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Sample records for heliospheric plasma turbulence

  1. Multifractal model for heliospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczepaniak, Anna

    Multifractal characteristics and models for astrophysical plasma at different regions of heliosphere are considered. We analyze the time series of the solar wind parameters measured in situby Helios 2 (0.3-1 AU), ACE (1 AU), and Voyager 2 (1-75 AU) spacecrafts [1]. We focus on the intermittent nature of the cascading eddies for solar wind turbulence. To look at intermittency we construct the multifractal measure describing energy transfer rate and we analyze its scaling properties [2,3]. This allows us to obtain generalized dimensions and multifractality spectra for different state of the solar wind depending on heliocentric distance and solar activity cycle. We also propose a generalization of the usual p-model [2] for the case when the turbulent cascade involves eddies of different sizes. Our model has two scaling parameters and a probability measure parameter allowing to decribe more intermittent data [4,5]. We compare the resulting generalized dimensions and singularity spectra for the solar wind with that for the generalized p-model. In this way we obtain a much better agreement with the solar wind data. Hence we hope that our model will be a useful tool to study complex nature of intermittent turbulence. [1] Burlaga, L. F.: Multifractal structure of the interplanetary magnetic field: Voyager 2 observations near 25 AU, 1987-1988, Geophys. Res. Lett. 18, 69-72, 1991. [2] Meneveau, C., and Sreenivasan, K. R.: Simple multifractal cascade model for fully developed turbulence, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 1424-1427, 1987. [3] Marsch, E., Tu, C.-Y., and Rosenbauer, H.: Multifractal scaling of the kinetic energy flux in solar wind turbulence, Ann. Geophys. 14, 259-269, 1996. [4] Macek, W. M. : Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind, Nonlinear Proc. Geophys., 14, 695-700, 2007. [5] Macek, W. M., and Szczepaniak, A.: Generalized two-scale weighted Cantor set model for solar wind turbulence, Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L02108, doi:10.1029/2007GL032263, 2008.

  2. Turbulence in the heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Bruno, R.; Telloni, D.; Marino, R.

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind is ubiquitous. To understand the transport of low-frequency turbulence in the sub- and super-Alfvénic solar wind flow, Zank et al. 2012 developed an extensive turbulence transport model that describes the evolution of the energy in forward and backward propagating modes, the total turbulent energy, the cross-helicity, the residual energy, the correlation lengths corresponding to forward and backward propagating modes, and the correlation length of the residual energy. Adhikari et. al. 2015 presented the first detailed solution of Zank et al., and found good agreement between the Zank et al. model and observations. Here, we solve the 1D steady-state turbulence transport equations with and without sources of turbulence, and show that all the identified sources are required to reproduce the theoretical results to be consistent with the observations.

  3. MHD Turbulence through the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltri, P.

    Velocity and magnetic field fluctuations in a wide range of space and time scales have been directly detected in the interplanetary medium In the solar corona the presence of MHD turbulence is naturally generated by the mechanical and magnetic energy input from the photosphere and it could be related to coronal heating as well as to energy release events like micro and nanoflares A certain amount of fluctuations from the solar corona arrives in the solar wind mainly as Alfvénic turbulence i e strongly correlated velocity and magnetic field fluctuations with a very low level of compressible density magnetic field intensity temperature fluctuations The whole system formed by the solar corona and the solar wind represents a sort of wind tunnel extremely useful to study the MHD turbulence properties The presence of magnetic turbulence in the heliosphere is identified as the source of charged particle collisionless diffusion which according the values of parameters like the energy level on magnetic fluctuations or the turbulence correlation length can display both a normal gaussian random walk and an anomalous subdiffusive or super diffusive behavior The former case is obtained in a situation of global stochasticity high level of fluctuation energy while the latter in a situation of weak chaos low level of fluctuation energy The talk will discuss turbulence generation at photospheric level its propagation and its interaction with heliospheric structures and its effects on anomalous transport processes of charged

  4. Particle acceleration, transport and turbulence in cosmic and heliospheric physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthaeus, W.

    1992-01-01

    In this progress report, the long term goals, recent scientific progress, and organizational activities are described. The scientific focus of this annual report is in three areas: first, the physics of particle acceleration and transport, including heliospheric modulation and transport, shock acceleration and galactic propagation and reacceleration of cosmic rays; second, the development of theories of the interaction of turbulence and large scale plasma and magnetic field structures, as in winds and shocks; third, the elucidation of the nature of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence processes and the role such turbulence processes might play in heliospheric, galactic, cosmic ray physics, and other space physics applications.

  5. A Heliosphere Buffeted by Interstellar Turbulence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jokipii, J. R.; Giacalone, J.

    2014-12-01

    Recent observations from IBEX combined with previous measurements from other sources suggest new, local, effects of interstellar turbulence. Observations of various interstellar parameters such as the magnetic field, fluid velocity and electron density, over large spatial scales, have revealed a broadband Kolmogorov spectrum of interstellar turbulence which pervades most of interstellar space. The outer scale (or coherence scale of this turbulence) is found to be approximately 10^19 cm and the inner cutoff scale is less than 1000 km. The root-mean-square relative fluctuation in the fluid and the magnetic-field parameters is of order unity. If this turbulence exists at the heliosphere, the root-mean-square relative fluctuations at 100 (heliospheric) AU scales is approximately 0.1. The recently published value for the change In observed velocity direction for the interstellar flow relative to the heliosphere (Frisch, etal, 2014)is consistent with this. Similarly, interpreting the width of the IBEX ribbon in terms of a fluctuating magnetic field also is in agreement with this picture. Observations of TeV cosmic rays can also be explained. Potential effects of these fluctuations in the interstellar medium on the heliosphere will be discussed. Reference: Frisch, etal, Science, 341, 480

  6. MHD Simulation Heliospheric Magnetic Fields and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2005-01-01

    This talk will present a summary of our results on simulations of heliospheric structure and dynamics. We use a three-dimensional MHD code in spherical coordinates to produce a solar wind containing a rotating, tilted heliospheric current sheet, fast-slow stream and microstream shear layers, waves, 2-D turbulence, and pressure balanced structures that are input to the inner (superAlfvenic) boundary. The evolution of various combinations of these has led to a deeper understanding of sector structure, magnetic holes, fluctuation anisotropies, and general turbulent evolution. We show how the sectors are likely to be connected, how spiral fields can arise, and how field line diffusion can be caused by waves with transverse structure and microstream shears.

  7. Plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Hu, G.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  8. The distribution of MHD turbulence in the heliosphere and the charged particle radiation environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, W. H.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence plays an important role in cross scale couplings in the heliospheric system and is central to understanding the distribution and variations of charged particle radiation. The nonlinear turbulent cascade process acts as a conduit connecting large scale fluid-like plasma motions to small scale kinetic motions, and is thus most likely an integral part of heating processes from the coronal base to the outer boundaries of the heliosphere. Turbulence also establishes key parameters that determine the transport (and perhaps also, acceleration) of energetic charged particles. In the inner heliospheric realm of solar energetic particles, turbulence can account for scattering, field line complexity, and topological trapping, and can provide other indirect effects such as turbulent transport affecting CMEs and shocks. To understand the distribution and spectra of galactic cosmic rays, one must know the diffusion tensor and therefore local turbulence properties. Turbulence is transported outward in the supersonic solar wind, while the cosmic rays diffuse and drift inwards from the interstellar medium. Thus to understand how the spectrum of galactic cosmic rays is established at any point in interplanetary space, it is necessary to have knowledge of the turbulence everywhere in the heliosphere. Here we summarize recent progress in this challenging area. Headway has been made by employing a four equation transport model with one point nonlinear modeling of locally homogeneous turbulence. The model follows turbulence energy density, correlation scale, temperature and cross helicity under the influence of specified large scale fields. The turbulence is driven by large scale shear, and in the outer heliosphere, by pickup ions. A few constants must be estimated either from theory or observations -- the MHD Karman-Taylor constants, the shear strength, a turbulence geometry factor ("mixing term"), and the Alfven ratio. The latitudinal dependence of

  9. Interplanetary magnetic field as a detector of turbulence in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabarova, O.

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) behavior at different scales may give a key for understanding of turbulence spatial evolution in the heliosphere. It has been known that the solar wind plasma becomes more and more turbulent with heliocentric distance. Recent multi-spacecraft investigations of the large-scale IMF [1] show unexpectedly fast lost of the regular sector structure of the solar wind in the inner heliosphere. In the ecliptic plane, it seems to be broken at 3-4 AU, much closer to the Sun than the Parker spiral gets perpendicular to the sunward direction. At the same time, the high-latitude solar wind remains more structured at the same heliocentric distances [2]. This fact may bear evidence of radial increase of turbulence and intermittency in the solar wind due to magnetic reconnection. The magnetic reconnection recurrently occurs at the large-scale heliospheric current sheet (HCS) as well as at smaller-scale current sheets during the solar wind expansion [3]. As a result, a significant part of the heliosphere is filled with secondary current sheets as well as with waves and accelerated particles in some vicinity of the HCS. Under averaging, it looks as a radial increase of turbulence, especially in low latitudes. It also can be considered as one of the main causes of the break of the expected IMF radial dependence law [1, 2]. Results of the consequent multi-spacecraft analysis of plasma and magnetic filed turbulence characteristics at different heliocentric distances and heliolatitudes will be discussed. 1. O. Khabarova, V. Obridko, Puzzles of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field in the Inner Heliosphere, 2012, Astrophysical Journal, 761, 2, 82, doi:10.1088/0004-637X/761/2/82, http://arxiv.org/pdf/1204.6672v2.pdf 2. O.V. Khabarova, The interplanetary magnetic field: radial and latitudinal dependences, Astronomy Reports, 2013, 57, 11, http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1305/1305.1204.pdf 3. V. Zharkova, O. Khabarova, Particle Acceleration in

  10. Transport of Turbulence Throughout the Heliosphere and Determining its Impact on Solar Modulation of Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parhi, S.; Minnie, J.; Breech, B.; Bieber, J.; Matthaeus, W.; Burger, R.

    2004-05-01

    A global solar wind turbulence model is considered in a simulation domain which spans from close to the Sun to 100 AU and excludes the effect of termination shock at present. The four governing equations that model the turbulence describe fluctuation energy, correlation scale, temperature, and cross-helicity everywhere in the heliosphere. The transport equation for cross-helicity is new in this simulation [1]. These four equations are solved numerically along every radial direction in our simulation domain. The parameters present in these equations are plasma shear, wind speed, and strength of pick-up ions among others. Magnetic variance, correlation length, cross helicity and plasma temperature have latitudinal dependence along the inner boundary at 0.2 AU. The solar wind speed and velocity shear are varied across the simulation domain. A simple model of pick-up ions is employed at present. The early indication shows that the simulation results thus obtained have a good agreement with observations. Heating is suppressed in the inner heliosphere and at high latitudes by the cross helicity effect, and the Alfvenicity of the turbulence almost completely vanishes by 10 AU. This turbulence model will be combined with a modulation code that integrates Parker's transport equation numerically. This approach gives a better physical basis for the heliospheric distribution of turbulence, and thus it is expected that the physics of the scattering and modulation is improved. The whole exercise is part of our ongoing effort to develop ab initio turbulence and modulation models and integrate them together. The combined effort will enhance our understanding of solar modulation of cosmic rays. Supported by NSF grant ATM-0000315 and NASA NAG5-8134. W H Matthaeus, J. Minnie, B. Breech, S. Parhi, J. W. Bieber and S. Oughton, submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett. (2004)

  11. Turbulence transport modeling of the temporal outer heliosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, L.; Zank, G. P.; Hu, Q.; Dosch, A.

    2014-09-20

    The solar wind can be regarded as a turbulent magnetofluid, evolving in an expanding solar wind and subject to turbulent driving by a variety of in situ sources. Furthermore, the solar wind and the drivers of turbulence are highly time-dependent and change with solar cycle. Turbulence transport models describing low-frequency magnetic and velocity fluctuations in the solar wind have so far neglected solar cycle effects. Here we consider the effects of solar cycle variability on a turbulence transport model developed by Zank et al. This model is appropriate for the solar wind beyond about 1 AU, and extensions have described the steady-state dependence of the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature throughout the outer heliosphere. We find that the temporal solar wind introduces a periodic variability, particularly beyond ∼10 AU, in the magnetic energy density fluctuations, correlation length, and solar wind temperature. The variability is insufficient to account for the full observed variability in these quantities, but we find that the time-dependent solutions trace the steady-state solutions quite well, suggesting that the steady-state models are reasonable first approximations.

  12. Non-Equilibrium Transitions of Heliospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Recent advances in Space Physics theory have established the connection between non-extensive Statistical Mechanics and space plasmas by providing a theoretical basis for the empirically derived kappa distributions commonly used to describe the phase space distribution functions of these systems [1]. The non-equilibrium temperature and the kappa index that govern these distributions are the two independent controlling parameters of non-equilibrium systems [1-3]. The significance of the kappa index is primarily given by its role in identifying the non-equilibrium stationary states, and measuring their "thermodynamic distance" from thermal equilibrium [4], while its physical meaning is connected to the correlation between the system's particles [5]. For example, analysis of the IBEX high Energetic Neutral Atom spectra [6] showed that the vast majority of measured kappa indices are between ~1.5 and ~2.5, consistent with the far-equilibrium "cavity" of minimum entropy discovered by Livadiotis & McComas [2]. Spontaneous procedures that can increase the entropy, move the system gradually toward equilibrium, that is the state with the maximum (infinite) kappa index. Other external factors that may decrease the entropy, move the system back to states further from equilibrium where the kappa indices are smaller. Newly formed pick-up ions can play this critical role in the solar wind and other space plasmas. We have analytically shown that their highly ordered motion can reduce the average entropy in the plasma beyond the termination shock, inside the inner heliosheath [7]. Non-equilibrium transitions have a key role in understanding the governing thermodynamical processes of space plasmas. References 1. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2009, JGR, 114, 11105. 2. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010a, ApJ, 714, 971. 3. Livadiotis, G., & McComas, D. J. 2010c, in AIP Conf. Proc. 9, Pickup Ions Throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond, ed. J. LeRoux, V. Florinski, G. P. Zank, & A

  13. Visualization of Remotely-Sensed Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, M.; Hick, P. P.; Wang, C.; Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.

    2002-12-01

    We demonstrate a software application designed for the display and real-time manipulation of 3D heliospheric volume data, such as solar wind density, velocity and magnetic field. The software exploits the capabilities of the Volume Pro 1000 (from TeraRecon, Inc.), a low-cost 64-bit PCI board capable of rendering a 512-cubed array of volume data in real time at up to 30 frames per second on a standard PC. The application allows stereo and perspective views, and animations of time-sequences. We show several examples of three-dimensional heliospheric volume data derived from tomographic reconstructions based on heliospheric remote sensing observations of the heliospheric density and velocity structure (e.g. Thomson scattering and interplanetary scintillation observations). This work was supported through NASA grant NAG5-9423 and Air Force MURI grant F49620-01-0359.

  14. Transport of cosmic-ray protons in intermittent heliospheric turbulence: Model and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Alouani-Bibi, Fathallah; Le Roux, Jakobus A.

    2014-02-01

    The transport of charged energetic particles in the presence of strong intermittent heliospheric turbulence is computationally analyzed based on known properties of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind plasma at 1 astronomical unit. The turbulence is assumed to be static, composite, and quasi-three-dimensional with a varying energy distribution between a one-dimensional Alfvénic (slab) and a structured two-dimensional component. The spatial fluctuations of the turbulent magnetic field are modeled either as homogeneous with a Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF), or as intermittent on large and small scales with a q-Gaussian PDF. Simulations showed that energetic particle diffusion coefficients both parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field are significantly affected by intermittency in the turbulence. This effect is especially strong for parallel transport where for large-scale intermittency results show an extended phase of subdiffusive parallel transport during which cross-field transport diffusion dominates. The effects of intermittency are found to depend on particle rigidity and the fraction of slab energy in the turbulence, yielding a perpendicular to parallel mean free path ratio close to 1 for large-scale intermittency. Investigation of higher order transport moments (kurtosis) indicates that non-Gaussian statistical properties of the intermittent turbulent magnetic field are present in the parallel transport, especially for low rigidity particles at all times.

  15. Voyager studies of the distant heliospheric magnetic fields and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ness, N. F.; Burlaga, L. F.; Richardson, J. D.

    2003-04-01

    Launched in 1977, the twin Voyager spacecraft (V1, V2) are exiting the heliosphere and each one is now well beyond the orbits of the planets. Careful studies have been made of the observed heliospheric magnetic field (HMF) and solar wind plasma over a full solar solar cycle through 2001. At that time, V1 was at a radial distance of 87 AU and heliographic latitude +35^o and V2 was at 69 AU and -26^o. These data have demonstrated that Parker's model of solar wind plasma flow and spatial structure of the solar originating field well describes these observations when due account of the temporal variations of the source field are taken into account by use of near-Earth observations at 1 AU. There has been continued study of the sector structure of the HMF delineating outward (outward) and inward (negative) directed fields. The Heliospheric Current Sheet (HCS) has thus been mapped to these distances and latitudes and its configuration shows agreement with predictions of the extrapolated solar surface magnetic field structure. Correlative studies with simultaneous cosmic ray observations have been conducted. All these data have helped delineate the manner in which solar originating disturbances such as shocks and Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) evolve at great heliospheric distances. The solar wind speed as observed by V2 has been showing a slow but steady decrease down to an average of ˜390 km/sec at 65 AU. Sufficient energy is transferred from the pickup ions to the solar wind protons to produce a temperature increase outside ˜30 AU. The structure of the magnetic field has been identified as becoming multi-fractal beginning at ˜40 AU. The field at V1 is primarily azimuthal and in 2000--2001 was averaging ˜0.05 nT at 87 AU. This paper summarizes the magnetic field and solar plasma observations in the outer heliosphere.

  16. BOUndary Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-01-25

    BOUT is a parallelized 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code. The principal calculations are the boundary plasma turbulence in a realistic magnetic geometry. BOUT uses fluid Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density, electron and ion temperature and Parallel mementum. With sources added in the core-edge region and sinks in the scrape-off-layer (SOL), BOUT follows the self-consistent profile evolution together with turbulence. BOUT also includes coupling to a magnetohyfrodynamic equlibrium (EFIT package) and a two-dimensional hydrodynamic edgemore » transport model (UEDGE package).« less

  17. Interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrčil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1996-07-01

    The interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) is simulated using the 2 12D MHD model in the meridional plane. The shock structure is generated by a velocity pulse and consists of a strong broad forward shock (FS) with a concave shape and a much weaker and narrower reverse shock (RS) with a convex shape. The flat equatorial HPS, with its larger mass density and slower flow velocity, modifies this shock structure. A dimple is formed at the FS and a reverse dimple is formed at the RS. A large distortion of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) occurs when the velocity pulse is introduced outside the HPS. The interaction of a shock with the HPS leads to very large southward values of the interplanetary magnetic field due to an effect of shock compression, field-line draping, and deflection of the HCS.

  18. Division E Commission 49: Interplanetary Plasma and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Ingrid; Manoharan, P. K.; Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk; Briand, Carine; Chashei, Igor V.; Gibson, Sarah E.; Lario, David; Hanaoka, Yoichiro; Malandraki, Olga; Kontar, Eduard; Richardson, John D.

    2016-04-01

    After a little more than forty years of work related to the interplanetary plasma and the heliosphere the IAU's Commission 49 was formally discontinued in 2015. The commission started its work when the first spacecraft were launched to measure the solar wind in-situ away from Earth orbit, both inward and outward from 1 AU. It now hands over its activities to a new commission during an era of space research when Voyager 1 measures in-situ the parameters of the local interstellar medium at the edge of the heliosphere. The commission will be succeeded by C.E3 with a similar area of responsibility but with more focused specific tasks that the community intends to address during the coming several years. This report includes a short description of the motivation for this commission and of the historical context. It then describes work from 2012 to 2015 during the present solar cycle 24 that has been the weakest in the space era so far. It gave rise to a large number of studies on solar energetic particles and cosmic rays. Other studies addressed e.g. the variation of the solar wind structure and energetic particle fluxes on long time scales, the detection of dust in the solar wind and the Voyager measurements at the edge of the heliosphere. The research is based on measurements from spacecraft that are at present operational and motivated by the upcoming Solar Probe + and Solar Orbiter missions to explore the vicinity of the Sun. We also report here the progress on new and planned radio instruments and their importance for heliospheric studies. Contributors to this report are Carine Briand, Yoichiro Hanaoka, Eduard Kontar, David Lario, Ingrid Mann, John D. Richardson.

  19. The role of magnetohydrodynamics in heliospheric space plasma physics research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryer, Murray; Smith, Zdenka Kopal; Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a fairly recent extension of the field of fluid mechanics. While much remains to be done, it has successfully been applied to the contemporary field of heliospheric space plasma research to evaluate the 'macroscopic picture' of some vital topics via the use of conducting fluid equations and numerical modeling and simulations. Some representative examples from solar and interplanetary physics are described to demonstrate that the continuum approach to global problems (while keeping in mind the assumptions and limitations therein) can be very successful in providing insight and large scale interpretations of otherwise intractable problems in space physics.

  20. Multiple Current Sheet Systems in the Outer Heliosphere: Energy Release and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, D.; Gingell, P. W.; Matteini, L.

    2016-05-01

    In the outer heliosphere, beyond the solar wind termination shock, it is expected that the warped heliospheric current sheet forms a region of closely packed, multiple, thin current sheets. Such a system may be subject to the ion-kinetic tearing instability, and hence may generate magnetic islands and hot populations of ions associated with magnetic reconnection. Reconnection processes in this environment have important implications for local particle transport, and for particle acceleration at reconnection sites and in turbulence. We study this complex environment by means of three-dimensional hybrid simulations over long timescales, in order to capture the evolution from linear growth of the tearing instability to a fully developed turbulent state at late times. The final state develops from the highly ordered initial state via both forward and inverse cascades. Component and spectral anisotropy in the magnetic fluctuations is present when a guide field is included. The inclusion of a population of newborn interstellar pickup protons does not strongly affect these results. Finally, we conclude that reconnection between multiple current sheets can act as an important source of turbulence in the outer heliosphere, with implications for energetic particle acceleration and propagation.

  1. The Physics of Remotely-Sensed Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Bernard V.

    1997-08-01

    Solar disturbances produce major effects on the corona, the solar wind, the interplanetary medium, and the Earth along with its magnetosphere. New techniques have been developed under this grant for studying plasma disturbances in the inner heliosphere by remotely sensing them. These techniques have used data from the HELIOS spacecraft zodiacal light photometers, in situ data and a variety of other spacecraft and ground based instruments. The zodiacal light photometers on board the two HELIOS spacecraft (data coverage from 1974 to 1986) provided the first reliable information about the heliospheric masses and shapes of propagating disturbances. The investigations into the physics of the disturbances sensed by these techniques, and the ability to forecast them, have been underway during the contract. The data analyses have used YOHKOH spacecraft observations, Sacramento Peak Observatory and Mauna Loa (Mark 3) coronagraph data to map solar surface features. In addition, interplanetary scintillation (IPS) data from the Cambridge, England, Nagoya, Japan, and Ooty, India radio telescopes plus ULYSSES and IMP in situ data have been used to determine present day conditions in the solar wind.

  2. Propagation of an interplanetary shock along the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrčil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1996-09-01

    Propagation of an interplanetary shock along the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) is simulated using a high-resolution numerical MHD model in the meridional plane. The ambient solar wind contains two opposite orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field above and below the equatorial plane. These regions are separated by a thin transition layer that represents the heliospheric current sheet contained within the HPS. A pulse is introduced at the inner boundary (0.1 AU) into this steady state to initiate the interplanetary shock. The HPS with its weaker intensity of the magnetic field, larger mass density, and slower flow velocity modifies the global shock structure. A dimple is formed at the forward shock front, a reverse dimple is formed at the reverse shock, and the contact discontinuity is significantly distorted. Weak compression of the HPS occurs beyond the forward shock front due to the postshock increase of the azimuthal magnetic pressure. Although slight collimation of mass flow takes place toward the axis of the HPS, an antisunward protrusion (``pimple'') within the shock front's dimple did not form in our simulation.

  3. Instabilities and Plasma Mixing at the Heliospheric Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avinash, K.; Zank, G. P.

    2014-12-01

    The stability of the heliopause (HP) that separates the tenuous heliosheath plasma from the relatively dense plasma of the local interstellar medium (LISM) is examined using a fully general model that includes all the important physical process pertaining to the heliosphere e.g., resonant charge exchange with neutral hydrogen, plasma flows and magnetic fields in the outer and inner heliosheath, and energetic neutral ENA) from the inner heliosheath. Charge exchange introduces Rayleigh Taylor (RT) like instability in the nose region of HP, the strong flow shear excites Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) like instability in the flanks while mixed RT-KH modes are unstable in the shoulder region in between. ENA are found to be essential for the instability of flanks in the presence of magnetic field stabilization. Further, the mixing of the LISM plasma with solar wind (SW) plasma is across the HP caused by these instabilities is examined. The magnetic field in the OHS and IHS are oriented approximately parallel to each (on either side of HP). Such field lines normally do not experience reconnection However, we show that in the nonlinear phase, local mushroom like structures of RT and RT-KH mode will drag the OHS field lines across HP into the inner heliosheath. Driven by local plasma flows, these field lines will reconnect with magnetic field lines in the HIS. This reconnection of fields in OHS and IHS will greatly enhance the mixing of plasma across the HP. This scenario is examined using Sweet-Parker and Petscheck models of driven reconnection. The reconnection rates and mixing rates with collisional resistivity and anomalous resistivity are evaluated and compared with other mechanisms of mixing to assess the importance of reconnection in plasma mixing across HP.

  4. ADVECTIVE TRANSPORT OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA INTO THE HELIOSPHERE ACROSS THE RECONNECTING HELIOPAUSE

    SciTech Connect

    Strumik, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Czechowski, A.; Macek, W. M.; Ratkiewicz, R.

    2014-02-10

    We discuss results of magnetohydrodynamical model simulations of plasma dynamics in the proximity of the heliopause (HP). The model is shown to fit details of the magnetic field variations observed by the Voyager 1 spacecraft during the transition from the heliosphere to the local interstellar medium (LISM). We propose an interpretation of magnetic field structures observed by Voyager 1 in terms of fine-scale physical processes. Our simulations reveal an effective transport mechanism of relatively dense LISM plasma across the reconnecting HP into the heliosphere. The mechanism is associated with annihilation of magnetic sectors in the heliospheric plasma near the HP.

  5. Quasi-periodic transverse plasma flow associated with an evolving MHD vortex street in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siregar, Edouard; Roberts, D. A.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    1993-01-01

    We study a transverse plasma flow induced by the evolution of a Karman vortex street using a Chebyshev-Fourier spectral algorithm to solve both the compressible Navier-Stokes and MHD equations. The evolving vortex street is formed by the nonlinear interaction of two vortex sheets initially in equilibrium. We study spatial profiles of the total plasma velocity, the density, the meridional flow angle and the location of sector boundaries and find generally good agreement with Voyager 2 measurements of quasi-periodic transverse flow in the outer heliosphere. The pressure pulses associated with the meridional flows in the simulation are too small, although they are correctly located, and this may be due to the lack of any 'warp' in the current sheet in this model. A strong, flow-aligned magnetic field, such as would occur in the inner heliosphere, is shown to lead to weak effects that would be masked by the background interplanetary turbulence. We also study the plasma and magnetic transport resulting from the meridional flow and find that deficits of magnetic quantities do occur near the ecliptic. While the effect is relatively small, it is in general agreement with the most recent analysis of 'flux deficit' in the outer heliosphere.

