Science.gov

Sample records for helium gas leakage

  1. Development of monitoring system of helium leakage from canister

    SciTech Connect

    Toriu, D.; Ushijima, S.; Takeda, H.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a computational method for the helium leakage from a canister. The governing equations for compressible fluids consist of mass conservation equation in Eulerian description, momentum equations and energy equation. The numerical procedures are divided into three phases, advection, diffusion and acoustic phases, and the equations of compressible fluids are discretized with a finite volume method. Thus, the mass conservation law is sufficiently satisfied in the calculation region. In particular, our computational method enables us to predict the change of the temperature distributions around the canister boundaries by calculating the governing equations for the compressible gas flows, which are leaked out from a slight crack on the canister boundary. In order to confirm the validity of our method, it was applied to the basic problem, 2-dimensional natural convection flows in a rectangular cavity. As a result, it was shown that the naturally convected flows can be reasonably simulated by our method. Furthermore, numerical experiments were conducted for the helium leakage from canister and we derived a close relationship between the inner pressure and the boundary temperature distributions.

  2. Detection of gas leakage

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M; Brown, Jason

    2015-02-17

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as a device, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), provides a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement. The PPM is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr) using a venturi pump, perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  3. Detection of gas leakage

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven; Brown, Jason

    2012-06-19

    A method of detecting leaks and measuring volumes as well as an apparatus, the Power-free Pump Module (PPM), that is a self-contained leak test and volume measurement apparatus that requires no external sources of electrical power during leak testing or volume measurement, where the invention is a portable, pneumatically-controlled instrument capable of generating a vacuum, calibrating volumes, and performing quantitative leak tests on a closed test system or device, all without the use of alternating current (AC) power. Capabilities include the ability is to provide a modest vacuum (less than 10 Torr), perform a pressure rise leak test, measure the gas's absolute pressure, and perform volume measurements. All operations are performed through a simple rotary control valve which controls pneumatically-operated manifold valves.

  4. Time reversal technique for gas leakage detection.

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A O; Polovinka, Yu A

    2015-04-01

    The acoustic remote sensing of subsea gas leakage traditionally uses sonars as active acoustic sensors and hydrophones picking up the sound generated by a leak as passive sensors. When gas leaks occur underwater, bubbles are produced and emit sound at frequencies intimately related to their sizes. The experimental implementation of an acoustic time-reversal mirror (TRM) is now well established in underwater acoustics. In the basic TRM experiment, a probe source emits a pulse that is received on an array of sensors, time reversed, and re-emitted. After time reversal, the resulting field focuses back at the probe position. In this study, a method for enhancing operation of the passive receiving system has been proposed by using it in the regime of TRM. Two factors, the local character of the acoustic emission signal caused by the leakage and a resonant nature of the bubble radiation at their birth, make particularly effective scattering with the conjugate wave (CW). Analytical calculations are performed for the scattering of CW wave on a single bubble when CW is formed by bubble birthing wail received on an array, time reversed, and re-emitted. The quality of leakage detection depends on the spatio-temporal distribution of ambient noise. PMID:25920866

  5. Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Sam; Meagher, Daniel; Linza, Robert; Saheli, Fariborz; Vargas, Gerardo; Lauterbach, John; Reis, Carl; Ganni, Venkatarao (Rao); Homan, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) Building 32 houses two large thermal-vacuum chambers (Chamber A and Chamber B). Within these chambers are liquid nitrogen shrouds to provide a thermal environment and helium panels which operate at 20K to provide cryopumping. Some amount of air leakage into the chambers during tests is inevitable. This causes "air fouling" of the helium panel surfaces due to the components of the air that adhere to the panels. The air fouling causes the emittance of the helium panels to increase during tests. The increase in helium panel emittance increases the heat load on the helium refrigerator that supplies the 20K helium for those panels. Planning for thermal-vacuum tests should account for this increase to make sure that the helium refrigerator capacity will not be exceeded over the duration of a test. During a recent test conducted in Chamber B a known-size air leak was introduced to the chamber. Emittance change of the helium panels and the affect on the helium refrigerator was characterized. A description of the test and the results will be presented.

  6. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Christopher E.; Dinc, Osman S.; Bagepalli, Bharat S.; Correia, Victor H.; Aksit, Mahmut F.

    1996-01-01

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the "plane" of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member.

  7. Gas-path leakage seal for a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, C.E.; Dinc, O.S.; Bagepalli, B.S.; Correia, V.H.; Aksit, M.F.

    1996-04-23

    A gas-path leakage seal is described for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a gas turbine (such as combustor casing segments). The seal includes a generally imperforate foil-layer assemblage which is generally impervious to gas and is located in the leakage-gap. The seal also includes a cloth-layer assemblage generally enclosingly contacting the foil-layer assemblage. In one seal, the first edge of the foil-layer assemblage is left exposed, and the foil-layer assemblage resiliently contacts the first member near the first edge to reduce leakage in the ``plane`` of the cloth-layer assemblage under conditions which include differential thermal growth of the two members. In another seal, such leakage is reduced by having a first weld-bead which permeates the cloth-layer assemblage, is attached to the metal-foil-layer assemblage near the first edge, and unattachedly contacts the first member. 4 figs.

  8. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1640 - Helium gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Helium gas analyzer. 868.1640 Section 868.1640...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1640 Helium gas analyzer. (a) Identification. A helium gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of helium in a...

  13. The role of helium gas in medicine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The noble gas helium has many applications owing to its distinct physical and chemical characteristics, namely: its low density, low solubility, and high thermal conductivity. Chiefly, the abundance of studies in medicine relating to helium are concentrated in its possibility of being used as an adjunct therapy in a number of respiratory ailments such as asthma exacerbation, COPD, ARDS, croup, and bronchiolitis. Helium gas, once believed to be biologically inert, has been recently shown to be beneficial in protecting the myocardium from ischemia by various mechanisms. Though neuroprotection of brain tissue has been documented, the mechanism by which it does so has yet to be made clear. Surgeons are exploring using helium instead of carbon dioxide to insufflate the abdomen of patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal procedures due to its superiority in preventing respiratory acidosis in patients with comorbid conditions that cause carbon dioxide retention. Newly discovered applications in Pulmonary MRI radiology and imaging of organs in very fine detail using Helium Ion Microscopy has opened exciting new possibilities for the use of helium gas in technologically advanced fields of medicine. PMID:23916029

  14. A CONCEPTUAL UNDERSTANDING OF LEAKAGE DURING SOIL-GAS SAMPLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    A heuristic model is developed to develop a conceptual understanding of leakage during soil-gas sampling. Leakage is shown to be simply a function of the permeability contrast between the formation and borehole and geometric factors. As the ratio of formation to borehole permea...

  15. Detectivity of gas leakage based on electromagnetic radiation transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yunting; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Zhang, Changxing; Zhang, Bei

    2011-05-01

    Standoff detection of gas leakage is a fundamental need in petrochemical and power industries. The passive gas imaging system using thermal imager has been proven to be efficient to visualize leaking gas which is not visible to the naked eye. The detection probability of gas leakage is the basis for designing a gas imaging system. Supposing the performance parameters of the thermal imager are known, the detectivity based on electromagnetic radiation transfer model to image gas leakage is analyzed. This model takes into consideration a physical analysis of the gas plume spread in the atmosphere-the interaction processes between the gas and its surrounding environment, the temperature of the gas and the background, the background surface emissivity, and also gas concentration, etc. Under a certain environmental conditions, through calculating the radiation reaching to the detector from the camera's optical field of view, we obtain an entity "Gas Equivalent Blackbody Temperature Difference (GEBTD)" which is the radiation difference between the on-plume and off-plume regions. Comparing the GEBTD with the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the thermal imager, we can know whether the system can image the gas leakage. At last, an example of detecting CO2 gas by JADE MWIR thermal imager with a narrow band-pass filter is presented.

  16. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Theyse, F.H.; Kelling, F.E.T.

    1980-01-08

    Ultra Centrifuge Nederland N.V.'s improved centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas comprises a hollow cylindrical rotor, designated as a separating drum, within a stationary housing. Natural gas liquids that condense under pressure in the separating drum pass through openings in the drum into the space between the drum and housing. In this space, a series of openings, or throttling restrictors, allows the liquids to expand and return to gas. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum remains separate for drawing off.

  17. The Gas Leakage Analysis in C/C Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Yuichi; Hatta, Hiroshi; Bando, Takamasa; Sugibayashi, Toshio

    Gas leakage through carbon fiber reinforcement carbon composites, C/Cs, was discussed so as to apply C/Cs to heat exchangers in an engine system for a future space-plane. Since C/Cs include many cracks and pores, gas easily leaks through C/Cs. To predict and to prevent the gas flow through a C/C, leakage rate was measured as a function of pressure and gas flow path was identified by micro-observation of the C/C. Then, several analytical models were examined to clarify principal mechanism yielding gas flow resistance. It was found that laminar flow models gave far small flow resistance compared with experimental results, but a model based on adiabatic expansion and compression flow, used for gas leak through labyrinth seals, resulted in reasonable agreement. Finally, Si impregnation in a C/C was examined to minimize the gas leakage. This treatment was shown to be an excellent measure to reduce the gas leakage through C/C.

  18. Bag Test Measures Leakage From Insulated Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schock, Kent D.; Easter, Barry P.

