has implications for plant water use under variable concentrations of CO₂, as well as the evolution of efficient xylem transport. PMID:23731256

  9. A GRAS-like gene of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) alters the gibberellin content and axillary meristem outgrowth in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Fambrini, M; Mariotti, L; Parlanti, S; Salvini, M; Pugliesi, C

    2015-11-01

    The GRAS proteins belong to a plant transcriptional regulator family that function in the regulation of plant growth and development. Despite their important roles, in sunflower only one GRAS gene (HaDella1) with the DELLA domain has been reported. Here, we provide a functional characterisation of a GRAS-like gene from Helianthus annuus (Ha-GRASL) lacking the DELLA motif. The Ha-GRASL gene contains an intronless open reading frame of 1,743 bp encoding 580 amino acids. Conserved motifs in the GRAS domain are detected, including VHIID, PFYRE, SAW and two LHR motifs. Within the VHII motif, the P-H-N-D-Q-L residues are entirely maintained. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that Ha-GRASL belongs to the SCARECROW LIKE4/7 (SCL4/7) subfamily of the GRAS consensus tree. Accumulation of Ha-GRASL mRNA at the adaxial boundaries from P6/P7 leaf primordia suggests a role of Ha-GRASL in the initiation of median and basal axillary meristems (AMs) of sunflower. When Ha-GRASL is over-expressed in Arabidopsis wild-type plants, the number of lateral bolts increases differently from untransformed plants. However, Ha-GRASL slightly affects the lateral suppressor (las-4-) mutation. Therefore, we hypothesise that Ha-GRASL and LAS are not functionally equivalent. The over-expression of Ha-GRASL reduces metabolic flow of gibberellins (GAs) in Arabidopsis and this modification could be relevant in AM development. Phylogenetic analysis includes LAS and SCL4/7 in the same major clade, suggesting a more recent separation of these genes with respect to other GRAS members. We propose that some features of their ancestor, as well as AM initiation and outgrowth, are partially retained in both LAS and SCL4/7. PMID:26081041

  10. Identification and characterization of two bisabolene synthases from linear glandular trichomes of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Anna-Katharina; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Conrad, Jürgen; Ro, Dae-Kyun; Spring, Otmar

    2016-04-01

    Sunflower is known to produce a variety of bisabolene-type sesquiterpenes and accumulates these substances in trichomes of leaves, stems and flowering parts. A bioinformatics approach was used to identify the enzyme responsible for the initial step in the biosynthesis of these compounds from its precursor farnesyl pyrophosphate. Based on sequence similarity with a known bisabolene synthases from Arabidopsis thaliana AtTPS12, candidate genes of Helianthus were searched in EST-database and used to design specific primers. PCR experiments identified two candidates in the RNA pool of linear glandular trichomes of sunflower. Their sequences contained the typical motifs of sesquiterpene synthases and their expression in yeast functionally characterized them as bisabolene synthases. Spectroscopic analysis identified the stereochemistry of the product of both enzymes as (Z)-γ-bisabolene. The origin of the two sunflower bisabolene synthase genes from the transcripts of linear trichomes indicates that they may be involved in the synthesis of sesquiterpenes produced in these trichomes. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of the sunflower bisabolene synthases showed high similarity with sesquiterpene synthases from other Asteracean species and indicated putative evolutionary origin from a β-farnesene synthase. PMID:26880289

  11. Supplemental macronutrients and microbial fermentation products improve the uptake and transport of foliar applied zinc in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Studies utilizing micro X-ray florescence

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Shengke; Lu, Lingli; Xie, Ruohan; Zhang, Minzhe; Jernstedt, Judith A.; Hou, Dandi; Ramsier, Cliff; Brown, Patrick H.

    2015-01-21

    Enhancing nutrient uptake and the subsequent elemental transport from the sites of application to sites of utilization is of great importance to the science and practical field application of foliar fertilizers. The aim of this study was to investigate the mobility of various foliar applied zinc (Zn) formulations in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and to evaluate the effects of the addition of an organic biostimulant on phloem loading and elemental mobility. This was achieved by application of foliar formulations to the blade of sunflower (H. annuus L.) and high-resolution elemental imaging with micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) to visualize Zn within the vascular system of the leaf petiole. Although no significant increase of total Zn in petioles was determined by inductively-coupled plasma mass-spectrometer, μ-XRF elemental imaging showed a clear enrichment of Zn in the vascular tissues within the sunflower petioles treated with foliar fertilizers containing Zn. The concentration of Zn in the vascular of sunflower petioles was increased when Zn was applied with other microelements with EDTA (commercial product Kick-Off) as compared with an equimolar concentration of ZnSO₄ alone. The addition of macronutrients N, P, K (commercial product CleanStart) to the Kick-Off Zn fertilizer, further increased vascular system Zn concentrations while the addition of the microbially derived organic biostimulant “GroZyme” resulted in a remarkable enhancement of Zn concentrations in the petiole vascular system. The study provides direct visualized evidence for phloem transport of foliar applied Zn out of sites of application in plants by using μ-XRF technique, and suggests that the formulation of the foliar applied Zn and the addition of the organic biostimulant GroZyme increases the mobility of Zn following its absorption by the leaf of sunflower.

  12. Respiration and Energy Turnover During the Seedling Development of Triticum aestivum L., Zea mays L., Helianthus annuus L., and Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Bolhàr-Nordenkampf, H R; Zahrl, J

    1984-08-01

    Seedling length, CO(2) output, dry weight and energy content of the seeds and seedling organs of Triticum, Zea, Helianthus and Phaseolus were determined in order to study the efficiency of storage substance utilization and energy turnover during seedling development up to 108 h. The respiration rate is lower in the large seeds of Zea and Phaseolus (2.2 and 2.0 mgCO(2)·gDW(-1)·h(-1)) than in the small seeds of Triticum and Helianthus (3.1 and 4.2 mgCO(2)·gDW(-1)·h(-1)). CO(2) output during the synthesis of seedling organs reaches a maximum value in Triticum, Zea and Helianthus after 36 h (1.0, 1.7 and 1.3 gCO(2)·gDW(n)(-1), resp.) and in Phaseolus after 60 h (3.0 gCO(2)·gDW(n)(-1)). This high CO(2) evolution is caused by the lag phase of growth at the beginning of germination, as indicated in the RGR course. The loss of mobilized storage substances caused by CO(2) evolution amounts to 46% in Phaseolus and is less (av. 30%) in the other seeds. The energy loss in relation to the energy of the ungerminated seed is relatively high in the small and energy-rich seeds of Triticum (19%) and Helianthus (21 %) compared with the large seeds of Zea (8 %) and Phaseolus (13 %). The efficiency of energy utilization corresponding to the energy stored in the newly formed seedling organs is low in Helianthus (40%) and Phaseolus (43%) and relatively high in Triticum (55%) and Zea (6 %). The calorific equivalent of the CO(2) amount evolved differs widely (11 to 24 kJ·gCO(2)(-1)). With the exception of Zea these values are much higher than the calorific equivalent of the dry weight loss. The latter may be explained by energy losses without CO(2) evolution, as well as by CO(2) refixation by PEPC and by energy dissipation in the maintenance metabolism. PMID:23194792

  13. Nongenotoxic effects and a reduction of the DXR-induced genotoxic effects of Helianthus annuus Linné (sunflower) seeds revealed by micronucleus assays in mouse bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This research evaluated the genotoxicity of oil and tincture of H. annuus L. seeds using the micronucleus assay in bone marrow of mice. The interaction between these preparations and the genotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DXR) was also analysed (antigenotoxicity test). Methods Experimental groups were evaluated at 24-48 h post treatment with N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea (positive control – NEU), DXR (chemotherapeutic), NaCl (negative control), a sunflower tincture (THALS) and two sources of sunflower oils (POHALS and FOHALS). Antigenotoxic assays were carried out using the sunflower tincture and oils separately and in combination with NUE or DXR. Results For THALS, analysis of the MNPCEs showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. A significant reduction in MNPCE was observed when THALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) was administered in combination with DXR (5 mg.Kg-1). For POHALS or FOHALS, analysis of the MNPCEs also showed no significant differences between treatment doses (250–2,000 mg.Kg-1) and NaCl. However, the combination DXR + POHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) or DXR + FOHALS (2,000 mg.Kg-1) not contributed to the MNPCEs reduction. Conclusions This research suggests absence of genotoxicity of THALS, dose-, time- and sex-independent, and its combination with DXR can reduce the genotoxic effects of DXR. POHALS and FOHALS also showed absence of genotoxicity, but their association with DXR showed no antigenotoxic effects. PMID:24694203

  14. Progress on the introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from wild perennial Helianthus species into cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary attacks sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) causing root, stalk, and head rot, and is one of the most damaging and difficult-to-control sunflower diseases. Some wild perennial Helianthus species have been identified to contain abundant res...

  15. Effect of asymmetric auxin application on Helianthus hypocotyl curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Migliaccio, F.; Rayle, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid was applied asymmetrically to the hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings. After 5 hours on a clinostat, auxin gradients as small as 1 to 1.3 produced substantial (more than 60 degrees) hypocotyl curvature. This result suggests the asymmetric growth underlying hypocotyl gravitropism can be explained by lateral auxin redistribution.

  16. [Study of Chloroplast DNA Polymorphism in the Sunflower (Helianthus L.)].

    PubMed

    Markina, N V; Usatov, A V; Logacheva, M D; Azarin, K V; Gorbachenko, C F; Kornienko, I V; Gavrilova, V A; Tihobaeva, V E

    2015-08-01

    The polymorphism of microsatellite loci of chloroplast genome in six Helianthus species and 46 lines of cultivated sunflower H. annuus (17 CMS lines and 29 Rf-lines) were studied. The differences between species are confined to four SSR loci. Within cultivated forms of the sunflower H. annuus, the polymorphism is absent. A comparative analysis was performed on sequences of the cpDNA inbred line 3629, line 398941 of the wild sunflower, and the American line HA383 H. annuus. As a result, 52 polymorphic loci represented by 27 SSR and 25 SNP were found; they can be used for genotyping of H. annuus samples, including cultural varieties: twelve polymorphic positions, of which eight are SSR and four are SNP. PMID:26601486

  17. Chromosomal Evolution and Patterns of Introgression in Helianthus

    PubMed Central

    Barb, Jessica G.; Bowers, John E.; Renaut, Sebastien; Rey, Juan I.; Knapp, Steven J.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Burke, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the nature and extent of karyotypic differences between species provides insight into the evolutionary history of the genomes in question and, in the case of closely related species, the potential for genetic exchange between taxa. We constructed high-density genetic maps of the silverleaf sunflower (Helianthus argophyllus) and Algodones Dune sunflower (H. niveus ssp. tephrodes) genomes and compared them to a consensus map of cultivated sunflower (H. annuus) to identify chromosomal rearrangements between species. The genetic maps of H. argophyllus and H. niveus ssp. tephrodes included 17 linkage groups each and spanned 1337 and 1478 cM, respectively. Comparative analyses revealed greater divergence between H. annuus and H. niveus ssp. tephrodes (13 inverted segments, 18 translocated segments) than between H. annuus and H. argophyllus (10 inverted segments, 8 translocated segments), consistent with their known phylogenetic relationships. Marker order was conserved across much of the genome, with 83 and 64% of the H. argophyllus and H. niveus ssp. tephrodes genomes, respectively, being syntenic with H. annuus. Population genomic analyses between H. annuus and H. argophyllus, which are sympatric across a portion of the natural range of H. annuus, revealed significantly elevated genetic structure in rearranged portions of the genome, indicating that such rearrangements are associated with restricted gene flow between these two species. PMID:24770331

  18. Oil Concentration and Fatty Acid Profile of Wild Helianthus Species fron the Southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) oil has the potential to be improved for industrial and nutritional purposes through selection and breeding. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from wild species and agronomic traits have been enhanced. Interes...

  19. Evaluation of rare Helianthus eggertii achenes for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) oil has the potential to be improved for nutritional and industrial purposes through selection and breeding. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from wild species, resulting in a continuous improvement in agrono...

  20. Evaluation of rare and endangered Helianthus species from the southeastern United States for fatty acid composition in the oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., oil has the potential to be improved for nutritional and industrial purposes through selection and breeding. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from wild species, resulting in a continuous improvement in agrono...

  1. Nutation of Helianthus Annuus in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to gather evidence to decide between the Darwinian concept of endogenously motivated nutation and the more mechanistic concept of gravity dependent nutation is described. If nutation persists in weightlessness, parameters describing the motion will be measured by recording in time lapse mode the video images of a population of seedlings that were grown at 1-g, but which will be observed at virtual zero gravity. Later, the plant images will be displayed on a video monitor in a laboratory, photographed on 16 millimeter film, and analyzed frame by frame to determine the kinetics of nutation for each specimen tested.

  2. Shoot development from hypocotyl protoplasts of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Taski-Ajdukovic, Ksenija; Nagl, Nevena; Miladinovic, Dragana; Mikic, A

    2009-06-01

    The plant regeneration from sunflower protoplast was achieved by protocols that considerably differ with respect to basal medium and concentration of growth regulators added. In most cases regeneration was restricted to a small proportion of genotypes. In this experiment, sunflower inbred line Ha-74A, with a high regeneration ability was used for protoplast isolation from etiolated hypocotyls. Isolated protoplasts were embedded in agarose droplets and cultured according to different regeneration protocols. The best results were obtained when protoplasts were cultured on L4 medium followed by transfer of regenerated microcalluses to solid regeneration media. Shoot regeneration was achieved by culture of calluses on SE regeneration medium after the treatment with 2.2 μM thidiazuron. PMID:19584032

  3. Plant response to lead in the presence or absence EDTA in two sunflower genotypes (cultivated H. annuus cv. 1114 and interspecific line H. annuus × H. argophyllus).

    PubMed

    Doncheva, Snezhana; Moustakas, Michael; Ananieva, Kalina; Chavdarova, Martina; Gesheva, Emiliya; Vassilevska, Rumyana; Mateev, Plamen

    2013-02-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the response of two sunflower genotypes (cultivated sunflower Helianthus annuus cv. 1114 and newly developed genotype H. annuus × Helianthus argophyllus) to Pb medium-term stress and the role of exogenously applied EDTA in alleviating Pb toxicity in hydroponics. Plant growth, morpho-anatomical characteristics of the leaf tissues, electrolyte leakage, total antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging capacity, total flavonoid content, and superoxide dismutase isoenzyme profile were studied by conventional methods. Differential responses of both genotypes to Pb supplied in the nutrient solution were recorded. Pb treatment induced a decrease in the relative growth rate, disturbance of plasma membrane integrity, and changes in the morpho-anatomical characteristics of the leaf tissues and in the antioxidant capacity, which were more pronounced in the cultivated sunflower H. annuus cv. 1114. The new genotype demonstrated higher tolerance to Pb when compared with the cultivar. This was mainly due to increased photosynthetically active area, maintenance of plasma membrane integrity, permanently high total antioxidant activity, and free radical scavenging capacity as well as total flavonoid content. The addition of EDTA into the nutrient solution led to limitation of the negative impact of Pb ions on the above parameters in both genotypes. This could be related to the reduced content of Pb in the roots, stems, and leaves, suggesting that the presence of EDTA limited the uptake of Pb. The comparative analysis of the responses to Pb treatment showed that the deleterious effect of Pb was more pronounced in the cultivated sunflower H. annuus cv. 1114. The new genotype H. annuus × H. argophyllus was more productive and demonstrated higher tolerance to Pb medium-term stress, which could indicate that it may possess certain mechanisms to tolerate high Pb concentrations. This character could be inherited from the wild parent used in the

  4. An approach to identify the novel miRNA encoded from H. Annuus EST sequences.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Hemant; Tiwari, Tanushree; Patel, Maulik; Mehta, Aditya; Ghosh, Arpita

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs are a newly discovered class of non-protein small RNAs with 22-24 nucleotides. They play multiple roles in biological processes including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, stress responses and many other cell functions. In this research, several approaches were combined to make a computational prediction of potential miRNAs and their targets in Helianthus annuus (H. annuus). The already available information of the plant miRNAs present in miRBase v21 was used against expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of three miRNAs were detected from which one potential novel miRNA was identified following a range of strict filtering criteria. The target prediction was carried out for these three miRNAs having various targets. These targets were functionally annotated and GO terms were assigned. To study the conserved nature of the miRNAs, predicted phylogenetic analysis was carried out. These findings will significantly provide the broader picture for understanding the functions in H. annuus. PMID:26697356

  5. Genetic diversity of worldwide Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) germplasm as revealed by RAPD markers.

    PubMed

    Wangsomnuk, P P; Khampa, S; Wangsomnuk, P; Jogloy, S; Mornkham, T; Ruttawat, B; Patanothai, A; Fu, Y B

    2011-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a wild relative of the cultivated sunflower (H. annuus); it is an old tuber crop that has recently received renewed interest. We used RAPD markers to characterize 147 Jerusalem artichoke accessions from nine countries. Thirty RAPD primers were screened; 13 of them detected 357 reproducible RAPD bands, of which 337 were polymorphic. Various diversity analyses revealed several different patterns of RAPD variation. More than 93% of the RAPD variation was found within accessions of a country. Weak genetic differentiation was observed between wild and cultivated accessions. Six groups were detected in this germplasm set. Four ancestral groups were found for the Canadian germplasm. The most genetically distinct accessions were identified. These findings provide useful diversity information for understanding the Jerusalem artichoke gene pool, for conserving Jerusalem artichoke germplasm, and for choosing germplasm for genetic improvement. PMID:22194201

  6. Weed control in sunflower (helianthus annuus L.) with post-emergent herbicides.

    PubMed

    Béres, I; Szente, D; Gyenes, V; Somlyay, I

    2005-01-01

    Sunflower is the most important oil crop in Hungary, is the base of the production of cooking oil and moreover takes an important part in production of margarine too. Extracted sunflower groats as a secondary product origining from the mentioned procedure can be used in forage successfully. The amount of harvested sunflower reaches the 20-25% of the EU's yield. The sowing area approaches 500 thousand hectares. The essential condition of successful crop production is the perfect weed control. Sowing areas are infected with monocotyledon and dicotyledonous weeds too. Annual dicotyledonous weeds are the most troublesome. The worst species is the Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. Many other weed species as Abutilon theophrasti MEDIC., Datura stramonium L. and Xanthium strumarium L. can cause serious damages. In our model experiments we examined the herbicide sensibility of two commercial sunflower cultivars as "Iregi szürke csikos", "Marica II" and a sulfonylurea-urea tolerant new hybrid "PR63E82". The experiment was set up under greenhouse conditions with the use of four important weed and different post-emergent herbicide as Modown 4F (bifenox), Pledge 50 WP (flumioxazin) and Granstar 75 DF (tribenuron-methyl). We applied normal and double doses too. Sunflower was cultivated to 4-6 leaf stage. Post-emergent herbicides were sprayed out when weeds were in 2, 2-4 and 4-6 leaf stage. Weed killer and phytotoxic effects of post-emergent herbicides were examined. We declared that development of weeds had significally effect on the effectiveness of different herbicides. PMID:16637218

  7. Gravity Functions of Circumnutation by Hypocotyls of Helianthus annuus in Simulated Hypogravity 12

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, David K.; Venditti, Allen L.; Brown, Allan H.

    1980-01-01

    For more than a decade research on the botanical mechanism responsible for circumnutation has centered on whether or not these nearly ubiquitous oscillations can be attributed to a hunting process whereby the plant organ continuously responds to the gravity force and, by overshooting each stimulus, initiates a sustained oscillation or, driven by a not yet defined autogenic mechanism, performs oscillatory activities that require no external reinforcement to maintain the observed rhythms of differential growth. We explore here the effects of altered gravity force on parameters of circumnutation. Following our earlier publication on circumnutation in hypergravity we report here an exploration of circumnutation in hypogravity. Parameters of circumnutation are recorded as functions of the axially imposed gravity force. The same method was used (two-axes clinostat rotation) to produce sustained gravity forces referred to as hypergravity (1 < g), hypogravity (0 [unk] g < 1), and negative gravity (−1 < g < 0). In these three regions of the g-parameter nutational frequency and nutational amplitude were influenced in different ways. The results of our tests describe the gravity dependence of circumnutation over the full range of real or simulated gravity levels that are available in an earth laboratory. Our results demonstrated that nutational parameters are indeed gravity-dependent but are not inconsistent with the postulate that circumnutation can proceed in the absence of a significant gravity force. PMID:16661229

  8. Characterization of partially purified milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seeds.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Assia I A M; Mohamed Ahmed, Isam A; Hamid, Omer I A

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to extract milk-clotting enzyme from sunflower seeds and to determine its potentiality for manufacturing white soft cheese from cows and goats milk. The seeds were blended and extracted using two types of buffers and milk-clotting and proteolytic activities were evaluated. The enzyme was partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation techniques. Results indicated that sunflower seeds extracted with 5% NaCl in 50 mmol/L acetate buffer, pH 5.0, had the highest milk-clotting activity (MCA) and lowest coagulation time compared to that extracted with only acetate buffer (pH 5.0). Ammonium sulfate at 30-50% saturation purified the enzyme to 4.3 folds with MCA of 241.0 U/mL and final enzyme yield of 10.9%. The partially purified enzyme was characterized by SDS-PAGE that showed two bands with molecular weight of 120 and 62 kDa. When compared with other plant enzymes, the partially purified sunflower enzyme was found to have higher milk-clotting activity and lower proteolytic activity. Also, both milk sources and enzyme types significantly affected the cheese yield and curd formation time. The cheese made from cow milk using sunflower enzyme had higher yield compared to that obtained using commercial rennet, whereas the opposite was observed when using goat milk. PMID:27625777

  9. Phytoaccumulation, interaction, toxicity and remediation of cadmium from Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower).

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Sharma, Bechan; Kumar, Chitranjan

    2007-07-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the interaction between Cd and Ca, Zn and organic matter for Cd-phytoremediation in sunflower on the alluvium soil of the Sheila Dhar Institute (SDI) experimental farm, Allahabad (India). Application of 40 ppm Zn produced 11.18% extra dry matter (DM) content and 5.8% extra seed yield over the control. We recommended 1.0% Ca, 40 ppm Zn and 20 tons/ha of compost to enhance dry matter yield and diminish the Cd accumulation in 15 ppm Cd- ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA)-treated plots up to 1/12 folds in sunflower (<0.21 ppm), which indicated phytoremediation of Cd-contaminated soil through soil-plant-rhizospheric processes. PMID:17549427

  10. Kinetics modeling of the drying of sunflower stem (Helianthus annuus L.) in a forced convection tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, R.; Vaca, M.; Terres, H.; Lizardi, A.; Morales, J.; Flores, J.; Chávez, S.

    2015-01-01

    The sunflower is an annual plant native to the Americas. It possesses a large inflorescence (flowering head), and its name is derived from the flower's shape and image, which is often used to capture the sun. The plant has a rough, broad, hairy stem, coarsely toothed, with rough leaves, and circular flower heads. The sunflower seeds are appreciated for their oil, which has become a widespread cooking ingredient. Leaves of the sunflower can be used as cattle feed, while the stems contain a fiber that may be used in paper production. Recently this flower has been used in phytoremediation of soils, contaminated with heavy metals. Sunflower has been probed as an efficient phytoextractor of chromium, lead, aluminum, zinc, cadmium from soil. In this work we present the experimental results of the drying of the sunflower stem, cut in 100 mm longitudinal sections, with diameters in the range of 11-18 mm. The aim was to obtain a dry and easy-to-handle final product, since these plants were originally cultivated in order to extract heavy metals from a polluted soil. The dried stems could then be easily confined or sent to recycle premises to concentrate the metals. The drying process was done in forced convection within a hot air tunnel. The used temperature was 60 °C, the velocity of air was 3 m/s and the required times were 8 hours. The initial average wet mass was 28 g and the final value was 5 g, resulting in the aimed product.

  11. Genetic characterization and molecular mapping of a chlorophyll deficiency gene in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major gene controlling leaf color (lg for light green versus normal green) of sunflower was identified and mapped in an F2 population derived from a cross between two breeding lines. All 20 F1 plants from the cross had normal green leaf color and the segregation of 172 plants in an F2 population f...

  12. Ecogeography and utility to plant breeding of the crop wild relatives of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop wild relatives (CWR) are a rich source of genetic diversity for crop improvement. Combining ecogeographic and phylogenetic techniques can inform both conservation and breeding. Geographic occurrence, bioclimatic, and biophysical data were used to predict species distributions, range overlap and...

  13. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pollination in California's Central Valley is limited by native bee nest site location.

    PubMed

    Sardiñas, Hillary S; Tom, Kathleen; Ponisio, Lauren Catherine; Rominger, Andrew; Kremen, Claire

    2016-03-01

    The delivery of ecosystem services by mobile organisms depends on the distribution of those organisms, which is, in turn, affected by resources at local and landscape scales. Pollinator-dependent crops rely on mobile animals like bees for crop production, and the spatial relationship between floral resources and nest location for these central-place foragers influences the delivery of pollination services. Current models that map pollination coverage in agricultural regions utilize landscape-level estimates of floral availability and nesting incidence inferred from expert opinion, rather than direct assessments. Foraging distance is often derived from proxies of bee body size, rather than direct measurements of foraging that account for behavioral responses to floral resource type and distribution. The lack of direct measurements of nesting incidence and foraging distances may lead to inaccurate mapping of pollination services. We examined the role of local-scale floral resource presence from hedgerow plantings on nest incidence of ground-nesting bees in field margins and within monoculture, conventionally managed sunflower fields in California's Central Valley. We tracked bee movement into fields using fluorescent powder. We then used these data to simulate the distribution of pollination services within a crop field. Contrary to expert opinion, we found that ground-nesting native bees nested both in fields and edges, though nesting rates declined with distance into field. Further, we detected no effect of field-margin floral enhancements on nesting. We found evidence of an exponential decay rate of bee movement into fields, indicating that foraging predominantly occurred in less than 1% of medium-sized bees' predicted typical foraging range. Although we found native bees nesting within agricultural fields, their restricted foraging movements likely centralize pollination near nest sites. Our data thus predict a heterogeneous distribution of pollination services within sunflower fields, with edges receiving higher coverage than field centers. To generate more accurate maps of services, we advocate directly measuring the autecology of ecosystem service providers, which vary by crop system, pollinator species, and region. Improving estimates of the factors affecting pollinator populations can increase the accuracy of pollination service maps and help clarify the influence of farming practices on wild bees occurring in agricultural landscapes. PMID:27209786

  14. Mapping the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling seed morphology in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the results of analyzing the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying sunflower seed morphological traits in a segregating population derived from an oilseed by confection cross. A linkage map containing 165 target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP) and 44 simple sequence re...

  15. Quality assessment and yield of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) grown at multiple locations in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hypothesis of this work was that sunflower could be grown as a cash crop in Mississippi and N and cultivar would alter oil yield, content, and composition. This study investigated the effect of N (0, 67, 134, and 202 kg ha-1), cultivar (DKF3875, DKF2990, DKF3510 and DKF3901) and their interactio...

  16. Evaluation of proteome alterations induced by cadmium stress in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cultures.

    PubMed

    Lopes Júnior, Cícero Alves; Barbosa, Herbert de Sousa; Moretto Galazzi, Rodrigo; Ferreira Koolen, Hector Henrique; Gozzo, Fábio Cesar; Arruda, Marco Aurélio Zezzi

    2015-09-01

    The present study evaluates, at a proteomic level, changes in protein abundance in sunflower leaves in the absence or presence (at 50 or 700mg) of cadmium (as CdCl2). At the end of the cultivation period (45 days), proteins are extracted from leaves with phenol, separated by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE), and excised from the gels. The differential protein abundances (for proteins differing by more than 1.8 fold, which corresponds to 90% variation) are characterized using nESI-LC-MS/MS. The protein content decreases by approximately 41% in plants treated with 700mg Cd compared with control plants. By comparing all groups of plants evaluated in this study (Control vs. Cd-lower, Control vs. Cd-higher and Cd-lower vs. Cd-higher), 39 proteins are found differential and 18 accurately identified; the control vs. Cd-higher treatment is that presenting the most differential proteins. From identified proteins, those involved in energy and disease/defense (including stress), are the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large chain, transketolase, and heat shock proteins are the most differential abundant proteins. Thus, at the present study, photosynthesis is the main process affected by Cd in sunflowers, although these plants are highly tolerant to Cd. PMID:26004357

  17. Molecular tagging of a novel rust resistance gene R12 in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower production in North America has recently suffered economic losses in yield and seed quality from sunflower rust (Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) because of the increasing incidence and lack of resistance to new rust races. RHA 464, a newly released sunflower male fertility restorer line, is r...

  18. Studies on genotypic variability and seed dormancy in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seed dormancy is a great drawback and causes a great problem in efficient seed production of sunflower for which great efforts have been made to develop techniques in breaking seed dormancy of sunflower. Studies have indicated that sunflower genotypes showed a large variability in dormancy. Few near...

  19. Molecular mapping of a new induced gene for nuclear male sterility in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new NMS line, NMS HA89-872, induced by mitomycin C and streptomycin carries a single recessive male-sterile gene ms6. An F2 population of 88 plants was obtained from a cross between nuclear male-sterile mutant NMS HA89-872 (msms) and male-fertile line RHA271 (MsMs). 225 SSR primers and 9 RFLP-deri...

  20. Rhizopus oryzae associated with Melanagromyza splendida and stem disease of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In September 2012, a female parental line in a Yolo, CA in sunflower seed-production field began displaying external stem symptoms that could not be attributed to any known disease. Symptoms appeared to be associated with tunneling caused by an un-identified insect. Stems were collected and Rhizopu...

  1. Physiological and gene expression responses of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants differ according to irrigation placement.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Ana; Capote, Nieves; Romero, Fernando; Dodd, Ian C; Colmenero-Flores, José M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate effects of soil moisture heterogeneity on plant physiology and gene expression in roots and leaves, three treatments were implemented in sunflower plants growing with roots split between two compartments: a control (C) treatment supplying 100% of plant evapotranspiration, and two treatments receiving 50% of plant evapotranspiration, either evenly distributed to both compartments (deficit irrigation - DI) or unevenly distributed to ensure distinct wet and dry compartments (partial rootzone drying - PRD). Plants receiving the same amount of water responded differently under the two irrigation systems. After 3 days, evapotranspiration was similar in C and DI, but 20% less in PRD, concomitant with decreased leaf water potential (Ψleaf) and increased leaf xylem ABA concentration. Six water-stress responsive genes were highly induced in roots growing in the drying soil compartment of PRD plants, and their expression was best correlated with local soil water content. On the other hand, foliar gene expression differed significantly from that of the root and correlated better with xylem ABA concentration and Ψleaf. While the PRD irrigation strategy triggered stronger physiological and molecular responses, suggesting a more intense and systemic stress reaction due to local dehydration of the dry compartment of PRD plants, the DI strategy resulted in similar water savings without strongly inducing these responses. Correlating physiological and molecular responses in PRD/DI plants may provide insights into the severity and location of water deficits and may enable a better understanding of long-distance signalling mechanisms. PMID:25219304

  2. Shade-Induced Action Potentials in Helianthus annuus L. Originate Primarily from the Epicotyl

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Nicholas R; Cleland, Robert E; Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Repeated observations that shading (a drastic reduction in illumination rate) increased the generation of spikes (rapidly reversed depolarizations) in leaves and stems of many cucumber and sunflower plants suggests a phenomenon widespread among plant organs and species. Although shaded leaves occasionally generate spikes and have been suggested to trigger systemic action potentials (APs) in sunflower stems, we never found leaf-generated spikes to propagate out of the leaf and into the stem. On the contrary, our data consistently implicate the epicotyl as the location where most spikes and APs (propagating spikes) originate. Microelectrode studies of light and shading responses in mesophyll cells of leaf strips and in epidermis/cortex cells of epicotyl segments confirm this conclusion and show that spike induction is not confined to intact plants. 90% of the epicotyl-generated APs undergo basipetal propagation to the lower epicotyl, hypocotyl and root. They propagate with an average rate of 2 ± 0.3 mm s−1 and always undergo a large decrement from the hypocotyl to the root. The few epicotyl-derived APs that can be tracked to leaf blades (< 10%) undergo either a large decrement or fail to be transmitted at all. Occasionally (5% of the observations) spikes were be generated in hypocotyl and lower epicotyl that moved towards the upper epicotyl unaltered, decremented, or amplified. This study confirms that plant APs arise to natural, nontraumatic changes. In simultaneous recordings with epicotyl growth, AP generation was found to parallel the acceleration of stem growth under shade. The possible relatedness of both processes must be further investigated. PMID:19521471

  3. Spectral reflectance as an indicator of foliar concentrations of arsenic in common sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandy, Yuridia Patricia Peralta De

    Studies were conducted to investigate the use of spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination of soil. Germination method was developed for sunflower seeds, and cohorts of sunflower seedlings in hydroponic tanks were established. The cohorts were exposed to 0 ppm, 5 ppm, 7.5 ppm, and 10 ppm treatments of As (V) and reflectance measurements of foliage were collected using a spectroradiometer during two experiments. Results demonstrated the feasibility of using spectral reflectance by foliage of common sunflower as a potential indicator of arsenic contamination. In both experiments, arsenic concentrations in leaf tissues were directly proportional to arsenic concentrations in hydroponic solutions in which such plants were grown. Although the effect(s) of arsenic accumulation had minimal impact on reflectance of visible wavelengths, the effects on NIR reflectance were substantial and resulted in a progressive decrease in reflectance as arsenic concentrations in foliage increased.

  4. Effect of salinity and sodicity stresses on physiological response and productivity in Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Fatma Aly; Radi, Abeer Ahmed; Abdel-Wahab, Dalia Ahmed; Hamada, Afaf Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Soil salinity and sodicity (alkalinity) are serious land degradation issues worldwide that are predicted to increase in the future. The objective of the present study is to distinguish the effects of NaCl and Na(2)CO(3) salinity in two concentrations on the growth, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, membrane integrity, total lipids, yield parameters and fatty acids (FAs) composition of seeds of sunflower cultivar Sakha 53. Plant growth, LOX activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content were reduced by salts stresses. On the contrary, salinity and alkalinity stress induced stimulatory effects on membrane permeability, leakage of UV-metabolites from leaves and total lipids of sunflower shoots and roots. Crop yield (plant height, head diameter, seed index and number of seeds for each head) that is known as a hallmark of plant stress was decreased by increasing concentrations of NaCl and Na(2)CO(3) in the growth media. Fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) composition of salt-stressed sunflower seeds varied with different levels of NaCl and Na(2)CO(3). PMID:27165529

  5. Florets of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): potential new sources of dietary fiber and phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qiang; Cui, Jun; Li, Hang; Liu, Jia; Zhao, Guohua

    2013-04-10

    Ray florets (Rf) and disc florets (Df) are agricultural byproducts of sunflower seeds. Their nutrition-related compounds were determined. The dietary fiber contents in Rf and Df were 42.90 mg/100 g and 58.97 mg/100 g. In both florets, palmitic, linoleic, and linolenic acids were identified as the three most abundant fatty acids, and the saturated ones constitute approximately two-thirds (w/w) of the total fatty acids. Lysine was the limiting amino acid in both florets by World Health Organization standards. Sixteen phenolic compounds, nine free and eight bound, mainly depsides, were identified in florets by RP-HPLC-DAD/ESI-TOF-MS. The free and bound phenolic compounds in Df were higher than in Rf. 1,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid was the predominant free phenolic compound in both florets. The present study revealed that the florets of sunflower are rich sources of dietary fiber, Fe, and phenols. PMID:23510166

  6. SELECTION ON LEAF ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL TRAITS IN A DESERT HYBRID HELIANTHUS SPECIES AND EARLY-GENERATION HYBRIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Fulco; Rosenthal, David M.; Johnston, Jill A.; Kane, Nolan; Gross, Briana L.; Lexer, Christian; Dudley, Susan A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2008-01-01

    Leaf ecophysiological traits related to carbon gain and resource use are expected to be under strong selection in desert annuals. We used comparative and phenotypic selection approaches to investigate the importance of leaf ecophysiological traits for Helianthus anomalus, a diploid annual sunflower species of hybrid origin that is endemic to active desert dunes. Comparisons were made within and among five genotypic classes: H. anomalus, its ancestral parent species (H. annuus and H. petiolaris), and two backcrossed populations of the parental species (designated BC2ann and BC2pet) representing putative ancestors of H. anomalus. Seedlings were transplanted into H. anomalus habitat at Little Sahara Dunes, Utah, and followed through a summer growing season for leaf ecophysiological traits, phenology, and fitness estimated as vegetative biomass. Helianthus anomalus had a unique combination of traits when compared to its ancestral parent species, suggesting that lower leaf nitrogen and greater leaf succulence might be adaptive. However, selection on leaf traits in H. anomalus favored larger leaf area and greater nitrogen, which was not consistent with the extreme traits of H. anomalus relative to its ancestral parents. Also contrary to expectation, current selection on the leaf traits in the backcross populations was not consistently similar to, or resulting in evolution toward, the current H. anomalus phenotype. Only the selection for greater leaf succulence in BC2ann and greater water-use efficiency in BC2pet would result in evolution toward the current H. anomalus phenotype. It was surprising that the action of phenotypic selection depended greatly on the genotypic class for these closely related sunflower hybrids grown in a common environment. We speculate that this may be due to either phenotypic correlations between measured and unmeasured but functionally related traits or due to the three genotypic classes experiencing the environment differently as a result of

  7. Sunflower germplasm development utilizing wild Helianthus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of agronomic traits for crop improvement. The genus Helianthus comprises 51 species (14 annual and 37 perennial), all native to North America. The...

  8. Collection of Helianthus exilis, an endemic serpentine sunflower of California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 51 species (14 annual and 37 perennial), all restricted to North America. Serpentine sunflower, Helianthus exilis A. Gray, is endemic to the serpentine soils of the Coastal Range and Sierra Nevada mountains of California and is a potential source of useful genes for ...

  9. Use of wild Helianthus species in sunflower breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 51 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 37 perennial species. The current USDA-ARS wild Helianthus germplasm collection contains 2150 accessions, 1369 annual species accessions and 781 perennial species accessions. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflo...

  10. Inheritance of resistance to sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) in an interspecific cross between Helianthus annuus and Helianthus debilis subsp. tardiflorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) constrains sunflower cultivation in increasing areas of Europe and Asia. Populations classified as race G that overcome all known resistance genes have recently appeared. The objective of this research was to study the inheritance of resistance to broomr...

  11. Antimony (SbIII) reduces growth, declines photosynthesis, and modifies leaf tissue anatomy in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Vaculík, Marek; Mrázová, Anna; Lux, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    The role of antimony (Sb)--a non-essential trace metalloid--in physiological processes running in crops is still poorly understood. Present paper describes the effect of Sb tartrate (SbIII) on growth, Sb uptake, photosynthesis, photosynthetic pigments, and leaf tissue organization in young sunflower plants grown in hydroponics. We found that growth of below- and aboveground part was reduced with increasing concentration of Sb in the medium. Although Sb was mostly taken up by sunflower roots and only small part (1-2%) was translocated to the shoots, decline in photosynthesis, transpiration, and decreased content of photosynthetic pigments were observed. This indicates that despite relatively low mobility of Sb in root-shoot system, Sb in shoot noticeably modifies physiological status and reduced plant growth. Additionally, leaf anatomical changes indicated that Sb reduced the size of intercellular spaces and made leaf tissue more compact. PMID:26194244

  12. Mapping of one of the two genes controlling lemon ray flower color in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In an F2 population of 120 plants derived from a cross between two breeding lines with yellow ray flowers, we observed 111 plants with yellow- and nine plants with lemon-colored ray flowers. The segregation pattern fit a 15:1 (x2(15:1)=0.32, p>0.5) ratio, suggesting that the lemon ray flower color i...

  13. Selection on Crop-Derived Traits and QTL in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Crop-Wild Hybrids under Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Owart, Birkin R.; Corbi, Jonathan; Burke, John M.; Dechaine, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Locally relevant conditions, such as water stress in irrigated agricultural regions, should be considered when assessing the risk of crop allele introgression into wild populations following hybridization. Although research in cultivars has suggested that domestication traits may reduce fecundity under water stress as compared to wild-like phenotypes, this has not been investigated in crop-wild hybrids. In this study, we examine phenotypic selection acting on, as well as the genetic architecture of vegetative, reproductive, and physiological characteristics in an experimental population of sunflower crop-wild hybrids grown under wild-like low water conditions. Crop-derived petiole length and head diameter were favored in low and control water environments. The direction of selection differed between environments for leaf size and leaf pressure potential. Interestingly, the additive effect of the crop-derived allele was in the direction favored by selection for approximately half the QTL detected in the low water environment. Selection favoring crop-derived traits and alleles in the low water environment suggests that a subset of these alleles would be likely to spread into wild populations under water stress. Furthermore, differences in selection between environments support the view that risk assessments should be conducted under multiple locally relevant conditions. PMID:25048600

  14. Genetic Mapping for the Rf1 (Fertility Restoration) Gene in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by SSR and TRAP Markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rf1 gene in sunflower can effectively restore the pollen fertility of PET1 cytoplasm in male sterile lines and has been widely used in commercial hybrid production. Identifying molecular markers tightly linked to this gene will be useful in marker-assisted selection to develop maintainer and res...

  15. Pl17 is a novel gene independent of known downy mildew resistance genes in the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Downy mildew (DM), caused by Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.) Berl. et de Toni, is one of the serious sunflower diseases in the world due to its high virulence and the variability of the pathogen. DM resistance in the USDA inbred line, HA 458, has been shown to be effective against all virulent races of...

  16. Differential expression of seven conserved microRNAs in response to abiotic stress and their regulatory network in Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi Khaksefidi, Reyhaneh; Mirlohi, Shirin; Khalaji, Fahimeh; Fakhari, Zahra; Shiran, Behrouz; Fallahi, Hossein; Rafiei, Fariba; Budak, Hikmet; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses affect plant development and production through alternation of the gene expression pattern. Gene expression itself is under the control of different regulators such as miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs). MiRNAs are known to play important roles in regulation of stress responses via interacting with their target mRNAs. Here, for the first time, seven conserved miRNAs, associated with drought, heat, salt and cadmium stresses were characterized in sunflower. The expression profiles of miRNAs and their targets were comparatively analyzed between leaves and roots of plants grown under the mentioned stress conditions. Gene ontology analysis of target genes revealed that they are involved in several important pathways such as auxin and ethylene signaling, RNA mediated silencing and DNA methylation processes. Gene regulatory network highlighted the existence of cross-talks between these stress-responsive miRNAs and the other stress responsive genes in sunflower. Based on network analysis, we suggest that some of these miRNAs in sunflower such as miR172 and miR403 may play critical roles in epigenetic responses to stress. It seems that depending on the stress type, theses miRNAs target several pathways and cellular processes to help sunflower to cope with drought, heat, salt and cadmium stress conditions in a tissue-associated manner. PMID:26442054

  17. Impact of extraneous proteins on the gastrointestinal fate of sunflower seed (Helianthus annuus) oil bodies: a simulated gastrointestinal tract study.

    PubMed

    Makkhun, Sakunkhun; Khosla, Amit; Foster, Tim; McClements, David Julian; Grundy, Myriam M L; Gray, David A

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the physicochemical nature of sunflower seed oil bodies (in the absence and presence of added protein) exposed to gastrointestinal conditions in vitro: crude oil bodies (COB); washed oil bodies (WOB); whey protein isolate-enriched oil bodies (WOB-WPI); and, sodium caseinate enriched-oil bodies (WOB-SC). All oil body emulsions were passed through an in vitro digestion model that mimicked the stomach and duodenal environments, and their physicochemical properties were measured before, during, and after digestion. Oil bodies had a positive charge under gastric conditions because the pH was below the isoelectric point of the adsorbed protein layer, but they had a negative charge under duodenal conditions which was attributed to changes in interfacial composition resulting from adsorption of bile salts. Oil bodies were highly susceptible to flocculation and coalescence in both gastric and duodenal conditions. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated degradation of oleosin proteins (ca. 18-21 kDa) to a greater or lesser extent (dependent on the emulsion) during the gastric phase in all emulsions tested; there is evidence that some oleosin remained intact in the crude oil body preparation during this phase of the digestion process. Measurements of protein displacement from the surface of COBs during direct exposure to bile salts, without inclusion of a gastric phase, indicated the removal of intact oleosin from native oil bodies. PMID:25284307

  18. Mapping the quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling seed morphology and disk diameter in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several seed morphological traits, along with disk diameter, differ greatly between oilseed and confection sunflower types, which are bred for different end-use purposes. This paper reports the results of analyzing the quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying seed morphological traits and disk diam...

  19. Search for Allergens from the Pollen Proteome of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.): A Major Sensitizer for Respiratory Allergy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bodhisattwa; Pandey, Naren; Gupta Bhattacharya, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory allergy triggered by pollen allergens is increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Sunflower pollen is thought to be an important source of inhalant allergens. Present study aims to identify the prevalence of sunflower pollinosis among the Indian allergic population and characterizes the pollen allergens using immuno-proteomic tools. Methodology Clinico-immunological tests were performed to understand the prevalence of sensitivity towards sunflower pollen among the atopic population. Sera from selected sunflower positive patients were used as probe to detect the IgE-reactive proteins from the one and two dimensional electrophoretic separated proteome of sunflower pollen. The antigenic nature of the sugar moiety of the glycoallergens was studied by meta-periodate modification of IgE-immunoblot. Finally, these allergens were identified by mass-spectrometry. Results Prevalence of sunflower pollen sensitization was observed among 21% of the pollen allergic population and associated with elevated level of specific IgE and histamine in the sera of these patients. Immunoscreening of sunflower pollen proteome with patient sera detected seven IgE-reactive proteins with varying molecular weight and pI. Hierarchical clustering of 2D-immunoblot data highlighted three allergens characterized by a more frequent immuno-reactivity and increased levels of IgE antibodies in the sera of susceptible patients. These allergens were considered as the major allergens of sunflower pollen and were found to have their glycan moiety critical for inducing IgE response. Homology driven search of MS/MS data of these IgE-reactive proteins identified seven previously unreported allergens from sunflower pollen. Three major allergenic proteins were identified as two pectate lyases and a cysteine protease. Conclusion Novelty of the present report is the identification of a panel of seven sunflower pollen allergens for the first time at immuno-biochemical and proteomic level, which substantiated the clinical evidence of sunflower allergy. Further purification and recombinant expression of these allergens will improve component-resolved diagnosis and therapy of pollen allergy. PMID:26418046

  20. Differential expression of seven conserved microRNAs in response to abiotic stress and their regulatory network in Helianthus annuus

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi Khaksefidi, Reyhaneh; Mirlohi, Shirin; Khalaji, Fahimeh; Fakhari, Zahra; Shiran, Behrouz; Fallahi, Hossein; Rafiei, Fariba; Budak, Hikmet; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses affect plant development and production through alternation of the gene expression pattern. Gene expression itself is under the control of different regulators such as miRNAs and transcription factors (TFs). MiRNAs are known to play important roles in regulation of stress responses via interacting with their target mRNAs. Here, for the first time, seven conserved miRNAs, associated with drought, heat, salt and cadmium stresses were characterized in sunflower. The expression profiles of miRNAs and their targets were comparatively analyzed between leaves and roots of plants grown under the mentioned stress conditions. Gene ontology analysis of target genes revealed that they are involved in several important pathways such as auxin and ethylene signaling, RNA mediated silencing and DNA methylation processes. Gene regulatory network highlighted the existence of cross-talks between these stress-responsive miRNAs and the other stress responsive genes in sunflower. Based on network analysis, we suggest that some of these miRNAs in sunflower such as miR172 and miR403 may play critical roles in epigenetic responses to stress. It seems that depending on the stress type, theses miRNAs target several pathways and cellular processes to help sunflower to cope with drought, heat, salt and cadmium stress conditions in a tissue-associated manner. PMID:26442054

  1. Evaluation and characterisation of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad seed oil: Comparison with Helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil.

    PubMed

    Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Sbihi, Hassen; Tan, Chin Ping; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2013-01-15

    The physicochemical properties, fatty acid, tocopherol, thermal properties, (1)H NMR, FTIR and profiles of non-conventional oil extracted from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad seeds were evaluated and compared with conventional sunflower seed oil. In addition, the antioxidant properties of C. colocynthis seed oil were also evaluated. The oil content of the C. colocynthis seeds was 23.16%. The main fatty acids in the oil were linoleic acid (66.73%) followed by oleic acid (14.78%), palmitic acid (9.74%), and stearic acid (7.37%). The tocopherol content was 121.85 mg/100g with γ-tocopherol as the major one (95.49%). The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the oil was thermally stable up to 286.57°C, and then began to decompose in four stages namely at 377.4°C, 408.4°C, 434.9°C and 559.2°C. The present study showed that this non-conventional C. colocynthis seed oil can be used for food and non-food applications to supplement or replace some of the conventional oils. PMID:23122069

  2. Inheritance and molecular mapping of a downy mildew resistance gene, Pl13 in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inheritance of resistance to sunflower downy mildew (SDM) derived from HA-R5 conferring resistance to nine races of the pathogen has been determined and the new source has been designated as Pl13. The F2 individuals and F2-3 families of the cross HA-R5 (resistant) x HA 821 (susceptible) were scr...

  3. Enhanced Accumulation of Copper and Lead in Amaranth (Amaranthus paniculatus), Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) and Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Motior M.; Azirun, Sofian M.; Boyce, Amru N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Soil contamination by copper (Cu) and lead (Pb) is a widespread environmental problem. For phytoextraction to be successful and viable in environmental remediation, strategies that can improve plant uptake must be identified. In the present study we investigated the use of nitrogen (N) fertilizer as an efficient way to enhance accumulation of Cu and Pb from contaminated industrial soils into amaranth, Indian mustard and sunflower. Methods/Principal Findings Plants were grown in a greenhouse and fertilized with N fertilizer at rates of 0, 190 and 380 mg kg−1 soil. Shoots, roots and total accumulation of Cu and Pb, transfer factor (TF), translocation index were assessed to evaluate the transport and translocation ability of tested plants. Addition of N fertilizer acidified the industrial soil and caused the pH to decrease to 5.5 from an initial pH of 6.9. Industrial soil amended with N fertilizer resulted in the highest accumulation of Pb and Cu (for Pb 10.1–15.5 mg kg−1, for Cu 11.6–16.8 mg kg−1) in the shoots, which was two to four folds higher relative to the concentration in roots in all the three plants used. Sunflower removed significantly higher Pb (50–54%) and Cu (34–38%) followed by amaranth and Indian mustard from industrial soils with the application of N fertilizer. The TF was <1 while the shoot and root concentration (SC/RC) ratios of Pb and Cu were between 1.3–4.3 and 1.8–3.8, respectively, regardless of plant species. Conclusions Sunflower is the best plant species to carry out phytoextraction of Pb and Cu. In contrast, Pb and Cu removal by Indian mustard and amaranth shows great potential as quick and short duration vegetable crops. The results suggest that the application of N fertilizer in contaminated industrial soil is an effective amendment for the phytoextraction of Pb and Cu from contaminated industrial soils. PMID:23667546

  4. Identification and characterization of contrasting sunflower genotypes to early leaf senescence process combining molecular and physiological studies (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    López Gialdi, A I; Moschen, S; Villán, C S; López Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Fernandez, P

    2016-09-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex mechanism ruled by multiple genetic and environmental variables that affect crop yields. It is the last stage in leaf development, is characterized by an active decline in photosynthetic rate, nutrients recycling and cell death. The aim of this work was to identify contrasting sunflower inbred lines differing in leaf senescence and to deepen the study of this process in sunflower. Ten sunflower genotypes, previously selected by physiological analysis from 150 inbred genotypes, were evaluated under field conditions through physiological, cytological and molecular analysis. The physiological measurement allowed the identification of two contrasting senescence inbred lines, R453 and B481-6, with an increase in yield in the senescence delayed genotype. These findings were confirmed by cytological and molecular analysis using TUNEL, genomic DNA gel electrophoresis, flow sorting and gene expression analysis by qPCR. These results allowed the selection of the two most promising contrasting genotypes, which enables future studies and the identification of new biomarkers associated to early senescence in sunflower. In addition, they allowed the tuning of cytological techniques for a non-model species and its integration with molecular variables. PMID:27457982

  5. Partial Hybridization in Wide Crosses between Cultivated Sunflower and the Perennial Helianthus Species H. mollis and H. orgyalis

    PubMed Central

    FAURE, N.; SERIEYS, H.; CAZAUX, E.; KAAN, F.; BERVILLÉ, A.

    2002-01-01

    To obtain introgressed sunflower lines with improved disease resistance, interspecific crosses were performed with foreign perennial species. We report on several unusual features displayed by these hybrid plants. The methods used to produce the kernels affected yield and genotypes of progeny. Phenotypic traits and DNA markers were investigated in 97 plants derived from cross‐pollination between annual diploid cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and the perennial diploid species H. mollis or H. orgyalis, and the reverse reciprocal crosses. The level of hybridization in progeny was determined using RAPD and RFLP markers. Hybridization was performed by leaving embryos to develop normally on the head (classical crossing) or using embryo rescue. All observed plants derived from H. mollis were diploid (2n = 34). Phenotypes were predominantly similar to the female when cultivated sunflower was the female parent. Progeny from crosses using a wild species as the female parent resembled that parent. Thus, reciprocal crosses led to different progeny. F1 sister progeny shared different sets of molecular markers representing a few of those of the wild species used as the pollen donor. Our results indicate mechanisms leading to the unusual event of partial hybridization. Possible mechanisms behind these unusual events and their possible impact on evolution are discussed. PMID:12096817

  6. Broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.) resistance breeding utilizing wild Helianthus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wild Helianthus species possess valuable resistance genes for sunflower broomrape (Orobanche cumana Wallr.), especially the 39 largely under-utilized perennial species. Resistance to race F has been transferred into cultivated background via bridging of interspecific amphiploids. More recently, a si...