  6. Interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odstrcil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Interplanetary shocks often propagate along the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) changes its polarity. This problem is investigated by the time-dependent 2.5-D MHD numerical model in the meridional plane. An example of computation is shown in the figure using density (log) contours and IMF vectors. Values of plasma parameters along the HPS fluctuate in time due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The HPS with its decreased intensity of the IMF as well as with its increased mass density causes a dimple in the shock structure (relatively weak for the forward shock, significant for the reverse shock, and very large for the contact discontinuity). Beyond the forward shock, the HPS is slightly compressed due to the post-shock increase of the azimuthal IMF component. Then follows expansion of the HPS surrounded by the highly-deformed contact discontinuity. A significant draping of IMF lines occurs around this structure that increases the meridional component of the IMF. This can cause a favorable condition for initiation of a geomagnetic storm.

  7. Interaction of an interplanetary shock with the heliospheric plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odstrcil, D.; Dryer, M.; Smith, Z.

    1995-06-01

    Interplanetary shocks often propagate along the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) where the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) changes its polarity. This problem is investigated by the time-dependent 2.5-D MHD numerical model in the meridional plane. An example of computation is shown in the figure using density (log) contours and IMF vectors. Values of plasma parameters along the HPS fluctuate in time due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The HPS with its decreased intensity of the IMF as well as with its increased mass density causes a dimple in the shock structure (relatively weak for the forward shock, significant for the reverse shock, and very large for the contact discontinuity). Beyond the forward shock, the HPS is slightly compressed due to the post-shock increase of the azimuthal IMF component. Then follows expansion of the HPS surrounded by the highly-deformed contact discontinuity. A significant draping of IMF lines occurs around this structure that increases the meridional component of the IMF. This can cause a favorable condition for initiation of a geomagnetic storm.

  8. Visualization of remotely sensed heliospheric plasmas for space weather applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Hick, P. P.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Bailey, Mike

    2004-02-01

    We demonstrate a software application designed for the display and interactive manipulation of 3D heliospheric volume data, such as solar wind density, velocity and magnetic field. The Volume Explorer software exploits the capabilities of the Volume Pro 1000 (from TeraRecon, Inc.), a low-cost 64-bit PCI board capable of rendering a 512-cubed array of volume data in real time at up to 30 frames per second on a standard PC. The application allows stereo and perspective views, and animations of time-sequences. We show examples of three-dimensional heliospheric volume data derived from tomographic reconstructions based on heliospheric remote sensing observations of the heliospheric density and velocity structure. Currently these reconstructions are based on archival IPS and Thomson scattering data. In the near future we expect to add reconstructions based on the all-sky observations from the recently launched Solar Mass Ejection Imager.

  9. CONNECTING THE SUN'S HIGH-RESOLUTION MAGNETIC CARPET TO THE TURBULENT HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Cranmer, Steven R.; Van Ballegooijen, Adriaan A.; Woolsey, Lauren N.

    2013-04-20

    The solar wind is connected to the Sun's atmosphere by flux tubes that are rooted in an ever-changing pattern of positive and negative magnetic polarities on the surface. Observations indicate that the magnetic field is filamentary and intermittent across a wide range of spatial scales. However, we do not know to what extent the complex flux-tube topology seen near the Sun survives as the wind expands into interplanetary space. In order to study the possible long-distance connections between the corona and the heliosphere, we developed new models of turbulence-driven solar wind acceleration along empirically constrained field lines. We used a potential field model of the quiet Sun to trace field lines into the ecliptic plane with unprecedented spatial resolution at their footpoints. For each flux tube, a one-dimensional model was created with an existing wave/turbulence code that solves equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation from the photosphere to 4 AU. To take account of stream-stream interactions between flux tubes, we used those models as inner boundary conditions for a time-steady magnetohydrodynamic description of radial and longitudinal structure in the ecliptic. Corotating stream interactions smear out much of the smallest-scale variability, making it difficult to see how individual flux tubes on granular or supergranular scales can survive out to 1 AU. However, our models help clarify the level of ''background'' variability with which waves and turbulent eddies should be expected to interact. Also, the modeled fluctuations in magnetic field magnitude were seen to match measured power spectra quite well.

  10. Turbulence in solar wind and laboratory plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Carbone, V.

    2010-06-16

    Recent studies of plasma turbulence based on measurements within solar wind and laboratory plasmas has been discussed. Evidences for the presence of a turbulent energy cascade, using the Yaglom's law for MHD turbulence, has been provided through data from the Ulysses spacecraft. This allows, for the first time, a direct estimate of the turbulent energy transfer rate, which can contribute to the in situ heating of the solar wind. The energy cascade has been evidenced also for ExB electrostatic turbulence in laboratory magnetized plasmas using measurements of intermittent transport (bursty turbulence) at the edge of the RFX-mod reversed field pinch plasma device. Finally the problem of the dispersive region of turbulence in solar wind above the ion-cyclotron frequency, where a spectral break is usually observed, and the problem of dissipation in a collisionless fluid as the solar wind, are briefly discussed.

  11. Strong turbulence of plasma waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, M. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews recent work related to modulational instability and wave envelope self-focusing in dynamical and statistical systems. After introductory remarks pertinent to nonlinear optics realizations of these effects, the author summarizes the status of the subject in plasma physics, where it has come to be called 'strong Langmuir turbulence'. The paper treats the historical development of pertinent concepts, analytical theory, numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and spacecraft observations. The role of self-similar self-focusing Langmuir envelope wave packets is emphasized, both in the Zakharov equation model for the wave dynamics and in a statistical theory based on this dynamical model.

  12. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  13. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  14. Global properties of the plasma in the outer heliosphere. I - Large-scale structure and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.; Gazis, P. R.; Lazarus, A. J.; Belcher, J. W.; Gordon, G. S., Jr.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Pioneers 10 and 11, and Voyager 2, have active plasma analyzers as they proceed through heliocentric distances of the order of 30-50 AU, facilitating comparative studies of the global character of the outer solar wind and its variation over the solar cycle. Careful study of these data show that wind ion temperature remains constant beyond 15 AU, and that there may be large-scale variations of temperature with celestial longitude and heliographic latitude. There has thus far been no indication of a heliospheric terminal shock.

  15. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  16. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  17. Future heliospheric missions from Russian perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrukovich, Anatoli; Izmodenov, Vladislav; Zelenyi, Lev; Kuzin, Sergey; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Eismont, Natan

    Structure and plasma processes of the heliosphere will be in the focus of attention for the next decade with the launch of Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus, Interhelioprobe and SPORT, as well as the continuing flight of Voyagers and New Horizons. We review possible scientific goals and technical challenges for even more distant projects which are under discussion now. The projects include high-ecliptic observations with the help of solar sail, remote observations of heliospheric outer boundaries with interstellar medium as well as local high resolution turbulence studies. A major future challenge for the space weather research is the support for manned spaceflight beyond low Earth orbit.

  18. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  19. Multiscale coherent structures in tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W.; Yang, Q. W.; Wang, L.; Wen, Y. Z.

    2006-10-15

    A 12-tip poloidal probe array is used on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak [Li, Wan, and Mao, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 135 (2000)] to measure plasma turbulence in the edge region. Some statistical analysis techniques are used to characterize the turbulence structures. It is found that the plasma turbulence is composed of multiscale coherent structures, i.e., turbulent eddies and there is self-similarity in a relative short scale range. The presence of the self-similarity is found due to the structural similarity of these eddies between different scales. These turbulent eddies constitute the basic convection cells, so the self-similar range is just the dominant scale range relevant to transport. The experimental results also indicate that the plasma turbulence is dominated by low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuation components and its dispersion relation shows typical electron-drift-wave characteristics. Some large-scale coherent structures intermittently burst out and exhibit a very long poloidal extent, even longer than 6 cm. It is found that these large-scale coherent structures are mainly contributed by the low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuating components and their presence is responsible for the observations of long-range correlations, i.e., the correlation in the scale range much longer than the turbulence decorrelation scale. These experimental observations suggest that the coexistence of multiscale coherent structures results in the self-similar turbulent state.

  20. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  1. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  2. Plasma sheet turbulence observed by Cluster II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weygand, James M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K. K.; Schwarzl, H. K.; Thompson, S. M.; McPherron, R. L.; Balogh, A.; Kistler, L. M.; Goldstein, M. L.; Borovsky, J.

    2005-01-01

    Cluster fluxgate magnetometer (FGM) and ion spectrometer (CIS) data are employed to analyze magnetic field fluctuations within the plasma sheet during passages through the magnetotail region in the summers of 2001 and 2002 and, in particular, to look for characteristics of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. Power spectral indices determined from power spectral density functions are on average larger than Kolmogorov's theoretical value for fluid turbulence as well as Kraichnan's theoretical value for MHD plasma turbulence. Probability distribution functions of the magnetic fluctuations show a scaling law over a large range of temporal scales with non-Gaussian distributions at small dissipative scales and inertial scales and more Gaussian distribution at large driving scales. Furthermore, a multifractal analysis of the magnetic field components shows scaling behavior in the inertial range of the fluctuations from about 20 s to 13 min for moments through the fifth order. Both the scaling behavior of the probability distribution functions and the multifractal structure function suggest that intermittent turbulence is present within the plasma sheet. The unique multispacecraft aspect and fortuitous spacecraft spacing allow us to examine the turbulent eddy scale sizes. Dynamic autocorrelation and cross correlation analysis of the magnetic field components allow us to determine that eddy scale sizes fit within the plasma sheet. These results suggest that magnetic field turbulence is occurring within the plasma sheet resulting in turbulent energy dissipation.

  3. Experimental Achievements on Plasma Confinement and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.

    2009-02-19

    This article presents a brief review of the experimental studies on turbulence and resultant transport in toroidal plasmas. The article focuses on two topics, physics of transport barrier and the role of mesoscale structure on plasma confinement, i.e. zonal flows. The two topics show the important roles of the mutual interactions between sheared flows, zonal flows and drift waves for plasma turbulence and transport. The findings can lead us to further generalized concept of the disparate scale interactions which could give a fundamental understanding of the plasma confinement from the first principle.

  4. A new stationary analytical model of the heliospheric current sheet and the plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kislov, Roman A.; Khabarova, Olga V.; Malova, Helmi V.

    2015-10-01

    We develop a single-fluid 2-D analytical model of the axially symmetric thin heliospheric current sheet (HCS) embedded into the heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS). A HCS-HPS system has a shape of a relatively thin plasma disk limited by separatrices that also represent current sheets, which is in agreement with Ulysses observations in the aphelion, when it crossed the HCS perpendicular to its plane. Our model employs a differential rotation of the solar photosphere that leads to unipolar induction in the corona. Three components of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), the solar wind speed, and the thermal pressure are taken into account. Solar corona conditions and a HCS-HPS system state are tied by boundary conditions and the "frozen-in" equation. The model allows finding spatial distributions of the magnetic field, the speed within the HPS, and electric currents within the HCS. An angular plasma speed is low within the HPS due to the angular momentum conservation (there is no significant corotation with the Sun), which is consistent with observations. We found that the HPS thickness L decreases with distance r, becoming a constant far from the Sun (L ~2.5 solar radii (R0) at 1 AU). Above the separatrices and at large heliocentric distances, the solar wind behavior obeys Parker's model, but the magnetic field spiral form may be different from Parker's one inside the HPS. At r ≤ 245 R0, the IMF spiral may undergo a turn simultaneously with a change of the poloidal current direction (from sunward to antisunward).

  5. Dissipation range turbulent cascades in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.; Almagri, A. F.; Forest, C. B.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Sarff, J. S.; Fiksel, G.; Hatch, D. R.; Jenko, F.; Prager, S. C.; Ren, Y.

    2012-05-15

    Dissipation range cascades in plasma turbulence are described and spectra are formulated from the scaled attenuation in wavenumber space of the spectral energy transfer rate. This yields spectra characterized by the product of a power law and exponential fall-off, applicable to all scales. Spectral indices of the power law and exponential fall-off depend on the scaling of the dissipation, the strength of the nonlinearity, and nonlocal effects when dissipation rates of multiple fluctuation fields are different. The theory is used to derive spectra for MHD turbulence with magnetic Prandtl number greater than unity, extending previous work. The theory is also applied to generic plasma turbulence by considering the spectrum from damping with arbitrary wavenumber scaling. The latter is relevant to ion temperature gradient turbulence modeled by gyrokinetics. The spectrum in this case has an exponential component that becomes weaker at small scale, giving a power law asymptotically. Results from the theory are compared to three very different types of turbulence. These include the magnetic plasma turbulence of the Madison Symmetric Torus, the MHD turbulence of liquid metal in the Madison Dynamo Experiment, and gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence.

  6. Global MHD Simulations of Space Plasma Environments: Heliosphere, Comets, Magnetospheres of Plants and Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabin, K.; Hansen, K. C.; Gombosi, T. I.; Combi, M. R.; Linde, T. J.; DeZeeuw, D. L.; Groth, C. P. T.; Powell, K. G.; Nagy, A. F.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides an approximate description of a great variety of processes in space physics. Accurate numerical solutions of the MHD equations are still a challenge, but in the past decade a number of robust methods have appeared. Once these techniques made the direct solution of MHD equations feasible, a number of global three-dimensional models were designed and applied to many space physics objects. The range of these objects is truly astonishing, including active galactic nuclei, the heliosphere, the solar corona, and the solar wind interaction with planets, satellites, and comets. Outside the realm of space physics, MHD theory has been applied to such diverse problems as laboratory plasmas and electromagnetic casting of liquid metals. In this paper we present a broad spectrum of models of different phenomena in space science developed in the recent years at the University of Michigan. Although the physical systems addressed by these models are different, they all use the MHD equations as a unifying basis.

  7. On kinetic dissipation in collisionless turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parashar, Tulasi Nandan

    Plasma turbulence is a phenomenon that is present in astrophysical as well as terrestrial plasmas. The earth is embedded in a turbulent plasma, emitting from the sun, called the solar wind. It is important to understand the nature of this plasma in order to understand space weather. A critical unsolved problem is that of the source of dissipation in turbulent plasmas. It is believed to play a central role in the heating of the solar corona which in turn drives the solar wind. The solar wind itself is observed to be highly turbulent and hotter than predicted through adiabatic expansion models. Turbulence and its associated dissipation have been studied extensively through the use of MHD models. However, the solar wind and large regions of the solar corona have very low collisionality, which calls into question the use of simple viscosity and resistivity in most MHD models. A kinetic treatment is needed for a better understanding of turbulent dissipation. This thesis studies the dissipation of collisionless turbulence using direct numerical hybrid simulations of turbulent plasmas. Hybrid simulations use kinetic ions and fluid electrons. Having full kinetic ion physics, the dissipation in these simulations at the ion scales is self consistent and requires no assumptions. We study decaying as well as quasi steady state systems (driven magnetically). Initial studies of the Orszag-Tang vortex [Orszag, JFM, 1979] (which is an initial condition that quickly generates decaying strong turbulence) showed preferential perpendicular heating of protons (with T_perp /T_|| > 1). An energy budget analysis showed that in the turbulent regime, almost all the dissipation occurs through magnetic interactions. We study the energy budget of waves using the k - o spectra (energy in the wavenumber-frequency space). The k - o spectra of this study and subsequent studies of driven turbulent plasmas do not show any significant power in the linear wave modes of the system. This suggests that

  8. Whistler Wave Turbulence in Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, G. P.

    2010-03-01

    Whistler waves are present in solar wind plasma. These waves possess characteristic turbulent fluctuations that are characterized typically by the frequency and length scales that are respectively bigger than ion gyro frequency and smaller than ion gyro radius. The electron inertial length is an intrinsic length scale in whistler wave turbulence that distinguishably divides the high frequency solar wind turbulent spectra into scales smaller and bigger than the electron inertial length. We present nonlinear three dimensional, time dependent, fluid simulations of whistler wave turbulence to investigate their role in solar wind plasma. Our simulations find that the dispersive whistler modes evolve entirely differently in the two regimes. While the dispersive whistler wave effects are stronger in the large scale regime, they do not influence the spectral cascades which are describable by a Kolmogorov-like k-7/3 spectrum. By contrast, the small scale turbulent fluctuations exhibit a Navier-Stokes like evolution where characteristic turbulent eddies exhibit a typical k-5/3 hydrodynamic turbulent spectrum. By virtue of equipartition between the wave velocity and magnetic fields, we quantify the role of whistler waves in the solar wind plasma fluctuations.

  9. Turbulent magnetized plasmas from ionizing shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zuohua

    Turbulent argon plasmas produced behind hypersonic shock waves (10 less than M less than 60) are studied in the presence of weak magnetic fields at various strengths between 0 and 600 gauss, parallel and antiparallel to the shock tube's axis. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical arc discharge shock tube of 5 cm diameter and 210 cm overall length. Laser induced fluorescence and an electric probe are used as diagnostics of the ion density. Turbulent fluctuations behind the shock front are observed which persist for a time in the order of 10 msec. Using standard turbulent and chaotic analytical procedures, the influence of the magnetic field on the characterizing parameters is determined under circumstances of changing Mach number and pressure. These parameters include spectral index, correlation time scales, turbulent intensity and chaotic dimensionality. The parameters of turbulence obtained from the two diagnostics are quite consistent. Fluctuation power spectra follow a P approx. f(sup -n) behavior with 1.3 less than n less than 2.8; this agrees with theoretical predictions as well as the results of other investigators. An increasing magnetic field increases the characterizing correlation time, the turbulent intensity, and the chaotic dimension but decreases the small correlation time. Therefore the magnetic field decreases the order (increases the dimensionality) in the turbulent plasma, independent of the direction of the field parallel or antiparallel to the direction of the shock wave. A turbulent velocity-field-coupling model is proposed. A dispersion relation shows that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, varieties of new modes in a turbulent plasma are generated. The model predicts an increasing complexity of the turbulent system with increasing strength of the field and is in very good qualitative agreement with our experiment results.

  10. Turbulent magnetized plasmas from ionizing shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Zuohua.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent argon plasmas produced behind hypersonic shock waves (10 less than M less than 60) are studied in the presence of weak magnetic fields at various strengths between 0 and 600 gauss, parallel and antiparallel to the shock tube's axis. The experiment is performed in a cylindrical arc discharge shock tube of 5 cm diameter and 210 cm overall length. Laser induced fluorescence and an electric probe are used as diagnostics of the ion density. Turbulent fluctuations behind the shock front are observed which persist for a time in the order of 10 msec. Using standard turbulent and chaotic analytical procedures, the influence of the magnetic field on the characterizing parameters is determined under circumstances of changing Mach number and pressure. These parameters include spectral index, correlation time scales, turbulent intensity and chaotic dimensionality. The parameters of turbulence obtained from the two diagnostics are quite consistent. Fluctuation power spectra follow a P approx. f(sup -n) behavior with 1.3 less than n less than 2.8; this agrees with theoretical predictions as well as the results of other investigators. An increasing magnetic field increases the characterizing correlation time, the turbulent intensity, and the chaotic dimension but decreases the small correlation time. Therefore the magnetic field decreases the order (increases the dimensionality) in the turbulent plasma, independent of the direction of the field parallel or antiparallel to the direction of the shock wave. A turbulent velocity-field-coupling model is proposed. A dispersion relation shows that, in the presence of an external magnetic field, varieties of new modes in a turbulent plasma are generated. The model predicts an increasing complexity of the turbulent system with increasing strength of the field and is in very good qualitative agreement with our experiment results.

  11. Turbulence evolution in MHD plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisniewski, Martina; Kissmann, Ralf; Spanier, Felix; Spanier

    2013-10-01

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium has been an active field of research in the last decade. Numerical simulations are the tool of choice in most cases. However, while there are a number of simulations on the market, some questions have not been answered finally. In this paper, we examine the influence of compressible and incompressible driving on the evolution of turbulent spectra in a number of possible interstellar medium scenarios. We conclude that the driving has an influence not only on the ratio of compressible to incompressible component but also on the anisotropy of turbulence.

  12. Additional Features of the Plasma Environment in the Heliosheath and Outer Heliosphere: Further Examination of the Voyager 2 Plasma Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Intriligator, J.; Miller, W.; Webber, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    We continue our examination of the plasma distributions obtained by the MIT plasma probe on Voyager 2 in 2007. Last year we presented an identification of High Energy Ions (HEIs) in the plasma data in the vicinity of the termination shock. These HEIs are reminiscent of the multiple reflected gyrating and pickup protons observed in the vicinity of planetary foreshocks. We continue to examine some of the details of the MIT plasma data and to compare these plasma data with other in-situ spacecraft measurements including with the enhanced signals in the plasma wave subsystem. We also evaluate our findings in terms of theoretical expectations. Our detailed analyses show that in 2007, in the vicinity of Voyager 2, the characteristics of the outer heliosphere and heliosheath were quite complex with variations occurring on many scales and indicating the need for further theoretical and empirical study. This work is sponsored by NASA Grant NNX08AE40G and by Carmel Research Center. We are grateful to John Richardson for providing the Voyager 2 MIT plasma data.

  13. Coherent Structures and Intermittency in Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit

    2008-10-15

    The paper discusses some fundamental issues related to the phenomenon of intermittency in plasma turbulence with particular reference to experimental observations in fusion devices. Intermittency is typically associated with the presence of coherent structures in turbulence. Since coherent structures can play an important role in governing the transport properties of a system they have received a great deal of attention in fusion research. We review some of the experimental measurements and numerical simulation studies on the presence and formation of coherent structures in plasmas and discuss their relevance to intermittency. Intermittency, as widely discussed in the context of neutral fluid turbulence, implies multiscaling behaviour in contrast to self-similar scaling patterns observed in self organized criticality (SOC) phenomenon. The experimental evidence from plasma turbulence measurements reveal a mixed picture--while some observations support the SOC model description others indicate the presence of multiscaling behaviour. We discuss these results in the light of our present understanding of plasma turbulence and in terms of certain unique aspects of intermittency as revealed by fluid models of plasmas.

  14. Turbulent Heating of the Core Solar Wind Protons in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamayunov, K.; Zhang, M.; Pogorelov, N.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Rassoul, H.

    2014-05-01

    A model of the interstellar pickup protons, slab component of the Alfvénic turbulence, and core solar wind (SW) protons is presented for r ≥ 1 AU along with a comparison with the Voyager 2 (V2) observations of the core SW temperature. The main conclusions of our study are summarized as follows. (1) A combined effect of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin attenuation, large-scale driving, and pickup proton generated waves results in the turbulent energy sink in the region 1 AU < r < 10 AU, while energy is pumped in the turbulence beyond ˜ 10 AU. Without energy pumping the nonlinear energy cascade is suppressed for r < 10 AU. A similar situation takes place for the 2D turbulence. (2) For both the slab and 2D turbulent components at the heliocentric distances r < 10 AU, the energy source for the core SW protons due to the Alfvén wave dissipation is small. As a result, adiabatic cooling mostly controls the model SW temperature in this region, and the model temperature disagrees with the V2 observations in the region r < 20 AU. (3) The model core SW temperature agrees well with the V2 observations for r > 20 AU.

  15. Origin and turbulence spreading of plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Scott, B. D.; Carralero, D.; Müller, S. H.; Müller, H. W.; Wolfrum, E.; Fuchert, G.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of plasma blobs is studied by analyzing their trajectories in a gyrofluid simulation in the vicinity of the separatrix. Most blobs arise at the maximum radial electric field outside the separatrix. In general, blob generation is not bound to one particular radial position or instability. A simple model of turbulence spreading for the scrape-off layer is derived. The simulations show that the blob dynamics can be represented by turbulence spreading, which constitutes a substantial energy drive for far scrape-off layer turbulence and is a more suitable quantity to study blob generation compared to the skewness.

  16. Neutrino oscillations in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mendonça, J. T.; Haas, F.

    2013-07-15

    A new model for the joint neutrino flavor and plasma oscillations is introduced, in terms of the dynamics of the neutrino flavor polarization vector in a plasma background. Fundamental solutions are found for both time-invariant and time-dependent media, considering slow and fast variations of the electron plasma density. The model is shown to be described by a generalized Hamiltonian formalism. In the case of a broad spectrum of electron plasma waves, a statistical approach indicates the shift of both equilibrium value and frequency oscillation of flavor coherence, due to the existence of a turbulent plasma background.

  17. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, Gregory G.

    2008-05-15

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) The conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  18. Plasma surrounding the global heliosphere at large distances controlled by the solar cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dialynas, Konstantinos; Krimigis, Stamatios; Mitchell, Donald; Decker, Robert; Roelof, Edmond

    2016-04-01

    The past decade can be characterized by a series of key, groundbreaking remote energetic neutral atom (ENA) images (INCA, IBEX) and in-situ ion (Voyager 1 & 2) observations concerning the characteristics and interactions of the heliosphere with the Local Interstellar Medium (LISM). Voyagers 1 and 2 (V1, V2) discovered the reservoir of ions and electrons that constitute the heliosheath (HS) after crossing the termination shock (TS) 35deg north and 32deg south of the ecliptic plane at 94 and 84 astronomical units (1 AU= 1.5 x108 km), respectively. The in situ measurements by each Voyager were placed in a global context by remote sensing images using ENA obtained with the Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA) onboard Cassini orbiting Saturn. The ENA images contain a 5.2-55 keV hydrogen (H) ENA region (Belt) that loops through the celestial sphere and contributes to balancing the pressure of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF). The success of any future mission with dedicated ENA detectors (e.g. the IMAP mission), highly depends on the antecedent understanding of the details of the plasma processes in the Heliosphere as revealed by remote sensing of the plasma environment characteristics. Therefore, we address here one of the remaining and most important questions: "Where do the 5-55 keV ENAs that INCA measures come from?". We analyzed INCA all-sky maps from 2003 to 2015 and compare the solar cycle (SC) variation of the ENAs in both the nose (upstream) and anti-nose (downstream) directions with the intensities of > 30 keV ions (source of ENA through charge exchange-CE with H) measured in-situ by V1 and V2, in overlapping energy bands ~30-55 keV. ENA intensities decrease during the declining phase of SC23 by ~x3 from 2003 to 2011 but recover through 2014 (SC24); similarly, V1 and V2 ion intensities also decrease and then recover through 2014. The similarity of time profiles of remotely sensed ENA and locally measured ions are consistent with (a) ENA originating in the HS

  19. Global simulations of plasma turbulence in laboratory plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Rogers, B. N.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    The Global Braginskii Solver (GBS) code has been developed in the last few years to simulate plasma turbulence in laboratory plasmas [1]. By solving the drift-reduced Braginkii equation in magnetic configurations of increasing complexity, from linear devices to the Simple Magnetized Toroidal (SMT) configuration, GBS performs non-linear self-consistent global three-dimensional simulations of the plasma dynamics, as the result of the interplay among the plasma source, the turbulent transport, and the plasma losses at the vessel. This gradual approach has allowed gaining a deep understanding of the turbulence dynamics, by identifying the instabilities responsible for driving plasma turbulence and to estimate the turbulence saturation amplitude. In particular, simulation results have pointed out the need of global simulations to correctly represent the dynamics of laboratory plasmas, as well as the importance of not separating fluctuations and equilibrium quantities. A code validation development project has been conducted side by side with the GBS development [2]. Such validation project has lead to the establishment of a rigorous methodology to carry out experiment-simulation comparison, and has allowed quantifying precisely the level of agreement between the GBS results and the experimental data from the TORPEX experiment at CRPP. [1] P. Ricci, B.N. Rogers, S. Brunner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 225002 (2008); P. Ricci and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 145001 (2010); B. N. Rogers and P. Ricci, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 225002 (2010); B. Li et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 056406 (2011). [2] P. Ricci et al, Phys. Plasmas 16, 055703 (2009); P. Ricci et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 032109 (2011).

  20. Measuring Collisionless Damping in Heliospheric Plasmas using Field–Particle Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.