    1994-01-01

    Test quantifies leakage of gas from pipe even though pipe covered with insulation. Involves use of helium analyzer to measure concentration of helium in impermeable bag around pipe. Test administered after standard soap-solution bubble test indicates presence and general class of leakage.

  19. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas and a mixture of gas and liquid helium

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium fluid comprised of a mixture of gas and boiling liquid so as to be near the same temperature but at different pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid in a go leg from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a high pressure helium gas near the normal boiling temperature of helium; then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a mixture of reduced pressure gas and boiling liquid at its boiling temperature; then by circulating the mixture in a return leg that is separated from but in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg and in the same enclosure therewith; and finally returning the resulting low pressure gas to the refrigerator for compression into a high pressure gas at T.sub.2 is a closed cycle, where T.sub.1 >T.sub.2, the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature is nearly constant along its length from the refrigerator to the expander due to the boiling of the liquid in the mixture. A heat exchanger between the go and return lines removes the gas from the liquid in the return leg while cooling the go leg.

  20. Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Ramón A; Pacala, Stephen W; Winebrake, James J; Chameides, William L; Hamburg, Steven P

    2012-04-24

    Natural gas is seen by many as the future of American energy: a fuel that can provide energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the process. However, there has also been confusion about the climate implications of increased use of natural gas for electric power and transportation. We propose and illustrate the use of technology warming potentials as a robust and transparent way to compare the cumulative radiative forcing created by alternative technologies fueled by natural gas and oil or coal by using the best available estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from each fuel cycle (i.e., production, transportation and use). We find that a shift to compressed natural gas vehicles from gasoline or diesel vehicles leads to greater radiative forcing of the climate for 80 or 280 yr, respectively, before beginning to produce benefits. Compressed natural gas vehicles could produce climate benefits on all time frames if the well-to-wheels CH(4) leakage were capped at a level 45-70% below current estimates. By contrast, using natural gas instead of coal for electric power plants can reduce radiative forcing immediately, and reducing CH(4) losses from the production and transportation of natural gas would produce even greater benefits. There is a need for the natural gas industry and science community to help obtain better emissions data and for increased efforts to reduce methane leakage in order to minimize the climate footprint of natural gas. PMID:22493226

  1. Greater focus needed on methane leakage from natural gas infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Ramón A.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Winebrake, James J.; Chameides, William L.; Hamburg, Steven P.

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas is seen by many as the future of American energy: a fuel that can provide energy independence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the process. However, there has also been confusion about the climate implications of increased use of natural gas for electric power and transportation. We propose and illustrate the use of technology warming potentials as a robust and transparent way to compare the cumulative radiative forcing created by alternative technologies fueled by natural gas and oil or coal by using the best available estimates of greenhouse gas emissions from each fuel cycle (i.e., production, transportation and use). We find that a shift to compressed natural gas vehicles from gasoline or diesel vehicles leads to greater radiative forcing of the climate for 80 or 280 yr, respectively, before beginning to produce benefits. Compressed natural gas vehicles could produce climate benefits on all time frames if the well-to-wheels CH4 leakage were capped at a level 45–70% below current estimates. By contrast, using natural gas instead of coal for electric power plants can reduce radiative forcing immediately, and reducing CH4 losses from the production and transportation of natural gas would produce even greater benefits. There is a need for the natural gas industry and science community to help obtain better emissions data and for increased efforts to reduce methane leakage in order to minimize the climate footprint of natural gas. PMID:22493226

  2. Leakage Currents and Gas Generation in Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Currently, military grade, established reliability wet tantalum capacitors are among the most reliable parts used for space applications. This has been achieved over the years by extensive testing and improvements in design and materials. However, a rapid insertion of new types of advanced, high volumetric efficiency capacitors in space systems without proper testing and analysis of degradation mechanisms might increase risks of failures. The specifics of leakage currents in wet electrolytic capacitors is that the conduction process is associated with electrolysis of electrolyte and gas generation resulting in building up of internal gas pressure in the parts. The risk associated with excessive leakage currents and increased pressure is greater for high value advanced wet tantalum capacitors, but it has not been properly evaluated yet. In this work, in Part I, leakages currents in various types of tantalum capacitors have been analyzed in a wide range of voltages, temperatures, and time under bias. Gas generation and the level of internal pressure have been calculated in Part II for different case sizes and different hermeticity leak rates to assess maximal allowable leakage currents. Effects related to electrolyte penetration to the glass seal area have been studied and the possibility of failures analyzed in Part III. Recommendations for screening and qualification to reduce risks of failures have been suggested.

  3. Neutral gas heating in helium microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugroot, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study details a self-consistent model of charged and neutral particle dynamics which is applied to atmospheric small-space (200 μm) discharges in helium. Hydrodynamic transport equations of the self-consistent and time-dependant model are described with an emphasis on the different terms involved in the close coupling among charged species, neutral species, and the electric field. Those equations are solved by two-dimensional numerical schemes for both species transport and electric field. The microplasmas are studied from an initial cloud until the stages of charged particle overamplification in small spaces, where transients are particularly important. Gas heating, neutral depletion initiation, and electric field reversal are observed, highlighting the close interaction between neutral gas and charged species in governing the evolution of the microplasma.

  4. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Farrell, Thomas Raymond

    1999-01-01

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges.

  5. Gas-path leakage seal for a turbine

    DOEpatents

    Bagepalli, B.S.; Aksit, M.F.; Farrell, T.R.

    1999-08-10

    A gas-path leakage seal for generally sealing a gas-path leakage-gap between spaced-apart first and second members of a turbine (such as combustor casing segments of a gas turbine). The seal includes a flexible and generally imperforate metal sheet assemblage having opposing first and second surfaces and two opposing raised edges extending a generally identical distance above and below the surfaces. A first cloth layer assemblage has a thickness generally equal to the previously-defined identical distance and is superimposed on the first surface between the raised edges. A second cloth layer assemblage is generally identical to the first cloth layer assemblage and is superimposed on the second surface between the raised edges. 5 figs.

  6. [A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Yu-jun; Kan, Rui-feng; Ruan, Jun; Wang, Li-ming; Yu, Dian-qiang; Dong, Jin-ting; Han, Xiao-lei; Cui, Yi-ben; Liu, Jian-guo

    2012-02-01

    The detection of natural gas pipeline leak becomes a significant issue for body security, environmental protection and security of state property. However, the leak detection is difficult, because of the pipeline's covering many areas, operating conditions and complicated environment. A mobile sensor for remote detection of natural gas leakage based on scanning wavelength differential absorption spectroscopy (SWDAS) is introduced. The improved soft threshold wavelet denoising was proposed by analyzing the characteristics of reflection spectrum. And the results showed that the signal to noise ratio (SNR) was increased three times. When light intensity is 530 nA, the minimum remote sensitivity will be 80 ppm x m. A widely used SWDAS can make quantitative remote sensing of natural gas leak and locate the leak source precisely in a faster, safer and more intelligent way. PMID:22512213

  7. Research on airborne infrared leakage detection of natural gas pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dongjie; Xu, Bin; Xu, Xu; Wang, Hongchao; Yu, Dongliang; Tian, Shengjie

    2011-12-01

    An airborne laser remote sensing technology is proposed to detect natural gas pipeline leakage in helicopter which carrying a detector, and the detector can detect a high spatial resolution of trace of methane on the ground. The principle of the airborne laser remote sensing system is based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The system consists of an optical unit containing the laser, camera, helicopter mount, electronic unit with DGPS antenna, a notebook computer and a pilot monitor. And the system is mounted on a helicopter. The principle and the architecture of the airborne laser remote sensing system are presented. Field test experiments are carried out on West-East Natural Gas Pipeline of China, and the results show that airborne detection method is suitable for detecting gas leak of pipeline on plain, desert, hills but unfit for the area with large altitude diversification.

  8. Measurement of Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas at the 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, John C.

    2001-10-31

    Seventy soil gas-sampling points were installed around the perimeter of the 618-11 Burial Ground, approximately 400 feet downgradient of well 699-13-3A, and in four transects downgradient of the burial ground to a maximum distance of 3,100 feet. Soil gas samples were collected and analyzed for helium-3/helium-4 ratios from these 70 points. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios determined from the soil gas sampling points showed significant enrichments, relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations. The highest concentrations were located along the northern perimeter of the burial ground. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) ranged from 1.0 to 62 around the burial ground. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from the 4 transect downgradient of the burial ground ranged from 0.988 to 1.68. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from around the burial ground suggest there is a vadose zone source of tritium along the north side of the burial ground. This vadose zone source is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios also suggest the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and the highest groundwater tritium value may be to the north of well 699-13-3A. Finally, there appears to be no immediately upgradient sources of tritium impacting the burial ground since all the upgradient helium-3/helium-4 ratios are approximately 1.0.

  9. Variable cycle stirling engine and gas leakage control system therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Otters, J.

    1984-12-25

    An improved thermal engine of the type having a displacer body movable between the hot end and the cold end of a chamber for subjecting a fluid within that chamber to a thermodynamic cycle and having a work piston driven by the fluid for deriving a useful work output. The work piston pumps a hydraulic fluid and a hydraulic control valve is connected in line with the hydraulic output conduit such that the flow of hydraulic fluid may be restricted to any desired degree or stopped altogether. The work piston can therefore be controlled by means of a controller device independently from the movement of the displacer such that a variety of engine cycles can be obtained for optimum engine efficiency under varying load conditions. While a Stirling engine cycle is particularly contemplated, other engine cycles may be obtained by controlling the movement of the displacer and work pistons. Also disclosed are a working gas recovery system for controlling leakage of working gas from the displacer chamber, and a compound work piston arrangement for preventing leakage of hydraulic fluid around the work piston into the displacer chamber.