  7. Transferring Sclerotinia Resistance Genes from Wild Helianthus into Cultivated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To enhance resistance to Sclerotinia head and stalk rot in cultivated sunflower, mining and introgression of Sclerotinia resistance genes from diverse wild Helianthus accessions into cultivated sunflower has been conducted using backcrossing method since 2004. During the last four years, numerous in...

  8. Molecular diversity of male sterility inducing and male-fertile cytoplasms in the genus Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Horn, R.

    2002-03-01

    The organisation of mtDNA was investigated for 28 sources of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and a fertile line (normal cytoplasm) of Helianthus annuus by Southern hybridisation. In addition to nine known mitochondrial genes ( atp6, atp9, cob, coxI, coxII, coxIII, 18S, 5S and nd5) three probes for the open reading frames in the rearranged area of PET1, orfH522, orfH708 and orfH873, were used. Genetic similarities of the investigat-ed cytoplasms varied between 0.3 and 1. Cluster analyses using the UPGMA method allowed the distinction of ten mitochondrial (mt) types between the 29 investigated cytoplasms. Most mitochondrial types comprise two or more CMS sources, which could not be further separated, like the PET1-like CMS sources (with the exception of ANO1 and PRR1), or ANN1/ANN2/ANN3, ANN4/ ANN5, ARG3/RIG1, BOL1/EXI1/PEF1/PEP1 and GIG1/ PET2. ANL1, ANL2 and the fertile cytoplasms are also regarded as one mitochondrial type. Unique banding patterns were only observed for ANT1 ( atp6), MAX1 ( atp6, orfH522 and orfH708) and PRR1 ( coxII). However, four of the mitochondrial types showed unique hybridisation signals: ANN4/ANN5 had characteristic bands for atp6 and orfH708, PEF1/PEP1/EXI1/BOL1 for atp6and coxII, and PET2/GIG1 for atp9. The PET1-like cytoplasms all shared the same patterns for orfH522, orfH708and cob (except ANO1). It could be demonstrated that CMS sources, like, e.g., PET2 and PEF1, are different from PET1 in mtDNA organisation and the CMS mechanism. Therefore, these CMS sources represent interesting candidates for the development of new hybrid breeding systems based on new CMS mechanisms. PMID:12582659

  9. Patterns of genetic diversity and candidate genes for ecological divergence in a homoploid hybrid sunflower, Helianthus anomalus

    PubMed Central

    SAPIR, YUVAL; MOODY, MICHAEL L.; BROUILLETTE, LARRY C.; DONOVAN, LISA A.; RIESEBERG, LOREN H.

    2008-01-01

    Natural hybridization accompanied by a shift in niche preference by hybrid genotypes can lead to hybrid speciation. Natural selection may cause the fixation of advantageous alleles in the ecologically diverged hybrids, and the loci experiencing selection should exhibit a reduction in allelic diversity relative to neutral loci. Here, we analyzed patterns of genetic diversity at 59 microsatellite loci associated with expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a homoploid hybrid sunflower species, Helianthus anomalus. We used two indices, ln RV and ln RH, to compare variation and heterozygosity (respectively) at each locus between the hybrid species and its two parental species, H. annuus and H. petiolaris. Mean values of ln RV and ln RH were significantly lower than zero, which implies that H. anomalus experienced a population bottleneck during its recent evolutionary history. After correcting for the apparent bottleneck, we found six loci with a significant reduction in variation or with heterozygosity in the hybrid species, compared to one or both of the parental species. These loci should be viewed as a ranked list of candidate loci, pending further sequencing and functional analyses. Sequence data were generated for two of the candidate loci, but population genetics tests failed to detect deviations from neutral evolution at either locus. Nonetheless, a greater than eight-fold excess of nonsynonymous substitutions was found near a putative N-myristoylation motif at the second locus (HT998), and likelihood-based models indicated that the protein has been under selection in H. anomalus in the past and, perhaps, in one or both parental species. Finally, our data suggest that selective sweeps may have united populations of H. anomalus isolated by a mountain range, indicating that even low gene-flow species may be held together by the spread of advantageous alleles. PMID:17944850

  10. Evaluation of achene oil of Helianthus porteri for fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confederate daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri (A. Gray) Pruski, formerly known as Viguiera porteri (A. Gray) S.F. Blake, is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and Sou...

  11. Evaluation of Helianthus porteri Achenes for Oil Concentration and Fatty Acid Composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confederate daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri, formerly known as Viguiera porteri is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It is an endemic species that occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and South Carolina,...

  12. Helianthus porteri as a Potential Source for Enhancing Linoleic Acid Concentration in Sunflower Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confederate Daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri, formerly known as Viguiera porteri, is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. Wil...

  13. Helianthus Porteri as a Potential Source for Enhancing the Linoleic Acid Concentration in Sunflower Oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confederate Daisy, or Porter's Golden-Eye, Helianthus porteri, formerly known as Viguiera porteri, is an annual sunflower that was recently transferred to the genus Helianthus. It occurs in and around granite outcroppings in the Piedmont regions of North and South Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia. Wil...

  14. The effect of subambient to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration on vascular function in Helianthus annuus: Implications for plant response to climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant gas-exchange is regulated by stomata, which co-ordinate leaf-level water loss with xylem transport. Stomatal opening responds to internal levels of CO2 in the leaf but changing CO2 can also lead to changes in stomatal density that influence transpiration. Given that stomatal conductance increa...

  15. Morphological and Cytological Study in a New Type of Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Line CMS-GIG2 in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in sunflower anthers, termed lemon CMS-GIG2, has been further confirmed by crossing with the maintenance line and restoration line of CMS-PET1, both of which maintain the male sterility of CMS-GIG2. Light microscopy observation of anther sections showed that bo...

  16. The origin and evolution of a recent agricultural weed: population genetic diversity of weedy populations of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in Spain and France

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Marie-Hélène; Latreille, Muriel; Tollon, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The recurrent evolution of crop-related weeds during agricultural history raises serious economic problems and challenging scientific questions. Weedy forms of sunflower, a species native from America, have been reported in European sunflower fields for a few decades. In order to understand their origin, we analysed the genetic diversity of a sample of weedy populations from France and Spain, and of conventional and ornamental varieties. A crop-specific maternally inherited marker was present in all weeds. At 16 microsatellite loci, the weedy populations shared most of their diversity with the conventional varieties. But they showed a large number of additional alleles absent from the cultivated pool. European weedy populations thus most probably originated from the unintentional pollination of maternal lines in seed production fields by wild plants growing nearby, resulting in the introduction of crop-wild hybrids into the farmers’ fields. The wide diversity and the low population structure detected were indicative of a multiplicity of introductions events rather than of field-to-field propagation. Further studies are required to understand the local evolutionary dynamics of a weedy population, and especially the respective roles of crop-to-weed gene flow and selection in the fate of an initial source of crop-wild hybrids. PMID:25567998

  17. Relocation of a rust resistance gene R2 and its marker-assisted gene pyramiding in confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rust (caused by Puccinia helianthi Schwein.) is a major disease of sunflower worldwide. Due to the frequent evolution of new pathogen races, the disease is a recurring threat to sunflower production especially in North America, Argentina, and Australia. The inbred line MC29 carries the rust resistan...

  18. Genetic Control of Water Use Efficiency and Leaf Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Subjected to Two Drought Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Adiredjo, Afifuddin Latif; Navaud, Olivier; Muños, Stephane; Langlade, Nicolas B.; Lamaze, Thierry; Grieu, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    High water use efficiency (WUE) can be achieved by coordination of biomass accumulation and water consumption. WUE is physiologically and genetically linked to carbon isotope discrimination (CID) in leaves of plants. A population of 148 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of sunflower derived from a cross between XRQ and PSC8 lines was studied to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlling WUE and CID, and to compare QTL associated with these traits in different drought scenarios. We conducted greenhouse experiments in 2011 and 2012 by using 100 balances which provided a daily measurement of water transpired, and we determined WUE, CID, biomass and cumulative water transpired by plants. Wide phenotypic variability, significant genotypic effects, and significant negative correlations between WUE and CID were observed in both experiments. A total of nine QTL controlling WUE and eight controlling CID were identified across the two experiments. A QTL for phenotypic response controlling WUE and CID was also significantly identified. The QTL for WUE were specific to the drought scenarios, whereas the QTL for CID were independent of the drought scenarios and could be found in all the experiments. Our results showed that the stable genomic regions controlling CID were located on the linkage groups 06 and 13 (LG06 and LG13). Three QTL for CID were co-localized with the QTL for WUE, biomass and cumulative water transpired. We found that CID and WUE are highly correlated and have common genetic control. Interestingly, the genetic control of these traits showed an interaction with the environment (between the two drought scenarios and control conditions). Our results open a way for breeding higher WUE by using CID and marker-assisted approaches and therefore help to maintain the stability of sunflower crop production. PMID:24992022

  19. Oleate Coated Magnetic Cores Based on Magnetite, Zn Ferrite and Co Ferrite Nanoparticles—Preparation, Physical Characterization and Biological Impact on Helianthus Annuus Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursache-Oprisan, Manuela; Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Cirlescu, Aurelian; Caltun, Ovidiu; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    Sodium oleate was used as coating shell for magnetite, Zn ferrite and Co ferrite powders to stabilize them in the form of aqueous magnetic suspensions. The physical characterization was carried out by applying X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Both crystallite size and magnetic core diameter ranged between 7 and 11 nm. The influence of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions (corresponding to magnetic nanoparticle levels of 10-14-10-15/cm3) on sunflower seedlings was studied considering the changes in the photosynthesis pigment levels. Similar responses were obtained for magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticle treatment consisting in the apparent inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis while for zinc ferrite nanoparticles some concentrations seemed to have stimulatory effects on the chlorophylls as well as on the carotene levels. But the chlorophyll ratio was diminished in the case of all three types of magnetic nanoparticles meaning their slight negative effect on the light harvesting complex II (LHC II) from the chloroplast membranes and consequently on the photosynthesis efficiency.

  20. Oil content and saturated fatty acids in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) as a function of planting date, N rate, and hybrid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fatty acids (FA) composition of sunflower determines its uses and health effects on humans, while oil content determines the price paid to producers. The hypothesis of this study was that agronomic factors (genotype, planting date, and N rate) will affect total saturated fatty acid (TSFA) concen...

  1. The origin and evolution of a recent agricultural weed: population genetic diversity of weedy populations of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in Spain and France.

    PubMed

    Muller, Marie-Hélène; Latreille, Muriel; Tollon, Christine

    2011-05-01

    The recurrent evolution of crop-related weeds during agricultural history raises serious economic problems and challenging scientific questions. Weedy forms of sunflower, a species native from America, have been reported in European sunflower fields for a few decades. In order to understand their origin, we analysed the genetic diversity of a sample of weedy populations from France and Spain, and of conventional and ornamental varieties. A crop-specific maternally inherited marker was present in all weeds. At 16 microsatellite loci, the weedy populations shared most of their diversity with the conventional varieties. But they showed a large number of additional alleles absent from the cultivated pool. European weedy populations thus most probably originated from the unintentional pollination of maternal lines in seed production fields by wild plants growing nearby, resulting in the introduction of crop-wild hybrids into the farmers' fields. The wide diversity and the low population structure detected were indicative of a multiplicity of introductions events rather than of field-to-field propagation. Further studies are required to understand the local evolutionary dynamics of a weedy population, and especially the respective roles of crop-to-weed gene flow and selection in the fate of an initial source of crop-wild hybrids. PMID:25567998

  2. Oleate Coated Magnetic Cores Based on Magnetite, Zn Ferrite and Co Ferrite Nanoparticles - Preparation, Physical Characterization and Biological Impact on Helianthus Annuus Photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ursache-Oprisan, Manuela; Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Cirlescu, Aurelian; Caltun, Ovidiu; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-02

    Sodium oleate was used as coating shell for magnetite, Zn ferrite and Co ferrite powders to stabilize them in the form of aqueous magnetic suspensions. The physical characterization was carried out by applying X-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements. Both crystallite size and magnetic core diameter ranged between 7 and 11 nm. The influence of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions (corresponding to magnetic nanoparticle levels of 10{sup -14}-10{sup -15}/cm{sup 3}) on sunflower seedlings was studied considering the changes in the photosynthesis pigment levels. Similar responses were obtained for magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticle treatment consisting in the apparent inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis while for zinc ferrite nanoparticles some concentrations seemed to have stimulatory effects on the chlorophylls as well as on the carotene levels. But the chlorophyll ratio was diminished in the case of all three types of magnetic nanoparticles meaning their slight negative effect on the light harvesting complex II (LHC II) from the chloroplast membranes and consequently on the photosynthesis efficiency.

  3. Excisions of a defective transposable CACTA element (Tetu1) generate new alleles of a CYCLOIDEA-like gene of Helianthus annuus.

    PubMed

    Fambrini, Marco; Basile, Alice; Salvini, Mariangela; Pugliesi, Claudio

    2014-10-01

    Tubular ray flower (turf) is a sunflower mutant that caught attention because it bears actinomorphic ray flowers, due to the presence of an active, although non-autonomous CACTA transposon (Tetu1) in the TCP domain of a CYCLOIDEA-like gene, HaCYC2c, a major regulator of sunflower floral symmetry. Here, we analyzed its excision rates in F3 population deriving from independent crosses of turf with common sunflower accessions. Our results suggest that the excision rate, ranging from 1.21 to 6.29%, depends on genetic background; moreover, the absence of somatic sectors in inflorescences of revertant individuals analyzed (182) and genetic analyses suggests a tight developmental control of Tetu1 excision, likely restricted to germinal cells. We individuate events of Tetu1 excision through molecular analysis that restore the wild type (WT) HaCYC2c allele, but even transposon excisions during which footprints are left. All mutations we detected occurred at the TCP basic motif and cause a change in ray flower phenotype. In particular, we selected five mutants with a one-to-four amino acid change that influence the capacity of reproductive organ development and ray flower corolla shaping (MUT-1, -2, -3, -4, -5). Revertant alleles not affecting turf phenotype (i.e. reading frame mutations) have also been identified (MUT-6). In all mutants, Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) experiments revealed variations of the steady state level of HaCYC2c mRNA. MUT-1 and MUT-4 showed a significant HaCYC2c down-regulation with respect to WT. A large variation within the biological replicates of MUT-2, MUT-3 and MUT-5 was detected and not significant differences in transcription levels between mutants and WT were observed. We detected low steady state level of HaCYC2c mRNA both in turf as in MUT-6. A three dimensional (3D) structure prediction tool let us predict an incorrect folding of the TCP protein already after a single amino acid deletion. This in turn is detectable as the restore of traits that are not peculiar of WT ray flowers, such as male fertility. Our analysis of an active TE sheds light on the TCP motif of the HaCYC2c gene and suggests that Tetu1 may be useful to obtain new natural mutants and for transposon tagging in different inbred lines of sunflower. PMID:25046140

  4. Genetics and mapping of the R11 gene conferring resistance to recently emerged rust races, tightly linked to male fertility restoration, in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower oil is one of the major sources of edible oil. As the second largest hybrid crop in the world, hybrid sunflowers are developed by using the PET1 cytoplasmic male sterility system that contributes a 20% yield advantage over the open-pollinated varieties. However, sunflower production in Nor...

  5. Map saturation and SNP marker development for the rust resistance genes (R4, R5, R13a, and R13b) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower rust, which is incited by the fungus Puccinia helianthi Schwein., is the most common disease in Australia, Argentina, South Africa, and North America. Three independent genes, R5, R4, and R13 with two alleles R13a and R13b, were discovered in sunflower and are promising sources of resistan...

  6. Immobilized jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tissue electrode for phenol detection.

    PubMed

    Odaci, Dilek; Timur, Suna; Telefoncu, Azmi

    2004-05-01

    A tissue based biosensor for the determination of phenol was developed by using Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) in combination with a dissolved oxygen (DO) probe. The tissue electrode response depends linearly on phenol concentration between 0.002 and 0.0101 microM in 10 min response time. Maximum electrode response was found in phosphate buffer at pH 8.0 and 35 degrees C. The reproducibility of the enzyme electrode was also tested by using standard phenol solutions (0.005 microM). The standard deviation (SD) and variation coefficient (cv) were calculated as +/- 1.4 x 10(-4) microM and 3.1%, respectively. PMID:15274436

  7. COMPARATIVE GENOMIC AND POPULATION GENETIC ANALYSES INDICATE HIGHLY POROUS GENOMES AND HIGH LEVELS OF GENE FLOW BETWEEN DIVERGENT HELIANTHUS SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Nolan C.; King, Matthew G.; Barker, Michael S.; Raduski, Andrew; Karrenberg, Sophie; Yatabe, Yoko; Knapp, Steven J.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2009-01-01

    While speciation can be found in the presence of gene flow, it is not clear what impact this gene flow has on genome- and range-wide patterns of differentiation. Here we examine gene flow across the entire range of the common sunflower, H. annuus, its historically allopatric sister species H. argophyllus and a more distantly related, sympatric relative H. petiolaris. Analysis of genotypes at 26 microsatellite loci in 1015 individuals from across the range of the three species showed substantial introgression between geographically proximal populations of H. annuus and H. petiolaris, limited introgression between H. annuus and H. argophyllus, and essentially no gene flow between the allopatric pair, H. argophyllus and H. petiolaris. Analysis of sequence divergence levels among the three species in 1420 orthologs identified from EST databases identified a subset of loci showing extremely low divergence between H. annuus and H. petiolaris and extremely high divergence between the sister species H. annuus and H. argophyllus, consistent with introgression between H. annuus and H. petiolaris at these loci. Thus, at many loci, the allopatric sister species are more genetically divergent than the more distantly related sympatric species, which have exchanged genes across much of the genome while remaining morphologically and ecologically distinct. PMID:19473382

  8. EXPLORATION FOR WILD HELIANTHUS ANOMALUS AND H. DESERTICOLA IN THE DESERT SOUTHWEST USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus is composed of 50 species and 19 subspecies with 13 annual and 37 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has...

  9. Exploration and collection of rare Helianthus species from southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 10-day trip, encompassing 4600 km in the states of Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and Alabama in southeastern U.S.A., was made in October, 2003. Our primary objective was to search for populations of Helianthus eggertii then on the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Threatened and...

  10. Collection and evaluation of Helianthus verticillatus, an endemic sunflower of the Southeast US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus comprises 51 species, 14 annual and 37 perennial, and all native to North America. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. Whorled sun...

  11. Collection and evaluation of wild perennial Helianthus pumilus achenes for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 51 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 37 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has ...

  12. Collection and evaluation of wild perennial Helianthus pumilus achenes for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 52 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 38 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has ...

  13. Exploration for wild Helianthus species from the desert southwestern USA for potential drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of some sunflower species to survive and thrive in shifting sand dunes with an annual precipitation of 50 mm could be of value for cultivated sunflower, a crop often grown in arid regions. The genus Helianthus comprises 51 species and 19 subspecies, with 14 annual and 37 perennial specie...

  14. Collection of Helianthus porteri, an endemic sunflower of granite outcrops in the southeastern United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus comprises 51 species, 14 annual and 37 perennial, all native to North America. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. Confederate dai...

  15. Evaluation of Wild Helianthus Species for Resistance to Sclerotinia Stalk Rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The evaluation efforts are focused primarily on the annual diploid Helianthus species in the USDA sunflower germplasm collection. A greenhouse screening method was employed, using soil-applied Sclerotinia-infested millet as inoculum. Greenhouse screening facilitates the rapid evaluation of much la...

  16. Volatiles from intact and Lygus-damaged Erigeron annuus (L.) Pers. are highly attractive to ovipositing Lygus and its parasitoid Peristenus relictus Ruthe.

    PubMed

    Halloran, Sean T; Mauck, Kerry E; Fleischer, Shelby J; Fleisher, Shelby F; Tumlinson, James H

    2013-08-01

    Trap cropping and biological control can provide a sustainable means of controlling insect pests. Insects in the genus Lygus (Hemiptera: Miridae) are major pests on cotton and horticultural crops throughout the United States, and pesticide resistance within Lygus populations necessitates more sustainable long-term management techniques. Here, we explore behavioral responses of Lygus bugs (L. rubrosignatus Knight) and an introduced parasitoid, Peristenus relictus (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), to a common field edge plant, Erigeron annuus, which has the potential to serve as a trap host. Erigeron annuus is attractive to Lygus in the field, with Lygus preferentially moving to Erigeron patches compared to more abundant cotton plants. To determine the role of odor cues in mediating this attraction, we collected volatiles from E. annuus with and without Lygus damage, and then tested the attractiveness of these volatiles vs. those of cotton to Lygus females and female P. relictus wasps using Y-tube and wind tunnel bioassays. We found that undamaged E. annuus emits high concentrations of a complex volatile blend (60+ compounds), with novel compounds induced and constitutive compounds up-regulated in response to damage. Additionally, both female Lygus bugs and female P. relictus wasps are highly attracted to E. annuus volatiles over those of cotton in almost every combination of damage treatments. Our results suggest that Erigeron annuus would be an effective trap plant to control Lygus in cotton, since it is highly attractive to both the pest and its natural enemy. PMID:23982679

  17. White mold of Jerusalem artichoke

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) is a Native American food plant closely related to the common sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Tubers of Jerusalem artichoke are increasingly available in retail grocery outlets. White mold (Sclerotinia stem rot), caused by the fungus, Sclerotinia sclerotioru...

  18. Sucrose Synthase, a Cytosolic Enzyme in Protoplasts of Jerusalem Artichoke Tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Felix; Frehner, Marco; Wiemken, Andres

    1988-01-01

    The exact subcellular location of sucrose synthase (UDP-d-glucose: d-fructose 2-α-d-glucosyltransferase, EC 2.4.1.13) in Helianthus tuberosus tubers was studied by comparison of its activity in protoplasts with that of vacuoles isolated from them. Assuming 100% of the β-N-acetylglucosaminidase activity to be of vacuolar origin, less than 5% of both the sucrose synthase activity and the extravacuolar marker NAD-malate dehydrogenase was detected in the vacuole preparations. Sucrose synthase is therefore an extravacuolar enzyme. Its role in the inulin metabolism of H. tuberosus is discussed. PMID:16666286

  19. Evaluation of achenes of Helianthus verticillatus, an endemic sunflower of the southeastern US for oil concentration and fatty acid composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. The genus Helianthus comprises 51 species, 14 annual and 37 perennial, all native to North America. Whorled sunflowe...

  20. Wild perennial Helianthus pumilus as a potential source for improved oil content and quality in cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus consists of 51 species and 19 subspecies with 14 annual and 37 perennial species. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from the wild species, which have provided a continued source of desirable agronomic traits. There has be...

  1. Comparison of five DNA extraction methods for molecular analysis of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus).

    PubMed

    Mornkham, T; Wangsomnuk, P P; Wangsomnuk, P; Jogloy, S; Pattanothai, A; Fu, Y B

    2012-01-01

    DNA extraction is an essential step for molecular analysis of an organism, but it is difficult to acquire a sufficient amount of pure DNA from plant tissue with high levels of phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, proteins, and secondary metabolites. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) has high levels of such substances. We compared five commonly used methods of extracting genomic DNA in tests made with leaves and seed of four Jerusalem artichoke genotypes: 1) modified method of Tai and Tanksley, 2) method of Doyle and Doyle, 3) method of Porebski, 4) modified method of Štorchová, and 5) Plant DNA Kit of Omega Bio-tek. The quality and quantity of extracted DNAs were assessed by photometric assay, electrophoresis on 1% agarose gel and a PCR-based technique. The modified method of Tai and Tanksley was found to be superior for both young leaves and seed. The quality of the extracted DNA was confirmed by sequence-related amplified polymorphism. This information will be useful for molecular analyses of Jerusalem artichoke and other related Helianthus species. PMID:22535392

  2. Macroevolution of leaf defenses and secondary metabolites across the genus Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Mason, Chase M; Bowsher, Alan W; Crowell, Breanna L; Celoy, Rhodesia M; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donovan, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    Leaf defenses are widely recognized as key adaptations and drivers of plant evolution. Across environmentally diverse habitats, the macroevolution of leaf defenses can be predicted by the univariate trade-off model, which predicts that defenses are functionally redundant and thus trade off, and the resource availability hypothesis, which predicts that defense investment is determined by inherent growth rate and that higher defense will evolve in lower resource environments. Here, we examined the evolution of leaf physical and chemical defenses and secondary metabolites in relation to environmental characteristics and leaf economic strategy across 28 species of Helianthus (the sunflowers). Using a phylogenetic comparative approach, we found few evolutionary trade-offs among defenses and no evidence for defense syndromes. We also found that leaf defenses are strongly related to leaf economic strategy, with higher defense in more resource-conservative species, although there is little support for the evolution of higher defense in low-resource habitats. A wide variety of physical and chemical defenses predict resistance to different insect herbivores, fungal pathogens, and a parasitic plant, suggesting that most sunflower defenses are not redundant in function and that wild Helianthus represents a rich source of variation for the improvement of crop sunflower. PMID:26583880

  3. High genetic diversity and low population structure in Porter's sunflower (Helianthus porteri).

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Scott D; Mandel, Jennifer R; Burke, John M; Donovan, Lisa A

    2013-01-01

    Granite outcrops in the southeastern United States are rare and isolated habitats that support edaphically controlled communities dominated by herbaceous plants. They harbor rare and endemic species that are expected to have low genetic variability and high population structure due to small population sizes and their disjunct habitat. We test this expectation for an annual outcrop endemic, Helianthus porteri (Porter's sunflower). Contrary to expectation, H. porteri has relatively high genetic diversity (H e = 0.681) and relatively low genetic structure among the native populations (F ST = 0.077) when compared to 5 other Helianthus species (N = 288; 18 expressed sequence tag-SSR markers). These findings suggest greater gene flow than expected. The potential for gene flow is supported by the analysis of transplant populations established with propagules from a common source in 1959. One population established close to a native population (1.5 km) at the edge of the natural range is genetically similar to and shares rare alleles with the adjacent native population and is distinct from the central source population. In contrast, a transplant population established north of the native range has remained similar to the source population. The relatively high genetic diversity and low population structure of this species, combined with the long-term success of transplanted populations, bode well for its persistence as long as the habitat persists. PMID:23487323

  4. Talc based exopolysaccharides formulation enhancing growth and production of Hellianthus annuus under saline conditions.

    PubMed

    Tewari, S; Arora, K

    2014-01-01

    Stress tolerating strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PF07 possessing plant growth promoting activity was screened for the production of exopolysaccharides (EPS). EPS production was monitored in the cell free culture supernatant (CFCS) and extracted EPS was further purified by thin layer chromatography. EPS producing cells were taken to design talc based formulation and its efficacy was checked on oilseed crop sunflower (Hellianthus annuus), under in vivo saline conditions (soil irrigated with 125 mM of saline water). Application of bioformulation significantly enhanced the yield and growth attributes of the plant in comparison to control (untreated seeds) under stress and non—stress conditions. Germination rate, plant length, dry weight and seed weight increased remarkably. The above findings suggest the application and benefits of utilizing EPS formulation in boosting early seedling emergence, enhancing plant growth parameters, increasing seed weight and mitigating stress in saline affected regions. Such bioformulation may enhance RAS/RT (Root Adhering Soil to Root Tissue ratio), texture of the soil, increase porosity, improve uptake of nutrients, and hence may be considered as commercially important formulation for renovation of stressed sites and enhancing plant growth. PMID:25535716

  5. Two independent loci control agamospermy (Apomixis) in the triploid flowering plant Erigeron annuus.

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, R D; Rieseberg, L H

    2000-01-01

    Asexual seed production (agamospermy) via gametophytic apomixis in flowering plants typically involves the formation of an unreduced megagametophyte (via apospory or diplospory) and the parthenogenetic development of the unreduced egg cell into an embryo. Agamospermy is almost exclusively restricted to polyploids. In this study, the genetic basis of agamospermy was investigated in a segregating population of 130 F(1)'s from a cross between triploid (2n = 27) agamospermous Erigeron annuus and sexual diploid (2n = 18) E. strigosus. Correlations between markers and phenotypes and linkage analysis were performed on 387 segregating amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Results show that four closely linked markers with polysomic inheritance are significantly associated with parthenogenesis and that 11 cosegregating markers with univalent inheritance are completely associated with diplospory. This indicates that diplospory and parthenogenesis are unlinked and inherited independently. Further, the absence of agamospermy in diploid F(1)'s appears to be best explained by a combination of recessive-lethal gametophytic selection against the parthenogenetic locus and univalent inheritance of the region bearing diplospory. These results may have major implications for attempts to manipulate agamospermy for agricultural purposes and for interpreting the evolution of the trait. PMID:10790411

  6. Effects of different doses of low power continuous wave he-ne laser radiation on some seed thermodynamic and germination parameters, and potential enzymes involved in seed germination of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    PubMed

    Perveen, Rashida; Ali, Qasim; Ashraf, Muhammad; Al-Qurainy, Fahad; Jamil, Yasir; Raza Ahmad, Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    In this study, water-soaked seeds of sunflower were exposed to He-Ne laser irradiation of different energies to determine whether or not He-Ne laser irradiation caused changes to seed thermodynamic and germination parameters as well as effects on the activities of germination enzymes. The experiment comprised four energy levels: 0 (control), 100, 300 and 500mJ of laser energy and each treatment replicated four times arranged in a completely randomized design. The experimentation was performed under the greenhouse conditions in the net-house of the Department of Botany, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad. The seed thermodynamic parameters were calculated according to seed germination thermograms determined with a calorimeter at 25.8°C for 72h. Various thermodynamic parameters of seed (ΔH, (ΔS)(e), (ΔS)(c), (ΔS)(e) /Δt and (ΔS)(c) /Δt) were affected significantly due to presowing laser treatment. Significant changes in seed germination parameters and enzyme activities were observed in seeds treated with He-Ne laser. The He-Ne laser seed treatment resulted in increased activities of amylase and protease. These results indicate that the low power continuous wave He-Ne laser light seed treatment has considerable biological effects on seed metabolism. This seed treatment technique can be potentially employed to enhance agricultural productivity. PMID:20670360

  7. Enzymatic browning and after-cooking darkening of Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

    PubMed

    Bach, Vibe; Jensen, Sidsel; Clausen, Morten R; Bertram, Hanne C; Edelenbos, Merete

    2013-11-15

    Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) undergo enzymatic browning when peeled or cut, and turn grey after boiling, due to after-cooking darkening reactions between iron and phenolic acids. In an attempt to reveal the components responsible for these discolouration reactions, sensory evaluation and instrumental colour measurements were related to contents of total phenolics, phenolic acids, organic acids and iron in three varieties of raw and boiled Jerusalem artichoke tubers harvested in the autumn and the spring. No differences were found between varieties in sensory evaluated enzymatic browning, but Rema and Draga had higher scores than Mari in after-cooking darkening. Jerusalem artichoke tubers had higher contents of total phenolics, phenolic acids and citric acid in the autumn and low contents in the spring, while it was the opposite for malic acid. None of the chemical parameters investigated could explain the discolouration of the Jerusalem artichoke tubers. PMID:23790937

  8. Metabolomics reveals drastic compositional changes during overwintering of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Morten R; Bach, Vibe; Edelenbos, Merete; Bertram, Hanne C

    2012-09-19

    Metabolic changes were investigated in overwintering Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers using proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) metabolomics. Three varieties were studied; as a result of overwintering, the amount of inulin was found to decrease in Jerusalem artichoke tubers. This was mainly due to its conversion to sucrose and, at the same time, formation of inulin with a lower degree of polymerization. Major effects on the concentration of citric acid, malic acid, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and adenosine were also found. Intriguingly, malic acid concentration increased and citric acid concentration decreased. These changes, together with an increase in sucrose and GABA concentrations, were ascribed to mobilization of nutrients prior to sprouting, suggesting that malic acid and GABA serve as carbon and nitrogen sources during sprouting of Jerusalem artichokes. PMID:22900787

  9. Chemical composition of the tuber essential oil from Helianthus tuberosus L. (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Radulović, Niko S; Đorđević, Miljana R

    2014-03-01

    Helianthus tuberosus L. (Jerusalem artichoke) is cultivated in Europe and other parts of the world as a food crop and ornamental plant. The volatile oils of the aerial parts of H. tuberosus were investigated more than 30 years ago, but no study could be found to date on the constituents of the tuber essential oil. Herein, the first characterization by GC-FID, GC/MS, and (13) C-NMR analyses of a hydrodistilled essential oil of Jerusalem artichoke tubers was reported. Fresh plant material collected in Serbia (Sample A) and a commercial sample (Sample B) yielded only small amounts of oil (0.0014 and 0.0021% (w/w), resp.). In total, 195 constituents were identified, representing 88.2 and 93.6% of the oil compositions for Samples A and B, respectively. The main constituents identified were β-bisabolene (1; 22.9-30.5%), undecanal (0-12.7%), α-pinene (7.6-0.8%), kauran-16-ol (2; 6.9-9.8%), 2-pentylfuran (0.0-5.7%), and (E)-tetradec-2-enal (0.0-4.9%). Several rare compounds characteristic for Helianthus ssp. were also detected: helianthol A (6; 2.1-1.9%), dihydroeuparin (10; 0.0-2.3%), euparin (9; 0.0-0.4%), desmethoxyencecalin (7; traces - 0.2%), desmethylencecalin (8; 0.0-0.4%), and an isomer of desmethylencecalin (0.0%-traces). The essential oils isolated from the tuber and the aerial parts share the common major component 1. PMID:24634072

  10. Coyote, Canis latrans, use of commercial sunflower, Helianthus spp., Seeds as a food source in western Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sovada, M.A.; Telesco, D.J.; Roy, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    Food habits of Coyotes (Canis latrans) were determined by analysis of scats collected in western Kansas in 1996. Mammals were the most frequently occurring food of Coyotes (100% of scats), followed by plants (39%), insects (30%) and birds (9%). Commercial sunflower (Helianthus spp.) seeds were found in 9 of 23 scats. When present, they composed a high volume of individual scats (X= 31%). Substantial use of commercial sunflower seeds as a food source by Coyotes has not been previously documented.

  11. In vitro antiproliferative and antifungal activity of essential oils from Erigeron acris L. and Erigeron annuus (L.) Pers.

    PubMed

    Nazaruk, Jolanta; Karna, Ewa; Wieczorek, Piotr; Sacha, Paweł; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta

    2010-01-01

    Antiproliferative and antifungal activities of essential oils from Erigeron acris root and herb and from Erigeron annuus herb were investigated. The cell viability assay was performed in cultured fibroblasts, cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MBA-231), and endometrial adenocarcinoma (Ishikawa) cells as well as colon adenocarcinoma (DLD-1) cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). The essential oil from E. acris root showed the highest antiproliferative activity in the MCF-7 cell line with an IC50 value of 14.5 microg/mL. No effect of the essential oil on normal cells at that concentration was found. Antifungal activity against various strains of five Candida species, i.e. C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, and C. parapsilosis, was tested by the microdilution method. It was found that all examined oils can be useful as antifungal agents against the above-mentioned species, but the essential oil of E. acris herb was the most active. Their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ranged from 30 to 0.4 microL/mL. The data presented suggest that essential oils from E. acris and E. annuus possess antifungal activity against Candida spp. and antiproliferative activity against breast cancer MCF-7 cells. PMID:21319704

  12. Effects of Polyamines on the Oxidation of Exogenous NADH by Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Rugolo, Michela; Antognoni, Fabiana; Flamigni, Alberto; Zannoni, Davide

    1991-01-01

    The effect of polyamines (putrescine, spermine, and spermidine) on the oxidation of exogenous NADH by Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. cv. OB1) mitochondria, have been studied. Addition of spermine and/or spermidine to a suspension of mitochondria in a low-cation medium (2 millimolar-K+) caused a decrease in the apparent Km and an increase in the apparent Vmax for the oxidation of exogenous NADH. These polycations released by screening effect the mitochondrially induced quenching of 9-aminoacridine fluorescence, their efficiency being dependent on the valency of the cation (C4+ > C3+). Conversely, putrescine only slightly affected both kinetic parameters of exogenous NADH oxidation and the number of fixed charges on the membranes. Spermine and spermidine, but not putrescine, decreased the apparent Km for Ca2+ from about 1 to about 0.2 micromolar, required to activate external NADH oxidation in a high-cation medium, containing physiological concentrations of Pi, Mg2+ and K+. The results are interpreted as evidence for a role of spermine and spermidine in the modulation of exogenous NADH oxidation by plant mitochondria in vivo. PMID:16667944

  13. Oxidation of External NAD(P)H by Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) Mitochondria 1

    PubMed Central

    Rugolo, Michela; Zannoni, Davide

    1992-01-01

    The functional interaction between the externally located NAD(P)H dehydrogenase and the Q-pool acceptor site(s) in Percoll-purified mitochondria from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L. cv OB1) mitochondria has been investigated. Oxidation of exogenous NADH is stimulated by ubiquinone (UQ1) with a parallel decrease of the apparent Km for NADH. In the presence of saturating amounts of UQ1 as electron acceptor, the Km (NADH) is not affected by variations of the ionic strength. Conversely, the Km for UQ1 is decreased by the screening effect of negative charges on the outer membrane surface. Under low-ionic strength, the hydroxyflavone platanetin progressively inhibits NADH oxidation with a mean inhibition dose of approximately 3 nanomoles of inhibitor per milligram of protein. Interestingly, under high-ionic strength, oxidation of NADH proceeds through two platanetin binding sites, one of which has a lower affinity for the inhibitor (mean inhibition dose = 20 nanomoles per milligram protein), because it is located near the outer surface of the membrane. This latter site is the one involved in the oxidation of external NADPH and, possibly, also affected by spermine and spermidine. Similarly to NADH, oxidation of NADPH is fully sensitive to micromolar concentrations of free Ca2+ ions; in addition, similar concentrations of the sulfhydryl reagent mersalyl are required to inhibit both NADH and NADPH oxidative activities. The results are interpreted as evidence for the presence of a single nonspecific NAD(P)H dehydrogenase. PMID:16668968

  14. The novel pathway for ketodiene oxylipin biosynthesis in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tubers.

    PubMed

    Chechetkin, Ivan R; Medvedeva, Natalia V; Grechkin, Alexander N

    2004-11-01

    The new route of the plant lipoxygenase pathway, directed specifically towards the ketodiene formation, was detected during in vitro experiments with Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tubers. Through this pathway (9Z,11E,13S)-13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HPOD) is reduced to corresponding 13-hydroxy acid (13-HOD), which is in turn dehydrogenated into ketodiene (9Z,11E,13S)-13-oxo-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-KOD). Dehydrogenation of 13-HOD into 13-KOD was not dependent on the presence of either NAD or NADP, but was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. Under anoxic conditions, 13-HOD dehydrogenation was blocked, but addition of 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol restored it. Sulfite addition fully suppressed the aerobic dehydrogenation of 13-HOD. Hydrogen peroxide is a by-product formed by the enzyme along with 13-KOD. These data suggest that the ketodiene biosynthesis in H. tuberosus tubers is catalyzed by flavin dehydrogenase. (9S,10E,12Z)-9-Hydroxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid (9-HOD) is dehydrogenated by this enzyme as effectively as 13-HOD, while alpha-ketol, (9Z)-12-oxo-13-hydroxy-9-octadecenoic acid, and ricinoleic acid did not act as substrates for dehydrogenase. The enzyme was soluble and possessed a pH optimum at pH 7.0-9.0. The only 13-HOD dehydrogenase known so far was detected in rat colon. However, unlike the H. tuberosus enzyme, the rat dehydrogenase is NAD-dependent. PMID:15522817

  15. Factors Affecting Crown Gall Tumorigenesis in Tuber Slices of Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus, L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Tanimoto, Eugene; Douglas, Carl; Halperin, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can induce tumors on thin slices which are excised from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tubers and grown in culture on medium containing minerals and a carbon source. A comparative study was made of the kinetics of cell division in slices under three conditions: (a) slices which were untreated and showed only spontaneous (wound-induced) cell divisions; (b) slices treated with indoleacetic acid at several concentrations; and (c) slices treated with virulent or avirulent bacteria. The earliest spontaneous cell divisions were completed (as detected by the appearance of new daughter cell pairs) by about 3 hours. These cells divide only once. In indoleacetic acid-treated tissue, more cells divide, with the first cell pairs being detected slightly earlier than in slices not subjected to the hormone. The number of cells which divide is roughly proportional to auxin concentration. Tissue treated with virulent bacteria showed only the pattern of spontaneous cell division until about 72 hours, after which another burst of cell division commenced and continued indefinitely. The bacteria-induced growths produced the unusual amino acids which are characteristic of crown gall tumors. The percentage of slices with tumors was sharply reduced if certain avirulent A. tumefaciens strains were applied prior to virulent strains. Images PMID:16660891

  16. Preparation of high-fructose syrup from the tubers of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.

    PubMed

    Fleming, S E; GrootWassink, J W

    1979-11-01

    Fructose has recently received much attention due to renewed interest in natural sweeteners. In addition, fructose has some advantages to sucrose in sweetness, solubility, viscosity, and dental health characteristics. Fructose is deposited as storage fructans of the inulin (beta-1,2) type in tubers and rhizomes of the Compositae family. The utilization of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) tuber as a source of fructose syrup is discussed. This plant has the potential to produce more sugar per acre than corn or sugar beets. In addition, the artichoke has higher frost resistance and lower heat unit requirements than corn and is somewhat more tolerant to low moisture conditions than sugar beets. A high quality fructose syrup can be produced from artichoke tubers. The extraction step was found to be particularly important since development of adverse colors and flavors must be prevented. The fructans may be acid or enzyme hydrolyzed but the latter method gave a higher quality syrup. Ion-exchange resins and activated charcoal were effective in removing coloring and flavoring materials, and also reduced other noncarbohydrate constituents. Since the enzymatic hydrolysis of the fructans is an attractive alternative to acid hydrolysis, a process was developed for producing and purifying a special beta-fructofuranosidase (inulase) from Saccharomyces fragilis. Inulase has a much higher specificity for fructans than commerically available beta-fructofuranosidase (invertase). PMID:41685

  17. Economically Viable Components from Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in a Biorefinery Concept

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Eva; Prade, Thomas; Angelidaki, Irini; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Newson, William R.; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Persson Hovmalm, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Biorefinery applications are receiving growing interest due to climatic and waste disposal issues and lack of petroleum resources. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is suitable for biorefinery applications due to high biomass production and limited cultivation requirements. This paper focuses on the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a biorefinery crop and the most viable products in such a case. The carbohydrates in the tubers were found to have potential for production of platform chemicals, e.g., succinic acid. However, economic analysis showed that production of platform chemicals as a single product was too expensive to be competitive with petrochemically produced sugars. Therefore, production of several products from the same crop is a must. Additional products are protein based ones from tubers and leaves and biogas from residues, although both are of low value and amount. High bioactive activity was found in the young leaves of the crop, and the sesquiterpene lactones are of specific interest, as other compounds from this group have shown inhibitory effects on several human diseases. Thus, future focus should be on understanding the usefulness of small molecules, to develop methods for their extraction and purification and to further develop sustainable and viable methods for the production of platform chemicals. PMID:25913379

  18. Transcriptome resources for the perennial sunflower Helianthus maximiliani obtained from ecologically divergent populations.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Darby, Brian J; Ungerer, Mark C

    2014-07-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provide a rapid means to generate genomic resources for species exhibiting interesting ecological and evolutionary variation but for which such resources are scant or nonexistent. In the current report, we utilize 454 pyrosequencing to obtain transcriptome information for multiple individuals and tissue types from geographically disparate and ecologically differentiated populations of the perennial sunflower species Helianthus maximiliani. A total of 850 275 raw reads were obtained averaging 355 bp in length. Reads were assembled, postprocessing, into 16 681 unique contigs with an N50 of 898 bp and a total length of 13.6 Mb. A majority (67%) of these contigs were annotated based on comparison with the Arabidopsis thaliana genome (TAIR10). Contigs were identified that exhibit high similarity to genes associated with natural variation in flowering time and freezing tolerance in other plant species and will facilitate future studies aimed at elucidating the molecular basis of clinal life history variation and adaptive differentiation in H. maximiliani. Large numbers of gene-associated simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) also were identified that can be deployed in mapping and population genomic analyses. PMID:24438509

  19. Economically viable components from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) in a biorefinery concept.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Eva; Prade, Thomas; Angelidaki, Irini; Svensson, Sven-Erik; Newson, William R; Gunnarsson, Ingólfur Bragi; Hovmalm, Helena Persson

    2015-01-01

    Biorefinery applications are receiving growing interest due to climatic and waste disposal issues and lack of petroleum resources. Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) is suitable for biorefinery applications due to high biomass production and limited cultivation requirements. This paper focuses on the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a biorefinery crop and the most viable products in such a case. The carbohydrates in the tubers were found to have potential for production of platform chemicals, e.g., succinic acid. However, economic analysis showed that production of platform chemicals as a single product was too expensive to be competitive with petrochemically produced sugars. Therefore, production of several products from the same crop is a must. Additional products are protein based ones from tubers and leaves and biogas from residues, although both are of low value and amount. High bioactive activity was found in the young leaves of the crop, and the sesquiterpene lactones are of specific interest, as other compounds from this group have shown inhibitory effects on several human diseases. Thus, future focus should be on understanding the usefulness of small molecules, to develop methods for their extraction and purification and to further develop sustainable and viable methods for the production of platform chemicals. PMID:25913379

  20. Uptake of Benzyladenine by Tuber Slices of Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) over a Wide Concentration Range 1

    PubMed Central

    Minocha, Subhash C.; Nissen, Per

    1982-01-01

    Uptake of the cytokinin benzyladenine by tuber slices of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) increased with the concentration of benzyladenine in the medium in the range 10−8 to 10−4 molar. The kinetics of uptake could be precisely represented by four phases of a single, multiphasic isotherm. Km and Vmax increased in a regular manner upon transition to higher phases. The fit to multiphasic kinetics was significantly better than the fit to cooperative kinetics or to the sum of four independent Michaells-Menten terms. PMID:16662528

  1. RNA-Seq Analysis and De Novo Transcriptome Assembly of Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Wook; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Min, Sung Ran; Moon, Jae Sun; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Cho, Hye Sun

    2014-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) has long been cultivated as a vegetable and as a source of fructans (inulin) for pharmaceutical applications in diabetes and obesity prevention. However, transcriptomic and genomic data for Jerusalem artichoke remain scarce. In this study, Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on samples from Jerusalem artichoke leaves, roots, stems and two different tuber tissues (early and late tuber development). Data were used for de novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome. In total 206,215,632 paired-end reads were generated. These were assembled into 66,322 loci with 272,548 transcripts. Loci were annotated by querying against the NCBI non-redundant, Phytozome and UniProt databases, and 40,215 loci were homologous to existing database sequences. Gene Ontology terms were assigned to 19,848 loci, 15,434 loci were matched to 25 Clusters of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups classifications, and 11,844 loci were classified into 142 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The assembled loci also contained 10,778 potential simple sequence repeats. The newly assembled transcriptome was used to identify loci with tissue-specific differential expression patterns. In total, 670 loci exhibited tissue-specific expression, and a subset of these were confirmed using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. Gene expression related to inulin biosynthesis in tuber tissue was also investigated. Exsiting genetic and genomic data for H. tuberosus are scarce. The sequence resources developed in this study will enable the analysis of thousands of transcripts and will thus accelerate marker-assisted breeding studies and studies of inulin biosynthesis in Jerusalem artichoke. PMID:25375764

  2. RNA-seq analysis and de novo transcriptome assembly of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne).

    PubMed

    Jung, Won Yong; Lee, Sang Sook; Kim, Chul Wook; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Min, Sung Ran; Moon, Jae Sun; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Cho, Hye Sun

    2014-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) has long been cultivated as a vegetable and as a source of fructans (inulin) for pharmaceutical applications in diabetes and obesity prevention. However, transcriptomic and genomic data for Jerusalem artichoke remain scarce. In this study, Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on samples from Jerusalem artichoke leaves, roots, stems and two different tuber tissues (early and late tuber development). Data were used for de novo assembly and characterization of the transcriptome. In total 206,215,632 paired-end reads were generated. These were assembled into 66,322 loci with 272,548 transcripts. Loci were annotated by querying against the NCBI non-redundant, Phytozome and UniProt databases, and 40,215 loci were homologous to existing database sequences. Gene Ontology terms were assigned to 19,848 loci, 15,434 loci were matched to 25 Clusters of Eukaryotic Orthologous Groups classifications, and 11,844 loci were classified into 142 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. The assembled loci also contained 10,778 potential simple sequence repeats. The newly assembled transcriptome was used to identify loci with tissue-specific differential expression patterns. In total, 670 loci exhibited tissue-specific expression, and a subset of these were confirmed using RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. Gene expression related to inulin biosynthesis in tuber tissue was also investigated. Exsiting genetic and genomic data for H. tuberosus are scarce. The sequence resources developed in this study will enable the analysis of thousands of transcripts and will thus accelerate marker-assisted breeding studies and studies of inulin biosynthesis in Jerusalem artichoke. PMID:25375764

  3. Evolutionary Divergences in Root Exudate Composition among Ecologically-Contrasting Helianthus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bowsher, Alan W.; Ali, Rifhat; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots exude numerous metabolites into the soil that influence nutrient availability. Although root exudate composition is hypothesized to be under selection in low fertility soils, few studies have tested this hypothesis in a phylogenetic framework. In this study, we examined root exudates of three pairs of Helianthus species chosen as phylogenetically-independent contrasts with respect to native soil nutrient availability. Under controlled environmental conditions, seedlings were grown to the three-leaf-pair stage, then transferred to either high or low nutrient treatments. After five days of nutrient treatments, we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of root exudates, and detected 37 metabolites across species. When compared in the high nutrient treatment, species native to low nutrient soils exhibited overall higher exudation than their sister species native to high nutrient soils in all three species pairs, providing support for repeated evolutionary shifts in response to native soil fertility. Species native to low nutrient soils and those native to high nutrient soils responded similarly to low nutrient treatments with increased exudation of organic acids (fumaric, citric, malic acids) and glucose, potentially as a mechanism to enhance nutrition acquisition. However, species native to low nutrient soils also responded to low nutrient treatments with a larger decrease in exudation of amino acids than species native to high nutrient soils in all three species pairs. This indicates that species native to low nutrient soils have evolved a unique sensitivity to changes in nutrient availability for some, but not all, root exudates. Overall, these repeated evolutionary divergences between species native to low nutrient soils and those native to high nutrient soils provide evidence for the adaptive value of root exudation, and its plasticity, in contrasting soil environments. PMID:26824236

  4. Evolutionary Divergences in Root Exudate Composition among Ecologically-Contrasting Helianthus Species.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, Alan W; Ali, Rifhat; Harding, Scott A; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Donovan, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots exude numerous metabolites into the soil that influence nutrient availability. Although root exudate composition is hypothesized to be under selection in low fertility soils, few studies have tested this hypothesis in a phylogenetic framework. In this study, we examined root exudates of three pairs of Helianthus species chosen as phylogenetically-independent contrasts with respect to native soil nutrient availability. Under controlled environmental conditions, seedlings were grown to the three-leaf-pair stage, then transferred to either high or low nutrient treatments. After five days of nutrient treatments, we used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for analysis of root exudates, and detected 37 metabolites across species. When compared in the high nutrient treatment, species native to low nutrient soils exhibited overall higher exudation than their sister species native to high nutrient soils in all three species pairs, providing support for repeated evolutionary shifts in response to native soil fertility. Species native to low nutrient soils and those native to high nutrient soils responded similarly to low nutrient treatments with increased exudation of organic acids (fumaric, citric, malic acids) and glucose, potentially as a mechanism to enhance nutrition acquisition. However, species native to low nutrient soils also responded to low nutrient treatments with a larger decrease in exudation of amino acids than species native to high nutrient soils in all three species pairs. This indicates that species native to low nutrient soils have evolved a unique sensitivity to changes in nutrient availability for some, but not all, root exudates. Overall, these repeated evolutionary divergences between species native to low nutrient soils and those native to high nutrient soils provide evidence for the adaptive value of root exudation, and its plasticity, in contrasting soil environments. PMID:26824236

  5. Re-collection of Helianthus argophyllus, source of the PlArg gene from downy mildew resistance, surviving for 25 years on Daytona Beach, Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Helianthus, besides constituting the basic genetic stock from which cultivated sunflower originated, continues to contribute unique characteristics for cultivated sunflower improvement. Genetic diversity of the wild species has allowed the crop to become and remain economically viable by c...