    2016-08-01

    An innovative field–particle correlation technique is proposed that uses single-point measurements of the electromagnetic fields and particle velocity distribution functions to investigate the net transfer of energy from fields to particles associated with the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in weakly collisional plasmas, such as the solar wind. In addition to providing a direct estimate of the local rate of energy transfer between fields and particles, it provides vital new information about the distribution of that energy transfer in velocity space. This velocity-space signature can potentially be used to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism responsible for the damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind. The application of this novel field–particle correlation technique is illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in an electrostatic 1D-1V Vlasov–Poisson plasma, showing that the procedure both estimates the local rate of energy transfer from the electrostatic field to the electrons and indicates the resonant nature of this interaction. Modifications of the technique to enable single-point spacecraft measurements of fields and particles to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, yielding a method with the potential to transform our ability to maximize the scientific return from current and upcoming spacecraft missions, such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) and Solar Probe Plus missions.

  1. Flux Rope Formation and Self-Generated Turbulent Reconnection Driven by the Plasmoid Instability in the Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, A.; Huang, Y. M.

    2015-12-01

    It has been established that the Sweet-Parker current layer in high Lundquist number reconnection is unstable to the super-Alfvénic plasmoid instability. Past two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations have demonstrated that the plasmoid instability leads to a new regime where the Sweet-Parker current layer changes into a chain of plasmoids connected by secondary current sheets, and the averaged reconnection rate becomes nearly independent of the Lundquist number. In this work, three-dimensional simulations with a guide field shows that the additional degree of freedom allows plasmoid instabilities to grow at oblique angles. We present a scenario in which large-scale oblique tearing modes overlap with each other, break flux surfaces, and stir up a spectrum of smaller-scale tearing modes, leading eventually to self-generated turbulent reconnection. The averaged reconnection rate in the self-generated turbulent state is of the order of a hundredth of the characteristic Alfvén speed, which is similar to the two-dimensional result but is an order of magnitude lower than the fastest reconnection rate reported in recent studies of externally driven three-dimensional turbulent reconnection. Kinematic and magnetic energy fluctuations both form elongated eddies along the direction of local magnetic field, which is a signature of anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Both energy fluctuations satisfy power-law spectra in the inertial range. The anisotropy of turbulence eddies is found to be nearly scale-independent, in contrast with the prediction of the Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) theory for anisotropic turbulence in a homogeneous plasma permeated by a uniform magnetic field. The effect of varying the magnitude of the toroidal field on the critical balance condition underlying the GS theory is discussed.

  2. Explosive Particle Dispersion in Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Servidio, S; Haynes, C T; Matthaeus, W H; Burgess, D; Carbone, V; Veltri, P

    2016-08-26

    Particle dynamics are investigated in plasma turbulence, using self-consistent kinetic simulations, in two dimensions. In the steady state, the trajectories of single protons and proton pairs are studied, at different values of plasma β (ratio between kinetic and magnetic pressure). For single-particle displacements, results are consistent with fluids and magnetic field line dynamics, where particles undergo normal diffusion for very long times, with higher β's being more diffusive. In an intermediate time range, with separations lying in the inertial range, particles experience an explosive dispersion in time, consistent with the Richardson prediction. These results, obtained for the first time with a self-consistent kinetic model, are relevant for astrophysical and laboratory plasmas, where turbulence is crucial for heating, mixing, and acceleration processes. PMID:27610862

  3. Complexity and Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    Sporadic and localized interactions of coherent structures arising from plasma resonances can be the origin of "complexity" of the coexistence of non- propagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes in space plasmas. Numerical simulation results are presented to demonstrate the intermittent character of the non-propagating fluctuations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization-group is introduced and applied to the study of scale invariance of such type of multiscale fluctuations. We also demonstrate that the particle interactions with the intermittent turbulence can lead to the efficient energization of the plasma populations. An example related to the ion acceleration processes in the auroral zone is provided.

  4. Magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Liao, X.; Sun, C. K.; Ou, W.; Liu, D.; Gui, G.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-06-01

    The magnetic curvature effects on plasma interchange turbulence and transport in the Z-pinch and dipole-like systems are explored with two-fluid global simulations. By comparing the transport levels in the systems with a different magnetic curvature, we show that the interchange-mode driven transport strongly depends on the magnetic geometry. For the system with large magnetic curvature, the pressure and density profiles are strongly peaked in a marginally stable state and the nonlinear evolution of interchange modes produces the global convective cells in the azimuthal direction, which lead to the low level of turbulent convective transport.

  5. Techniques for the remote sensing of space plasma in the heliosphere via energetic neutral atoms - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, K. C.; Curtis, C. C.; Fan, C. Y.; Gruntman, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is conducted for state-of-the-art techniques for detecting energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) in the 100-300 keV range, in regions from the heliospheric boundary to the auroral zones where the solar wind plays a crucial role. While ENA spectrometry allows sampling of the mass and energy distributions of a distant plasma, ENA imaging gives a global view of the structures and dynamics of an extended plasma. The ENA instrument designs discussed share many components which exhibit excellent flight performance as elements in charged-particle analyzers for space missions.

  6. Spectral and Instability Analysis of Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, C. T.

    2003-12-01

    Despite an abundance of data on plasma turbulence, obtained either by direct space observations or from computer simulation, most of the data are interpreted only in a qualitative way, rather than by a detailed analysis that would allow a quantitative comparison with theory. For such a comparison one needs to obtain, as a key ingredient, reliable wave spectra as a function of wave number and frequency. The free energy sources, linear instability mechanisms and nonlinear coupling mechanisms that generate these wave spectra should also be identified. In the case of micro turbulence these mechanisms depend on details of the particle distribution functions. Even the nature of wave modes, not only wave growth rates, may change as the plasma evolves. A particle simulation in which an electron beam excites a variety of wave modes is used as an example for such an analysis. The model corresponds to proposed mechanisms for ion conic generation on auroral field lines. The rather rapid evolution of plasma and turbulence requires that the spectral analysis is carried out over time intervals that are sufficiently short compared to time scales for spectral changes, whereas for statistical reasons and good frequency resolution long sampling intervals would be desirable. Straightforward periodograms are unsatisfactory under these conditions, even when applying windows (tapers) to the wave trains, in order to reduce spectral leakage. Modern spectral analysis methods which were mostly developed in the geophysics context, such as the maximum entropy method and the multiple taper method, can yield far better results. They are adopted for the analysis of plasma turbulence, in particular in connection with particle simulation codes, although, with other data limitations, the considerations mostly apply also to observations. Particular attention is paid to statistical tests for spectral lines which may correspond to eigenmodes (instabilities) of the plasma. For reliable results it is

  7. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A.; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  8. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    PubMed

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas. PMID:27035981

  9. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  10. Multifractality in plasma edge electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Neto, C. Rodrigues; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Nascimento, I. C.; Kuznetsov, Yu. K.

    2008-08-15

    Plasma edge turbulence in Tokamak Chauffage Alfven Bresilien (TCABR) [R. M. O. Galvao et al., Plasma Phys. Contr. Fusion 43, 1181 (2001)] is investigated for multifractal properties of the fluctuating floating electrostatic potential measured by Langmuir probes. The multifractality in this signal is characterized by the full multifractal spectra determined by applying the wavelet transform modulus maxima. In this work, the dependence of the multifractal spectrum with the radial position is presented. The multifractality degree inside the plasma increases with the radial position reaching a maximum near the plasma edge and becoming almost constant in the scrape-off layer. Comparisons between these results with those obtained for random test time series with the same Hurst exponents and data length statistically confirm the reported multifractal behavior. Moreover, the persistence of these signals, characterized by their Hurst exponent, present radial profile similar to the deterministic component estimated from analysis based on dynamical recurrences.

  11. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-11-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated.

  12. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-01-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated. PMID:23155481

  13. Mixing of the Interstellar and Solar Plasmas at the Heliospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelov, N. V.; Borovikov, S. N.

    2015-10-01

    From the ideal MHD perspective, the heliopause is a tangential discontinuity that separates the solar wind plasma from the local interstellar medium plasma. There are physical processes, however, that make the heliopause permeable. They can be subdivided into kinetic and MHD categories. Kinetic processes occur on small length and time scales, and cannot be resolved with MHD equations. On the other hand, MHD instabilities of the heliopause have much larger scales and can be easily observed by spacecraft. The heliopause may also be a subject of magnetic reconnection. In this paper, we discuss mechanisms of plasma mixing at the heliopause in the context of Voyager 1 observations. Numerical results are obtained with a Multi-Scale Fluid-Kinetic Simulation Suite (MS-FLUKSS), which is a package of numerical codes capable of performing adaptive mesh refinement simulations of complex plasma flows in the presence of discontinuities and charge exchange between ions and neutral atoms. The flow of the ionized component is described with the ideal MHD equations, while the transport of atoms is governed either by the Boltzmann equation or multiple Euler gas dynamics equations. The code can also treat nonthermal ions and turbulence produced by them.

  14. Cluster and SOHO - A joint endeavor by ESA and NASA to address problems in solar, heliospheric, and space plasma physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Rudolf; Domingo, Vicente; Shawhan, Stanley D.; Bohlin, David

    1988-01-01

    The NASA/ESA Solar-Terrestrial Science Program, which consists of the four-spacecraft cluster mission and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), is examined. It is expected that the SOHO spacecraft will be launched in 1995 to study solar interior structure and the physical processes associated with the solar corona. The SOHO design, operation, data, and ground segment are discussed. The Cluster mission is designed to study small-scale structures in the earth's plasma environment. The Soviet Union is expected to contribute two additional spacecraft, which will be similar to Cluster in instrumentation and design. The capabilities, mission strategy, spacecraft design, payload, and ground segment of Cluster are discussed.

  15. Advective turbulent transport in the fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byung-Hoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2013-10-01

    The Hasegawa-Wakatani model (HWM) has been employed in pedagogical analyses of the physics behind the behavior of the tokamak plasmas. In addition to the geometric simplicity HWM has an appealing feature of sustaining autonomous quasi-steady state, unstable modes providing the power that is being transported by the nonlinear interactions and is eventually dissipated by the collisional damping at small scales. Emergence of the zonal flow out of the turbulence is a main candidate to cause the transition from the low plasma confinement to the high mode. In the study of such LH transition with the HWM, the adiabaticity parameter has been shown to play an important role in forcing the zonal flow that results in the regulation of the drift-wave turbulence. Instead of concentrating on the physics of the feedback loop between the turbulence and the zonal flow the present study focuses on the presence of the advective transport of the energy. Numerical simulations of HWM are performed and the connections between the advective transport and the zonal flow will be presented. This work was supported by the Supercpmputing Center/Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information with supercomputing resources including technical support (KSC-2013-C1-009).

  16. Space plasma turbulent dissipation - Reality or myth?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    A prevalent approach to understanding magnetospheric dynamics is to combine a hydromagnetic description of the large scale magnetic structure and convection flows with a locally determined anomalous dissipation which develops in boundary layers. Three problems (nose and tail reconnection, auroral field-aligned currents, and diffuse auroral precipitation) are critically examined to test the validity of this theoretical philosophy. Although the expected plasma wave turbulence is observed for each case, the concept of local anomalous dissipation fails to provide an adequate or complete description of the phenomenae.

  17. Weak turbulence theory for collisional plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, P. H.; Ziebell, L. F.; Kontar, E. P.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2016-03-01

    Plasma is an ionized gas in which the collective behavior dominates over the individual particle interactions. For this reason, plasma is often treated as collisionless or collision-free. However, the discrete nature of the particles can be important, and often, the description of plasmas is incomplete without properly taking the discrete particle effects into account. The weak turbulence theory is a perturbative nonlinear theory, whose essential formalism was developed in the late 1950s and 1960s and continued on through the early 1980s. However, the standard material found in the literature does not treat the discrete particle effects and the associated fluctuations emitted spontaneously by thermal particles completely. Plasma particles emit electromagnetic fluctuations in all frequencies and wave vectors, but in the standard literature, the fluctuations are approximately treated by considering only those frequency-wave number regimes corresponding to the eigenmodes (or normal modes) satisfying the dispersion relations, while ignoring contributions from noneigenmodes. The present paper shows that the noneigenmode fluctuations modify the particle kinetic equation so that the generalized equation includes the Balescu-Lénard-Landau collision integral and also modify the wave kinetic equation to include not only the collisional damping term but also a term that depicts the bremsstrahlung emission of plasma normal modes.

  18. Visualization of plasma turbulence with laser-induced fluorescence (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Levinton, Fred M.; Trintchouk, Fedor

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence is a key factor limiting the performance of fusion devices. Plasma edge turbulence determines the boundary values of the plasma density and temperature, which in turn determine the internal gradients and controls global plasma transport. In recent years, significant progress has been made in modeling turbulence behavior in plasmas and its effect on transport. Progress has also been made in diagnostics for turbulence measurement; however, there is still a large gap in our understanding of it. An approach to improve this situation is to experimentally visualize the turbulence, that is, a high resolution 2-D image of the plasma density. Visualization of turbulence can improve the connection to theory and help validate theoretical models. One method that has been successfully developed to visualize turbulence in gases and fluids is planar laser-induced fluorescence. We have recently applied this technique to visualize turbulence and structures in a plasma. This was accomplished using an Alexandrite laser that is tunable between 700 and 800 nm, and from 350 to 400 nm with second harmonic generation. The fluorescence light from an argon ion transition has been imaged onto an intensified charged coupled device camera that is gated in synchronization with the laser. Images from the plasma show a rotating structure at 30 kHz in addition to small scale turbulence.

  19. Validation metrics for turbulent plasma transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, C.

    2016-06-01

    Developing accurate models of plasma dynamics is essential for confident predictive modeling of current and future fusion devices. In modern computer science and engineering, formal verification and validation processes are used to assess model accuracy and establish confidence in the predictive capabilities of a given model. This paper provides an overview of the key guiding principles and best practices for the development of validation metrics, illustrated using examples from investigations of turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas. Particular emphasis is given to the importance of uncertainty quantification and its inclusion within the metrics, and the need for utilizing synthetic diagnostics to enable quantitatively meaningful comparisons between simulation and experiment. As a starting point, the structure of commonly used global transport model metrics and their limitations is reviewed. An alternate approach is then presented, which focuses upon comparisons of predicted local fluxes, fluctuations, and equilibrium gradients against observation. The utility of metrics based upon these comparisons is demonstrated by applying them to gyrokinetic predictions of turbulent transport in a variety of discharges performed on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], as part of a multi-year transport model validation activity.

  20. Measuring plasma turbulence using low coherence microwave radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.

    2012-02-20

    Low coherence backscattering (LCBS) is a proposed diagnostic technique for measuring plasma turbulence and fluctuations. LCBS is an adaptation of optical coherence tomography, a biomedical imaging technique. Calculations and simulations show LCBS measurements can achieve centimeter-scale spatial resolution using low coherence microwave radiation. LCBS measurements exhibit several advantages over standard plasma turbulence measurement techniques including immunity to spurious reflections and measurement access in hollow density profiles. Also, LCBS is scalable for 1-D profile measurements and 2-D turbulence imaging.

  1. Turbulent cascade in a two-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xin; Liu, San-Qiu; Yu, Ming-Yang

    2014-11-15

    It is shown that small but finite-amplitude drift wave turbulence in a two-ion-species plasma can be modeled by a Hasegawa-Mima equation. The mode cascade process and resulting turbulent spectrum are investigated. The spectrum is found to be similar to that of a two-component plasma, but the space and time scales of the turbulent cascade process can be quite different since they are rescaled by the presence of the second ion species.

  2. Global scale-invariant dissipation in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kiyani, K H; Chapman, S C; Khotyaintsev, Yu V; Dunlop, M W; Sahraoui, F

    2009-08-14

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of the dissipation range of collisionless plasma turbulence is presented using in situ high-frequency magnetic field measurements from the Cluster spacecraft in a stationary interval of fast ambient solar wind. The observations, spanning five decades in temporal scales, show a crossover from multifractal intermittent turbulence in the inertial range to non-Gaussian monoscaling in the dissipation range. This presents a strong observational constraint on theories of dissipation mechanisms in turbulent collisionless plasmas. PMID:19792654

  3. The Heliosphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    The heliosphere is a bubble that surrounds our entire solar system and is inflated by the outward solar wind, which pushes out and deflects the material from the part of the galactic medium through...

  4. Interplanetary conditions during 3-kHz radio-wave detections in the outer heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.; Gold, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma waves detected by the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft beyond about 12 AU that may be associated with the turbulence expected at the heliopause are interpreted in terms of the characteristics of the interplanetary medium at large heliocentric distances. The low-energy charged-particle environment in the outer heliosphere during the observations of the unusual plasma-wave signals is addressed. The particle data suggest that the outer heliosphere was unusually stable and free of transient shock and particle events for the roughly eight months during the wave observations.

  5. Multifractal Structures Detected by Voyager 1 at the Heliospheric Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macek, W. M.; Wawrzaszek, A.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  6. MULTIFRACTAL STRUCTURES DETECTED BY VOYAGER 1 AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Macek, W. M.; Burlaga, L. F. E-mail: anna.wawrzaszek@cbk.waw.pl

    2014-10-01

    To better understand the dynamics of turbulent systems, we have proposed a phenomenological model based on a generalized Cantor set with two rescaling and one weight parameters. In this Letter, using recent Voyager 1 magnetic field data, we extend our two-scale multifractal analysis further in the heliosheath beyond the heliospheric termination shock, and even now near the heliopause, when entering the interstellar medium for the first time in human history. We have identified the scaling inertial region for magnetized heliospheric plasma between the termination shock and the heliopause. We also show that the degree of multifractality decreases with the heliocentric distance and is still modulated by the phases of the solar cycle in the entire heliosphere including the heliosheath. Moreover, we observe the change of scaling toward a nonintermittent (nonmultifractal) behavior in the nearby interstellar medium, just beyond the heliopause. We argue that this loss of multifractal behavior could be a signature of the expected crossing of the heliopause by Voyager 2 in the near future. The results obtained demonstrate that our phenomenological multifractal model exhibits some properties of intermittent turbulence in the solar system plasmas, and we hope that it could shed light on universal characteristics of turbulence.

  7. Effects of Turbulent Magnetic Fields on the Transport and Acceleration of Energetic Charged Particles: Numerical Simulations with Application to Heliospheric Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fan

    2012-11-01

    Turbulent magnetic fields are ubiquitous in space physics and astrophysics. The influence of magnetic turbulence on the motions of charged particles contains the essential physics of the transport and acceleration of energetic charged particles in the heliosphere, which is to be explored in this thesis. After a brief introduction on the energetic charged particles and magnetic fields in the heliosphere, the rest of this dissertation focuses on three specific topics: 1. the transport of energetic charged particles in the inner heliosphere, 2. the acceleration of ions at collisionless shocks, and 3. the acceleration of electrons at collisionless shocks. We utilize various numerical techniques to study these topics. In Chapter 2 we study the propagation of charged particles in turbulent magnetic fields similar to the propagation of solar energetic particles in the inner heliosphere. The trajectories of energetic charged particles in the turbulent magnetic field are numerically integrated. The turbulence model includes a Kolmogorov-like magnetic field power spectrum containing a broad range of scales from those that lead to large-scale field-line random walk to small scales leading to resonant pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles. We show that small-scale variations in particle intensities (the so-called "dropouts") and velocity dispersions observed by spacecraft can be reproduced using this method. Our study gives a new constraint on the error of "onset analysis", which is a technique commonly used to infer information about the initial release of energetic particles. We also find that the dropouts are rarely produced in the simulations using the so-called "two-component" magnetic turbulence model (Matthaeus et al., 1990). The result questions the validity of this model in studying particle transport. In the first part of Chapter 3 we study the acceleration of ions in the existence of turbulent magnetic fields. We use 3-D self-consistent hybrid simulations

  8. A Concept of Cross-Ferroic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, S; Kobayashi, T; Kosuga, Y; Itoh, S-I; Mitsuzono, T; Nagashima, Y; Arakawa, H; Yamada, T; Miwa, Y; Kasuya, N; Sasaki, M; Lesur, M; Fujisawa, A; Itoh, K

    2016-01-01

    The variety of scalar and vector fields in laboratory and nature plasmas is formed by plasma turbulence. Drift-wave fluctuations, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasmas, are known to relax the density gradient while they can generate flows. On the other hand, the sheared flow in the direction of magnetic fields causes Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, which mix particle and momentum. These different types of fluctuations coexist in laboratory and nature, so that the multiple mechanisms for structural formation exist in extremely non-equilibrium plasmas. Here we report the discovery of a new order in plasma turbulence, in which chained structure formation is realized by cross-interaction between inhomogeneities of scalar and vector fields. The concept of cross-ferroic turbulence is developed, and the causal relation in the multiple mechanisms behind structural formation is identified, by measuring the relaxation rate and dissipation power caused by the complex turbulence-driven flux. PMID:26917218

  9. A Concept of Cross-Ferroic Plasma Turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.; Mitsuzono, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Sasaki, M.; Lesur, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.

    2016-01-01

    The variety of scalar and vector fields in laboratory and nature plasmas is formed by plasma turbulence. Drift-wave fluctuations, driven by density gradients in magnetized plasmas, are known to relax the density gradient while they can generate flows. On the other hand, the sheared flow in the direction of magnetic fields causes Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, which mix particle and momentum. These different types of fluctuations coexist in laboratory and nature, so that the multiple mechanisms for structural formation exist in extremely non-equilibrium plasmas. Here we report the discovery of a new order in plasma turbulence, in which chained structure formation is realized by cross-interaction between inhomogeneities of scalar and vector fields. The concept of cross-ferroic turbulence is developed, and the causal relation in the multiple mechanisms behind structural formation is identified, by measuring the relaxation rate and dissipation power caused by the complex turbulence-driven flux. PMID:26917218

  10. Mass dependency of turbulent parameters in stationary glow discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, A. B.; Wiggins, D. L.; Johnson, J. A. III

    2013-05-15

    A direct current glow discharge tube is used to determine how mass changes the effects of certain turbulence characteristics in a weakly ionized gas. Helium, neon, argon, and krypton plasmas were created, and an axial magnetic field, varied from 0.0 to 550.0 Gauss, was used to enhance mass dependent properties of turbulence. From the power spectra of light emission variations associated with velocity fluctuations, determination of mass dependency on turbulent characteristic unstable modes, energy associated with turbulence, and the rate at which energy is transferred from scale to scale are measured. The magnetic field strength is found to be too weak to overcome particle diffusion to the walls to affect the turbulence in all four types of plasmas, though mass dependency is still detected. Though the total energy and the rate at which the energy moves between scales are mass invariant, the amplitude of the instability modes that characterize each plasma are dependent on mass.

  11. A dynamical model of plasma turbulence in the solar wind

    PubMed Central

    Howes, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical approach, rather than the usual statistical approach, is taken to explore the physical mechanisms underlying the nonlinear transfer of energy, the damping of the turbulent fluctuations, and the development of coherent structures in kinetic plasma turbulence. It is argued that the linear and nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén waves are responsible, at a very fundamental level, for some of the key qualitative features of plasma turbulence that distinguish it from hydrodynamic turbulence, including the anisotropic cascade of energy and the development of current sheets at small scales. The first dynamical model of kinetic turbulence in the weakly collisional solar wind plasma that combines self-consistently the physics of Alfvén waves with the development of small-scale current sheets is presented and its physical implications are discussed. This model leads to a simplified perspective on the nature of turbulence in a weakly collisional plasma: the nonlinear interactions responsible for the turbulent cascade of energy and the formation of current sheets are essentially fluid in nature, while the collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations and the energy injection by kinetic instabilities are essentially kinetic in nature. PMID:25848075

  12. Nondiffusive transport regimes for suprathermal ions in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Bovet, A; Fasoli, A; Ricci, P; Furno, I; Gustafson, K

    2015-04-01

    The understanding of the transport of suprathermal ions in the presence of turbulence is important for fusion plasmas in the burning regime that will characterize reactors, and for space plasmas to understand the physics of particle acceleration. Here, three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam in the toroidal plasma device TORPEX are presented. These measurements demonstrate, in a turbulent plasma, the existence of subdiffusive and superdiffusive transport of suprathermal ions, depending on their energy. This result stems from the unprecedented combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first-principles numerical simulations that reveal the mechanisms responsible for the nondiffusive transport. The transport regime is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma dynamics, and is strongly affected by the ratio of the suprathermal ion energy to the background plasma temperature. PMID:25974432

  13. Exploring Plasma Turbulence in the Kronian Magnetosheath Using Cassini Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadid, L.; Sahraoui, F.; Kiyani, K. H.; Modolo, R.; Retino, A.; Canu, P.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    The shocked solar wind plasma upstream of the bowshock forms the magnetosheath. Through this region energy, mass and momentum are transported from the solar wind into the planet's magnetosphere, playing a crucial role in the solar-planet interactions. Hence, the planets' magnetosheath present a high level of turbulence, with a rich variety of wave and stochastic phenomena. While the magnetic turbulence of the terrestrial magnetosheath has been extensively studied, not so much work has been done regarding the planets magnetosheaths. Therefore, and in order to expand our knowledge on plasma turbulence, we investigate here the main properties of the plasma turbulence in the magnetosheath of Saturn using the Cassini spacecraft data and compare it with the well-explored terrestrial solar wind turbulence. These properties include the magnetic field energy spectra, the magnetic compressibility and intermittency, at both MHD and kinetic scales. The analysis is based on in-situ data provided by the Fluxgate Magnetometer of the MAG instrument, which measures the magnetic field data with 32ms time resolution and the plasma data from the CAPS/IMS (Cassini Plasma Spectrometer) and the Electron Spectrometer (ELS), during 39 shock-crossings between 2004 and 2005. Similarities and differences were found between the different media, in particular about the nature of the turbulence and its scaling laws. These finding will be discussed along with theoretical implications on the modeling of space plasma.

  14. Immediate Influence of External Sources on Turbulent Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosuga, Yusuke; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    Immediate impact of external sources on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and turbulent transport (without waiting the evolution of global parameters and those in mean velocity distribution function) is discussed. The case, where an external source directly couples with plasma fluctuations in particle source and momentum source, is investigated. Theoretical analysis is developed by use of Hasegawa-Wakatani model equations. It is shown that the momentum source can induce the immediate influence on the turbulence and turbulent transport. The effect of this coupling between source and fluctuations on the momentum theorem is also explained.

  15. Critically Balanced Ion Temperature Gradient Turbulence in Fusion Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.

    2011-09-09

    Scaling laws for ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in magnetized toroidal plasmas are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. Predicted dependences of turbulence fluctuation amplitudes, spatial scales, and resulting heat fluxes on temperature gradient and magnetic field line pitch are found to agree with numerical results in both the driving and inertial ranges. Evidence is provided to support the critical balance conjecture that parallel streaming and nonlinear perpendicular decorrelation times are comparable at all spatial scales, leading to a scaling relationship between parallel and perpendicular spatial scales. This indicates that even strongly magnetized plasma turbulence is intrinsically three dimensional.

  16. Turbulence studies in Tokamak boundary plasmas with realistic divertor geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X.Q.

    1998-10-14

    Results are presented from the 3D nonlocal electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT [1] and the linearized shooting code BAL[2] to study turbulence in tokamak boundary plasmas and its relationship to the L-H transition, in a realistic divertor plasma geometry. The key results include: (1) the identification of the dominant, resistive X-point mode in divertor geometry and (2) turbulence suppression in the L-H transition by shear in the ExB drift speed, ion diamagnetism and finite polarization. Based on the simulation results, a parameterization of the transport is given that includes the dependence on the relevant physical parameters.