  10. Federal helium program: The reaction over an inert gas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mielke, J.E.

    1996-10-09

    Helium, present in relatively high concentrations in only a few natural gas fields, is released to the atmosphere and wasted when the natural gas is burned as fuel. Government involvement in helium conservation dates to the Helium Act of 1925 which authorized the Bureau of Mines to build and operate a large-scale helium extraction and purification plant. From 1929 until 1960 the federal government was the only domestic helium producer. In 1960, Congress amended the Helium Act to provide incentives to natural gas producers for stripping natural gas of its helium, for purchase of the separated helium by the government, and for its long-term storage. With over 960 million cubic meters (34.6 billion cubic feet) of helium in government storage and a large private helium recovery industry, questions arise as to the need for either the federal helium extraction program or the federally maintained helium stockpile.

  11. Recovery of purified helium or hydrogen from gas mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Merriman, J.R.; Pashley, J.H.; Stephenson, M.J.; Dunthorn, D.I.

    1974-01-15

    A process is described for the removal of helium or hydrogen from gaseous mixtures also containing contaminants. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a liquid fluorocarbon in an absorption zone maintained at superatomspheric pressure to preferentially absorb the contaminants in the fluorocarbon. Unabsorbed gas enriched in hydrogen or helium is withdrawn from the absorption zone as product. Liquid fluorocarbon enriched in contaminants is withdrawn separately from the absorption zone. (10 claims)

  12. Influence of flowing helium gas on plasma plume formation in atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Konda, Kohmei; Ogura, Kazuo

    2015-05-15

    We have studied atmospheric pressure plasma generated using a quartz tube, helium gas, and a foil electrode by applying RF high voltage. The atmospheric pressure plasma in the form of a bullet is released as a plume into the atmosphere. The helium gas flowing out of quartz tube mixes with air, and the flow channel is composed of the regions of flowing helium gas and air. The plasma plume length is equivalent to the reachable distance of flowing helium gas. Although the amount of helium gas on the flow channel increases by increasing the inner diameter of quartz tube at the same gas flow velocity, the plasma plume length peaks at around 8 m/s of gas flow velocity, which is the result that a flow of helium gas is balanced with the amount of gas. The plasma plume is formed at the boundary region where the flow of helium gas is kept to the wall of the air.

  13. Long-term monitoring of marine gas leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spickenbom, Kai; Faber, Eckhard; Poggenburg, Jürgen; Seeger, Christian; Furche, Markus

    2010-05-01

    The sequestration of CO2 in sub-seabed geological formations is one of the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) strategies currently under study. Although offshore operations are significantly more expensive than comparable onshore operations, the growing public resistance against onshore CCS projects makes sub-seabed storage a promising option. Even after a thorough review of the geological setting, there is always the possibility of leakage from the reservoir. As part of the EU-financed project CO2ReMoVe (Research, Monitoring, Verification), which aims to develop innovative research and technologies for monitoring and verification of carbon dioxide geological storage, we are working on the development of submarine long-term gas flow monitoring systems. The basic design of the monitoring system builds on our experience in volcano monitoring. Early prototypes were composed of a raft floating on the surface of a mud volcano, carrying sensors for CO2 flux and concentration, data storage and transmission, and power supply by battery-buffered solar panels. The system was modified for installation in open sea by using a buoy instead of a raft and a funnel on the seafloor to collect the gas, connected by a flexible tube. This setup provides a cost-effective solution for shallow waters. However, a buoy interferes with ship traffic, and it is also difficult to adapt this design to greater water depths. These requirements can best be complied by a completely submersed system. A system for unattended long-term monitoring in a marine environment has to be extremely durable. Therefore, we focussed on developing a mechanically and electrically as simple setup as possible, which has the additional advantage of low cost. The system consists of a funnel-shaped gas collector, a sensor head and pressure housings for electronics and power supply. Since this setup is inexpensive, it can be deployed in numbers to cover larger areas. By addition of multi-channel data loggers, data

  14. Comparing Natural Gas Leakage Detection Technologies Using an Open-Source "Virtual Gas Field" Simulator.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Chandler E; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Brandt, Adam R

    2016-04-19

    We present a tool for modeling the performance of methane leak detection and repair programs that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of detection technologies and proposed mitigation policies. The tool uses a two-state Markov model to simulate the evolution of methane leakage from an artificial natural gas field. Leaks are created stochastically, drawing from the current understanding of the frequency and size distributions at production facilities. Various leak detection and repair programs can be simulated to determine the rate at which each would identify and repair leaks. Integrating the methane leakage over time enables a meaningful comparison between technologies, using both economic and environmental metrics. We simulate four existing or proposed detection technologies: flame ionization detection, manual infrared camera, automated infrared drone, and distributed detectors. Comparing these four technologies, we found that over 80% of simulated leakage could be mitigated with a positive net present value, although the maximum benefit is realized by selectively targeting larger leaks. Our results show that low-cost leak detection programs can rely on high-cost technology, as long as it is applied in a way that allows for rapid detection of large leaks. Any strategy to reduce leakage should require a careful consideration of the differences between low-cost technologies and low-cost programs. PMID:27007771

  15. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority...

  16. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority...

  17. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority...

  18. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority...

  19. 43 CFR 16.1 - Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. 16.1 Section 16.1 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior CONSERVATION OF HELIUM § 16.1 Agreements to dispose of helium in natural gas. (a) Pursuant to his authority...

  20. Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S.

    1995-08-18

    Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. Centrifuge for separating helium from natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kelling, F.E.; Theyse, F.H.

    1980-01-08

    A centrifuge is claimed for the separation of gaseous mixtures with a rotor inside a housing, comprising a hollow, cylindrical or nearly cylindrical rotorpart also called a separating drum, in which drum a gaseous component may condense as a liquid. This liquid is admitted thereafter through openings in the drum to the space between drum and housing. In this space are formed a sequence of narrow openings, so called restrictors in which the liquid is brought to expansion, returning to gas form. These restrictors act also as bearings for the drum. The gaseous component that does not liquefy in the drum is drawn off.

  2. Microwave electrothermal thruster performance in helium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehair, S.; Asmussen, J.; Nakanishi, S.

    1987-04-01

    The microwave electrothermal thruster presented uses an internally tuned, single-mode cylindrical cavity applicator to focus and match microwave energy into an electrodeless, high pressure flowing gas discharge that is located within a quartz discharge chamber. Experimental measurements of microwave coupling efficiency, thruster energy efficiency, and specific impulse, are obtained for N and He discharges; the efficiency of microwave energy transfer to the discharge is found to be of the order of 95 percent. Higher temperature nozzle materials and more efficient discharge chambers will further enhance performance. 25 references.

  3. Superconducting cable cooling system by helium gas at two pressures

    DOEpatents

    Dean, John W.

    1977-01-01

    Thermally contacting, oppositely streaming, cryogenic fluid streams in the same enclosure in a closed cycle that changes the fluid from a cool high pressure helium gas to a cooler reduced pressure helium gas in an expander so as to be at different temperature ranges and pressures respectively in go and return legs that are in thermal contact with each other and in thermal contact with a longitudinally extending superconducting transmission line enclosed in the same cable enclosure that insulates the line from the ambient at a temperature T.sub.1. By first circulating the fluid from a refrigerator at one end of the line as a cool gas at a temperature range T.sub.2 to T.sub.3 in the go leg, then circulating the gas through an expander at the other end of the line where the gas becomes a cooler gas at a reduced pressure and at a reduced temperature T.sub.4 and finally by circulating the cooler gas back again to the refrigerator in a return leg at a temperature range T.sub.4 to T.sub.5, while in thermal contact with the gas in the go leg, and in the same enclosure therewith for compression into a higher pressure gas at T.sub.2 in a closed cycle, where T.sub.2 >T.sub.3 and T.sub.5 >T.sub.4, the fluid leaves the enclosure in the go leg as a gas at its coldest point in the go leg, and the temperature distribution is such that the line temperature decreases along its length from the refrigerator due to the cooling from the gas in the return leg.

  4. Helium isotopes in soil gas: the surficial indicators of the 'leaking mantle'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, T. F.; Yang, T. F.; Lee, H. F.; Chuang, P. C.; Chen, C. H.; Sano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    By re-defining 'excess helium' as isotopic abundance of both helium isotopes normalized to those of the air, helium-3 and helium-4 in the soil gas stand out as two independent proxies of mantle and crustal degassing in the Yilan Plain, Taiwan. The spatial distribution of soil gas helium-3 correlates well with the locations of both shallow and deep structures; and its extent of anomaly indicates the depth of faults. Helium-3 also points out the locations of the dyke intrusion and the initial depression center of the Plain. Soil gas helium-4, on the other hand, does not reflect structure locations as well as helium-3. We suggest that the faults might have activated long ago so that crustal helium-4 had released to the atmosphere, while helium-3 still has constant supply from the mantle. One prominent feature-obvious abundance difference-shows up in spatial distribution of both helium-3 and helium-4 at longitude 121.75°. This feature could only be explained by the appearance of deep tectonic structures since helium-3 is a primordial gas from the deep earth. We believe that it is the location of the sharp plate boundary as proposed by Ustaszewski et al. (2012). However, we suggest that the location should be in the Plain rather than in the mountain area. The distribution of soil helium-4 also implies that the crustal delamination depth is ranged around 3-14 km, where the major heat-producing elements in the upper crust are heated, and thus enhance crustal degassing. With the new definition of excess helium, we found the interpretation of helium isotopes in soil gas is no longer affected by air contamination. Even soil gas samples are taken from surficial crust; helium isotopes are still useful to trace mantle and crustal degassing and could shed light on tectonic settings.