  6. Analysis of Phenolic Acids of Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) Responding to Salt-Stress by Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fujia; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Plant phenolics can have applications in pharmaceutical and other industries. To identify and quantify the phenolic compounds in Helianthus tuberosus leaves, qualitative analysis was performed by a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and quantitative analysis by HPLC. Ten chlorogenic acids (CGAs) were identified (3-o-caffeoylquinic acid, two isomers of caffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaroyl-quinic acid, feruloylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoyquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid) by comparing their retention times, UV-Vis absorption spectra, and MS/MS spectra with standards. In addition, four other phenolic compounds, including caffeoyl glucopyranose, isorhamnetin glucoside, kaempferol glucuronide, and kaempferol-3-o-glucoside, were tentatively identified in Helianthus tuberosus leaves for the first time. The 3-o-caffeoylquinic acid (7.752 mg/g DW), 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (5.633 mg/g DW), and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4.900 mg/g DW) were the major phenolic compounds in leaves of Helianthus tuberosus cultivar NanYu in maturity. The variations in phenolic concentrations and proportions in Helianthus tuberosus leaves were influenced by genotype and plant growth stage. Cultivar NanYu had the highest concentration of phenolic compounds, in particular 3-o-caffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid compared with the other genotypes (wild accession and QingYu). Considering various growth stages, the concentration of total phenolics in cultivar NanYu was higher at flowering stage (5.270 mg/g DW) than at budding and tuber swelling stages. Cultivar NanYu of Helianthus tuberosus is a potential source of natural phenolics that may play an important role in the development of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25302328

  7. Analysis of phenolic acids of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) responding to salt-stress by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fujia; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Plant phenolics can have applications in pharmaceutical and other industries. To identify and quantify the phenolic compounds in Helianthus tuberosus leaves, qualitative analysis was performed by a reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and quantitative analysis by HPLC. Ten chlorogenic acids (CGAs) were identified (3-o-caffeoylquinic acid, two isomers of caffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaroyl-quinic acid, feruloylquinic acid, 3,4-dicaffeoyquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 1,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid) by comparing their retention times, UV-Vis absorption spectra, and MS/MS spectra with standards. In addition, four other phenolic compounds, including caffeoyl glucopyranose, isorhamnetin glucoside, kaempferol glucuronide, and kaempferol-3-o-glucoside, were tentatively identified in Helianthus tuberosus leaves for the first time. The 3-o-caffeoylquinic acid (7.752 mg/g DW), 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (5.633 mg/g DW), and 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid (4.900 mg/g DW) were the major phenolic compounds in leaves of Helianthus tuberosus cultivar NanYu in maturity. The variations in phenolic concentrations and proportions in Helianthus tuberosus leaves were influenced by genotype and plant growth stage. Cultivar NanYu had the highest concentration of phenolic compounds, in particular 3-o-caffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid compared with the other genotypes (wild accession and QingYu). Considering various growth stages, the concentration of total phenolics in cultivar NanYu was higher at flowering stage (5.270 mg/g DW) than at budding and tuber swelling stages. Cultivar NanYu of Helianthus tuberosus is a potential source of natural phenolics that may play an important role in the development of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25302328

  8. Biomass, extracted liquid yields, sugar content or seed yields of biofuel feedstocks as affected by fertilizer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Harvesting products from plants for conversion into renewable resources is increasing in importance. Determination of nutrition requirements for the applicable crops is necessary, especially in regions where the biofuel feedstock crops have not been grown historically. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus...

  9. Host plant effects on development and reproduction of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Development, survivorship, longevity, reproduction and life table parameters of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), were examined in the laboratory using three host plants, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), Chrysanthemum morifolium L. and euonymus (Euonymus japonica Thu...

  10. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  11. Two variants of the major serine protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, expressed in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Ziegelmüller, Patrick; González, Lidice; Mansur, Manuel; Machado, Yoan; Redecke, Lars; Hahn, Ulrich; Betzel, Christian; Chávez, María de Los Ángeles

    2016-07-01

    The major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (ShPI-1) is a non-specific inhibitor that binds trypsin and other trypsin-like enzymes, as well as chymotrypsin, and human neutrophil elastase. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of ShPI-1 to produce two variants (rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S) that were expressed in Pichia pastoris, purified, and characterized. After a single purification step, 65 mg and 15 mg of protein per liter of culture supernatant were obtained for rShPI-1/K13L and rShPI/Y15S, respectively. Functional studies demonstrated a 100-fold decreased trypsin inhibitory activity as result of the K13L substitution at the reactive (P1) site. This protein variant has a novel tight-binding inhibitor activity of pancreatic elastase and increased activity toward neutrophil elastase in comparison to rShPI-1A. In contrast, the substitution Y15S at P2' site did not affect the Ki value against trypsin, but did reduce activity 10-fold against chymotrypsin and neutrophil elastase. Our results provide two new ShPI-1 variants with modified inhibitory activities, one of them with increased biomedical potential. This study also offers new insight into the functional impact of the P1 and P2' sites on ShPI-1 specificity. PMID:26993255

  12. Stressed Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) excrete a protein fraction with specific cytotoxicity on plant and animal tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Griffaut, B; Debiton, E; Madelmont, J C; Maurizis, J C; Ledoigt, G

    2007-09-01

    Wounds from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers excrete bioactive metabolites from a variety of structural classes, including proteins. Here we describe a protein specifically active against tumour cells arising either from human, animal or plant tissues. The non-tumour animal cells or the plant callus cells are not sensitive to these excreta. The active product was only obtained after a wound-drought stress of plant tubers. The cytotoxicity varies according to the tumour cell type. For instance, some human tumour cell lines and especially the human mammary tumour cells MDA-MB-231 were shown to be very susceptible to the active product. The active agent is shown to contain an 18-kDa polypeptide with homology to a superoxide dismutase (SOD). A 28-kDa polypeptide, related to an alkaline phosphatase (AP), was shown to be tightly linked to this 18-kDa polypeptide. The excreted 28-kDa polypeptide also displayed a consensus sequence similar to the group of DING proteins, but with a smaller molecular weight. The superoxide dismutase polypeptide was shown to be involved in the antitumour activity, but the presence of smaller factors (MW<10 kDa), such as salicylic acid, can enhance this activity. PMID:17662535

  13. Isolation, characterization and expression of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase genes in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Donna; Riou-Khamlichi, Catherine; Oakenfull, E Ann; Murray, James A H

    2003-01-01

    Tuber explants of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) are a model system for cell-cycle re-entry from a quiescent state, involving the activation of division of tuber parenchyma cells in response to exogenous auxin. To enable molecular studies of this system, two cyclin (Heltu;CYCD1;1 and Heltu; CYCD3;1) and two cyclin-dependent kinase (Heltu; CDKA;1 and Heltu;CDKB1;1) genes have been isolated from a Jerusalem artichoke cDNA library and their expression demonstrated during the activation of cell division. It was found that CDKA;1 transcripts are present in quiescent tubers, whereas CYCD1;1, CYCD3;1 and CDKB1;1 transcripts are induced during cell-cycle re-entry as well as during bud growth of whole tubers. Both CYCD1;1 and CYCD3;1 transcripts appear shortly before, or coincident with, the onset of S phase. PMID:12493857

  14. Mitochondria-localized NAD biosynthesis by nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) heterotrophic tissues.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Catello; Pallotta, Maria Luigia

    2011-10-01

    Current studies in plants suggest that the content of the coenzyme NAD is variable and potentially important in determining cell fate. In cases that implicate NAD consumption, re-synthesis must occur to maintain dinucleotide pools. Despite information on the pathways involved in NAD synthesis in plants, the existence of a mitochondrial nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT) activity which catalyses NAD synthesis from nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and ATP has not been reported. To verify the latter assumed pathway, experiments with purified and bioenergetically active mitochondria prepared from tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) were performed. To determine whether NAD biosynthesis might occur, NMN was added to Jerusalem artichoke mitochondria (JAM) and NAD biosynthesis was tested by means of HPLC and spectroscopically. Our results indicate that JAM contain a specific NMNAT inhibited by Na-pyrophosphate, AMP and ADP-ribose. The dependence of NAD synthesis rate on NMN concentration shows saturation kinetics with K (m) and V (max) values of 82 ± 1.05 μM and 4.20 ± 0.20 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein, respectively. The enzyme's pH and temperature dependence were also investigated. Fractionation studies revealed that mitochondrial NMNAT activity was present in the soluble matrix fraction. The NAD pool needed constant replenishment that might be modulated by environmental inputs. Thus, the mitochondrion in heterotrophic plant tissues ensures NAD biosynthesis by NMNAT activity and helps to orchestrate NAD metabolic network in implementing the survival strategy of cells. PMID:21598001

  15. Influence of nitrogen fertilization on diazotrophic communities in the rhizosphere of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfa; Wang, Lin; Long, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhaopu; Zhang, Zhenhua; Zed, Rengel

    2012-06-01

    Diazotrophs in the soil may be influenced by plant factors as well as nitrogen (N) fertilization. In this study, we investigated potential diazotrophic communities in the rhizosphere of the Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) supplied with differing amounts of N. The community structure of N(2)-fixing bacteria was profiled using the length heterogeneity polymerase chain reaction (LH-PCR) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) based on a variation in the nifH gene. Higher numbers of diazotrophs were detected by T-RFLP compared to LH-PCR. The lowest number of N(2)-fixing bacteria was observed in the rhizosphere soil with high N fertilization. T-RFLP was a better method than LH-PCR for profiling microbial diversity of diazotrophs using multidimensional scaling (MDS) and analysis of similarity (ANOSIM) of fingerprints as well as diversity measures. The supply of N fertilizer appeared to negatively influence the abundance of diazotrophs in the rhizophere of the Jerusalem artichoke. PMID:22564556

  16. Sequence-specific H NMR assignments and secondary structure in the sea anemone polypeptide Stichodactyla helianthus neurotoxin I

    SciTech Connect

    Fogh, R.H.; Mabbutt, B.C.; Kem, W.R.; Norton, R.S. )

    1989-02-21

    Sequence-specific assignments are reported for the 500-MHz H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the 48-residue polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I). Spin systems were first identified by using two-dimensional relayed or multiple quantum filtered correlation spectroscopy, double quantum spectroscopy, and spin lock experiments. Specific resonance assignments were then obtained from nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) connectivities between protons from residues adjacent in the amino acid sequence. Of a total of 265 potentially observable resonances, 248 (i.e., 94%) were assigned, arising from 39 completely and 9 partially assigned amino acid spin systems. The secondary structure of Sh I was defined on the basis of the pattern of sequential NOE connectivities. NOEs between protons on separate strands of the polypeptide backbone, and backbone amide exchange rates. Sh I contains a four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet encompassing residues 1-5, 16-24, 30-33, and 40-46, with a {beta}-bulge at residues 17 and 18 and a reverse turn, probably a type II {beta}-turn, involving residues 27-30. No evidence of {alpha}-helical structure was found.

  17. Functional analyses of a putative plasma membrane Na+/H+ antiporter gene isolated from salt tolerant Helianthus tuberosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Tang, Zhong; Hu, Yibing; Yu, Ling; Liu, Zhaopu; Xu, Guohua

    2014-08-01

    Jerusalem artichokes (Helianthus tuberosus L.) can tolerate relatively higher salinity, drought and heat stress. In this paper, we report the cloning of a Salt Overly Sensitive 1 (SOS1) gene encoding a plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) antiporter from a highly salt-tolerant genotype of H. tuberosus, NY1, named HtSOS1 and characterization of its function in yeast and rice. The amino acid sequence of HtSOS1 showed 83.4% identity with the previously isolated SOS1 gene from the Chrysanthemum crassum. The mRNA level in the leaves of H. tuberosus was significantly up-regulated by presence of high concentrations of NaCl. Localization analysis using rice protoplast expression showed that the protein encoded by HtSOS1 was located in the plasma membrane. HtSOS1 partially suppressed the salt sensitive phenotypes of a salt sensitive yeast strain. In comparison with wild type (Oryza sativa L., ssp. Japonica. cv. Nipponbare), the transgenic rice expressed with HtSOS1 could exclude more Na(+) and accumulate more K(+). Expression of HtSOS1 decreased Na(+) content much larger in the shoot than in the roots, resulting in more water content in the transgenic rice than WT. These data suggested that HtSOS1 may be useful in transgenic approaches to improving the salinity tolerance of glycophyte. PMID:24771143

  18. Analysis of Essential Oil in Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) Leaves and Tubers by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Helmi, Zead; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Tsymbalista, Yuliya; Ghazleh, Refat Abo; Shaibah, Hassan; Aboul-Enein, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate, for the first time, the chemical composition of essential oil of the tubers and leaves of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.), a species of sunflower native to eastern North America, growing in Ukraine. Methods: A hydrodistillation apparatus was used for the extraction of volatile components and then it was analysed by gas chromatography equipped with a split-splitless injector (split ratio, 1:50) and flame ionization detector (FID). The oil was analyzed under linear temperature programming applied at 4°C/min from 50°C - 340°C. Temperatures of the injector and FID detector were maintained at 280°C and 300°C, respectively. The chemical analysis of the oil was carried out using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to determine the chemical composition of the volatile fraction. Results: The essential oils content ranged from 0.00019 to 0.03486 and 0.00011 to 0.00205 (g/100g), in leaves and tubers, respectively. The qualitative and quantitative analysis led to the identification of 17 components in both species samples. The major component found in leaves and tubers was (-)-β-bisabolene with 70.7% and 63.1%, respectively. Conclusion: Essential oil profile of Jerusalem artichoke species showed significant differences between leaves and tubers species. Additionally, the leaves of Jerusalem artichoke are a promising source of natural β-bisabolene. PMID:25671184

  19. Sunflower stem weevil and its larval parasitoids in native sunflowers: Is parasitoid abundance and diversity greater in the US Southwest?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower stem weevils (Cylindrocopturus adspersus) and their larval parasitoids were collected from stems of four native sunflower species (Helianthus annuus, H. nuttallii, H. pauciflorus, and H. petiolaris) from 147 sites across eight states in 2003 and 2005. Native H. annuus constituted the major...

  20. The Development of Perennial Sunflower for Wildlife and Food Uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to use current genetics and plant breeding techniques to introgress genes for perennial habit from Helianthus tuberosus L. (2n=6x=102) into domesticated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n=2x=34). H. tuberosus is part of the secondary gene pool of sunflower and has ...

  1. Evaluating perennial sunflower for wildlife and food uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to use current genetics and plant breeding techniques to introgress genes for perennial habit from Helianthus tuberosus L. (2n=6x=102) into domesticated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n=2x=34). H. tuberosusis part of the secondary gene pool of sunflower and has b...

  2. Insects of sunflower in the northern Great Plains of North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ancestors of cultivated sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., are native to North America and approximately 13 of the 51 species in the genus Helianthus are reported to occur in Canada. Sunflower was introduced to Spain in the early 1500s, gradually spread across the European continent, and was then ...

  3. Purification and characterization of the reconstitutively active adenine nucleotide carrier from mitochondria of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Spagnoletta, Anna; De Santis, Aurelio; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Genchi, Giuseppe

    2002-12-01

    The adenine nucleotide carrier from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers mitochondria was solubilized with Triton X-100 and purified by sequential chromatography on hydroxapatite and Matrex Gel Blue B in the presence of cardiolipin and asolectin. SDS gel electrophoresis of the purified fraction showed a single polypeptide band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa. When reconstituted in liposomes, the adenine nucleotide carrier catalyzed a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-sensitive ATP/ATP exchange. It was purified 75-fold with a recovery of 15% and a protein yield of 0.18% with respect to the mitochondrial extract. Among the various substrates and inhibitors tested, the reconstituted protein transported only ATP, ADP, and GTP and was inhibited by bongkrekate, phenylisothiocyanate, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, mersalyl and p-hydroxymercuribenzoate (but not N-ethylmaleimide). Atractyloside and carboxyatractyloside (at concentrations normally inhibitory in animal and plant mitochondria) were without effect in Jerusalem artichoke tubers mitochondria. Vmax of the reconstituted ATP/ATP exchange was determined to be 0.53 micromol/min per mg protein at 25 degrees C. The half-saturation constant Km and the corresponding inhibition constant Ki were 20.4 microM for ATP and 45 microM for ADP. The activation energy of the ATP/ATP exchange was 28 KJ/mol between 5 and 30 degrees C. The N-terminal amino acid partial sequence of the purified protein showed a partial homology with the ANT protein purified from mitochondria of maize shoots. PMID:12678438

  4. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of the solution properties of the polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, R.S.; Cossins, A.I.; Kem, W.R. )

    1989-02-21

    The solution properties of the polypeptide neurotoxin I from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus (Sh I) have been investigated by high-resolution H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy at 300 MHz. The pH dependence of the spectra has been examined over the range 1.1-12.2 at 27{degree}C. Individual pK{sub a} values have been obtained for the {alpha}-ammonium group of Ala-1 (8.6) and the side chains of Glu-8 (3.7), Tyr-36 (10.9), and Tyr-37 (10.8). For the remaining seven carboxyl groups in the molecule, four pK{sub a} values can be clearly identified. The five Lys residues titrate in the range 10.5-11, but individual pK{sub a} values could not be obtained because of peak overlap. Conformational changes associated with the protonation of carboxylates occur below pH 4, while in the alkaline pH range major unfolding occurs above pH 10. The molecule also unfolds at elevated temperatures. Exchange of the backbone amide protons has been monitored at various values of pH and temperature in the ranges pH 4-5 and 12-27{degree}C. Comparison of these properties of Sh I in solution with those of the related polypeptides anthopleurin A and Anemonia sulcata toxins I and II indicates that Sh I is less stable thermally and that there are some significant differences in the ionic interactions that maintain the tertiary structure. The solvent accessibility of aromatic residues has been probed with photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization NMR at 360 MHz.

  5. Cloning and functional characterization of two abiotic stress-responsive Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) fructan 1-exohydrolases (1-FEHs).

    PubMed

    Xu, Huanhuan; Liang, Mingxiang; Xu, Li; Li, Hui; Zhang, Xi; Kang, Jian; Zhao, Qingxin; Zhao, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Two fructan hydrolases were previously reported to exist in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) and one native fructan-β-fructosidase (1-FEH) was purified to homogeneity by SDS-PAGE, but no corresponding cDNA was cloned. Here, we cloned two full-length 1-FEH cDNA sequences from Jerusalem artichoke, named Ht1-FEH I and Ht1-FEH II, which showed high levels of identity with chicory 1-FEH I and 1-FEH II. Functional characterization of the corresponding recombinant proteins in Pichia pastoris X-33 demonstrated that both Ht1-FEHs had high levels of hydrolase activity towards β(2,1)-linked fructans, but low or no activity towards β(2,6)-linked levan and sucrose. Like other plant FEHs, the activities of the recombinant Ht1-FEHs were greatly inhibited by sucrose. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis showed that Ht1-FEH I transcripts accumulated to high levels in the developing leaves and stems of artichoke, whereas the expression levels of Ht1-FEH II increased in tubers during tuber sprouting, which implies that the two Ht1-FEHs play different roles. The levels of both Ht1-FEH I and II transcript were significantly increased in the stems of NaCl-treated plants. NaCl treatment also induced transcription of both Ht1-FEHs in the tubers, while PEG treatments slightly inhibited the expression of Ht1-FEH II in tubers. Analysis of sugar-metabolizing enzyme activities and carbohydrate concentration via HPLC showed that the enzyme activities of 1-FEHs were increased but the fructose content was decreased under NaCl and PEG treatments. Given that FEH hydrolyzes fructan to yield Fru, we discuss possible explanations for the inconsistency between 1-FEH activity and fructan dynamics in artichokes subjected to abiotic stress. PMID:25522837

  6. Fine root tradeoffs between nitrogen concentration and xylem vessel traits preclude unified whole-plant resource strategies in Helianthus.

    PubMed

    Bowsher, Alan W; Mason, Chase M; Goolsby, Eric W; Donovan, Lisa A

    2016-02-01

    Recent work suggests variation in plant growth strategies is governed by a tradeoff in resource acquisition and use, ranging from a rapid resource acquisition strategy to a resource-conservative strategy. While evidence for this tradeoff has been found in leaves, knowledge of root trait strategies, and whether they reflect adaptive differentiation across environments, is limited. In the greenhouse, we investigated variation in fine root morphology (specific root length and tissue density), chemistry (nitrogen concentration and carbon:nitrogen), and anatomy (root cross-sectional traits) in populations of 26 Helianthus species and sister Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also compared root trait variation in this study with leaf trait variation previously reported in a parallel study of these populations. Root traits varied widely and exhibited little phylogenetic signal, suggesting high evolutionary lability. Specific root length and root tissue density were weakly negatively correlated, but neither was associated with root nitrogen, providing little support for a single axis of root trait covariation. Correlations between traits measured in the greenhouse and native site characteristics were generally weak, suggesting a variety of equally viable root trait combinations exist within and across environments. However, high root nitrogen was associated with lower xylem vessel number and cross-sectional area, suggesting a tradeoff between nutrient investment and water transport capacity. This led to correlations between root and leaf traits that were not always consistent with an acquisition-conservation tradeoff at the whole-plant level. Given that roots must balance acquisition of water and nutrients with functions like anchorage, exudation, and microbial symbioses, the varied evidence for root trait covariation likely reflects the complexity of interacting selection pressures belowground. Similarly, the lack of evidence for a single acquisition-conservation tradeoff at the

  7. Monospecific polyclonal antibodies directed against purified cinnamate 4-hydroxylase from Helianthus tuberosus. Immunopurification, immunoquantitation, and interspecies cross-reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Werck-Reichhart, D; Batard, Y; Kochs, G; Lesot, A; Durst, F

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported the purification of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase (CA4H), a cytochrome P-450 catalyzing the second reaction of the general phenylpropanoid pathway, from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) (B. Gabriac, D. Werck-Reichhart, H. Teutsch, F. Durst [1991] Arch Biochem Biophys 288: 302-309). Rabbit polyclonal antibodies were raised against the native and denaturated nitrocellulose-bound enzyme. Only the immunoglobulins G (IgGs) elicited upon immunization with native enzyme produced strong inhibition of catalytic activity and good cross-reactivity on western blots. In microsomes from H. tuberosus tissues induced by wounding and various chemicals, a positive correlation between catalytic activity and amounts of immunoreactive protein on western blots was observed. When coupled to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose, purified IgGs selectively retained CA4H activity from solubilized plant microsomes. Acid elution from the immunoaffinity matrix provided a rapid procedure for high-yield purification of the CA4H protein. The same IgGs immunoprecipitated a single protein from the in vitro translation products of mRNA isolated from wounded tissues. The apparent molecular weight (57,000) of this polypeptide was identical to that of CA4H purified from tuber microsomes. Immunochemical relatedness between CA4H from different plant species was demonstrated by strong inhibition of catalytic activity and immunopurification of several orthologous enzymes, using IgGs directed against CA4H from H. tuberosus. However, only limited interspecies cross-reactivity was observed on western blots. A careful immunochemical analysis indicates that CA4H immunoreactivity significantly differs from plant to plant. Results are discussed in terms of antibody specificity, enzyme glycosylation, and CA4H regulation. PMID:8278549

  8. The nonvolatile metabolome of sunflower linear glandular trichomes.

    PubMed

    Spring, Otmar; Pfannstiel, Jens; Klaiber, Iris; Conrad, Jürgen; Beifuß, Uwe; Apel, Lysanne; Aschenbrenner, Anna-Katharina; Zipper, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    Uniseriate linear glandular trichomes occur on stems, leaves and flowering parts of Helianthus species and related taxa. Their metabolic activity and biological function are still poorly understood. A phytochemical study documented the accumulation of bisabolene type sesquiterpenes and flavonoids as the major constituents of the non-volatile metabolome of linear glandular trichomes in the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus. Besides known sesquiterpenes of the glandulone, helibisabonol and heliannuol type, four previously undescribed sesquiterpenes named glandulone D, E, F and helibisabonol C were identified by spectroscopic analysis. In addition, four known nevadensin type flavonoids varying in O-methoxy substitutions were found. None of them has previously been reported from Helianthus annuus. PMID:26412774

  9. Localization of the Enzymes of Fructan Metabolism in Vacuoles Isolated by a Mechanical Method from Tubers of Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Darwen, Christopher W. E.; John, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Vacuoles isolated by a mechanical slicing method from developing tubers of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) contain activities of the two principal enzymes responsible for fructan synthesis: sucrose-sucrose fructosyl transferase and fructan-fructan fructosyl transferase. Both enzymes are associated with the vacuolar sap and not with the tonoplast. In vacuoles isolated from dormant tubers, the fructan-fructan fructosyl transferase activity remains in the vacuolar sap but the fructan exohydrolase activity is associated with the tonoplast. Fructan is hydrolysed by these vacuoles to fructose, which can be exported to the suspending medium. The localization of the enzymes of fructan metabolism in the vacuole has implications for the maintenance of fructan polymerisation. PMID:16666597

  10. A micro-batchwise technique method for rapid reconstitution of functionally active mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Spagnoletta, A; De Palma, A; Prezioso, G; Scalera, V

    2008-04-24

    A method for rapid reconstitution of ADP/ATP carrier from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers mitochondria in proteoliposomes is described. The method is based on the well known property of the Amberlite resin to absorb the detergent allowing proteoliposome formation. This has been achieved by a micro-batchwise technique, using a rotating plate stirrer. An evaluation of the optimal conditions, in comparison with the more usual column method is presented. The purified ADP/ATP carrier, incorporated in proteoliposomes by this method, shows a high transport activity and a higher specific activity with respect to proteoliposomes obtained by the column procedure. Furthermore the proteoliposomal preparations are more homogeneous in size, with a diameter ranging from 300 to 350 nm. The method is suitable for the reconstitution of other membrane transport proteins. PMID:18076996

  11. Demonstration of an intramitochondrial invertase activity and the corresponding sugar transporters of the inner mitochondrial membrane in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Horemans, Nele; Passarella, Salvatore; Tarcsay, Akos; Orsi, Ferenc; Salgó, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor

    2008-10-01

    Genetic evidences indicate that alkaline/neutral invertases are present in plant cell organelles, and they might have a novel physiological function in mitochondria. The present study demonstrates an invertase activity in the mitochondrial matrix of Helianthus tuberosus tubers. The pH optimum, the kinetic parameters and the inhibitor profile of the invertase activity indicated that it belongs to the neutral invertases. In accordance with this topology, transport activities responsible for the mediation of influx/efflux of substrate/products were studied in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The transport of sucrose, glucose and fructose was shown to be bidirectional, saturable and independent of the mitochondrial respiration and membrane potential. Sucrose transport was insensitive to the inhibitors of the proton-sucrose symporters. The different kinetic parameters and inhibitors as well as the absence of cross-inhibition suggest that sucrose, glucose and fructose transport are mediated by separate transporters in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The mitochondrial invertase system composed by an enzyme activity in the matrix and the corresponding sugar transporters might have a role in both osmoregulation and intermediary metabolism. PMID:18600345

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of cDNA coding for a lectin from Helianthus tuberosus callus and its jasmonate-induced expression.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, R; Yasokawa, D; Okumura, Y; Nagashima, K

    2000-06-01

    Two lectins (designated as HTA I and HTA II) that seemed to be isolectins were found in Helianthus tuberosus callus. cDNA encoding HTA I was isolated from a ZAP Express expression library by immunoselection by using the anti-HTA antiserum. The sequence of this cDNA consisted of 432 bp nucleotides coding for a polypeptide of 143 amino acid residues (Mr, 15,314). When introduced into E. coli, the cDNA directed the synthesis of active HTA I as indicated by the hemagglutination activity. The deduced amino acid sequence showed homology with some lectins and jasmonate-induced proteins. When callus was cultured in the presence of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), the hemagglutination activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. The levels of expression of the HTA protein and of the corresponding mRNA also increased in the treated callus. In view of these results, HTA I is considered to be a jasmonate-induced protein. PMID:10923797

  13. Registration of a sunflower genetic stock (RS3) with reduced palmitic and stearic acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genetic stock, RS3 (PI 642702), having reduced levels of palmitic and stearic acids, was developed and released by the USDA-ARS and the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, Fargo, ND. This genetic stock provides an additional source of lower saturated fatt...

  14. Registration of two double rust resistant germplasms, HA-R12 and HA-R13 for confection sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasms HA-R12 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673104) and HA-R13 (Reg. No. ______, PI 673105) were developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station, and released in Jul...

  15. Evapotranspiration of irrigated sunflower in a semi-arid environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is an alternative crop for the Southern High Plains typically produced under dryland; however irrigation offers greater potential for enhanced productivity and quality. Sunflower [cv, S 672 NuSun (Triumph Dwarf)] was grown in 2009 at Bushland, Texas, on two 4.2 ha fiel...

  16. Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a species native to North America. It is a relatively new crop in the USA with commercialization starting around 1970. The high oil content sunflower seed changed the economics of producing and crushing sunflower seed for oil, making it attractive for growers. A n...

  17. Sunflower water productivity in four Great Plains soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a drought-adapted crop whose short growing season reduces irrigation requirements, makes it ideal for regions with limited irrigation water supplies. Our objectives were to a) evaluate the yield (Y) potential of sunflower under full and deficit irrigation (IR) b)...

  18. Wild sunflower species from the southeastern United States as potential sources for improving oil content and quality in cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) oil has the potential to be improved for nutritional and industrial purposes through selection and breeding. The narrow genetic base of cultivated sunflower has been broadened by the infusion of genes from wild species, resulting in a continuous improvement in agrono...

  19. Oil productivity and composition of sunflower as a function of hybrid and planting date

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is potential cash crop for the southeastern United States for production of cooking oil or biodiesel. Two years of experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of location (five locations in Mississippi), planting date (April 20, May 20, and June 20), and hybrid...

  20. Measured soil water evaporation as a function of the square root of time and reference ET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a drought-adapted crop with a short growing season that reduces irrigation requirements and makes it ideal for regions with limited irrigation water supplies. Our objectives were a) to evaluate the yield potential of sunflower under deficit irrigation and b) det...

  1. Registration of cytoplasmic male-sterile oilseed sunflower genetic stocks CMS GIG2 and CMS GIG2-RV, and fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genetic stocks, CMS GIG2 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and CMS GIG2-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx), and corresponding fertility restoration lines RF GIG2-MAX 1631 (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxxx) and RF GIG2-MAX 1631-RV (Reg. No. xxx, PI xxx...

  2. Registration of a male fertility restorer oilseed sunflower germplasm HA-R9 resistant to sunflower rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm HA-R9 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 667595) was developed by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the Agricultural Experiment Station of North Dakota State University and released in January, 2013. Sunflower rust (caused by P...

  3. Registration of an oilseed sunflower germplasm HA-DM1 resistant to sunflower downy mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HA-DM1 (Reg. No.xxx, PI 674793) sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm was developed and released cooperatively by the USDA-ARS, Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit and the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station in 2015. HA-DM1 is a BC2F4 derived oilseed maintainer line from the cros...

  4. Registration of two confection sunflower germplasm Lines, HA-R10 and HA-R11, Resistant to sunflower rust

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two confection sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) germplasm lines, HA-R10 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670043) and HA-R11 (Reg. No.xxx, PI670044) were developed by the USDA-ARS Sunflower and Plant Biology Research Unit in collaboration with the North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station and released December, 20...

  5. Development of insect resistant sunflowers: Updates and challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower Helianthus annuus L. is one of the major oil seed crops grown in the USA. with a highest estimated cultivated acreage of 975,000 acres in North Dakota. Besides diseases and weeds, insects are one of the major causes for yield losses. An average of 9-10% yield losses was attributed to insec...

  6. First Report of Pathogenicity of Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium acuminatum on Sunflowers in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread infection of charcoal rot (Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid) was observed in a commercial sunflower field (Helianthus annuus L. cv. 'Pioneer 63M82') in Todd County, MN in September 2009. Stem sections of the basal portion of infected plants were harvested and dissected. In addition to...

  7. Resistance in Cultivated Sunflower Germplasm to the Red Sunflower Seed Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Northern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 6-year field study evaluated 52 sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., accessions, 20 breeding lines, and 9 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Germplasm with potent...

  8. Evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for irrigated sunflower in the southern high plains.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is diverse crop grown for oil or confectionary uses in the Southern High Plains often under irrigation. Crop water use (evapotranspiration or ET) was measured in 2009 and 2011 in two 4-ha fields using two precision 9 m**2 weighing lysimeters containing 2.3-m deep mo...

  9. Consumptive Water Use and Crop Coefficients of Irrigated Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semi-arid environments, the use of irrigation is necessary for sunflower production to reach its maximum potential. The aim of this study was to quantify the consumptive water use and crop coefficients of irrigated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) without soil water limitations during two growing...

  10. Registration of the oilseed sunflower genetic stocks HA 458, HA 459, and HA 460 possessing genes for resistance to downy mildew

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genetic stocks, HA 458, HA 459, and HA 460 have been released which are resistant to downy mildew (caused by Plasmopara halstedii (Farl.) Berl. & De Toni) and possess a high-oleic fatty acid profile (oleic acid > 800 g kg-1) in the seed oil. These genet...

  11. Sources of resistance to sunflower diseases in a global collection of domesticated USDA plant introductions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Basal stalk rot (BSR) and head rot (HR) caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary are traditionally major diseases of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in the United States, while Phomopsis stem canker (PSC) caused by Phomopsis helianthi Munt.-Cvet. et. al. has increasingly become damaging in...

  12. Resistance Among Cultivated Sunflower Germplasm to the Banded Sunflower Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the Northern Great Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A five year field trial evaluated 71 oilseed sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., accessions, 32 breeding lines, and 25 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), in North Dak...

  13. First Report of Charcoal Rot of Sunflower in Minnesota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field of oilseed sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. hybrid 'Pioneer 63M82') was observed with uneven maturation in west central Minnesota near Aldrich (Todd County) in late September, 2009. The field's soil type was sandy loam and cropping history was oats in 2008 preceded by four years of alfalfa. M...

  14. Resistance of Sunflower Germplasm to the Sunflower Stem Weevil and Red Sunflower Seed Weevil and Evaluation of Commercial Hybrids for Resistance to the Sunflower Midge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the central and northern Plains, cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is attacked by a number of insect pests resulting in yield losses for sunflower producers. Host-plant resistance can provide a long-term solution to managing these insects with reduced input costs and with potentially lo...

  15. Impact of irrigation on larval density of stem-infesting pests of cultivated sunflower in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The guild of stem-infesting insect pests of cultivated sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., within the central Plains is a concern to producers chiefly due to losses caused by plant lodging from the sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Dectes texanu...

  16. Natural Rubber Quantification in Sunflower Using an Automated Solvent Extractor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) produce a small amount of low molecular weight natural rubber (NR) and this species has potential as a rubber-producing crop plant. Quantifying NR in plant tissue has traditionally been accomplished using Soxhlet or gravimetric methodologies. Accelerated solve...

  17. Effect of seeding date and N rate on sunflower yields, oil content and composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is not a commonly grown crop in southeastern US. However, recent research has demonstrated the potential for sunflower to be grown as a cash crop in the region. Field experiment was conducted in 2007 to evaluate the effect of N (0, 67, 134, and 202 kg ha-1), seeding...

  18. Agronomic feasibility of sunflower as an oilseed cover crop for Florida vegetable production systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oil producing sunflower (Helianthus annuus) was evaluated as a cover crop for Florida vegetable growers. The performance of a traditional, dwarf and herbicide resistant hybrid was evaluated at two locations (Martin and St. Lucie counties) in replicated 0.6 acre plots and a grain combine was used ha...

  19. Variation for seed phytosterols in sunflower germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds and oils are rich sources of phytosterols, which are important compounds for human nutrition. There is limited information on variability for seed phytosterols in sunflower germplasm. The objective of the present research was to evaluate kernel phytosterol cont...

  20. Isolation of three diterpenoid acids from sunflowers, as oviposition stimulants for the banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The banded sunflower moth (BSFM), Cochylis hospes Walshingham (Lepidoptera: Cochylidae) is a specialist insect, the larvae of which feed on sunflowers, Helianthus spp., and a few other species of Compositae. It is one of the most important pests of sunflower in the USA. Previous work on H. annuus, t...

  1. 2009 Sunflower Insect Pest Problems and Insecticide Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) are native to North America and a number of insect pests cause economic losses to sunflower production. Head-infesting insects include the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte, banded sunflower moth, Cochylis hospes Walsingham, sunflower moth, Homoeos...

  2. Sesquiterpene lactone composition of wild and cultivated sunflowers and biological activity against an insect pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sesquiterpene lactones in sunflowers, Helianthus spp., are important to interactions with pathogens, weeds and insects. Across a broad range of H. annuus, differences in composition of sesquiterpene lactones extracted from florets were found between wild and cultivated sunflowers, but also between d...

  3. Impact of combining planting date and chemical control to reduce larval densities of stem-infesting pests of sunflower in the Central Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The guild of stem-infesting insect pests of sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., within the central Plains is a concern to producers chiefly due to losses caused by plant lodging from the sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and Dectes texanus texanus L...

  4. INTERCROPPING SUNFLOWER VARIETIES WITH BELL PEPPER: EFFECT ON POPULATIONS OF THE MINUTE PIRATE BUG, ORIUS INSIDIOSUS AND THRIPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight varieties of sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asterales: Asteraceae) (Bashful, Double Quick Orange, Pro Cut Bicolor, Pro Cut Lemon, Sundance Kid, Sunrich Lemon, Teddy Bear and Zebulon) were evaluated for attractiveness to predators, mostly the minute pirate bug, Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemipte...

  5. Post-anthesis development of oil content and composition with respect to seed moisture in two high-oleic sunflower hybrids in the northern US

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desiccating sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) at physiological maturity (PM) or as early as possible can be used to hasten harvest and thus, reduce yield loss associated with severe weather, plant degradation, and bird predation. Previous work showed that two modern oilseed sunflower hybrids studied ...

  6. Seed moisture at physiological maturity in oilseed and confectionary sunflower hybrids in the Northern U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desiccating sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) to hasten harvest has become a common practice in the northern U.S. and can aid in reducing yield loss associated with severe weather and bird predation. Currently, it is recommended to apply desiccants to sunflower at 35% or less seed moisture correspond...

  7. Impact of sunflower on land productivity in the semiarid steppe of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is widely grown in the steppe region of Ukraine and Russia because of favorable economics. Sunflower is also grown in the steppe of the United States. Sunflower, however, has damaged soil health in the U.S. steppe because of its low after-harvest residue levels, thus ...

  8. Sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) is a relatively new crop among the world field crops, grown as an oilseed crop worldwide in temperate and subtropical areas in 72 countries. It is one of only a few crops (cranberries, blueberries, and pecans are others) to have originated from the United States. Sunflo...

  9. Impact of planting dates on a seed maggot, Neotephritis finalis (Diptera: Tephritidae), and sunflower bud moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) damage in cultivated sunflower

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neotephritis finalis (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), and sunflower bud moth, Suleima helianthana (Riley) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) are major head-infesting insect pests of cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Planting date was evaluated as a cultural pest management strategy for control of N...

  10. Update on Host Plant Resistance Studies of Banded Sunflower Moth and Sunflower Moth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding pest-resistance crop cultivars to insects and diseases is one of the primary goals of integrated pest management programs worldwide. Host plant resistance is a tactic that uses the plant's own defenses to reduce injury from pest attack. Among the sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) insect pest...

  11. Resistance in Cultivated Sunflower to the Sunflower Moth (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) in the Central Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A 5-year field study evaluated 42 sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) accessions, 25 breeding lines, and 40 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the sunflower moth, Homeosoma electellum (Hulst) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Germplasm with resistance to i...

  12. Sunflower water productivity in four Great Plains soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) is a drought-adapted crop with a short growing season that reduces irrigation requirements and makes it ideal for regions with limited irrigation water supplies. Our objectives were to evaluate the yield potential of sunflower under deficit irrigation and to determi...

  13. Intercropping sunflower varieties with bell pepper: effect on populations of Orius insidiosus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) and thrips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight varieties of sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asterales: Asteraceae) (Bashful, Double Quick Orange, Pro Cut Bicolor, Pro Cut Lemon, Sundance Kid, Sunrich Lemon, Teddy Bear and Zebulon) were evaluated for attractiveness to predators, mostly the minute pirate bug, Orius insidiosus (Say) (Hemipte...

  14. Response of ornamental sunflower cultivars ‘Sunbeam’ and ‘Moonbright’ to irrigation with saline wastewaters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore the possibility that saline wastewaters may be used to grow commercially acceptable floriculture crops, a study was initiated to determine the effects of salinity on two pollen-free cultivars of ornamental sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). ‘Moonbright’ and ‘Sunbeam’ were grown in greenho...

  15. Agronomic and Natural Rubber Characteristics of Sunflower as a Rubber-Producing Plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) is a genus native to North American and is a potential natural rubber (NR) producing crop. The objectives of the study were to: 1) evaluate commercial sunflower cultivars to determine biomass production and how they partition biomass into leaves, stems, ...

  16. [Reaction of the seedlings of flowering plants to the effects of imino-di-(paradimethylaminophenyl)-methane-aurine-00].

    PubMed

    Gabaraeva, N I; Slepian, E I

    1975-01-01

    The influence of auramine-00 on seedlings of three species of plants - Cucurbita pepo L., Helianthus annuus L., Zea mays L.-was investigated. Auramine was added in agar-agar, on which the seedlings were growing. Two concentrations of auramine were used--0.001%. Besides the delay in growth, also the formation of local overgrowth of cotyledons and hypocotyl of C. pepo, the base of cotyledons of H. annuus and mezocotyl of Z. mays were observed. The histological analysis has shown these swellings to arise on the grounds of two processes: pathological proliferation and hypertrophy. PMID:1166654

  17. [Response of flowering plant seedlings to the action of N-nitroso-N-methylurea].

    PubMed

    Slepian, E I; Gabaraeva, N I

    1975-01-01

    The influence of N-nitroso-N-methylurea on seedlings of two species of plants--Cucurbita pepo L., Helianthus annuus L.--was investigated. NMU was added in agar-agar, on which seedlings were growing. 0.02% concentration of NMU was used. In addition to the delay in growth and appearance of necrotic regions, also local overgrowth of cotyledons of C. pepo and overgrowth of hypocotyl and the base of cotyledons of H. annuus were observed. A histological analysis has shown that these swellings arise due to two processes: pathological hypertrophy and proliferation. PMID:1210149

  18. N-Terminally extended analogues of the K⁺ channel toxin from Stichodactyla helianthus as potent and selective blockers of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shih C; Huq, Redwan; Chhabra, Sandeep; Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael W; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S

    2015-06-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.3 is an important target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and asthma. Blockade of Kv1.3 by the sea anemone peptide K⁺-channel toxin from Stichodactyla helianthus (ShK) inhibits the proliferation of effector memory T lymphocytes and ameliorates autoimmune diseases in animal models. However, the lack of selectivity of ShK for Kv1.3 over the Kv1.1 subtype has driven a search for Kv1.3-selective analogues. In the present study, we describe N-terminally extended analogues of ShK that contain a negatively-charged Glu, designed to mimic the phosphonate adduct in earlier Kv1.3-selective analogues, and consist entirely of common protein amino acids. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that a Trp residue at position [-3] of the tetrapeptide extension could form stable interactions with Pro377 of Kv1.3 and best discriminates between Kv1.3 and Kv1.1. This led to the development of ShK with an N-terminal Glu-Trp-Ser-Ser extension ([EWSS]ShK), which inhibits Kv1.3 with an IC₅₀ of 34 pm and is 158-fold selective for Kv1.3 over Kv1.1. In addition, [EWSS]ShK is more than 2900-fold more selective for Kv1.3 over Kv1.2 and KCa3.1 channels. As a highly Kv1.3-selective analogue of ShK based entirely on protein amino acids, which can be produced by recombinant expression, this peptide is a valuable addition to the complement of therapeutic candidates for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25864722

  19. Antimicrobial benzopyrans from the receptacle of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Satoh, A; Utamura, H; Ishizuka, M; Endo, N; Tsuji, M; Nishimura, H

    1996-04-01

    The antimicrobial substances in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) were investigated. Two antifungal benzopyran derivatives, 6-acetyl-2,2-dimethyl-1,2-benzopyran (1) and 6-acetyl-7-hydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-1,2-benzopyran (2), were isolated from the ethanol extract of sunflower receptacles. The antimicrobial activities of isolated compounds 1 and 2 and their related compounds (precocenes) were evaluated by the paper disk method, using Pyricularia oryzae as the test fungus. PMID:8829537

  20. Genome scans reveal candidate domestication and improvement genes in cultivated sunflower, as well as post-domestication introgression with wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Baute, Gregory J; Kane, Nolan C; Grassa, Christopher J; Lai, Zhao; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-04-01

    The development of modern crops typically involves both selection and hybridization, but to date most studies have focused on the former. In the present study, we explore how both processes, and their interactions, have molded the genome of the cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus), a globally important oilseed. To identify genes targeted by selection during the domestication and improvement of sunflower, and to detect post-domestication hybridization with wild species, we analyzed transcriptome sequences of 80 genotypes, including wild, landrace, and modern lines of H. annuus, as well as two cross-compatible wild relatives, Helianthus argophyllus and Helianthus petiolaris. Outlier analyses identified 122 and 15 candidate genes associated with domestication and improvement, respectively. As in several previous studies, genes putatively involved in oil biosynthesis were the most extreme outliers. Additionally, several promising associations were observed with previously mapped quantitative trait loci (QTLs), such as branching. Admixture analyses revealed that all the modern cultivar genomes we examined contained one or more introgressions from wild populations, with every chromosome having evidence of introgression in at least one modern line. Cumulatively, introgressions cover c. 10% of the cultivated sunflower genome. Surprisingly, introgressions do not avoid candidate domestication genes, probably because of the reintroduction of branching. PMID:25641359

  1. Revisiting a classic case of introgression: hybridization and gene flow in Californian sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gregory L; Baute, Gregory J; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2016-06-01

    During invasion, colonizing species can hybridize with native species, potentially swamping out native genomes. However, theory predicts that introgression will often be biased into the invading species. Thus, empirical estimates of gene flow between native and invasive species are important to quantify the actual threat of hybridization with invasive species. One classic example of introgression occurs in California, where Helianthus bolanderi was thought to be a hybrid between the serpentine endemic Helianthus exilis and the congeneric invader Helianthus annuus. We used genotyping by sequencing to look for signals of introgression and population structure. We find that H. bolanderi and H. exilis form one genetic clade, with weak population structure that is associated with geographic location rather than soil composition and likely represent a single species, not two. Additionally, while our results confirmed early molecular analysis and failed to support the hybrid origin of H. bolanderi, we did find evidence for introgression mainly into the invader H. annuus, as predicted by theory. PMID:26840428

  2. High-resolution non-contact measurement of the electrical activity of plants in situ using optical recording.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Zi-Yang; Xue, Lin; Mao, Tong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of conventional extracellular recording and intracellular recording make high-resolution multisite recording of plant bioelectrical activity in situ challenging. By combining a cooled charge-coupled device camera with a voltage-sensitive dye, we recorded the action potentials in the stem of Helianthus annuus and variation potentials at multiple sites simultaneously with high spatial resolution. The method of signal processing using coherence analysis was used to determine the synchronization of the selected signals. Our results provide direct visualization of the phloem, which is the distribution region of the electrical activities in the stem and leaf of H. annuus, and verify that the phloem is the main action potential transmission route in the stems of higher plants. Finally, the method of optical recording offers a unique opportunity to map the dynamic bioelectrical activity and provides an insight into the mechanisms of long-distance electrical signal transmission in higher plants. PMID:26333536

  3. High-resolution non-contact measurement of the electrical activity of plants in situ using optical recording

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Zi-Yang; Xue, Lin; Mao, Tong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of conventional extracellular recording and intracellular recording make high-resolution multisite recording of plant bioelectrical activity in situ challenging. By combining a cooled charge-coupled device camera with a voltage-sensitive dye, we recorded the action potentials in the stem of Helianthus annuus and variation potentials at multiple sites simultaneously with high spatial resolution. The method of signal processing using coherence analysis was used to determine the synchronization of the selected signals. Our results provide direct visualization of the phloem, which is the distribution region of the electrical activities in the stem and leaf of H. annuus, and verify that the phloem is the main action potential transmission route in the stems of higher plants. Finally, the method of optical recording offers a unique opportunity to map the dynamic bioelectrical activity and provides an insight into the mechanisms of long-distance electrical signal transmission in higher plants. PMID:26333536

  4. Sesquiterpene Lactone Composition of Wild and Cultivated Sunflowers and Biological Activity against an Insect Pest.

    PubMed

    Prasifka, Jarrad R; Spring, Otmar; Conrad, Jürgen; Cook, Leonard W; Palmquist, Debra E; Foley, Michael E

    2015-04-29

    Sesquiterpene lactones in sunflowers, Helianthus spp., are important to interactions with pathogens, weeds, and insects. Across a broad range of Helianthus annuus, differences in composition of sesquiterpene lactones extracted from disc florets were found between wild and cultivated sunflowers and also between distinct groups of inbreds used to produce sunflower hybrids. Discriminant function analysis showed the presence and relative abundance of argophyllone B, niveusin B, and 15-hydroxy-3-dehydrodesoxyfruticin were usually (75%) effective at classifying wild sunflowers, cultivated inbreds, and hybrids. Argophyllone B reduced the larval mass of the sunflower moth, Homeosoma electellum, by >30%, but only at a dose greater than that found in florets. Low doses of mixed extracts from cultivated florets produced a similar (≈40%) reduction in larval mass, suggesting combinations of sesquiterpene lactones act additively. Although the results support a role for sesquiterpene lactones in herbivore defense of cultivated sunflowers, additional information is needed to use these compounds purposefully in breeding. PMID:25853587

  5. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Galiová, M.; Novotný, K.; Červenka, R.; Reale, L.; Novotný, J.; Liška, M.; Samek, O.; Kanický, V.; Hrdlička, A.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 μm in a up to cm × cm area of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  6. Sunflower-based Feedstocks in Nonfood Applications: Perspectives from Olefin Metathesis

    PubMed Central

    Marvey, Bassie B.

    2008-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) oil remains under-utilised albeit one of the major seed oils produced world-wide. Moreover, the high oleic sunflower varieties make the oil attractive for applications requiring high temperature processes and those targeting the C=C double bond functionality. Herein an overview of the recent developments in olefin metathesis of sunflower-based feedstocks is presented. The improved performance of olefin metathesis catalysts leading to high turnover numbers, high selectivity and catalyst recyclability, opens new opportunities for tailoring sunflower-based feedstocks into products required for possible new niche market applications. Promising results in biofuel, biopolymers, fragrances and fine chemicals applications have been reported. PMID:19325810

  7. New monoterpene glycosides from sunflower seeds and their protective effects against H2O2-induced myocardial cell injury.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yonghe; Zhao, Jianping; Liu, Yanli; Li, Xiaoran; Xu, Qiongming; Wang, Taoyun; Khan, Ikhlas A; Yang, Shilin

    2015-11-15

    Three new monoterpene glycosides (1-3) and eleven known compounds (4-14) were isolated from seeds of Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower). Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods. All the compounds were isolated from sunflower seeds for the first time. Protective effects of compounds 1-14 against H2O2-induced H9c2 cardiomyocyte injury were evaluated, and compounds 1 and 2 showed some cell-protective effects. No significant DPPH radical scavenging activity was observed for compounds 1-14. PMID:25977041

  8. Comparison of Water Potentials Measured by In Situ Psychrometry and Pressure Chamber in Morphologically Different Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Neil C.; Spurway, R. A.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf water potentials measured by in situ psychrometry were compared with leaf water potentials measured by the pressure chamber technique at various values of water potential in Helianthus annuus, Helianthus nuttallii, Vigna unguiculata, Nerium oleander, Pistacia vera, and Corylus avellana. In V. unguiculata, the leaf water potentials measured by the in situ psychrometer oscillated at the same periodicity as, and proportional to, the leaf conductance. In all species, potentials measured by in situ psychrometers operating in the psychrometric mode were linearly correlated with potentials measured with the pressure chamber. However, the in situ psychrometers underestimated the leaf water potential in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials and overestimated the water potential in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana. The underestimation in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials resulted from differences in water potential across the leaf. The overestimation in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana was considered to arise from low epidermal conductances in these species even after abrasion of the cuticle. Pressure-volume studies with Lycopersicon esculentum showed that less water was expressed from distal than proximal leaflets when the whole leaf was slowly pressurized. The implication of this for water relations characteristics obtained by pressure-volume techniques is discussed. We conclude that in situ psychrometers are suitable for following dynamic changes in leaf water potential, but should be used with caution on leaves with low epidermal conductances. PMID:16663415

  9. Genome skimming reveals the origin of the Jerusalem Artichoke tuber crop species: neither from Jerusalem nor an artichoke.

    PubMed

    Bock, Dan G; Kane, Nolan C; Ebert, Daniel P; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2014-02-01

    The perennial sunflower Helianthus tuberosus, known as Jerusalem Artichoke or Sunchoke, was cultivated in eastern North America before European contact. As such, it represents one of the few taxa that can support an independent origin of domestication in this region. Its tubers were adopted as a source of food and forage when the species was transferred to the Old World in the early 1600s, and are still used today. Despite the cultural and economic importance of this tuber crop species, its origin is debated. Competing hypotheses implicate the occurrence of polyploidization with or without hybridization, and list the annual sunflower H. annuus and five distantly related perennial sunflower species as potential parents. Here, we test these scenarios by skimming the genomes of diverse populations of Jerusalem Artichoke and its putative progenitors. We identify relationships among Helianthus taxa using complete plastomes (151 551 bp), partial mitochondrial genomes (196 853 bp) and 35S (8196 bp) and 5S (514 bp) ribosomal DNA. Our results refute the possibility that Jerusalem Artichoke is of H. annuus ancestry. We provide the first genetic evidence that this species originated recursively from perennial sunflowers of central-eastern North America via hybridization between tetraploid Hairy Sunflower and diploid Sawtooth Sunflower. PMID:24245977

  10. Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Sarandy, Mariáurea Matias; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; da Matta, Sérgio Luiz Pinto; Mezencio, Jose Mario da Silveira; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Zanuncio, José Cola; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue. PMID:26170889

  11. Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarandy, Mariáurea Matias; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; da Matta, Sérgio Luiz Pinto; Mezencio, Jose Mario da Silveira; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Zanuncio, José Cola; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue. PMID:26170889

  12. The potential of wild Helianthus species for industrial uses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Within the past decade, the desire for alternative sources of fuels, chemicals, feeds, and other materials has received increased attention. Wild sunflower species have the potential to contribute to these renewable resources. During the past three decades, the narrow genetic base of cultivated sunf...