  17. The energetic coupling of scales in gyrokinetic plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Teaca, Bogdan; Jenko, Frank

    2014-07-15

    In magnetized plasma turbulence, the couplings of perpendicular spatial scales that arise due to the nonlinear interactions are analyzed from the perspective of the free-energy exchanges. The plasmas considered here, with appropriate ion or electron adiabatic electro-neutrality responses, are described by the gyrokinetic formalism in a toroidal magnetic geometry. Turbulence develops due to the electrostatic fluctuations driven by temperature gradient instabilities, either ion temperature gradient (ITG) or electron temperature gradient (ETG). The analysis consists in decomposing the system into a series of scale structures, while accounting separately for contributions made by modes possessing special symmetries (e.g., the zonal flow modes). The interaction of these scales is analyzed using the energy transfer functions, including a forward and backward decomposition, scale fluxes, and locality functions. The comparison between the ITG and ETG cases shows that ETG turbulence has a more pronounced classical turbulent behavior, exhibiting a stronger energy cascade, with implications for gyrokinetic turbulence modeling.

  18. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  19. A weakened cascade model for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.; Dorland, W.

    2011-10-15

    A refined cascade model for kinetic turbulence in weakly collisional astrophysical plasmas is presented that includes both the transition between weak and strong turbulence and the effect of nonlocal interactions on the nonlinear transfer of energy. The model describes the transition between weak and strong MHD turbulence and the complementary transition from strong kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence to weak dissipating KAW turbulence, a new regime of weak turbulence in which the effects of shearing by large scale motions and kinetic dissipation play an important role. The inclusion of the effect of nonlocal motions on the nonlinear energy cascade rate in the dissipation range, specifically the shearing by large-scale motions, is proposed to explain the nearly power-law energy spectra observed in the dissipation range of both kinetic numerical simulations and solar wind observations.

  20. The Dynamical Generation of Current Sheets in Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory G.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence profoundly affects particle transport and plasma heating in many astrophysical plasma environments, from galaxy clusters to the solar corona and solar wind to Earth's magnetosphere. Both fluid and kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence ubiquitously generate coherent structures, in the form of current sheets, at small scales, and the locations of these current sheets appear to be associated with enhanced rates of dissipation of the turbulent energy. Therefore, illuminating the origin and nature of these current sheets is critical to identifying the dominant physical mechanisms of dissipation, a primary aim at the forefront of plasma turbulence research. Here, we present evidence from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations that strong nonlinear interactions between counterpropagating Alfvén waves, or strong Alfvén wave collisions, are a natural mechanism for the generation of current sheets in plasma turbulence. Furthermore, we conceptually explain this current sheet development in terms of the nonlinear dynamics of Alfvén wave collisions, showing that these current sheets arise through constructive interference among the initial Alfvén waves and nonlinearly generated modes. The properties of current sheets generated by strong Alfvén wave collisions are compared to published observations of current sheets in the Earth's magnetosheath and the solar wind, and the nature of these current sheets leads to the expectation that Landau damping of the constituent Alfvén waves plays a dominant role in the damping of turbulently generated current sheets.

  1. Reverse Energy Cascade in Turbulent Weakly Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Kyron; Appartaim, R.; Belay, K.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1998-01-01

    For systems far from equilibrium, the neglect of a role for viscous effects in turbulence may be generally inappropriate when the relaxation time for the molecular process approaches the local flow time (Orou et al. (1996)). Furthermore, for stationary collisional plasmas, the conventional Reynolds number is irrelevant under circumstances where the standard features of turbulence in ordinary gases are observed in the plasma (Johnson et al. (1987)). The current theoretical understanding of these turbulent phenomenon is particularly inadequate for turbulence associated with ionizing shock waves; generally speaking, thermodynamic, acoustic and pressure fluctuations are all seen as amplified across the shock wave followed by a dramatic decay (relaminarization) usually attributed to a lack of importance of viscosity in the turbulent regions. This decay would be accelerated when the flow speed is also reduced due to the importance usually given to the conventional Reynolds number (which is directly proportional to velocity) as a quality of turbulence index. However, evidence supporting this consensus is lacking. By contrast, recent evidence of vanishing triple correlations form De Silva et al. (1996) provides strong support for early theoretical speculation of inherently molecular effects in macroscopic turbulence in Tsuge (1974). This specifically suggests that the role of compressive effects ordinarily associated with the shock wave could be significantly muted by the existence of a strongly turbulent local environment. There is also more recent theoretical speculation (Frisch et al. (1984)) of an inherently and previously unsuspected non-dissipative nature to turbulence, with energy conservation being nurtured by reverse energy cascades in the turbulent fluctuation spectra. Furthermore, the role which might be played by fluctuations on quantum mechanical phenomena and variations in molecular parameters is completely unknown, especially of the sort which might be found

  2. The Conversion of Large-Scale Turbulent Energy to Plasma Heat In Astrophysical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howes, Gregory

    2015-11-01

    Turbulence in space and astrophysical plasmas plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of violent events and instabilities at large scales into plasma heat. The turbulent cascade transfers this energy from the large scales at which the motions are driven down to small scales, and this essentially fluid process can be understood in terms of nonlinear wave-wave interactions. At sufficiently small scales, for which the dynamics is often weakly collisional, collisionless mechanisms damp the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, and this essentially kinetic process can be understood in terms of linear wave-particle interactions. In this talk, I will summarize the possible channels of the turbulent dissipation in a weakly collisional plasma, and present recent results from kinetic numerical simulations of plasma turbulence. Finally, I will discuss strategies for the definitive identification of the dominant dissipation channels using spacecraft measurements of turbulence in the solar wind.

  3. Waves and turbulence in a tokamak fusion plasma.

    PubMed

    Surko, C M; Slusher, R E

    1983-08-26

    The tokamak is a prototype fusion device in which a toroidal Magnetic field is used to confine a hot plasma. Coherent waves, excited near the plasma edge, can be used to transport energy into the plasma in order to heat it to the temperatures required for thermonuclear fusion. In addition, tokamak plasmas are known to exhibit high levels of turbulent density fluctuations, which can transport particles and energy out of the plasma. Recently, experiments have been conducted to elucidate the nature of both the coherent waves and the turbulence. The experiments provide insight into a broad range of interesting linear and nonlinear plasma phenomena and into many of the processes that determine such practical things as plasma heating and confinement. PMID:17753464

  4. DISSIPATION WAVENUMBERS FOR TURBULENCE IN ELECTRON-POSITRON PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Gary, S.; Roytershteyn, Vadim S.; Karimabadi, Homa E-mail: roytersh@lanl.gov

    2009-08-20

    Many astrophysical systems involve turbulent electron-positron plasmas. Linear kinetic theory of electromagnetic fluctuations in homogeneous, magnetized, collisionless, non-relativistic electron-positron plasmas predicts that two lightly damped modes propagate at relatively long wavelengths: an Alfven-like mode with dispersion {omega}{sub r}=k{sub ||}v-tilde{sub A} and a magnetosonic-like mode with dispersion {omega}{sub r}{approx_equal}kv-tilde{sub A} if {beta} {sub e} << 1. Here, v-tilde{sub A} is the Alfven speed in an electron-positron plasma and || refers to the direction parallel to the background magnetic field B{sub o}. The dissipation wavenumber k{sub d} is defined as the value of k at which the damping rate equals the rate of energy transfer by the turbulent cascade. Using linear theory and a basic turbulent cascade model, k{sub d} is predicted for turbulence at propagation quasi parallel to B{sub o}, for quasi-perpendicular magnetosonic-like turbulence, and for quasi-perpendicular Alfven-like turbulence. In the latter case, the model predicts that an increase in the turbulent energy should correspond to an increase in k{sub d} . The assumptions and predictions of the model may be tested by particle-in-cell simulations.

  5. Status and Verification of Edge Plasma Turbulence Code BOUT

    SciTech Connect

    Umansky, M V; Xu, X Q; Dudson, B; LoDestro, L L; Myra, J R

    2009-01-08

    The BOUT code is a detailed numerical model of tokamak edge turbulence based on collisional plasma uid equations. BOUT solves for time evolution of plasma uid variables: plasma density N{sub i}, parallel ion velocity V{sub {parallel}i}, electron temperature T{sub e}, ion temperature T{sub i}, electric potential {phi}, parallel current j{sub {parallel}}, and parallel vector potential A{sub {parallel}}, in realistic 3D divertor tokamak geometry. The current status of the code, physics model, algorithms, and implementation is described. Results of verification testing are presented along with illustrative applications to tokamak edge turbulence.

  6. Interactions of the heliospheric current and plasma sheets with the bow shock: Cluster and Polar observations in the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Nelson C.; Farrugia, Charles J.; Burke, William J.; Ober, Daniel M.; Scudder, Jack D.; Mozer, Forrest S.; Russell, Christopher T.; Rème, Henri; Mouikis, Christopher; Siebert, Keith D.

    2011-01-01

    On 12 March 2001, the Polar and Cluster spacecraft were at subsolar and cusp latitudes in the dayside magnetosheath, respectively, where they monitored the passage by Earth of a large-scale planar structure containing the high-density heliospheric plasma sheet (HPS) and the embedded current sheet. Over significant intervals, as the magnetic hole of the HPS passed Cluster and Polar, magnetic field strengths ∣B∣ were much smaller than expected for the shocked interplanetary magnetic field. For short periods, ∣B∣ even fell below values measured by ACE in the upstream solar wind. Within the magnetic hole the ratio of plasma thermal and magnetic pressures (plasma β) was consistently >100 and exceeded 1000. A temporary increase in lag times for identifiable features in B components to propagate from the location of ACE to those of Cluster and Polar was associated with the expansion (and subsequent compression) of the magnetic field and observed low ∣B∣. Triangulation of the propagation velocity of these features across the four Cluster spacecraft configuration showed consistency with the measured component of ion velocity normal to the large-scale planar structure. B experienced large-amplitude wave activity, including fast magnetosonic waves. Within the low ∣B∣ region, guiding center behavior was disrupted and ions were subject to hydrodynamic rather than magnetohydrodynamic forcing. Under the reported conditions, a significant portion of the interplanetary coupling to the magnetosphere should proceed through interaction with the low-latitude boundary layer. Data acquired during a nearly simultaneous high-latitude pass of a Defense Meteorological Satellites Program satellite are consistent with this conjecture.

  7. Inner Heliosphere Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sillter, Edward C., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The future HELEX mission concept by NASA/ESA to the inner heliosphere (0.22 AU < r < 0.7 AU) and the possibility of a Solar Probe mission to the Sun (9.5 Rs < r < 0.7 AU) will allow for a comprehensive exploration of the inner heliosphere with the prospect for major discoveries and resolution of long standing issues of heliospheric science. The new Solar Probe mission being considered is equatorial and will allow exploration of the streamer belt region from a closeup perspective. We'll be able to look for the suprathermal ion population some think are necessary as the seed population for SEP events, look closeup at CMEs and formation of shock inside the Alfven critical point, probe the outer boundaries of the streamer belts, reconnection within the current sheets, MHD waves and turbulence and the inner source where they are felt to form and may reveal themselves as pickup ions. All will be launched around Solar Minimum with rise in solar activity toward the end of these missions. Extended missions could then occur during Solar Maximum. I'll talk about the complement of instrumentation and mission strategies.

  8. SELF-CONSISTENT MODEL OF THE INTERSTELLAR PICKUP PROTONS, ALFVENIC TURBULENCE, AND CORE SOLAR WIND IN THE OUTER HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Gamayunov, Konstantin V.; Zhang Ming; Rassoul, Hamid K.; Pogorelov, Nikolai V.; Heerikhuisen, Jacob

    2012-09-20

    A self-consistent model of the interstellar pickup protons, the slab component of the Alfvenic turbulence, and core solar wind (SW) protons is presented for r {>=} 1 along with the initial results of and comparison with the Voyager 2 (V2) observations. Two kinetic equations are used for the pickup proton distribution and Alfvenic power spectral density, and a third equation governs SW temperature including source due to the Alfven wave energy dissipation. A fraction of the pickup proton free energy, f{sub D} , which is actually released in the waveform during isotropization, is taken from the quasi-linear consideration without preexisting turbulence, whereas we use observations to specify the strength of the large-scale driving, C{sub sh}, for turbulence. The main conclusions of our study can be summarized as follows. (1) For C{sub sh} Almost-Equal-To 1-1.5 and f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1, the model slab component agrees well with the V2 observations of the total transverse magnetic fluctuations starting from {approx}8 AU. This indicates that the slab component at low-latitudes makes up a majority of the transverse magnetic fluctuations beyond 8-10 AU. (2) The model core SW temperature agrees well with the V2 observations for r {approx}> 20 AU if f{sub D} Almost-Equal-To 0.7-1. (3) A combined effect of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin attenuation, large-scale driving, and pickup proton generated waves results in the energy sink in the region r {approx}< 10 AU, while wave energy is pumped in the turbulence beyond 10 AU. Without energy pumping, the nonlinear energy cascade is suppressed for r {approx}< 10 AU, supplying only a small energy fraction into the k-region of dissipation by the core SW protons. A similar situation takes place for the two-dimensional turbulence. (4) The energy source due to the resonant Alfven wave damping by the core SW protons is small at heliocentric distances r {approx}< 10 AU for both the slab and the two-dimensional turbulent components

  9. Gyrokinetic turbulence simulations at high plasma beta

    SciTech Connect

    Pueschel, M. J.; Kammerer, M.; Jenko, F.

    2008-10-15

    Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence simulations employing Cyclone Base Case parameters are presented for {beta} values up to and beyond the kinetic ballooning threshold. The {beta} scaling of the turbulent transport is found to be linked to a complex interplay of linear and nonlinear effects. Linear investigation of the kinetic ballooning mode is performed in detail, while nonlinearly, it is found to dominate the turbulence only in a fairly narrow range of {beta} values just below the respective ideal limit. The magnetic transport scales like {beta}{sup 2} and is well described by a Rechester-Rosenbluth-type ansatz.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and enhanced atomic processes in astrophysical plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1998-08-01

    This article discusses a way in which enhanced atomic physics processes, including radiative energy losses, may occur in an astrophysical plasma containing magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. Two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is adopted as a model. A major characteristic feature of 2D MHD turbulence is the development of strong current sheets on a dynamical time scale L/V0 where L is the spatial scale of the turbulent fluid and V0 is the scale of the velocity fluctuations. The current contained in the sheets will be carried by an electron drift relative to the ions. The case of a plasma containing minority atoms or ions with an excited state accessible to collisions from the tail of the electron distribution is considered. In the current carrying sheets or filaments, the electron distribution function will be perturbed such that collisional excitations will be enhanced relative to the current-free plasma. Subsequent radiative de-excitation of the atoms or ions removes energy from the turbulence. Expressions are presented for the electron drift velocity arising in 2D turbulence, the enhancement of collisional excitations of a trace atom or ion, and the energy lost to the plasma turbulence by radiative de-excitation of these atoms or ions. The mechanism would be most pronounced in plasmas for which the magnitude of the magnetic field is large, the outer scale of the turbulence is small, and the electron density and temperature are low. A brief discussion of the relevance of this mechanism to some specific astrophysical plasmas is given.

  11. Tomography as a promising diagnostic tool for plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Inagaki, S.; Onchi, T.; Ohshima, S.; Shimizu, A.

    2016-02-01

    A system for plasma turbulence tomography has been developed in a linear cylindrical plasma as a prototype with aiming at future application on toroidal plasma of higher temperature. This paper describes the diagnostic system in both aspects of the soft- and hardware, and reports the first results of tomographic reconstruction that can successfully produce local emission and its fluctuations. In the reconstruction process, two dimensional view of plasma is obtained for approximately 0.6 ms in every sampling time of 1 μs using parallel processing of 120 cores with 10 personal computers. The results include the steady state analysis of local fluctuation power spectra using fast Fourier transform, analysis of temporal behavior of fluctuation power spectra with wavelet transform, and analyses of the structural deformation or pattern of local plasma emission, demonstrating that the success of tomography as a promising diagnostic tool for plasma turbulence.

  12. Turbulent Transport in Tokamak Plasmas with Rotational Shear

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.; Highcock, E. G.; Cowley, S. C.; Roach, C. M.

    2011-04-29

    Nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations are conducted to investigate turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas with rotational shear. At sufficiently large flow shears, linear instabilities are suppressed, but transiently growing modes drive subcritical turbulence whose amplitude increases with flow shear. This leads to a local minimum in the heat flux, indicating an optimal ExB shear value for plasma confinement. Local maxima in the momentum fluxes are observed, implying the possibility of bifurcations in the ExB shear. The critical temperature gradient for the onset of turbulence increases with flow shear at low flow shears; at higher flow shears, the dependence of heat flux on temperature gradient becomes less stiff. The turbulent Prandtl number is found to be largely independent of temperature and flow gradients, with a value close to unity.

  13. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  14. Physics of the inner heliosphere 1-10R sub O plasma diagnostics and models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withbroe, G. L.

    1984-01-01

    The physics of solar wind flow in the acceleration region and impulsive phenomena in the solar corona is studied. The study of magnetohydrodynamic wave propagation in the corona and the solutions for steady state and time dependent solar wind equations gives insights concerning the physics of the solar wind acceleration region, plasma heating and plasma acceleration processes and the formation of shocks. Also studied is the development of techniques for placing constraints on the mechanisms responsible for coronal heating.

  15. Trapped electron mode turbulence driven intrinsic rotation in Tokamak plasmas.

    PubMed

    Wang, W X; Hahm, T S; Ethier, S; Zakharov, L E; Diamond, P H

    2011-02-25

    Progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported. The turbulence-driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation due to zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing experimental empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation. The origin of current scaling is found to be enhanced k(∥) symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The intrinsic torque is proportional to the pressure gradient because both turbulence intensity and zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with turbulence drive, which is R/L(T(e)) and R/L(n(e)) for the trapped electron mode. PMID:21405577

  16. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    PubMed

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures. PMID:23004954

  17. Non-Markovian Effects in Turbulent Diffusion in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zagorodny, Anatoly; Weiland, Jan

    2009-10-08

    The derivation of the kinetic equations for inhomogeneous plasma in an external magnetic field is presented. The Fokker-Planck-type equations with the non-Markovian kinetic coefficients are proposed. In the time-local limit (small correlation times with respect to the distribution function relaxation time) the relations obtained recover the results known from the appropriate quasilinear theory and the Dupree-Weinstock theory of plasma turbulence. The equations proposed are used to describe zonal flow generation and to estimate the diffusion coefficient for saturated turbulence.

  18. Turbulence in Toroidally Confined Plasma: Ion - - Gradient-Driven Turbulence; Dynamics of Magnetic Relaxation in Current-Carrying Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gyung Su.

    This thesis is devoted to two studies of low-frequency turbulence in toroidally confined plasma. Low-frequency turbulence is believed to play an important role in anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices. The first study pertains the the development of an analytic theory of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence in tokamaks. Energy-conserving, renormalized spectrum equations are derived and solved in order to obtain the spectra of stationary ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence. Corrections to mixing-length estimates are calculated explicitly. The resulting anomalous ion thermal diffusivity is derived and is found to be consistent with experimentally-deduced ion thermal diffusivities. The associated electron thermal diffusivity, particle and heat-pinch velocities are also calculated. The effects of impurity gradients on saturated ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence are discussed and a related explanation of density profile steepening during Z-mode operation is proposed. The second study is devoted to the role of multiple helicity nonlinear interactions of tearing modes and dynamics of magnetic relaxation in a high-temperature current-carrying plasma. To extend the resistive MHD theory of magnetic fluctuations and dynamo activity observed in the reversed field pinch, the fluid equations for high-temperature regime are derived and basic nonlinear interaction mechanism and the effects of diamagnetic corrections to the MHD turbulence theory are studied for the case of fully developed, densely packed turbulence. Modifications to the MHD dynamo theory and anomalous thermal transport and confinement scaling predictions are examined.

  19. Space-Time Localization of Plasma Turbulence Using Multiple Spacecraft Radio Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, John W.; Estabrook, Frank B.

    2011-01-01

    Space weather is described as the variability of solar wind plasma that can disturb satellites and systems and affect human space exploration. Accurate prediction requires information of the heliosphere inside the orbit of the Earth. However, for predictions using remote sensing, one needs not only plane-of-sky position but also range information the third spatial dimension to show the distance to the plasma disturbances and thus when they might propagate or co-rotate to create disturbances at the orbit of the Earth. Appropriately processed radio signals from spacecraft having communications lines-of-sight passing through the inner heliosphere can be used for this spacetime localization of plasma disturbances. The solar plasma has an electron density- and radio-wavelength-dependent index of refraction. An approximately monochromatic wave propagating through a thin layer of plasma turbulence causes a geometrical-optics phase shift proportional to the electron density at the point of passage, the radio wavelength, and the thickness of the layer. This phase shift is the same for a wave propagating either up or down through the layer at the point of passage. This attribute can be used for space-time localization of plasma irregularities. The transfer function of plasma irregularities to the observed time series depends on the Doppler tracking mode. When spacecraft observations are in the two-way mode (downlink radio signal phase-locked to an uplink radio transmission), plasma fluctuations have a two-pulse response in the Doppler. In the two-way mode, the Doppler time series y2(t) is the difference between the frequency of the downlink signal received and the frequency of a ground reference oscillator. A plasma blob localized at a distance x along the line of sight perturbs the phase on both the up and down link, giving rise to two events in the two-way tracking time series separated by a time lag depending the blob s distance from the Earth: T2-2x/c, where T2 is the

  20. Plasma turbulence in the downstream ionosheath of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Intriligator, D. S.; Scarf, F. L.

    1982-01-01

    Observations made by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma analyzer and the plasma wave instrument in the Venus ionosheath are compared. Large increases in plasma wave turbulence levels appear to be connected with changing plasma distributions and interpenetrating plasma beams. Some of these plasma waves are identified as Doppler - shifted ion acoustic waves due to beam/beam interactions, but it is noted that different forms of instabilities are probably also operative. The changes in the temperature, intensity and energy of the peak in the PVO plasma distributions are similar to those observed by Venera 10 closer to the planet and appear to be evidence for rarefaction and compression in the downstream ionosheath. Some of the changes in the PVO plasma distributions may be related to the presence of a second ion population or the acceleration of protons.

  1. Turbulent and directed plasma motions in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fludra, A.; Bentley, R. D.; Lemen, J. R.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.

    1989-01-01

    An improved method for fitting asymmetric soft X-ray line profiles from solar flares is presented. A two-component model is used where one component represents the total emission from directed upflow plasma and the other the emission from the plasma at rest. Unlike previous methods, the width of the moving component is independent from that of the stationary component. Time variations of flare plasma characteristics (i.e., temperature, emission measure of moving and stationary plasma, upflow and turbulent velocities) are derived from the Ca XIX and Fe XXV spectra recorded by the Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission. The fitting technique provides a statistical estimation for the uncertainties in the fitting parameters. The relationship between the directed and turbulent motions has been studied, and a correlation of the random and directed motions has been found in some flares with intensive plasma upflows. Mean temperatures of the upflowing and stationary plasmas are compared for the first time from ratios of calcium to iron X-ray line intensities. Finally, evidence for turbulent motions and the possibility of plasma upflow late into the decay phase is presented and discussed.

  2. The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere and Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    The solar wind environment has a large influence on the transport of cosmic rays. This chapter discusses the observations of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the outer heliosphere and the heliosheath. In the supersonic solar wind, interaction regions with large magnetic fields form barriers to cosmic ray transport. This effect, the "CR-B" relationship, has been quantified and is shown to be valid everywhere inside the termination shock (TS). In the heliosheath, this relationship breaks down, perhaps because of a change in the nature of the turbulence. Turbulence is compressive in the heliosheath, whereas it was non-compressive in the solar wind. The plasma pressure in the outer heliosphere is dominated by the pickup ions which gain most of the flow energy at the TS. The heliosheath plasma and magnetic field are highly variable on scales as small as ten minutes. The plasma flow turns away from the nose roughly as predicted, but the radial speeds at Voyager 1 are much less than those at Voyager 2, which is not understood. Despite predictions to the contrary, magnetic reconnection is not an important process in the inner heliosheath with only one observed occurrence to date.

  3. The Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere and Heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.; Burlaga, L. F.

    2013-06-01

    The solar wind environment has a large influence on the transport of cosmic rays. This chapter discusses the observations of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field in the outer heliosphere and the heliosheath. In the supersonic solar wind, interaction regions with large magnetic fields form barriers to cosmic ray transport. This effect, the "CR-B" relationship, has been quantified and is shown to be valid everywhere inside the termination shock (TS). In the heliosheath, this relationship breaks down, perhaps because of a change in the nature of the turbulence. Turbulence is compressive in the heliosheath, whereas it was non-compressive in the solar wind. The plasma pressure in the outer heliosphere is dominated by the pickup ions which gain most of the flow energy at the TS. The heliosheath plasma and magnetic field are highly variable on scales as small as ten minutes. The plasma flow turns away from the nose roughly as predicted, but the radial speeds at Voyager 1 are much less than those at Voyager 2, which is not understood. Despite predictions to the contrary, magnetic reconnection is not an important process in the inner heliosheath with only one observed occurrence to date.

  4. Suppression of phase mixing in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, J. T.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Dellar, P. J.

    2016-07-01

    Transfer of free energy from large to small velocity-space scales by phase mixing leads to Landau damping in a linear plasma. In a turbulent drift-kinetic plasma, this transfer is statistically nearly canceled by an inverse transfer from small to large velocity-space scales due to "anti-phase-mixing" modes excited by a stochastic form of plasma echo. Fluid moments (density, velocity, and temperature) are thus approximately energetically isolated from the higher moments of the distribution function, so phase mixing is ineffective as a dissipation mechanism when the plasma collisionality is small.

  5. Heliospheric plasma sheet inflation as a cause of solar wind anomaly during the solar cycle 23-24 minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chin-Chun; Liou, Kan; Wu, S. T.; Dryer, Murray

    2016-03-01

    The unusual low solar wind density and weak magnetic field observed at the near-Earth orbit during the 2007-2009 solar minimum years has been an actively studied subject. Our previous numerical simulation suggested that an inflation of the heliosphere current/plasma sheet (HCS/HPS) could be the cause of the density and field anomaly [1]. The inflation of HCS/HPS hypothesizes that HCS/HPS is thicker if Sun's polar magnetic field is weaker and thinner if Sun's polar magnetic field is stronger. In this study, we provide additional evidence to support this hypothesis using photosphere magnetographs from the ground-based stations (NSO, MWO or WMO). Specifically, we compute and compare average values of the solar magnetic field for two different periods: 1995-1997 and 2007-2009. We also integrate the magnetic field over the equatorial (< 7.5°), the polar (47.5°-87.5°), and the mid-latitude (12.5°-42.5°) regions. It is found that at 2.5 solar radii the averaged radial-component of the magnetic field (Br) is smaller in the 2007-2009 period than in the 1995-1997 period by ˜33% in the polar region, ˜36% in the mid-latitude region, and ˜11% in the equatorial region. When moving outward with the solar wind, the relatively large magnetic field at the equator may inflate the HCS/HPS at a farther distance causing the unusually low solar wind density and weak magnetic field at the equator during 2007-2009.

  6. Simultaneous Multi-angle Measurements of Plasma Turbulence at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naomi; Golkowski, Mark; Sheerin, James; University of Colorado Denver Team

    2013-10-01

    We report the results from a recent series of experiments employing the HAARP HF transmitter to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. Diagnostics included the Modular UHF Ionospheric Radar (MUIR) located at HAARP, the Super DARN-Kodiak HF radar, and HF receivers to record stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE). Short pulse, low duty cycle experiments demonstrate control and suppression of artificial field-aligned irregularities (AFAI). This allows the isolation of ponderomotive plasma turbulence effects. For the first time, plasma line spectra measured simultaneously in different spots of the interaction region displayed marked but contemporaneous differences dependent on the aspect angle of the HF pump beam and the pointing angle of the MUIR diagnostic radar. Outshifted Plasma Line (OPL) spectra, rarely observed in past experiments, occurred with sufficient regularity for experimentation. Experimental results are compared to previous high latitude experiments and predictions from recent modeling efforts.

  7. Investigation of an Oscillating Surface Plasma for Turbulent Drag Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.