  5. Helium gas bubble trapped in liquid helium in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, H. Hannahs, S. T.; Markiewicz, W. D.; Weijers, H. W.

    2014-03-31

    High magnetic field magnets are used widely in the area of the condensed matter physics, material science, chemistry, geochemistry, and biology at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory. New high field magnets of state-of-the-art are being pursued and developed at the lab, such as the current developing 32 T, 32 mm bore fully superconducting magnet. Liquid Helium (LHe) is used as the coolant for superconducting magnets or samples tested in a high magnetic field. When the magnetic field reaches a relatively high value the boil-off helium gas bubble generated by heat losses in the cryostat can be trapped in the LHe bath in the region where BzdBz/dz is less than negative 2100 T{sup 2}/m, instead of floating up to the top of LHe. Then the magnet or sample in the trapped bubble region may lose efficient cooling. In the development of the 32 T magnet, a prototype Yttrium Barium Copper Oxide coil of 6 double pancakes with an inner diameter of 40 mm and an outer diameter of 140 mm was fabricated and tested in a resistive magnet providing a background field of 15 T. The trapped gas bubble was observed in the tests when the prototype coil was ramped up to 7.5 T at a current of 200 A. This letter reports the test results on the trapped gas bubble and the comparison with the analytical results which shows they are in a good agreement.

  6. Evaluation of the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Recent advances in gas-turbine and heat exchanger technology have enhanced the potential for a Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) incorporating a direct gas turbine (Brayton) cycle for power conversion. The resulting Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) power plant combines the high temperature capabilities of the MHR with the efficiency and reliability of modern gas turbines. While the passive safety features of the steam cycle MHR (SC-MHR) are retained, generation efficiencies are projected to be in the range of 48% and steam power conversion systems, with their attendant complexities, are eliminated. Power costs are projected to be reduced by about 20%, relative to the SC-MHR or coal. This report documents the second, and final, phase of a two-part evaluation that concluded with a unanimous recommendation that the direct cycle (DC) variant of the GT-MHR be established as the commercial objective of the US Gas-Cooled Reactor Program. This recommendation has been endorsed by industrial and utility participants and accepted by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The Phase II effort, documented herein, concluded that the DC GT-MHR offers substantial technical and economic advantages over both the IDC and SC systems. Both the DC and IDC were found to offer safety advantages, relative to the SC, due to elimination of the potential for water ingress during power operations. This is the dominant consequence event for the SC. The IDC was judged to require somewhat less development than the direct cycle, while the SC, which has the greatest technology base, incurs the least development cost and risk. While the technical and licensing requirements for the DC were more demanding, they were judged to be incremental and feasible. Moreover, the DC offers significant performance and cost improvements over the other two concepts. Overall, the latter were found to justify the additional development needs.

  7. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  8. Gettering of Hydrogen and Methane from a Helium Gas Mixture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cardenas, Rosa E.; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-10-21

    In our study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H2 and CH4 can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172® getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. Moreover, the optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650°C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110°C to remove the hydrogen. Finally, this approach eliminatedmore » the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.« less

  9. Gettering of hydrogen and methane from a helium gas mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Cárdenas, Rosa Elia; Stewart, Kenneth D.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the authors developed an approach for accurately quantifying the helium content in a gas mixture also containing hydrogen and methane using commercially available getters. The authors performed a systematic study to examine how both H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} can be removed simultaneously from the mixture using two SAES St 172{sup ®} getters operating at different temperatures. The remaining He within the gas mixture can then be measured directly using a capacitance manometer. The optimum combination involved operating one getter at 650 °C to decompose the methane, and the second at 110 °C to remove the hydrogen. This approach eliminated the need to reactivate the getters between measurements, thereby enabling multiple measurements to be made within a short time interval, with accuracy better than 1%. The authors anticipate that such an approach will be particularly useful for quantifying the He-3 in mixtures that include tritium, tritiated methane, and helium-3. The presence of tritiated methane, generated by tritium activity, often complicates such measurements.

  10. Improving emissions factors for estimating urban natural gas leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    Emissions factors for pipeline natural gas leaks are in need of refinement. In addition to limitations from the small sample sizes of leaks that were initially used to develop emissions factors, a further limitation to emissions factors is lack of knowledge of characteristic statistical distributions of pipeline leak rates. For example, leaks were implicitly assumed to be normally distributed so that an average leak rate was used for pipelines of a given construction. Our natural gas leak data from Boston, USA, in which we found over 3,000 natural gas leaks, indicates that leaks rates are highly skewed, with relatively few leaks likely contributing disproportionately to the total. The long-tailed distribution of gas leak rates is mirrored by a similarly skewed distribution of surface methane concentrations in air. These data suggest that emissions factors should be based on correctly specified statistical distributions, and that fixing relatively few large leaks first may provide the most environmental benefit per cost.

  11. Helium soil-gas survey of the aurora uranium deposit, McDermitt Caldera Complex, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, G.M.

    1986-11-10

    Two soil gas helium surveys were carried out in a section of the McDermitt caldera complex of mineralized volcanic rocks in Oregon. A regional helium anomaly was found and is thought to be associated with uranium-rich tuffaceous fill of the caldera and the Aurora uranium deposit, which occurs near the northeastern rim of the Caldera. Local hydrology may have an effect on the displacement of the helium anomaly from the uranium deposit and be a carrier of helium from sources at depth. This study suggests that helium surveys may be useful in a volcanic environment by helping to select areas for exploratory drilling for uranium deposits.

  12. An unusual cause of cold injury: liquified petroleum gas leakage.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nevra; Jasharllari, Lorenc; Kayapınar, Muhammed; Savacı, Nedim

    2011-11-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) is an odorless and colorless gas that is a mixture of hydrocarbons (propane and butane). It is now more commonly preferred among drivers as an auto-gas throughout the world because it is cheaper than petrol or diesel and produces the same amount of energy. Because of its rapid vaporization and consequent lowering of temperature, it may cause severe cold injuries. A 33-year-old male who suffered from hand burn due to LPG is presented in this article. In LPG-converted cars, if the conversion has not been done properly, LPG may leak. Thus, the public must be informed of this potential danger while undertaking repairs of their vehicles. PMID:22290012

  13. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  14. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  15. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tracer gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and nanoparticles as well as an active test using an operator handling nanoalumina were conducted. A commercially available particle generator was used to produce sodium chloride tracer nanoparticles. Containment effectiveness was evaluated by sampling both in the breathing zone (BZ) of a mannequin and operator as well as across the hood opening. These containment tests were conducted across a range of hood face velocities (60, 80, and 100 feet/minute) and with the room ventilation system turned off and on. For the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was much more prominent on the left side of the hood (closest to the room supply air diffuser) although some leakage was noted on the right side and in the BZ sample locations. During the tracer gas and tracer nanoparticle tests, leakage was primarily noted when the room air conditioner was on for both the low and medium hood exhaust air flows. When the room air conditioner was turned off, the static tracer gas tests showed good containment across most test conditions. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. The impact of a room air conditioner was demonstrated with containment being adversely impacted during the use of room air ventilation. The tracer nanoparticle approach is a simple method requiring minimal setup and instrumentation. However, the method requires the reduction in

  16. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  17. An Explanation of the Varied Measurements of Gas Field Methane Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, W. F.; McHugh, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    In situ engineering measurements of natural gas well sites indicate leakage rates with a mean rate of 1.5% of the gas production rate from individual wells. These have been made at several gas basins using in situ measurements. These in situ engineering measurements are reported as the fugitive emission rates to the UNCCC by the EPA. On the other hand, atmospheric measurements at altitudes above the surface by several atmospheric groups indicate that gas fields are leaking at an average rate of over 9 %. Papers have been published in several highly reputable journals by government and university scientists. Both groups have been criticizing the methodologies of the opposite group. We propose that a more likely explanation is that both groups are correct. Although this appears as a direct conflict with one group on each side, a careful analysis shows that the two groups are measuring different air parcels. This is the only explanation which will explain the apparent conflicting situation. This can be understood if the basins in which the wells are sited are actually leaking from the bed rock formations in which the wells are drilled. If the geology of the natural gas basins is examined in detail, then the situation becomes understandable. Many basins contain gas in fault traps. These faults often leak, particularly if there is a small earthquake. The leaks can follow tilted layers, resulting in vertical transport of gas along the slanted layer cracks. This leakage may emerge into the atmosphere at large distances from the actual gas well under measurement. Fracking can obviously increase the leakage from a valley gas field. The methane leaks could alter the budgets of greenhouse gases reported by various gas producing countries by significant amounts. The potential increases and altered budgets for various countries as reported to the UNCCC are estimated and reported in this presentation. The fraction of these unreported leaks which should be reported will have to

  18. Analysis for leakage and rotordynamic coefficients of surface roughened tapered annular gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, C. C.