  13. Transposable Element Proliferation and Genome Expansion Are Rare in Contemporary Sunflower Hybrid Populations Despite Widespread Transcriptional Activity of LTR Retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Dhakal, Preeti; Katterhenry, Angela N.; Heatherington, Chelsea A.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2011-01-01

    Hybridization is a natural phenomenon that has been linked in several organismal groups to transposable element derepression and copy number amplification. A noteworthy example involves three diploid annual sunflower species from North America that have arisen via ancient hybridization between the same two parental taxa, Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris. The genomes of the hybrid species have undergone large-scale increases in genome size attributable to long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon proliferation. The parental species that gave rise to the hybrid taxa are widely distributed, often sympatric, and contemporary hybridization between them is common. Natural H. annuus × H. petiolaris hybrid populations likely served as source populations from which the hybrid species arose and, as such, represent excellent natural experiments for examining the potential role of hybridization in transposable element derepression and proliferation in this group. In the current report, we examine multiple H. annuus × H. petiolaris hybrid populations for evidence of genome expansion, LTR retrotransposon copy number increases, and LTR retrotransposon transcriptional activity. We demonstrate that genome expansion and LTR retrotransposon proliferation are rare in contemporary hybrid populations, despite independent proliferation events that took place in the genomes of the ancient hybrid species. Interestingly, LTR retrotransposon lineages that proliferated in the hybrid species genomes remain transcriptionally active in hybrid and nonhybrid genotypes across the entire sampling area. The finding of transcriptional activity but not copy number increases in hybrid genotypes suggests that proliferation and genome expansion in contemporary hybrid populations may be mitigated by posttranscriptional mechanisms of repression. PMID:21282712

  14. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Hannah M; Ungerer, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  15. Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Content in Eight Diploid Sunflower Species Inferred from Next-Generation Sequence Data

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Hannah M.; Ungerer, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    The most abundant transposable elements (TEs) in plant genomes are Class I long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons represented by superfamilies gypsy and copia. Amplification of these superfamilies directly impacts genome structure and contributes to differential patterns of genome size evolution among plant lineages. Utilizing short-read Illumina data and sequence information from a panel of Helianthus annuus (sunflower) full-length gypsy and copia elements, we explore the contribution of these sequences to genome size variation among eight diploid Helianthus species and an outgroup taxon, Phoebanthus tenuifolius. We also explore transcriptional dynamics of these elements in both leaf and bud tissue via RT-PCR. We demonstrate that most LTR retrotransposon sublineages (i.e., families) display patterns of similar genomic abundance across species. A small number of LTR retrotransposon sublineages exhibit lineage-specific amplification, particularly in the genomes of species with larger estimated nuclear DNA content. RT-PCR assays reveal that some LTR retrotransposon sublineages are transcriptionally active across all species and tissue types, whereas others display species-specific and tissue-specific expression. The species with the largest estimated genome size, H. agrestis, has experienced amplification of LTR retrotransposon sublineages, some of which have proliferated independently in other lineages in the Helianthus phylogeny. PMID:27233667

  16. Comparative analysis of the complete sequence of the plastid genome of Parthenium argentatum and identification of DNA barcodes to differentiate Parthenium species and lines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Parthenium argentatum (guayule) is an industrial crop that produces latex, which was recently commercialized as a source of latex rubber safe for people with Type I latex allergy. The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum was sequenced. The sequence provides important information useful for genetic engineering strategies. Comparison to the sequences of plastid genomes from three other members of the Asteraceae, Lactuca sativa, Guitozia abyssinica and Helianthus annuus revealed details of the evolution of the four genomes. Chloroplast-specific DNA barcodes were developed for identification of Parthenium species and lines. Results The complete plastid genome of P. argentatum is 152,803 bp. Based on the overall comparison of individual protein coding genes with those in L. sativa, G. abyssinica and H. annuus, we demonstrate that the P. argentatum chloroplast genome sequence is most closely related to that of H. annuus. Similar to chloroplast genomes in G. abyssinica, L. sativa and H. annuus, the plastid genome of P. argentatum has a large 23 kb inversion with a smaller 3.4 kb inversion, within the large inversion. Using the matK and psbA-trnH spacer chloroplast DNA barcodes, three of the four Parthenium species tested, P. tomentosum, P. hysterophorus and P. schottii, can be differentiated from P. argentatum. In addition, we identified lines within P. argentatum. Conclusion The genome sequence of the P. argentatum chloroplast will enrich the sequence resources of plastid genomes in commercial crops. The availability of the complete plastid genome sequence may facilitate transformation efficiency by using the precise sequence of endogenous flanking sequences and regulatory elements in chloroplast transformation vectors. The DNA barcoding study forms the foundation for genetic identification of commercially significant lines of P. argentatum that are important for producing latex. PMID:19917140

  17. Phytoremediation of soil co-contaminated with heavy metals and TNT using four plant species.

    PubMed

    Lee, Insook; Baek, Kyunghwa; Kim, Hyunhee; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jaisoo; Kwon, Youngseok; Chang, Yoontoung; Bae, Bumhan

    2007-11-01

    We investigated the germination, growth rates and uptake of contaminants of four plant species, barnyard grass (Echinochloa crusgalli), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), Indian mallow (Abutilon avicennae) and Indian jointvetch (Aeschynomene indica), grown in soil contaminated with cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). These contaminants are typically found at shooting ranges. Experiments were carried out over 180 days using both single plant cultures and cultures containing an equal mix of the 4 plant species. Germination rates differed among the species in single culture (92% for H. annuus, 84% for E. crusgalli, 48% for A. avicennae and 38% Ae. indica). In the 4-plant mix culture, < 20% of seeds germinated for all 4 species. E. crusgalli and H. annuus grew slightly faster in the four-plant mix culture than in single culture, whereas A. avicennae and Ae. indica grew much slower in the 4-plant mix culture. In both single and 4-plant mix cultures, Cd concentrations in the roots of A. avicennae and E. crusgalliwere high, and Pb concentrations were high in A. avicennae and H. annuus. Cd and Pb concentrations in shoots were low to negligible in both treatment cultures for all species, except E. crusgalli in the 4-plant mix culture. The concentrations of TNT and its metabolites, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT) and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene (4ADNT) were high in H. annuus, Ae. indica and A. avicennae. Total Cd removal from soil differed among species, with E. crusgalliremoving the most (50.1%) followed by H. annuus(41.3%), Ae. indica(41.1%) and A. avicennae(33.3%). The four-plant mix removed more Cd (25.8%) than a no-plant control (12.9%). Pb removal was negligible for all plant species. All plant species rapidly removed TNT and its metabolites, regardless of whether the culture was single or mixed. From in these results, we conclude that a phytoremediation for the removal of heavy metals and TNT from contaminated soils should use a single plant species

  18. Lapacho tea (Tabebuia impetiginosa) extract inhibits pancreatic lipase and delays postprandial triglyceride increase in rats.

    PubMed

    Kiage-Mokua, Beatrice Nyanchama; Roos, Nils; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    Earlier work in our laboratory indicated that ethanolic extracts of Tabebuia impetiginosa, Arctium lappa L., Calendula officinalis, Helianthus annuus, Linum usitatissimum and L. propolis, inhibit pancreatic lipase in vitro. In a follow-up study we assessed their effects on plasma triglycerides in rats fed on a fatty meal. Extracts, orlistat or only ethanol were given orally to the rats together with the test meal and the rate of increase of postprandial triglycerides was assessed over 4 h. Clearing of the triglycerides from the blood compartment was abolished by inhibiting lipoprotein lipase with Triton WR-1339. Our results showed that out of all the extracts, the bark of Tabebuia impetiginosa led to a significant delay in the postprandial increase of plasma triglycerides. However, lapachol, which is contained in the bark of Tabebuia impetiginosa and soluble in ethanol, had no lipase inhibitory effect in vitro and hence this substance did not seem to mediate the pertinent effect. PMID:22431070

  19. Effect of crop residue harvest on long-term crop yield, soil erosion, and carbon balance: tradeoffs for a sustainable bioenergy feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, Jay S.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2010-08-26

    Agricultural residues are a potential feedstock for bioenergy production, if residue harvest can be done sustainably. The relationship between crop residue harvest, soil erosion, crop yield and carbon balance was modeled with the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator/ Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) using a factorial design. Four crop rotations (winter wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – sunflower [Helianthus annuus]; spring wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.)] – canola [Brassica napus]; corn [Zea mays L.] – soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]; and cotton [Gossypium hirsutum] – peanut [Arachis hypogaea]) were simulated at four US locations each, under different topographies (0-10% slope), and management practices [crop residue removal rates (0-75%), conservation practices (no till, contour cropping, strip cropping, terracing)].

  20. Tracking photosynthetic efficiency with narrow-band spectroradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, John A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1992-01-01

    Narrow-waveband spectroradiometry presents the possibility of detecting subtle signals closely related to the current physiological state of vegetation. One such signal related to the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin is discussed. Recent advances in plant ecophysiology demonstrated a close relationship between these pigments and the regulatory state of photosystem 2 in photosynthesis. Our recent field studies of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and oak (Quercus agrifolia) demonstrated that a 'xanthophyll signal' can be isolated from the diurnal reflectance spectra of intact canopies. Furthermore, the xanthophyll signal can be used to derive a 'physiological reflectance index' (PRI) that closely correlates with the actual photosynthetic efficiency (defined as the photosynthetic rate divided by the incident PAR) in closed canopies. If these signals were detectable in Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometers (AVIRIS) images, they could lead to improved remote estimates of photosynthetic fluxes.

  1. Investigation of heavy-metal accumulation in selected plant samples using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiová, M.; Kaiser, J.; Novotný, K.; Novotný, J.; Vaculovič, T.; Liška, M.; Malina, R.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2008-12-01

    Single-pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser-Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were applied for mapping the silver and copper distribution in Helianthus Annuus L. samples treated with contaminant in controlled conditions. For Ag and Cu detection the 328.07 nm Ag(I) and 324.75 nm Cu(I) lines were used, respectively. The LIBS experimental conditions (mainly the laser energy and the observation window) were optimized in order to avoid self-absorption effect in the measured spectra. In the LA-ICP-MS analysis the Ag 107 and Cu 63 isotopes were detected. The capability of these two analytical techniques for high-resolution mapping of selected trace chemical elements was demonstrated.

  2. Structure and Absolute Configuration of Kongiidiazadione, a New Phytotoxic 3-Substituted-5-Diazenylcyclopentendione Produced by Diaporthe Kongii.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Marco; Boari, Angela; Vergura, Stefania; Cimmino, Alessio; Vurro, Maurizio; Ash, Gavin; Superchi, Stefano; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-09-01

    A new 3-substituted-5-diazenylcyclopentendione named kongiidiazadione was isolated from culture filtrates of Diaporthe kongii, associated with stem cankers on sunflower in Australia. Kongiidiazadione was characterized by spectroscopic (essentially nuclear magnetic resonance [NMR] and high-resolution, electrospray ionization, mass spectrometry [HRESIMS]) methods as (-)-5-diazenyl-3-hydroxymethyl-cyclopent-3-en-1,2-dione. The stereochemistry of the diazenyl group was determined by IR spectroscopy, while the (R) absolute configuration at C(5) was assigned by computational analysis of its electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectrum. When assayed on leaf disks of different plant species at 5 mM, the kongiidiazadione had a differential impact, causing clear necrosis, in particular to Helianthus annuus. Moreover, kongiidiazadione proved to have a weak antibacterial activity against gram-positive Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. PMID:26011252

  3. Comparative Cytogenetic Study on the Toxicity of Magnetite and Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles in Sunflower Root Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foca-nici, Ecaterina; Capraru, Gabriela; Creanga, Dorina

    2010-12-01

    In this experimental study the authors present their results regarding the cellular division rate and the percentage of chromosomal aberrations in the root meristematic cells of Helianthus annuus cultivated in the presence of different volume fractions of magnetic nanoparticle suspensions, ranging between 20 and 100 microl/l. The aqueous magnetic colloids were prepared from chemically co-precipitated ferrites coated in sodium oleate. Tissue samples from the root meristeme of 2-3 day old germinated seeds were taken to prepare microscope slides following Squash method combined with Fuelgen techniques. Microscope investigation (cytogenetic tests) has resulted in the evaluation of mitotic index and chromosomal aberration index that appeared diminished and respectively increased following the addition of magnetic nanoparticles in the culture medium of the young seedlings. Zinc ferrite toxic influence appeared to be higher than that of magnetite, according to both cytogenetic parameters.

  4. Plant development in the absence of epiphytic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Koopmann, V.; Grotha, R.

    2002-05-01

    Microorganisms (bacteria, fungi) are common residents of the roots, stems and leaves of higher plants. In order to explore the dependency of plant development on the presence of epiphytic microorganisms, the achenes (seeds) of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were sterilized and germinated under aseptic conditions. The sterility of the seedlings was determined with the agar impression method. In seedlings from non-sterile seeds (control) that were likewise raised in a germ-free environment, all plant organs investigated (stem, cotyledons and primary leaves) were contaminated with bacteria. Hypocotyl elongation was not affected by epiphytic microorganisms. However, the growth rates of the cotyledons and primary leaves were higher in sterile seedlings compared with the control. The implications of this differential inhibition of organ development by epiphytic bacteria that are transmitted via the outer surface of the seed coat are discussed. We conclude that epiphytes in the above-ground phytosphere are not necessary for the development of the sunflower seedling.

  5. Uptake of VOC by sunflower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkers, A.; Miebach, M.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.

    2003-04-01

    To study potential VOC uptake by plants we exposed sunflower (Helianthus annuus) to different VOC in continuously stirred tank reactors. For many VOC like methanol, ethanol, acetone, methylvinylketone, isoprene or limonene no uptake was detectable within the accuracy of our analytic set up. Other VOC like hexanal, octanal, (E)-3-hexenol and nopinone were taken up by sunflower. The uptake was related to stomatal aperture. Obviously, these VOC enter the plants through stomata. In case of hexanal, octanal, and (E)-3-hexenol the uptake was only limited by stomatal aperture implying that these VOC are rapidly metabolised. For nopinone the uptake seems to be limited by a slow metabolization. Estimations of deposition velocities showed that dry deposition of these compounds cannot be neglected as sink if diffusion through stomata is the limiting step for dry deposition. In such cases the lifetime with respect to dry deposiotion is comparable to the lifetime with respect to oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  6. Circumnutation augmented in clinostatted plants by a tactile stimulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    Dark-grown, 4-day old, Helianthus annuus seedlings were rotated for 20 hr on horizontal clinostats to minimize the amplitude of circumnutation. Then a Plexiglas sheet was placed gently against the tip of the cotyledons. By time-lapse video imaging (using intermittent IR illumination to which the plants were insensitive) movements of the clinostatted plants were observed before, during, and after the period of mechanical contact. Immediately after the Plexiglas sheet was removed residual nutation increased in amplitude almost three-fold, then declined over the next 7 hr to the prestimulation level. This demonstration of enhancement of circumnutation by mechanical contact is consistent with the model of an endogeneous oscillator that can be stimulated by factors other than gravity.

  7. Circumnutation Tracker: novel software for investigation of circumnutation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An endogenous, helical plant organ movement named circumnutation is ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. Plant shoots, stems, tendrils, leaves, and roots commonly circumnutate but their appearance is still poorly described. To support such investigations, novel software Circumnutation Tracker (CT) for spatial-temporal analysis of circumnutation has been developed. Results CT works on time-lapse video and collected circumnutation parameters: period, length, rate, shape, angle, and clockwise- and counterclockwise directions. The CT combines a filtering algorithm with a graph-based method to describe the parameters of circumnutation. The parameters of circumnutation of Helianthus annuus hypocotyls and the relationship between cotyledon arrangement and circumnutation geometry are presented here to demonstrate the CT options. Conclusions We have established that CT facilitates and accelerates analysis of circumnutation. In combination with the physiological, molecular, and genetic methods, this software may be a powerful tool also for investigations of gravitropism, biological clock, and membrane transport, i.e. processes involved in the mechanism of circumnutation.

  8. Wall extensibility and gravitropic curvature of sunflower hypocotyls: correlation between timing of curvature and changes in extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagshaw, S. L.; Cleland, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    Gravitropic curvature results from unequal growth rates on the upper and lower sides of horizontal stems. These unequal growth rates could be due to differences in wall extensibility between the two sides. To test this, the time course of curvature of horizontal sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls was determined and compared with the time courses of changes in Instron-measured wall extensibility (PEx) of the upper and lower epidermal layers. As gravicurvature developed, so did the difference in PEx between the upper and lower epidermis. The enhanced growth rate on the lower side during the period of maximum increase in curvature was matched by PEx values greater than those of the vertical control, while the inhibited growth rate on the upper side was accompanied by PEx values below that of the control. The close correlation between changes in growth rates and alterations in PEx demonstrates that changes in wall extensibility play a major role in controlling gravicurvature.

  9. Effects of sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron applications on sunflower yield and plant nutrient concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, B.R.; Zubriski, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Sulfur, zinc, iron, copper, manganese, and boron application did not affect the seed yield or oil percentage of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) on both dryland and irrigated soils in North Dakota in 1981. Field averages indicated significant Zn, Mn, and B uptake by sunflower at the 12-leaf stage as a result of fertilization with these elements. Increased Zn uptake was also observed in the uppermost mature leaf at anthesis from zinc fertilization. Although sunflower yield from boron fertilization was not significantly different from the check, a trend was observed in which boron fertilization seemed to decrease sunflower yield. Sunflower yields from the boron treatment were the lowest out of seven treatments in three out of four fields. Also, sunflower yield from the boron treatment was significantly lower than both iron and sulfur treatments when all fields were combined.

  10. Evaluation of terrestrial plants extracts for uranium sorption and characterization of potent phytoconstituents.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Singh, Bikram; Thulasidas, S K; Kulkarni, Madhuri J; Natarajan, V; Manchanda, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Sorption capacity of four plants (Funaria hygrometrica, Musa acuminata, Brassica juncea and Helianthus annuus) extracts/fractions for uranium, a radionuclide was investigated by EDXRF and tracer studies. The maximum sorption capacity, i.e., 100% (complete sorption) was observed in case of Musa acuminata extract and fractions. Carbohydrate, proteins, phenolics and flavonoids contents in the active fraction (having maximum sorption capacity) were also determined. Further purification of the most active fraction provided three pure molecules, mannitol, sorbitol and oxo-linked potassium oxalate. The characterization of isolated molecules was achieved by using FTIR, NMR, GC-MS, MS-MS, and by single crystal-XRD analysis. Of three molecules, oxo-linked potassium oxalate was observed to have 100% sorption activity. Possible binding mechanism of active molecule with the uranyl cation has been purposed. PMID:25946322

  11. Short-period circumnutations found in sunflower hypocotyls in satellite orbit. A reappraisal of data from Spacelab-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardal, Tom Kr; Johnsson, Anders; Chapman, David K.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    We have further analysed data from an experiment performed in satellite orbit, in Spacelab-1. In micro-gravity the hypocotyls of Helianthus annuus, cv. "Teddy Bear", showed short period circumnutations (periods around 30 minutes) as well as the already reported long period nutations (with an average period of about 115 minutes). We applied various types of signal analysis (Fourier and wavelet analysis) to the data series. The long period circumnutations have a larger amplitude than the short term circumnutations. Both short and long period circumnutations exist in one and the same hypocotyl. (This is in contrast to our ground control experiments, where were found only the long-period nutations.) The period of the nutations changed throughout the experiment. These results are extending the conclusions drawn after the Spacelab experiment (Brown et al. 1990). In particular they emphasize the existence of both short- and long-period circumnutations in micro-gravity.

  12. Copper and cobalt mobility in soil and accumulation in a metallophyte as influenced by experimental manipulation of soil chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bastien; Pourret, Olivier; Meerts, Pierre; Jitaru, Petru; Cancès, Benjamin; Grison, Claude; Faucon, Michel-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    The influence of Fe oxides, Mn oxides and organic matter (OM) on the Cu and Co mobility in soil and accumulation in the metallophyte Anisopappus chinensis (Ac), as compared with Helianthus annuus (Ha), was experimentally investigated. Growth and accumulation response when increasing the exchangeable Cu and Co concentrations in soil were also investigated. Plants were cultivated on soil where concentrations of Cu, Co, Fe oxides, Mn oxides and OM content were varied according to 36 treatments. The OM supply decreased the Cu mobility and increased the Co mobility, resulting in decreasing the foliar Cu of Ac and increasing the foliar Co of Ha. The Fe oxides supply could increase the Cu accumulation for Ac, but was not verified for Ha. Compared with Ha, Ac increasingly accumulated Cu and Co without negative effect on plant growth while increasing Cu and Co mobility to phytotoxic concentrations. The results revealed promising perspectives for the use of Ac in Cu-contaminated environment phytoremediation applications. PMID:26706934

  13. Nutations of sunflower seedlings on tilted clinostats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1977-01-01

    The kinetics of hypocotyl nutations in Helianthus annuus L. were measured on plants which were rotated on clinostats with axes of rotation inclined at various angles, alpha, away from the vertical. The g-force component acting in the direction of the plant axis was taken as g cos alpha. The average period and average amplitude of nutation were constant for all such axially directed g-forces between 1.0 and 0.2 g (vertical to about 80 inclination). On the horizontal clinostat (90 inclination) nutation was neither initiated nor sustained. The g-force just sufficient fully to activate nutational oscillations should be sought for g-force parameter values ranging from 0 to 0.2.

  14. Lipase-mediated conversion of vegetable oils into biodiesel using ethyl acetate as acyl acceptor.

    PubMed

    Modi, Mukesh Kumar; Reddy, J R C; Rao, B V S K; Prasad, R B N

    2007-04-01

    Ethyl acetate was explored as an acyl acceptor for immobilized lipase-catalyzed preparation of biodiesel from the crude oils of Jatropha curcas (jatropha), Pongamia pinnata (karanj) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower). The optimum reaction conditions for interesterification of the oils with ethyl acetate were 10% of Novozym-435 (immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B) based on oil weight, ethyl acetate to oil molar ratio of 11:1 and the reaction period of 12h at 50 degrees C. The maximum yield of ethyl esters was 91.3%, 90% and 92.7% with crude jatropha, karanj and sunflower oils, respectively under the above optimum conditions. Reusability of the lipase over repeated cycles in interesterification and ethanolysis was also investigated under standard reaction conditions. The relative activity of lipase could be well maintained over twelve repeated cycles with ethyl acetate while it reached to zero by 6th cycle when ethanol was used as an acyl acceptor. PMID:16822671

  15. Optical parameters of leaves of seven weed species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gausman, H. W.; Menges, R. M.; Richardson, A. J.; Walter, H.; Rodriguez, R. R.; Tamez, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Absorption coefficient (k), infinite reflectance (R inf.) and scattering coefficient (s) were tabulated for five wavelengths and analyzed for statistical differences for seven weed species. The wavelengths were: 0.55, 0.65, 0.85, 1.65, and 2.20 microns. The R inf. of common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.), johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense L. Pers.), and annual sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L.) leaves at the 0.85 micron wavelength were significantly (p = 0.05) higher than for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), ragweed parthenium (parthenium hysterophorus L.), or London rocket (Sisymbrium irio L.). Annual sowthistle had the largest k value, and Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri S. Wats.) had the smallest k value at the 0.65 micron chlorophyll absorption wavelength. In general, johnsongrass, ragweed parthenium, and London rocket had the largest s values among the five wavelengths, whereas annual sowthistle and Palmer amaranth were usually lowest.

  16. Effect of a mutagenized acyl-ACP thioesterase FATA allele from sunflower with improved activity in tobacco leaves and Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, Antonio Javier; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Vaistij, Fabián E; Salas, Joaquin J; Larson, Tony R; Garcés, Rafael; Graham, Ian A; Martínez-Force, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    The substrate specificity of the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterases significantly determines the type of fatty acids that are exported from plastids. Thus, designing acyl-ACP thioesterases with different substrate specificities or kinetic properties would be of interest for plant lipid biotechnology to produce oils enriched in specialty fatty acids. In the present work, the FatA thioesterase from Helianthus annuus was used to test the impact of changes in the amino acids present in the binding pocket on substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency. Amongst all the mutated enzymes studied, Q215W was especially interesting as it had higher specificity towards saturated acyl-ACP substrates and higher catalytic efficiency compared to wild-type H. annuus FatA. Null, wild type and high-efficiency alleles were transiently expressed in tobacco leaves to check their effect on lipid biosynthesis. Expression of active FatA thioesterases altered the composition of leaf triacylglycerols but did not alter total lipid content. However, the expression of the wild type and the high-efficiency alleles in Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic seeds resulted in a strong reduction in oil content and an increase in total saturated fatty acid content. The role and influence of acyl-ACP thioesterases in plant metabolism and their possible applications in lipid biotechnology are discussed. PMID:24327259

  17. Transpiration and CO/sub 2/ fixation of selected desert shrubs as related to soil-water potential

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, S.B.; Letey, J. Jr.; Lunt, O.R.; Wallace, A.; Kleinkopf, G.E.; Romney, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    In desert plants, transpiration rates decreased before photosynthetic rates when plants were entering a period of water stress. This may have adaptive consequences. A difference of -5 bars in the soil-moisture potential had considerable importance in reducing the rate of transpiration. In Helianthus annuus L. (sunflower) the photosynthetic rate decreased before the transpiration rate in contrast to Great Basin-Mojave Desert plants, and the changes occurred with a -1 bar difference in soil-moisture potential. Morphological changes in three desert plant species (Artemisia tridentata Nutt., Ambrosia dumosa (Gray) Payne, Larrea tridentata (Ses. Moc. ex DC) Cov.) as the soil-moisture potential decreased are given. With a mesic species, H. annuus, 20% reduction in photosynthesis and transpiration was reached at higher soil-moisture potentials than with the desert plants. Loss of net photosynthesis occurred in A. dumosa (a summer deciduous shrub) as PSI soil reached -48 bars in the field, whereas L. tridentata (an evergreen shrub) at the same time was able to maintain a water potential difference between soil and plant of -10 to -15 bars and continue net CO/sub 2/ gain well into the summer months.

  18. Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1

    PubMed Central

    Hacke, Uwe G.; Stiller, Volker; Sperry, John S.; Pittermann, Jarmila; McCulloh, Katherine A.

    2001-01-01

    Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance of xylem. Stem or petiole segments were tested for cavitation resistance before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling cycle. Cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air drying of shoots, or soil drought. Except for droughted plants, material was not significantly water stressed prior to collection. Cavitation resistance was determined from “vulnerability curves” showing the percentage loss of conductivity versus xylem pressure. Two responses were observed. “Resilient” xylem (Acer negundo and Alnus incana stems) showed no change in cavitation resistance after a cavitation-refilling cycle. In contrast, “weakened” xylem (Populus angustifolia, P. tremuloides, Helianthus annuus stems, and Aesculus hippocastanum petioles) showed considerable reduction in cavitation resistance. Weakening was observed whether cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air dehydration, or soil drought. Observations from H. annuus showed that weakening was proportional to the embolism induced by stress. Air injection experiments indicated that the weakened response was a result of an increase in the leakiness of the vascular system to air seeding. The increased air permeability in weakened xylem could result from rupture or loosening of the cellulosic mesh of interconduit pit membranes during the water stress and cavitation treatment. PMID:11161035

  19. Microbially assisted phytoremediation approaches for two multi-element contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Langella, Francesca; Grawunder, Anja; Stark, Romy; Weist, Aileen; Merten, Dirk; Haferburg, Götz; Büchel, Georg; Kothe, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is an environmental friendly, cost-effective technology for a soft restoration of abandoned mine sites. The grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra, and the annual herb Helianthus annuus were combined with microbial consortia in pot experiments on multi-metal polluted substrates collected at a former uranium mine near Ronneburg, Germany, and a historic copper mine in Kopparberg, Sweden, to test for phytoextraction versus phytostabilization abilities. Metal uptake into plant biomass was evaluated to identify optimal plant-microbe combinations for each substrate. Metal bioavailability was found to be plant species and element specific, and influenced by the applied bacterial consortia of 10 strains, each isolated from the same soil to which it was applied. H. annuus showed high extraction capacity for several metals on the German soil independent of inoculation. Our study could also show a significant enhancement of extraction for F. rubra and A. capillaris when combined with the bacterial consortium, although usually grasses are considered metal excluder species. On the Swedish mixed substrate, due to its toxicity, with 30 % bark compost, A. capillaris inoculated with the respective consortium was able to extract multi-metal contaminants. PMID:24081921

  20. Characterization of metal-resistant plant-growth promoting Bacillus weihenstephanensis isolated from serpentine soil in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Mani; Ma, Ying; Freitas, Helena

    2008-12-01

    A metal-resistant bacterial strain SM3 isolated from a serpentine soil in the north-east of Portugal was characterized as Bacillus weihenstephanensis based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics and on the comparative analysis of the partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequence. Bacillus weihenstephanensis SM3 showed a high degree of resistance to nickel (1500 mg l(-1)), copper (500 mg l(-1)) and zinc (700 mg l(-1)) and also to antibiotics (ampicillin, penicillin, kanamycin and streptomycin). Strain SM3 has also exhibited the capability of solubilizing phosphate and producing indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) both in the absence and in the presence of metals (Ni, Cu and Zn). A pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of strain SM3 on plant growth and uptake of Ni, Cu or Zn by Helianthus annuus. Inoculation with strain SM3 increased the shoot and root biomass of H. annuus grown in both non-contaminated and contaminated soil. Furthermore, strain SM3 increased the accumulation of Cu and Zn in the root and shoot systems. A batch experiment was also conducted to assess the metal mobilization potential of strain SM3 in soil. Inoculation with this strain increased the concentrations of water soluble Ni, Cu and Zn in soil. Metal solubilization by this bacterial strain may be an important process to promote the uptake of heavy metals by plants. This study elucidates the multifarious role of strain SM3 in plant growth promotion and its metal mobilizing potential. PMID:18785659

  1. Reappraisal of the genus Alternariaster (Dothideomycetes).

    PubMed

    Alves, J L; Woudenberg, J H C; Duarte, L L; Crous, P W; Barreto, R W

    2013-12-01

    Alternariaster was erected in 2007 to accommodate Alternaria helianthi, a fungal species known to cause leaf spots on Helianthus annuus (sunflower). It was segregated from Alternaria based on conidial morphology. Recently an unknown alternaria-like dematiaceous fungus was found associated with leaf spots on Bidens sulphurea (yellow cosmos) in Brazil. Based on a multi-gene phylogeny of parts of the ITS and LSU genes, this fungus was placed within the Leptosphaeriaceae with Alternariaster helianthi as its closest neighbour. Additional genes sequenced, RPB2 and GAPDH, confirmed this close relationship. The fungus on B. sulphurea has smaller conidia, 50-97.5 × 12.5-20 μm, compared to Al. helianthi, 80-160 × 18-30 μm, and lacks oblique or transverse septa which can be present in Al. helianthi. Pathogenicity studies on 18 plant species belonging to the Compositae showed that the B. sulphurea fungus only infected B. sulphurea, whereas Al. helianthi infected H. annuus and Galinsoga quadriradiata, a yet unreported host of Al. helianthi. The fungus causing disease on B. sulphurea is hence closely related but phylogenetically, morphologically and pathologically distinct from Al. helianthi, and therefore newly described as Alternariaster bidentis. The collection of a second species in the genus Alternariaster and the multigene phylogenetic analysis of these two species, confirmed Alternariaster to be a well-delimited genus in the Leptosphaeriaceae rather than the Pleosporaceae, to which Alternaria belongs. PMID:24761036

  2. QTL mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Kenneth D.; Broman, Karl W.; Kane, Nolan C.; Hovick, Stephen M.; Randell, Rebecca A.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2014-01-01

    The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H. annuus to form the natural hybrid lineage H. a. texanus. Two 500-individual BC1 mapping populations were grown in central Texas, genotyped for 384 SNP markers, and then phenotyped in the field for two fitness and 22 herbivore resistance, ecophysiological, phenological, and architectural traits. We identified a total of 110 QTL, including at least one QTL for 22 of the 24 traits. Over 75% of traits exhibited at least one H. debilis QTL allele that would shift the trait in the direction of the wild hybrid H. a. texanus. We identified three chromosomal regions where H. debilis alleles increased both female and male components of fitness; these regions are expected to be strongly favored in the wild. QTL for a number of other ecophysiological, phenological, and architectural traits co-localized with these three regions and are candidates for the actual traits driving adaptive shifts. G × E interactions played a modest role, with 17% of the QTL showing potentially divergent phenotypic effects between the two field sites. The candidate adaptive chromosomal regions identified here serve as explicit hypotheses for how the genetic architecture of the hybrid lineage came into existence. PMID:25522096

  3. Quantitative trait locus mapping identifies candidate alleles involved in adaptive introgression and range expansion in a wild sunflower.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Kenneth D; Broman, Karl W; Kane, Nolan C; Hovick, Stephen M; Randell, Rebecca A; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-05-01

    The wild North American sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. debilis are participants in one of the earliest identified examples of adaptive trait introgression, and the exchange is hypothesized to have triggered a range expansion in H. annuus. However, the genetic basis of the adaptive exchange has not been examined. Here, we combine quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with field measurements of fitness to identify candidate H. debilis QTL alleles likely to have introgressed into H. annuus to form the natural hybrid lineage H. a. texanus. Two 500-individual BC1 mapping populations were grown in central Texas, genotyped for 384 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and then phenotyped in the field for two fitness and 22 herbivore resistance, ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits. We identified a total of 110 QTL, including at least one QTL for 22 of the 24 traits. Over 75% of traits exhibited at least one H. debilis QTL allele that would shift the trait in the direction of the wild hybrid H. a. texanus. We identified three chromosomal regions where H. debilis alleles increased both female and male components of fitness; these regions are expected to be strongly favoured in the wild. QTL for a number of other ecophysiological, phenological and architectural traits colocalized with these three regions and are candidates for the actual traits driving adaptive shifts. G × E interactions played a modest role, with 17% of the QTL showing potentially divergent phenotypic effects between the two field sites. The candidate adaptive chromosomal regions identified here serve as explicit hypotheses for how the genetic architecture of the hybrid lineage came into existence. PMID:25522096

  4. Genome-scale transcriptional analyses of first-generation interspecific sunflower hybrids reveals broad regulatory compatibility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interspecific hybridization creates individuals harboring diverged genomes. The interaction of these genomes can generate successful evolutionary novelty or disadvantageous genomic conflict. Annual sunflowers Helianthus annuus and H. petiolaris have a rich history of hybridization in natural populations. Although first-generation hybrids generally have low fertility, hybrid swarms that include later generation and fully fertile backcross plants have been identified, as well as at least three independently-originated stable hybrid taxa. We examine patterns of transcript accumulation in the earliest stages of hybridization of these species via analyses of transcriptome sequences from laboratory-derived F1 offspring of an inbred H. annuus cultivar and a wild H. petiolaris accession. Results While nearly 14% of the reference transcriptome showed significant accumulation differences between parental accessions, total F1 transcript levels showed little evidence of dominance, as midparent transcript levels were highly predictive of transcript accumulation in F1 plants. Allelic bias in F1 transcript accumulation was detected in 20% of transcripts containing sufficient polymorphism to distinguish parental alleles; however the magnitude of these biases were generally smaller than differences among parental accessions. Conclusions While analyses of allelic bias suggest that cis regulatory differences between H. annuus and H. petiolaris are common, their effect on transcript levels may be more subtle than trans-acting regulatory differences. Overall, these analyses found little evidence of regulatory incompatibility or dominance interactions between parental genomes within F1 hybrid individuals, although it is unclear whether this is a legacy or an enabler of introgression between species. PMID:23701699

  5. Effects of humic acid on phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil simultaneously contaminated with heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Park, Soyoung; Kim, Ki Seob; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Kang, Daeseok; Sung, Kijune

    2011-01-01

    The use of humic acid (HA) to enhance the efficiency of phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel was evaluated in this study. A sample of soil was artificially contaminated with commercially available diesel fuel to an initial total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) concentration of 2300 mg/kg and four heavy metals with concentrations of 400 mg/kg for Pb, 200 mg/kg for Cu, 12 mg/kg for Cd, and 160 mg/kg for Ni. Three plant species, Brassica campestris, Festuca arundinacea, and Helianthus annuus, were selected for the phytodegradation experiment. Percentage degradation of TPH in the soil in a control pot supplemented with HA increased to 45% from 30% without HA. The addition of HA resulted in an increases in the removal of TPH from the soil in pots planted with B. campestris, E arundinacea, and H. annuus, enhancing percentage degradation to 86%, 64%, and 85% from 45%, 54%, and 66%, respectively. The effect of HA was also observed in the degradation of n-alkanes within 30 days. The rates of removal of n-alkanes in soil planted with B. campestris and H. annuus were high for n-alkanes in the range of C11-C28. A dynamic increase in dehydrogenase activity was observed during the last 15 days of a 30-day experimental period in all the pots amended with HA. The enhanced biodegradation performance for TPHs observed might be due to an increase in microbial activities and bioavailable TPH in soils caused by combined effects of plants and HA. The results suggested that HA could act as an enhancing agent for phytodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil contaminated with diesel fuel and heavy metals. PMID:22432335

  6. Identification and mapping of SNPs from ESTs in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, K.; Zou, Y.; Church, S. A.; Knapp, S. J.; Andrews, J.; Rieseberg, L. H.

    2008-01-01

    More than 67,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) have recently been generated for sunflower (Helianthus), including 44,000 from cultivated confectionery (RHA280) and oilseed (RHA801) lines of Helianthus annuus and 23,000 from droughtand salt-tolerant wild sunflowers, H. argophyllus and H. paradoxus, respectively. To create a transcript map for sunflower, we identified 605 ESTs that displayed small insertion–deletion polymorphism (SNP) variation in silico, had apparent tissue-specific expression patterns, and/or were ESTs with candidate functions in traits such as development, cell transport, metabolism, plant defense, and tolerance to abiotic stress. Primer pairs for 535 of the loci were designed from the ESTs and screened for polymorphism in recombinant inbred lines derived from a cross between the same cultivars (RHA280 × RHA801) employed for sequencing. In total, 273 of the loci amplified polymorphic products, of which 243 mapped to the 17 linkage groups previously identified for sunflower. Comparisons with previously mapped QTL revealed some cases where ESTs with putatively related functions mapped near QTLs identified in other crosses for salt tolerance and for domestication traits such as stem diameter, shattering, flowering time, and achene size. PMID:16205907

  7. Genomics of homoploid hybrid speciation: diversity and transcriptional activity of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in hybrid sunflowers

    PubMed Central

    Renaut, Sebastien; Rowe, Heather C.; Ungerer, Mark C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization is thought to play an important role in plant evolution by introducing novel genetic combinations and promoting genome restructuring. However, surprisingly little is known about the impact of hybridization on transposable element (TE) proliferation and the genomic response to TE activity. In this paper, we first review the mechanisms by which homoploid hybrid species may arise in nature. We then present hybrid sunflowers as a case study to examine transcriptional activity of long terminal repeat retrotransposons in the annual sunflowers Helianthus annuus, Helianthus petiolaris and their homoploid hybrid derivatives (H. paradoxus, H. anomalus and H. deserticola) using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing technologies (RNAseq). Sampling homoploid hybrid sunflower taxa revealed abundant variation in TE transcript accumulation. In addition, genetic diversity for several candidate genes hypothesized to regulate TE activity was characterized. Specifically, we highlight one candidate chromatin remodelling factor gene with a direct role in repressing TE activity in a hybrid species. This paper shows that TE amplification in hybrid lineages is more idiosyncratic than previously believed and provides a first step towards identifying the mechanisms responsible for regulating and repressing TE expansions. PMID:24958919

  8. Analysis of leaf wetness duration dynamics on a sunflower ( Heliantus annuus L.) canopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Marta, A.; Orlandini, S.

    Leaf wetness duration (LWD) is an important agrometeorological variable, responsible for the development of many plant pests and diseases. Despite its importance, LWD is a variable which is difficult to measure since numerous sensor types exist, made in different materials and based on different principles, and its measurement procedure is not described in an official or unequivocal protocol. For this reason it is necessary to understand and firmly establish the dynamics of dew condensation and evaporation and the relations between leaf wetness and the agrometeorological variables that affect and cause this phenomenon. Comprehension of these dynamics will allow for overcoming the problems linked to the lack of a standard protocol for the use of sensors, with opportunity of setting up a model capable of determining leaf wetness duration based on the available agrometeorological and crop variables. The results of the research have demonstrated that there is a recognizable relationship between agrometeorological variables and their influence is statistically significant. Nevertheless, the relations found were not sufficient for enabling a precise determination of LWD. Moreover, the comparison between field measurements and visual inspections demonstrated that sensors tended to overestimate the number of wetness hours in comparison to the real data. These results revealed that LWD is a very critical variable and its variability is not easy to describe in detail.

  9. Variation in Fitness of the Longhorned Beetle, Dectes texanus, as a Function of Host Plant

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, J.P.; Grant, Angela K.

    2010-01-01

    Dectes texanus LeConte (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) has become a serious pest of two different crops in the American Midwest, sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. and soybean, Glycines max (L.). Laboratory and field studies were used to compare the effects of these two host plants on D. texanus life history and behavior. Insects from soybean were 40–60% smaller than those from sunflower and larval weight at collection was strongly correlated with survival to adulthood, whereas it was not in sunflower, suggesting that body size was more limiting to immature survival in soybean. Pupal weights increased more rapidly with increasing stem diameter in soybean than in sunflower and the correlation was stronger, indicating that body size was more limited by plant size in soybean. Adults collected as larvae from soybean had shorter longevities when starved, fed soybean, or fed an alternating diet of soybean and cultivated sunflower, than did those collected from sunflower, suggesting a negative larval legacy of soybean on adult fitness. Adult beetles that developed in soybean lived longer when fed soybean than when starved, but an adult diet of sunflower doubled longevity compared to soybean for beetles that developed in sunflower, and tripled it for those that developed in soybean. An adult diet of wild H. annuus yielded survivorship equivalent to cultivated H. annuus in one trial, and slightly lower in another. Larval host plant did not influence the numbers of ovipunctures or eggs laid by females in field trials, but adult diet did. Sunflower-fed females punctured more, and laid more eggs, on sunflowers than on soybeans in field cages and the reverse trend was evident, but not significant, in soybean-fed females. It can be concluded that H. annuus is a superior food source to G. max for both larval and adult D. texanus, and that wild sunflowers may represent a valuable food for adults during the pre-reproductive period, prior to invasion of soybean fields, even though they

  10. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus) using Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown in the extract derived from the tubers of Jeusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (EST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35/sup 0/C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated haveing a ..mu../sub max/ = 0.41 h/sup -1/ and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y/sub p///sub = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y/sub x///sub s/ = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with K. marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr /sup -1/ to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The SCP yields for K. marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell acre/sup -1/ yr/sup -1/. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed.

  11. Ethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus). Using Kluyveromyces marxcianus and Saccharomyces rosei

    SciTech Connect

    Margaritis, A.; Bajpai, P.

    1982-04-01

    This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown on the extract derived from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35 degrees C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated having a mu max = 0.41/h and the ethanol and biomass yields were determined to be Y p/s = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y x/s = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with Kluyveromyces marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol/acre/yr to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol/acre/yr. The SCP yields for Kluyveromyces marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell/acre/yr. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed. (Refs. 27).

  12. Preparation of Inulin Powder from Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) Tuber.

    PubMed

    Srinameb, Bang-orn; Nuchadomrong, Suporn; Jogloy, Sanun; Patanothai, Aran; Srijaranai, Supalax

    2015-06-01

    The complete procedure for the production of inulin powder from Jerusalem artichoke tubers (JAT) was investigated. The procedure consists of isolation of inulin from JAT, elimination of color from the inulin extract and solidification. Washed tubers were first sliced, dried in a 60 °C oven for 10 h and then milled and sieved into a powder. Inulin was isolated from the JAT powder by hot water extraction using an accelerated solvent extractor (ASE). The effects of temperature and time for the extraction were investigated. The highest extraction efficiency was obtained at the extraction temperature of 80 °C for 20 min. The color of the extract was eliminated using ion exchange process with diethylaminoethyl cellulose as the sorbent. The inulin powder was subsequently obtained by freeze drying. Inulin content and inulin profiles were monitored to evaluate the efficiencies of the complete procedure. The inulin content was indirectly determined by spectrophotometry from free and total fructose measurements using potassium iodide. The inulin profile was monitored using high performance anion exchange chromatography equipped with integrated pulse amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD). The proposed method provided the inulin production yield of 92.5%. The present procedure is fast, simple and effective for production of inulin powder from JAT. In addition, infrared spectra and some physico-chemical properties of the obtained inulin powder were determined and compared with the standard inulin. PMID:25804251

  13. Unconventional amino acid sequence of the sun anemone (Stoichactis helianthus) polypeptide neurotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Kem, W.; Dunn, B.; Parten, B.; Pennington, M.; Price, D.

    1986-05-01

    A 5000 dalton polypeptide neurotoxin (Sh-NI) purified by G50 Sephadex, P-cellulose, and SP-Sephadex chromatography was homogeneous by isoelectric focusing. Sh-NI was highly toxic to crayfish (LD/sub 50/ 0.6 ..mu..g/kg) but without effect upon mice at 15,000 ..mu..g/kg (i.p. injection). The reduced, /sup 3/H-carboxymethylated toxin and its fragments were subjected to automatic Edman degradation and the resulting PTH-amino acids were identified by HPLC, back hydrolysis, and scintillation counting. Peptides resulting from proteolytic (clostripain, staphylococcal protease) and chemical (tryptophan) cleavage were sequenced. The sequence is: AACKCDDEGPDIRTAPLTGTVDLGSCNAGWEKCASYYTIIADCCRKKK. This sequence differs considerably from the homologous Anemonia and Anthopleura toxins; many of the identical residues (6 half-cystines, G9, P10, R13, G19, G29, W30) are probably critical for folding rather than receptor recognition. However, the Sh-NI sequence closely resembles Radioanthus macrodactylus neurotoxin III and r. paumotensis II. The authors propose that Sh-NI and related Radioanthus toxins act upon a different site on the sodium channel.

  14. Genetic diversity of water use efficiency in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity in crop germplasm is an important resource for crop improvement, but information on genetic diversity is rare for Jerusalem artichoke, especially for traits related to water use efficiency. The objectives of this study were to investigate genetic variations for water use and water...

  15. Influence of planting date and temperature on inulin content in Jerusalem Artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower temperatures during the dry season in tropical regions might affect inulin content and inulin yield of Jerusalem artichoke. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of planting dates during low temperature on inulin yield and content of Jerusalem artichoke. Two pot experiments...

  16. Relationship between chlorophyll density and SPAD chlorophyll meter reading for Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chlorophyll is an indicator of crop health and productivity. Measuring chlorophyll is usually done directly and requires significant time and resources. Indirect measurement of chlorophyll density using a handheld portable chlorophyll meter can reduce time. However, this information is very limit...

  17. Temperature and the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Francis, D; Barlow, P W

    1988-01-01

    During the period between successive divisions, a cell traverses three stages of interphase: G1 (pre-synthetic interphase), S-phase (DNA synthetic interphase) and G2 (post-synthetic interphase). The time taken for all cells in a meristem to divide (the cell doubling time (cdt] decreases in response to an increase in temperature. For example, the cdt in root meristems of Zea mays decreases 21-fold as the temperature is increased from 3 to 25 degrees C. Whether all phases of the cell cycle alter proportionately with temperature has been ascertained by comparing data from the root meristem of five species: Pisum sativum, Helianthus annuus, Tradescantia paludosa, Allium cepa and Triticum aestivum. In three of the five species there is a disproportionate lengthening of the G1 phase at low temperatures. We suggest that arrest in G1 with the associated 2C amount of DNA, confers maximal protection on the genome of a somatic cell to the stress of low temperature. DNA replication has been studied at different temperatures for Helianthus annuus, Secale cereal and Oryza sativa. The rate of DNA replication, per single replication fork, increases when the temperature is raised, while the distance between initiation points (replicon size) remains constant. The temperature at which the cell cycle has a minimum duration is close to 30 degrees C in many species, and it seems that this optimum temperature is always near the upper temperature limit of the cell cycle. The rate of cell division determines the rates of organ and cell growth. Thus, temperature has a major effect on the way in which meristematic cells are deployed in organogenesis. The rate of organogenesis, in turn, determines the response of the plant to the growing season. We predict that species growing in sub-arctic conditions comprise cells with low DNA contents and hence have the potentialities for rapid cell cycles so that maximum advantage can be taken of a short growing season. Data from Triticum aestivum show

  18. Plant growth promotion by inoculation with selected bacterial strains versus mineral soil supplements.

    PubMed

    Wernitznig, S; Adlassnig, W; Sprocati, A R; Turnau, K; Neagoe, A; Alisi, C; Sassmann, S; Nicoara, A; Pinto, V; Cremisini, C; Lichtscheidl, I

    2014-01-01

    In the process of remediation of mine sites, the establishment of a vegetation cover is one of the most important tasks. This study tests two different approaches to manipulate soil properties in order to facilitate plant growth. Mine waste from Ingurtosu, Sardinia, Italy rich in silt, clay, and heavy metals like Cd, Cu, and Zn was used in a series of greenhouse experiments. Bacteria with putative beneficial properties for plant growth were isolated from this substrate, propagated and consortia of ten strains were used to inoculate the substrate. Alternatively, sand and volcanic clay were added. On these treated and untreated soils, seeds of Helianthus annuus, of the native Euphorbia pithyusa, and of the grasses Agrostis capillaris, Deschampsia flexuosa and Festuca rubra were germinated, and the growth of the seedlings was monitored. The added bacteria established well under all experimental conditions and reduced the extractability of most metals. In association with H. annuus, E. pithyusa and D. flexuosa bacteria improved microbial activity and functional diversity of the original soil. Their effect on plant growth, however, was ambiguous and usually negative. The addition of sand and volcanic clay, on the other hand, had a positive effect on all plant species except E. pithyusa. Especially the grasses experienced a significant benefit. The effects of a double treatment with both bacteria and sand and volcanic clay were rather negative. It is concluded that the addition of mechanical support has great potential to boost revegetation of mining sites though it is comparatively expensive. The possibilities offered by the inoculation of bacteria, on the other hand, appear rather limited. PMID:23990253

  19. BSTA: a targeted approach combines bulked segregant analysis with next- generation sequencing and de novo transcriptome assembly for SNP discovery in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sunflower belongs to the largest plant family on earth, the genomically poorly explored Compositae. Downy mildew Plasmopara halstedii (Farlow) Berlese & de Toni is one of the major diseases of cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). In the search for new sources of downy mildew resistance, the locus PlARG on linkage group 1 (LG1) originating from H. argophyllus is promising since it confers resistance against all known races of the pathogen. However, the mapping resolution in the PlARG region is hampered by significantly suppressed recombination and by limited availability of polymorphic markers. Here we examined a strategy developed for the enrichment of molecular markers linked to this specific genomic region. We combined bulked segregant analysis (BSA) with next-generation sequencing (NGS) and de novo assembly of the sunflower transcriptome for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discovery in a sequence resource combining reads originating from two sunflower species, H. annuus and H. argophyllus. Results A computational pipeline developed for SNP calling and pattern detection identified 219 candidate genes. For a proof of concept, 42 resistance gene-like sequences were subjected to experimental SNP validation. Using a high-resolution mapping population, 12 SNP markers were mapped to LG1. We successfully verified candidate sequences either co-segregating with or closely flanking PlARG. Conclusions This study is the first successful example to improve bulked segregant analysis with de novo transcriptome assembly using next generation sequencing. The BSTA pipeline we developed provides a useful guide for similar studies in other non-model organisms. Our results demonstrate this method is an efficient way to enrich molecular markers and to identify candidate genes in a specific mapping interval. PMID:24330545

  20. Influence of copper on root exudate patterns in some metallophytes and agricultural plants.

    PubMed

    Meier, S; Alvear, M; Borie, F; Aguilera, P; Ginocchio, R; Cornejo, P

    2012-01-01

    A hydroponic experiment was carried out to determine the root exudation patterns in two Cu-metallophytes (Oenothera picensis and Imperata condensata) and two agricultural plants (Lupinus albus and Helianthus annuus). Plants were grown in nutrient solution at increasing Cu doses (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 and 2mgCuL(-1)), and plant growth, root elongation, Cu accumulation and root exudates were measured. All plants showed a decrease of over 60% in root elongation at the highest Cu supply level, being O. picensis the most sensitive specie and showing the highest shoot and root Cu concentrations (116 and 2657μgCug(-1), respectively), which were six fold higher than the other species. Differences in root exudation patterns of low molecular weight organic acids were found, with extremely high amounts of succinic acid exuded by O. picensis (1049μmolg(-1)h(-1)), and citric acid by I. condensata (164μmolg(-1)h(-1)). In metallophytes, the organic acid exudation was increased even with no root elongation, meanwhile agricultural plants exuded citric acid at constant levels. Exudation of phenolic compounds was highly species-dependent, with catechin mainly exuded by I. condensata, (2.62μmolg(-1)h(-1)) cinnamic acid by O. picensis (5.08μmolg(-1)h(-1)) and coumaric acid exclusively exuded by H. annuus (13.6μmolg(-1)h(-1)) at high Cu levels. These results indicated that differences in root exudation patterns among metallophytes and agricultural plants could affect their Cu tolerance. Particularly, the higher exudation rate showed by I. condensata can be an effective exclusion mechanism to tolerate high Cu concentrations, supporting its use in Cu phytostabilization programs. PMID:21937112

  1. Low temperature acclimation of photosynthetic capacity and leaf morphology in the context of phloem loading type.

    PubMed

    Dumlao, Matthew R; Darehshouri, Anza; Cohu, Christopher M; Muller, Onno; Mathias, Jennifer; Adams, William W; Demmig-Adams, Barbara

    2012-09-01

    Carbon export from leaf mesophyll to sugar-transporting phloem occurs via either an apoplastic (across the cell membrane) or symplastic (through plasmodesmatal cell wall openings) pathway. Herbaceous apoplastic loaders generally exhibit an up-regulation of photosynthetic capacity in response to growth at lower temperature. However, acclimation of photosynthesis to temperature by symplastically loading species, whose geographic distribution is particularly strong in tropical and subtropical areas, has not been characterized. Photosynthetic and leaf anatomical acclimation to lower temperature was explored in two symplastic (Verbascum phoeniceum, Cucurbita pepo) and two apoplastic (Helianthus annuus, Spinacia oleracea) loaders, representing summer- and winter-active life histories for each loading type. Regardless of phloem loading type, the two summer-active species, C. pepo and H. annuus, exhibited neither foliar anatomical nor photosynthetic acclimation when grown under low temperature compared to moderate temperature. In contrast, and again irrespective of phloem loading type, the two winter-active mesophytes, V. phoeniceum and S. oleracea, exhibited both a greater number of palisade cell layers (and thus thicker leaves) and significantly higher maximal capacities of photosynthetic electron transport, as well as, in the case of V. phoeniceum, a greater foliar vein density in response to cool temperatures compared to growth at moderate temperature. It is therefore noteworthy that symplastic phloem loading per se does not prevent acclimation of intrinsic photosynthetic capacity to cooler growth temperatures. Given the vagaries of weather and climate, understanding the basis of plant acclimation to, and tolerance of, low temperature is critical to maintaining and increasing plant productivity for food, fuel, and fiber to meet the growing demands of a burgeoning human population. PMID:22791016

  2. C3 versus C4 cavitation resistance and embolism repair under different levels of soil moisture availability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparison of maize and sunflower (Helianthus) under deficit irrigation indicates that maize has more conservative water use with lower maximum hydraulic conductance than Helianthus. We observe that maize under deficit irrigation dramatically reduces transpiration while Helianthus maintains high wat...