    2003-01-01

    An oscillating, weakly ionized surface plasma has been investigated for use in turbulent boundary layer viscous drag reduction. The study was based on reports showing that mechanical spanwise oscillations of a wall can reduce viscous drag due to a turbulent boundary layer by up to 40%. It was hypothesized that the plasma induced body force in high electric field gradients of a surface plasma along strip electrodes could also be configured to oscillate the flow. Thin dielectric panels with millimeter-scale, flush- mounted, triad electrode arrays with one and two-phase high voltage excitation were tested. Results showed that while a small oscillation could be obtained, the effect was lost at a low frequency (less than 100Hz). Furthermore, a mean flow was generated during the oscillation that complicates the effect. Hot-wire and pitot probe diagnostics are presented along with phase-averaged images revealing plasma structure.

  8. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, W.; Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-01

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  9. RF wave propagation and scattering in turbulent tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W. Michoski, C.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2015-12-10

    Drift wave turbulence driven by the steep electron and ion temperature gradients in H-mode divertor tokamaks produce scattering of the RF waves used for heating and current drive. The X-ray emission spectra produced by the fast electrons require the turbulence broaden RF wave spectrum. Both the 5 GHz Lower Hybrid waves and the 170 GHz electron cyclotron [EC] RF waves experience scattering and diffraction by the electron density fluctuations. With strong LHCD there are bifurcations in the coupled turbulent transport dynamics giving improved steady-state confinement states. The stochastic scattering of the RF rays makes the prediction of the distribution of the rays and the associated particle heating a statistical problem. Thus, we introduce a Fokker-Planck equation for the probably density of the RF rays. The general frame work of the coupled system of coupled high frequency current driving rays with the low-frequency turbulent transport determines the profiles of the plasma density and temperatures.

  10. Kinetic simulations of magnetized turbulence in astrophysical plasmas.

    PubMed

    Howes, G G; Dorland, W; Cowley, S C; Hammett, G W; Quataert, E; Schekochihin, A A; Tatsuno, T

    2008-02-15

    This Letter presents the first ab initio, fully electromagnetic, kinetic simulations of magnetized turbulence in a homogeneous, weakly collisional plasma at the scale of the ion Larmor radius (ion gyroscale). Magnetic- and electric-field energy spectra show a break at the ion gyroscale; the spectral slopes are consistent with scaling predictions for critically balanced turbulence of Alfvén waves above the ion gyroscale (spectral index -5/3) and of kinetic Alfvén waves below the ion gyroscale (spectral indices of -7/3 for magnetic and -1/3 for electric fluctuations). This behavior is also qualitatively consistent with in situ measurements of turbulence in the solar wind. Our findings support the hypothesis that the frequencies of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind remain well below the ion cyclotron frequency both above and below the ion gyroscale. PMID:18352484

  11. ENERGETIC PARTICLE ANISOTROPIES AT THE HELIOSPHERIC BOUNDARY

    SciTech Connect

    Florinski, V.; Le Roux, J. A.; Jokipii, J. R.; Alouani-Bibi, F.

    2013-10-20

    In 2012 August the Voyager 1 space probe entered a distinctly new region of space characterized by a virtual absence of heliospheric energetic ions and magnetic fluctuations, now interpreted as a part of the local interstellar cloud. Prior to their disappearance, the ion distributions strongly peaked at a 90° pitch angle, implying rapid escape of streaming particles along the magnetic field lines. Here we investigate the process of particle crossing from the heliosheath into the interstellar space, using a kinetic approach that resolves scales of the particle's cyclotron radius and smaller. It is demonstrated that a 'pancake' pitch-angle distribution naturally arises at a tangential discontinuity separating a weakly turbulent plasma from a laminar region with a very low pitch-angle scattering rate. The relatively long persistence of gyrating ions is interpreted in terms of field line meandering facilitating their cross-field diffusion within the depletion region.

  12. Turbulence in laboratory and natural plasmas: Connecting the dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenko, Frank

    2015-11-01

    It is widely recognized that turbulence is an important and fascinating frontier topic of both basic and applied plasma physics. Numerous aspects of this paradigmatic example of self-organization in nonlinear systems far from thermodynamic equilibrium remain to be better understood. Meanwhile, for both laboratory and natural plasmas, an impressive combination of new experimental and observational data, new theoretical concepts, and new computational capabilities (on the brink of the exascale era) have become available. Thus, it seems fair to say that we are currently facing a golden age of plasma turbulence research, characterized by fundamental new insights regarding the role and nature of turbulent processes in phenomena like cross-field transport, particle acceleration and propagation, plasma heating, magnetic reconnection, or dynamo action. At the same time, there starts to emerge a more unified view of this key topic of basic plasma physics, putting it into the much broader context of complex systems research and connecting it, e.g., to condensed matter physics and biophysics. I will describe recent advances and future challenges in this vibrant area of plasma physics, highlighting novel insights into the redistribution and dissipation of energy in turbulent plasmas at kinetic scales, using gyrokinetic, hybrid, and fully kinetic approaches in a complementary fashion. In this context, I will discuss, among other things, the influence of damped eigenmodes, the importance of nonlocal interactions, the origin and nature of non-universal power law spectra, as well as the role of coherent structures. Moreover, I will outline exciting new research opportunities on the horizon, combining extreme scale simulations with basic plasma and fusion experiments as well as with observations from satellites.

  13. Turbulent and neoclassical impurity transport in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fueloep, T.; Nordman, H.

    2009-03-15

    Impurity particle transport in tokamaks is studied using an electrostatic fluid model for main ion and impurity temperature gradient (ITG) mode and trapped electron (TE) mode turbulence in the collisionless limit and neoclassical theory. The impurity flux and impurity density peaking factor obtained from a self-consistent treatment of impurity transport are compared and contrasted with the results of the often used trace impurity approximation. Comparisons between trace and self-consistent turbulent impurity transport are performed for ITER-like profiles. It is shown that for small impurity concentrations the trace impurity limit is adequate if the plasma is dominated by ITG turbulence. However, in case of TE mode dominated plasmas the contribution from impurity modes may be significant, and therefore a self-consistent treatment may be needed.

  14. Selective formation of turbulent structures in magnetized cylindrical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka; Yagi, Masatoshi; Itoh, Sanae-I

    2008-05-15

    The mechanism of nonlinear structural formation has been studied with a three-field reduced fluid model, which is extended to describe the resistive drift wave turbulence in magnetized cylindrical plasmas. In this model, ion-neutral collisions strongly stabilize the resistive drift wave, and the formed structure depends on the collision frequency. If the collision frequency is small, modulational coupling of unstable modes generates a zonal flow. On the other hand, if the collision frequency is large, a streamer, which is a localized vortex in the azimuthal direction, is formed. The structure is generated by nonlinear wave coupling and is sustained for a much longer duration than the drift wave oscillation period. This is a minimal model for analyzing the turbulent structural formation mechanism by mode coupling in cylindrical plasmas, and the competitive nature of structural formation is revealed. These turbulent structures affect particle transport.

  15. Spontaneous emission of electromagnetic radiation in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; Simões, F. J. R.; Pavan, J.; Gaelzer, R.

    2014-01-15

    Known radiation emission mechanisms in plasmas include bremmstrahlung (or free-free emission), gyro- and synchrotron radiation, cyclotron maser, and plasma emission. For unmagnetized plasmas, only bremmstrahlung and plasma emissions are viable. Of these, bremmstrahlung becomes inoperative in the absence of collisions, and the plasma emission requires the presence of electron beam, followed by various scattering and conversion processes. The present Letter proposes a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of thermodynamic quasi-equilibrium between particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. The radiation emission mechanism proposed in the present Letter is not predicted by the linear theory of thermal plasmas, but it relies on nonlinear wave-particle resonance processes. The electromagnetic particle-in-cell numerical simulation supports the new mechanism.

  16. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS OF CONTINUOUSLY DRIVEN MIRROR AND ION CYCLOTRON INSTABILITIES IN HIGH BETA ASTROPHYSICAL AND HELIOSPHERIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel E-mail: eliot@berkeley.edu

    2015-02-10

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ∼ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p {sub ∥} and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ∼ 0.3 (B) in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ∼ 0.1 (B), the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  17. Particle-in-cell Simulations of Continuously Driven Mirror and Ion Cyclotron Instabilities in High Beta Astrophysical and Heliospheric Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riquelme, Mario A.; Quataert, Eliot; Verscharen, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    We use particle-in-cell simulations to study the nonlinear evolution of ion velocity space instabilities in an idealized problem in which a background velocity shear continuously amplifies the magnetic field. We simulate the astrophysically relevant regime where the shear timescale is long compared to the ion cyclotron period, and the plasma beta is β ~ 1-100. The background field amplification in our calculation is meant to mimic processes such as turbulent fluctuations or MHD-scale instabilities. The field amplification continuously drives a pressure anisotropy with p > p ∥ and the plasma becomes unstable to the mirror and ion cyclotron instabilities. In all cases, the nonlinear state is dominated by the mirror instability, not the ion cyclotron instability, and the plasma pressure anisotropy saturates near the threshold for the linear mirror instability. The magnetic field fluctuations initially undergo exponential growth but saturate in a secular phase in which the fluctuations grow on the same timescale as the background magnetic field (with δB ~ 0.3 langBrang in the secular phase). At early times, the ion magnetic moment is well-conserved but once the fluctuation amplitudes exceed δB ~ 0.1 langBrang, the magnetic moment is no longer conserved but instead changes on a timescale comparable to that of the mean magnetic field. We discuss the implications of our results for low-collisionality astrophysical plasmas, including the near-Earth solar wind and low-luminosity accretion disks around black holes.

  18. Global Turbulence Simulations of CYCLONE Base Case and MAST Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Saarelma, S.; Akers, R.; Reshko, M.; Roach, C. M.; Romanelli, M.; Thyagaraja, A.; Bottino, A.; Jolliet, S.

    2008-11-01

    The non-local effects of turbulence can affect the transport especially in devices when the ration of ion gyroradius to plasma size ({rho}{sub i}*) is large. We show how the local linear and nonlinear ITG flux-tube results are modified when the simulations are done with finite {rho}{sub i}* in a global code.

  19. Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a turbulent plasma slab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    Scattering of electromagnetic waves from a turbulent plasma slab is studied. Part of the effects of the multiple scattering is taken into account. The reflection coefficient is found to be increased and its variation with respect to the slab thickness is smoothed out by the random scattering.

  20. Two-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamics and Interstellar Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven R.

    1999-09-01

    This paper is concerned with a physical understanding of the main features of interstellar plasma turbulence. Our observational knowledge of this turbulence is provided by radio-wave propagation observations, generically referred to as interstellar scintillations. Distinctive features of the observations are the nearly omnipresent anisotropy of scattering, revealed by elliptical rather than circular scattering disks, drastic differences in the magnitude of scattering between closely spaced lines of sight through the interstellar medium, evidence from Faraday rotation observations that the interstellar vector magnetic field changes markedly on small spatial scales, and the existence of a power-law spectrum of density irregularities over a wide range of spatial scales. This power-law density spectrum strongly suggests the existence of similar spatial power spectra for the other magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) variables such as flow velocity and magnetic field. In this paper, it is pointed out that the aforementioned features arise or may naturally be explained by an approximate theory of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics. In this theory, the plasma turbulence is described by two scalar functions (a velocity stream function and one component of the magnetic vector potential) that are coupled by nonlinear partial differential equations. These equations are physically transparent, possess some relevant analytic results, and are easily solved numerically. Arguments for the relevance of this reduced plasma description are presented. Although obviously an incomplete description of the interstellar plasma, these equations provide plausible explanations for the observational features described above. Anisotropy of scattering arises as an obvious consequence of the conditions for validity of the two-dimensional MHD description, i.e., that spatial gradients along a large-scale magnetic field are much smaller than those perpendicular to the field

  1. Granular fluctuations in plasma turbulence and their role in transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    Three general types of granular or discrete fluctuations in plasma turbulence are reviewed, with emphasis placed on their unique role in fluctuation-induced transport. These fluctuations are clumps, holes, and vortices, and represent structures that are not part of the normal mode response, the basis of conventional descriptions of plasma turbulence and transport. These fluctuations interact with the normal mode response to produce profound modifications of transport. The self-consistent linking of fields and particle distributions through quasineutrality and Ampere's law is shown to be crucial in calculating these modifications. In particular, it is pointed out that collisionless electron motion along perturbed magnetic fields produces almost no transport of field aligned current across equilibrium surfaces. It is also shown that clumps are granular structures which are turbulently mixed, whereas holes and vortices avoid mixing and relaxation through strong self-binding effects. The distinction between structures that are mixed and those that are persistent is probed in an analysis of the interaction of an intense vortex and ambient turbulent fluctuations. It is shown that, above a critical amplitude, the shearing of eddies due to the differential rotation of the vortex suppresses the fluctuations that mix its vorticity, allowing it to achieve a lifetime greatly in excess of the turbulent interaction time scale.

  2. Granular fluctuations in plasma turbulence and their role in transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    Three general types of granular or discrete fluctuations in plasma turbulence are reviewed, with emphasis placed on their unique role in fluctuation-induced transport. These fluctuations are clumps, holes, and vortices, and represent structures that are not part of the normal mode response, the basis of conventional descriptions of plasma turbulence and transport. These fluctuations interact with the normal mode response to produce profound modifications of transport. The self-consistent linking of fields and particle distributions through quasineutrality and Ampere`s law is shown to be crucial in calculating these modifications. In particular, it is pointed out that collisionless electron motion along perturbed magnetic fields produces almost no transport of field aligned current across equilibrium surfaces. It is also shown that clumps are granular structures which are turbulently mixed, whereas holes and vortices avoid mixing and relaxation through strong self-binding effects. The distinction between structures that are mixed and those that are persistent is probed in an analysis of the interaction of an intense vortex and ambient turbulent fluctuations. It is shown that, above a critical amplitude, the shearing of eddies due to the differential rotation of the vortex suppresses the fluctuations that mix its vorticity, allowing it to achieve a lifetime greatly in excess of the turbulent interaction time scale.

  3. COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT THEORY IN PARTIALLY TURBULENT SPACE PLASMAS WITH COMPRESSIBLE MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, S.; Schlickeiser, R.

    2012-02-01

    Recently, a new transport theory of cosmic rays in magnetized space plasmas extending the quasilinear approximation to the particle orbit has been developed for the case of an axisymmetric incompressible magnetic turbulence. Here, we generalize the approach to the important physical case of a compressible plasma. As previously obtained in the case of an incompressible plasma, we allow arbitrary gyrophase deviations from the unperturbed spiral orbits in the uniform magnetic field. For the case of quasi-stationary and spatially homogeneous magnetic turbulence we derive, in the small Larmor radius approximation, gyrophase-averaged cosmic-ray Fokker-Planck coefficients. Upper limits for the perpendicular and pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficients and for the perpendicular and parallel spatial diffusion coefficients are presented.

  4. Intermittent Dissipation and Heating in 3D Kinetic Plasma Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Roytershteyn, V; Karimabadi, H; Parashar, T; Wu, P; Shay, M

    2015-05-01

    High resolution, fully kinetic, three dimensional (3D) simulation of collisionless plasma turbulence shows the development of turbulence characterized by sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales. The nonlinear evolution is initialized with a long wavelength isotropic spectrum of fluctuations having polarizations transverse to an imposed mean magnetic field. We present evidence that these current sheet structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger currents signify higher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J·E, electron, and proton temperatures, and conditional averages of these quantities based on local electric current density. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previous results from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequency solar wind observational data, are discussed. PMID:25978241

  5. Strongly turbulent stabilization of electron beam-plasma interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, H. P.; Haber, I.; Palmadesso, P.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1980-01-01

    The stabilization of electron beam interactions due to strongly turbulent nonlinearities is studied analytically and numerically for a wide range of plasma parameters. A fluid mode coupling code is described in which the effects of electron and ion Landau damping and linear growth due to the energetic electron beam are included in a phenomenological manner. Stabilization of the instability is found to occur when the amplitudes of the unstable modes exceed the threshold of the oscillating two-stream instability. The coordinate space structure of the turbulent spectrum which results clearly shows that soliton-like structures are formed by this process. Phenomenological models of both the initial stabilization and the asymptotic states are developed. Scaling laws between the beam-plasma growth rate and the fluctuations in the fields and plasma density are found in both cases, and shown to be in good agreement with the results of the simulation.

  6. Vorticity scaling and intermittency in drift-interchange plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Dura, P. D.; Hnat, B.; Robinson, J.; Dendy, R. O.

    2012-09-15

    The effects of spatially varying magnetic field strength on the scaling properties of plasma turbulence, modelled by an extended form of Hasegawa-Wakatani model, are investigated. We study changes in the intermittency of the velocity, density, and vorticity fields, as functions of the magnetic field inhomogeneity C=-{partial_derivative} ln B/{partial_derivative}x. While the velocity fluctuations are always self-similar and their scaling is unaffected by the value of C, the intermittency levels in density and vorticity change with parameter C, reflecting morphological changes in the coherent structures due to the interchange mechanism. Given the centrality of vorticity in conditioning plasma transport, this result is of interest in scaling the results of transport measurements and simulations in tokamak edge plasmas, where drift-interchange turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is likely to occur.

  7. Vorticity scaling and intermittency in drift-interchange plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dura, P. D.; Hnat, B.; Robinson, J.; Dendy, R. O.

    2012-09-01

    The effects of spatially varying magnetic field strength on the scaling properties of plasma turbulence, modelled by an extended form of Hasegawa-Wakatani model, are investigated. We study changes in the intermittency of the velocity, density, and vorticity fields, as functions of the magnetic field inhomogeneity C =-∂ ln B/∂x. While the velocity fluctuations are always self-similar and their scaling is unaffected by the value of C, the intermittency levels in density and vorticity change with parameter C, reflecting morphological changes in the coherent structures due to the interchange mechanism. Given the centrality of vorticity in conditioning plasma transport, this result is of interest in scaling the results of transport measurements and simulations in tokamak edge plasmas, where drift-interchange turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is likely to occur.

  8. GYROKINETIC PARTICLE SIMULATION OF TURBULENT TRANSPORT IN BURNING PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, Claude Wendell

    2014-06-10

    The SciDAC project at the IFS advanced the state of high performance computing for turbulent structures and turbulent transport. The team project with Prof Zhihong Lin [PI] at Univ California Irvine produced new understanding of the turbulent electron transport. The simulations were performed at the Texas Advanced Computer Center TACC and the NERSC facility by Wendell Horton, Lee Leonard and the IFS Graduate Students working in that group. The research included a Validation of the electron turbulent transport code using the data from a steady state university experiment at the University of Columbia in which detailed probe measurements of the turbulence in steady state were used for wide range of temperature gradients to compare with the simulation data. These results were published in a joint paper with Texas graduate student Dr. Xiangrong Fu using the work in his PhD dissertation. X.R. Fu, W. Horton, Y. Xiao, Z. Lin, A.K. Sen and V. Sokolov, “Validation of electron Temperature gradient turbulence in the Columbia Linear Machine, Phys. Plasmas 19, 032303 (2012).

  9. Intermittent dissipation at kinetic scales in collisionless plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Karimabadi, H; Roytershteyn, V; Shay, M; Wu, P; Daughton, W; Loring, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-11-01

    High resolution kinetic simulations of collisionless plasma driven by shear show the development of turbulence characterized by dynamic coherent sheetlike current density structures spanning a range of scales down to electron scales. We present evidence that these structures are sites for heating and dissipation, and that stronger current structures signify higher dissipation rates. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma, like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due to current sheet formation, leading to the expectation that heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmas may be highly nonuniform and patchy. PMID:23215389

  10. Particle energization and current sheets in Alfvenic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makwana, Kirit; Li, Hui; Guo, Fan; Daughton, William; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2015-11-01

    Plasma turbulence is driven by injecting energy at large scales through stirring or instabilities. This energy cascades forward to smaller scales by nonlinear interactions, described by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) at scales larger than the ion gyroradius. At smaller scales, the fluid description of MHD breaks down and kinetic mechanisms convert turbulent energy into particle energy. We investigate this entire process by simulating the cascade of strongly interacting Alfven waves using MHD and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. The plasma beta is varied and particle heating is analyzed. Anisotropic heating of particles is observed. We calculate the fraction of injected energy converted into non-thermal energy. At low beta we obtain a significant non-thermal component to the particle energy distribution function. We investigate the mechanisms behind this acceleration. The velocity distribution function is correlated with the sites of turbulent current sheets. The different dissipative terms due to curvature drift, gradB drift, polarization drifts, and parallel current density are also calculated. This has applications for understanding particle energization in turbulent space plasmas.

  11. Intermittency, coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Parashar, T. N.; Wu, P.; Karimabadi, H.

    2016-04-01

    Collisionless dissipation in turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and the solar corona has been an intensively studied subject recently, with new insights often emerging from numerical simulation. Here we report results from high resolution, fully kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in both two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions, studying the relationship between intermittency and dissipation. The simulations show development of turbulent coherent structures, characterized by sheet-like current density structures spanning a range of scales. An approximate dissipation measure is employed, based on work done by the electromagnetic field in the local electron fluid frame. This surrogate dissipation measure is highly concentrated in small subvolumes in both 2D and 3D simulations. Fully kinetic simulations are also compared with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations in terms of coherent structures and dissipation. The interesting result emerges that the conditional averages of dissipation measure scale very similarly with normalized current density J in 2D and 3D particle-in-cell and in MHD. To the extent that the surrogate dissipation measure is accurate, this result implies that on average dissipation scales as ˜J2 in turbulent kinetic plasma. Multifractal intermittency is seen in the inertial range in both 2D and 3D, but at scales ˜ion inertial length, the scaling is closer to monofractal.

  12. Turbulence in strongly coupled dusty plasmas using generalized hydrodynamic description

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar; Dharodi, Vikram Singh; Das, Amita; Patel, Bhavesh G.; Kaw, Predhiman

    2015-02-15

    The properties of decaying turbulence have been studied with the help of a Generalized Hydrodynamic (GHD) fluid model in the context of strongly coupled dusty plasma medium in two dimensions. The GHD model treats the strongly coupled dusty plasma system as a visco-elastic medium. The incompressible limit of the GHD model is considered here. The studies carried out here are, however, applicable to a wider class of visco-elastic systems, and are not merely confined to the dusty plasma medium. Our simulations studies show that an initial spectrum that is confined in a limited domain of wave numbers becomes broad, even when the Reynold's number is much less than the critical value required for the onset of turbulence in Newtonian fluids. This is a signature of elastic turbulence, where Weissenberg's number also plays an important role on the onset of turbulence. This feature has been observed in several experiments. It is also shown that the existence of memory relaxation time parameter and the transverse shear wave inhibit the normal process (for 2-D systems) of inverse spectral cascade in this case. A detailed simulation study has been carried out for the understanding of this inhibition.

  13. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-15

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  14. Ion temperature gradient turbulence in helical and axisymmetric RFP plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Predebon, I.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2015-05-01

    Turbulence induced by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) is investigated in the helical and axisymmetric plasma states of a reversed field pinch device by means of gyrokinetic calculations. The two magnetic configurations are systematically compared, both linearly and nonlinearly, in order to evaluate the impact of the geometry on the instability and its ensuing transport, as well as on the production of zonal flows. Despite its enhanced confinement, the high-current helical state demonstrates a lower ITG stability threshold compared to the axisymmetric state, and ITG turbulence is expected to become an important contributor to the total heat transport.

  15. Dissipation of Astrophysical Plasma Turbulence by Radiative Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Steven

    1997-11-01

    One of the more plausible yet tractable models for turbulence in astrophysical plasmas such as the interstellar medium and solar wind is that of reduced MHD. In reduced MHD spatial gradients perpendicular to a large scale magnetic field are much more important than those along the field, and the plasma is approximated as being two dimensional. A salient characteristic of reduced MHD is the development of thin, intense current sheets on an eddy turnover time. The large current density in these sheets is most plausibly carried by electron drift relative to the ions at a drift speed v_d. This drift will enhance the high speed tail of the electron distribution relative to that of a current-free plasma. If the plasma contains a neutral atom or ion species, enhanced collisional excitation will occur in the current sheets. Radiative deexcitation of the atom or ion will then produce loss of energy from the plasma. The theory of reduced MHD may be used to obtain an expression for the electron drift speed, which depends on the characteristics of the host plasma as well as the amplitude, spatial scale, and initial conditions of the MHD turbulence. When vd ~ v_th, the thermal electron speed, enhanced electron collisional excitation may be an important process. I consider the importance of this process for various astrophysical plasmas. The mechanism may well be important in the interstellar molecular clouds in which stars form.

  16. Plasma transport induced by kinetic Alfven wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Izutsu, T.; Hasegawa, H.; Fujimoto, M.; Nakamura, T. K. M.

    2012-10-15

    At the Earth's magnetopause that separates the hot-tenuous magnetospheric plasma from the cold dense solar wind plasma, often seen is a boundary layer where plasmas of both origins coexist. Plasma diffusions of various forms have been considered as the cause of this plasma mixing. Here, we investigate the plasma transport induced by wave-particle interaction in kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence, which is one of the candidate processes. We clarify that the physical origin of the KAW-induced cross-field diffusion is the drift motions of those particles that are in Cerenkov resonance with the wave: E Multiplication-Sign B-like drift that emerges in the presence of non-zero parallel electric field component and grad-B drift due to compressional magnetic fluctuations. We find that KAW turbulence, which has a spectral breakpoint at which an MHD inertial range transits to a dissipation range, causes selective transport for particles whose parallel velocities are specified by the local Alfven velocity and the parallel phase velocity at the spectral breakpoint. This finding leads us to propose a new data analysis method for identifying whether or not a mixed plasma in the boundary layer is a consequence of KAW-induced transport across the magnetopause. The method refers to the velocity space distribution function data obtained by a spacecraft that performs in situ observations and, in principle, is applicable to currently available dataset such as that provided by the NASA's THEMIS mission.

  17. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  18. Neoclassical diffusion in a turbulent plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yushmanov, P. |

    1991-11-01

    This work describes a new approach to plasma transport where the toroidal drift motion is considered as a perturbation to the fluctuating velocity. Percolation theory is used to determine the scaling of the diffusion coefficient. Several neoclassical phenomena should persist even when diffusion is enhanced from neoclassical predictions. Numerical simulation results support the theoretical scaling arguments.

  19. First 3-D simulations of meteor plasma dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2015-02-01

    Millions of small but detectable meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere every second, creating trails of hot plasma that turbulently diffuse into the background atmosphere. For over 60 years, radars have detected meteor plasmas and used these signals to infer characteristics of the meteoroid population and upper atmosphere, but, despite the importance of meteor radar measurements, the complex processes by which these plasmas evolve have never been thoroughly explained or modeled. In this paper, we present the first fully 3-D simulations of meteor evolution, showing meteor plasmas developing instabilities, becoming turbulent, and inhomogeneously diffusing into the background ionosphere. These instabilities explain the characteristics and strength of many radar observations, in particular the high-resolution nonspecular echoes made by large radars. The simulations reveal how meteors create strong electric fields that dig out deep plasma channels along the Earth's magnetic fields. They also allow researchers to explore the impacts of the intense winds and wind shears, commonly found at these altitudes, on meteor plasma evolution. This study will allow the development of more sophisticated models of meteor radar signals, enabling the extraction of detailed information about the properties of meteoroid particles and the atmosphere.

  20. Plasma physics abstracts, 1 January - 31 December, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Dangelo, N.; Goertz, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: ion-cyclotron waves; plasma waves; solar wind lithium releases; bow shock; Pi2 wave bursts; auroral kilometric radiation; ion energization; magnetic field corrections; electric fields; magnetospheric processes; electron acceleration; inner heliosphere; nightside auroral zone; computerized simulation; plasma wave turbulence; and magnetohydrodynamic waves in plasma sheets.