    1984-01-01

    In order to soften the effects of rub, the smooth stators of turbine gas seals are sometimes replaced by a honeycomb surface. This deliberately roughened stator and smooth rotor combination retards the seal leakage and may lead to enhanced rotor stability. However, many factors determine the rotordynamic coefficients and little is known as to the effectiveness of these honeycomb seals under various changes in the independent seal parameters. An analytical-computational method to solve for the rotordynamic coefficients of this type of compressible-flow seal is developed. The governing equations for surface roughned tapered annular gas seals are based on a modified Hirs' turbulent bulk flow model. A perturbation analysis is employed to develop zeroth and first-order perturbation equations. These equations are numerically integrated to solve for the leakage, pressure, density, and velocity for small motion of the shaft about the centered position. The resulting pressure distribution is then integrated to find the corresponding rotor-dynamic coefficients.

  19. Leakage detection of Marcellus Shale natural gas at an Upper Devonian gas monitoring well: a 3-d numerical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwei; Anderson, Nicole; Dilmore, Robert; Soeder, Daniel J; Bromhal, Grant

    2014-09-16

    Potential natural gas leakage into shallow, overlying formations and aquifers from Marcellus Shale gas drilling operations is a public concern. However, before natural gas could reach underground sources of drinking water (USDW), it must pass through several geologic formations. Tracer and pressure monitoring in formations overlying the Marcellus could help detect natural gas leakage at hydraulic fracturing sites before it reaches USDW. In this study, a numerical simulation code (TOUGH 2) was used to investigate the potential for detecting leaking natural gas in such an overlying geologic formation. The modeled zone was based on a gas field in Greene County, Pennsylvania, undergoing production activities. The model assumed, hypothetically, that methane (CH4), the primary component of natural gas, with some tracer, was leaking around an existing well between the Marcellus Shale and the shallower and lower-pressure Bradford Formation. The leaky well was located 170 m away from a monitoring well, in the Bradford Formation. A simulation study was performed to determine how quickly the tracer monitoring could detect a leak of a known size. Using some typical parameters for the Bradford Formation, model results showed that a detectable tracer volume fraction of 2.0 × 10(-15) would be noted at the monitoring well in 9.8 years. The most rapid detection of tracer for the leak rates simulated was 81 days, but this scenario required that the leakage release point was at the same depth as the perforation zone of the monitoring well and the zones above and below the perforation zone had low permeability, which created a preferred tracer migration pathway along the perforation zone. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the time needed to detect CH4 leakage at the monitoring well was very sensitive to changes in the thickness of the high-permeability zone, CH4 leaking rate, and production rate of the monitoring well. PMID:25144442

  20. Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

  1. Development of the educational Arduino module using the helium gas airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Se-Ho; Kim, Won-Hoe; Seo, Suk-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    Various educational Arduino modules with its simplicity have been developed since Arduino's release into the market. In this study, the helium gas airship was employed to make an Arduino module by applying Arduino Mini, Bluetooth and Android applications.

  2. Quasi-One-Dimensional Electron Gas Bound to a Helium-Coated Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebrecht, Michael; Del Maestro, Adrian; Cole, Milton W.

    2016-05-01

    A much-studied system is the quasi-2D electron gas in image-potential bound states at the surface of helium and hydrogen. In this paper, we report on an analogous quasi-1D system: electrons bound by image-like polarization forces to the surface of a helium-coated carbon nanotube. The potential is computed from an electron-helium pseudopotential, plus a dynamic image term evaluated from a semi-classical model of the nanotube's response function. Predictions are made for the bound states and potential many-body properties of this novel electron gas for a specific choice of tube radius and film thickness.

  3. Spatial concentration distribution model for short-range continuous gas leakage of small amount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meirong; Wang, Lingxue; Li, Jiakun; Long, Yunting; Gao, Yue

    2012-06-01

    Passive infrared gas imaging systems have been utilized in the equipment leak detection and repair in chemical manufacturers and petroleum refineries. The detection performance mainly relates to the sensitivity of infrared detector, optical depth of gas, atmospheric transmission, wind speed, and so on. Based on our knowledge, the spatial concentration distribution of continuously leaking gas plays an important part in leak detection. Several computational model of gas diffusion were proposed by researchers, such as Gaussian model, BM model, Sutton model and FEM3 model. But these models focus on calculating a large scale gas concentration distribution for a great amount of gas leaks above over 100- meter height, and not applicable to assess detection limit of a gas imaging system in short range. In this paper, a wind tunnel experiment is designed. Under different leaking rate and wind speed, concentration in different spatial positions is measured by portable gas detectors. Through analyzing the experimental data, the two parameters σy(x) and σz (x) that determine the plume dispersion in Gaussian model are adjusted to produce the best curve fit to the gas concentration data. Then a concentration distribution model for small mount gas leakage in short range is established. Various gases, ethylene and methane are used to testify this model.

  4. Methane Leakage from Natural Gas Systems: Comparisons, Communication, and Policy Relevance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, C.; Clavin, C.; Mueller, K. L.

    2013-12-01

    Increases in domestic natural gas production from shale gas and tight oil resources have ignited a scientific and policy debate about the climate implications of increasing levels of natural gas utilization on a national and global scale. The debate has primarily centered on characterizing the life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions associated with natural gas electricity generation or transportation. As such, there has been significant recent attention to estimating upstream methane and CO2 emissions from natural gas production, processing, transmission, and distribution using either bottom-up inventory or top-down atmospheric methods ranging from regional to global scales. Due to the general scarcity of measured data, the highly variable production practices of the oil & gas industry, and the different geological conditions under which the industry operates, determining methane emissions (sometimes calculated as a 'leakage rate') and overall climate impact over a policy-relevant spatial and temporal scale has been highly challenging. This unsettled state of the science exists as energy and climate policy decisions are being made in tandem with scientific knowledge generation, while at the same time production practices continue to change in a quickly innovating industry. This research critically reviews the work to date on quantifying methane leakage and life-cycle greenhouse gas implications of unconventional onshore oil & gas compared to other fuels such as coal. We take the perspective of a national-level U.S. decision-maker and ask how different methods (inventories, device-level measurements, regional and national inversions) can contribute to the information needed to make informed energy and climate policy decision regarding unconventional resources. Different methods have different strengths, weaknesses, and uncertainties, and such differences must be accounted for properly to ensure usefulness. We find that most work to date has suffered from one or more of

  5. Real gas flow parameters for NASA Langley 22-inch Mach 20 helium tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational procedure was developed which can be used to determine the flow properties in hypersonic helium wind tunnels in which real gas behavior is significant. In this procedure, a three-coefficient virial equation of state and the assumption of isentropic nozzle flow are employed to determine the tunnel reservoir, nozzle, throat, freestream, and post-normal shock conditions. This method was applied to a range of conditions which encompasses the operational capabilities of the LaRC 22-Inch Mach 20 Helium Tunnel. Results are presented graphically in the form of real gas correction factors which can be applied to perfect gas calculations. Important thermodynamic properties of helium are also plotted versus pressure and temperature. The computational scheme used to determine the real-helium flow parameters was incorporated into a FORTRAN code which is discussed.

  6. Evaluation of leakage from a metal machining center using tracer gas methods: a case study.

    PubMed

    Heitbrink, W A; Earnest, G S; Mickelsen, R L; Mead, K R; D'Arcy, J B

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of engineering controls in reducing worker exposure to metalworking fluids, an evaluation of an enclosure for a machining center during face milling was performed. The enclosure was built around a vertical metal machining center with an attached ventilation system consisting of a 25-cm diameter duct, a fan, and an air-cleaning filter. The evaluation method included using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas to determine the ventilation system's flow rate and capture efficiency, a respirable aerosol monitor (RAM) to identify aerosol leak locations around the enclosure, and smoke tubes and a velometer to evaluate air movement around the outside of the enclosure. Results of the tracer gas evaluation indicated that the control system was approximately 98% efficient at capturing tracer gas released near the spindle of the machining center. This result was not significantly different from 100% efficiency (p = 0.2). The measured SF6 concentration when released directly into the duct had a relative standard deviation of 2.2%; whereas, when releasing SF6 at the spindle, the concentration had a significantly higher relative standard deviation of 7.8% (p = 0.016). This increased variability could be due to a cyclic leakage at a small gap between the upper and lower portion of the enclosure or due to cyclic stagnation. Leakage also was observed with smoke tubes, a velometer, and an aerosol photometer. The tool and fluid motion combined to induce a periodic airflow in and out of the enclosure. These results suggest that tracer gas methods could be used to evaluate enclosure efficiency. However, smoke tubes and aerosol instrumentation such as optical particle counters or aerosol photometers also need to be used to locate leakage from enclosures. PMID:10635544

  7. Cryogenic Thermal Studies on Terminations for Helium Gas Cooled Superconducting Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chul Han; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Graber, Lukas; Pamidi, Sastry V.

    Details of the design of terminations for testing a superconducting DC monopole cable cooled with gaseous helium are presented. The termination design includes a liquid nitrogen chamber to reduce heat influx into the helium section through current leads. Thermal studies on the assembly of the two terminations and a 1 m or 30 m cable cryostat were performed at variable mass flow rates of helium gas. Measurements of temperature profile for the test system without the superconducting cable showed temperature rise between 5 K and 20 K depending on the mass flow rate. The temperature profile across the test system was used to estimate the heat load from different components of the system. Results with and without the liquid nitrogen in current lead section were compared to estimate the savings provided by the liquid nitrogen on the head of the helium circulation system. Suggestions for improving the design to enable fully gas cooled terminations are presented.