  3. The Population Genomics of Sunflowers and Genomic Determinants of Protein Evolution Revealed by RNAseq

    PubMed Central

    Renaut, Sébastien; Grassa, Christopher J.; Moyers, Brook T.; Kane, Nolan C.; Rieseberg, Loren H.

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the causes of evolutionary rate variation among plant nuclear genes, especially in recently diverged species still capable of hybridizing in the wild. The recent advent of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) permits investigation of genome wide rates of protein evolution and the role of selection in generating and maintaining divergence. Here, we use individual whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNAseq) to refine our understanding of the population genomics of wild species of sunflowers (Helianthus spp.) and the factors that affect rates of protein evolution. We aligned 35 GB of transcriptome sequencing data and identified 433,257 polymorphic sites (SNPs) in a reference transcriptome comprising 16,312 genes. Using SNP markers, we identified strong population clustering largely corresponding to the three species analyzed here (Helianthus annuus, H. petiolaris, H. debilis), with one distinct early generation hybrid. Then, we calculated the proportions of adaptive substitution fixed by selection (alpha) and identified gene ontology categories with elevated values of alpha. The “response to biotic stimulus” category had the highest mean alpha across the three interspecific comparisons, implying that natural selection imposed by other organisms plays an important role in driving protein evolution in wild sunflowers. Finally, we examined the relationship between protein evolution (dN/dS ratio) and several genomic factors predicted to co-vary with protein evolution (gene expression level, divergence and specificity, genetic divergence [FST], and nucleotide diversity pi). We find that variation in rates of protein divergence was correlated with gene expression level and specificity, consistent with results from a broad range of taxa and timescales. This would in turn imply that these factors govern protein evolution both at a microevolutionary and macroevolutionary timescale. Our results contribute to a general understanding of the determinants

  4. Phytoextraction and phytostabilisation of metal-contaminated soil in temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmavathiamma, P. K.; Li, L. Y.

    2009-04-01

    This research addressed the phytoremediation of roadside soils subjected to multi-component metal solutions. A typical right of way for roads in Canada is around 30 m, and at least 33% of that land in the right of way is unpaved and can support animal life. Thus, land associated with 12,000 km of roads in the province of British Columbia and millions of kilometres around the world represent a substantial quantity of wildlife habitat where metal contamination needs to be remediated. Phytostabilisation, requires least maintenance among different phytoremediation techniques, and it could be a feasible and practical method of remediating in roadside soils along highways and for improving highway runoff drainage. The suitability of five plant species was studied for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation in a region with temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada. Pot experiments were conducted using Lolium perenne L (perennial rye grass), Festuca rubra L (creeping red fescue), Helianthus annuus L (sunflower), Poa pratensis L (Kentucky bluegrass) and Brassica napus L (rape) in soils treated with three different metal (Cu, Pb, Mn and Zn) concentrations. The bio-metric characters of plants in soils with multiple-metal contaminations, their metal accumulation characteristics, translocation properties and metal removal were assessed at different stages of plant growth, 90 and 120 DAS (days after sowing). Lolium was found to be suitable for the phytostabilisation of Cu and Pb, Festuca for Mn and Poa for Zn. Metal removal was higher at 120 than at 90 days after sowing, and metals concentrated more in the underground tissues with less translocation to the above-ground parts. Bioconcentration factors indicate that Festuca had the highest accumulation for Cu, Helianthus for Pb and Zn and Poa for Mn.

  5. Characterization of a Plasmopara species on Ambrosia artemisiifolia, and notes on P. halstedii, based on morphology and multiple gene phylogenies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Kiss, Levente; Vajna, László; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2009-10-01

    Common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) is an invasive and highly allergenic plant species, on which two species, Plasmopara halstedii and Plasmopara angustiterminalis, have been recognized to cause downy mildew disease. In this study, morphological and molecular patterns of seven Plasmopara specimens collected from A. artemisiifolia in Canada, Hungary, and USA were compared with those of P. halstedii and P. angustiterminalis from Helianthus and Xanthium, respectively. Analyses of partial sequences of three genes, namely those for the large subunit (28S) of rDNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (COX2), and NADH dehydrogenase subunit I (ND1) of mtDNA, were carried out to examine the phylogenetic relationships among these specimens using both Bayesian and maximum parsimony methods. All the phylogenetic analyses revealed that the downy mildew pathogens infecting A. artemisiifolia in Hungary and North America clearly represent a lineage distinct from other Plasmopara taxa investigated. The shape of sporangia and the width of trunks and branches also allowed the separation of the specimens parasitic to A. artemisiifolia from P. halstedii on Helianthus annuus and P. angustiterminalis on Xanthium strumarium. Surprisingly, the Hungarian and the Canadian specimens were more closely related to each other than to those from the USA based on COX2 and ND1 mtDNA data, although the D1/D2/D3 sequences of 28S rDNA were identical in all these Plasmopara specimens. The regional distribution of the mtDNA haplotypes seen in this study suggests a transatlantic migration has occurred and would be interesting to follow up with a more detailed sampling. To investigate the diversity within P. halstedii sensu lato, infecting different host plant species, specimens from six asteraceous genera, Ambrosia, Flaveria, Helianthus, Siegesbeckia, Solidago, and Xanthium, were also included in molecular analyses. These represented six distinct lineages according to the host plant genera. These

  6. Dermocosmetics for dry skin: a new role for botanical extracts.

    PubMed

    Casetti, F; Wölfle, U; Gehring, W; Schempp, C M

    2011-01-01

    Dry skin is associated with a disturbed skin barrier and reduced formation of epidermal proteins and lipids. During recent years, skin-barrier-reinforcing properties of some botanical compounds have been described. Searching the PubMed database revealed 9 botanical extracts that specifically improve skin barrier and/or promote keratinocyte differentiation in vivo after topical application. The topical application of Aloe vera (leaf gel), Betula alba (birch bark extract), Helianthus annuus (sunflower oleodistillate), Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort extract), Lithospermum erythrorhizon (root extract), Piptadenia colubrina (angico-branco extract) and Simarouba amara (bitter wood extract) increased skin hydration, reduced the transepidermal water loss, or promoted keratinocyte differentiation in humans in vivo. The topical application of Rubia cordifolia root extract and rose oil obtained from Rosa spp. flowers stimulated keratinocyte differentiation in mouse models. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are discussed. It is concluded that some botanical compounds display skin-barrier-reinforcing properties that may be used in dermocosmetics for dry skin. However, more investigations on the mode of action and more vehicle-controlled studies are required. PMID:21709432

  7. Molecular and Physiological Responses to Water Deficit in Drought-Tolerant and Drought-Sensitive Lines of Sunflower1

    PubMed Central

    Cellier, Françoise; Conéjéro, Geneviève; Breitler, Jean-Christophe; Casse, Francine

    1998-01-01

    To investigate correlations between phenotypic adaptation to water limitation and drought-induced gene expression, we have studied a model system consisting of a drought-tolerant line (R1) and a drought-sensitive line (S1) of sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) subjected to progressive drought. R1 tolerance is characterized by the maintenance of shoot cellular turgor. Drought-induced genes (HaElip1, HaDhn1, and HaDhn2) were previously identified in the tolerant line. The accumulation of the corresponding transcripts was compared as a function of soil and leaf water status in R1 and S1 plants during progressive drought. In leaves of R1 plants the accumulation of HaDhn1 and HaDhn2 transcripts, but not HaElip1 transcripts, was correlated with the drought-adaptive response. Drought-induced abscisic acid (ABA) concentration was not associated with the varietal difference in drought tolerance. Stomata of both lines displayed similar sensitivity to ABA. ABA-induced accumulation of HaDhn2 transcripts was higher in the tolerant than in the sensitive genotype. HaDhn1 transcripts were similarly accumulated in the tolerant and in the sensitive plants in response to ABA, suggesting that additional factors involved in drought regulation of HaDhn1 expression might exist in tolerant plants. PMID:9499218

  8. Metabolism of 2'-carboxyarabinitol in leaves.

    PubMed

    Moore, B D; Seemann, J R

    1992-08-01

    Results presented here indicate that 2'-carboxyarabinitol (CA) is the in vivo precursor and product of 2'-carboxyarabinitol 1-phosphate (CA1P) metabolism in leaves. When [2-(14)C]CA was fed in the light to leaves of five species known to be highly active in CA1P metabolism (Phaseolus vulgaris, Lycopersicon esculentum, Helianthus annuus, Petunia hybrida, and Beta vulgaris), [(14)C]CA1P was formed in the dark. Reillumination of a Phaseolus leaf caused this [(14)C]CA1P to be rapidly metabolized to [(14)C]CA (t((1/2)) = 1 min). The epimer 2'-carboxyribitol could not substitute for CA in the dark synthesis of CA1P, and CA in the anionic form was a better substrate than CA in the lactone form. In leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris, the active CA pool size used in the dark synthesis of CA1P is between about 70 and 110 nanomoles per milligram of chlorophyll. The photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor diuron did not affect the dark synthesis of [(14)C]CA1P, but did greatly reduce the rate of its subsequent light degradation (t((1/2)) = approximately 10 min). Dark synthesis of [(14)C]CA1P was inhibited by dithiothreitol and NaF. From the present data, we suggest that CA1P and CA participate in a metabolic substrate cycle in vivo. PMID:16669073

  9. Sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Korsinczky, Michael L J; Schirra, Horst Joachim; Craik, David J

    2004-10-01

    SFTI-1 is a bicyclic 14 amino acid peptide that was originally isolated from the seeds of the sunflower Helianthus annuus. It is a potent inhibitor of trypsin, with a sub-nanomolar K(i) value and is homologous to the active site region of the well-known family of serine protease inhibitors known as the Bowman-Birk trypsin inhibitors. It has a cyclic backbone that is cross-braced by a single disulfide bridge and a network of hydrogen bonds that result in a well-defined structure. SFTI-1 is amenable to chemical synthesis, allowing for the creation of synthetic variants. Alterations to the structure such as linearising the backbone or removing the disulfide bridge do not reduce the potency of SFTI-1 significantly, and minimising the peptide to as few as nine residues results in only a small decrease in reactivity. The creation of linear variants of SFTI-1 also provides a tool for investigating putative linear precursor peptides. The mechanism of biosynthesis of SFTI-1 is not yet known but it seems likely that it is a gene-coded product that has arisen from a precursor protein that may be evolutionarily related to classic Bowman-Birk inhibitors. PMID:15544530

  10. Role of Calcium in the Polar Secretion of Indoleacetic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    dela Fuente, R. K.

    1984-01-01

    The rate of auxin transport in sunflower hypocotyls (Helianthus annuus L. cv `Russian mammoth') or corn coleoptiles (Zea mays L. cv `WF9 × 38') was less in seedlings grown in Ca-deficient medium than in controls. The rate of IAA transport depended on the concentration of Ca in the root medium up to 1 millimolar. Further increases in auxin transport were observed when the isolated segments were incubated in medium containing up to 30 millimolar Ca. We suggest that the rate of auxin transport in plant tissue is dependent on the pool of ionic Ca in the extracellular space. Segments from Ca-deficient seedlings exhibited a high specific requirement for Ca2+ in auxin transport. Magnesium, strontium, and several other divalent cations tested for their ability to replace Ca2+ in restoring auxin transport showed no effect; partial replacement by lanthanum was observed. Auxin transport, or auxin flux through the segment, which is the result of IAA secretion by individual cells, was reduced in the low Ca2+ segments due both to lowered velocity and to reduced capacity of transport. The requirement for Ca2+ in the secretion of auxin is believed to be equivalent to the phenomenon observed in animal cell secretion, where the influx of Ca2+ serves as a link between an external stimulus and the secretion response. PMID:16663844

  11. Life history traits and phenotypic selection among sunflower crop–wild hybrids and their wild counterpart: implications for crop allele introgression

    PubMed Central

    Kost, Matthew A; Alexander, Helen M; Jason Emry, D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization produces strong evolutionary forces. In hybrid zones, selection can differentially occur on traits and selection intensities may differ among hybrid generations. Understanding these dynamics in crop–wild hybrid zones can clarify crop-like traits likely to introgress into wild populations and the particular hybrid generations through which introgression proceeds. In a field experiment with four crop–wild hybrid Helianthus annuus (sunflower) cross types, we measured growth and life history traits and performed phenotypic selection analysis on early season traits to ascertain the likelihood, and routes, of crop allele introgression into wild sunflower populations. All cross types overwintered, emerged in the spring, and survived until flowering, indicating no early life history barriers to crop allele introgression. While selection indirectly favored earlier seedling emergence and taller early season seedlings, direct selection only favored greater early season leaf length. Further, there was cross type variation in the intensity of selection operating on leaf length. Thus, introgression of multiple early season crop-like traits, due to direct selection for greater early season leaf length, should not be impeded by any cross type and may proceed at different rates among generations. In sum, alleles underlying early season sunflower crop-like traits are likely to introgress into wild sunflower populations. PMID:26029263

  12. Assessing the effects of heavy metals in ACC deaminase and IAA production on plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Mendoza-Hernández José; Stefani, Perea-Vélez Yazmin; Janette, Arriola-Morales; Melani, Martínez-Simón Sara; Gabriela, Pérez-Osorio

    2016-01-01

    This study poses a methodology in order to simultaneously quantify ACC deaminase and IAA levels in the same culture medium. Ten bacterial strains isolated from plant rhizosphere naturally settled in mining residues were chosen. These bacterial strains were characterized as PGPB, and all of them showed at least three characteristics (indole-3 acetic acid and siderophore production, ACC deaminase enzyme activity, and inorganic phosphate solubilization). Taxonomic identification showed that the strains belong to Enterobacter, Serratia, Klebsiella, and Escherichia genera. Similarly, both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis in the presence of Cu, As, Pb, Ni, Cd, and Mn were measured. The results showed that both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA synthesis were higher with the Pb, As, and Cu treatments than with the Escherichia N16, Enterobacter K131, Enterobacter N9, and Serratia K120 control treatments. On the other hand, Ni, Cd, and Mn negatively affected both the ACC deaminase enzyme activity and the IAA production on every bacterium except on the Klebsiella Mc173 strain. Serratia K120 bacterium got a positive correlation between ACC deaminase and IAA in the presence of every heavy metal, and it also promoted Helianthus annuus plant growth, showing a potential use in phytoremediation systems. PMID:27296962

  13. Physicochemical properties of honey from Marche, Central Italy: classification of unifloral and multifloral honeys by multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Truzzi, Cristina; Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldia, Anna; Finale, Carolina; Rossetti, Monica; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was the physicochemical characterization and classification of Italian honey from Marche Region with a chemometric approach. A total of 135 honeys of different botanical origins [acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia L.), chestnut (Castanea sativa), coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), lime (Tilia spp.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), Metcalfa honeydew and multifloral honey] were considered. The average results of electrical conductivity (0.14-1.45 mS cm(-1)), pH (3.89-5.42), free acidity (10.9-39.0 meq(NaOH) kg(-1)), lactones (2.4-4.5 meq(NaOH) kg(-1)), total acidity (14.5-40.9 meq(NaOH) kg(-1)), proline (229-665 mg kg(-1)) and 5-(hydroxy-methyl)-2-furaldehyde (0.6-3.9 mg kg(-1)) content show wide variability among the analysed honey types, with statistically significant differences between the different honey types. Pattern recognition methods such as principal component analysis and discriminant analysis were performed in order to find a relationship between variables and types of honey and to classify honey on the basis of its physicochemical properties. The variables of electrical conductivity, acidity (free, lactones), pH and proline content exhibited higher discriminant power and provided enough information for the classification and distinction of unifloral honey types, but not for the classification of multifloral honey (100% and 85% of samples correctly classified, respectively). PMID:25532290

  14. Assembly and loss of the polar flagellum in plant-associated methylobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerges, L.; Kutschera, U.

    2014-04-01

    On the leaf surfaces of numerous plant species, inclusive of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.), pink-pigmented, methanol-consuming, phytohormone-secreting prokaryotes of the genus Methylobacterium have been detected. However, neither the roles, nor the exact mode of colonization of these epiphytic microbes have been explored in detail. Using germ-free sunflower seeds, we document that, during the first days of seedling development, methylobacteria exert no promotive effect on organ growth. Since the microbes are evenly distributed over the outer surface of the above-ground phytosphere, we analyzed the behavior of populations taken from two bacterial strains that were cultivated as solid, biofilm-like clones on agar plates in different aqueous environments ( Methylobacterium mesophilicum and M. marchantiae, respectively). After transfer into liquid medium, the rod-shaped, immobile methylobacteria assembled a flagellum and developed into planktonic microbes that were motile. During the linear phase of microbial growth in liquid cultures, the percentage of swimming, flagellated bacteria reached a maximum, and thereafter declined. In stationary populations, living, immotile bacteria, and isolated flagella were observed. Hence, methylobacteria that live in a biofilm, transferred into aqueous environments, assemble a flagellum that is lost when cell density has reached a maximum. This swimming motility, which appeared during ontogenetic development within growing microbial populations, may be a means to colonize the moist outer surfaces of leaves.

  15. Phytoremediation of carbamazepine and its metabolite 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine by C3 and C4 plants.

    PubMed

    Ryšlavá, Helena; Pomeislová, Alice; Pšondrová, Šárka; Hýsková, Veronika; Smrček, Stanislav

    2015-12-01

    The anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine is considered as an indicator of sewage water pollution: however, its uptake by plants and effect on metabolism have not been sufficiently documented, let alone its metabolite (10,11-epoxycarbamazepine). In a model system of sterile, hydroponically cultivated Zea mays (as C4 plant) and Helianthus annuus (as C3 plant), the uptake and effect of carbamazepine and 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine were studied in comparison with those of acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were effectively extracted from drug-supplemented media by both plants, while the uptake of more hydrophobic carbamazepine was much lower. On the other hand, the carbamazepine metabolite, 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine, was, unlike sunflower, willingly taken up by maize plants (after 96 h 88 % of the initial concentration) and effectively stored in maize tissues. In addition, the effect of the studied pharmaceuticals on the plant metabolism (enzymes of Hatch-Slack cycle, peroxidases) was followed. The activity of bound peroxidases, which could cause xylem vessel lignification and reduction of xenobiotic uptake, was at the level of control plants in maize leaves contrary to sunflower. Therefore, our results indicate that maize has the potential to remove 10,11-epoxycarbamazepine from contaminated soils. PMID:26310701

  16. Novel Fibonacci and non-Fibonacci structure in the sunflower: results of a citizen science experiment

    PubMed Central

    Swinton, Jonathan; Ochu, Erinma

    2016-01-01

    This citizen science study evaluates the occurrence of Fibonacci structure in the spirals of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedheads. This phenomenon has competing biomathematical explanations, and our core premise is that observation of both Fibonacci and non-Fibonacci structure is informative for challenging such models. We collected data on 657 sunflowers. In our most reliable data subset, we evaluated 768 clockwise or anticlockwise parastichy numbers of which 565 were Fibonacci numbers, and a further 67 had Fibonacci structure of a predefined type. We also found more complex Fibonacci structures not previously reported in sunflowers. This is the third, and largest, study in the literature, although the first with explicit and independently checkable inclusion and analysis criteria and fully accessible data. This study systematically reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, seedheads without Fibonacci structure. Some of these are approximately Fibonacci, and we found in particular that parastichy numbers equal to one less than a Fibonacci number were present significantly more often than those one more than a Fibonacci number. An unexpected further result of this study was the existence of quasi-regular heads, in which no parastichy number could be definitively assigned. PMID:27293788

  17. The Response of Durum Wheat to the Preceding Crop in a Mediterranean Environment

    PubMed Central

    Ercoli, Laura; Masoni, Alessandro; Pampana, Silvia; Mariotti, Marco; Arduini, Iduna

    2014-01-01

    Crop sequence is an important management practice that may affect durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) production. Field research was conducted in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons in a rain-fed cold Mediterranean environment to examine the impact of the preceding crops alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), maize (Zea mays L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on yield and N uptake of four durum wheat varieties. The response of grain yield of durum wheat to the preceding crop was high in 2007-2008 and was absent in the 2008-2009 season, because of the heavy rainfall that negatively impacted establishment, vegetative growth, and grain yield of durum wheat due to waterlogging. In the first season, durum wheat grain yield was highest following alfalfa, and was 33% lower following wheat. The yield increase of durum wheat following alfalfa was mainly due to an increased number of spikes per unit area and number of kernels per spike, while the yield decrease following wheat was mainly due to a reduction of spike number per unit area. Variety growth habit and performance did not affect the response to preceding crop and varieties ranked in the order Levante > Saragolla = Svevo > Normanno. PMID:25401153

  18. Biosynthesis of Jasmonic Acid by Several Plant Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Brady A.; Zimmerman, Don C.

    1984-01-01

    Six plant species metabolized 18O-labeled 12-oxo-cis,cis-10,15-phytodienoic acid (12-oxo-PDA) to short chain cyclic fatty acids. The plant species were corn (Zea mays L.), eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), oat (Avena sativa L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Among the products was jasmonic acid, a natural plant constituent with growth-regulating properties. The pathway is the same as the one recently reported by us for jasmonic acid synthesis in Vicia faba L. pericarp. First, the ring double bond of 12-oxo-PDA is saturated; then β-oxidation enzymes remove six carbons from the carboxyl side chain of the ring. Substrate specificity studies indicated that neither the stereochemistry of the side chain at carbon 13 of 12-oxo-PDA nor the presence of the double bond at carbon 15 was crucial for either enzyme step. The presence of enzymes which convert 12-oxo-PDA to jasmonic acid in several plant species indicates that this may be a general metabolic pathway in plants. PMID:16663643

  19. Novel Fibonacci and non-Fibonacci structure in the sunflower: results of a citizen science experiment.

    PubMed

    Swinton, Jonathan; Ochu, Erinma

    2016-05-01

    This citizen science study evaluates the occurrence of Fibonacci structure in the spirals of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedheads. This phenomenon has competing biomathematical explanations, and our core premise is that observation of both Fibonacci and non-Fibonacci structure is informative for challenging such models. We collected data on 657 sunflowers. In our most reliable data subset, we evaluated 768 clockwise or anticlockwise parastichy numbers of which 565 were Fibonacci numbers, and a further 67 had Fibonacci structure of a predefined type. We also found more complex Fibonacci structures not previously reported in sunflowers. This is the third, and largest, study in the literature, although the first with explicit and independently checkable inclusion and analysis criteria and fully accessible data. This study systematically reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, seedheads without Fibonacci structure. Some of these are approximately Fibonacci, and we found in particular that parastichy numbers equal to one less than a Fibonacci number were present significantly more often than those one more than a Fibonacci number. An unexpected further result of this study was the existence of quasi-regular heads, in which no parastichy number could be definitively assigned. PMID:27293788

  20. Seed fates in crop–wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  1. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf

    PubMed Central

    Simonin, Kevin A.; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M.; Dawson, Todd E.; Franks, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem–leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO2 concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO2 on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem–leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO2 assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  2. Cell lineage patterns in the shoot meristem of the sunflower embryo in the dry seed

    SciTech Connect

    Jegla, D.E.; Sussex, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    We mapped the fate of cells in the shoot meristem of the dry-seed embryo of sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. cv. Peredovic, using irradiation-induced somatic sectors. We analyzed 249 chlorophyll-deficient or glabrous (hairless) sectors generated in 236 plants. Most sectors observed in the inflorescence extended into vegetative nodes. Thus cell lineages that ultimately gave rise to reproductive structures also contributed to vegetative structures. No single sector extended the entire length of the shoot. Thus the shoot is not derived from one or a few apical initials. Rather, the position, vertical extent, and width of the sectors at different levels of the shoot suggest that the shoot is derived from three to four circumferential populations of cells in each of three cell layers of the embryo meristem. Sectors had no common boundaries even in plants with two or three independent sectors, but varied in extent and overlapped along the length of the shoot. Thus individual cells in a single circumferential population behaved independently to contribute lineages of different vertical extents to the growing shoot. The predicted number of circumferential populations of cells as well as the apparent cell number in each population was consistent with the actual number of cells in the embryo meristem observed in histological sections.

  3. Nonphotochemical Reduction of the Plastoquinone Pool in Sunflower Leaves Originates from Chlororespiration1

    PubMed Central

    Feild, Taylor S.; Nedbal, Ladislav; Ort, Donald R.

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between nonphotochemical plastoquinone reduction and chlororespiration in leaves of growth-chamber-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Following a short induction period, leaves of previously illuminated sunflower showed a substantially increased level of minimal fluorescence following a light-to-dark transition. This increase in minimal fluorescence was reversed by far-red illumination, inhibited by rotenone or photooxidative methyl viologen treatment, and stimulated by fumigation with CO. Using flash-induced electrochromic absorption-change measurements, we observed that the capacity of sunflower to reduce plastoquinone in the dark influenced the activation state of the chloroplast ATP synthase, although chlororespiratory transmembrane electrochemical potential formation alone does not fully explain our observations. We have added several important new observations to the work of others, forming, to our knowledge, the first strong experimental evidence that chlororespiratory, nonphotochemical plastoquinone reduction and plastoquinol oxidation occur in the chloroplasts of higher plants. We have introduced procedures for monitoring and manipulating chlorores-piratory activity in leaves that will be important in subsequent work aimed at defining the pathway and function of this dark electron flux in higher plant chloroplasts. PMID:9536037

  4. Modeling and analysis of a density-dependent stochastic integral projection model for a disturbance specialist plant and its seed bank.

    PubMed

    Eager, Eric Alan; Rebarber, Richard; Tenhumberg, Brigitte

    2014-07-01

    In many plant species dormant seeds can persist in the soil for one to several years. The formation of these seed banks is especially important for disturbance specialist plants, as seeds of these species germinate only in disturbed soil. Seed movement caused by disturbances affects the survival and germination probability of seeds in the seed bank, which subsequently affect population dynamics. In this paper, we develop a stochastic integral projection model for a general disturbance specialist plant-seed bank population that takes into account both the frequency and intensity of random disturbances, as well as vertical seed movement and density-dependent seedling establishment. We show that the probability measures associated with the plant-seed bank population converge weakly to a unique measure, independent of initial population. We also show that the population either persists with probability one or goes extinct with probability one, and provides a sharp criteria for this dichotomy. We apply our results to an example motivated by wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) populations, and explore how the presence or absence of a "storage effect" impacts how a population responds to different disturbance scenarios. PMID:24916367

  5. Shrinkage and growth compensation in common sunflowers: refining estimates of damage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Oldemeye, John L.; Swenson, Elizabeth L.

    1986-01-01

    Shrinkage and growth compensation of artificially damaged common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) were studied in central North Dakota during 1981-1982 in an effort to increase accuracy of estimates of blackbird damage to sunflowers. In both years, as plants matured damaged areas on seedheads shrank at a greater rate than the sunflower heads themselves. This differential shrinkage resulted in an underestimation of the area damaged. Sunflower head and damaged-area shrinkage varied widely by time and degree of damage and by size of the seedhead damaged. Because variation in shrinkage by time of damage was so large, predicting when blackbird damage occurs may be the most important factor in estimating seed loss. Yield'occupied seed area was greater (P < 0.05) for damaged than undamaged heads and tended to increase as degree of damage inflicted increased, indicating growth compensation was occurring in response to lost seeds. Yields of undamaged seeds in seedheads damaged during early seed development were higher than those of heads damaged later. This suggested that there was a period of maximal response to damage when plants were best able to redirect growth to seeds remaining in the head. Sunflowers appear to be able to compensate for damage of ≤ 15% of the total hear area. Estimates of damage can be improved by applying empirical results of differential shrinkage and growth compensations.

  6. Importance of the Chiral Centers of Jasmonic Acid in the Responses of Plants (Activities and Antagonism between Natural and Synthetic Analogs).

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, L.; Tung, P.; Ward, K.; Reid, D. M.; Abrams, S.; Lamb, N.; Quail, J. W.; Moloney, M. M.

    1997-01-01

    The importance of the two chiral centers at C-3 and C-7 in the molecular structure of jasmonic acid in plant responses was investigated. We separated methyl jasmonate (MeJA) into (3R)- and (3S)-isomers with a fixed stereochemistry at C-3, but epimerization at C-7 is possible. The four isomers of the nonepimerizable analog 7-methyl MeJA were synthesized. These six esters and their corresponding acids were tested in three bioassays: (a) senescence in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cotyledons; (b) proteinase inhibitor II gene expression in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) with [beta]-glucuronidase as a biochemical reporter; and (c) seed germination in Brassica napus and wheat (Triticum aestivum). The esters and acids had similar activities in the three assays, with the ester being more effective than its acid. The (3R)-stereochemistry was critical for jasmonate activity. Although activity was reduced after substituting the C-7 proton with a methyl group, the analogs with (3R,7R)- or (3R,7S)-stereochemistry were active in some of the assays. Although the four isomers of 7-methyl MeJA were inactive or only weakly active in the senescence assay, they could overcome the senescence-promoting effect of (3R)-MeJA. The strongest antagonistic effect was observed with the (3R,7S)-isomer. PMID:12223716

  7. Acetohydroxyacid synthase activity and transcripts profiling reveal tissue-specific regulation of ahas genes in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana A; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) is the target site of several herbicides and catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acid. Three genes coding for AHAS catalytic subunit (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) have been reported for sunflower. The aim of this work was to study the expression pattern of ahas genes family and AHAS activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Different organs (leaves, hypocotyls, roots, flowers and embryos) were evaluated at several developmental stages. The transcriptional profile was studied through RT-qPCR. The highest expression for ahas1 was shown in leaves, where all the induced and natural gene mutations conferring herbicide resistance were found. The maximal expression of ahas2 and ahas3 occurred in immature flowers and embryos. The highest AHAS activity was found in leaves and immature embryos. Correlation analysis among ahas gene expression and AHAS activity was discussed. Our results show that differences in ahas genes expression are tissue-specific and temporally regulated. Moreover, the conservation of multiple AHAS isoforms in sunflower seems to result from different expression requirements controlled by tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms at different developmental stages. PMID:24908515

  8. Precision phenotyping of imidazolinone-induced chlorosis in sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Ochogavía, Ana Claudia; Gil, Mercedes; Picardi, Liliana; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Chlorosis level is a useful parameter to assess imidazolinone resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The aim of this study was to quantify chlorosis through two different methods in sunflower plantlets treated with imazapyr. The genotypes used in this study were two inbred lines reported to be different in their resistance to imidazolinones. Chlorosis was evaluated by spectrophotometrical quantification of photosynthetic leaf pigments and by a bioinformatics-based color analysis. A protocol for pigment extraction was presented which improved pigment stability. Chlorophyll amount decreased significantly when both genotypes were treated with 10 μM of imazapyr. Leaf color was characterized using Tomato Analyzer® color test software. A significant positive correlation between color reduction and chlorophyll concentration was found. It suggests that leaf color measurement could be an accurate method to estimate chlorosis and infer chlorophyll levels in sunflower plants. These results highlight a strong relationship between imidazolinone-induced chlorosis and variations in leaf color and in chlorophyll concentration. Both methods are quantitative, rapid, simple, and reproducible. Thus, they could be useful tools for phenotyping and screening large number of plants when breeding for imidazolinone resistance in this species. PMID:25914598

  9. [Cloning and expression analysis of a LIM-domain protein gene from cotton (Gossypium hirsuturm L.)].

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Xiao, Yue-Hua; Hou, Lei; Luo, Xiao-Ying; Li, De-Mou; Pei, Yan

    2003-02-01

    LIM-domain protein plays an important role in various cellular processes, including construction of cytoskeleton, transcription control and signal transduction. Based on cotton fiber EST database and contig analysis, the coding region of a cotton LIM-domain protein gene (GhLIM1) was obtained by RT-PCR from 4DPA (day post anthesis) ovule with fiber. The cloned fragment of 848 bp contains an open reading frame of 570 bp, coding for a polypeptide of 189 amino acids. It was demonstrated that the deduced GhLIM1 protein was highly homologous to the LIM-domain protein of sunflower (Helianthus annuus), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis thaliana. Two intact LIM-domains, with the conserved sequence of a double zinc-finger structure (C-X2-C-X17-19-H-X2-C-X2-C-X2-C-X16-24-C-X2-H), were found in the GhLIM1 protein. RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis showed that GhLIM1 gene expressed in root, shoot tip, hypocotyls, bud, leaf, anther, ovule and fiber (4DPA, 12DPA, 18DPA). However it was preferentially expressed in the shoot tip, fiber and ovule. It was proposed that the express of GhLIM1 gene is related to cotton fiber development. PMID:12776607

  10. Plant uptake of depleted uranium from manure-amended and citrate treated soil.

    PubMed

    Sevostianova, Elena; Lindemann, William C; Ulery, April L; Remmenga, Marta D

    2010-08-01

    Six plant species were tested for their ability to accumulate depleted uranium in their above-ground biomass from deployed munitions contaminated soil in New Mexico. In greenhouse experiments, Kochia (Kochia scoparia L. Schrad.) and pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L) were grown with steer manure added at rates of 22.4, 44.8, and 89.6 Mg ha(-1). Citric acid and glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethyl) glycine) applied at the end of the growing season increased DU concentrations from 2.5 to 17 times. Leaf and stem DU concentrations in kochia increased from 17.0 to 41.9 mg kg(-1) and from 3.5 to 18.0 mg kg(-1), respectively. In pigweed, leaf and stem DU concentrations increased from 1.0 to 17.3 and from 1.0 to 4.7 mg kg(-1), respectively. Manure generally decreased or had no effect on DU uptake. The effect of citric acid and ammonium citrate on DU uptake by kochia, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L), and sweet corn (Zea mays L) was also studied. Ammonium citrate was just as effective in enhancing DU uptake as citric acid. This implies that the citrate ion is more important in DU uptake and translocation than the solubilization of DU through acidification. In both experiments, leaves had higher DU concentrations than stems. PMID:21166280

  11. Growth in liverworts of the Marchantiales is promoted by epiphytic methylobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, U.; Koopmann, V.

    2005-07-01

    Liverworts, the most basal lineage of extant land plants, have been used as model systems in the reconstruction of adaptations to life on land. In this study, we used gemmae (specialized propagules) that were isolated from mature gemma cups of two distantly related species of liverworts, Marchantia polymorpha L. and Lunularia cruciata L. (order Marchantiales). We show that methylobacteria (genus Methylobacterium), microbes that inhabit the surfaces of land plants where they secrete phytohormones (cytokinines), promote the growth of isolated gemmae cultivated on agar plates. As a control, two species of higher plants, maize (Zea mays L.) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) were raised aseptically from sterile seeds (i.e., caryopses, achenes). Inoculation of these propagules with methylobacteria was without effect on growth in the above-ground phytosphere (expansion of stems and leaves). We conclude that normal development in Marchantia and Lunularia is dependent on (and possibly regulated by) epiphytic methylobacteria, whereas representative higher plants grow at optimal rates in the absence of these prokaryotic epiphytes.

  12. Turgor and the transport of CO2 and water across the cuticle (epidermis) of leaves

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf photosynthesis relies on CO2 diffusing in while water vapour diffuses out. When stomata close, cuticle waxes on the epidermal tissues increasingly affect this diffusion. Also, changes in turgor can shrink or swell a leaf, varying the cuticle size. In this study, the properties of the cuticle were investigated while turgor varied in intact leaves of hypo stomatous grape (Vitis vinifera L.) or amphistomatous sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). For grape, stomata on the abaxial surface were sealed and high CO2 concentrations outside the leaf were used to maximize diffusion through the adaxial, stoma-free cuticle. For sunflower, stomata were closed in the dark or with abscisic acid to maximize the cuticle contribution to the path. In both species, the internal CO2 concentration was measured directly and continuously while other variables were determined to establish the cuticle properties. The results indicated that stomatal closure diminished the diffusion of both gases in both species, but for CO2 more than for water vapour. Decreasing the turgor diminished the movement of both gases through the cuticle of both species. Because this turgor effect was observed in the adaxial surface of grape, which had no stomata, it could only be attributed to cuticle tightening. Comparing calculated and measured concentrations of CO2 in leaves revealed differences that became large as stomata began to close. These differences in transport, together with turgor effects, suggest calculations of the CO2 concentration inside leaves need to be viewed with caution when stomata begin to close. PMID:25737532

  13. Continuous Monitoring of Plant Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Nick L.; Trickett, Edward S.; Ceresa, Anthony; Barrs, Henry D.

    1986-01-01

    Plant water potential was monitored continuously with a Wescor HR-33T dewpoint hygrometer in conjunction with a L51 chamber. This commercial instrument was modified by replacing the AC-DC mains power converter with one stabilized by zener diode controlled transistors. The thermocouple sensor and electrical lead needed to be thermally insulated to prevent spurious signals. For rapid response and faithful tracking a low resistance for water vapor movement between leaf and sensor had to be provided. This could be effected by removing the epidermis either by peeling or abrasion with fine carborundum cloth. A variety of rapid plant water potential responses to external stimuli could be followed in a range of crop plants (sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., var. Hysun 30); safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L., var. Gila); soybean (Glycine max L., var. Clark); wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Egret). These included light dark changes, leaf excision, applied pressure to or anaerobiosis of the root system. Water uptake by the plant (safflower, soybean) mirrored that for water potential changes including times when plant water status (soybean) was undergoing cyclical changes. PMID:16664805

  14. Correction of Flow Resistances of Plants Measured From Covered and Exposed Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Neil C.

    1981-01-01

    The difference in water potential between an enclosed nontranspiring leaf and an adjacent exposed transpiring leaf, and the transpiration rate of a similarly exposed leaf, were used to calculate the change in hydraulic resistance of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves throughout the day and at various rates of transpiration. Since cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) leaves enclosed in aluminum foil alone had enclosed leaf water potentials about 0.06 megapascals lower than similar leaves enclosed in a polyethylene bag shielded with aluminum foil, the sorghum and sunflower leaves were enclosed in polyethylene bags shielded with aluminum foil. Enclosing the exposed leaf in a plastic sheath just prior to excision led to the water potential measured by the pressure chamber technique being 0.3 to 0.4 megapascals higher at rapid transpiration rates than in exposed leaves not sheathed just prior to excision. This error, previously shown to arise from rapid water loss after excision, led to an overestimation of the leaf hydraulic resistance in both species. Correction of the error reduced the resistance by 40 to 90% in irrigated sorghum and by about 40% in irrigated and unirrigated sunflower. After correction, the hydraulic resistances were still flow-dependent, but the dependency was markedly reduced in sorghum. PMID:16662056

  15. Soil-food chain-pesticide wildlife relationships in aldrin-treated fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, L.J.

    1970-01-01

    Soil-food-chain-pesticide wildlife relationships were investigated to learn the concentration of pesticide residues present in soils, macro-invertebrates, vertebrates, and seeds as a result of annual applications of aldrin at recommended rates for pest control. Two central Missouri cornfields treated witb aldrin at 1 lb/acre, for 16 and 15 of the past 17 years, were selected for study during 1965-67. Primary samples collected for residue analyses included soils, earthworms (Lumbricidae), crickets (GryIlidae), and two kinds of ground beetles (Carabidae) obtained during early April, June, August, and October. Vertebrates and plant seeds collected during 1967 included white-footed mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), toads (Bufo americanus), snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis and Pituophis sayi), corn (Zea Mays), foxtail (Setaria Faberii), and annual sunflower (Helianthus annuus). Pesticide residues consisted primarily of dieldrin, the degradation product of aldrin. Combined aldrin and dieldrin residues, as two field all-season averages, wet weight basis, were: soils, 0.31 ppm; earthworms, 1.49 ppm; crickets, 0.23 ppm; Harpalus ground beetles, 1.10 ppm; Poecilus ground beetles, 9.67 ppm; white-footed mice, 0.98 ppm; toads, 3.53 ppm; garter snakes, 12.35 ppm; and corn, foxtail, and sunflower seeds less than 0.02 ppm each. Unusually high average residues (37.48 ppm) in Poecilus beetles during June, 1967, were attributed to abnormally high soil moisture and predacious feeding habits of these insects.

  16. Photosynthesis at Low Water Potentials in Sunflower: Lack of Photoinhibitory Effects 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Robert E.; Boyer, John S.

    1986-01-01

    The losses in chloroplast capacity to fix CO2 when photosynthesis is reduced at low leaf water potential (ψ1) have been proposed to result from photoinhibition. We investigated this possibility in soil-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv IS894) using gas exchange techniques to measure directly the influence of light during dehydration on the in situ chloroplast capacity to fix CO2. The quantum yield for CO2 fixation as well as the rate of light- and CO2-saturated photosynthesis were strongly inhibited at low ψ1. The extent of inhibition was the same whether the leaves were exposed to high or to low light during dehydration. When intercellular partial pressures of CO2 were decreased to the compensation point, which was lower than the partial pressures resulting from stomatal closure, the inhibition of the quantum yield was also unaffected. Photoinhibition could be observed only after high light exposures were imposed under nonphysiological low CO2 and O2 where both photosynthesis and photorespiration were suppressed. The experiments are the first to test whether gas exchange at low ψ1 is affected by potentially photoinhibitory conditions and show that the loss in chloroplast capacity to fix CO2 was entirely the result of a direct effect of water availability on chloroplast function and not photoinhibition. PMID:16665029

  17. Association Mapping and the Genomic Consequences of Selection in Sunflower

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Jennifer R.; Nambeesan, Savithri; Bowers, John E.; Marek, Laura F.; Ebert, Daniel; Rieseberg, Loren H.; Knapp, Steven J.; Burke, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of large-scale population genomic analyses and trait-based mapping approaches has the potential to provide novel insights into the evolutionary history and genome organization of crop plants. Here, we describe the detailed genotypic and phenotypic analysis of a sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) association mapping population that captures nearly 90% of the allelic diversity present within the cultivated sunflower germplasm collection. We used these data to characterize overall patterns of genomic diversity and to perform association analyses on plant architecture (i.e., branching) and flowering time, successfully identifying numerous associations underlying these agronomically and evolutionarily important traits. Overall, we found variable levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD) across the genome. In general, islands of elevated LD correspond to genomic regions underlying traits that are known to have been targeted by selection during the evolution of cultivated sunflower. In many cases, these regions also showed significantly elevated levels of differentiation between the two major sunflower breeding groups, consistent with the occurrence of divergence due to strong selection. One of these regions, which harbors a major branching locus, spans a surprisingly long genetic interval (ca. 25 cM), indicating the occurrence of an extended selective sweep in an otherwise recombinogenic interval. PMID:23555290

  18. Functional Interaction between Two Transcription Factors Involved in the Developmental Regulation of a Small Heat Stress Protein Gene Promoter1[w

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Martín, Juan; Almoguera, Concepción; Prieto-Dapena, Pilar; Espinosa, José M.; Jordano, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Hahsp17.6G1 is the promoter of a small heat stress protein (sHSP) from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) that is activated during zygotic embryogenesis, but which does not respond to heat stress. We report here the cloning of a transcription factor (TF), sunflower drought-responsive element binding factor 2 (HaDREB2), by one-hybrid interaction with functional cis-elements in Hahsp17.6G1. We have analyzed the functional interaction between HaDREB2 and a second transcription factor, sunflower heat stress factor A9 (HaHSFA9), which was previously assigned to the regulation of Hahsp17.6G1. HaDREB2 and HaHSFA9 synergistically trans-activate the Hahsp17.6G1 promoter in bombarded sunflower embryos. This synergistic interaction is heat stress factor (HSF) specific and requires the binding of both factors to the promoter. The C-terminal region of HaHSFA9 is sufficient for the HSF specificity. Our results represent an example of a functional interaction between members of the Apetala 2 (HaDREB2) and HSF (HaHSFA9) families of transcription factors. We suggest new roles in zygotic embryogenesis for specific members of the AP2 transcription factor family. PMID:16244139

  19. Turgor and the transport of CO2 and water across the cuticle (epidermis) of leaves.

    PubMed

    Boyer, John S

    2015-05-01

    Leaf photosynthesis relies on CO₂ diffusing in while water vapour diffuses out. When stomata close, cuticle waxes on the epidermal tissues increasingly affect this diffusion. Also, changes in turgor can shrink or swell a leaf, varying the cuticle size. In this study, the properties of the cuticle were investigated while turgor varied in intact leaves of hypo stomatous grape (Vitis vinifera L.) or amphistomatous sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). For grape, stomata on the abaxial surface were sealed and high CO₂ concentrations outside the leaf were used to maximize diffusion through the adaxial, stoma-free cuticle. For sunflower, stomata were closed in the dark or with abscisic acid to maximize the cuticle contribution to the path. In both species, the internal CO₂ concentration was measured directly and continuously while other variables were determined to establish the cuticle properties. The results indicated that stomatal closure diminished the diffusion of both gases in both species, but for CO₂ more than for water vapour. Decreasing the turgor diminished the movement of both gases through the cuticle of both species. Because this turgor effect was observed in the adaxial surface of grape, which had no stomata, it could only be attributed to cuticle tightening. Comparing calculated and measured concentrations of CO₂ in leaves revealed differences that became large as stomata began to close. These differences in transport, together with turgor effects, suggest calculations of the CO₂ concentration inside leaves need to be viewed with caution when stomata begin to close. PMID:25737532

  20. Life history traits and phenotypic selection among sunflower crop-wild hybrids and their wild counterpart: implications for crop allele introgression.

    PubMed

    Kost, Matthew A; Alexander, Helen M; Jason Emry, D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-06-01

    Hybridization produces strong evolutionary forces. In hybrid zones, selection can differentially occur on traits and selection intensities may differ among hybrid generations. Understanding these dynamics in crop-wild hybrid zones can clarify crop-like traits likely to introgress into wild populations and the particular hybrid generations through which introgression proceeds. In a field experiment with four crop-wild hybrid Helianthus annuus (sunflower) cross types, we measured growth and life history traits and performed phenotypic selection analysis on early season traits to ascertain the likelihood, and routes, of crop allele introgression into wild sunflower populations. All cross types overwintered, emerged in the spring, and survived until flowering, indicating no early life history barriers to crop allele introgression. While selection indirectly favored earlier seedling emergence and taller early season seedlings, direct selection only favored greater early season leaf length. Further, there was cross type variation in the intensity of selection operating on leaf length. Thus, introgression of multiple early season crop-like traits, due to direct selection for greater early season leaf length, should not be impeded by any cross type and may proceed at different rates among generations. In sum, alleles underlying early season sunflower crop-like traits are likely to introgress into wild sunflower populations. PMID:26029263

  1. Reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid and ethylene interact to regulate sunflower seed germination.

    PubMed

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Sajjad, Yasar; Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Cristescu, Simona M; Balzergue, Sandrine; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Bailly, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed dormancy is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can be alleviated by incubating dormant embryos in the presence of methylviologen (MV), a ROS-generating compound. Ethylene alleviates sunflower seed dormancy whereas abscisic acid (ABA) represses germination. The purposes of this study were to identify the molecular basis of ROS effect on seed germination and to investigate their possible relationship with hormone signalling pathways. Ethylene treatment provoked ROS generation in embryonic axis whereas ABA had no effect on their production. The beneficial effect of ethylene on germination was lowered in the presence of antioxidant compounds, and MV suppressed the inhibitory effect of ABA. MV treatment did not alter significantly ethylene nor ABA production during seed imbibition. Microarray analysis showed that MV treatment triggered differential expression of 120 probe sets (59 more abundant and 61 less abundant genes), and most of the identified transcripts were related to cell signalling components. Many transcripts less represented in MV-treated seeds were involved in ABA signalling, thus suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA signalling pathways at the transcriptional level. Altogether, these results shed new light on the crosstalk between ROS and plant hormones in seed germination. PMID:24811898

  2. Visualizing the impact of living roots on rhizosphere soil structure using X-ray microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, M.; Berli, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Nico, P.; Young, M. H.; Tyler, S. W.

    2009-04-01

    The rhizosphere is an interface between bulk soil and plant root and plays a critical role in root water and nutrient uptake. In this study, we used X-ray Computerized Microtomography (microCT) to visualize soil structure around living roots non-destructively and with high spatial resolution. Four different plant species (Helianthus annuus, Lupinus hartwegii, Vigna radiata and Phaseolus lunatus), grown in four different porous materials (glass beads, medium and coarse sand, loam aggregates), were scanned with 10 μm spatial resolution, using the microtomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. Sample cross section images clearly show contacts between roots and soil particles, connecting water films, air-water interfaces as well as some cellular features of the plants taproots. We found with a simulation experiment, inflating a cylindrical micro-balloon in a pack of air-dry loam aggregates, that soil fracturing rather than compaction might occur around a taproot growing in dry soil. Form these preliminary experiments, we concluded that microCT has potential as a tool for a more process-based understanding of the role of rhizosphere soil structure on soil fertility, plant growth and the water balance at the earth-atmosphere interface.

  3. Biological seed priming mitigates the effects of water stress in sunflower seedlings.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narsingh Bahadur; Singh, Deepmala; Singh, Amit

    2015-04-01

    The sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. PAC 36) seedlings were inoculated with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), viz. Azotobacter chroococcum (A+), Bacillus polymyxa (B+), separately and in combination of the two (AB+). Relative water content and seedling growth were maximum in AB+ seedlings under control. Water stress significantly decreased the RWC, growth and dry mass of non-inoculated seedlings. However, inoculated seedlings maintained higher growth even under water stress. Pigments and protein contents decreased under water stress, but higher amount of the same was observed in stressed AB+ seedlings. Enhanced activity of nitrate reductase was recorded in AB+ seedlings with maximum in control. Water stress significantly decreased the nitrate reductase activity. A significant increase in the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in leaves was recorded under water stress except in B+ with maximum increase in non-inoculated seedlings. Catalase (CAT) activity decreased in stressed non-inoculated seedlings while increased in the leaves of A+ and AB+ seedlings. Almost similar trends were recorded for both leaves and cotyledons. PGPR improved the water status in stressed seedlings and thereby physiological and biochemical parameters and thus ameliorated the severe effects of water stress. PMID:25964714

  4. Expression of the tetrahydrofolate-dependent nitric oxide synthase from the green alga Ostreococcus tauri increases tolerance to abiotic stresses and influences stomatal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Mayta, Martín L; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Scuffi, Denise; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; García-Mata, Carlos; Casalongué, Claudia; Carrillo, Néstor; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule with diverse biological functions in plants. NO plays a crucial role in growth and development, from germination to senescence, and is also involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals, NO is synthesized by well-described nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS activity has also been detected in higher plants, but no gene encoding an NOS protein, or the enzymes required for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor of mammalian NOS activity, have been identified so far. Recently, an NOS gene from the unicellular marine alga Ostreococcus tauri (OtNOS) has been discovered and characterized. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with OtNOS under the control of the inducible short promoter fragment (SPF) of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Hahb-4 gene, which responds to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid. Transgenic plants expressing OtNOS accumulated higher NO concentrations compared with siblings transformed with the empty vector, and displayed enhanced salt, drought and oxidative stress tolerance. Moreover, transgenic OtNOS lines exhibited increased stomatal development compared with plants transformed with the empty vector. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that OtNOS, unlike mammalian NOS, efficiently uses tetrahydrofolate as a cofactor in Arabidopsis plants. The modulation of NO production to alleviate abiotic stress disturbances in higher plants highlights the potential of genetic manipulation to influence NO metabolism as a tool to improve plant fitness under adverse growth conditions. PMID:25880454

  5. Seed fates in crop-wild hybrid sunflower: crop allele and maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M; Emry, Jason D; Mercer, Kristin L

    2015-02-01

    Domestication has resulted in selection upon seed traits found in wild populations, yet crop-wild hybrids retain some aspects of both parental phenotypes. Seed fates of germination, dormancy, and mortality can influence the success of crop allele introgression in crop-wild hybrid zones, especially if crop alleles or crop-imparted seed coverings result in out-of-season germination. We performed a seed burial experiment using crop, wild, and diverse hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus) cross types to test how a cross type's maternal parent and nuclear genetic composition might affect its fate under field conditions. We observed higher maladaptive fall germination in the crop- and F1- produced seeds than wild-produced seeds and, due to an interaction with percent crop alleles, fall germination was higher for cross types with more crop-like nuclear genetics. By spring, crop-produced cross types had the highest overwintering mortality, primarily due to higher fall germination. Early spring germination was identical across maternal types, but germination continued for F1-produced seeds. In conclusion, the more wild-like the maternal parent or the less proportion of the cross type's genome contributed by the crop, the greater likelihood a seed will remain ungerminated than die. Wild-like dormancy may facilitate introgression through future recruitment from the soil seed bank. PMID:25685189

  6. Visualizing Rhizosphere Soil Structure Around Living Roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, M.; Berli, M.; Ghezzehei, T. A.; Nico, P.; Young, M. H.; Tyler, S. W.