  1. Free energy and entropy flows in magnetised plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schekochihin, A.; Cowley, S.; Dorland, W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.; Plunk, G.; TenBarge, J.; Mallet, A.; Kanekar, A.

    2011-12-01

    Just as fluid turbulence can be conceptualised as a cascade of kinetic energy from large to small scales, kinetic plasma turbulence is a cascade of free energy in the 6D phase space (position and velocity). I will discuss this as a general principle and then specialise to the case of magnetised plasma turbulence at kinetic (sub-ion-Larmor) scales. At these scales, the free energy flux arriving from the inertial range splits into two channels: the kinetic Alfven wave cascade destined to be dissipated into electron heat and the ion entropy cascade, resulting in ion heating. The phase-space nature of the cascade is particularly manifest in this case as the ion entropy cascade involves simultaneous generation of small spatial scales and small scales in velocity space, the latter via a nonlinear phase-mixing process due to ion gyromotion. I will also discuss how the electron Landau damping and the associated process of parallel phase mixing fit into this cascade picture and whether they represent an effective dissipation mechanism in a strongly turbulent nonlinear system.

  2. Intermittent dissipation and heating in 3D kinetic plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.; Parashar, T.; Wu, P.; Shay, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The nature of collisionless dissipation has been hotlydebated in recent years, with alternative ideas posed interms of various wave modes, such as kinetic Alfven waves,whistlers, linear Vlasov instabilities, cyclotron resonance,and Landau damping. Here we use large scale, fully kinetic3D simulations of collisionless plasma turbulence which showthe development of turbulence characterized by sheet-likecurrent density structures spanning a range of scales.We present evidence that these structures are sites for heatingand dissipation, and that stronger current structures signifyhigher dissipation rates. The analyses focus on quantities such as J.E, electron and proton temperatures, and PVI of the magnetic field. Evidently, kinetic scale plasma,like magnetohydrodynamics, becomes intermittent due tocurrent sheet formation, leading to the expectationthat heating and dissipation in astrophysical and space plasmasmay be highly nonuniform. Comparison with previousresults from 2D kinetic simulations, as well as high frequencysolar wind observational data will also be discussed.

  3. Global spectral investigation of plasma turbulence in gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Henriksson, S. V.; Janhunen, S. J.; Kiviniemi, T. P.; Heikkinen, J. A.

    2006-07-15

    Gyrokinetic global particle-in-cell simulations for a small torus with a large aspect ratio ({epsilon}{sup -1}>{approx}7) indicate a k{sub perpendicular}{sup -{alpha}} spectrum for electrostatic turbulence. When electrons are treated kinetically, the simulation results fit {alpha} that grows from about 1 at the plasma core to about 3 at the plasma edge for the flux surface component of the wave vector perpendicular to the magnetic field, while for adiabatic electrons {alpha}=4 is found for all radii, in agreement with the Hasegawa-Mima model. The relation between spectra and transport is investigated through the formation of an internal transport barrier. The role of flow shear in suppressing turbulence is illustrated by spectral diagnostics. A strong dependence between the presence of small wavenumbers and transport is explicitly observed. The simulated spectra are compared to recent experimental results.

  4. Complexity Induced Anisotropic Bimodal Intermittent Turbulence in Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Tom; Tam, Sunny W. Y.; Wu, Cheng-Chin

    2004-01-01

    The "physics of complexity" in space plasmas is the central theme of this exposition. It is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures arising from the plasma resonances can be the source for the coexistence of nonpropagating spatiotemporal fluctuations and propagating modes. Non-Gaussian probability distribution functions of the intermittent fluctuations from direct numerical simulations are obtained and discussed. Power spectra and local intermittency measures using the wavelet analyses are presented to display the spottiness of the small-scale turbulent fluctuations and the non-uniformity of coarse-grained dissipation that can lead to magnetic topological reconfigurations. The technique of the dynamic renormalization group is applied to the study of the scaling properties of such type of multiscale fluctuations. Charged particle interactions with both the propagating and nonpropagating portions of the intermittent turbulence are also described.

  5. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Oughton, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Osman, K. T.

    2015-01-01

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  6. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    PubMed

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters. PMID:25848082

  7. Electrostatic and magnetic transport of energetic ions in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauff, T.; Pueschel, M. J.; Jenko, F.; Dannert, T.

    2009-02-20

    Analytical and numerical work is used in tandem to address the problem of turbulent transport of energetic ions in magnetized plasmas. It is shown that orbit averaging is not valid under rather generic conditions, and that perpendicular decorrelation effects lead to a slow 1/E decay of the electrostatic particle diffusivity of beam ions, while the respective magnetic quantity is even independent of the particle energy E.

  8. Numerical simulations of tokamak plasma turbulence and internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    2000-12-01

    A wide variety of magnetically confined plasmas, including many tokamaks such as the JET, TFTR, JT-60U, DIII-D, RTP, show clear evidence for the existence of the so-called `internal transport barriers' (ITBs) which are regions of relatively good confinement, associated with substantial gradients in temperature and/or density. A computational approach to investigating the properties of tokamak plasma turbulence and transport is developed. This approach is based on the evolution of global, two-fluid, nonlinear, electromagnetic plasma equations of motion with specified sources. In this paper, the computational model is applied to the problem of determining the nature and physical characteristics of barrier phenomena, with particular reference to RTP (electron-cyclotron resonance heated) and JET (neutral beam heated) observations of ITBs. The simulations capture features associated with the formation of these ITBs, and qualitatively reproduce some of the observations made on RTP and JET. The picture of plasma turbulence suggested involves variations of temperature and density profiles induced by the electromagnetic fluctuations, on length scales intermediate between the system size and the ion Larmor radius, and time scales intermediate between the confinement time and the Alfvén time (collectively termed `mesoscales'). The back-reaction of such profile `corrugations' (features exhibiting relatively high local spatial gradients and rapid time variations) on the development and saturation of the turbulence itself plays a key role in the nonlinear dynamics of the system. The corrugations are found to modify the dynamical evolution of radial electric field shear and the bootstrap current density, which in turn influence the turbulence. The interaction is mediated by relatively long wavelength, electromagnetic modes excited by an inverse cascade and involving nonlinear instabilities and relaxation phenomena such as intermittency and internal mode locking.

  9. Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence Driven Intrinsic Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Zakharov, L. E.

    2011-02-07

    Recent progress from global gyrokinetic simulations in understanding the origin of intrinsic rotation in toroidal plasmas is reported with emphasis on electron thermal transport dominated regimes. The turbulence driven intrinsic torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation by the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of zonal flow shear induced asymmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is shown to scale close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current. These results qualitatively reproduce empirical scalings of intrinsic rotation observed in various experiments. The origin of current scaling is found to be due to enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by the increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic torque on pressure gradient is that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving residual stress, increase with the strength of turbulence drive, which is R0/LTe and R0/Lne for the trapped electron mode. __________________________________________________

  10. A Model of the Heliosphere with Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, James; Swisdak, Marc; Opher, Merav

    2015-11-01

    The conventional picture of the heliosphere is that of a comet-shaped structure with an extended tail produced by the relative motion of the sun through the local interstellar medium. Recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the heliosphere have revealed that the heliosphere drives magnetized jets to the north and south similar to those driven by the Crab Nebula. That the sun's magnetic field can drive such jets when β = 8 πP /B2 >> 1 in the outer heliosphere is a major surprise. An analytic model of the heliosheath (HS) is developed in the limit in which the interstellar flow and magnetic field are neglected. The heliosphere in this limit is axi-symmetric and the overall structure of the HS is controlled by the solar magnetic field even for very high β. The tension of the solar magnetic field produces a drop in the total pressure between the termination shock and the HP. This same pressure drop accelerates the plasma flow into the north and south directions to form two collimated jets. MHD simulations of the global heliosphere embedded in a stationary interstellar medium match well with the analytic model. Evidence from the distribution of energetic neutral atoms from the outer heliosphere from IBEX and CASSINI supports the picture of a heliosphere with jets.

  11. Langmuir wave decay in turbulent inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, C.; Volokitin, A.

    2016-03-01

    Langmuir wave decay in solar wind plasmas typical of type III bursts' source regions near 1 AU have been reported by several spacecraft observations. In such plasmas, due to the presence of random density fluctuations, wave decay occurs usually simultaneously and compete with other coupling effects between the fields and the density irregularities, as reflection, scattering and/or refraction processes. Numerical simulations show that resonant three-wave coupling processes including several cascades of Langmuir wave decay can occur in such plasmas, leading to wave energy transfer to smaller wavenumbers k, as shown in the frame of weak turbulence theory. However, in such conditions, and contrary to what occurs in homogeneous plasmas, the decay process is localized in space at a given time. Moreover, wave-wave coupling plays a significant role in the modulation of the Langmuir waveforms, in agreement with recent space observations.

  12. On Kraichnan's 'direct interaction approximation' and Kolmogoroff's theory in two-dimensional plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Sudan, R.N.

    1981-04-01

    The nonlinear damping in a strongly turbulent convecting plasma computed by Kraichnan's modified direct inteaction approximation and the power spectrum are rederived in a physically transparent form using Kolmogoroff's theory of turbulence.

  13. Aging of solar wind magnetic and velocity fluctuations from observations in the inner heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, M. E.; Dasso, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Weygand, J. M.; Marsch, E.

    2010-12-01

    The heliosphere is a natural laboratory to study several aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. MHD fluctuations are ubiquitous in the solar wind (SW) and 'in situ' observations of plasma properties and magnetic field are one of the keys to unveil the secrets of MHD turbulence. In the interplanetary medium, MHD scale fluctuations are usually anisotropic, and these fluctuations frequently present different properties in regions of quasi-stationary SW with different bulk plasma parameters, or in regions associated with the presence of transients (e.g., magnetic clouds). It is known that the spatial structure of magnetic and velocity correlation functions evolves in the inner heliosphere. This evolution in terms of the aging of plasma parcels, as observed by the spacecrafts Helios 1-2, is the subject of the work presented here. Particular interest is put on the evolution of anisotropies in the integral length scale. Results are consistent with driving modes with wavevectors parallel to the direction of the local mean magnetic field near Sun, and a progressive spectral transfer of energy to modes with perpendicular wavevectors. Advances made in this direction, as those presented here, will be usefull to refine models used to describe the propagation and diffusion of charged solar and galactic energetic particles in the inner heliosphere, and will contribute to understand the MHD Alfvenic wave activity for this system.

  14. Coherent structure and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kasde, Satish Kumar

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the coherent structures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft. Previously established novel wavelet and higher order statistics are used in this work. We analyze the wavelet power spectrum of various solar wind plasma parameters. We construct a statistical significance level in the wavelet power spectrum to quantify the interference effects arising from filling missing data in the time series, allowing extraction of significant power from the measured data. We analyze each wavelet power spectra for transient coherency, and global periodicities resulting from the superposition of repeating coherent structures. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. These results offer a new understanding of various processes in a turbulent regime. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for current theories of solar wind generation and describe future work for determining the relationship between the coherent structures in our ionic composition data and the structure of the coronal magnetic field. Keywords: Wavelet Power Spectrum, Coherent structure and Solar wind plasma

  15. Strong Turbulence in Alkali Halide Negative Ion Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Daniel

    1999-11-01

    Negative ion plasmas (NIPs) are charge-neutral plasmas in which the negative charge is dominated by negative ions rather than electrons. They are found in laser discharges, combustion products, semiconductor manufacturing processes, stellar atmospheres, pulsar magnetospheres, and the Earth's ionosphere, both naturally and man-made. They often display signatures of strong turbulence^1. Development of a novel, compact, unmagnetized alkali halide (MX) NIP source will be discussed, it incorporating a ohmically-heated incandescent (2500K) tantulum solenoid (3cm dia, 15 cm long) with heat shields. The solenoid ionizes the MX vapor and confines contaminant electrons, allowing a very dry (electron-free) source. Plasma densities of 10^10 cm-3 and positive to negative ion mass ratios of 1 <= fracm_+m- <= 20 are achievable. The source will allow tests of strong turbulence theory^2. 1 Sheehan, D.P., et al., Phys. Fluids B5, 1593 (1993). 2 Tsytovich, V. and Wharton, C.W., Comm. Plasma Phys. Cont. Fusion 4, 91 (1978).

  16. Low-frequency instabilities and plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilic, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study is reported of steady-state and time-dependent characteristics of the positive column and the hollow cathode discharge (HCD). The steady state of a non-isothermal, cylindrical positive column in an axial magnetic field is described by three moment equations in the plasma approximation. Volume generation of electron-ion pairs by single-stage ionization, the presence of axial current, and collisions with neutrals are considered. The theory covers the range from the low pressure, collisionless regime to the intermediate pressure, collisional regime. It yields radial profiles of the charged particle velocities, density, potential, electron and ion temperatures, and demonstrates similarity laws for the positive column. The results are compared with two moment theories and with experimental data on He, Ar and Hg found in the literature for a wide range of pressures. A simple generalization of the isothermal theory for an infinitely long cylinder in an axial magnetic field to the case of a finite column with axial current flow is also demonstrated.

  17. Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere: Opportunities with IMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zank, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the radiation environment at the Earth and beyond is one of the critical elements in our developing Space Weather capabilities and strategy. Furthermore, the energization of charged particles in a collisionless plasma remains one of the compelling unsolved yet universal problems in space physics and astrophysics. The proposed instrumentation of IMAP enables two critical goals: 1) real-time monitoring of the radiation and plasma environment as part of a Space Weather capability, and 2) making coordinated simultaneous measurements of all the basic plasma parameters needed to develop a comprehensive and detailed understanding of fundamental particle energization processes. Since the session addresses the "Physics of particle acceleration", we will survey briefly the critical open problems associated with particle acceleration during quiet and active solar wind periods. At least three elements will be discussed. 1) Dissipative processes in the quiet solar wind and at shock waves. For the former, we discuss emerging ideas about the dissipation of turbulence via structures such as flux ropes and their role in possibly energizing charged particles during quiet times, especially in the vicinity of the heliospheric current sheet. In the latter, reflected ions play an essential role in dissipative processes at both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks. This in turn has consequences for the energization of particles, the generation of turbulence upstream and downstream of the shock, and the importance of a pre-existing suprathermal ion population. 2) What is the role of pre-existing energetic particles versus injection from a background thermal population of charged particles in the context of diffusive shock acceleration? Does the pre-existing suprathermal particle population play a fundamental role in the dissipation processes governing heliospheric shock, as suggested by the case of the heliospheric termination shock and pickup ions? 3) What is the

  18. Fundamental Statistical Descriptions of Plasma Turbulence in Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2001-02-16

    A pedagogical review of the historical development and current status (as of early 2000) of systematic statistical theories of plasma turbulence is undertaken. Emphasis is on conceptual foundations and methodology, not practical applications. Particular attention is paid to equations and formalism appropriate to strongly magnetized, fully ionized plasmas. Extensive reference to the literature on neutral-fluid turbulence is made, but the unique properties and problems of plasmas are emphasized throughout. Discussions are given of quasilinear theory, weak-turbulence theory, resonance-broadening theory, and the clump algorithm. Those are developed independently, then shown to be special cases of the direct-interaction approximation (DIA), which provides a central focus for the article. Various methods of renormalized perturbation theory are described, then unified with the aid of the generating-functional formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose. A general expression for the renormalized dielectric function is deduced and discussed in detail. Modern approaches such as decimation and PDF methods are described. Derivations of DIA-based Markovian closures are discussed. The eddy-damped quasinormal Markovian closure is shown to be nonrealizable in the presence of waves, and a new realizable Markovian closure is presented. The test-field model and a realizable modification thereof are also summarized. Numerical solutions of various closures for some plasma-physics paradigms are reviewed. The variational approach to bounds on transport is developed. Miscellaneous topics include Onsager symmetries for turbulence, the interpretation of entropy balances for both kinetic and fluid descriptions, self-organized criticality, statistical interactions between disparate scales, and the roles of both mean and random shear. Appendices are provided on Fourier transform conventions, dimensional and scaling analysis, the derivations of nonlinear gyrokinetic and gyrofluid equations

  19. High-Beta Electromagnetic Turbulence in LAPD Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, G.; Carter, T. A.; Pueschel, M. J.; Jenko, F.; Told, D.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of a new LaB6 cathode plasma source in the Large Plasma Device has enabled the study of pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and transport variations at significantly higher plasma β. Density fluctuations are observed to decrease with increasing β while magnetic fluctuations increase. Furthermore, the perpendicular magnetic fluctuations are seen to saturate while parallel (compressional) magnetic fluctuations increase continuously with β. These observations are compared to linear and nonlinear simulations with the GENE code. The results are consistent with the linear excitation of a Gradient-driven Drift Coupling mode (GDC) which relies on grad-B drift due to parallel magnetic fluctuations and can be driven by density or temperature gradients.

  20. Solar system plasma Turbulence: Observations, inteRmittency and Multifractals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, Marius M.

    2016-04-01

    The FP7 project STORM is funded by the European Commission to "add value to existing data bases through a more comprehensive interpretation". STORM targets plasma and magnetic field databases collected in the solar wind (Ulysses and also some planetary missions), planetary magnetospheres (Venus Express, Cluster, a few orbits from Cassini), cometary magnetosheaths (e.g. Haley from Giotto observations). The project applies the same package of analysis methods on geomagnetic field observations from ground and on derived indices (e.g. AE, AL, AU, SYM-H). The analysis strategy adopted in STORM is built on the principle of increasing complexity, from lower (like, e.g., the Power Spectral Density - PSD) to higher order analyses (the Probability Distribution Functions - PDFs, Structure Functions - SFs, Fractals and Multifractals - MFs). Therefore STORM targets not only the spectral behavior of turbulent fluctuations but also their topology and scale behavior inferred from advanced mathematical algorithms and geometrical-like analogs. STORM started in January 2013 and ended in December 2015. We will report on a selection of scientific and technical achievements and will highlight: (1) the radial evolution of solar wind turbulence and intermittency based on Ulysses data with some contributions from Venus Express and Cluster; (2) comparative study of fast and slow wind turbulence and intermittency at solar minimum; (3) comparative study of the planetary response (Venus and Earth magnetosheaths) to turbulent solar wind; (4) the critical behavior of geomagnetic fluctuations and indices; (5) an integrated library for non-linear analysis of time series that includes all the approaches adopted in STORM to investigate solar system plasma turbulence. STORM delivers an unprecedented volume of analysed data for turbulence. The project made indeed a systematic survey, orbit by orbit, of data available from ESA repositories and Principal Investigators and provides results ordered as a

  1. Modification of Edge Plasma Turbulence by External Magnetic Pertubations

    SciTech Connect

    Boedo, J; McKee, G; Rudakov, D; Reiser, D; Evans, T; Moyer, R; Schaffer, M; Watkins, J; Allen, S; Fenstermacher, M; Groth, M; Holland, C; Hollmann, E; Lasnier, C; Leonard, A; Mahdavi, M; McLean, A; Tynan, G; Wang, G; West, W; Zeng, L

    2006-06-19

    Magnetostatic perturbations applied to the DIII-D plasma using a n=3 coil set have significant impact on the plasma edge, such as edge localized mode (ELM) suppression [1], but also affect the background turbulence levels. Discharges with parameters R=1.75 m, a=0.56 m, B{sub T} {approx} 1.6 T, I{sub p} {approx} 1 MA and n{sub e} {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}-n{sub e} {approx} 7 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} (low, v*{sub e} {approx} 0.1 and moderate, v*{sub e} {approx} 1 electron pedestal collisionality) were used as a target for the perturbation, [applied at 3 s Fig. 1(a) and 2 s Fig. 1(b)]. The global density and energy content, among many other parameters, are unaffected, raising the issue of what mechanism replaces the particle and heat exhaust otherwise mediated by ELMs. Mixed ELMs (high frequency, low amplitude Type II ELMs interspersed with Type I) in the moderate collisionality regime and Type I ELMs in the low collisionality regime, are replaced by intermittency and broadband turbulence or semiperiodic events. It is important to notice that the coils can be energized in high poloidal mode spectra (upper and lower coils produce fields in the same direction) or odd configuration (upper and lower coils produce fields in the opposite direction) and also rotated 60 deg toroidally. Although we will focus on scanning probe [2] data obtained in the scrape-off layer (SOL), other diagnostics, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), reflectometry [3], were used to study the changes in the plasma turbulence when the ELMs are suppressed and the underlying turbulence and transport change. Thomson scattering n{sub e} and T{sub e} profiles (Fig. 2) accumulated over 200 ms before (red) and during (blue) I-coil perturbation are fitted with y = a + b* tanh[(r-c)/d] resulting in a,b staying constant while d varies from -0.009 to -0.011 and c from -0.013 to -0.009, i.e. the profiles mostly broaden and shift outward, changes which may be connected to an increase in radial turbulent

  2. Experimental Investigation of Complex Dynamics of Plasma Turbulence and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, M.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Newman, D. E.; Sanchez, R.

    2000-10-01

    Theoretical predictions of complex dynamics, such as self-organized criticality (SOC), have led to new insights into the behavior of a wide range of complex systems, such as sandpiles, evolution/extinction models and earthquake fault zones. Recently, complex dynamics have been invoked as a paradigm for understanding turbulent transport in plasmas. In particular, complex dynamical models of turbulent transport make specific predictions regarding power spectra and long range spatial and temporal correlations. In order to test the models experimentally, detailed studies utilizing probe arrays at many axial and azimuthal positions are under way in the linear Large Plasma Device at UCLA. Preliminary edge fluctuation data show frequency spectra with three distinct regions, scaling approximately as f^0, f-1, and f-4, in low, intermediate, and high frequency intervals respectively. The f-1 frequency interval decreases - eventually to zero - as the plasma is scanned from the edge to the core. These observations are consistent with a recently developed complex dynamics model that includes classical diffusion. *Supported by the National Science Foundation

  3. Dynamics of Turbulence Suppression in a Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Tiffany; Gilmore, Mark

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are currently being conducted in the the Helicon-Cathode Device (HelCat) at the University of New Mexico. The goal is to the study in detail the transition from a turbulent to a non-turbulent state in the presence of flow shear. HelCat has intrinsic fluctuations that have been identified as drift-waves. Using simple electrode biasing, it has been found that these fluctuations can be completely suppressed. In some extreme cases, a different instability, possibly the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, can be excited. Detailed studies are underway in order to understand the characteristics of each mode, and to elucidate the underlying physics that cause the change between an unstable plasma, and an instability-free plasma. Dynamics being observed include changes in flow profiles, both azimuthal and parallel, as well as changes in potential and temperature gradients. Further understanding is being sought using several computer codes developed at EPFL: a linear stability solver (LSS,footnotetextP. Ricci and B.N. Rogers (2009). Phys Plasmas 16, 062303. a one-dimensional PIC code/sheath solver, ODISEE,footnotetextJ. Loizu, P. Ricci, and C. Theiler (2011). Phys Rev E 83, 016406 and a global, 3D Braginski code, GBS.footnotetextRicci, Rogers (2009) A basic overview of results will be presented.

  4. TEST FOR WAVEVECTOR ANISOTROPIES IN PLASMA TURBULENCE CASCADES

    SciTech Connect

    Gary, S. Peter

    2013-05-20

    The frequency and wavevector matching conditions in nonlinear three-wave coupling are used to test whether the forward cascade of plasma turbulence may lead to wavevector anisotropies in a homogeneous, collisionless, magnetized plasma. Linear kinetic theory at {beta}{sub p} = 0.01, 0.10, and 1.0 is used to determine the frequency-wavenumber dispersion of three normal modes: long-wavelength Alfven-cyclotron waves, long-wavelength magnetosonic waves, and intermediate-wavelength magnetosonic-whistler waves. Using linear dispersion in the nonlinear matching conditions, the test predicts with one exception that forward cascades are favored by fluctuations propagating nearly perpendicular to the background magnetic field B{sub o}. This is consistent with the typical development of wavevector anisotropies with k >> k{sub Parallel-To} (subscripts refer to directions perpendicular and parallel to B{sub o}, respectively) in computer simulations of the forward cascade of various types of plasma turbulence. The exception is that, at {beta}{sub p} = 1.0, the test predicts that the cascade of long-wavelength magnetosonic waves should be favored by modes at k {approx} k{sub Parallel-To }.

  5. Turbulent equipartition and homogenization of plasma angular momentum.

    PubMed

    Gürcan, O D; Diamond, P H; Hahm, T S

    2008-04-01

    A physical model of turbulent equipartition (TEP) of plasma angular momentum is developed. We show that using a simple, model insensitive ansatz of conservation of total angular momentum, a TEP pinch of angular momentum can be obtained. We note that this term corresponds to a part of the pinch velocity previously calculated using quasilinear gyrokinetic theory. We observe that the nondiffusive TEP flux is inward, and therefore may explain the peakedness of the rotation profiles observed in certain experiments. Similar expressions for linear toroidal momentum and flow are computed and it is noted that there is an additional effect due the radial profile of moment of inertia density. PMID:18517961

  6. Turbulence and Proton–Electron Heating in Kinetic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthaeus, William H.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Wan, Minping; Wu, P.

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of particle-in-cell simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence reveals a connection between the strength of cascade, the total heating rate, and the partitioning of dissipated energy into proton heating and electron heating. A von Karman scaling of the cascade rate explains the total heating across several families of simulations. The proton to electron heating ratio increases in proportion to total heating. We argue that the ratio of gyroperiod to nonlinear turnover time at the ion kinetic scales controls the ratio of proton and electron heating. The proposed scaling is consistent with simulations.

  7. Length of magnetic field lines in turbulent plasmas.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Manuel

    2002-06-01

    An estimation of the length of any magnetic field line in a two-dimensional periodic magnetohydrodynamic problem is provided. This is done by using some classical function theory results on the analytic extension of the vector potential. The essential parameter, the maximum of this extension, may be analyzed in the case of turbulent plasmas by admitting the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan statistics, establishing in this way a relation between the length of any magnetic field line and the energy dissipation scale. (c) 2002 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779559

  8. Exploring turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas: the science of THOR mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retinò, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent magnetized plasmas. They are found in active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, as well as in the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. Turbulent plasmas are also found in laboratory devices such as e.g. tokamaks. Our comprehension of the plasma Universe is largely based on measurements of electromagnetic radiation such as light or X-rays which originate from particles that are heated and accelerated as a result of energy dissipation in turbulent environments. Therefore it is of key importance to study and understand how plasma is energized by turbulence. Most of the energy dissipation occurs at kinetic scales, where plasma no longer behaves as a fluid and the properties of individual plasma species (electrons, protons and other ions) become important. THOR (Turbulent Heating ObserveR - http://thor.irfu.se/) is a space mission currently in Study Phase as candidate for M-class mission within the Cosmic Vision program of the European Space Agency. The scientific theme of the THOR mission is turbulent energy dissipation and particle energization in space plasmas, which ties in with ESA's Cosmic Vision science. The main focus is on turbulence and shock processes, however areas where the different fundamental processes interact, such as reconnection in turbulence or shock generated turbulence, are also of high importance. The THOR mission aims to address fundamental questions such as how plasma is heated and particles are accelerated by turbulent fluctuations at kinetic scales, how energy is partitioned among different plasma components and how dissipation operates in different regimes of turbulence. To reach the goal, a careful design of the THOR spacecraft and its payload is ongoing, together with a strong interaction with numerical simulations. Here we present the science of THOR mission and we discuss implications of THOR observations for space

  9. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    Federrath, Christoph; Schober, Jennifer; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G.