  8. Remote reactor repair: GTA (gas tungsten Arc) weld cracking caused by entrapped helium

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, Jr, W R

    1988-01-01

    A repair patch was welded to the wall of a nuclear reactor tank using remotely controlled thirty-foot long robot arms. Further repair was halted when gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds joining type 304L stainless steel patches to the 304 stainless steel wall developed toe cracks in the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The role of helium in cracking was investigated using material with entrapped helium from tritium decay. As a result of this investigation, and of an extensive array of diagnostic tests performed on reactor tank wall material, helium embrittlement was shown to be the cause of the toe cracks.

  9. A possible petroleum related helium anomaly in the soil gas, Boulder and Weld Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Alan A.; Dalziel, M.C.; Pogorski, L.A.; Quirt, S.G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the concentrations of helium in the soil gas conducted over a portion of the Denver Basin in Boulder and Weld Counties, Colorado, supports the existence of a potential petroleum prospect that was suggested by earlier geochemical analyses of the outcropping sandstones. The helium survey technique may prove to be a rapid, inexpensive, and valuable surface prospecting tool for detecting buried petroleum deposits.

  10. 100th Anniversary of the Discovery of Helium in Natural Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longsworth, Ralph Cady

    2006-04-01

    December 7, 2005 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of helium in natural gas by H. P. Cady and D. F. McFarland at the University of Kansas. The work was done in the Chemistry building, Bailey Hall, built in 1900 and designated as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in 2000. An early air liquefier was installed in 1903 and in the same year McFarland used the liquid air to analyze a sample of natural gas that wouldn't burn. He analyzed it as having 71% nitrogen plus the expected methane and residual gas that couldn't be condensed. It took two years to assemble the apparatus that Cady used to see the helium spectrum in the residual gas. This paper includes a discussion of the discoveries related to helium, personal insights into the life and contributions of H. P. Cady, and the evolution of its production.

  11. Helium Ionization in the Diffuse Ionized Gas surrounding Ultra-compact HII regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anish Roshi, D.; Churchwell, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    We observed radio recombination lines (RRLs) from regions surrounding three Ultra-compact HII (UCHII) regions at frequencies near 5 GHz. The observations were made with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). From existing observations we know that helium in the diffuse ionized gas (DIR), located far from the ionizing source, is not fully ionized. The objectives of our observations are to determine (a) the distance from the ionizing stars where helium is under ionized for a variety of physical conditions and (b) whether the helium ionization depends on the age of the ionizing star. With these objectives, we observed RRLs towards 16 positions in the envelops of UCHII regions G10.15-0.34, G23.46-0.20 and G29.96-0.02. Helium lines were detected toward 10 of the observed positions and hydrogen RRLs were detected toward all the observed positions. The observed ratio of ionized helium to ionized hydrogen (He^+/H^+) at the positions where helium lines are detected range between 0.03 and 0.09. At positions where helium lines are not detected the upper limit on the ratio is ~ 0.05. We discuss the dependence of He^+/H^+ ratio on the distance from and age of the ionizing star clusters in the observed sources.

  12. The application of laser Rayleigh scattering to gas density measurements in hypersonic helium flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoppe, J. C.; Honaker, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of the mean static free-stream gas density have been made in two Langley Research Center helium facilities, the 3-inch leg of the high-Reynolds-number helium complex and the 22-inch hypersonic helium tunnel. Rayleigh scattering of a CW argon ion laser beam at 514.5 nm provided the basic physical mechanism. The behavior of the scattered signal was linear, confirmed by a preliminary laboratory study. That study also revealed the need to introduce baffles to reduce stray light. A relatively simple optical system and associated photon-counting electronics were utilized to obtain data for densities from 10 to the 23rd to 10 to the 25th per cu m. The major purpose, to confirm the applicability of this technique in the hypersonic helium flow, was accomplished.

  13. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.; Zhang, M. M.; Xu, D.

    2014-01-29

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H{sub 2} from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H{sub 2} in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  14. Cryogenic system with GM cryocooler for krypton, xenon separation from hydrogen-helium purge gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X. X.; Zhang, M. M.; Zhang, D. X.; Xu, D.; Qian, Y.; Liu, W.

    2014-01-01

    In the thorium molten salt reactor (TMSR), fission products such as krypton, xenon and tritium will be produced continuously in the process of nuclear fission reaction. A cryogenic system with a two stage GM cryocooler was designed to separate Kr, Xe, and H2 from helium purge gas. The temperatures of two stage heat exchanger condensation tanks were maintained at about 38 K and 4.5 K, respectively. The main fluid parameters of heat transfer were confirmed, and the structural heat exchanger equipment and cold box were designed. Designed concentrations after cryogenic separation of Kr, Xe and H2 in helium recycle gas are less than 1 ppb.

  15. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  16. Modeling CO2 Gas Migration of Shallow Subsurface CO2 Leakage Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. L.; Plampin, M. R.; Pawar, R.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Leakage of injected CO2 into shallow subsurface aquifers or back into the atmosphere at geologic carbon sequestration sites is a risk that must be minimized. One potential CO2 leakage pathway involves the transport of dissolved CO2 into a shallow aquifer where the CO2 exsolves, forming a free CO2 gas phase that subsequently migrates through the aquifer. In order to reduce the negative effects of CO2 exsolution, it is important to fully understand each of the processes controlling the movement CO2, as well as the effects of aquifer heterogeneity on the overall fate and transport of CO2. In this work, we present multiphase flow simulations of intermediate scale CO2 exsolution experiments. The multiphase flow simulations were carried out using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Simulations were first designed to model experiments conducted in two different homogeneous packed sands. PEST (Parameter Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis) was used to optimize multiphase flow parameters (i.e., porosity, permeability, relative permeability, and capillary pressure) within FEHM. The optimized parameters were subsequently used to model heterogeneous experiments consisting of various packing configurations using the same sands. Comparisons of CO2 saturation between experiments and simulations will be presented and analyzed.

  17. Physiological response of rats to delivery of helium and xenon: implications for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Sigaloff, K. C.; Kubatina, L. V.; Donahue, M. A.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; ALbert, M. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    The physiological effects of various hyperpolarized helium and xenon MRI-compatible breathing protocols were investigated in 17 Sprague-Dawley rats, by continuous monitoring of blood oxygen saturation, heart rate, EKG, temperature and endotracheal pressure. The protocols included alternating breaths of pure noble gas and oxygen, continuous breaths of pure noble gas, breath-holds of pure noble gas for varying durations, and helium breath-holds preceded by two helium rinses. Alternate-breath protocols up to 128 breaths caused a decrease in oxygen saturation level of less than 5% for either helium or xenon, whereas 16 continuous-breaths caused a 31.5% +/- 2.3% decrease in oxygen saturation for helium and a 30.7% +/- 1. 3% decrease for xenon. Breath-hold protocols up to 25 s did not cause the oxygen saturation to fall below 90% for either of the noble gases. Oxygen saturation values below 90% are considered pathological. At 30 s of breath-hold, the blood oxygen saturation dropped precipitously to 82% +/- 0.6% for helium, and to 76.5% +/- 7. 4% for xenon. Breath-holds longer than 10 s preceded by pre-rinses caused oxygen saturation to drop below 90%. These findings demonstrate the need for standardized noble gas inhalation procedures that have been carefully tested, and for continuous physiological monitoring to ensure the safety of the subject. We find short breath-hold and alternate-breath protocols to be safe procedures for use in hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Remote laser detection of natural gas leakages from pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petukhov, V. O.; Gorobets, V. A.; Andreev, Yu M.; Lanskii, G. V.

    2010-02-01

    A differential absorption lidar based on a tunable TEA CO2 laser emitting at 42 lines of the 'hot' 0111 — 1110 band in the range from 10.9 to 11.4 μm is developed for detecting natural gas leakages from oil pipelines by measuring the ethane content in the atmosphere. The ethane detection sensitivity is 0.9 ppm km. The presence of methane does not distort the measurement results. The developed lidar can detect the natural gas leakage from kilometre heights at the flying velocities up to 200 km h-1 and a probe pulse repetition rate of 5 Hz.

  19. Application of gas chromatographic method in simultaneous measurements of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najman, J.; Bielewski, J.; Sliwka, I.

    2012-04-01

    Helium concentration in groundwater is a fine indicator in water dating in a range from a hundred to tens of thousands of years. Gas chromatography (GC) measurements of helium can be used as an alternative to mass spectrometry (MS) determinations of 4He for groundwater dating [1]. Argon and neon concentrations mainly serve for determining the temperature of recharge and the air excess which is needed to correct measured values of helium concentration [2] . A chromatographic measurement system of helium, argon and neon concentration in groundwater is presented [3]. Water samples are taken from groundwater with a precise procedure without contamination with air in a special stainless steel vessels of volume equal to 2900 cm3. Helium is extracted from water samples using the head-space method. After enrichment by cryotrap method helium is analyzed in the gas chromatograph equipped with the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) with detection limit of about 2.8 ng He. The helium limit of detection of presented method is 1,2·10-8 cm3STP/gH2O [4]. We are currently working on adapting the method of cryogenic enrichment of helium concentration for simultaneous measurements of the concentration of helium, argon and neon using single sample of groundwater. Neon will be measured with the thermal conductivity detector and capillary column filled with molecular sieve 5A. Argon will be analyzed also with the thermal conductivity detector and packed column filled with molecular sieve 5A. This work was supported by grant No. N N525 3488 38 from the polish National Science Centre. [1] A. Zuber, W. Ciężkowski, K. Różański (red.), Tracer methods in hydrogeological studies - a methodological guide. Wroclaw University of Technology Publishing House, Wroclaw, 2007 (in polish). [2] P. Mochalski, Chromatographic method for the determination of Ar, Ne and N2 in water, Ph.D. thesis, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Krakow, 2003 (in polish). [3] A. Żurek, P

  20. Real-Gas Correction Factors for Hypersonic Flow Parameters in Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Wayne D.