    2008-12-01

    The rhizosphere, a thin layer of soil (0 to 2 mm) surrounding a living root, is an important interface between bulk soil and plant root and plays a critical role in root water and nutrient uptake. In this study, we used X-ray Computerized Microtomography (microCT) to visualize soil structure around living roots non-destructively and with high spatial resolution. Four different plant species (Helianthus annuus, Lupinus hartwegii, Vigna radiata and Phaseolus lunatus), grown in four different porous materials (glass beads, medium and coarse sand, loam aggregates), were scanned with 10 ìm spatial resolution, using the microtomography beamline 8.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA. Sample cross section images clearly show contacts between roots and soil particles, connecting water films, air-water interfaces as well as some cellular features of the plants taproots. We found with a simulation experiment, inflating a cylindrical micro-balloon in a pack of air-dry loam aggregates, that soil fracturing rather than compaction might occur around a taproot growing in dry soil. Form these preliminary experiments, we concluded that microCT has potential as a tool for a more process-based understanding of the role of rhizosphere soil structure on soil fertility, plant growth and the water balance at the earth-atmosphere interface.

  7. Increasing leaf hydraulic conductance with transpiration rate minimizes the water potential drawdown from stem to leaf.

    PubMed

    Simonin, Kevin A; Burns, Emily; Choat, Brendan; Barbour, Margaret M; Dawson, Todd E; Franks, Peter J

    2015-03-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (k leaf) is a central element in the regulation of leaf water balance but the properties of k leaf remain uncertain. Here, the evidence for the following two models for k leaf in well-hydrated plants is evaluated: (i) k leaf is constant or (ii) k leaf increases as transpiration rate (E) increases. The difference between stem and leaf water potential (ΔΨstem-leaf), stomatal conductance (g s), k leaf, and E over a diurnal cycle for three angiosperm and gymnosperm tree species growing in a common garden, and for Helianthus annuus plants grown under sub-ambient, ambient, and elevated atmospheric CO₂ concentration were evaluated. Results show that for well-watered plants k leaf is positively dependent on E. Here, this property is termed the dynamic conductance, k leaf(E), which incorporates the inherent k leaf at zero E, which is distinguished as the static conductance, k leaf(0). Growth under different CO₂ concentrations maintained the same relationship between k leaf and E, resulting in similar k leaf(0), while operating along different regions of the curve owing to the influence of CO₂ on g s. The positive relationship between k leaf and E minimized variation in ΔΨstem-leaf. This enables leaves to minimize variation in Ψleaf and maximize g s and CO₂ assimilation rate over the diurnal course of evaporative demand. PMID:25547915

  8. A Novel Protocol for Detection of Nitric Oxide in Plants.

    PubMed

    Jain, Prachi; David, Anisha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of nitric oxide (NO) in plant cells is mostly undertaken using diaminofluorescein (DAF) dyes. Serious drawbacks and limitations have been identified in methods using DAF as a probe for NO detection. The present work reporting an alternative fluorescent probe for NO detection is thus proposed for varied applications in plant systems for physiological investigations. This method involves a simple, two-step synthesis, characterization, and application of MNIP-Cu {Copper derivative of [4-methoxy-2-(1H-napthol[2,3-d]imidazol-2-yl)phenol]} for specific and rapid binding with NO, leading to its detection in plant cells by epifluorescence microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) whole seedlings, hypocotyl segments, stigmas from capitulum, protoplasts, and isolated oil bodies, present investigations demonstrate the versatile nature of MNIP-Cu in applications for NO localization studies. MNIP-Cu can detect NO in vivo without any time lag (ex. 330-385 nm; em. 420-500 nm). It exhibits fluorescence both under anoxic and oxygen-rich conditions. This probe is specific to NO, which enhances its fluorescence due to MNIP-Cu complexing with NO and treatment with PTIO leads to quenching of fluorescence. It is relatively nontoxic when used at a concentration of up to 50 μM. PMID:27094412

  9. Continuous monitoring of plant water potential.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, N L; Trickett, E S; Ceresa, A; Barrs, H D

    1986-05-01

    Plant water potential was monitored continuously with a Wescor HR-33T dewpoint hygrometer in conjunction with a L51 chamber. This commercial instrument was modified by replacing the AC-DC mains power converter with one stabilized by zener diode controlled transistors. The thermocouple sensor and electrical lead needed to be thermally insulated to prevent spurious signals. For rapid response and faithful tracking a low resistance for water vapor movement between leaf and sensor had to be provided. This could be effected by removing the epidermis either by peeling or abrasion with fine carborundum cloth. A variety of rapid plant water potential responses to external stimuli could be followed in a range of crop plants (sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., var. Hysun 30); safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L., var. Gila); soybean (Glycine max L., var. Clark); wheat (Triticum aestivum L., var. Egret). These included light dark changes, leaf excision, applied pressure to or anaerobiosis of the root system. Water uptake by the plant (safflower, soybean) mirrored that for water potential changes including times when plant water status (soybean) was undergoing cyclical changes. PMID:16664805

  10. Thiamethoxam Seed Treatments Have No Impact on Pest Numbers or Yield in Cultivated Sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Bredeson, Michael M; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2015-12-01

    The use of neonicotinoid seed treatments is a nearly ubiquitous practice in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) pest management. Sunflowers have a speciose pest complex, but also harbor a diverse and abundant community of beneficial, nontarget organisms which may be negatively affected by pest management practices. Here, we investigate how the foliar and subterranean arthropod pest communities in sunflower fields were affected by a thiamethoxam seed treatment over three site years (two years on one farm, and another year at an additional field in the second year). Thiamethoxam and its metabolite clothianidin in leaf tissue were quantified throughout the growing season, and yield differences between treatments were measured. Across site years, foliar herbivores and key pests of sunflowers were unaffected by the seed treatment. Likewise, subterranean herbivores were unaffected. Thiamethoxam was measurable in leaf tissue through the R1 plant stage, while its metabolite clothianidin was detected throughout flowering (R6). No difference in sunflower yield was observed between treatments across site years. This research suggests that neonicotinoid seed treatments in sunflowers do not always provide economic benefits to farmers in the form of pest reductions or yield improvements. Future research should focus on sunflower integrated pest management strategies that limit nontarget effects of agrochemicals, while providing greater economic returns to farmers. PMID:26340223

  11. An extracellular lipid transfer protein is relocalized intracellularly during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Pagnussat, Luciana; Burbach, Christian; Baluska, Frantisek; de la Canal, Laura

    2012-11-01

    Plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) constitute a family of small proteins recognized as being extracellular. In agreement with this notion, several lines of evidence have shown the apoplastic localization of HaAP10, a LTP from Helianthus annuus dry seeds. However, HaAP10 was recently detected intracellularly in imbibing seeds. To clarify its distribution, immunolocalization experiments were performed during the course of germination and confirmed its intracellular localization upon early seed imbibition. Further assays using a hydrophobic dye, FM4-64, inhibitors of vesicular traffic, and immunolocalization of the pectin rhamnogalacturonan-II, allowed the conclusion that endocytosis is activated as soon as seed imbibition starts. Furthermore, this study demonstrated that HaAP10 is endocytosed throughout imbibition. Biochemical and cellular approaches indicate that the intracellular fraction of this LTP appears associated with oil bodies and some evidence also suggest its presence in glyoxysomes. So, HaAP10 is apoplastic in dry seeds and upon imbibition is rapidly internalized and relocalized to organelles involved in lipid metabolism. The results suggest that HaAP10 may be acting as a fatty acid shuttle between the oil body and the glyoxysome during seed germination. This concept is consistent with the initial proposition that LTPs participate in the intracellular transfer of lipids which was further denied based on their apparent extracellular localization. This report reveals for the first time the relocalization of a lipid transfer protein and opens new perspectives on its role. PMID:23162115

  12. Leaf magnesium alters photosynthetic response of low water potentials in sunflower

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, I.M.; Sharp, R.E.; Boyer, J.S. )

    1987-08-01

    We grew sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants in nutrient solutions having nutritionally adequate but low or high Mg{sup 2+} concentrations and determined whether photosynthesis was effected as leaf water potentials ({psi}{sub w}) decreased. Leaf Mg contents were 3- to 4-fold higher in the plants grown in high Mg{sup 2+} concentrations (10 millimolar) than in those grown in low concentrations (0.25 millimolar). These contents were sufficient to support maximum growth, plant dry weight, and photosynthesis, and the plants appeared normal. As low {psi}{sub w} developed, photosynthesis was inhibited but more so in high Mg leaves than in low Mg leaves. The effect was particularly apparent under conditions of light- and CO{sub 2}-saturation, indicating that the chloroplast capacity to fix CO{sub 2} was altered. The differential inhibition observed in leaves of differing Mg contents was not observed in leaves having differing K contents, suggesting that the effect may have been specific for Mg. Because Mg{sup 2+} inhibits photophosphorylation and coupling factor activities at concentrations likely to occur as leaves dehydrate, Mg may play a role in the inhibition of chloroplast reactions at low {psi}{sub w}, especially in leaves such as sunflower that markedly decrease in water content as {psi}{sub w} decreases.

  13. Acclimation of photosynthesis to low leaf water potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.A.; Boyer, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Photosynthesis is reduced at low leaf water potentials (PSI/sub l/) but repeated water deficits can decrease this reduction, resulting in photosynthetic acclimation. The contribution of the stomata and the chloroplasts to this acclimation is unknown. The authors evaluated stomatal and chloroplast contributions when soil-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to water deficit pretreatments for 2 weeks. The relationship between photosynthesis and PSI/sub l/, determined from gas-exchange and isopiestic thermocouple psychometry, was shifted 3 to 4 bars towards lower PSI/sub l/ in pretreated plants. Leaf diffusive resistance was similarly affected. Chloroplast activity, demonstrated in situ with measurements of quantum yield and the capacity to fix CO/sub 2/ at all partial pressures of CO/sub 2/, and in vitro by photosystem II activity of isolated organelles, was inhibited at low PSI/sub l/ but less in pretreated plants than in control plants. The magnitude of this inhibition indicated that decreases in chloroplast activity contributed more than closure of stomata both to losses in photosynthesis and to the acclimation of photosynthesis to low PSI/sub l/. 32 references, 8 figures.

  14. Co-regulation of water and K(+) transport in sunflower plants during water stress recovery.

    PubMed

    Benlloch, Manuel; Benlloch-González, María

    2016-06-01

    16-day-old sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants were subjected to deficit irrigation for 12 days. Following this period, plants were rehydrated for 2 days to study plant responses to post-stress recovery. The moderate water stress treatment applied reduced growth in all plant organs and the accumulation of K(+) in the shoot. After the rehydration period, the stem recovered its growth and reached a similar length to the control, an effect which was not observed in either root or leaves. Moreover, plant rehydration after water stress favored the accumulation of K(+) in the apical zone of the stem and expanding leaves. In the roots of plants under water stress, watering to field capacity, once the plants were de- topped, rapidly favored K(+) and water transport in the excised roots. This quick and short-lived response was not observed in roots of plants recovered from water stress for 2 days. These results suggest that the recovery of plant growth after water stress is related to coordinated water and K(+) transport from the root to the apical zone of the ​​stem and expanding leaves. This stimulation of K(+) transport in the root and its accumulation in the cells of the growing zones of the ​​stem must be one of the first responses induced in the plant during water stress recovery. PMID:27016874

  15. Circumnutations of sunflower hypocotyls in satellite orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Lewis, R. F.; Venditti, A. L.

    1990-01-01

    The principal objective of the research reported here was to determine whether a plant's periodic growth oscillations, called circumnutations, would persist in the absence of a significant gravitational or inertial force. The definitive experiment was made possible by access to the condition of protracted near weightlessness in an earth satellite. The experiment, performed during the first flight of Spacelab on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle, Columbia, in November and December, 1983, tested a biophysical model, proposed in 1967, that might account for circumnutation as a gravity-dependent growth response. However, circumnutations were observed in microgravity. They continued for many hours without stimulation by a significant g-force. Therefore, neither a gravitational nor an inertial g-force was an absolute requirement for initiation [correction of initation] or continuation of circumnutation. On average, circumnutation was significantly more vigorous in satellite orbit than on earth-based clinostats. Therefore, at least for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) circumnutation, clinostatting is not the functional equivalent of weightlessness.

  16. Newly Emerged Populations of Plasmopara halstedii Infecting Rudbeckia Exhibit Unique Genotypic Profiles and Are Distinct from Sunflower-Infecting Strains.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Yazmín; Salgado-Salazar, Catalina; Gulya, Thomas J; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2016-07-01

    The oomycete Plasmopara halstedii emerged at the onset of the 21st century as a destructive new pathogen causing downy mildew disease of ornamental Rudbeckia fulgida (rudbeckia) in the United States. The pathogen is also a significant global problem of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and is widely regarded as the cause of downy mildew affecting 35 Asteraceae genera. To determine whether rudbeckia and sunflower downy mildew are caused by the same genotypes, population genetic and phylogenetic analyses were performed. A draft genome assembly of a P. halstedii isolate from sunflower was generated and used to design 15 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. SSRs and two sequenced phylogenetic markers measured differentiation between 232 P. halstedii samples collected from 1883 to 2014. Samples clustered into two main groups, corresponding to host origin. Sunflower-derived samples separated into eight admixed subclusters, and rudbeckia-derived samples further separated into three subclusters. Pre-epidemic rudbeckia samples clustered separately from modern strains. Despite the observed genetic distinction based on host origin, P. halstedii from rudbeckia could infect sunflower, and exhibited the virulence phenotype of race 734. These data indicate that the newly emergent pathogen populations infecting commercial rudbeckia are a different species from sunflower-infecting strains, notwithstanding cross-infectivity, and genetically distinct from pre-epidemic populations infecting native rudbeckia hosts. PMID:27003506

  17. Effects of increased gravity force on nutations of sunflower hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.

    1977-01-01

    A centrifuge was used to provide sustained acceleration in order to study the hypocotyl nutation of 6-day-old Helianthus annuus L. over a range of g-forces, up to 20 times normal g. At the upper end of this g-range, nutation was impeded and at times was erratic evidently because the weight of the cotyledons exceeded the supportive abilities of the hypocotyls. Over the range 1 to 9 g, the period of nutation was independent of the resultant force vector. Over the same g-range, the amplitude of nutation was nearly independent of the chronic g-force. If nutation in sunflower seedlings is an oscillation caused by a succession of geotropic responses which continue to overshoot the equilibrium position (plumb line), its amplitude might be expected to be more sensitive to changes in magnitude of the sustained g-force. In order to preserve the geotropic model, in which nutation is considered to be a sustained oscillation driven by geotropic reactions, it is necessary to assume that geotropic response must increase with increasing g most rapidly in the region of the g-parameter below the terrestrial value of 1 g.

  18. Life form-specific gradients in compound-specific hydrogen isotope ratios of modern leaf waxes along a North American Monsoonal transect.

    PubMed

    Berke, Melissa A; Tipple, Brett J; Hambach, Bastian; Ehleringer, James R

    2015-12-01

    The use of hydrogen isotope ratios (δ(2)H) of sedimentary n-alkanes from leaf waxes has become an important tool for reconstructing paleoenvironmental and ancient hydrologic conditions. Studies of modern plant waxes can elucidate driving ecological mechanisms behind geologic deposits. Here, we used a transect across the North American Monsoon region of the western USA from Tucson, Arizona to Salt Lake City, Utah to study variations in leaf wax δ(2)H among co-occurring plants. Three co-occurring life forms were selected: perennial shrub (rabbit brush, Chrysothamnus nauseosus; sagebrush, Artemisia tridentata); tree (Gambel's oak tree, Quercus gambelii); and annual (sunflower, Helianthus annuus). Our results showed that the distributions and abundances of n-alkanes in perennial plants were similar across all sites and generally did not vary with environmental conditions (e.g., precipitation and temperature). In contrast, variations in n-alkane δ(2)H were significantly correlated with the fraction of the annual precipitation coming during the summer monsoon period. We use a modified Craig-Gordon model to speculate on the possible drivers of the δ(2)H values of leaf wax n-alkanes of plants across the region. The model results suggest that the most likely explanation for variation in wax δ(2)H values was a combination of seasonal source water usage and subsequent environmental conditions. PMID:26310435

  19. Influence of the g-force on the circumnutations of sunflower hypocotyls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachariassen, E.; Johnsson, A.; Brown, A. H.; Chapman, D. K.; Johnson-Glebe, C.

    1987-01-01

    Circumnutations of hypocotyls of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Californicus) were studied under 1 g and 3 g conditions. Root mean square values of the hypocotyl deviation from the plumbline and period of the movements were determined from calculations of the autocorrelation functions of the movements. The amplitude and the period of the circumnutations increased under 3 g as compared to 1 g. A transition from 3 to 1 g or vice versa also caused changes in period and amplitude of the movements. The results are interpreted as a support for the idea that gravity influences the circumnutation parameters in this sunflower variety. A comparison is made with published results on the dwarf sunflower cv. Teddy Bear where the force influence is very small or negligible. Simulations of a model for circumnutations show movements which are in qualitative agreement with the experimental results, provided adaptation to g-levels is included in the model. Finally, the results are discussed with the recent Spacelab-experiment (SL1) as a background.

  20. Whole plant senescence of sunflower following seedhead removal

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, InSun; Below, F.E. )

    1989-09-01

    This study was undertaken to further clarify the relationship between seed development and monocarpic senescence of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Field-grown plants with and without seedheads were evaluated for rate and duration of accumulation of dry weight, reduced N, and P by whole shoots, and for partitioning of these constituents within the individual plant parts. Concurrent with seedhead removal, ({sup 15}N)nitrate was applied to the plants in a selected are of the experimental plot. Whole plants (above ground portions) were harvested seven times during the seed-filling period and analyzed from dry weight, reduced N, and P. Although seedhead removal depressed the rates of dry weight, reduced N, and P accumulation by whole shoots, it extended the duration of accumulation of these constituents, relative to headed control plants. As a result, the final whole shoot dry weight and N and P contents at seed maturity were similar for deheaded and headed plants. Seedhead removal also affected the partitioning of dry matter, reduced N, and P but the relative proportions varied as a function of constituent and growth stage. Analysis of {sup 15}N present in whole shoots at physiological maturity showed that similar amounts of nitrate were absorbed during the postflowering period by headed and deheaded plants. These data indicate that the absence of seeds does not affect the total accumulation of dry matter, reduced N, or P, by sunflower plants, but does alter the rates of accumulation and partitioning of these constituents.

  1. Heterologous expression of chloroplast-localized geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase confers fast plant growth, early flowering and increased seed yield.

    PubMed

    Tata, Sandeep Kumar; Jung, Jihye; Kim, Yoon-Ha; Choi, Jun Young; Jung, Ji-Yul; Lee, In-Jung; Shin, Jeong Sheop; Ryu, Stephen Beungtae

    2016-01-01

    Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GGPS) is a key enzyme for a structurally diverse class of isoprenoid biosynthetic metabolites including gibberellins, carotenoids, chlorophylls and rubber. We expressed a chloroplast-targeted GGPS isolated from sunflower (Helianthus annuus) under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The resulting transgenic tobacco plants expressing heterologous GGPS showed remarkably enhanced growth (an increase in shoot and root biomass and height), early flowering, increased number of seed pods and greater seed yield compared with that of GUS-transgenic lines (control) or wild-type plants. The gibberellin levels in HaGGPS-transgenic plants were higher than those in control plants, indicating that the observed phenotype may result from increased gibberellin content. However, in HaGGPS-transformant tobacco plants, we did not observe the phenotypic defects such as reduced chlorophyll content and greater petiole and stalk length, which were previously reported for transgenic plants expressing gibberellin biosynthetic genes. Fast plant growth was also observed in HaGGPS-expressing Arabidopsis and dandelion plants. The results of this study suggest that GGPS expression in crop plants may yield desirable agronomic traits, including enhanced growth of shoots and roots, early flowering, greater numbers of seed pods and/or higher seed yield. This research has potential applications for fast production of plant biomass that provides commercially valuable biomaterials or bioenergy. PMID:25644367

  2. Synthesis of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, M.A.; Key, J.L. )

    1987-08-01

    Heat shock of living tissue induces the synthesis of a unique group of proteins, the heat shock proteins. In plants, the major group of heat shock proteins has a molecular mass of 15 to 25 kilodaltons. Accumulation to these proteins to stainable levels has been reported in only a few species. To examine accumulation of the low molecular weight heat shock proteins in a broader range of species, two-dimensional electrophoresis was used to resolve total protein from the following species: soybean (Glycine max L. Merr., var Wayne), pea (Pisum sativum L., var Early Alaska), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum asetivum L.), rice (Oryza sativa L., cv IR-36), maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum americanum L. Leeke, line 23DB), and Panicum miliaceum L. When identified by both silver staining and incorporation of radiolabel, a diverse array of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was synthesized in each of these species. These proteins accumulated to significant levels after three hours of heat shock but exhibited considerable heterogeneity in isoelectric point, molecular weight, stainability, and radiolabel incorporation. Although most appeared to be synthesized only during heat shock, some were detectable at low levels in control tissue. Compared to the monocots, a higher proportion of low molecular weight heat shock proteins was detectable in control tissues from dicots.

  3. Residual nutational activity of the sunflower hypocotyl in simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, D. K.; Brown, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    The gravity dependence of circumnutational activity in the sunflower hypocotyl is investigated under conditions of simulated weightlessness. Seedling cultures of the sunflower Helianthus annuus were placed four days after planting in clinostats rotating at a rate of 1.0 rpm in the horizontal or somersaulting configurations, and plant movements around their growth axes were recorded in infrared light by a time-lapse closed-circuit video system. The amplitudes and mean cycle durations of the plant nutations in the horizontal and tumbling clinostats are observed to be 20% and 72%, and 32% and 74%, respectively, of the values observed in stationary plants; extrapolations to a state of zero g by the imposition of small centripetal forces on horizontally clinostated plants also indicate some nutational motion in the absence of gravity. It is concluded that the results are incompatible with the model of Israelsson and Johnsson (1967) of geotropic response with overshoot for sunflower circumnutation; however, results of the Spacelab 1 mission experiment are needed to unambiguously define the role of gravitation.

  4. Evaluation of aluminum indices to predict aluminum toxicity to plants grown in nutrient solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Alva, A.K.; Blamey, F.P.C.; Edwards, D.G.; Asher, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    Difficulty has been experienced in establishing a suitable aluminum (Al) index to predict Al toxicity to plants grown in nutrient solutions with a wide range of properties. In the present study, relationships were evaluated between root length and (i) concentration of total Al, (ii) concentration of monomeric Al, and (iii) the sum of the activities of monomeric Al species (..sigma..a/sub Al mono/) in solution. Results are reported for soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Total Al concentration in solution, comprising polymeric and monomeric Al species, was a poor index of Al toxicity, confirming the hypothesis that only monomeric Al is toxic to root growth. In solutions with widely differing composition, the concentration of monomeric Al also proved unsatisfactory due to ionic strength effects on the activities of monomeric Al species. ..sigma..a/sub Al mono/ was the best index of Al toxicity, accounting for 72 to 92% of the variation in root length depending on the plant species. Root length was reduced by 50% at ..sigma..a/sub Al mono/ of 7-16 ..mu..M in soybean, 13 ..mu..M in subterranean clover and alfalfa, and 11 ..mu..M in sunflower.

  5. Could blackbird mortality from avicide DRC-1339 contribute to avian botulism outbreaks in North Dakota?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, D.R.; Samuel, M.D.; Rocke, T.E.; Johnson, K.M.; Linz, G.

    2004-01-01

    Blackbird (family lcteridae) depredation on sunflower (Helianthus annuus) crops in the prairie states of the United States has motivated the proposed use of an avicide, DRC-1339 (3-chloro-4-methylaniline), to decrease their numbers. The resulting mortality of blackbirds at wetland roosts could increase the potential of avian botulism occurring in affected marshes. To assess this possibility, we seeded (artificially placed) blackbird carcasses in selected wetlands in Stutsman County, North Dakota, during August-September 2000 and July-September 2001 to evaluate their rate of decomposition and role in initiating avian botulism outbreaks. We monitored carcasses to determine their persistence, the frequency and amount of maggots produced, and the presence of type C botulinum toxin. In 10 of our 12 study wetlands, blackbird carcasses were not rapidly removed by scavengers, thus providing substrate for maggot growth and potential production of Clostridium botulinum toxin. Decomposition of carcasses occurred rapidly, and maggot production averaged 4a??5 g per carcass within 9 days. We were unable to detect C. botulinum type C toxin in any of the 377 blackbird carcasses or the 112 samples of maggots we collected in 2000 or 2001. None of the 25 blackbird carcasses we tested contained botulinum spores, the most probable explanation for the absence of botulinum toxin production. Our results indicate that the likelihood of DRC-1339-poisoned blackbirds causing botulism outbreaks would be minimal in North Dakota wetlands during late summer and early autumn.

  6. Simulating sunflower canopy temperatures to infer root-zone soil water potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Idso, S. B.

    1983-01-01

    A soil-plant-atmosphere model for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), together with clear sky weather data for several days, is used to study the relationship between canopy temperature and root-zone soil water potential. Considering the empirical dependence of stomatal resistance on insolation, air temperature and leaf water potential, a continuity equation for water flux in the soil-plant-atmosphere system is solved for the leaf water potential. The transpirational flux is calculated using Monteith's combination equation, while the canopy temperature is calculated from the energy balance equation. The simulation shows that, at high soil water potentials, canopy temperature is determined primarily by air and dew point temperatures. These results agree with an empirically derived linear regression equation relating canopy-air temperature differential to air vapor pressure deficit. The model predictions of leaf water potential are also in agreement with observations, indicating that measurements of canopy temperature together with a knowledge of air and dew point temperatures can provide a reliable estimate of the root-zone soil water potential.

  7. Physiological Studies of a Synthetic Gibberellin-Like Bioregulator

    PubMed Central

    Suttle, Jeffrey C.; Hultstrand, Julie F.

    1987-01-01

    The biological activity of the synthetic gibberellin agonist AC-94,377 (1-[3-chlorophthalimido]-cyclohexanecarboxamide) in certain plants is strictly dependent on the site of application. Root application of AC-94,377 at concentrations greater than or equal to 1 micromolar to seedlings of dwarf corn (Zea mays L. var d5), dwarf rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Tan-ginbozu), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv NK265) seedlings resulted in readily measurable gibberellin-like biological activity. Application of up to 10 micrograms of AC-94,377 to the shoots of these same species had no effect. AC-94,377 was metabolized to more polar products in both dwarf corn and sunflower seedlings. After 4 days of continuous root treatment with [14C]AC-94,377, greater than 70% of the recovered 14C was found in the form of unmetabolized AC-94,377. In contrast, only 30 to 40% of the recovered 14C was unmetabolized 4 days after shoot treatment. Translocation studies demonstrated that the movement of [14C]AC-94,377 was limited and occurred almost exclusively in an apoplastic fashion. Four days after leaf treatment, less than 1.5% (corn) or 4% (sunflower) of the recovered radioactivity had moved away from the treated area. It was concluded that the lack of biological activity of AC-94,377 following shoot treatment resulted principally from limited phloem mobility and to a lesser extent from accelerated metabolic breakdown. PMID:16665563

  8. Molecular mapping of a sunflower rust resistance gene from HAR6

    PubMed Central

    Bulos, Mariano; Ramos, María L.; Altieri, Emiliano; Sala, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower rust, caused by Puccinia helianthi Schw., can result in significant yield losses in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. var. macrocarpus Ckll.). HAR6 is a germplasm population resistant to most predominant rust races. The objectives of this study were to map the resistance factor present in HAR6 (RHAR6), and to provide and validate molecular tools for the identification of this gene for marker assisted selection purposes. Virulence reaction of seedlings for the F2 population and F2:3 families suggested that a single dominant gene confers rust resistance in HAR6-1, a selected rust resistance line from the original population. Genetic mapping with eight markers covered 97.4 cM of genetic distance on linkage group 13 of the sunflower consensus map. A co-dominant marker ZVG61 is the closest marker distal to RHAR6 at a genetic distance of 0.7 cM, while ORS581, a dominant marker linked in the coupling phase, is proximal to RHAR6 at a genetic distance of 1.5 cM. Validation of these markers was assessed by converting a susceptible line into a rust resistant isoline by means of marker assisted backcrossing. The application of these results to assist the breeding process and to design new strategies for rust control in sunflower is discussed. PMID:23641190

  9. Cloning, Expression and Purification of an Acetoacetyl CoA Thiolase from Sunflower Cotyledon

    PubMed Central

    Dyer, James H.; Maina, Anthony; Gomez, Iris D.; Cadet, Melissa; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schiedel, Anke C.

    2009-01-01

    Thiolase I and II coexist as part of the glyoxysomal β-oxidation system in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) cotyledons, the only system shown to have both forms. The importance of thiolases can be underscored not only by their ubiquity, but also by their involvement in a wide variety of processes in plants, animals and bacteria. Here we describe the cloning, expression and purification of acetoacetyl CoA thiolase (AACT) in enzymatically active form. Use of the extensive amount of sequence information from the databases facilitated the efficient generation of the gene-specific primers used in the RACE protocols. The recombinant AACT (1233 bp) shares 75% similarity with other plant AACTs. Comparison of specific activity of this recombinant AACT to a previously reported enzyme purified from primary sunflower cotyledon tissue was very similar (263 nkat/mg protein vs 220 nkat/mg protein, respectively). Combining the most pure fractions from the affinity column, the enzyme was purified 88-fold with a 55% yield of the enzymatically active, 47 kDa AACT. PMID:20011134

  10. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Aster spathulifolius (Asteraceae); genomic features and relationship with Asteraceae.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyoung Su; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-11-10

    Aster spathulifolius, a member of the Asteraceae family, is distributed along the coast of Japan and Korea. This plant is used for medicinal and ornamental purposes. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of A. sphathulifolius consists of 149,473 bp that include a pair of inverted repeats of 24,751 bp separated by a large single copy region of 81,998 bp and a small single copy region of 17,973 bp. The chloroplast genome contains 78 coding genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. When compared to other cpDNA sequences of Asteraceae, A. spathulifolius showed the closest relationship with Jacobaea vulgaris, and its atpB gene was found to be a pseudogene, unlike J. vulgaris. Furthermore, evaluation of the gene compositions of J. vulgaris, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and A. spathulifolius revealed that 13.6-kb showed inversion from ndhF to rps15, unlike Lactuca of Asteraceae. Comparison of the synonymous (Ks) and nonsynonymous (Ka) substitution rates with J. vulgaris revealed that synonymous genes related to a small subunit of the ribosome showed the highest value (0.1558), while nonsynonymous rates of genes related to ATP synthase genes were highest (0.0118). These findings revealed that substitution has occurred at similar rates in most genes, and the substitution rates suggested that most genes is a purified selection. PMID:26164759

  11. Proteomic analysis of oil body membrane proteins accompanying the onset of desiccation phase during sunflower seed development

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Anita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    A noteworthy metabolic signature accompanying oil body (OB) biogenesis during oilseed development is associated with the modulation of the oil body membranes proteins. Present work focuses on 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE)-based analysis of the temporal changes in the OB membrane proteins analyzed by LC-MS/MS accompanying the onset of desiccation (20–30 d after anthesis; DAA) in the developing seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Protein spots unique to 20–30 DAA stages were picked up from 2-D gels for identification and the identified proteins were categorized into 7 functional classes. These include proteins involved in energy metabolism, reactive oxygen scavenging, proteolysis and protein turnover, signaling, oleosin and oil body biogenesis-associated proteins, desiccation and cytoskeleton. At 30 DAA stage, exclusive expressions of enzymes belonging to energy metabolism, desiccation and cytoskeleton were evident which indicated an increase in the metabolic and enzymatic activity in the cells at this stage of seed development (seed filling). Increased expression of cruciferina-like protein and dehydrin at 30 DAA stage marks the onset of desiccation. The data has been analyzed and discussed to highlight desiccation stage-associated metabolic events during oilseed development. PMID:26786011

  12. Selecting single-copy nuclear genes for plant phylogenetics: a preliminary analysis for the Senecioneae (Asteraceae).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Inés; Costa, Andrea; Feliner, Gonzalo Nieto

    2008-03-01

    Compared to organelle genomes, the nuclear genome comprises a vast reservoir of genes that potentially harbor phylogenetic signal. Despite the valuable data that sequencing projects of model systems offer, relatively few single-copy nuclear genes are being used in systematics. In part this is due to the challenges inherent in generating orthologous sequences, a problem that is ameliorated when the gene family in question has been characterized in related organisms. Here we illustrate the utility of diverse sequence databases within the Asteraceae as a framework for developing single-copy nuclear genes useful for inferring phylogenies in the tribe Senecioneae. We highlight the process of searching for informative genes by using data from Helianthus annuus, Lactuca sativa, Stevia rebaudiana, Zinnia elegans, and Gerbera cultivar. Emerging from this process were several candidate genes; two of these were used for a phylogenetic assessment of the Senecioneae and were compared to other genes previously used in Asteraceae phylogenies. Based on the preliminary sampling used, one of the genes selected during the searching process was more useful than the two previously used in Asteraceae. The search strategy described is valid for any group of plants but its efficiency is dependent on the phylogenetic proximity of the study group to the species represented in sequence databases. PMID:18305978

  13. Xanthium italicum, Xanthium strumarium and Arctium lappa as new hosts for Diaporthe helianthi.

    PubMed

    Vrandecic, Karolina; Jurkovic, Drazenka; Riccioni, Luca; Cosic, Jasenka; Duvnjak, Tomislav

    2010-07-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) stem canker caused by Diaporthe helianthi is one of the most important sunflower diseases in Croatia. Until recently, sunflower was the only known host for D. helianthi. In our research carried out in the area of Eastern Croatia, isolates of Diaporthe/Phomospis were collected from Xanthium italicum, X. strumarium and Arctium lappa. Using morphological, cultural and molecular ITS rDNA data, isolates from these weeds were identified as D. helianthi. The following isolates were used in the pathogenicity test: one isolate originated from sunflower (Su5/04), three from X. italicum (Xa2, Xa3 and Xa5), two from X. strumarium (Xa9 and Xa12), one from Xanthium sp. (Xa13) and one from A. lappa (Ar3). According to the results, it was determined that isolate Xa5 (originated from X. italicum) was the most pathogenic to sunflower stems. The average length of the lesion was 11.3 cm. The lowest level of pathogenicity was found in Xa9 (isolated from X. strumarium). The length of the lesion was 0.1 cm. PMID:20182800

  14. Precision phenotyping of imidazolinone-induced chlorosis in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana Claudia; Gil, Mercedes; Picardi, Liliana; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-12-01

    Chlorosis level is a useful parameter to assess imidazolinone resistance in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). The aim of this study was to quantify chlorosis through two different methods in sunflower plantlets treated with imazapyr. The genotypes used in this study were two inbred lines reported to be different in their resistance to imidazolinones. Chlorosis was evaluated by spectrophotometrical quantification of photosynthetic leaf pigments and by a bioinformatics-based color analysis. A protocol for pigment extraction was presented which improved pigment stability. Chlorophyll amount decreased significantly when both genotypes were treated with 10 μM of imazapyr. Leaf color was characterized using Tomato Analyzer(®) color test software. A significant positive correlation between color reduction and chlorophyll concentration was found. It suggests that leaf color measurement could be an accurate method to estimate chlorosis and infer chlorophyll levels in sunflower plants. These results highlight a strong relationship between imidazolinone-induced chlorosis and variations in leaf color and in chlorophyll concentration. Both methods are quantitative, rapid, simple, and reproducible. Thus, they could be useful tools for phenotyping and screening large number of plants when breeding for imidazolinone resistance in this species. PMID:25914598

  15. Proteomic analysis of oil body membrane proteins accompanying the onset of desiccation phase during sunflower seed development.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Anita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    A noteworthy metabolic signature accompanying oil body (OB) biogenesis during oilseed development is associated with the modulation of the oil body membranes proteins. Present work focuses on 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE)-based analysis of the temporal changes in the OB membrane proteins analyzed by LC-MS/MS accompanying the onset of desiccation (20-30 d after anthesis; DAA) in the developing seeds of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Protein spots unique to 20-30 DAA stages were picked up from 2-D gels for identification and the identified proteins were categorized into 7 functional classes. These include proteins involved in energy metabolism, reactive oxygen scavenging, proteolysis and protein turnover, signaling, oleosin and oil body biogenesis-associated proteins, desiccation and cytoskeleton. At 30 DAA stage, exclusive expressions of enzymes belonging to energy metabolism, desiccation and cytoskeleton were evident which indicated an increase in the metabolic and enzymatic activity in the cells at this stage of seed development (seed filling). Increased expression of cruciferina-like protein and dehydrin at 30 DAA stage marks the onset of desiccation. The data has been analyzed and discussed to highlight desiccation stage-associated metabolic events during oilseed development. PMID:26786011

  16. Dynamics of three organic acids (malic, acetic and succinic acid) in sunflower exposed to cadmium and lead.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhixin; Li, Xiaodong; Sun, Lina; Sun, Tieheng

    2013-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) has been considered as a good candidate for bioaccumulation of heavy metals. In the present study, sunflower was used to enrich the cadmium and lead in sand culture during 90 days. Biomass, Cd and Pb uptake, three organic acids and pH in cultures were investigated. Results showed that the existence of Cd and Pb showed different interactions on the organic acids exudation. In single Cd treatments, malic and acetic acids in Cd10 showed an incremental tendency with time. In the mixed treatments of Cd and Pb, malic acids increased when 10 and 40 mg x L(-1) Cd were added into Pb50, but acetic acids in Pb50 were inhibited by Cd addition. The Cd10 supplied in Pb10 stimulated the secretion of malic and succinic acids. Moreover, the Cd or Pb uptake in sunflower showed various correlations with pH and some organic acids, which might be due to the fact that the Cd and Pb interfere with the organic acids secretion in rhizosphere of sunflower, and the changes of organic acids altered the form and bioavailability of Cd and Pb in cultures conversely. PMID:23819268

  17. Circumnutations of Sunflower Hypocotyls in Satellite Orbit 1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Allan H.; Chapman, David K.; Lewis, Robert F.; Venditti, Allen L.

    1990-01-01

    The principal objective of the research reported here was to determine whether a plant's periodic growth oscillations, called circumnutations, would persist in the absence of a significant gravitational or inertial force. The definitive experiment was made possible by access to the condition of protracted near weightlessness in an earth satellite. The experiment, performed during the first flight of Spacelab on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration shuttle, Columbia, in November and December, 1983, tested a biophysical model, proposed in 1967, that might account for circumnutation as a gravity-dependent growth response. However, circumnutations were observed in microgravity. They continued for many hours without stimulation by a significant g-force. Therefore, neither a gravitational nor an inertial g-force was an absolute requirement for initation or continuation of circumnutation. On average, circumnutation was significantly more vigorous in satellite orbit than on earth-based clinostats. Therefore, at least for sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) circumnutation, clinostatting is not the functional equivalent of weightlessness. PMID:11537478

  18. Stomatal responses to flooding of the intercellular air spaces suggest a vapor-phase signal between the mesophyll and the guard cells.

    PubMed

    Sibbernsen, Erik; Mott, Keith A

    2010-07-01

    Flooding the intercellular air spaces of leaves with water was shown to cause rapid closure of stomata in Tradescantia pallida, Lactuca serriola, Helianthus annuus, and Oenothera caespitosa. The response occurred when water was injected into the intercellular spaces, vacuum infiltrated into the intercellular spaces, or forced into the intercellular spaces by pressurizing the xylem. Injecting 50 mm KCl or silicone oil into the intercellular spaces also caused stomata to close, but the response was slower than with distilled water. Epidermis-mesophyll grafts for T. pallida were created by placing the epidermis of one leaf onto the exposed mesophyll of another leaf. Stomata in these grafts opened under light but closed rapidly when water was allowed to wick between epidermis and the mesophyll. When epidermis-mesophyll grafts were constructed with a thin hydrophobic filter between the mesophyll and epidermis stomata responded normally to light and CO(2). These data, when taken together, suggest that the effect of water on stomata is caused partly by dilution of K(+) in the guard cell and partly by the existence of a vapor-phase signal that originates in the mesophyll and causes stomata to open in the light. PMID:20472750

  19. Food waste composting: its use as a peat replacement.

    PubMed

    Farrell, M; Jones, D L

    2010-01-01

    We successfully co-composted catering waste with green waste and shredded paper to yield two high-nitrogen composts for use in horticulture. Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) were grown in various mixtures of the compost and a commercially available peat-based compost to assess the efficacy of catering waste-based composts for peat replacement. Height, head diameter, seed mass and above-ground biomass were measured, with all mixtures giving a significant increase in yield or size over the commercially available peat-free control compost. We conclude that differences in physical structure governed sunflower growth over substrate chemistry, and none of the compost mixtures were nutrient deficient. We recommend that catering waste co-compost can be substituted to at least 75% within Sphagnum-based traditional growing media, providing a viable replacement for a large proportion of peat used as a growth medium in the horticulture industry. Our catering waste compost yielded similar seed head, seed mass and above-ground biomass values to 100% peat-based compost in all food waste compost blends tested in this study. PMID:20185289

  20. Isotopic inhomogeneity of leaf water: Evidence and implications for the use of isotopic signals transduced by plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakir, Dan; DeNiro, Michael J.; Rundel, Philip W.

    1989-10-01

    Variations as large as 11%. in δ18O values and 50%. in δD values were observed among different fractions of water in leaves of ivy (Hedera helix) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus). This observation contradicts previous experimental approaches to leaf water as an isotopically uniform pool. Using ion analysis of the water fractions to identify sources within the leaf, we conclude that the isotopic composition of the water within cells, which is involved in biosynthesis and therefore recorded in the plant organic matter, differs substantially from that of total leaf water. This conclusion must be taken into account in studies in which isotope ratios of fossil plant cellulose are interpreted in paleoclimatic terms. In addition, our results have implications for attempts to explain the Dole effect and to account for the variations of 18O/16O ratios in atmospheric carbon dioxide, since the isotopic composition of cell water, not of total leaf water, influences theδ18O values of O2 and CO2 released from plants into the atmosphere.

  1. Effect of microbial inoculation and EDTA on the uptake and translocation of heavy metal by corn and sunflower.

    PubMed

    Usman, Adel Rabie Ahmed; Mohamed, Hashem M

    2009-08-01

    A greenhouse experiment was carried out to study the effect of microbial inoculation and EDTA as synthetic chelator on heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd) uptake into and translocation within corn (Zea mays) and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) grown on contaminated soil. Four treatments were included: the control, EDTA as synthetic chelator, inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), and the inoculation with yeast. Microbial inoculation increased biomass of both species of agricultural crop plants, but EDTA addition decreased only biomass of sunflower. The results also showed that EDTA was more effective than microbial inoculation at increasing the concentrations of all metals in plants. Generally, there were significant differences among the treatments in the most metals taken up, especially by corn plants, with an order: AM fungi>yeast>EDTA>control except for Pb. It was found that the efficiency of EDTA in increasing Pb uptake was significantly higher than that of microbial inoculation treatments. The most effective treatments to stimulate the translocation of the studied metals from roots to shoots were EDTA and/or AM fungi. Overall, the maximum metal uptake and phytoextraction efficiencies were pronounced for corn either with AM fungi treatment for Zn, Cu and Cd or after EDTA addition for Pb. However, heavy metals uptake was not high enough to achieve extraction rates which would be necessary for practical use. PMID:19524998

  2. Feasibility of Using Phytoextraction to Remediate a Compost-Based Soil Contaminated with Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Parisien, Michele A; Rutter, Allison; Zeeb, Barbara A

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouse and in-situ field experiments were used to determine the potential for phytoextraction to remediate soil contaminated with Cd from municipal solid waste (MSW) and sewage sludge (SS) compost application at a Peterborough (Canada) site. For the greenhouse experiment, one native (Chenopodium album) and three naturalized (Poa compressa, Brassica juncea, Helianthus annuus) plant species were planted in soil containing no detectable Cd (<1.0 μg·g(-1)), and soil from the site containing low (5.0 ± 0.3 μg·g(-1) Cd), and high (16.5 ± 1.2 μg⋅g(-1) Cd) Cd concentrations. Plant uptake was low (root BAFs ≤0.5) for all species except P. compressa in the low Cd treatment (BAF 1.0). Only B. juncea accumulated Cd in its shoots, though uptake was low (BAF ≤0.3). For the field experiment, B. juncea was planted in-situ in areas of low and high Cd concentrations. Brassica juncea Cd uptake was low (root and shoot BAFs <0.2) in both treatments. Sequential extraction analysis indicated that Cd is retained primarily by low bioavailability soil fractions, and phytoextraction is therefore not feasible at this site. Though low Cd bioavailability has negative implications for Cd phytoextraction from MSW/SS compost-based soils, it may limit receptor exposure to Cd sufficiently to eliminate the potential for risk at this site. PMID:25848836

  3. Integrated micro-biochemical approach for phytoremediation of cadmium and zinc contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Kumar, Chitranjan; Patel, Niraj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The integrated potential of oilcake manure (OM), elemental sulphur (S(0)), Glomus fasciculatum and Pseudomonas putida by growing Helianthus annuus L for phytoremediation of cadmium and zinc contaminated soils was investigated under pot experiment. The integrated treatment (2.5 g kg(-1) OM, 0.8 g kg(-1) S(0) and co-inoculation with G. fasciculatum and P. putida promoted the dry biomass of the plant. The treatment was feasible for enhanced cadmium accumulation up to 6.56 and 5.25 mg kg(-1) and zinc accumulation up to 45.46 and 32.56 mg kg(-1) in root and shoot, respectively, which caused maximum remediation efficiency (0.73 percent and 0.25 percent) and bioaccumulation factor (2.39 and 0.83) for Cd and Zn, respectively showing feasible uptake (in mg kg(-1) dry biomass) of Cd (5.55) and Zn (35.51) at the contaminated site. Thus, authors conclude to integrate oilcake manure, S(0) and microbial co-inoculation for enhanced clean-up of cadmium and zinc-contaminated soils. PMID:25450919

  4. Leaching and utilization of nitrogen during a spring wheat catch crop succession.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Juan M; Liedgens, Markus

    2009-01-01

    An experiment covering a 2-yr spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) catch crop succession was conducted in lysimeters to account for the losses of N due to leaching. We sought to relate these losses to the N uptake of the main crop and to integrate the estimated N loss and uptake into a balance. The non-winter hardy catch crops [yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.), Phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.)] as well as bare soil fallow were studied at low and high N input levels of 4 and 29 g N m(-2) yr(-1), respectively. Catch crops allowed for an effective reduction of N leaching of 0.33 to 1.67 g N m(-2) yr(-1) compared to fallow. Reductions in N leaching were achieved mainly by avoiding the fallow period during autumn and winter while the catch crop species grown had little impact. During the spring wheat growing season, N leaching losses were highest after yellow mustard, the most effective catch crop for the entire crop succession. A balance of N indicated that the reductions in N leaching exerted by the catch crops did not result in a higher overall utilization of N by spring wheat. Thus, the efficacy shown by catch crops in reducing N leaching during growth is relatively lower when considering the entire crop succession. In addition, the N saved by growing catch crops does not increase N utilization by succeeding spring wheat. PMID:19465716

  5. Production of an endoinulinase from Aspergillus niger AUMC 9375, by solid state fermentation of agricultural wastes, with purification and characterization of the free and immobilized enzyme.

    PubMed

    Housseiny, Manal M

    2014-05-01

    Two different substrates, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) tubers and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) roots, were tested. Using a mixture of both wastes resulted in higher production of endoinulinase than either waste alone. Also, ten fungal species grown on these substrates as inexpensive, carbon sources were screened for the best production of endoinulinase activities. Of these, Aspergillus niger AUMC 9375 was the most productive, when grown on the mixture using a 6:1 w/w ratio of sun flower: lettuce, and yielded the highest levels of inulinase at 50% moisture, 30°C, pH 5.0, with seven days of incubation, and with yeast extract as the best nitrogen source. Inulinase was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography and gel-filtration giving a 51.11 fold purification. The mixture of sunflower tubers and lettuce roots has potential to be an effective and economical substrate for inulinase production. Inulinase was successfully immobilized with an immobilization yield of 71.28%. After incubation for 2 h at 60°C, the free enzyme activity decreased markedly to 10%, whereas that of the immobilized form decreased only to 87%. A reusability test demonstrated the durability of the immobilized inulinase for 10 cycles and in addition, that it could be stored for 32 days at 4°C. These results indicate that this inulinase, in the immobilized form, is a potential candidate for large-scale production of high purity fructose syrups. PMID:24810318

  6. Dieldrin uptake and translocation in plants growing in hydroponic medium.

    PubMed

    Murano, Hirotatsu; Otani, Takashi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Sakai, Mizuki

    2010-01-01

    It has been known that the Cucurbitaceae family takes up a large amount of persistent organic pollutants from soils and that the translocation of those compounds in cucurbits is higher than those in non-cucurbits. To understand the persistent organic pollutant uptake mechanisms of plant species, we compared the dieldrin absorption and transportation potentials of several plants in hydroponic medium. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Moench), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), soybean (Glycine max), komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. peruviridis), white-flowered gourd (Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown in a dieldrin-added hydroponic medium for 10 d, and then the amount of dieldrin in their shoots and roots was measured. All of the roots contained dieldrin, whereas only the cucurbits (white-flowered gourd, cucumber, and zucchini) contained considerable amounts of dieldrin in their shoots. The dieldrin uptake to the roots depended on the concentration of the n-hexane soluble components in the roots, regardless of whether the dieldrin in the roots was translocated to shoots or not. The dieldrin uptake from the solution to the roots was thought to be due to a passive response, such as adsorption on the roots. The translocation of dieldrin from the roots to the shoots was probably through the xylems. The amounts of dieldrin in the shoots per transpiration rates were higher for cucurbits than for non-cucurbits. It seems likely that cucurbits have uptake mechanisms for hydrophobic organic chemicals. PMID:20821429

  7. Association between photosynthesis and contrasting features of minor veins in leaves of summer annuals loading phloem via symplastic versus apoplastic routes.

    PubMed

    Muller, Onno; Cohu, Christopher M; Stewart, Jared J; Protheroe, Johanna A; Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Adams, William W

    2014-09-01

    Foliar vascular anatomy and photosynthesis were evaluated for a number of summer annual species that either load sugars into the phloem via a symplastic route (Cucumis sativus L. cv. Straight Eight; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Italian Zucchini Romanesco; Citrullus lanatus L. cv. Faerie Hybrid; Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Autumn Gold) or an apoplastic route (Nicotiana tabacum L.; Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Brandywine; Gossypium hirsutum L.; Helianthus annuus L. cv. Soraya), as well as winter annual apoplastic loaders (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Giant Nobel; Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynhold Col-0, Swedish and Italian ecotypes). For all summer annuals, minor vein cross-sectional xylem area and tracheid number as well as the ratio of phloem loading cells to phloem sieve elements, each when normalized for foliar vein density (VD), was correlated with photosynthesis. These links presumably reflect (1) the xylem's role in providing water to meet foliar transpirational demand supporting photosynthesis and (2) the importance of the driving force of phloem loading as well as the cross-sectional area for phloem sap flux to match foliar photosynthate production. While photosynthesis correlated with the product of VD and cross-sectional phloem cell area among symplastic loaders, photosynthesis correlated with the product of VD and phloem cell number per vein among summer annual apoplastic loaders. Phloem cell size has thus apparently been a target of selection among symplastic loaders (where loading depends on enzyme concentration within loading cells) versus phloem cell number among apoplastic loaders (where loading depends on membrane transporter numbers). PMID:24450755

  8. Translocation of Radioactive Carbon after the Application of 14C-Alanine and 14CO2 to Sunflower Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chopowick, R. E.; Forward, D. F.

    1974-01-01

    14C-(UL)-l-Alanine was applied to the surface of mature leaves at the second node of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Commander) plants, under illumination. The alanine was absorbed during a 4-hour period, and some of it was metabolized by the absorbing tissue. After a lag period of about 15 minutes from first application, distribution of 14C through the plant proceeded in much the same pattern as when 14CO2 is assimilated by similar leaves. Most, if not all, of the 14C exported from the absorbing regions was in sucrose. Only minute amounts appeared in alanine or other amino acids in surrounding parts of the leaf blade or in the petiole, although these were strongly labeled in the tissue absorbing 14C-alanine. When 14CO2 was supplied for 15 minutes to leaves of different ages, amino acids were lightly labeled in the leaf blade. Mature green leaves exported only sucrose. Yellowing leaves on 60-day-old plants exported a variety of substances including amino acids. PMID:16658645

  9. Heliolactone, a non-sesquiterpene lactone germination stimulant for root parasitic weeds from sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kotomi; Furumoto, Toshio; Umeda, Shuhei; Mizutani, Masaharu; Takikawa, Hirosato; Batchvarova, Rossitza; Sugimoto, Yukihiro

    2014-12-01

    Root exudates of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) line 2607A induced germination of seeds of root parasitic weeds Striga hermonthica, Orobanche cumana, Orobanche minor, Orobanche crenata, and Phelipanche aegyptiaca. Bioassay-guided purification led to the isolation of a germination stimulant designated as heliolactone. FT-MS analysis indicated a molecular formula of C20H24O6. Detailed NMR spectroscopic studies established a methylfuranone group, a common structural component of strigolactones connected to a methyl ester of a C14 carboxylic acid via an enol ether bridge. The cyclohexenone ring is identical to that of 3-oxo-α-ionol and the other part of the molecule corresponds to an oxidized carlactone at C-19. It is a carlactone-type molecule and functions as a germination stimulant for seeds of root parasitic weeds. Heliolactone induced seed germination of the above mentioned root parasitic weeds, while dehydrocostus lactone and costunolide, sesquiterpene lactones isolated from sunflower root exudates, were effective only on O. cumana and O. minor. Heliolactone production in aquacultures increased when sunflower seedlings were grown hydroponically in tap water and decreased on supplementation of the culture with either phosphorus or nitrogen. Costunolide, on the other hand, was detected at a higher concentration in well-nourished medium as opposed to nutrient-deficient media, thus suggesting a contrasting contribution of heliolactone and the sesquiterpene lactone to the germination of O. cumana under different soil fertility levels. PMID:25446236

  10. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase content, assimilatory charge, and mesophyll conductance in leaves

    PubMed

    Eichelmann; Laisk

    1999-01-01

    The content of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Et; EC 4.1.1.39) measured in different-aged leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and other plants grown under different light intensities, varied from 2 to 75 &mgr;mol active sites m-2. Mesophyll conductance (&mgr;) was measured under 1.5% O2, as well as postillumination CO2 uptake (assimilatory charge, a gas-exchange measure of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate pool). The dependence of &mgr; on Et saturated at Et = 30 &mgr;mol active sites m-2 and &mgr; = 11 mm s-1 in high-light-grown leaves. In low-light-grown leaves the dependence tended toward saturation at similar Et but reached a &mgr; of only 6 to 8 mm s-1. &mgr; was proportional to the assimilatory charge, with the proportionality constant (specific carboxylation efficiency) between 0.04 and 0.075 &mgr;M-1 s-1. Our data show that the saturation of the relationship between Et and &mgr; is caused by three limiting components: (a) the physical diffusion resistance (a minor limitation), (b) less than full activation of Rubisco (related to Rubisco activase and the slower diffusibility of Rubisco at high protein concentrations in the stroma), and (c) chloroplast metabolites, especially 3-phosphoglyceric acid and free inorganic phosphate, which control the reaction kinetics of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation by competitive binding to active sites. PMID:9880359

  11. Toluene emissions from plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiden, A. C.; Kobel, K.; Komenda, M.; Koppmann, R.; Shao, M.; Wildt, J.