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  10. Unified models of E-layer plasma turbulence from density gradients and Hall currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ehab; Litt, Sandeep; Horton, Wendell; Smolyakov, Andrei; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    The Earth's ionosphere is rich with plasma irregularities of scale-lengths extend from few centimeters to hundreds of kilometers. The combination of small-scale turbulence with large coherent structures is at the forefront of basic plasma turbulence theory. A new unified model for the small-scale plasma turbulence called Type-I and Type-II in the E-region ionosphere is presented. Simulations and a proposed laboratory experiment for these plasma waves in a weakly ionized plasma are reported. The ions [Argon in the lab and NO+ in the ionosphere] are collisional and the electrons ExB drifts produce Hall currents. The dispersion relations are analyzed for both density gradient and electron current driven instabilities. A basic understanding of the turbulence is important for forecasting disruptions in GNSS communication signals from RF signal scattering produced by the E-layer plasma turbulence on the 10cm to 10m scales lengths. NSF:AGS-0964692.

  11. Zonal flows and turbulence in fluids and plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jeffrey Bok-Cheung

    In geophysical and plasma contexts, zonal flows are well known to arise out of turbulence. We elucidate the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence without zonal flows to statistically inhomogeneous turbulence with steady zonal flows. Starting from the Hasegawa--Mima equation, we employ both the quasilinear approximation and a statistical average, which retains a great deal of the qualitative behavior of the full system. Within the resulting framework known as CE2, we extend recent understanding of the symmetry-breaking 'zonostrophic instability'. Zonostrophic instability can be understood in a very general way as the instability of some turbulent background spectrum to a zonally symmetric coherent mode. As a special case, the background spectrum can consist of only a single mode. We find that in this case the dispersion relation of zonostrophic instability from the CE2 formalism reduces exactly to that of the 4-mode truncation of generalized modulational instability. We then show that zonal flows constitute pattern formation amid a turbulent bath. Zonostrophic instability is an example of a Type I s instability of pattern-forming systems. The broken symmetry is statistical homogeneity. Near the bifurcation point, the slow dynamics of CE2 are governed by a well-known amplitude equation, the real Ginzburg-Landau equation. The important features of this amplitude equation, and therefore of the CE2 system, are multiple. First, the zonal flow wavelength is not unique. In an idealized, infinite system, there is a continuous band of zonal flow wavelengths that allow a nonlinear equilibrium. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets. These behaviors are shown numerically to hold in the CE2 system, and we calculate a stability diagram. The stability diagram is in agreement with direct numerical simulations of the quasilinear

  12. Turbulent convective flows in the solar photospheric plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroli, A.; Giannattasio, F.; Fanfoni, M.; Del Moro, D.; Consolini, G.; Berrilli, F.

    2015-10-01

    > The origin of the 22-year solar magnetic cycle lies below the photosphere where multiscale plasma motions, due to turbulent convection, produce magnetic fields. The most powerful intensity and velocity signals are associated with convection cells, called granules, with a scale of typically 1 Mm and a lifetime of a few minutes. Small-scale magnetic elements (SMEs), ubiquitous on the solar photosphere, are passively transported by associated plasma flows. This advection makes their traces very suitable for defining the convective regime of the photosphere. Therefore the solar photosphere offers an exceptional opportunity to investigate convective motions, associated with compressible, stratified, magnetic, rotating and large Rayleigh number stellar plasmas. The magnetograms used here come from a Hinode/SOT uninterrupted 25-hour sequence of spectropolarimetric images. The mean-square displacement of SMEs has been modelled with a power law with spectral index . We found for times up to and for times up to . An alternative way to investigate the advective-diffusive motion of SMEs is to look at the evolution of the two-dimensional probability distribution function (PDF) for the displacements. Although at very short time scales the PDFs are affected by pixel resolution, for times shorter than the PDFs seem to broaden symmetrically with time. In contrast, at longer times a multi-peaked feature of the PDFs emerges, which suggests the non-trivial nature of the diffusion-advection process of magnetic elements. A Voronoi distribution analysis shows that the observed small-scale distribution of SMEs involves the complex details of highly nonlinear small-scale interactions of turbulent convective flows detected in solar photospheric plasma.

  13. Enhanced current flow through a plasma cloud by induction of plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. E.

    1987-01-01

    Electrodynamic tethers have been proposed as a means of generating power in low earth orbit. One of the limitations on the power generated is the relatively low electron current that can be collected. It is proposed that the electron current can be significantly enhanced by means of current-induced plasma turbulence in a plasma cloud around the collecting anode. This is examined for the specific case of ion acoustic turbulence. An important conclusion is that the use of plasma clouds in the ionosphere will entail a high-impedance (no instability) and a low-impedance (ion acoustic instability) mode of operation. The low-impedance mode of operation will have two submodes, one steady state and one pulsed.

  14. Plasma flow, turbulence and magnetic islands in TJ-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, T.; Ascasíbar, E.; Blanco, E.; Cappa, A.; Hidalgo, C.; Ida, K.; López-Fraguas, A.; van Milligen, B. Ph

    2016-02-01

    The effect of magnetic islands on plasma flow and turbulence has been experimentally investigated in ohmically induced magnetic configuration scans at the stellarator TJ-II. This operational mode allows sweeping the radial position of a low order rational surface from the plasma core towards the edge in a controlled way, what reveals effects that are difficult to notice in scans performed on a shot to shot basis. The main diagnostic used in the present work is a two-channel Doppler reflectometer that allows the measurement of the perpendicular rotation velocity of the turbulence and density fluctuations with good spatial and temporal resolution. A characteristic signature of the n/m  =  3/2 magnetic island as it crosses the measurement position is clearly detected: the perpendicular flow reverses at the center of the magnetic island and a flow shear develops at the island boundaries. Fluctuations of the perpendicular flow and density have been also measured along the 3/2 magnetic island. An increase in the low frequency flow oscillations is measured at the magnetic island boundaries together with a reduction in the density fluctuation level; the later being more pronounced at the inner island boundary. These observations could explain the link between magnetic islands and transport barriers observed in a number of fusion devices.

  15. Galactic Cosmic Rays in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, V.; Washimi, H.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Adams, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    We report a next generation model of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) transport in the three dimensional heliosphere. Our model is based on an accurate three-dimensional representation of the heliospheric interface. This representation is obtained by taking into account the interaction between partially ionized, magnetized plasma flows of the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. Our model reveals that after entering the heliosphere GCRs are stored in the heliosheath for several years. The preferred GCR entry locations are near the nose of the heliopause and at high latitudes. Low-energy (hundreds of MeV) galactic ions observed in the heliosheath have spent, on average, a longer time in the solar wind than those observed in the inner heliosphere, which would explain their cooled-off spectra at these energies. We also discuss radial gradients in the heliosheath and the implications for future Voyager observations

  16. A Study of Heliospheric Modulation and Periodicities of Galactic Cosmic Rays During Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Partha; Kudela, K.; Moon, Y.-J.

    2016-02-01

    Galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) are energetic, charged particles coming from outside the solar system. These particles encounter an outward-moving turbulent solar wind with cyclic magnetic-field fluctuations when entering the heliosphere. This causes convection and diffusion in the heliosphere. The GCR counts detected by the ground-based neutron-monitor stations show intensity changes with a fluctuation of ˜ 11 years and are anti-correlated with the sunspot numbers with some time lags. GCRs experience various types of modulation from different solar activity features and are important components of space weather. The previous solar cycle, Cycle 23, has shown anomalous behavior with a prolonged deep minimum, which was characterized by a record-setting high Galactic cosmic-ray flux observed at Earth. Solar Cycle 24 started much later than expected and progressed sluggishly toward its maxima. In this paper, we study the heliospheric modulation and intermediate-term periodicities of GCRs during the ascending phase of Cycle 24. We utilize simultaneous solar, interplanetary plasma, magnetic field, and geomagnetic activity data including the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet, and we study their relation with GCRs. The wavelet power spectrum of GCRs exhibits the presence of a variety of prominent short- and mid-term periodicities including the well-known Rieger and quasi-biennial periodicities. Possible explanations of the observed results are discussed in the light of numerical models.

  17. A region of intense plasma wave turbulence on auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a detailed study of the plasma wave turbulence observed by HAWKEYE-1 and IMP-6 on high latitude auroral field lines and investigates the relationship of this turbulence to magnetic field and plasma measurements obtained in the same region.

  18. Ion-cyclotron turbulence and diagonal double layers in a magnetospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liperovskiy, V. A.; Pudovkin, M. I.; Skuridin, G. A.; Shalimov, S. L.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of current concepts regarding electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence (theory and experiment), and regarding inclined double potential layers in the magnetospheric plasma is presented. Anomalous resistance governed by electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence, and one-dimensional and two-dimensional models of double electrostatic layers in the magnetospheric plasma are examined.

  19. TOWARD A THEORY OF ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMA TURBULENCE AT SUBPROTON SCALES

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav; Horaites, Konstantinos; Xia, Qian; Perez, Jean Carlos

    2013-11-01

    We present an analytical study of subproton electromagnetic fluctuations in a collisionless plasma with a plasma beta of the order of unity. In the linear limit, a rigorous derivation from the kinetic equation is conducted focusing on the role and physical properties of kinetic-Alfvén and whistler waves. Then, nonlinear fluid-like equations for kinetic-Alfvén waves and whistler modes are derived, with special emphasis on the similarities and differences in the corresponding plasma dynamics. The kinetic-Alfvén modes exist in the lower-frequency region of phase space, ω << k v{sub Ti} , where they are described by the kinetic-Alfvén system. These modes exist both below and above the ion-cyclotron frequency. The whistler modes, which are qualitatively different from the kinetic-Alfvén modes, occupy a different region of phase space, k v{sub Ti} << ω << k{sub z}v{sub Te} , and they are described by the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) system or the reduced electron MHD system if the propagation is oblique. Here, k{sub z} and k are the wavenumbers along and transverse to the background magnetic field, respectively, and v{sub Ti} and v{sub Te} are the ion and electron thermal velocities, respectively. The models of subproton plasma turbulence are discussed and the results of numerical simulations are presented. We also point out possible implications for solar-wind observations.

  20. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulation of tokamak plasmas: enhanced heat loss due to cross-scale coupling of plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Candy, J.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is dominated by the complex nonlinear dynamics of plasma turbulence. In magnetically confined plasmas used for fusion energy research, turbulence is responsible for cross-field transport that limits the performance of tokamak reactors. We report a set of novel gyrokinetic simulations that capture ion and electron-scale turbulence simultaneously, revealing the dynamics of cross-scale energy transfer and zonal flow modification that give rise to heat losses. Multi-scale simulations are required to match experimental ion and electron heat fluxes and electron profile stiffness, establishing the applicability of the newly discovered physics to experiment. Importantly, these results provide a likely explanation for the loss of electron heat from tokamak plasmas, the ‘great unsolved problem’ (Bachelor et al (2007 Plasma Sci. Technol. 9 312-87)) in plasma turbulence and the projected dominant loss channel in ITER.

  1. Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.; Rogers, B. N.; Ricci, P.; Gentle, K. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-05-15

    Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas are explored with global three-dimensional fluid simulations, focusing on the parameters of the Helimak experiment. The simulations show that plasma turbulence and transport in the regime of interest are dominated by the ideal interchange instability. The application of a bias voltage alters the structure of the plasma potential, resulting in the equilibrium sheared flows.These bias-induced vertical flows located in the gradient region appear to reduce the radial extent of turbulent structures,and thereby lower the radial plasma transport on the low field side.

  2. Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory for the Heliospheric Data Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Armstrong, T. P.; Hill, M. E.; Lal, N.; McGuire, R. E.; McKibben, R. B.; Narock, T. W.; Szabo, A.; Tranquille, C.

    2007-01-01

    The heliosphere is pervaded by interplanetary energetic particles, traditionally also called cosmic rays, from solar, internal heliospheric, and galactic sources. The particles species of interest to heliophysics extend from plasma energies to the GeV energies of galactic cosmic rays still measurably affected by heliospheric modulation and the still higher energies contributing to atmospheric ionization. The NASA and international Heliospheric Network of operational and legacy spacecraft measures interplanetary fluxes of these particles. Spatial coverage extends from the inner heliosphere and geospace to the heliosheath boundary region now being traversed by Voyager 1 and soon by Voyager 2. Science objectives include investigation of solar flare and coronal mass ejection events, acceleration and transport of interplanetary particles within the inner heliosphere, cosmic ray interactions with planetary surfaces and atmospheres, sources of suprathermal and anomalous cosmic ray ions in the outer heliosphere, and solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. The Virtual Energetic Particle Observatory (VEPO) will improve access and usability of selected spacecraft and sub-orbital NASA heliospheric energetic particle data sets as a newly approved effort within the evolving heliophysics virtual observatory environment. In this presentation, we will describe current VEPO science requirements, our initial priorities and an overview of our strategy to implement VEPO rapidly and at minimal cost by working within the high-level framework of the Virtual Heliospheric Observatory (VHO). VEPO will also leverage existing data services of NASA's Space Physics Data Facility and other existing capabilities of the U.S. and international heliospheric research communities.

  3. Three-Fluid Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of the Solar Wind in the Outer Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Matthaeus, William H.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a three-fluid, fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of the solar wind plasma in the outer heliosphere as a co-moving system of solar wind protons, electrons, and interstellar pickup protons, with separate energy equations for each species. Our approach takes into account the effects of electron heat conduction and dissipation of Alfvenic turbulence on the spatial evolution of the solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic fields. The turbulence transport model is based on the Reynolds decomposition of physical variables into mean and fluctuating components and uses the turbulent phenomenologies that describe the conversion of fluctuation energy into heat due to a turbulent cascade. We solve the coupled set of the three-fluid equations for the mean-field solar wind and the turbulence equations for the turbulence energy, cross helicity, and correlation length. The equations are written in the rotating frame of reference and include heating by turbulent dissipation, energy transfer from interstellar pickup protons to solar wind protons, and solar wind deceleration due to the interaction with the interstellar hydrogen. The numerical solution is constructed by the time relaxation method in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU. Initial results from the novel model are presented.

  4. Anisotropy of the energetic neutral atom flux in the heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruntman, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the energetic neutral atoms born at the heliospheric interface are considered for plasma flow structure resulting from a two-shock model of the interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium. The energy distributions of heliospheric energetic neutral atoms (HELENAs) are calculated and it is shown that the HELENA flux is highly anisotropic at the earth's orbit. The characteristics of the HELENA flux are highly sensitive to the size of the heliosphere. This supports the conclusion that measurements of HELENAs from the earth's orbit would provide an efficient tool to remotely study the heliosphere.

  5. Effects of Plasma Shaping on Nonlinear Gyrokinetic Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    E. A. Belli; Hammett, G. W.; Dorland, W.

    2008-08-01

    The effects of flux surface shape on the gyrokinetic stability and transport of tokamak plasmas are studied using the GS2 code [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88, 128 (1995); W. Dorland, F. Jenko, M. Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)]. Studies of the scaling of nonlinear turbulence with shaping parameters are performed using analytic equilibria based on interpolations of representative shapes of the Joint European Torus (JET) [P.H. Rebut and B.E. Keen, Fusion Technol. 11, 13 (1987)]. High shaping is found to be a stabilizing influence on both the linear ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability and the nonlinear ITG turbulence. For the parameter regime studied here, a scaling of the heat flux with elongation of χ ~ κ-1.5 or κ-2.0, depending on the triangularity, is observed at fixed average temperature gradient. While this is not as strong as empirical elongation scalings, it is also found that high shaping results in a larger Dimits upshift of the nonlinear critical temperature gradient due to an enhancement of the Rosenbluth-Hinton residual zonal flows.

  6. Plasma beta control of scaling of solar wind turbulent structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safrankova, Jana; Nemecek, Zdenek; Nemec, Frantisek; Prech, Lubomir; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Zastenker, Georgy N.

    2016-04-01

    The high-time resolution of Spektr-R plasma measurements allows us to make direct observations of solar wind turbulence below ion kinetic length scales. The paper analyzes solar wind power spectra of bulk and thermal speeds that are computed with a time resolution of 32 ms in the frequency range of 0.001-2 Hz. The statistics based on more than 5000 of individual spectra shows that: (1) the spectra of bulk and thermal speeds can be fitted by two power-law segments; (2) despite their large variations, the parameters characterizing frequency spectra fits computed on each particular time interval are very similar for both quantities; (3) the median slopes of the segment attributed to the MHD scale are ‑1.43 and ‑1.38, respectively for the bulk and thermal speeds, whereas those in the kinetic scale are ‑3.08 and ‑2.43, respectively; (4) the break between both MHD and kinetic scales is controlled the ion beta; and (5) the power index corresponding to kinetic turbulence depends on a level of the density variations in the high beta solar wind, whereas the ion gyromotion determines it for low beta intervals.

  7. Kinetic theory of weak turbulence in magnetized plasmas: Perpendicular propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Peter H.

    2015-08-15

    The present paper formulates a weak turbulence theory in which electromagnetic perturbations are assumed to propagate in directions perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. By assuming that all wave vectors lie in one direction transverse to the ambient magnetic field, the linear solution and second-order nonlinear solutions to the equation for the perturbed distribution function are obtained. Nonlinear perturbed current from the second-order nonlinearity is derived in general form, but the limiting situation of cold plasma temperature is taken in order to derive an explicit nonlinear wave kinetic equation that describes three-wave decay/coalescence interactions among X and Z modes. A potential application of the present formalism is also discussed.

  8. Transport equations for lower hybrid waves in a turbulent plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Horton, W.; Galvao, R. M. O.; Elskens, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Injection and control of intense lower hybrid (LH) wave spectra is required to achieve steady state tokamak operation in the new WEST tokamak at CEA France. The tungsten [W] environment [E] steadytstate [S] tokamak [T] has two high-power [20 MW] lower hybrid antennas launching 3.7 GHz polarized waves for steady fusion-grade plasmas control. The wave propagation and scattering is described in by ray equations in the presence of the drift wave turbulence. Theory for the wave transport equations for propagation of the wave momentum and energy densities are derived from the Wigner function method of QM. The limits of the diffraction and scattering for ray transport theory are established. Comparisons are made between the wave propagation in WEST and ITER tokamaks. Supported by the University of Texas at Austin; PIIM/CNRS at Aix-Marseille University and University of Sao Paulo.

  9. Developed turbulence and nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Meinecke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bell, Anthony; Bingham, Robert; Clarke, Robert; Churazov, Eugene; Crowston, Robert; Doyle, Hugo; Drake, R. Paul; Heathcote, Robert; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lee, Dongwook; MacDonald, Michael; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Park, Hye-Sook; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Youichi; Wan, Willow; Woolsey, Nigel; Yurchak, Roman; Miniati, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander; Lamb, Don; Gregori, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The visible matter in the universe is turbulent and magnetized. Turbulence in galaxy clusters is produced by mergers and by jets of the central galaxies and believed responsible for the amplification of magnetic fields. We report on experiments looking at the collision of two laser-produced plasma clouds, mimicking, in the laboratory, a cluster merger event. By measuring the spectrum of the density fluctuations, we infer developed, Kolmogorov-like turbulence. From spectral line broadening, we estimate a level of turbulence consistent with turbulent heating balancing radiative cooling, as it likely does in galaxy clusters. We show that the magnetic field is amplified by turbulent motions, reaching a nonlinear regime that is a precursor to turbulent dynamo. Thus, our experiment provides a promising platform for understanding the structure of turbulence and the amplification of magnetic fields in the universe. PMID:26100873

  10. Developed turbulence and nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas.

    PubMed

    Meinecke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bell, Anthony; Bingham, Robert; Clarke, Robert; Churazov, Eugene; Crowston, Robert; Doyle, Hugo; Drake, R Paul; Heathcote, Robert; Koenig, Michel; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Kuranz, Carolyn; Lee, Dongwook; MacDonald, Michael; Murphy, Christopher; Notley, Margaret; Park, Hye-Sook; Pelka, Alexander; Ravasio, Alessandra; Reville, Brian; Sakawa, Youichi; Wan, Willow; Woolsey, Nigel; Yurchak, Roman; Miniati, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander; Lamb, Don; Gregori, Gianluca

    2015-07-01

    The visible matter in the universe is turbulent and magnetized. Turbulence in galaxy clusters is produced by mergers and by jets of the central galaxies and believed responsible for the amplification of magnetic fields. We report on experiments looking at the collision of two laser-produced plasma clouds, mimicking, in the laboratory, a cluster merger event. By measuring the spectrum of the density fluctuations, we infer developed, Kolmogorov-like turbulence. From spectral line broadening, we estimate a level of turbulence consistent with turbulent heating balancing radiative cooling, as it likely does in galaxy clusters. We show that the magnetic field is amplified by turbulent motions, reaching a nonlinear regime that is a precursor to turbulent dynamo. Thus, our experiment provides a promising platform for understanding the structure of turbulence and the amplification of magnetic fields in the universe. PMID:26100873

  11. Non-thermal Dupree diffusivity and shielding effects on atomic collisions in astrophysical turbulent plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2016-02-01

    The influence of non-thermal Dupree turbulence and the plasma shielding on the electron-ion collision is investigated in astrophysical non-thermal Lorentzian turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal analysis and the effective interaction potential including the Lorentzian far-field term are employed to obtain the eikonal scattering phase shift and the eikonal collision cross section as functions of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, Debye length and spectral index of the astrophysical Lorentzian plasma. It is shown that the non-thermal effect suppresses the eikonal scattering phase shift. However, it enhances the eikonal collision cross section in astrophysical non-thermal turbulent plasmas. The effect of non-thermal turbulence on the eikonal atomic collision cross section is weakened with increasing collision energy. The variation of the atomic cross section due to the non-thermal Dupree turbulence is also discussed.

  12. Interstellar turbulence model : A self-consistent coupling of plasma and neutral fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Zank, Gary P.; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2006-09-26

    We present results of a preliminary investigation of interstellar turbulence based on a self-consistent two-dimensional fluid simulation model. Our model describes a partially ionized magnetofluid interstellar medium (ISM) that couples a neutral hydrogen fluid to a plasma through charge exchange interactions and assumes that the ISM turbulent correlation scales are much bigger than the shock characteristic length-scales, but smaller than the charge exchange mean free path length-scales. The shocks have no influence on the ISM turbulent fluctuations. We find that nonlinear interactions in coupled plasma-neutral ISM turbulence are influenced substantially by charge exchange processes.

  13. Azimuthal inhomogeneity of turbulence structure and its impact on intermittent particle transport in linear magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, T.; Inagaki, S.; Sasaki, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Kasuya, N.; Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kosuga, Y.; Arakawa, H.; Yamada, T.; Miwa, Y.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-15

    Fluctuation component in the turbulence regime is found to be azimuthally localized at a phase of the global coherent modes in a linear magnetized plasma PANTA. Spatial distribution of squared bicoherence is given in the azimuthal cross section as an indicator of nonlinear energy transfer function from the global coherent mode to the turbulence. Squared bicoherence is strong at a phase where the turbulence amplitude is large. As a result of the turbulence localization, time evolution of radial particle flux becomes bursty. Statistical features such as skewness and kurtosis are strongly modified by the localized turbulence component, although contribution to mean particle flux profile is small.

  14. Permutation entropy and statistical complexity analysis of turbulence in laboratory plasmas and the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Weck, P J; Schaffner, D A; Brown, M R; Wicks, R T

    2015-02-01

    The Bandt-Pompe permutation entropy and the Jensen-Shannon statistical complexity are used to analyze fluctuating time series of three different turbulent plasmas: the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the plasma wind tunnel of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX), drift-wave turbulence of ion saturation current fluctuations in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD), and fully developed turbulent magnetic fluctuations of the solar wind taken from the Wind spacecraft. The entropy and complexity values are presented as coordinates on the CH plane for comparison among the different plasma environments and other fluctuation models. The solar wind is found to have the highest permutation entropy and lowest statistical complexity of the three data sets analyzed. Both laboratory data sets have larger values of statistical complexity, suggesting that these systems have fewer degrees of freedom in their fluctuations, with SSX magnetic fluctuations having slightly less complexity than the LAPD edge I(sat). The CH plane coordinates are compared to the shape and distribution of a spectral decomposition of the wave forms. These results suggest that fully developed turbulence (solar wind) occupies the lower-right region of the CH plane, and that other plasma systems considered to be turbulent have less permutation entropy and more statistical complexity. This paper presents use of this statistical analysis tool on solar wind plasma, as well as on an MHD turbulent experimental plasma. PMID:25768612

  15. Magnetized Jets Driven by the Sun, the Structure of the Heliosphere Revisited: Consequences for Draping of BISM ahead of the HP and Time Variability of ENAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opher, M.; Drake, J. F.; Zieger, B.; Michael, A.; Toth, G.; Swisdak, M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    Recently we proposed (Opher et al. 2015) that the structure of the heliosphere might be very different than we previously thought. The classic accepted view of the heliosphere is a quiescent, comet-like shape aligned in the direction of the Sun's travel through the interstellar medium (ISM) extending for thousands of astronomical units. We have shown, based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, that the tension force of the twisted magnetic field of the Sun confines the solar wind plasma beyond the termination shock and drives jets to the north and south very much like astrophysical jets. These heliospheric jets are deflected into the tail region by the motion of the Sun through the ISM. As in some astrophysical jets the interstellar wind blows the two jets into the tail but is not strong enough to force the lobes into a single comet-like tail. Instead, the interstellar wind flows around the heliosphere and into the equatorial region between the two jets. We show that the heliospheric jets are turbulent (due to large-scale MHD instabilities and reconnection) and strongly mix the solar wind with the ISM. The resulting turbulence has important implications for particle acceleration in the heliosphere. The two-lobe structure is consistent with the energetic neutral atom (ENA) images of the heliotail from IBEX where two lobes are visible in the north and south and the suggestion from the Cassini ENAs that the heliosphere is "tailless." The new structure of the heliosphere is supported by recent analytic work (Drake et al. 2015) that shows that even in high β heliosheath the magnetic field plays a crucial role in funneling the solar wind in two jets. Here we present these recent results and show that the heliospheric jets mediate the draping of the magnetic field and the conditions ahead of the heliopause. We show that reconnection between the interstellar and solar magnetic field both at the flanks of the jets and in between them twist the interstellar magnetic

  16. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    PubMed

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  17. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence. PMID:27561246

  18. ECE Imaging of Broadband Turbulence in DIII-D Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemedkun, S. E.; Munsat, T.; Tobias, B. J.; Donier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.

    2013-10-01

    Observations of 2D turbulent structures have been performed with the ECEI instrument on DIII-D in plasmas heated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron heating (ECH), at a fixed heating power (up to 5 MW). Correlation techniques similar to those used in correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) systems are employed, with the advantage that the ECEI system detects a full 2D array of plasma locations; vertical separation is provided by an optical system and horizontal separation is provided by frequency discrimination in the detection electronics. Among the results are 2D images of poloidally-propagating drift waves, and correlation properties of fluctuations (<200 kHz) in the poloidal direction. Observed dispersion relations for two different heating conditions (ECH and NBI) will be presented. Comparison of results with simulations using GEM code will be discussed. In addition to the physics results, the data demonstrates the viability of the ECEI system in the presence of ECH heating. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-05ER54816, DE-SC0003913, DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC02-09CH11466, and DE-FG02-99ER54531.

  19. Investigation of turbulence in reversed field pinch plasma by using microwave imaging reflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Z. B.; Nagayama, Y.; Hamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, S.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.; Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Michael, C. A.; Yambe, K.

    2011-10-15

    Turbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP) plasma has been investigated by using the microwave imaging reflectometry in the toroidal pinch experiment RX (TPE-RX). In conventional RFP plasma, the fluctuations are dominated by the intermittent blob-like structures. These structures are accompanied with the generation of magnetic field, the strong turbulence, and high nonlinear coupling among the high and low k modes. The pulsed poloidal current drive operation, which improves the plasma confinement significantly, suppresses the dynamo, the turbulence, and the blob-like structures.