    1960-01-01

    The real-gas hypersonic flow parameters for helium have been calculated for stagnation temperatures from 0 F to 600 F and stagnation pressures up to 6,000 pounds per square inch absolute. The results of these calculations are presented in the form of simple correction factors which must be applied to the tabulated ideal-gas parameters. It has been shown that the deviations from the ideal-gas law which exist at high pressures may cause a corresponding significant error in the hypersonic flow parameters when calculated as an ideal gas. For example the ratio of the free-stream static to stagnation pressure as calculated from the thermodynamic properties of helium for a stagnation temperature of 80 F and pressure of 4,000 pounds per square inch absolute was found to be approximately 13 percent greater than that determined from the ideal-gas tabulation with a specific heat ratio of 5/3.

  1. [Research on vehicle-based remote sensing of natural gas pipeline leakage].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Tan, Tu; Cao, Zhen-song; Wang, Gui-shi; Zhang, Wei-jun; Gao, Xiao-ming

    2010-08-01

    In the present paper the authors designed a vehicle-based remote sensing system using simulated platform and presented a new method of concentration calibration of natural gas pipeline leakage remote sensing. By investigating the performance of different distance, different material, different angle of topographic back scatter and different scan speed, a good coincidence was achieved between experimental results and theoretical results. The system can realize the remote detection of low-level methane concentration at a velocity of 53.3 km x h(-1), and the detecting distance is about 70 m with the minimum detectable sensitivity being 28.9 ppm x m. The research result shows the feasibility in the application. PMID:20939337

  2. Groundwater baseline sampling programs designed to identify potential leakage from unconventional gas plays in Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, B.; Humez, P.; Ing, J.; Nightingale, M.

    2014-12-01

    With the rapid expansion of natural gas exploitation from unconventional reservoirs including coalbed methane and shale gas plays, there is significant public concern about potential future contamination of shallow potable groundwater with stray gases, formation waters or chemicals used during hydraulic fracturing. In order to enable a scientifically sound assessment of potential future deterioration of freshwater resources in shallow aquifers, it is essential to first establish and understand the current baseline of groundwater quality including its dissolved or free gases. Since 2006, we have conducted monitoring programs determining the chemical and isotopic compositions of water, its dissolved constituents, and of gases obtained from shallow groundwater and formation fluids collected from coalbed methane and shale gas plays in Western Canada. For groundwater samples, we placed special emphasis on determining the sources of dissolved and free gases using isotope techniques to assess whether gases produced from shale gas plays or potentially leaking from the intermediate zone are isotopically distinct from those in shallow aquifers. Methane and ethane in free gas samples obtained from shallow aquifers (n = 24) were found to have mean δ13C values of -72.4 ‰ and -50.2 ‰, respectively. These values are markedly different from the much higher δ13C values of methane and ethane in deeper portions of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin and in shale gas plays. Therefore, it appears highly feasible to identify potential gas leakage from unconventional gas plays provided that baseline data for shallow groundwater have been determined. Repeat baseline sampling of free gas from selected wells revealed a comparatively low variability of δ13C values of methane and ethane of usually < 2 ‰ over periods of several years, suggesting that it is not necessary to conduct baseline analyses more than three times. Also, δ13C values of methane in free gas samples and

  3. Characteristics of helium isotopes in natural gas and its tectonic implication in Bohai Bay Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Weiwei; Dai, Jinxin; Yang, Shufeng; Chen, Hanlin

    2006-09-01

    Analysis on helium isotopes in natural gas in Bohai Bay Basin showed their mantle-origin indicated by high3He/4He ratio. The span of3He/4He ratio increased from west to east. This pattern implied a close relationship to the local tectonic setting. Bohai Bay Basin experienced intensive neo-tectonic activities in the Cenozoic. Widespread faulted-depressions and strong volcanic eruptions manifested its extensional tectonics. Abiogenic natural gas could be released from magmas and migrate upward through deep faults during the extension. Tectonic conditions in the area would favor upward invasion and reservation of mantle-originated helium. Furthermore, with decrease of convergence rate between the Pacific and the Eurasia Plate, the subduction slab of the Pacific Plate rolled back and became steeper, resulting in mantle flow and other tectonic activities migrating from west to east in nature, and caused the variation in isotopic helium ratios.

  4. Charge stripping of U238 ion beam by helium gas stripper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imao, H.; Okuno, H.; Kuboki, H.; Yokouchi, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Kamigaito, O.; Hasebe, H.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kase, M.; Yano, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a nondestructive, efficient electric-charge-stripping method is a key requirement for next-generation high-intensity heavy-ion accelerators such as the RIKEN Radioactive-Isotope Beam Factory. A charge stripper employing a low-Z gas is an important candidate applicable to high-intensity uranium beams for replacing carbon-foil strippers. In this study, a high-beam-transmission charge-stripping system employing helium gas for U238 beams injected at 10.8MeV/u was developed and demonstrated for the first time. The charge-state evolution measured using helium in a thickness range of 0.24-1.83mg/cm2 is compared with theoretical predictions. Energy attenuation and energy spread due to the helium stripper are also investigated.

  5. Investigation of personal and fixed head oxygen deficiency hazard monitor performance for helium gas

    SciTech Connect

    D. Arenius; D. Curry; A. Hutton; K. Mahoney; S. Prior; H. Robertson

    2002-05-10

    On May 14, 2001, the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB) conducted a planned liquid helium release into its accelerator tunnel to study the effectiveness of the JLAB facility to vent the helium and therefore limit the oxygen deficiency hazard (ODH). During the test, it was discovered that a wide range of various oxygen deficiency monitors, of different manufacturers, were providing substantial conflicting measurements of the true oxygen level where health effects are of concern. Yet, when tested separately with nitrogen gas as the diluting gas into air, the same models performed very well. This problem, which is associated with helium displacement of air, was found for both personal oxygen monitors and fixed installation monitors from many different manufacturers. By informing other facilities of its findings, JLAB became aware this problem also exists among other national laboratories and facilities. Many manufacturers do not have data on the effects of helium displacing air for their devices. Some manufacturers have now duplicated the test results conducted at JLAB. Since both fixed installation and personal oxygen monitors have become standard safety device in many research facilities and industries in the United States and abroad, it is important that these facilities are aware of the problem and how it is being addressed at JLAB. This paper discusses the methods, procedures and materials used by JLAB to qualify its ODH sensors for helium. Data and graphs of JLAB's findings are provided.

  6. Fluid Leakage Pathways and Shallow Gas Accumulation in Peon field, northern North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadakkepuliyambatta, S.; Planke, S.; Bunz, S.

    2012-12-01

    Shallow gas accumulations are well known as a hazard for drilling activities as well as future prospective reservoirs. The Peon field is a huge shallow gas accumulation located in the northern North Sea discovered by Statoil in 2005. The Peon sandstone reservoir is formed as a sub-aquatic, ice-contact glaciomarine fan in Pleistocene (0.01-1.8 Ma) and is located 574m below sea level. The reservoir covers a large area of 250 km2 and contains approximately 35GSm3 gas in place. We use high-resolution P-Cable 3D seismic data to characterize the shallow gas reservoir, fluid leakage pathways and geological features in the Pleistocene sediments. The survey was acquired in 2009 and covers an area of 210 km2. The seismic data has a vertical resolution of 4.5m and provide significantly improved details of the internal structure of shallow gas reservoir and associated fluid flow. The P-Cable data provide high-resolution seismic images up to one second two-way travel time. Conventional 3D seismic data is used to analyze deeper features. In addition, well logs from exploration wells in the area are integrated with the seismic interpretation. The top of Peon sandstone reservoir is marked by a strong, polarity-reversed reflection at ~165m below seafloor. The neutron porosity log and density log distinguish gas-water contact at ~184m below seafloor. The upper regional unconformity (URU) marks the base of the sandstone body at ~198m below seafloor and separates it from westward dipping Late Pliocene sequences. Unconsolidated Pleistocene sediment sequences overlying the reservoir exhibits glacial plough marks indicating periodic glacial activity. High-amplitude reflections in the glacially deposited, unconsolidated formations above the reservoir and pull-down in reflections indicate presence of gas. Chaotic, low-amplitude reflections below the high-amplitude reflections could be due to upward migrating gas. Pockmark-like depressions, varying in width from ~200m to ~400m occur at

  7. Helium soil-gas variations associated with recent central California earthquakes: precursor or coincidence?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1981-01-01

    Decreases in the helium concentration of soil-gas have been observed to precede six of eight recent central California earthquakes. Ten monitoring stations were established near Hollister, California and along the San Andreas Fault to permit gas collection. The data showed decreases occurring a few weeks before the earthquakes and concentratiosn returned to prequake levels either shortly before or after the earthquakes.-Author

  8. Direct evidence of mismatching effect on H emission in laser-induced atmospheric helium gas plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Zener Sukra Lie; Koo Hendrik Kurniawan; May On Tjia; Rinda, Hedwig; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid; Nasrullah Idris; Alion Mangasi Marpaung; Marincan Pardede; Jobiliong, Eric; Muliadi Ramli; Heri Suyanto; Fukumoto, Kenichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro

    2013-02-07

    A time-resolved orthogonal double pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) with helium surrounding gas is developed for the explicit demonstration of time mismatch between the passage of fast moving impurity hydrogen atoms and the formation of thermal shock wave plasma generated by the relatively slow moving major host atoms of much greater masses ablated from the same sample. Although this so-called 'mismatching effect' has been consistently shown to be responsible for the gas pressure induced intensity diminution of hydrogen emission in a number of LIBS measurements using different ambient gases, its explicit demonstration has yet to be reported. The previously reported helium assisted excitation process has made possible the use of surrounding helium gas in our experimental set-up for showing that the ablated hydrogen atoms indeed move faster than the simultaneously ablated much heavier major host atoms as signaled by the earlier H emission in the helium plasma generated by a separate laser prior to the laser ablation. This conclusion is further substantiated by the observed dominant distribution of H atoms in the forward cone-shaped target plasma.