    The emission of toluene from different plants was observed in continuously stirred tank reactors and in field measurements. For plants growing without stress, emission rates were low and ranged from the detection limit up to 2·10-16 mol·cm-2·s-1. Under conditions of stress, the emission rates exceeded 10-14 mol·cm-2·s-1. Exposure of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv. Gigantheus) to 13CO2 resulted in 13C-labeling of the emitted toluene on a time scale of hours. Although no biochemical pathway for the production of toluene is known, these results indicate that toluene is synthesized by the plants. The emission rates of toluene from sunflower are dependent on nutrient supply and wounding. Since α-pinene emission rates are also influenced by these factors, toluene and α-pinene emissions show a high correlation. During pathogen attack on Scots pines (Pinus sylvestris L.) significant toluene emissions were observed. In this case emissions of toluene and α-pinene also show a good correlation. Toluene emissions were also found in field experiments with pines using branch enclosures.

  12. Characterization of the Variation Potential in Sunflower.

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, B.; Zawadzki, T.; Davies, E.

    1997-01-01

    A major candidate for intercellular signaling in higher plants is the stimulus-induced systemic change in membrane potential known as variation potential (VP). We investigated the mechanism of occurrence and long-distance propagation of VP in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants. Here we present evidence of the relationship among injury-induced changes in xylem tension, turgor pressure, and electrical potential. Although locally applied wounding did trigger a change in membrane potential, it evoked even faster changes in tissue deformation, apparently resulting from pressure surges rapidly transmitted through the xylem and experienced throughout the plant. Externally applied pressure mimicked flame wounding by triggering an electrical response resembling VP. Our findings suggest that VP in sunflower is not a propagating change in electrical potential and not the consequence of chemicals transmitted via the xylem, affecting ligand-modulated ion channels. Instead, VP appears to result from the surge in pressure in the xylem causing a change in activity of mechanosensitive, stretch-responsive ion channels or pumps in adjacent, living cells. The ensuing ion flux evokes local plasma membrane depolarization, which is monitored extracellularly as VP. PMID:12223859

  13. Contribution of botanical origin and sugar composition of honeys on the crystallization phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Escuredo, Olga; Dobre, Irina; Fernández-González, María; Seijo, M Carmen

    2014-04-15

    The present work provides information regarding the statistical relationships among the palynological characteristics, sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose, melezitose and maltose), moisture content and sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W) of 136 different honey types (including bramble, chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia, lime, rape, sunflower and honeydew). Results of the statistical analyses (multiple comparison Bonferroni test, Spearman rank correlations and principal components) revealed the valuable significance of the botanical origin on the sugar ratios (F+G, F/G and G/W). Brassica napus and Helianthus annuus pollen were the variables situated near F+G and G/W ratio, while Castanea sativa, Rubus and Eucalyptus pollen were located further away, as shown in the principal component analysis. The F/G ratio of sunflower, rape and lime honeys were lower than those found for the chestnut, eucalyptus, heather, acacia and honeydew honeys (>1.4). A lower value F/G ratio and lower water content were related with a faster crystallization in the honey. PMID:24295680

  14. The response of durum wheat to the preceding crop in a Mediterranean environment.

    PubMed

    Ercoli, Laura; Masoni, Alessandro; Pampana, Silvia; Mariotti, Marco; Arduini, Iduna

    2014-01-01

    Crop sequence is an important management practice that may affect durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) production. Field research was conducted in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons in a rain-fed cold Mediterranean environment to examine the impact of the preceding crops alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), maize (Zea mays L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) on yield and N uptake of four durum wheat varieties. The response of grain yield of durum wheat to the preceding crop was high in 2007-2008 and was absent in the 2008-2009 season, because of the heavy rainfall that negatively impacted establishment, vegetative growth, and grain yield of durum wheat due to waterlogging. In the first season, durum wheat grain yield was highest following alfalfa, and was 33% lower following wheat. The yield increase of durum wheat following alfalfa was mainly due to an increased number of spikes per unit area and number of kernels per spike, while the yield decrease following wheat was mainly due to a reduction of spike number per unit area. Variety growth habit and performance did not affect the response to preceding crop and varieties ranked in the order Levante > Saragolla = Svevo > Normanno. PMID:25401153

  15. Evolutionary Origins of a Bioactive Peptide Buried within Preproalbumin[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Alysha G.; Delay, Christina; Liu, Huanle; Phua, Zaiyang; Rosengren, K. Johan; Benfield, Aurélie H.; Panero, Jose L.; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Jayasena, Achala S.; Dunse, Kerry M.; Anderson, Marilyn A.; Schilling, Edward E.; Ortiz-Barrientos, Daniel; Craik, David J.; Mylne, Joshua S.

    2014-01-01

    The de novo evolution of proteins is now considered a frequented route for biological innovation, but the genetic and biochemical processes that lead to each newly created protein are often poorly documented. The common sunflower (Helianthus annuus) contains the unusual gene PawS1 (Preproalbumin with SFTI-1) that encodes a precursor for seed storage albumin; however, in a region usually discarded during albumin maturation, its sequence is matured into SFTI-1, a protease-inhibiting cyclic peptide with a motif homologous to unrelated inhibitors from legumes, cereals, and frogs. To understand how PawS1 acquired this additional peptide with novel biochemical functionality, we cloned PawS1 genes and showed that this dual destiny is over 18 million years old. This new family of mostly backbone-cyclic peptides is structurally diverse, but the protease-inhibitory motif was restricted to peptides from sunflower and close relatives from its subtribe. We describe a widely distributed, potential evolutionary intermediate PawS-Like1 (PawL1), which is matured into storage albumin, but makes no stable peptide despite possessing residues essential for processing and cyclization from within PawS1. Using sequences we cloned, we retrodict the likely stepwise creation of PawS1’s additional destiny within a simple albumin precursor. We propose that relaxed selection enabled SFTI-1 to evolve its inhibitor function by converging upon a successful sequence and structure. PMID:24681618

  16. A specific role for Ca2+ in the oxidation of exogenous NADH by Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Møller, I M; Johnston, S P; Palmer, J M

    1981-01-01

    1. The addition of chelators to a suspension of mitochondria in a low-cation medium containing 9-aminoacridine caused a decrease in 9-aminoacridine fluorescence. The chelators removed bivalent cations from the membranes and allowed more 9-aminoacridine to move into the diffuse layer. The relative effect of EGTA and EDTA on the fluorescence suggested that the mitochondria are isolated with about equal amounts of Ca2+ and Mg2+ on the membranes. 2. The removal of the bivalent ions by chelators resulted in the inhibition of NADH oxidation. The inhibition could not be removed by adding sufficient decamethylenebistrimethylammonium ion (DM2+) to screen the fixed charges on the membranes and restore the fluorescence of 9-aminoacridine. This observation suggests that bivalent metal ions have a specific role in the oxidation of NADH. 3. Ca2+ and not Mg2+ reversed the inhibition of NADH oxidation caused by EGTA, whereas both reversed the inhibition caused by EDTA. This suggests that Ca2+ plays a specific role and that Mg2+ reverses the inhibition caused by EDTA by displacing the bound calcium from the chelator. 4. The results are interpreted as showing that Ca2+ plays a specific role in the oxidation of external NADH in addition to its ability to screen electrostatically or bind to the fixed charges associated with the surface of the membrane. PMID:6796061

  17. The activation of non-phosphorylating electron transport by adenine nucleotides in Jerusalem-artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Sotthibandhu, R; Palmer, J M

    1975-01-01

    In isolated plant mitochondria the oxidation of both succinate and exogenous NADH responded in the expected manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents, and the uncoupled rate of respiration was often in excess of the rate obtained in the presence of ADP. However, the oxidation of NAD+-linked substrates responded in a much more complex manner to the addition of ADP or uncoupling agents such as carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone to mitochondria oxidizing pyruvate plus malate failed to result in a reliable stimulation; this uncoupled rate could be stimulated by adding AMP or ADP in the presence of oligomycin or bongkrekic acid. Spectrophometric measurements showed that the addition of AMP or ADP resulted in the simultaneous oxidation of endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide and the reduction of cytochrome b. ADP was only effective in bringing about these changes in redox state in the presence of Mg2+ whereas AMP did not require Mg2+. It was concluded that AMP activated the flow of electrons from endogenous nicotinamide nucleotide to cytochrome b, possible at the level of the internal NADH dehydrogenase. PMID:1227506

  18. Cellulosic bioethanol production from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) using hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Song, Younho; Wi, Seung Gon; Kim, Ho Myeong; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (JA) is recognized as a suitable candidate biomass crop for bioethanol production because it has a rapid growth rate and high biomass productivity. In this study, hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid (HPAC) pretreatment was used to enhance the enzymatic hydrolysis and to effectively remove the lignin of JA. With optimized enzyme doses, synergy was observed from the combination of three different enzymes (RUT-C30, pectinase, and xylanase) which provided a conversion rate was approximately 30% higher than the rate with from treatment with RUT-C30 alone. Fermentation of the JA hydrolyzates by Saccharomyces cerevisiae produced a fermentation yield of approximately 84%. Therefore, Jerusalem artichoke has potential as a bioenergy crop for bioethanol production. PMID:27115748

  19. Genetic analysis and molecular mapping of an Rf gene from Helianthus angustifolius for a new cytoplasmic male-sterile line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) and the corresponding fertility restoration genes (Rf) is a critical tool in large-scale hybrid seed production of sunflower. A new CMS line 514A, derived from H. tuberosus / 7718B, was obtained from a scientific exchange with the Liaoning Academy of...

  20. Isolation and molecular tagging of Rf4, a new male fertility restoration gene from wild sunflower Helianthus maximiliani L.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In sunflower, CMS PET1 and the associated fertility restoration gene Rf1 is the only source extensively used in commercial hybrid production. The search for new cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) and restorer sources to broaden the genetic diversity is needed to insure efficient hybrid seed production...

  1. Overcoming phytoremediation limitations. A case study of Hg contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbafieri, Meri

    2013-04-01

    Phytoremediation is a broad term that comprises several technologies to clean up water and soil. Despite the numerous articles appearing in scientific journals, very few field applications of phytoextraction have been successfully realized. The research here reported on Phytoextraction, the use the plant to "extract" metals from contaminated soil, is focused on implementations to overcome two main drawbacks: the survival of plants in unfavorable environmental conditions (contaminant toxicity, low fertility, etc.) and the often lengthy time it takes to reduce contaminants to the requested level. Moreover, to overcome the imbalance between the technology's potential and its drawbacks, there is growing interest in the use of plants to reduce only the fraction that is the most hazardous to the environment and human health, that is to target the bioavailable fractions of metals in soil. Bioavailable Contaminant Stripping (BCS) would be a remediation approach focused to remove the bioavailable metal fractions. BCS have been used in a mercury contaminated soil from Italian industrial site. Bioavailable fractions were determined by sequential extraction with H2O and NH4Cl.Combined treatments of plant hormone and thioligand to strength Hg uptake by crop plants (Brassica juncea and Helianthus annuus) were tested. Plant biomass, evapotranspiration, Hg uptake and distribution following treatments were compared. Results indicate the plant hormone, cytokinine (CK) foliar treatment, increased evapotranspiration rate in both tested plants. The Hg uptake and translocation in both tested plants increased with simultaneous addition of CK and TS treatments. B. juncea was the most effective in Hg uptake. Application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to an increase in Hg concentration of 232% in shoots and 39% in roots with respect to control. While H. annuus gave a better response in plant biomass production, the application of CK to plants grown in TS-treated soil lead to

  2. A Comparison of the First Two Sequenced Chloroplast Genomes in Asteraceae: Lettuce and Sunflower

    SciTech Connect

    Timme, Ruth E.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-20

    Asteraceae is the second largest family of plants, with over 20,000 species. For the past few decades, numerous phylogenetic studies have contributed to our understanding of the evolutionary relationships within this family, including comparisons of the fast evolving chloroplast gene, ndhF, rbcL, as well as non-coding DNA from the trnL intron plus the trnLtrnF intergenic spacer, matK, and, with lesser resolution, psbA-trnH. This culminated in a study by Panero and Funk in 2002 that used over 13,000 bp per taxon for the largest taxonomic revision of Asteraceae in over a hundred years. Still, some uncertainties remain, and it would be very useful to have more information on the relative rates of sequence evolution among various genes and on genome structure as a potential set of phylogenetic characters to help guide future phylogenetic structures. By way of contributing to this, we report the first two complete chloroplast genome sequences from members of the Asteraceae, those of Helianthus annuus and Lactuca sativa. These plants belong to two distantly related subfamilies, Asteroideae and Cichorioideae, respectively. In addition to these, there is only one other published chloroplast genome sequence for any plant within the larger group called Eusterids II, that of Panax ginseng (Araliaceae, 156,318 bps, AY582139). Early chloroplast genome mapping studies demonstrated that H. annuus and L. sativa share a 22 kb inversion relative to members of the subfamily Barnadesioideae. By comparison to outgroups, this inversion was shown to be derived, indicating that the Asteroideae and Cichorioideae are more closely related than either is to the Barnadesioideae. Later sequencing study found that taxa that share this 22 kb inversion also contain within this region a second, smaller, 3.3 kb inversion. These sequences also enable an analysis of patterns of shared repeats in the genomes at fine level and of RNA editing by comparison to available EST sequences. In addition, since

  3. Lateral Diffusion of CO2 in Leaves Is Not Sufficient to Support Photosynthesis[w

    PubMed Central

    Morison, James I.L.; Gallouët, Emily; Lawson, Tracy; Cornic, Gabriel; Herbin, Raphaèle; Baker, Neil R.

    2005-01-01

    Lateral diffusion of CO2 was investigated in photosynthesizing leaves with different anatomy by gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence imaging using grease to block stomata. When one-half of the leaf surface of the heterobaric species Helianthus annuus was covered by 4-mm-diameter patches of grease, the response of net CO2 assimilation rate (A) to intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) indicated that higher ambient CO2 concentrations (Ca) caused only limited lateral diffusion into the greased areas. When single 4-mm patches were applied to leaves of heterobaric Phaseolus vulgaris and homobaric Commelina communis, chlorophyll a fluorescence images showed dramatic declines in the quantum efficiency of photosystem II electron transport (measured as Fq′/Fm′) across the patch, demonstrating that lateral CO2 diffusion could not support A. The Fq′/Fm′ values were used to compute images of Ci across patches, and their dependence on Ca was assessed. At high Ca, the patch effect was less in C. communis than P. vulgaris. A finite-volume porous-medium model for assimilation rate and lateral CO2 diffusion was developed to analyze the patch images. The model estimated that the effective lateral CO2 diffusion coefficients inside C. communis and P. vulgaris leaves were 22% and 12% of that for free air, respectively. We conclude that, in the light, lateral CO2 diffusion cannot support appreciable photosynthesis over distances of more than approximately 0.3 mm in normal leaves, irrespective of the presence or absence of bundle sheath extensions, because of the CO2 assimilation by cells along the diffusion pathway. PMID:16113223

  4. Root water potential integrates discrete soil physical properties to influence ABA signalling during partial rootzone drying.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Ian C; Egea, Gregorio; Watts, Chris W; Whalley, W Richard

    2010-08-01

    To investigate the influence of different growing substrates (two mineral, two organic) on root xylem ABA concentration ([ABA](root)) and the contribution of the drying root system to total sap flow during partial rootzone drying (PRD), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) shoots were grafted onto the root systems of two plants grown in separate pots. Sap flow through each hypocotyl was measured below the graft union when one pot ('wet') was watered and other ('dry') was not. Each substrate gave unique relationships between dry pot matric potential (Psi(soil)), volumetric water content ((v)) or penetrometer resistance (Q) and either the fraction of photoperiod sap flow from roots in drying soil or [ABA](root). However, decreased relative sap flow, and increased [ABA](root), from roots in drying soil varied with root water potential (Psi(root)) more similarly across a range of substrates. The gradient between Psi(soil) and Psi(root) was greater in substrates with high sand or peat proportions, which may have contributed to a more sensitive response of [ABA](root) to Psi(soil) in these substrates. Whole plant transpiration was most closely correlated with the mean Psi(soil) of both pots, and then with detached leaf xylem ABA concentration. Although Psi(root) best predicted decreased relative sap flow, and increased [ABA](root), from roots in drying soil across a range of substrates, the inaccessibility of this variable in field studies requires a better understanding of how measurable soil variables (Psi(soil), (v), Q) affect Psi(root). PMID:20591896

  5. Regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by plant nitrate reductase in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rockel, Peter; Strube, Frank; Rockel, Andra; Wildt, Juergen; Kaiser, Werner M

    2002-01-01

    NO (nitric oxide) production from sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus L.), detached spinach leaves (Spinacia oleracea L.), desalted spinach leaf extracts or commercial maize (Zea mays L.) leaf nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.6.6.1) was continuously followed as NO emission into the gas phase by chemiluminescence detection, and its response to post-translational NR modulation was examined in vitro and in vivo. NR (purified or in crude extracts) in vitro produced NO at saturating NADH and nitrite concentrations at about 1% of its nitrate reduction capacity. The K(m) for nitrite was relatively high (100 microM) compared to nitrite concentrations in illuminated leaves (10 microM). NO production was competitively inhibited by physiological nitrate concentrations (K(i)=50 microM). Importantly, inactivation of NR in crude extracts by protein phosphorylation with MgATP in the presence of a protein phosphatase inhibitor also inhibited NO production. Nitrate-fertilized plants or leaves emitted NO into purified air. The NO emission was lower in the dark than in the light, but was generally only a small fraction of the total NR activity in the tissue (about 0.01-0.1%). In order to check for a modulation of NO production in vivo, NR was artificially activated by treatments such as anoxia, feeding uncouplers or AICAR (a cell permeant 5'-AMP analogue). Under all these conditions, leaves were accumulating nitrite to concentrations exceeding those in normal illuminated leaves up to 100-fold, and NO production was drastically increased especially in the dark. NO production by leaf extracts or intact leaves was unaffected by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. It is concluded that in non-elicited leaves NO is produced in variable quantities by NR depending on the total NR activity, the NR activation state and the cytosolic nitrite and nitrate concentration. PMID:11741046

  6. Cloning, biochemical characterisation, tissue localisation and possible post-translational regulatory mechanism of the cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerase from developing sunflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Troncoso-Ponce, M A; Rivoal, J; Cejudo, F J; Dorion, S; Garcés, R; Martínez-Force, E

    2010-09-01

    Lipid biosynthesis in developing sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seeds requires reducing power. One of the main sources of cellular NADPH is the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (OPPP), generated from the oxidation of glucose-6-phosphate. This glycolytic intermediate, which can be imported to the plastid and enter in the OPPP, is the substrate and product of cytosolic phosphoglucose isomerase (cPGI, EC 5.3.1.9). In this report, we describe the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding cPGI from developing sunflower seeds. The sequence was predicted to code for a protein of 566 residues characterised by the presence of two sugar isomerase domains. This cDNA was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein. The recombinant protein was purified using immobilised metal ion affinity chromatography and biochemically characterised. The enzyme had a specific activity of 1,436 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) and 1,011 micromol min(-1) mg(-1) protein when the reaction was initiated with glucose-6-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate, respectively. Activity was not affected by erythrose-4-phosphate, but was inhibited by 6-P gluconate and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. A polyclonal immune serum was raised against the purified enzyme, allowing the study of protein levels during the period of active lipid synthesis in seeds. These results were compared with PGI activity profiles and mRNA expression levels obtained from Q-PCR studies. Our results point to the existence of a possible post-translational regulatory mechanism during seed development. Immunolocalisation of the protein in seed tissues further indicated that cPGI is highly expressed in the procambial ring. PMID:20628759

  7. Suitability of different pollen as alternative food for the predatory mite Amblyseius swirskii (Acari, Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Goleva, Irina; Zebitz, Claus P W

    2013-11-01

    The predacious mite Amblyseius swirskii Athias-Henriot is used as a biological control agent against various pests in greenhouses. Pollen offered as supplementary food is reported to improve their fast establishment and performance. However, the nutritional suitability of different pollens for A. swirskii is not sufficiently known yet. Pollens of 21 plant species were offered to the mites as exclusive food during preimaginal development. Preimaginal mortality and developmental time have been assessed, followed by a life-table analysis of the emerged adults and a calculation of demographic parameters. Amblyseius swirskii can feed exclusively on pollen, but the nutritional value of the pollens differed significantly. Pollens of Lilium martagon and Hippeastrum sp. were toxic, causing 100 % preimaginal mortality, probably due to secondary plant compounds. Hibiscus syriacus pollen was absolutely incompatible for the juvenile and adult mites, possibly due to their external morphology, differing from all the other pollens tested and leading to 100 % preimaginal mortality also. Considering all parameters, feeding on Aesculus hippocastanum, Crocus vernus, Echinocereus sp. and Paulownia tomentosa pollens lead to the best performance of the mites. Feeding on most pollens resulted in no or low preimaginal mortality of A. swirskii, but affected significantly developmental time, adult longevity, and reproduction parameters. Commercial bee pollen was not able to improve life-table parameters compared to pure pollen of the plant species. Pollens of Helianthus annuus, Corylus avellana and a Poaceae mix were less suitable as food source and resulted in a poor performance of all tested parameters. Compared with literature data, 18 pollens tested proved to be a similar or better food source than cattail pollen, qualifying A. swirskii as a positively omnivorous type IV species. Pollens of Ricinus communis and Zea mays can be recommended as supplementary food offered as banker plants

  8. Polar Calcium Flux in Sunflower Hypocotyl Segments 1

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Constancio C.; dela Fuente, Rollo K.

    1986-01-01

    Calcium flux in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv Russian mammoth) hypocotyl was measured with a Ca2+ electrode as the increase or decrease in Ca2+ in an aqueous solution (10 micromolar CaCl2) in contact with either the basal or apical end of 20 millimeter segments. Ca2+ efflux was significantly higher at the apical end compared with the basal end; this apparent polarity was maintained even when the segments were inverted. No significant difference was observed in the cation exchange capacity of apical and basal cell walls that could explain the difference in Ca2+ efflux at opposite ends of the hypocotyl segment. The presence of exogenous indoleacetic acid (IAA) in the segment medium resulted in the promotion of both Ca2+ efflux and segment elongation. However, osmotic inhibition of the IAA-induced elongation did not result in inhibiting the IAA-induced Ca2+ efflux. Ca2+ efflux was inhibited by cyanide. Lowering the temperature from 25°C also caused the gradual reduction of Ca2+ efflux; at 5°C the hypocotyl segments showed a net absorption of Ca2+ from the segment medium. These findings support the suggestion that: (a) the observed Ca2+ efflux in hypocotyl segments is probably the manifestation of the system which maintains the transmembrane Ca2+ gradient at the cellular level. (b) The acropetal polarity of Ca2+ efflux may be the result of the involvement of Ca2+ in the basipetal transport of IAA. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:16664830

  9. Light Response of CO(2) Assimilation, Dissipation of Excess Excitation Energy, and Zeaxanthin Content of Sun and Shade Leaves.

    PubMed

    Demmig-Adams, B; Winter, K; Krüger, A; Czygan, F C

    1989-07-01

    Intact attached sun leaves of Helianthus annuus and shade leaves of Monstera deliciosa and Hedera helix were used to obtain light response curves of CO(2) uptake, the content of the carotenoid zeaxanthin (formed by violaxanthin de-epoxidation), as well as nonphotochemical quenching (q(NP)), and the rate constant of radiationless energy dissipation (k(D)). The latter two parameters were calculated from the decrease of chlorophyll a fluorescence at closed photosystem II traps in saturating pulses in the light. Among the three species, the light-saturated capacity of CO(2) uptake differed widely and light saturation of CO(2) uptake occurred at very different photon flux densities. Fluorescence quenching and zeaxanthin content exhibited features which were common to all three species: below light-saturation of CO(2) uptake nonphotochemical quenching occurred in the absence of zeaxanthin and was not accompanied by a decrease in the yield of instantaneous fluorescence. Nonphotochemical quenching, q(NP), increased up to values which ranged between 0.35 and 0.5 when based on a control value of the yield of variable fluorescence determined after 12 hours of darkness. As light saturation of CO(2) uptake was approached, q(NP) showed a secondary increase and the zeaxanthin content of the leaves began to rise. This was also the point from which the yield of instantaneous fluorescence began to decrease. The increase in zeaxanthin was paralleled by an increase in the rate constant for radiationless energy dissipation k(D), which opens the possibility that zeaxanthin is related to the rapidly relaxing "high-energy-state quenching" in leaves. PMID:16666892

  10. Light Response of CO2 Assimilation, Dissipation of Excess Excitation Energy, and Zeaxanthin Content of Sun and Shade Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Winter, Klaus; Krüger, Almuth; Czygan, Franz-Christian

    1989-01-01

    Intact attached sun leaves of Helianthus annuus and shade leaves of Monstera deliciosa and Hedera helix were used to obtain light response curves of CO2 uptake, the content of the carotenoid zeaxanthin (formed by violaxanthin de-epoxidation), as well as nonphotochemical quenching (qNP), and the rate constant of radiationless energy dissipation (kD). The latter two parameters were calculated from the decrease of chlorophyll a fluorescence at closed photosystem II traps in saturating pulses in the light. Among the three species, the light-saturated capacity of CO2 uptake differed widely and light saturation of CO2 uptake occurred at very different photon flux densities. Fluorescence quenching and zeaxanthin content exhibited features which were common to all three species: below light-saturation of CO2 uptake nonphotochemical quenching occurred in the absence of zeaxanthin and was not accompanied by a decrease in the yield of instantaneous fluorescence. Nonphotochemical quenching, qNP, increased up to values which ranged between 0.35 and 0.5 when based on a control value of the yield of variable fluorescence determined after 12 hours of darkness. As light saturation of CO2 uptake was approached, qNP showed a secondary increase and the zeaxanthin content of the leaves began to rise. This was also the point from which the yield of instantaneous fluorescence began to decrease. The increase in zeaxanthin was paralleled by an increase in the rate constant for radiationless energy dissipation kD, which opens the possibility that zeaxanthin is related to the rapidly relaxing “high-energy-state quenching” in leaves. PMID:16666892

  11. Synchrotron-Based Techniques Shed Light on Mechanisms of Plant Sensitivity and Tolerance to High Manganese in the Root Environment.

    PubMed

    Blamey, F Pax C; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C; Cheng, Miaomiao; Tang, Caixian; Paterson, David J; Lombi, Enzo; Wang, Wei Hong; Scheckel, Kirk G; Kopittke, Peter M

    2015-11-01

    Plant species differ in response to high available manganese (Mn), but the mechanisms of sensitivity and tolerance are poorly understood. In solution culture, greater than or equal to 30 µm Mn decreased the growth of soybean (Glycine max), but white lupin (Lupinus albus), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupin angustifolius), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) grew well at 100 µm Mn. Differences in species' tolerance to high Mn could not be explained simply by differences in root, stem, or leaf Mn status, being 8.6, 17.1, 6.8, and 9.5 mmol kg(-1) leaf fresh mass at 100 µm Mn. Furthermore, x-ray absorption near edge structure analyses identified the predominance of Mn(II), bound mostly to malate or citrate, in roots and stems of all four species. Rather, differences in tolerance were due to variations in Mn distribution and speciation within leaves. In Mn-sensitive soybean, in situ analysis of fresh leaves using x-ray fluorescence microscopy combined with x-ray absorption near edge structure showed high Mn in the veins, and manganite [Mn(III)] accumulated in necrotic lesions apparently through low Mn sequestration in vacuoles or other vesicles. In the two lupin species, most Mn accumulated in vacuoles as either soluble Mn(II) malate or citrate. In sunflower, Mn was sequestered as manganite at the base of nonglandular trichomes. Hence, tolerance to high Mn was ascribed to effective sinks for Mn in leaves, as Mn(II) within vacuoles or through oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III) in trichomes. These two mechanisms prevented Mn accumulation in the cytoplasm and apoplast, thereby ensuring tolerance to high Mn in the root environment. PMID:26395840

  12. Chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics and yield responses in rainfed crops with variable potassium nutrition in K deficient semi-arid alfisols.

    PubMed

    Srinivasarao, Ch; Shanker, Arun K; Kundu, Sumanta; Reddy, Sharanbhoopal

    2016-07-01

    Optimum potassium (K) nutrition in semi-arid regions may help crop plants to overcome constraints in their growth and development such as moisture stress, leading to higher productivity of rainfed crops, thus judicious K management is essential. A study was conducted to evaluate the importance of K nutrition on physiological processes like photosynthesis through chlorophyll a fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence induction kinetics (OJIP) of rainfed crops viz., maize (Zea mays L.), pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum), groundnut (Arachis hypogaea), sunflower (Helianthus annuus), castor (Ricinus communis L.) and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) under water stress conditions by studying their growth attributes, water relations, yield, K uptake and use efficiency under varied K levels. Highest chlorophyll content was observed under K60 in maize and pearl millet. Narrow and wide Chl a:b ratio was observed in castor and groundnut respectively. The fluorescence yield decreased in the crops as K dosage increased, evidenced by increasing of all points (O, J, I and P) of the OJIP curves. The fluorescence transient curve for K60 was lower than K0 and K40 for all the crops. Potassium levels altered the fluorescence induction and impaired photosynthetic systems in all the crops studied. There was no distinct trend observed in leaf water potential of crops under study. Uptake of K was high in sunflower with increased rate of K application. Quantitatively, K uptake by castor crop was lesser compared to all other crops. Our results indicate that the yield reduction under low K was due to the low capacity of the crops to translocate K from non-photosynthetic organs such as stems and petioles to upper leaves and harvested organs and this in turn influenced the capacity of the crops to produce a high economic yield per unit of K taken up thus reducing utilization efficiency of K. PMID:27101276

  13. Transient phytoextraction agents: establishing criteria for the use of chelants in phytoextraction of recalcitrant metals.

    PubMed

    Parra, R; Ulery, A L; Elless, M P; Blaylock, M J

    2008-01-01

    The phytoremediation of recalcitrant metals such as lead and uranium rely on soil amendments to enhance metal availability within the rhizosphere. Because these amendments may persist in soils, agents that not only biodegrade rapidly but also are effective in triggering metal uptake in plants are needed for metals phytoextraction to be considered as an accepted practice. In this study, several biodegradable organic acids and chelating agents were assessed to determine if these amendments can be used in an effective manner, and if their activity and use is consistent with a proposed class of soil amendments for phytoextraction, here termed transient phytoextraction agents (TPAs). A TPA is proposed as an agent that would exhibit both effectiveness in triggering plant accumulation of the targeted metal while minimizing the risk of migration through rapid degradation or inactivation of the soluble complex. Eleven candidate TPAs (acetic acid, ascorbic acid, citric acid, malic acid, oxalic acid, succinic acid, ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, dicarboxymethylglutamic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, BayPure CX 100, and the siderophore desferrioxamine B) were tested in batch studies to evaluate their complexation behavior using contaminated soils, with uranium and lead as the target metals. A growth chamber study was then conducted with Brassica juncea (Indian mustard), Helianthus annuus (sunflower), and Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) grown in a lead-contaminated soil that was treated with the candidate TPAs to assess phytoextraction effectiveness. For the soils tested, citric acid, oxalic acid, and succinic acid were found to be effective complexing agents for uranium phytoextraction, whereas Baypure CX 100 and citric acid exhibited effectiveness for lead phytoextraction. PMID:19260223

  14. A Gene-Phenotype Network Based on Genetic Variability for Drought Responses Reveals Key Physiological Processes in Controlled and Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, David; Arribat, Sandrine; Maury, Pierre; Martin-Magniette, Marie-Laure; Hourlier, Thibaut; Laporte, Marion; Varès, Didier; Carrère, Sébastien; Grieu, Philippe; Balzergue, Sandrine; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the connections between molecular and physiological processes underlying the diversity of drought stress responses in plants is key for basic and applied science. Drought stress response involves a large number of molecular pathways and subsequent physiological processes. Therefore, it constitutes an archetypical systems biology model. We first inferred a gene-phenotype network exploiting differences in drought responses of eight sunflower (Helianthus annuus) genotypes to two drought stress scenarios. Large transcriptomic data were obtained with the sunflower Affymetrix microarray, comprising 32423 probesets, and were associated to nine morpho-physiological traits (integrated transpired water, leaf transpiration rate, osmotic potential, relative water content, leaf mass per area, carbon isotope discrimination, plant height, number of leaves and collar diameter) using sPLS regression. Overall, we could associate the expression patterns of 1263 probesets to six phenotypic traits and identify if correlations were due to treatment, genotype and/or their interaction. We also identified genes whose expression is affected at moderate and/or intense drought stress together with genes whose expression variation could explain phenotypic and drought tolerance variability among our genetic material. We then used the network model to study phenotypic changes in less tractable agronomical conditions, i.e. sunflower hybrids subjected to different watering regimes in field trials. Mapping this new dataset in the gene-phenotype network allowed us to identify genes whose expression was robustly affected by water deprivation in both controlled and field conditions. The enrichment in genes correlated to relative water content and osmotic potential provides evidence of the importance of these traits in agronomical conditions. PMID:23056196

  15. Preference of a Polyphagous Mirid Bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) for Flowering Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hongsheng; Lu, Yanhui; Wyckhuys, Kris A. G.; Wu, Kongming

    2013-01-01

    Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is one of the most important herbivores in a broad range of cultivated plants, including cotton, cereals, vegetables, and fruit crops in China. In this manuscript, we report on a 6-year long study in which (adult) A. lucorum abundance was recorded on 174 plant species from 39 families from early July to mid-September. Through the study period per year, the proportion of flowering plants exploited by adult A. lucorum was significantly greater than that of non-flowering plants. For a given plant species, A. lucorum adults reached peak abundance at the flowering stage, when the plant had the greatest attraction to the adults. More specifically, mean adult abundance on 26 species of major host plants and their relative standard attraction were 10.3–28.9 times and 9.3–19.5 times higher at flowering stage than during non-flowering periods, respectively. Among all the tested species, A. lucorum adults switched food plants according to the succession of flowering plant species. In early July, A. lucorum adults preferred some plant species in bloom, such as Vigna radiata, Gossypium hirsutum, Helianthus annuus and Chrysanthemum coronarium; since late July, adults dispersed into other flowering hosts (e.g. Ricinus communis, Impatiens balsamina, Humulus scandens, Ocimum basilicum, Agastache rugosus and Coriandrum sativum); in early September, they largely migrated to flowering Artemisia spp. (e.g. A. argyi, A. lavandulaefolia, A. annua and A. scoparia). Our findings underscore the important role of flowering plays in the population dynamics and inter-plant migration of this mirid bug. Also, our work helps understand evolutionary aspects of host plant use in polyphagous insects such as A. lucorum, and provides baseline information for the development of sustainable management strategies of this key agricultural pest. PMID:23874835

  16. Exogenous malic and acetic acids reduce cadmium phytotoxicity and enhance cadmium accumulation in roots of sunflower plants.

    PubMed

    Hawrylak-Nowak, Barbara; Dresler, Sławomir; Matraszek, Renata

    2015-09-01

    There is increasing evidence showing that low molecular weight organic acids (LMWOA) are involved in heavy metal resistance mechanisms in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous malic (MA) or acetic (AA) acids on the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium (Cd) in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). For this purpose, plants were grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions. Single Cd stress (5 μM Cd for 14 days) induced strong phytotoxic effects, as indicated by a decrease in all growth parameters, concentration of photosynthetic pigments, and root activity, as well as a high level of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. Exogenous MA or AA (250 or 500 μM) applied to the Cd-containing medium enhanced the accumulation of Cd by the roots and limited Cd translocation to the shoots. Moreover, the MA or AA applied more or less reduced Cd phytotoxicity by increasing the growth parameters, photosynthetic pigment concentrations, decreasing accumulation of H2O2, and improving the root activity. Of the studied organic acids, MA was much more efficient in mitigation of Cd toxicity than AA, probably by its antioxidant effects, which were stronger than those of AA. Plant response to Cd involved decreased production of endogenous LMWOA, probably as a consequence of severe Cd toxicity. The addition of MA or AA to the medium increased endogenous accumulation of LMWOA, especially in the roots, which could be beneficial for plant metabolism. These results imply that especially MA may be involved in the processes of Cd uptake, translocation, and tolerance in plants. PMID:26115548

  17. (137)Cs and (90)Sr uptake by sunflower cultivated under hydroponic conditions.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Valenová, Sárka; Vavríková, Zuzana; Vanek, Tomás

    2006-01-01

    The (90)Sr and (137)Cs uptake by the plant Helianthus annuus L. was studied during cultivation in a hydroponic medium. The accumulation of radioactivity in plants was measured after 2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 days of cultivation. About 12% of (137)Cs and 20% of (90)Sr accumulated during the experiments. We did not find any differences between the uptake of radioactive and stable caesium and strontium isotopes. Radioactivity distribution within the plant was determined by autoradiography. (137)Cs was present mainly in nodal segments, leaf veins and young leaves. High activity of (90)Sr was localized in leaf veins, stem, central root and stomata. The influence of stable elements or analogues on the transfer behaviour was investigated. The percentage of non-active caesium and strontium concentration in plants decreased with the increasing initial concentration of Cs or Sr in the medium. The percentage of (90)Sr activity in plants decreased with increasing initial activity of the nuclide in the medium, but the activity of (137)Cs in plants increased. The influence of K(+) and NH(4)(+) on the uptake of (137)Cs and the influence of Ca(2+) on the uptake of (90)Sr was tested. The highest accumulation of (137)Cs (24-27% of the initial activity of (137)Cs) was found in the presence of 10 mM potassium and 12 mM ammonium ions. Accumulation of about 22% of initial activity of (90)Sr was determined in plants grown on the medium with 8 mM calcium ions. PMID:16630674

  18. Synchrotron-Based Techniques Shed Light on Mechanisms of Plant Sensitivity and Tolerance to High Manganese in the Root Environment1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Blamey, F. Pax C.; Hernandez-Soriano, Maria C.; Cheng, Miaomiao; Tang, Caixian; Paterson, David J.; Lombi, Enzo; Wang, Wei Hong; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Kopittke, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Plant species differ in response to high available manganese (Mn), but the mechanisms of sensitivity and tolerance are poorly understood. In solution culture, greater than or equal to 30 µm Mn decreased the growth of soybean (Glycine max), but white lupin (Lupinus albus), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupin angustifolius), and sunflower (Helianthus annuus) grew well at 100 µm Mn. Differences in species’ tolerance to high Mn could not be explained simply by differences in root, stem, or leaf Mn status, being 8.6, 17.1, 6.8, and 9.5 mmol kg–1 leaf fresh mass at 100 µm Mn. Furthermore, x-ray absorption near edge structure analyses identified the predominance of Mn(II), bound mostly to malate or citrate, in roots and stems of all four species. Rather, differences in tolerance were due to variations in Mn distribution and speciation within leaves. In Mn-sensitive soybean, in situ analysis of fresh leaves using x-ray fluorescence microscopy combined with x-ray absorption near edge structure showed high Mn in the veins, and manganite [Mn(III)] accumulated in necrotic lesions apparently through low Mn sequestration in vacuoles or other vesicles. In the two lupin species, most Mn accumulated in vacuoles as either soluble Mn(II) malate or citrate. In sunflower, Mn was sequestered as manganite at the base of nonglandular trichomes. Hence, tolerance to high Mn was ascribed to effective sinks for Mn in leaves, as Mn(II) within vacuoles or through oxidation of Mn(II) to Mn(III) in trichomes. These two mechanisms prevented Mn accumulation in the cytoplasm and apoplast, thereby ensuring tolerance to high Mn in the root environment. PMID:26395840

  19. Review of anthraquinone applications for pest management and agricultural crop protection.

    PubMed

    DeLiberto, Shelagh T; Werner, Scott J

    2016-10-01

    We have reviewed published anthraquinone applications for international pest management and agricultural crop protection from 1943 to 2016. Anthraquinone (AQ) is commonly found in dyes, pigments and many plants and organisms. Avian repellent research with AQ began in the 1940s. In the context of pest management, AQ is currently used as a chemical repellent, perch deterrent, insecticide and feeding deterrent in many wild birds, and in some mammals, insects and fishes. Criteria for evaluation of effective chemical repellents include efficacy, potential for wildlife hazards, phytotoxicity and environmental persistence. As a biopesticide, AQ often meets these criteria of efficacy for the non-lethal management of agricultural depredation caused by wildlife. We summarize published applications of AQ for the protection of newly planted and maturing crops from pest birds. Conventional applications of AQ-based repellents include preplant seed treatments [e.g. corn (Zea mays L.), rice (Oryza sativa L.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), wheat (Triticum spp.), millet (Panicum spp.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), pelletized feed and forest tree species] and foliar applications for rice, sunflower, lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), turf, sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.), soybean (Glycine max L.), sweet corn and nursery, fruit and nut crops. In addition to agricultural repellent applications, AQ has also been used to treat toxicants for the protection of non-target birds. Few studies have demonstrated AQ repellency in mammals, including wild boar (Sus scrofa, L.), thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, Mitchill), black-tailed prairie dogs (Cyomys ludovicainus, Ord.), common voles (Microtus arvalis, Pallas), house mice (Mus musculus, L.), Tristram's jirds (Meriones tristrami, Thomas) and black rats (Rattus rattus L.). Natural sources of AQ and its derivatives have also been identified as insecticides and insect repellents. As a natural or synthetic biopesticide, AQ

  20. Hahb-10, a sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene, is regulated by light quality and quantity, and promotes early flowering when expressed in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Eva C; Dezar, Carlos A; Gonzalez, Daniel H; Chan, Raquel L

    2005-12-01

    Homeodomain-leucine zipper proteins constitute a family of transcription factors found only in plants. Expression patterns of the sunflower homeobox-leucine zipper gene Hahb-10 (Helianthus annuus homeobox-10), that belongs to the HD-Zip II subfamily, were analysed. Northern blots showed that Hahb-10 is expressed primarily in mature leaves, although expression is clearly detectable in younger leaves and also in stems. Considerably higher expression levels were detected in etiolated seedlings compared with light-grown seedlings. Induction of Hahb-10 expression was observed when seedlings were subjected to treatment with gibberellins. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express Hahb-10 under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter show special phenotypic characteristics such as darker cotyledons and planar leaves. A reduction in the life cycle of about 25% allowing earlier seed collection was also observed, and this phenomenon is clearly related to a shortened flowering time. When the number of plants per pot increased, the difference in developmental rate between transgenic and non-transformed individuals became larger. After gibberellin treatment, the relative difference in life cycle duration was considerably reduced. Several light-regulated genes have been tested as possible target genes of Hahb-10. One of them, PsbS, shows a different response to illumination conditions in transgenic plants compared with the response in wild-type plants while the other genes behave similarly in both genotypes. We propose that Hahb-10 functions in a signalling cascade(s) that control(s) plant responses to light quality and quantity, and may also be involved in gibberellin transduction pathways. PMID:16215272

  1. Comparative biochemical and immunological studies of the glycine betaine synthesis pathway in diverse families of dicotyledons.

    PubMed

    Weretilnyk, E A; Bednarek, S; McCue, K F; Rhodes, D; Hanson, A D

    1989-06-01

    Members of the Chenopodiaceae can accumulate high levels (>100 μmol·(g DW)(-1)) of glycine betaine (betaine) in leaves when salinized. Chenopodiaceae synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline→betaine aldehyde→ betaine), with the second step catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8). High betaine levels have also been reported in leaves of species from several distantly-related families of dicotyledons, raising the question of whether the same betaine-synthesis pathway is used in all cases.Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry showed that betaine levels of >100 μmol·(g DW)(-1) are present in Lycium ferocissimum Miers (Solanaceae), Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae), and Amaranthus caudatus L. (Amaranthaceae), that salinization promotes betaine accumulation in these plants, and that they can convert supplied choline to betaine aldehyde and betaine. Nicotiana tabacum L. and Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) Karst. ex Farw. (Solanaceae), Lactuca sativa L. (Asteraceae) and Ipomoea purpurea L. (Convolvulaceae) also contained betaine, but at a low level (0.1-0.5 μmol·(g DW)(-1). Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assays, immunotitration and immunoblotting demonstrated that the betaine-accumulating species have a BADH enzyme recognized by antibodies raised against BADH from Spinacia oleracea L. (Chenopodiaceae), and that the Mr of the BADH monomer is in all cases close to 63 000. These data indicate that the choline→betaine aldehyde→betaine pathway may have evolved by vertical descent from an early angiosperm ancestor, and might be widespread (albeit not always strongly expressed) among flowering plants. Consistent with these suggestions, Magnolia x soulangiana was found to have a low level of betaine, and to express a protein of Mr 63 000 which cross-reacted with antibodies to BADH from Spinacia oleracea. PMID:24212901

  2. Cloning and transcriptional analysis of Crepis alpina fatty acid desaturases affecting the biosynthesis of crepenynic acid.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeong-Won; Kappock, T Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Crepis alpina acetylenase is a variant FAD2 desaturase that catalyses the insertion of a triple bond at the Delta12 position of linoleic acid, forming crepenynic acid in developing seeds. Seeds contain a high level of crepenynic acid but other tissues contain none. Using reverse transcriptase-coupled PCR (RT-PCR), acetylenase transcripts were identified in non-seed C. alpina tissues, which were highest in flower heads. To understand why functional expression of the acetylenase is limited to seeds, genes that affect acetylenase activity by providing substrate (FAD2) or electrons (cytochrome b5), or that compete for substrate (FAD3), were cloned. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the availability of a preferred cytochrome b5 isoform is not a limiting factor. Developing seeds co-express acetylenase and FAD2 isoform 2 (FAD2-2) at high levels. Flower heads co-express FAD2-3 and FAD3 at high levels, and FAD2-2 and acetylenase at moderate levels. FAD2-3 was not expressed in developing seed. Real-time RT-PCR absolute transcript quantitation showed 10(4)-fold higher acetylenase expression in developing seeds than in flower heads. Collectively, the results show that both the acetylenase expression level and the co-expression of other desaturases may contribute to the tissue specificity of crepenynate production. Helianthus annuus contains a Delta12 acetylenase in a polyacetylene biosynthetic pathway, so does not accumulate crepenynate. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed relatively strong acetylenase expression in young sunflowers. Acetylenase transcription is observed in both species without accumulation of the enzymatic product, crepenynate. Functional expression of acetylenase appears to be affected by competition and collaboration with other enzymes. PMID:17329262

  3. Inhibitors of fatty acid biosynthesis in sunflower seeds.

    PubMed

    Pleite, Rafael; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    During de novo fatty acid synthesis in sunflower seeds, saturated fatty acid production is influenced by the competition between the enzymes of the principal pathways and the saturated acyl-ACP thioesterases. Genetic backgrounds with more efficient saturated acyl-ACP thioesterase alleles only express their phenotypic effects when the alleles for the enzymes in the main pathway are less efficient. For this reason, we studied the incorporation of [2-(14)C]acetate into the lipids of developing sunflower seeds (Helianthus annuus L.) from several mutant lines in vivo. The labelling of different triacylglycerol fatty acids in different oilseed mutants reflects the fatty acid composition of the seed and supports the channelling theory of fatty acid biosynthesis. Incubation with methyl viologen diminished the conversion of stearoyl-ACP to oleoyl-ACP in vivo through a decrease in the available reductant power. In turn, this led to the accumulation of stearoyl-ACP to the levels detected in seeds from high stearic acid mutants. The concomitant reduction of oleoyl-ACP content inside the plastid allowed us to study the activity of acyl-ACP thioesterases on saturated fatty acids. In these mutants, we verified that the accumulation of saturated fatty acids requires efficient thioesterase activity on saturated-ACPs. By studying the effects of cerulenin on the in vivo incorporation of [2-(14)C]acetate into lipids and on the in vitro activity of beta-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II, we found that elongation to very long chain fatty acids can occur both inside and outside of the plastid in sunflower seeds. PMID:16500723

  4. Isolation and characterization of a glyphosate-degrading rhizosphere strain, Enterobacter cloacae K7.

    PubMed

    Kryuchkova, Yelena V; Burygin, Gennady L; Gogoleva, Natalia E; Gogolev, Yuri V; Chernyshova, Marina P; Makarov, Oleg E; Fedorov, Evgenii E; Turkovskaya, Olga V

    2014-01-20

    Plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria exert beneficial effects on plants through their capacity for nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, phosphate solubilization, and improvement of the water and mineral status of plants. We suggested that these bacteria may also have the potential to express degradative activity toward glyphosate, a commonly used organophosphorus herbicide. In this study, 10 strains resistant to a 10 mM concentration of glyphosate were isolated from the rhizoplane of various plants. Five of these strains--Alcaligenes sp. K1, Comamonas sp. K4, Azomonas sp. K5, Pseudomonas sp. K3, and Enterobacter cloacae K7--possessed a number of associative traits, including fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, solubilization of phosphates, and synthesis of the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid. One strain, E. cloacae K7, could utilize glyphosate as a source of P. Gas-liquid chromatography showed that E. cloacae growth correlated with a decline in herbicide content in the culture medium (40% of the initial 5mM content), with no glyphosate accumulating inside the cells. Thin-layer chromatography analysis of the intermediate metabolites of glyphosate degradation found that E. cloacae K7 had a C-P lyase activity and degraded glyphosate to give sarcosine, which was then oxidized to glycine. In addition, strain K7 colonized the roots of common sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and sugar sorghum (Sorghum saccharatum Pers.), promoting the growth and development of sunflower seedlings. Our findings extend current knowledge of glyphosate-degrading rhizosphere bacteria and may be useful for developing a biotechnology for the cleanup and restoration of glyphosate-polluted soils. PMID:23545355

  5. Gravitropism in Higher Plant Shoots 1

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; White, Rosemary G.; Salisbury, Frank B.

    1986-01-01

    Ethylene at 1.0 and 10.0 cubic centimeters per cubic meter decreased the rate of gravitropic bending in stems of cocklebur (Xanthium strumarium L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill), but 0.1 cubic centimeter per cubic meter ethylene had little effect. Treating cocklebur plants with 1.0 millimolar aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG) (ethylene synthesis inhibitor) delayed stem bending compared with controls, but adding 0.1 cubic centimeter per cubic meter ethylene in the surrounding atmosphere (or applying 0.1% ethephon solution) partially restored the rate of bending of AVG-treated plants. Ethylene increases in bending stems, and AVG inhibits this. Virtually all newly synthesized ethylene appeared in bottom halves of horizontal stems, where ethylene concentrations were as much as 100 times those in upright stems or in top halves of horizontal stems. This was especially true when horizontal stems were physically restrained from bending. Ethylene might promote cell elongation in bottom tissues of a horizontal stem or indicate other factors there (e.g. a large amount of `functioning' auxin). Or top and bottom tissues may become differentially sensitive to ethylene. Auxin applied to one side of a vertical stem caused extreme bending away from that side; gibberellic acid, kinetin, and abscisic acid were without effect. Acidic ethephon solutions applied to one side of young seedlings of cocklebur, tomato, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) caused bending away from that side, but neutral ethephon solutions did not cause bending. Buffered or unbuffered acid (HCl) caused similar bending. Neutral ethephon solutions produced typical ethylene symptoms (i.e. epinasty, inhibition of stem elongation). HCl or acidic ethephon applied to the top of horizontal stems caused downward bending, but these substances applied to the bottom of such stems inhibited growth and upward bending—an unexpected result. PMID:11539089

  6. Plant available nitrogen from anaerobically digested sludge and septic tank sludge applied to crops grown in the tropics.