  20. Gaussianity versus intermittency in solar system plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echim, M.

    2014-12-01

    Statistical properties of plasma and magnetic field fluctuations exhibit features linked with the dynamics of the targeted system and sometimes with the physical processes that are at the origin of these fluctuations. Intermittency is sometimes discussed in terms of non-Gaussianity of the Probability Distribution Functions (PDFs) of fluctuations for ranges of spatio/temporal scales. Some examples of self-similarity have been however shown for PDFs whose wings are not Gaussian. In this study we discuss intermittency in terms of non-Gaussianity as well as scale dependence of the higher order moments of PDFs, in particular the flatness. We use magnetic field and plasma data from several space missions, in the solar wind (Ulysses, Cluster, and Venus Express), and in the planetary magnetosheaths (Cluster and Venus Express). We analyze Ulysses data that satisfy a consolidated set of selection criteria able to identify "pure" fast and slow wind. We investigate Venus Express data close to the orbital apogee, in the solar wind, at 0.72 AU, and in the Venus magnetosheath. We study Cluster data in the solar wind (for time intervals not affected by planetary ions effects), and the magnetosheath. We organize our results in three solar wind data bases (one for the solar maximum, 1999-2001, two for the solar minimum, 1997-1998 and respectively, 2007-2008), and two planetary databases (one for the solar maximum, 2000-2001, that includes PDFs obtained in the terrestrial magnetosphere, and one for the solar minimum, 2007-2008, that includes PDFs obtained in the terrestrial and Venus magnetospheres and magnetosheaths). In addition to investigating the statistical properties of fluctuations for the minimum and maximum of the solar cycle we also analyze the similarities and differences between fast and slow wind. We emphasize the importance of our data survey and analysis in the context of understanding the solar wind turbulence and complexity, and the exploitation of data bases and as

  1. Recent Developments in Reconnection Theory: the Plasmoid Instability, Self-Generated Turbulence, and Implications for Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, new developments in reconnection theory have challenged classical nonlinear reconnection models. One of these developments is the so-called plasmoid instability of thin current sheets that grows at super-Alfvenic growth rates. Within the resistive MHD model, this instability alters qualitatively the predictions of the Sweet-Parker model, leading to a new nonlinear regime of fast reconnection in which the reconnection rate itself becomes independent of S. This regime has also been seen in Hall MHD as well as fully kinetic simulations, and thus appears to be a universal feature of thin current sheet dynamics, including applications to reconnection forced by the solar wind in the heliosphere and spontaneously unstable sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks. Plasmoids, which can grow by coalescence to large sizes, provide a powerful mechanism for coupling between global and kinetic scales as well as an efficient accelerator of particles to high energies. In two dimensions, the plasmoids are characterized by power-law distribution functions followed by exponential tails. In three dimensions, the instability produces self-generated and strongly anisotropic turbulence in which the reconnection rate for the mean-fields remain approximately at the two-dimensional value, but the energy spectra deviate significantly from anisotropic strong MHD turbulence phenomenology. A new phase diagram of fast reconnection has been proposed, guiding the design of future experiments in magnetically confined and high-energy-density plasmas, and have important implications for explorations of the reconnection layer in the recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission. This research is supported by DOE, NASA, and NSF.

  2. Interhelioprobe Mission for Solar and Heliospheric Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Zelenyi, Lev; Zimovets, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    A new concept has been adopted for the Interhelioprobe mission intended for studying the inner heliosphere and the Sun at short distances and from out-of-ecliptic positions. In accordance with this concept, two identical SC spaced by a quarter of a period on heliocentric orbits inclined to the ecliptic plane in different directions will orbit the Sun, thus ensuring continuous out-of-ecliptic solar observations and measurements in the heliosphere. The scientific payload will comprise instruments for remote observations of the Sun (Optical photometer, Magnetograph, Chemical Composition Analyzer, EUV Imager-Spectrometer, Coronagraph, X-ray Imager, Heliospheric Imager, X-ray Polarimeter, and Gamma-Spectrometers) and in-situ measurements in the heliosphere (Solar Wind Ion Analyzer, Solar Wind Electron Analyzer, Solar Wind Plasma Analyzers, Energetic Particle Telescope, Neutron Detector, Magnetic Wave Complex, Magnetometer, and Radio Spectrometer Detector). The instruments will study the structure and dynamics of the magnetic fields and plasma flows in the polar regions of the Sun, solar flares and mass ejections, the heating of the solar corona and solar wind acceleration, acceleration and propagation of energetic particles in the Sun and heliosphere, the solar wind, as well as disturbances and ejections that come from the Sun to the Earth and control space weather in the near-Earth space. The schedule of the mission and the development status of the instruments and the spacecraft are provided.

  3. Alfvén wave collisions, the fundamental building block of plasma turbulence. IV. Laboratory experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, D. J.; Schroeder, J. W. R.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Skiff, F.; Carter, T. A.; Auerbach, D. W.

    2013-07-15

    Turbulence is a phenomenon found throughout space and astrophysical plasmas. It plays an important role in solar coronal heating, acceleration of the solar wind, and heating of the interstellar medium. Turbulence in these regimes is dominated by Alfvén waves. Most turbulence theories have been established using ideal plasma models, such as incompressible MHD. However, there has been no experimental evidence to support the use of such models for weakly to moderately collisional plasmas which are relevant to various space and astrophysical plasma environments. We present the first experiment to measure the nonlinear interaction between two counterpropagating Alfvén waves, which is the building block for astrophysical turbulence theories. We present here four distinct tests that demonstrate conclusively that we have indeed measured the daughter Alfvén wave generated nonlinearly by a collision between counterpropagating Alfvén waves.

  4. Models for the probability densities of the turbulent plasma flux in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, A. S.; Fredriksen, Å; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas indicate that plasma losses can be due to coherent structures or bursts of plasma rather than a classical random walk or diffusion process. A model for synthetic data based on coherent plasma flux events is proposed, where all basic properties can be obtained analytically in terms of a few control parameters. One basic parameter in the present case is the density of burst events in a long time-record, together with parameters in a model of the individual pulse shapes and the statistical distribution of these parameters. The model and its extensions give the probability density of the plasma flux. An interesting property of the model is a prediction of a near-parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis of the statistical flux distribution for a wide range of parameters. The model is generalized by allowing for an additive random noise component. When this noise dominates the signal we can find a transition to standard results for Gaussian random noise. Applications of the model are illustrated by data from the toroidal Blaamann plasma.

  5. Sentinels of the Heliosphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    Heliophysics describes the study of the Sun, its atmosphere or the heliosphere, and the planets within it as a system. This visualization tours areas from the Sun to the boundary between the Sun an...

  6. A 'Squashed' Heliosphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    Number 2 in the Top 5 Solar Discoveries is the finding of the 'squashed' heliosphere when Voyager 1 and 2 crossed the bubble of solar wind at different distances from the sun. This led to a change ...

  7. A Squashed Heliosphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    Heliophysics' finding of the 'squashed' heliosphere when Voyager 1 and 2 crossed the bubble of solar wind at different distances from the sun. This led to a change in the way we see the shape of ou...

  8. Approaching the investigation of plasma turbulence through a rigorous verification and validation procedure: A practical examplea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Riva, F.; Theiler, C.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Halpern, F. D.; Loizu, J.

    2015-05-01

    In the present work, a Verification and Validation procedure is presented and applied showing, through a practical example, how it can contribute to advancing our physics understanding of plasma turbulence. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, in particular, the computational fluid dynamics community, a rigorous methodology for the verification of a plasma simulation code is presented, based on the method of manufactured solutions. This methodology assesses that the model equations are correctly solved, within the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme. The technique to carry out a solution verification is described to provide a rigorous estimate of the uncertainty affecting the numerical results. A methodology for plasma turbulence code validation is also discussed, focusing on quantitative assessment of the agreement between experiments and simulations. The Verification and Validation methodology is then applied to the study of plasma turbulence in the basic plasma physics experiment TORPEX [Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)], considering both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations carried out with the GBS code [Ricci et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 124047 (2012)]. The validation procedure allows progress in the understanding of the turbulent dynamics in TORPEX, by pinpointing the presence of a turbulent regime transition, due to the competition between the resistive and ideal interchange instabilities.

  9. Approaching the investigation of plasma turbulence through a rigorous verification and validation procedure: A practical example

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, P. Riva, F.; Theiler, C.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Halpern, F. D.; Loizu, J.

    2015-05-15

    In the present work, a Verification and Validation procedure is presented and applied showing, through a practical example, how it can contribute to advancing our physics understanding of plasma turbulence. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, in particular, the computational fluid dynamics community, a rigorous methodology for the verification of a plasma simulation code is presented, based on the method of manufactured solutions. This methodology assesses that the model equations are correctly solved, within the order of accuracy of the numerical scheme. The technique to carry out a solution verification is described to provide a rigorous estimate of the uncertainty affecting the numerical results. A methodology for plasma turbulence code validation is also discussed, focusing on quantitative assessment of the agreement between experiments and simulations. The Verification and Validation methodology is then applied to the study of plasma turbulence in the basic plasma physics experiment TORPEX [Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)], considering both two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations carried out with the GBS code [Ricci et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 54, 124047 (2012)]. The validation procedure allows progress in the understanding of the turbulent dynamics in TORPEX, by pinpointing the presence of a turbulent regime transition, due to the competition between the resistive and ideal interchange instabilities.

  10. The Heliosphere in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Hanson, A. J.; Fu, P. C.

    2008-12-01

    A scientifically accurate visualization of the Journey of the Sun through deep space has been created in order to share the excitement of heliospheric physics and scientific discovery with the non-expert. The MHD heliosphere model of Linde (1998) displays the interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium for a supersonic heliosphere traveling through a low density magnetized interstellar medium. The camera viewpoint follows the solar motion through a virtual space of the Milky Way Galaxy. This space is constructed from real data placed in the three-dimensional solar neighborhood, and populated with Hipparcos stars in front of a precisely aligned image of the Milky Way itself. The celestial audio track of this three minute movie includes the music of the heliosphere, heard by the two Voyager satellites as 3 kHz emissions from the edge of the heliosphere. This short heliosphere visualization can be downloaded from http://www.cs.indiana.edu/~soljourn/pub/AstroBioScene7Sound.mov, and the full scientific data visualization of the Solar Journey is available commercially.

  11. Influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Myoung-Jae; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-12-15

    The influence of Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance for the electron-ion collision is investigated in turbulent plasmas. The second-order eikonal method and the effective Dupree potential term associated with the plasma turbulence are employed to obtain the occurrence scattering time as a function of the diffusion coefficient, impact parameter, collision energy, thermal energy, and Debye length. The result shows that the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the Dupree diffusivity. Hence, we have found that the influence of plasma turbulence diminishes the occurrence time advance in forward electron-ion collisions in thermal turbulent plasmas. The occurrence time advance shows that the propensity of the occurrence time advance increases with increasing scattering angle. It is also found that the effect of turbulence due to the Dupree diffusivity on the occurrence scattering time advance decreases with an increase of the thermal energy. In addition, the variation of the plasma turbulence on the occurrence scattering time advance due to the plasma parameters is also discussed.

  12. Electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence in finite-beta helical plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Nakajima, N.; Maeyama, S.

    2014-05-15

    A saturation mechanism for microturbulence in a regime of weak zonal flow generation is investigated by means of electromagnetic gyrokinetic simulations. The study identifies a new saturation process of the kinetic ballooning mode (KBM) turbulence originating from the spatial structure of the KBM instabilities in a finite-beta Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma. Specifically, the most unstable KBM in LHD has an inclined mode structure with respect to the mid-plane of a torus, i.e., it has a finite radial wave-number in flux tube coordinates, in contrast to KBMs in tokamaks as well as ion-temperature gradient modes in tokamaks and helical systems. The simulations reveal that the growth of KBMs in LHD is saturated by nonlinear interactions of oppositely inclined convection cells through mutual shearing as well as by the zonal flow. The saturation mechanism is quantitatively investigated by analysis of the nonlinear entropy transfer that shows not only the mutual shearing but also a self-interaction with an elongated mode structure along the magnetic field line.

  13. Onsager's symmetry relation and the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a magnetized plasma with electrostatic turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yang Wang, Shaojie

    2014-09-15

    The physics of the residual parallel Reynolds stress in a rotating plasma with electrostatic turbulence is explicitly identified by using the transport formulation of the gyrokinetic turbulence. It is clarified that the residual stress consists of four terms, among which are the cross terms due to the pressure gradient and the temperature gradient and the terms related to the turbulent acceleration impulse and the turbulent heating rate. The last two terms are identified for the first time, and are shown to cause analogous residual term in the heat flux. Meanwhile, the transport matrix reveals diffusion in the phase space. The transport matrix is demonstrated to satisfy the Onsager's symmetry relation.

  14. Report of the cosmic and heliospheric panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewaldt, Richard A.; Mason, Glenn M.; Barnes, Aaron; Binns, W. Robert; Burlaga, Leonard F.; Cherry, Michael L.; Holzer, Thomas E.; Jokipii, J. R.; Jones, Vernon; Ling, James C.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic and Heliospheric Branch proposes a bold new program for the years 1995 to 2010 that is centered on the following two themes: (1) the global heliosphere and interstellar space; and (2) cosmic particle acceleration and the evolution of matter. Within these major themes are more specific goals that have been studied and continue to be examined for a better understanding of their processes. These include: origin, structure, and evolution of the solar wind; interaction of the heliosphere, the solar wind, and the interstellar medium; fundamental microscopic and macroscopic plasma processes; acceleration and transport of energetic particles; and the origin and evolution of matter. Finally, the report summarizes a wide variety of proposed small and large space missions.

  15. Feedback control of plasma instabilities with charged particle beams and study of plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tham, Philip Kin-Wah

    1994-01-01

    . A plasma instability is usually observed in its saturated state and appears as a single feature in the frequency spectrum with a single azimuthal and parallel wavenumbers. The physics of the non-zero spectral width was investigated in detail because the finite spectral width can cause "turbulent" transport. One aspect of the "turbulence" was investigated by obtaining the scaling of the linear growth rate of the instabilities with the fluctuation levels. The linear growth rates were measured with the established gated feedback technique. The research showed that the ExB instability evolves into a quasi-coherent state when the fluctuation level is high. The coherent aspects were studied with a bispectral analysis. Moreover, the single spectral feature was discovered to be actually composed of a few radial harmonics. The radial harmonics play a role in the nonlinear saturation of the instability via three-wave coupling.

  16. Studies of Zonal Flows Driven by Drift Mode Turbulence in Laboratory and Space Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, R.; Trines, R.; Dunlop, M. W.; Davies, J. A.; Bamford, R. A.; Mendonca, J. T.; Silva, L. O.; Shukla, P. K.; Vaivads, A.; Mori, W. B.; Tynan, G.

    2008-10-15

    The interaction between broadband drift mode turbulence and zonal flows is an important topic associated with transport at plasma boundaries. The generation of zonal flows by the modulational instability of broad band drift waves has resulted in the observation of self organized solitary wave structures at the magnetopause. To understand these structures and their importance to future burning plasmas and space plasmas we have developed a unique numerical simulation code that describes drift wave--zonal flow turbulence. We show that observations by cluster spacecraft confirms the role of drift wave zonal flow turbulence at the Earth's magnetopause and further demonstrates that the magnetopause boundary acts in a s similar manner to transport barriers in tokamak fusion devices. Thus cementing the relationship between the plasma physics of laboratory devices and space plasmas.

  17. Ionospheric plasma Turbulence detection in the VLF data observed by DEMETER Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondhiya, Deepak Kumar; Gwal, Ashok Kumar; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-07-01

    The electromagnetic wave data in the Very Low Frequency (VLF) range detected by DEMETER satellite has been analyzed, with special attention to the variation in spectral characteristics and non-linear effects, using the statistical and wavelet based techniques.The enhancement in statistical parameters shows the coherent structure and intermittent phenomenon which is the signature of turbulence. The characteristics features of VLF disturbances have further been studied using the wavelet and bispectral analysis tools which provide useful information on the plasma turbulence.A more interesting result emerges when the low-frequency turbulence emissions produce turbulence in VLF range. Finally, the relevance of the various turbulence mechanisms and their importance in ionospheric turbulence is discussed. Keywords:DEMETER, Earthquake, Phenomena of Intermittence, Coherent Structure.

  18. Compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves observed in the bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tieyan; Cao, Jinbin; Fu, Huishan; Meng, Xuejie; Dunlop, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report the evidence of compressible turbulence with slow-mode waves in a bursty bulk flow of plasma sheet. This compressible turbulence is characterized by a multiscale (1-60 s) anticorrelation between plasma density and magnetic field strength. Besides, the magnetic compressibility spectrum stays nearly constant at all the measured frequencies. Furthermore, the turbulence energy distributions are anisotropic with k⊥ > k//, and the dispersion relation is consistent with slow-mode prediction. The fluctuations of density and magnetic field have similar double slope spectrum and kurtosis. These results suggest that the slow waves are involved in the intermittent turbulence cascade from MHD to ion kinetic scales, which may have significant implications for the energy transfer in the plasma sheet.

  19. Low Frequency Turbulence as the Source of High Frequency Waves in Multi-Component Space Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khazanov, George V.; Krivorutsky, Emmanuel N.; Uritsky, Vadim M.

    2011-01-01

    Space plasmas support a wide variety of waves, and wave-particle interactions as well as wavewave interactions are of crucial importance to magnetospheric and ionospheric plasma behavior. High frequency wave turbulence generation by the low frequency (LF) turbulence is restricted by two interconnected requirements: the turbulence should be strong enough and/or the coherent wave trains should have the appropriate length. These requirements are strongly relaxed in the multi-component plasmas, due to the heavy ions large drift velocity in the field of LF wave. The excitation of lower hybrid waves (LHWs), in particular, is a widely discussed mechanism of interaction between plasma species in space and is one of the unresolved questions of magnetospheric multi-ion plasmas. It is demonstrated that large-amplitude Alfven waves, in particular those associated with LF turbulence, may generate LHW s in the auroral zone and ring current region and in some cases (particularly in the inner magnetosphere) this serves as the Alfven wave saturation mechanism. We also argue that the described scenario can playa vital role in various parts of the outer magnetosphere featuring strong LF turbulence accompanied by LHW activity. Using the data from THEMIS spacecraft, we validate the conditions for such cross-scale coupling in the near-Earth "flow-braking" magnetotail region during the passage of sharp injection/dipolarization fronts, as well as in the turbulent outflow region of the midtail reconnection site.

  20. Influence of ExB shear flows on plasma edge turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Ramisch, M.; Mahdizadeh, N.; Stroth, U.; Greiner, F.

    2008-03-19

    Poloidal ExB shear flows are widely accepted as a trigger mechanism of transport barriers in the edge of fusion plasmas. Strong ExB flows can act on turbulence and turbulent transport through the shear decorrelation mechanism, which can reduce the radial size of turbulent structures or change the phase relation between density and potential fluctuations. In this contribution the influence of ExB shear flows on the microscopic structure of turbulence is investigated. The experiments have been carried out on the toroidally confined low-temperature plasma of the torsatron TJ-K. The plasma is dimensionally similar to fusion edge plasmas and accessible throughout for Langmuir probes. Multi-probe arrays are used to resolve the turbulent dynamics perpendicular to the confining magnetic field in high detail.Strong ExB flows are externally generated by core plasma biasing. It is shown that the fluctuations are dominated by large-scale coherent structures even though strong flow shear is present. These structures reveal increased correlation lengths. It is found that these structures can contribute to improved confinement through inwards transport due to cross-phase modifications. Furthermore, the response of the turbulent Reynolds stress, which is supposed to drive zonal flows as internally ExB shear flows, is investigated. The externally generated flow shear leads to a redistribution of the Reynolds stress with increased poloidal symmetry.

  1. High density turbulent plasma processes from a shock tube. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.A. III

    1997-01-01

    A broad-based set of measurements has begun on high density turbulent plasma processes. This includes determinations of new plasma physics and the initiation of work on new diagnostics for collisional plasmas as follows: (1) A transient increase is observed in both the spectral energy decay rate and the degree of chaotic complexity at the interface of a shock wave and a turbulent ionized gas. Even though the gas is apparently brought to rest by the shock wave, no evidence is found either of prompt relaminarization or of any systematic influence of end-wall material thermal conductivities on the turbulence parameters. (2) Point fluorescence emissions and averaged spectral line evolutions in turbulent plasmas produced in both the primary and the reflected shock wave flows exhibit ergodicity in the standard turbulence parameters. The data show first evidence of a reverse energy cascade in the collisional turbulent plasma. This suggests that the fully turbulent environment can be described using a stationary state formulation. In these same data, the author finds compelling evidence for a turbulent Stark effect on neutral emission lines in these data which is associated with evidence of large coherent structures and dominant modes in the Fourier analyses of the fluctuations in the optical spectra. (3) A neutral beam generator has been assembled by coupling a Colutron Ion Gun to a charge exchange chamber. Beam-target collisions where the target species is neutral and the beam is either singly charged or neutral have been performed using argon as the working gas. Spectral analysis of the emission shows specific radiative transitions characteristic of both Ar I and Ar II, indicating that some ionization of the target gas results. Gas and plasma parameters such as density, pressure, temperature and flow velocity and their fluctuations can now be followed in real time by spectroscopic analysis of carefully chosen radiative emissions.

  2. Diagnosis of Magnetic Structures and Intermittency in Space Plasma Turbulence using the Method of Surrogate Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahraoui, Fouad; Goldstein, Melvyn

    2008-01-01

    Several observations in space plasmas have reported the presence of coherent structures at different plasma scales. Structure formation is believed to be a direct consequence of nonlinear interactions between the plasma modes, which depend strongly on phase synchronization of those modes. Despite this important role of the phases in turbulence, very limited work has been however devoted to study the phases as a potential tracers of nonlinearities in comparison with the wealth of literature on power spectra of turbulence where phases are totally missed. We present a method based on surrogate data to systematically detect coherent structures in turbulent signals. The new method has been applied successfully to magnetosheath turbulence (Sahraoui, Phys. Rev. E, 2008, in press), where the relationship between the identified phase coherence and intermittency (classically identified as non Gaussian tails of the PDFs) as well as the energy cascade has been studied. Here we review the main results obtained in that study and show further applications to small scale solar wind turbulence. Implications of the results on theoretical modelling of space turbulence (applicability of weak/wave turbulence, its validity limits and its connection to intermittency) will be discussed.

  3. Probabilistic analysis of turbulent structures from two-dimensional plasma imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, S. H.; Diallo, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Labit, B.; Plyushchev, G.; Podesta, M.; Poli, F. M.

    2006-10-15

    A method is presented to construct object-related structure observables, such as size, mass, shape, and trajectories from two-dimensional plasma imaging data. The probability distributions of these observables, deduced from measurements of many realizations, provide a robust framework in which the fluctuations, the turbulence, and the related transport are characterized. The results for imaging data recorded in the presence of drift-interchange instabilities and turbulence on the TORPEX toroidal plasma experiment [A. Fasoli et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 055902 (2006)] are discussed.

  4. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    SciTech Connect

    Comişel, H.; Verscharen, D.; Narita, Y.; Motschmann, U.

    2013-09-15

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  5. HELCATS - Heliospheric Cataloguing, Analysis and Techniques Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard; Davies, Jackie; Perry, Chris; Moestl, Christian; Rouillard, Alexis; Bothmer, Volker; Rodriguez, Luciano; Eastwood, Jonathan; Kilpua, Emilia; Gallagher, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the evolution of the solar wind is fundamental to advancing our knowledge of energy and mass transport in the solar system, rendering it crucial to space weather and its prediction. The advent of truly wide-angle heliospheric imaging has revolutionised the study of both transient (CMEs) and background (SIRs/CIRs) solar wind plasma structures, by enabling their direct and continuous observation out to 1 AU and beyond. The EU-funded FP7 HELCATS project combines European expertise in heliospheric imaging, built up in particular through lead involvement in NASA's STEREO mission, with expertise in solar and coronal imaging as well as in-situ and radio measurements of solar wind phenomena, in a programme of work that will enable a much wider exploitation and understanding of heliospheric imaging observations. With HELCATS, we are (1.) cataloguing transient and background solar wind structures imaged in the heliosphere by STEREO/HI, since launch in late October 2006 to date, including estimates of their kinematic properties based on a variety of established techniques and more speculative, approaches; (2.) evaluating these kinematic properties, and thereby the validity of these techniques, through comparison with solar source observations and in-situ measurements made at multiple points throughout the heliosphere; (3.) appraising the potential for initialising advanced numerical models based on these kinematic properties; (4.) assessing the complementarity of radio observations (in particular of Type II radio bursts and interplanetary scintillation) in combination with heliospheric imagery. We will, in this presentation, provide an overview of progress from the first 18 months of the HELCATS project.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  7. From coherent structures to turbulence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lion, Sonny; Alexandrova, Olga; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind has been attracting attention since first in-situ measurements in the Heliosphere. Still a lot of open questions remain. In particular, the nature of turbulence around plasma kinetic scales, where self-similarity breaks down and no-power law behaviour of the turbulent spectrum is expected. It is known that approaching these small scales, Probability Distribution Functions (PDF) of magnetic fluctuations deviate strongly from the Gaussian distribution. This is called intermittency and is usually interpreted as presence of coherent structures. Here, using magnetic field waveforms and their wavelet coefficients, we study the nature of these intermittent events. We propose as well a universal description of magnetic fluctuations PDF using a four-parameter function and we describe the evolution of this parameters with increasing frequencies. Using two different approaches we establish the connection between intermittency and the evolution of the turbulent spectrum at ion scales. Finally the relationship between intermittency and ion temperature is discussed.

  8. Nonlinear Phase Mixing and Phase-Space Cascade of Entropy in Gyrokinetic Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuno, T.; Dorland, W.; Plunk, G. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.

    2009-07-03

    Electrostatic turbulence in weakly collisional, magnetized plasma can be interpreted as a cascade of entropy in phase space, which is proposed as a universal mechanism for dissipation of energy in magnetized plasma turbulence. When the nonlinear decorrelation time at the scale of the thermal Larmor radius is shorter than the collision time, a broad spectrum of fluctuations at sub-Larmor scales is numerically found in velocity and position space, with theoretically predicted scalings. The results are important because they identify what is probably a universal Kolmogorov-like regime for kinetic turbulence; and because any physical process that produces fluctuations of the gyrophase-independent part of the distribution function may, via the entropy cascade, result in turbulent heating at a rate that increases with the fluctuation amplitude, but is independent of the collision frequency.

  9. Ion kinetic instabilities and turbulence of a parallel shearing flow of a plasma with hot ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr St.; Mykhaylenko, Volodymyr; Lee, Hae June

    2015-11-01

    The results of the analytical and numerical investigations of the shear flow driven ion kinetic instabilities, excited due to the inverse ion Landau damping in the parallel shearing flow of plasmas with comparable ion and electron temperatures, that is the case relevant to a tokamak and space plasma, are presented. The levels of turbulence and the turbulent heating rates of ions and ion turbulent viscosity, resulted from the development of the electrostatic ion-temperature gradient and electromagnetic drift-Alfven turbulence, are determined and their consequences are discussed. This work was funded by National R&D Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea.Grants NRF-2014M1A7A1A03029878, NRF-2013R1A1A2005758.

  10. Observation of multi-scale turbulence and non-local transport in LHD plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuzawa, T.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Shimizu, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tamura, N.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Yamada, I.; Tanaka, K.; Akiyama, T.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Yamada, H.; Kitajima, S.

    2014-05-15

    We have studied two types of spatio-temporal turbulence dynamics in plasmas in the Large Helical Device, based on turbulence measurements with high spatial and temporal resolution. Applying conditional ensemble-averaging to a plasma with Edge-Localized Modes (ELMs), fast radial inward propagation of a micro-scale turbulence front is observed just after ELM event, and the propagation speed is evaluated as ∼100 m/s. A self-organized radial electric field structure is observed in an electrode biasing experiment, and it is found to realize a multi-valued state. The curvature of the radial electric field is found to play an important role for turbulence reduction.