    PubMed

    Sripanomtanakorn, S; Polprasert, C

    2002-04-01

    Agricultural land is an attractive alternative for the disposal of biosolids since it utilises the recyclable nutrients in the production of crops. In Thailand and other tropical regions, limited field-study information exists on the effect of biosolids management strategies on crop N utilisation and plant available N (PAN) of biosolids. A field study was conducted to quantify the PAN of the applied biosolids, and to evaluate the N uptake rates of some tropical crops. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) were chosen in this study. Two types of biosolids used were: anaerobically digested sludge and septic tank sludge. The soil is acid sulfate and is classified as Sulfic Tropaquepts with heavy clay in texture. The anaerobically digested sludge applied rates were: 0, 156 and 312 kg N ha(-1) for the sunflower plots, and 0, 586, and 1172 kg N ha(-1) for the tomato plots. The septic tank sludge applied rates were: 0, 95 and 190 kg N ha(-1) for the sunflower plots, and 0, 354 and 708 kg N ha(-1) for the tomato plots, respectively. The results indicated the feasibility of applying biosolids to grow tropical crops. The applications of the anaerobically digested sludge and the septic tank sludge resulted in the yields of sunflower seeds and tomato fruits and the plant N uptakes comparable or better than that applied with only the chemical fertiliser. The estimated PAN of the anaerobically digested sludge was about 27-42% of the sludge organic N during the growing season. For the septic tank sludge, the PAN was about 15-58% of the sludge organic N. It is interesting to observe that an increase of the rate of septic tank sludge incorporated into this heavy clay soil under the cropping system resulted in the decrease of N mineralisation rate. This situation could cause the reduction of yield and N uptake of crops. PMID:12058820

  7. Large-spored Alternaria pathogens in section Porri disentangled

    PubMed Central

    Woudenberg, J.H.C.; Truter, M.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    The omnipresent fungal genus Alternaria was recently divided into 24 sections based on molecular and morphological data. Alternaria sect. Porri is the largest section, containing almost all Alternaria species with medium to large conidia and long beaks, some of which are important plant pathogens (e.g. Alternaria porri, A. solani and A. tomatophila). We constructed a multi-gene phylogeny on parts of the ITS, GAPDH, RPB2, TEF1 and Alt a 1 gene regions, which, supplemented with morphological and cultural studies, forms the basis for species recognition in sect. Porri. Our data reveal 63 species, of which 10 are newly described in sect. Porri, and 27 species names are synonymised. The three known Alternaria pathogens causing early blight on tomato all cluster in one clade, and are synonymised under the older name, A. linariae. Alternaria protenta, a species formerly only known as pathogen on Helianthus annuus, is also reported to cause early blight of potato, together with A. solani and A. grandis. Two clades with isolates causing purple blotch of onion are confirmed as A. allii and A. porri, but the two species cannot adequately be distinguished based on the number of beaks and branches as suggested previously. This is also found among the pathogens of Passifloraceae, which are reduced from four to three species. In addition to the known pathogen of sweet potato, A. bataticola, three more species are delineated of which two are newly described. A new Alternaria section is also described, comprising two large-spored Alternaria species with concatenate conidia. PMID:25492985

  8. Large-spored Alternaria pathogens in section Porri disentangled.

    PubMed

    Woudenberg, J H C; Truter, M; Groenewald, J Z; Crous, P W

    2014-09-01

    The omnipresent fungal genus Alternaria was recently divided into 24 sections based on molecular and morphological data. Alternaria sect. Porri is the largest section, containing almost all Alternaria species with medium to large conidia and long beaks, some of which are important plant pathogens (e.g. Alternaria porri, A. solani and A. tomatophila). We constructed a multi-gene phylogeny on parts of the ITS, GAPDH, RPB2, TEF1 and Alt a 1 gene regions, which, supplemented with morphological and cultural studies, forms the basis for species recognition in sect. Porri. Our data reveal 63 species, of which 10 are newly described in sect. Porri, and 27 species names are synonymised. The three known Alternaria pathogens causing early blight on tomato all cluster in one clade, and are synonymised under the older name, A. linariae. Alternaria protenta, a species formerly only known as pathogen on Helianthus annuus, is also reported to cause early blight of potato, together with A. solani and A. grandis. Two clades with isolates causing purple blotch of onion are confirmed as A. allii and A. porri, but the two species cannot adequately be distinguished based on the number of beaks and branches as suggested previously. This is also found among the pathogens of Passifloraceae, which are reduced from four to three species. In addition to the known pathogen of sweet potato, A. bataticola, three more species are delineated of which two are newly described. A new Alternaria section is also described, comprising two large-spored Alternaria species with concatenate conidia. PMID:25492985

  9. Genetic analysis of safflower domestication

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) is an oilseed crop in the Compositae (a.k.a. Asteraceae) that is valued for its oils rich in unsaturated fatty acids. Here, we present an analysis of the genetic architecture of safflower domestication and compare our findings to those from sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an independently domesticated oilseed crop within the same family. We mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying 24 domestication-related traits in progeny from a cross between safflower and its wild progenitor, Carthamus palaestinus Eig. Also, we compared QTL positions in safflower against those that have been previously identified in cultivated x wild sunflower crosses to identify instances of colocalization. Results We mapped 61 QTL, the vast majority of which (59) exhibited minor or moderate phenotypic effects. The two large-effect QTL corresponded to one each for flower color and leaf spininess. A total of 14 safflower QTL colocalized with previously reported sunflower QTL for the same traits. Of these, QTL for three traits (days to flower, achene length, and number of selfed seed) had cultivar alleles that conferred effects in the same direction in both species. Conclusions As has been observed in sunflower, and unlike many other crops, our results suggest that the genetics of safflower domestication is quite complex. Moreover, our comparative mapping results indicate that safflower and sunflower exhibit numerous instances of QTL colocalization, suggesting that parallel trait transitions during domestication may have been driven, at least in part, by parallel genotypic evolution at some of the same underlying genes. PMID:24502326

  10. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bruce D.; Yarnell, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings. PMID:19366669

  11. An Antibody to the Castor Bean Glyoxysomal Lipase (62 kD) also Binds to a 62 kD Protein in Extracts from Many Young Oilseed Plants.

    PubMed

    Hills, M J; Beevers, H

    1987-12-01

    An antibody raised against purified glyoxysomal lipase (triacylglycerol hydrolase EC 3.1.1.3.) from castor bean (relative molecular weight of 62,000) also binds to a protein with a relative molecular weight of 62,000 in extracts of food reserve tissues from many young oilseed plants. These plants include Brassica napus L., Zea mays L., Arachis hypogaea L., Glycine max L., Gossipium hirsutum L., Cucurbita pepo L., Helianthus annuus L., Pisum sativum L., and Cicer arietinum L. The antibody caused inhibition of triacylglycerol hydrolysis by the lipases in extracts from seedlings of corn, oilseed rape, castor bean, soybean, and peanut. The pattern of antilipase binding to the 62 kilodalton protein in subcellular fractions from these other seedlings was consistent with the patterns of lipase activity reported in the literature and it is suggested that lipases from these oil seeds all have a subunit with a molecular weight of 62,000. The protein was only found in the food reserve tissues and was not present in extracts of roots and leaves of mature plants. In addition, the immunoreactive 62 kilodalton polypeptide was not detectable in lima beans and only at very low levels in kidney beans. Both these seeds are known to contain very little storage lipid and would not be expected to contain lipase. With the exception of the acid lipase of castor bean, ungerminated seeds do not generally contain active lipases. The immunoreactive 62 kilodalton protein could not be detected in the ungerminated seeds of most plants and only at very low low levels in others. PMID:16665808

  12. Cuticle Affects Calculations of Internal CO2 in Leaves Closing Their Stomata.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Jun; Kawamitsu, Yoshinobu

    2015-10-01

    Analyzing the assimilation rate (A) relative to the CO(2) concentration inside leaves (C(i)) has been a useful approach for investigating plant responses to various environments. Nevertheless, there are uncertainties in calculating C(i) when stomata close, restricting the application. Here, A-C(i) curves were traced in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) leaves using a method for directly measuring C(i). The method was incorporated into an LI-6400 open gas exchange system, and stomata were closed by feeding 10 µM ABA through petioles. The conductance to CO(2) was derived from the directly measured C(i) and compared with the conductance from the water vapor flux (i.e. the standard calculation). When stomata were open, measured and calculated C(i) gave similar A-C(i) curves. When stomata were closed, the curves differed because measured C(i) departed from the calculated value. This difference caused the calculation to trace an artifactual limitation of photosynthesis. The direct measurement avoided this problem and followed the curve for leaves with open stomata. Largely because of the cuticle, the calculation overestimated CO(2) entry into the leaf because the cuticle transmitted more water vapor than CO(2), and the calculation relied on water vapor. Consequently, the standard calculation gave conductances larger than those from directly measured C(i). Although the cuticle conductance to water vapor remained constant as stomata closed, it increasingly contributed to the overestimation of C(i). The system provided here is not affected by these cuticle properties and thus is expected to open up the opportunity for A-C(i) analysis in plant physiology. PMID:26206845

  13. Sunflower metallothionein family characterisation. Study of the Zn(II)- and Cd(II)-binding abilities of the HaMT1 and HaMT2 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Tomas, M; Pagani, M A; Andreo, C S; Capdevila, M; Atrian, S; Bofill, R

    2015-07-01

    Plant metallothioneins (MTs) constitute a family of small Cys-rich proteins capable of coordinating metal ions, significantly differing from microbial and animal MTs. They are divided into four subfamilies depending on the Cys pattern in their sequence. In this work, the MT system of the sunflower plant (Helianthus annuus) has been defined, with ten genes coding for MTs (HaMT) belonging to the four plant MT subfamilies; three HaMT1, four HaMT2, one HaMT3 and two HaMT4 isoforms. The gene expression pattern and capacity to confer metal resistance to yeast cells have been analysed for at least one member of each subfamily. The divalent metal ion-binding abilities of HaMT1-2 and HaMT2-1 (the isoforms encoded by the most abundantly expressed HaMT1 and HaMT2 isogenes) have been characterised, as HaMT3 and HaMT4 were previously studied. Those isoforms constitute an optimum material to study the effect of Cys number variability on their coordination abilities, as they exhibit additional Cys residues regarding the canonical Cys pattern of each subfamily. Our results show that the variation in the number of Cys does not drastically modify their M(II)-binding abilities, but instead modulates the degree of heterogeneity of the corresponding recombinant syntheses. Significantly, the Zn(II)-HaMT1 complexes were highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. The recombinant Cd-MT preparations of both isoforms exhibit significant acid-labile sulphide content-Cd6S8 or Cd7S7 species. Overall results suggest that HaMT2-1 is probably associated with Cd(II) detoxification, in contrast to HaMT1-2, which may be more related to physiological functions, such as metal ion transport and delivery. PMID:25770010

  14. ‘Fungicide application method’ and the interpretation of mycorrhizal fungus insect indirect effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Robert A.; Addicott, John F.

    2008-09-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi, by altering their host plant's physiology, can have indirect effects on insect herbivores. The 'fungicide application method' is a common approach used to investigate the indirect effects of mycorrhizal fungi on insects. This approach works by using initially mycorrhizal plants, and then generating a subset of these plants that are free of mycorrhizal fungi by applying fungicide to their roots. When insect feeding-bioassays are conducted using the resulting mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants, differences in insect performance are typically attributed to differences in mycorrhizal colonization per se, rather than the application of the fungicide. Thus, the fungicide application method relies on the assumption that there is no direct toxicity of the fungicide on the focal insect species, and no indirect effects on the focal insect resulting from effects of the fungicide on the host plant or on non-target soil micro-organisms. We tested this critical assumption by feeding Zygogramma exclamationis (Chrysomelidae) larvae on non-mycorrhizal Helianthus annuus (Asteraceae) plants whose roots were treated with a solution of the fungicide benomyl or with a distilled water control. Larvae fed on benomyl-treated plants had reduced survival, lower relative growth rate, and lower food conversion efficiency, compared to larvae fed on control plants. Hence, fungicides applied to roots can affect herbivorous insect performance even in the absence of the possibility of mycorrhizal fungi-mediated effects. We recommend caution when using fungicide application and suggest that selective inoculation is a preferable method of generating mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants when studying mycorrhizal fungi-insect indirect effects.

  15. Controls on compound specific 2H/1H of leaf waxes along a North American monsoonal transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berke, M. A.; Tipple, B. J.; Hambach, B.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    The use of hydrogen isotope ratios of sedimentary n-alkanes from leaf waxes has become an important method for the reconstruction of paleohydrologic conditions. Ideally, the relationship between lipid 2H/1H values and source water is one-to-one. But the extent to which the 2H/1H values are altered between initial source water and lipid 2H/1H values varies by plant type and environment. Additionally, these variables may be confounded by use of varied source waters by plants in the same ecosystem. Here, we use a transect study across the arid southwestern landscape of the United States, which is heavily influenced by the North American Monsoon, to study the variability in 2H/1H values of leaf waxes in co-occurring plants from Tucson, Arizona to Salt Lake City, Utah. Perennials, including rabbit brush (Chrysothamnus nauseosus), sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), and gambel oak (Quercus gambelii) and an annual plant, sunflower (Helianthus annuus), were chosen for their wide geographic distribution along the entire transect. Our results indicate that n-alkane distribution for each plant was similar and generally showed no relationship to environmental variables (elevation, mean annual precipitation, latitude, and temperature). However, we find evidence of n-alkane 2H/1H value relating to transect latitude, a relationship that is weaker for all samples combined than the strong individual correlation for each plant species. Further, these 2H/1H values suggest that not all plants in the monsoon region utilize monsoon-delivered precipitation. These results imply an adaptation to discontinuous spatial coverage and amount of monsoonal precipitation and suggest care must be taken when assuming consistent source water for different plants, particularly in regions with highly seasonal precipitation delivery.

  16. Gulypyrones A and B and Phomentrioloxins B and C Produced by Diaporthe gulyae, a Potential Mycoherbicide for Saffron Thistle (Carthamus lanatus).

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Anna; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Marco; Cimmino, Alessio; Vurro, Maurizio; Ash, Gavin; Evidente, Antonio

    2015-04-24

    A virulent strain of Diaporthe gulyae, isolated from stem cankers of sunflower and known to be pathogenic to saffron thistle, has been shown to produce both known and previously undescribed metabolites when grown in either static liquid culture or a bioreactor. Together with phomentrioloxin, a phytotoxic geranylcyclohexenetriol recently isolated from a strain of Phomopsis sp., two new phytotoxic trisubstituted α-pyrones, named gulypyrones A and B (1 and 2), and two new 1,O- and 2,O-dehydro derivatives of phomentrioloxin, named phomentrioloxins B and C (3 and 4), were isolated from the liquid culture filtrates of D. gulyae. These four metabolites were characterized as 6-[(2S)2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl]-4-methoxy-5-methylpyran-2-one (1), 6-[(1E)-3-hydroxy-1-methylpropenyl]-4-methoxy-3-methylpyran-2-one (2), 4,6-dihydroxy-5-methoxy-2-(7-methyl-3-methyleneoct-6-en-1-ynyl)cyclohex-2-enone (3), and 2,5-dihydroxy-6-methoxy-3-(7-methyl-3-methyleneoct-6-en-1-ynyl)cyclohex-3-enone (4) using spectroscopic and chemical methods. The absolute configuration of the hydroxylated secondary carbon of the 2-hydroxy-1-methylpropyl side chain at C-6 of gulypyrone A was determined as S by applying a modified Mosher's method. Other well-known metabolites were also isolated including 3-nitropropionic, succinic, and p-hydroxy- and p-methylbenzoic acids, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, and nectriapyrone. When assayed using a 5 mM concentration on punctured leaf disks of weedy and crop plants, apart from 3-nitropropionic acid (the main metabolite responsible for the strong phytotoxicity of the culture filtrate), phomentrioloxin B caused small, but clear, necrotic spots on a number of plant species, whereas gulypyrone A caused leaf necrosis on Helianthus annuus plantlets. All other compounds were weakly active or inactive. PMID:25700035

  17. Sunflower: a potential fructan-bearing crop?

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Noël, Giselle M. A.; Dosio, Guillermo A. A.; Puebla, Andrea F.; Insani, Ester M.; Tognetti, Jorge A.

    2015-01-01

    Grain filling in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) mainly depends on actual photosynthesis, being the contribution of stored reserves in stems (sucrose, hexoses, and starch) rather low. Drought periods during grain filling often reduce yield. Increasing the capacity of stem to store reserves could help to increase grain filling and yield stability in dry years. Fructans improve water uptake in soils at low water potential, and allow the storage of large amount of assimilates per unit tissue volume that can be readily remobilized to grains. Sunflower is a close relative to Jerusalem artichoke (H. tuberosus L.), which accumulates large amounts of fructan (inulin) in tubers and true stems. The reason why sunflower does not accumulate fructans is obscure. Through a bioinformatics analysis of a sunflower transcriptome database, we found sequences that are homologous to dicotyledon and monocotyledon fructan synthesis genes. A HPLC analysis of stem sugar composition revealed the presence of low amounts of 1-kestose, while a drastic enhancement of endogenous sucrose levels by capitulum removal did not promote 1-kestose accumulation. This suggests that the regulation of fructan synthesis in this species may differ from the currently best known model, mainly derived from research on Poaceae, where sucrose acts as both a signaling molecule and substrate, in the induction of fructan synthesis. Thus, sunflower might potentially constitute a fructan-bearing species, which could result in an improvement of its performance as a grain crop. However, a large effort is needed to elucidate how this up to now unsuspected potential could be effectively expressed. PMID:26528295

  18. Interpreting chlorophyll fluorescence signals: the effects of leaf age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, L.; Vergeli, P.; Martins, G.; Saleska, S. R.; Huxman, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Remote sensing of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) promises robust estimation of carbon uptake across landscapes, as studies of plant physiology have shown that fluorescence emission is directly linked to photosynthesis at the leaf level. Yet most leaf-level studies demonstrating the link between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis have studied leaves in their prime: leaves that recently finished expansion and have yet to senesce. By contrast, remote sensing of landscapes involves observing leaves of different ages. For example, broadleaf deciduous forests and annual plant communities in temperate regions have leaves that develop and then senesce over the course of a growing season. In this experiment, we explored how leaf age and moisture availability affect steady-state fluoresence (Fs) at the leaf level. We simultaneously measured net photosynthesis (Anet) and Fs for leaves of known ages on greenhouse-grown dwarf Helianthus Annuus (sunflowers) from two watering treatments. To monitor plant water status, we measured pre-dawn water potential, and, for a subset of leaves, osmotic potential. Fully expanded or near-fully expanded leaves (~8 to ~23 days old) had higher Anet at saturating light than young, expanding leaves (less than 8 days old) or old leaves nearing senescence (>23 days old). We found a positive relationship between Fs and Anet, suggesting that the link between fluorescence emission and photosynthesis is robust across leaves of different ages. However, leaf age had marked effects on the light response curve of photosynthesis and fluorescence metrics. These results suggest that leaf age distribution, and changes in leaf age distribution due to phenology, should be considered when interpreting SIF at the landscape level.

  19. Effector Polymorphisms of the Sunflower Downy Mildew Pathogen Plasmopara halstedii and Their Use to Identify Pathotypes from Field Isolates.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Quentin; Bordat, Amandine; Sallet, Erika; Pouilly, Nicolas; Carrere, Sébastien; Roux, Fabrice; Vincourt, Patrick; Godiard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The obligate biotroph oomycete Plasmopara halstedii causes downy mildew on sunflower crop, Helianthus annuus. The breakdown of several Pl resistance genes used in sunflower hybrids over the last 25 years came along with the appearance of new Pl. halstedii isolates showing modified virulence profiles. In oomycetes, two classes of effector proteins, key players of pathogen virulence, are translocated into the host: RXLR and CRN effectors. We identified 54 putative CRN or RXLR effector genes from transcriptomic data and analyzed their genetic diversity in seven Pl. halstedii pathotypes representative of the species variability. Pl. halstedii effector genes were on average more polymorphic at both the nucleic and protein levels than random non-effector genes, suggesting a potential adaptive dynamics of pathogen virulence over the last 25 years. Twenty-two KASP (Competitive Allele Specific PCR) markers designed on polymorphic effector genes were genotyped on 35 isolates belonging to 14 Pl. halstedii pathotypes. Polymorphism analysis based on eight KASP markers aims at proposing a determination key suitable to classify the eight multi-isolate pathotypes into six groups. This is the first report of a molecular marker set able to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes based on the polymorphism of pathogenicity effectors. Compared to phenotypic tests handling living spores used until now to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes, this set of molecular markers constitutes a first step in faster pathotype diagnosis of Pl. halstedii isolates. Hence, emerging sunflower downy mildew isolates could be more rapidly characterized and thus, assessment of plant resistance breakdown under field conditions should be improved. PMID:26845339

  20. Rhizobium helianthi sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of sunflower.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuexin; Yan, Shouwei; Li, Dai; Pang, Huancheng; Li, Yuyi; Zhang, Jianli

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-stain-negative, non-spore-forming, rod-shaped and aerobic bacterium, designated Xi19T, was isolated from a soil sample collected from the rhizosphere of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) in Wuyuan county of Inner Mongolia, China and was characterized taxonomically by using a polyphasic approach. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the novel isolate was related to species of the genus Rhizobium, sharing the greatest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Rhizobium rhizoryzae J3-AN59T (98.4 %), followed by Rhizobium pseudoryzae J3-A127T (97.4 %). There were low similarities ( < 91 %) between the atpD, recA and glnII gene sequences of the novel strain and those of members of the genus Rhizobium. DNA-DNA hybridization values between strain Xi19T and the most related strain Rhizobium rhizoryzae J3-AN59T were low. The major cellular fatty acids of strain Xi19T were C16 : 0, summed feature 8 (C18 : 1ω7c and/or C18 : 1ω6c) and C19 : 0 cyclo ω8c. Q-10 was identified as the predominant ubiquinone and the major polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. The DNA G+C content of strain Xi19T was 60.2 mol%. On the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics, coupled with genotypic data obtained in this work, strain Xi19T represents a novel species of the genus Rhizobium, for which the name Rhizobium helianthi is proposed. The type strain is Xi19T ( = CGMCC 1.12192T = KCTC 23879T). PMID:26364048

  1. Differential hormonal and gene expression dynamics in two inbred sunflower lines with contrasting dormancy level.

    PubMed

    Roselló, Paula L; Vigliocco, Ana E; Andrade, Andrea M; Riera, Natalí V; Calafat, Mario; Molas, María L; Alemano, Sergio G

    2016-05-01

    Seed germination and dormancy are tightly regulated by hormone metabolism and signaling pathway. We investigated the endogenous content of abscisic acid (ABA), its catabolites, and gibberellins (GAs), as well as the expression level of certain ABA and GAs metabolic and signaling genes in embryo of dry and imbibed cypselas of inbred sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., Asteraceae) lines: B123 (dormant) and B91 (non-dormant). Under our experimental conditions, the expression of RGL2 gene might be related to the ABA peak in B123 line at 3 h of imbibition. Indeed, RGL2 transcripts are absent in dry and early embedded cypselas of the non-dormant line B91. ABA increase was accompanied by a significant ABA-Glucosyl ester (ABA-GE) and phaseic acid (PA) (two ABA catabolites) decrease in B123 line (3 h) which indicates that ABA metabolism seems to be more active in this line, and that it would be involved in the imposition and maintenance of sunflower seed dormancy, as it has been reported for many species. Finally, an increase of bioactive GAs (GA1 and GA3) occurs at 12 h of imbibition in both lines after a decrease in ABA content. This study shows the first report about the RGL2 tissue-specific gene expression in sunflower inbred lines with contrasting dormancy level. Furthermore, our results provide evidence that ABA and GAs content and differential expression of metabolism and signaling genes would be interacting in seed dormancy regulation through a mechanism of action related to embryo itself. PMID:26934102

  2. Ontogenetic changes in the scaling of cellular respiration with respect to size among sunflower seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Niklas, K J

    2011-01-01

    The respiration rates R (oxygen uptake per min) and body mass M (mg per individual) of sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings were measured for populations raised in the dark (scotomorphogenesis) and for plants subsequently grown in white light (photomorphogenesis) to determine the allometric (scaling) relationship for R vs. M. Based on ordinary least squares and reduced major axis regression protocols, cellular respiration rates were found to increase non-linearly as a 'broken-stick' curve of increasing M. During germination, the scaling was ca. 7.5-fold higher than after the emergence of the cotyledons from the seed coat, which can be attributed to the hypoxic conditions of the enclosed embryo. During seedling development, R was found to scale roughly as the 3/7 power of body mass (i.e., R ~ M(-3/7)), regardless of whether plants were grown in the dark or subsequently in white light. The numerical value of 3/7 statistically significantly differs from that reported across field- or laboratory-grown plants (i.e., R ~ M(-1.0)). It also differs from the expectations of recent allometric theory (i.e., R ~ M(-0.75) to M(-1.0)). This difference is interpreted to be the result of species-specific tissue-compositions that affect the volume fractions of metabolically active and less active cells. These findings, which are supported by cytological and ultrastructural observations (i.e., scanning- and transmission electron micrographs), draw attention to the need to measure R of developing plants in a tissue- or organ-specific context. PMID:21301213

  3. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Mongolia Medicine Artemisia frigida and Phylogenetic Relationships with Other Plants

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yue; Huo, Naxin; Dong, Lingli; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Shuixian; Young, Hugh A.; Feng, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yong Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Background Artemisia frigida Willd. is an important Mongolian traditional medicinal plant with pharmacological functions of stanch and detumescence. However, there is little sequence and genomic information available for Artemisia frigida, which makes phylogenetic identification, evolutionary studies, and genetic improvement of its value very difficult. We report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida based on 454 pyrosequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings The complete chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida is 151,076 bp including a large single copy (LSC) region of 82,740 bp, a small single copy (SSC) region of 18,394 bp and a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,971 bp. The genome contains 114 unique genes and 18 duplicated genes. The chloroplast genome of Artemisia frigida contains a small 3.4 kb inversion within a large 23 kb inversion in the LSC region, a unique feature in Asteraceae. The gene order in the SSC region of Artemisia frigida is inverted compared with the other 6 Asteraceae species with the chloroplast genomes sequenced. This inversion is likely caused by an intramolecular recombination event only occurred in Artemisia frigida. The existence of rich SSR loci in the Artemisia frigida chloroplast genome provides a rare opportunity to study population genetics of this Mongolian medicinal plant. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates a sister relationship between Artemisia frigida and four other species in Asteraceae, including Ageratina adenophora, Helianthus annuus, Guizotia abyssinica and Lactuca sativa, based on 61 protein-coding sequences. Furthermore, Artemisia frigida was placed in the tribe Anthemideae in the subfamily Asteroideae (Asteraceae) based on ndhF and trnL-F sequence comparisons. Conclusion The chloroplast genome sequence of Artemisia frigida was assembled and analyzed in this study, representing the first plastid genome sequenced in the Anthemideae tribe. This complete chloroplast genome sequence will be

  4. The Catalytic Properties of Hybrid Rubisco Comprising Tobacco Small and Sunflower Large Subunits Mirror the Kinetically Equivalent Source Rubiscos and Can Support Tobacco Growth1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Sharwood, Robert Edward; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Maliga, Pal; Whitney, Spencer Michael

    2008-01-01

    Plastomic replacement of the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Rubisco large subunit gene (rbcL) with that from sunflower (Helianthus annuus; rbcLS) produced tobaccoRst transformants that produced a hybrid Rubisco consisting of sunflower large and tobacco small subunits (LsSt). The tobaccoRst plants required CO2 (0.5% v/v) supplementation to grow autotrophically from seed despite the substrate saturated carboxylation rate, Km, for CO2 and CO2/O2 selectivity of the LsSt enzyme mirroring the kinetically equivalent tobacco and sunflower Rubiscos. Consequently, at the onset of exponential growth when the source strength and leaf LsSt content were sufficient, tobaccoRst plants grew to maturity without CO2 supplementation. When grown under a high pCO2, the tobaccoRst seedlings grew slower than tobacco and exhibited unique growth phenotypes: Juvenile plants formed clusters of 10 to 20 structurally simple oblanceolate leaves, developed multiple apical meristems, and the mature leaves displayed marginal curling and dimpling. Depending on developmental stage, the LsSt content in tobaccoRst leaves was 4- to 7-fold less than tobacco, and gas exchange coupled with chlorophyll fluorescence showed that at 2 mbar pCO2 and growth illumination CO2 assimilation in mature tobaccoRst leaves remained limited by Rubisco activity and its rate (approximately 11 μmol m−2 s−1) was half that of tobacco controls. 35S-methionine labeling showed the stability of assembled LsSt was similar to tobacco Rubisco and measurements of light transient CO2 assimilation rates showed LsSt was adequately regulated by tobacco Rubisco activase. We conclude limitations to tobaccoRst growth primarily stem from reduced rbcLS mRNA levels and the translation and/or assembly of sunflower large with the tobacco small subunits that restricted LsSt synthesis. PMID:17993544

  5. Diversifying Sunflower Germplasm by Integration and Mapping of a Novel Male Fertility Restoration Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhao; Wang, Dexing; Feng, Jiuhuan; Seiler, Gerald J.; Cai, Xiwen; Jan, Chao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The combination of a single cytoplasmic male-sterile (CMS) PET-1 and the corresponding fertility restoration (Rf) gene Rf1 is used for commercial hybrid sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., 2n = 34) seed production worldwide. A new CMS line 514A was recently developed with H. tuberosus cytoplasm. However, 33 maintainers and restorers for CMS PET-1 and 20 additional tester lines failed to restore the fertility of CMS 514A. Here, we report the discovery, characterization, and molecular mapping of a novel Rf gene for CMS 514A derived from an amphiploid (Amp H. angustifolius/P 21, 2n = 68). Progeny analysis of the male-fertile (MF) plants (2n = 35) suggested that this gene, designated Rf6, was located on a single alien chromosome. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) indicated that Rf6 was on a chromosome with a small segment translocation on the long arm in the MF progenies (2n = 34). Rf6 was mapped to linkage group (LG) 3 of the sunflower SSR map. Eight markers were identified to be linked to this gene, covering a distance of 10.8 cM. Two markers, ORS13 and ORS1114, were only 1.6 cM away from the gene. Severe segregation distortions were observed for both the fertility trait and the linked marker loci, suggesting the possibility of a low frequency of recombination or gamete selection in this region. This study discovered a new CMS/Rf gene system derived from wild species and provided significant insight into the genetic basis of this system. This will diversify the germplasm for sunflower breeding and facilitate understanding of the interaction between the cytoplasm and nuclear genes. PMID:23307903

  6. Salt stress-induced seedling growth inhibition coincides with differential distribution of serotonin and melatonin in sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumya; David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Baluška, František; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2014-12-01

    Indoleamines regulate a variety of physiological functions during the growth, morphogenesis and stress-induced responses in plants. Present investigations report the effect of NaCl stress on endogenous serotonin and melatonin accumulation and their differential spatial distribution in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seedling roots and cotyledons using HPLC and immunohistochemical techniques, respectively. Exogenous serotonin and melatonin treatments lead to variable effect on hypocotyl elongation and root growth under NaCl stress. NaCl stress for 48 h increases endogenous serotonin and melatonin content in roots and cotyledons, thus indicating their involvement in salt-induced long distance signaling from roots to cotyledons. Salt stress-induced accumulation of serotonin and melatonin exhibits differential distribution in the vascular bundles and cortex in the differentiating zones of the primary roots, suggesting their compartmentalization in the growing region of roots. Serotonin and melatonin accumulation in oil body rich cells of salt-treated seedling cotyledons correlates with longer retention of oil bodies in the cotyledons. Present investigations indicate the possible role of serotonin and melatonin in regulating root growth during salt stress in sunflower. Effect of exogenous serotonin and melatonin treatments (15 μM) on sunflower seedlings grown in the absence or presence of 120 mM NaCl substantiates their role on seedling growth. Auxin and serotonin biosynthesis are coupled to the common precursor tryptophan. Salt stress-induced root growth inhibition, thus pertains to partial impairment of auxin functions caused by increased serotonin biosynthesis. In seedling cotyledons, NaCl stress modulates the activity of N-acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase (HIOMT; EC 2.1.1.4), the enzyme responsible for melatonin biosynthesis from N-acetylserotonin. PMID:24799301

  7. Nitric oxide triggers a concentration-dependent differential modulation of superoxide dismutase (FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD) activity in sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons as an early and long distance signaling response to NaCl stress.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dhara; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Dark-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings exhibit modulation of total superoxide dismutase (SOD;EC 1.15.1.1) activity in roots and cotyledons (10,000g supernatant) in response to salt stress (NaCl; 120 mM) through a differential, zymographically detectable, whole tissue activity of FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD. Confocal laser scanning microscopic imaging (CLSM) has further shown that NaCl stress significantly influences differential spatial distribution of Cu/ZnSOD and MnSOD isoforms in an inverse manner. Dual action of nitric oxide (NO) is evident in its crosstalk with FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in seedling roots and cotyledons in control and NaCl(-) stress conditions. Cu/ZnSOD activity in the roots of 2 d old NaCl(-) stressed seedlings is enhanced in the presence of 125-1000 µM of NO donor (sodium nitroprusside; SNP) indicating salt sensitivity of the enzyme activity. Quenching of endogenous NO by cPTIO treatment (500, 1000 µM) lowers FeSOD activity in roots (-NaCl). Cotyledons from control seedlings show an upregulation of FeSOD activity with increasing availability of SNP (125-1000 µM) in the Hoagland irrigation medium. Quenching of NO by cPTIO provides evidence for an inverse correlation between NO availability and FeSOD activity in seedling cotyledons irrespective of NaCl stress. Variable response due to NO on SOD isoforms in sunflower seedlings reflects its concentration-dependent biphasic (pro- and antioxidant) nature of action. Differential induction of SOD isoforms by NO indicates separate intracellular signaling pathways (associated with their respective functional separation) operative in seedling roots as an early salt stress mechanism and in cotyledons as an early long-distance NaCl stress sensing mechanism. PMID:26339977

  8. Light signaling and the phytohormonal regulation of shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kurepin, Leonid V; Pharis, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    Shoot growth of dicot plants is rigorously controlled by the interactions of environmental cues with several groups of phytohormones. The signaling effects of light on shoot growth are of special interest, as both light irradiance and light quality change rapidly throughout the day, causing profound changes in stem elongation and leaf area growth. Among the several dicot species examined, we have focused on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) because its shoots are robust and their growth is highly plastic. Sunflower shoots thus constitute an ideal tissue for assessing responses to both light irradiance and light quality signals. Herein, we discuss the possible roles of gibberellins, auxin, ethylene, cytokinins and brassinosteroids in mediating the stem elongation and leaf area growth that is induced by shade light. To do this we uncoupled the plant's responses to changes in the red to far-red [R/FR] light ratio from its responses to changes in irradiance of photosynthetically active radiation [PAR]. Reducing each of R/FR light ratio and PAR irradiance results in increased sunflower stem elongation. However, the plant's response for leaf area growth differs considerably, with a low R/FR ratio generally promoting leaf area growth, whereas low irradiance PAR inhibits it. The increased stem elongation that occurs in response to lowering R/FR ratio and PAR irradiance is accomplished at the expense of leaf area growth. In effect, the low PAR irradiance signal overrides the low R/FR ratio signal in shade light's control of leaf growth and development. Three hormone groups, gibberellins, auxin and ethylene are directly involved in regulating these light-mediated shoot growth changes. Gibberellins and auxin function as growth promoters, with auxin likely acting as an up-regulator of gibberellin biosynthesis. Ethylene functions as a growth-inhibitor and probably interacts with gibberellins in regulating both stem and leaf growth of the sunflower shoot. PMID:25443853

  9. Accounting for sap flow from different parts of the root system improves the prediction of xylem ABA concentration in plants grown with heterogeneous soil moisture

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Ian C.; Egea, Gregorio; Davies, William J.

    2008-01-01

    When soil moisture is heterogeneous, sap flow from, and ABA status of, different parts of the root system impact on leaf xylem ABA concentration ([X-ABA]leaf). The robustness of a model for predicting [X-ABA]leaf was assessed. ‘Two root-one shoot’ grafted sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) plants received either deficit irrigation (DI, each root system received the same irrigation volumes) or partial rootzone drying (PRD, only one root system was watered and the other dried the soil). Irrespective of whether relative sap flow was assessed using sap flow sensors in vivo or by pressurization of de-topped roots, each root system contributed similarly to total sap flow during DI, while sap flow from roots in drying soil declined linearly with soil water potential (Ψsoil) during PRD. Although Ψsoil of the irrigated pot determined the threshold Ψsoil at which sap flow from roots in drying soil decreased, the slope of this decrease was independent of the wet pot Ψsoil. Irrespective of whether sap was collected from the wet or dry root system of PRD plants, or a DI plant, root xylem ABA concentration increased as Ψsoil declined. The model, which weighted ABA contributions of each root system according to the sap flow from each, almost perfectly explained [X-ABA] immediately above the graft union. That the model overestimated measured [X-ABA]leaf may result from changes in [X-ABA] along the transport pathway or an artefact of collecting xylem sap from detached leaves. The implications of declining sap flow through partially dry roots during PRD for the control of stomatal behaviour and irrigation scheduling are discussed. PMID:18940933

  10. Soil coverage evolution and wind erosion risk on summer crops under contrasting tillage systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, Mariano J.; Buschiazzo, Daniel E.

    2015-03-01

    The effectiveness of wind erosion control by soil surface conditions and crop and weed canopy has been well studied in wind tunnel experiments. The aim of this study is to assess the combined effects of these variables under field conditions. Soil surface conditions, crop and weed coverage, plant residue, and non-erodible aggregates (NEA) were measured in the field between the fallow start and the growth period of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and corn (Zea mays). Both crops were planted on a sandy-loam Entic Haplustoll with conventional-(CT), vertical-(VT) and no-till (NT) tillage systems. Wind erosion was estimated by means of the spreadsheet version the Revised Wind Erosion Equation and the soil coverage was measured each 15 days. Results indicated that wind erosion was mostly negligible in NT, exceeding the tolerable levels (estimated between 300 and 1400 kg ha-1 year-1 by Verheijen et al. (2009)) only in an year with high climatic erosivity. Wind erosion exceeded the tolerable levels in most cases in CT and VT, reaching values of 17,400 kg ha-1. Wind erosion was 2-10 times higher after planting of both crops than during fallows. During the fallows, the soil was mostly well covered with plant residues and NEA in CT and VT and with residues and weeds in NT. High wind erosion amounts occurring 30 days after planting in all tillage systems were produced by the destruction of coarse aggregates and the burying of plant residues during planting operations and rains. Differences in soil protection after planting were given by residues of previous crops and growing weeds. The growth of weeds 2-4 weeks after crop planting contributed to reduce wind erosion without impacting in crops yields. An accurate weeds management in semiarid lands can contribute significantly to control wind erosion. More field studies are needed in order to develop management strategies to reduce wind erosion.

  11. Improving the efficiency of phytoremediation using electrically charged plant and chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbian, Iman; Safari Sinegani, Ali Akbar

    2016-02-01

    The low efficiency of phytoremediation is a considerable problem that limits the application of this environmentally friendly method on heavy metal-polluted soils. The combination of chelate-assisted phytoextraction and electrokinetic remediation could offer new opportunities to improve the effectiveness of phytoextraction. The current experiment aims to investigate the effects of electrical fields and chelating agents on phytoremediation efficiency. In a pot experiment using mine soil, poultry manure extract (PME), cow manure extract (CME), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) were applied to soil as chelating agents (2 g kg(-1)) at the beginning of the flowering stage. A week later, Helianthus annuus (sunflower) was negatively charged by inserting a stainless steel needle with 10 and 30 V DC electricity in the lowest part of the stems for 1 h each day for a 14-day period. At the end of the experiment, the shoot and root dry weight, lead (Pb) concentration in plant organs, translocation factor (TF), metal uptake index (UI), and soil available Pb (diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) extractable) were detected. Results indicated that the application of electrical fields had no significant impact on the shoot and root dry weights, while Pb concentration and UI increased in the 10-V EDTA treatment by 500 % compared to control. There was no significant difference between UI in 30- and 10-V EDTA treatments. Soil available Pb significantly increased in the 30-V treated soil. A positive correlation was observed between the available Pb in soil near the root and Pb concentration in shoot, its TF, and UI. In conclusion, a negatively charged plant along with the application of EDTA significantly increased the phytoremediation efficiency. PMID:26423283

  12. Carbon storage in a heavy clay soil landfill site after biosolid application.

    PubMed

    Bolan, N S; Kunhikrishnan, A; Naidu, R

    2013-11-01

    Applying organic amendments including biosolids and composts to agricultural land could increase carbon (C) storage in soils and contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Although a number of studies have examined the potential value of biosolids as a soil conditioner and nutrient source, there has been only limited work on the impact of biosolid application on C sequestration in soils. The objective of this study was to examine the potential value of biosolids in C sequestration in soils. Two types of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of biosolid application on C sequestration. In the first laboratory incubation experiment, the rate of decomposition of a range of biosolid samples was compared with other organic amendments including composts and biochars. In the second field experiment, the effect of biosolids on the growth of two bioenergy crops, Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) and Helianthus annuus (sunflower) on a landfill site was examined in relation to biomass production and C sequestration. The rate of decomposition varied amongst the organic amendments, and followed: composts>biosolids>biochar. There was a hundred fold difference in the rate of decomposition between biochar and other organic amendments. The rate of decomposition of biosolids decreased with increasing iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) contents of biosolids. Biosolid application increased the dry matter yield of both plant species (by 2-2.5 fold), thereby increasing the biomass C input to soils. The rate of net C sequestration resulting from biosolid application (Mg C ha(-1) yr(-1) Mg(-1) biosolids) was higher for mustard (0.103) than sunflower (0.087). Biosolid application is likely to result in a higher level of C sequestration when compared to other management strategies including fertilizer application and conservation tillage, which is attributed to increased microbial biomass, and Fe and Al oxide-induced immobilization of C. PMID:23380138

  13. Root growth and nitrate-nitrogen leaching of catch crops following spring wheat.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Juan M; Feil, Boy; Stamp, Peter; Liedgens, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Growing nitrogen (N) catch crops can reduce NO(3)-N leaching after cultivating cereals. The objective of this study was to relate NO(3)-N leaching to variation in the uptake of N and the size and distribution of the root systems of different catch crops species. In a 3-yr lysimeter experiment, phacelia (Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth.), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), and a Brassica species (yellow mustard [Brassica alba L.] or a hybrid of turnip rape [B. rapa L. spp. oleifera (DC.) Metzg.] and Chinese cabbage [B. rapa L. ssp. chinensis (L.) Hanelt]) were grown after the harvest of spring wheat under two levels of N supply. Bare soil lysimeters served as the control. Water percolation from the lysimeters and the NO(3)(-) concentration in the leachate were measured weekly from the sowing until the presumed frost-kill of the catch crops. Minirhizotrons were used to assess the spatial and temporal patterns of root growth from 0.10 to 1.00 m. The catch crop species differed in their shoot biomass, N uptake, total NO(3)-N leaching, and root growth. The results suggested that there was no strict relationship between the total NO(3)-N leaching of each catch crop species and the N uptake or parameters that indicate static characteristics of the root system. In contrast, the ranking of each catch crop species by parameters that indicate early root growth was inversely related to the ranking of each catch crop species in NO(3)-N leaching. The rapid establishment of the root system is essential for a catch crop following spring wheat to reduce the amount of NO(3)-N leaching after the harvest of spring wheat. PMID:20400580

  14. Fitness of crop-wild hybrid sunflower under competitive conditions: implications for crop-to-wild introgression.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Kristin L; Emry, D Jason; Snow, Allison A; Kost, Matthew A; Pace, Brian A; Alexander, Helen M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the likelihood and extent of introgression of novel alleles in hybrid zones requires comparison of lifetime fitness of parents and hybrid progeny. However, fitness differences among cross types can vary depending on biotic conditions, thereby influencing introgression patterns. Based on past work, we predicted that increased competition would enhance introgression between cultivated and wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) by reducing fitness advantages of wild plants. To test this prediction, we established a factorial field experiment in Kansas, USA where we monitored the fitness of four cross types (Wild, F1, F2, and BCw hybrids) under different levels of interspecific and intraspecific competition. Intraspecific manipulations consisted both of density of competitors and of frequency of crop-wild hybrids. We recorded emergence of overwintered seeds, survival to reproduction, and numbers of seeds produced per reproductive plant. We also calculated two compound fitness measures: seeds produced per emerged seedling and seeds produced per planted seed. Cross type and intraspecific competition affected emergence and survival to reproduction, respectively. Further, cross type interacted with competitive treatments to influence all other fitness traits. More intense competition treatments, especially related to density of intraspecific competitors, repeatedly reduced the fitness advantage of wild plants when considering seeds produced per reproductive plant and per emerged seedling, and F2 plants often became indistinguishable from the wilds. Wild fitness remained superior when seedling emergence was also considered as part of fitness, but the fitness of F2 hybrids relative to wild plants more than quadrupled with the addition of interspecific competitors and high densities of intraspecific competitors. Meanwhile, contrary to prediction, lower hybrid frequency reduced wild fitness advantage. These results emphasize the importance of taking a full life cycle

  15. Effects of biochar produced from different feedstocks on soil properties and sunflower growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alburquerque, J. A.; Calero, J. M.; Villar, R.; Barrón, V.; Torrent, J.; del Campillo, M. C.; Gallardo, A.

    2012-04-01

    The use of biochar obtained from biomass pyrolysis as a soil amendment has potential benefits, such as reduction in gas emissions, increase in soil carbon sequestration and improvements in soil fertility and crop yield. These constitute a great incentive for the implementation of biochar-based strategies, which could contribute to improvement of the sustainability of agricultural systems. However, to date, the results of research studies show great variability as a result of differences in both the raw materials and the pyrolysis conditions used to produce biochar, as well as in the experimental setting (crop, soil type, pedo-climatic conditions, etc.). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of five types of biochar produced from representative agricultural and forestry wastes (olive husk, almond shell, wheat straw, pine woodchips and olive tree prunings), and applied to soil at different rates, on soil properties and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) growth. The biochars had a high organic matter content, alkaline pH, variable soluble salt content and non-phytotoxic properties. The addition of biochar to soil increased pH, electrical conductivity and water retention capacity, and decreased soil bulk density compared to control (unamended soil). However, these effects differed depending on biochar type. In contrast, no consistent effects on sunflower growth variables were observed due to the addition of biochar: increases were observed in some variables (plant dry weight, leaf area and height), but these increases were, in general, not statistically significant when compared to the unamended soil. This can be explained by the nature of biochar, being rich in carbon but relatively poor in nutrients. In summary, our results indicate that biochar is capable of improving soil properties which can impact positively on soil-plant water relations, without negative effects on sunflower growth, and therefore it is suitable for use as a long-term carbon sink in

  16. Naturalization of plant populations: the role of cultivation and population size and density.

    PubMed

    Minton, Mark S; Mack, Richard N

    2010-10-01

    Field experimentation is required to assess the effects of environmental stochasticity on small immigrant plant populations-a widely understood but largely unexplored aspect of predicting any species' likelihood of naturalization and potential invasion. Cultivation can mitigate this stochasticity, although the outcome for a population under cultivation nevertheless varies enormously from extinction to persistence. Using factorial experiments, we investigated the effects of population size, density, and cultivation (irrigation) on the fate of founder populations for four alien species with different life history characteristics (Echinochloa frumentacea, Fagopyrum esculentum, Helianthus annuus, and Trifolium incarnatum) in eastern Washington, USA. The fate of founder populations was highly variable within and among the 3 years of experimentation and illustrates the often precarious environment encountered by plant immigrants. Larger founder populations produced more seeds (P < 0.001); the role of founder population size, however, differed among years. Irrigation resulted in higher percent survival (P < 0.001) and correspondingly larger net reproductive rate (R(0); P < 0.001). But the minimum level of irrigation for establishment, R(0) > 1, differed among years and species. Sowing density did not affect the likelihood of establishment for any species. Our results underscore the importance of environmental stochasticity in determining the fate of founder populations and the potential of cultivation and large population size in countering the long odds against naturalization. Any implementation of often proposed post-immigration field trials to assess the risk of an alien species becoming naturalized, a requisite step toward invasion, will need to assess different sizes of founder populations and the extent and character of cultivation (intentional or unintentional) that the immigrants might receive. PMID:20532919

  17. Effector Polymorphisms of the Sunflower Downy Mildew Pathogen Plasmopara halstedii and Their Use to Identify Pathotypes from Field Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Gascuel, Quentin; Bordat, Amandine; Sallet, Erika; Pouilly, Nicolas; Carrere, Sébastien; Roux, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    The obligate biotroph oomycete Plasmopara halstedii causes downy mildew on sunflower crop, Helianthus annuus. The breakdown of several Pl resistance genes used in sunflower hybrids over the last 25 years came along with the appearance of new Pl. halstedii isolates showing modified virulence profiles. In oomycetes, two classes of effector proteins, key players of pathogen virulence, are translocated into the host: RXLR and CRN effectors. We identified 54 putative CRN or RXLR effector genes from transcriptomic data and analyzed their genetic diversity in seven Pl. halstedii pathotypes representative of the species variability. Pl. halstedii effector genes were on average more polymorphic at both the nucleic and protein levels than random non-effector genes, suggesting a potential adaptive dynamics of pathogen virulence over the last 25 years. Twenty-two KASP (Competitive Allele Specific PCR) markers designed on polymorphic effector genes were genotyped on 35 isolates belonging to 14 Pl. halstedii pathotypes. Polymorphism analysis based on eight KASP markers aims at proposing a determination key suitable to classify the eight multi-isolate pathotypes into six groups. This is the first report of a molecular marker set able to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes based on the polymorphism of pathogenicity effectors. Compared to phenotypic tests handling living spores used until now to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes, this set of molecular markers constitutes a first step in faster pathotype diagnosis of Pl. halstedii isolates. Hence, emerging sunflower downy mildew isolates could be more rapidly characterized and thus, assessment of plant resistance breakdown under field conditions should be improved. PMID:26845339

  18. Initial formation of an indigenous crop complex in eastern North America at 3800 B.P.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bruce D; Yarnell, Richard A

    2009-04-21

    Although geneticists and archaeologists continue to make progress world-wide in documenting the time and place of the initial domestication of a growing number of plants and animals, far less is known regarding the critically important context of coalescence of various species into distinctive sets or complexes of domesticates in each of the world's 10 or more independent centers of agricultural origin. In this article, the initial emergence of a crop complex is described for one of the best-documented of these independent centers, eastern North America (ENA). Before 4000 B.P. there is no indication of a crop complex in ENA, only isolated evidence for single indigenous domesticate species. By 3800 B.P., however, at least 5 domesticated seed-bearing plants formed a coherent complex in the river valley corridors of ENA. Accelerator mass spectrometer radiocarbon dates and reanalysis of archaeobotanical assemblages from a short occupation of the Riverton Site in Illinois documents the contemporary cultivation at 3800 B.P. of domesticated bottle gourd (Lagenaria siceraria), marshelder (Iva annua var. macrocarpa), sunflower (Helianthus annuus var. macrocarpus), and 2 cultivated varieties of chenopod (Chenopodium berlandieri), as well as the possible cultivation of Cucurbita pepo squash and little barley (Hordeum pusillum). Rather than marking either an abrupt developmental break or a necessary response to population-packing or compressed resource catchments, the coalescence of an initial crop complex in ENA appears to reflect an integrated expansion and enhancement of preexisting hunting and gathering economies that took place within a context of stable long-term adaptation to resource-rich river valley settings. PMID:19366669

  19. Nitric oxide triggers a concentration-dependent differential modulation of superoxide dismutase (FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD) activity in sunflower seedling roots and cotyledons as an early and long distance signaling response to NaCl stress

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Dhara; Bhatla, Satish C

    2015-01-01

    Dark-grown sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seedlings exhibit modulation of total superoxide dismutase (SOD;EC 1.15.1.1) activity in roots and cotyledons (10,000g supernatant) in response to salt stress (NaCl; 120 mM) through a differential, zymographically detectable, whole tissue activity of FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD. Confocal laser scanning microscopic imaging (CLSM) has further shown that NaCl stress significantly influences differential spatial distribution of Cu/ZnSOD and MnSOD isoforms in an inverse manner. Dual action of nitric oxide (NO) is evident in its crosstalk with FeSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in seedling roots and cotyledons in control and NaCl− stress conditions. Cu/ZnSOD activity in the roots of 2 d old NaCl− stressed seedlings is enhanced in the presence of 125–1000 µM of NO donor (sodium nitroprusside; SNP) indicating salt sensitivity of the enzyme activity. Quenching of endogenous NO by cPTIO treatment (500, 1000 µM) lowers FeSOD activity in roots (-NaCl). Cotyledons from control seedlings show an upregulation of FeSOD activity with increasing availability of SNP (125–1000 µM) in the Hoagland irrigation medium. Quenching of NO by cPTIO provides evidence for an inverse correlation between NO availability and FeSOD activity in seedling cotyledons irrespective of NaCl stress. Variable response due to NO on SOD isoforms in sunflower seedlings reflects its concentration-dependent biphasic (pro- and antioxidant) nature of action. Differential induction of SOD isoforms by NO indicates separate intracellular signaling pathways (associated with their respective functional separation) operative in seedling roots as an early salt stress mechanism and in cotyledons as an early long-distance NaCl stress sensing mechanism. PMID:26339977

  20. Integrated faecal sludge treatment and recycling through constructed wetlands and sunflower plant irrigation.

    PubMed

    Koottatep, T; Polprasert, C; Hadsoi, S

    2006-01-01

    Faecal sludge (FS) from the on-site sanitation systems is a nutrient-rich source but can contain high concentrations of toxic metals and chemicals and infectious micro-organisms. The study employed 3 vertical-flow CW units, each with a dimension of 5 x 5 x 0.65 m (width x length x media depth) and planted with cattails (Typha augustifolia). At the solid loading rate of 250 kg total solids (TS)/m(2).yr and a 6-day percolate impoundment, the CW system could achieve chemical oxygen demand (COD), TS and total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) removal efficiencies in the range of 80-96%. A solid layer of about 80 cm was found accumulated on the CW bed surface after operating the CW units for 7 years, but no clogging problem has been observed. The CW percolate was applied to 16 irrigation sunflower plant (Helianthus annuus) plots, each with a dimension of 4.5 x 4.5 m (width x length). In the study, tap water was mixed with 20%, 80% and 100% of the CW percolate at the application rate of 7.5 mm/day. Based on a 1-year data in which 3 crops of plantation were experimented, the contents of Zn, Mn and Cu in soil of the experimental plots were found to increase with increase in CW percolate ratios. In a plot with 100% of CW percolate irrigation, the maximum Zn, Mn and Cu concentrations of 5.0, 12.3 and 2.5 mg/kg, respectively, were detected in the percolate-fed soil, whereas no accumulation of heavy metals in the plant tissues (i.e. leaves, stems and flowers) of the sunflower were detected. The highest plant biomass yield and oil content of 1000 kg/ha and 35%, respectively, were obtained from the plots fed with 20% or 50% of the CW percolate. PMID:17302316