  9. Effects of helium gas mixing on the production of active species in nitrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveed, M. A.; Qayyum, A.; Ali, Shujaat; Zakaullah, M.

    2006-12-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effects of helium gas mixing on the electron temperature and the production of active species in nitrogen plasma generated by 50 Hz pulsed-DC power source. The electron temperature is determined from He I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot method. The relative changes in the concentration of active species N2(C Πu3) and N+2(B Σu+2) are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of nitrogen (0 0) bands of the second positive and the first negative systems. It is found that the electron temperature can be raised considerably by mixing helium in nitrogen plasma, which in return plays a significant role in enhancing the concentration of active species through Penning effect of metastable states of the helium.

  10. Numerical investigation of methane and formation fluid leakage along the casing of a decommissioned shale gas well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowamooz, A.; Lemieux, J.-M.; Molson, J.; Therrien, R.

    2015-06-01

    Methane and brine leakage rates and associated time scales along the cemented casing of a hypothetical decommissioned shale gas well have been assessed with a multiphase flow and multicomponent numerical model. The conceptual model used for the simulations assumes that the target shale formation is 200 m thick, overlain by a 750 m thick caprock, which is in turn overlain by a 50 m thick surficial sand aquifer, the 1000 m geological sequence being intersected by a fully penetrating borehole. This succession of geological units is representative of the region targeted for shale gas exploration in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Québec, Canada). The simulations aimed at assessing the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine leakage at the base of a surficial aquifer. The leakage of fluids can subsequently lead to the contamination of groundwater resources and/or, in the case of methane migration to ground surface, to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions. The minimum reported surface casing vent flow (measured at ground level) for shale gas wells in Quebec (0.01 m3/d) is used as a reference to evaluate the impact of well casing cementation quality on methane and brine migration. The simulations suggest that an adequately cemented borehole (with a casing annulus permeability kc≤ 1 mD) can prevent methane and brine leakage over a time scale of up to 100 years. However, a poorly cemented borehole (kc≥ 10 mD) could yield methane leakage rates at the base of an aquifer ranging from 0.04 m3/d to more than 100 m3/d, depending on the permeability of the target shale gas formation after abandonment and on the quantity of mobile gas in the formation. These values are compatible with surface casing vent flows reported for shale gas wells in the St. Lawrence Lowlands (Quebec, Canada). The simulated travel time of methane from the target shale formation to the surficial aquifer is between a few months and 30 years, depending on cementation quality and

  11. Helium concentrations in soil gas of the Ely and Delta 1 degree x 2 degrees quadrangles. Basin and Range Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Bowles, C.G.

    1983-01-01

    A reconnaissance soil-gas helium survey was made of the Ely, Nevada and Delta, Utah 1? x 2? quadrangles in the Basin and Range Province. Helium concentrations in 510 samples ranged from -147 to 441 ppb He with respect to ambient air. The median helium value for the study area was 36 ppb. Concentrations of more than 100 ppb He, and less than -20 ppb He, occur more commonly in the Ely Quadrangle and are especially numerous in the western one-half of this quadrangle. The data are presented both in figures and tables, and some of the geologic factors that may affect the helium distribution are discussed.

  12. Numerical simulation of sealing effect of gas hydrate for CO2 leakage in marine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Yu, T.; Oyama, H.; Yoshida, T.; Nakashima, T.; Kamada, K.

    2015-12-01

    Although carbon dioxide capture and storage in subsea geological structure is regarded as one of the promising mitigation technologies against the global warming, there is a risk of CO2 leakage and it is required to develop numerical models to predict how the CO2 migrate in the marine sediments. It is said that there are CO2-trap mechanisms in the geological formations, such as capillary trap, dissolution trap, and mineral trap. In this study, we focus on another trap mechanism: namely, hydrate trap. If the water is deep in the ocean, say more than 250 m, CO2 hydrate forms near the sea floor, at which temperature and pressure conditions can stabilise CO2 hydrate. To predict the gas productivity, it is important to know permeability damage in hydrate bearing sediments. Although hydrate saturation is the same, the permeability is different depending on its spatial distribution within the pore of sand sediment. Here, to know where hydrate is formed in the pore of porous media, we propose a numerical model for estimating the microscopic distribution of CO2 hydrate in sand sediment using a classical nucleation theory and the phase-field model.

  13. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  14. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  15. Evaluation Method of Gas Leakage Flow Through Small Clearances in CO2 Scroll Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Noriaki; Oku, Tatsuya; Anami, Keiko; Sawai, Kiyoshi; Sano, Kiyoshi; Morimoto, Takashi

    This study presents an evaluation method of leakage flow through small axial and radial clearances between the orbiting and fixed scrolls of scroll compressors, where empirical friction factors were addressed. Leakage flow experiments were conducted for two refrigerants, CO2 and R22, flowing through the small axial and radial clearance models with a thin rectangular cross-sectional opening. The pressure drop in a pressurized closed vessel, due to leakage, was measured at a variety of initial pressure up to 3 MPa for CO2 and 0.6 MPa for R22. Darcy-Weisbach equation for the incompressible viscous fluid flow through the circular pipe was successfully applied to calculate the pressure drop due to leakage through the thin rectangular cross-section, where the empirical friction factors were determined and plotted on a Moody diagram. It was concluded that the working fluids are compressible and the leakage flow through the small clearances can be treated as the incompressible viscous fluid, where both the axial and radial clearance leakage flows can be represented by the same friction factor for both CO2 and R22 refrigerants, despite the significantly different working pressures. In addition it was addressed that the empirical friction factors were strongly dependent on the relative roughness of leakage channel surface.

  16. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent.

  17. Efficient rotational cooling of Coulomb-crystallized molecular ions by a helium buffer gas.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A K; Versolato, O O; Kłosowski, L; Kristensen, S B; Gingell, A; Schwarz, M; Windberger, A; Ullrich, J; López-Urrutia, J R Crespo; Drewsen, M

    2014-04-01

    The preparation of cold molecules is of great importance in many contexts, such as fundamental physics investigations, high-resolution spectroscopy of complex molecules, cold chemistry and astrochemistry. One versatile and widely applied method to cool molecules is helium buffer-gas cooling in either a supersonic beam expansion or a cryogenic trap environment. Another more recent method applicable to trapped molecular ions relies on sympathetic translational cooling, through collisional interactions with co-trapped, laser-cooled atomic ions, into spatially ordered structures called Coulomb crystals, combined with laser-controlled internal-state preparation. Here we present experimental results on helium buffer-gas cooling of the rotational degrees of freedom of MgH(+) molecular ions, which have been trapped and sympathetically cooled in a cryogenic linear radio-frequency quadrupole trap. With helium collision rates of only about ten per second--that is, four to five orders of magnitude lower than in typical buffer-gas cooling settings--we have cooled a single molecular ion to a rotational temperature of 7.5(+0.9)(-0.7) kelvin, the lowest such temperature so far measured. In addition, by varying the shape of, or the number of atomic and molecular ions in, larger Coulomb crystals, or both, we have tuned the effective rotational temperature from about 7 kelvin to about 60 kelvin by changing the translational micromotion energy of the ions. The extremely low helium collision rate may allow for sympathetic sideband cooling of single molecular ions, and eventually make quantum-logic spectroscopy of buffer-gas-cooled molecular ions feasible. Furthermore, application of the present cooling scheme to complex molecular ions should enable single- or few-state manipulations of individual molecules of biological interest. PMID:24670662

  18. Helium Gas Permeability of SiC/SiC Composite Developed for Blanket Component

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Tomoaki; Jinushi, Takahiro; Hirohata, Yuko; Hashiba, Masao; Yamauchi, Yuji; Katoh, Yutai; Kohyama, Akira

    2003-03-15

    To employ SiC/SiC composite as blanket components of a fusion reactor, permeation behavior of helium gas has to be investigated since the helium is used as the coolant. For this purpose, a vacuum system consisting of upstream and downstream chambers was fabricated for the measurement of permeability, and the permeability was measured for several SiC/SiC composite materials recently developed. For the pressure range from 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 5} Pa in the upstream chamber, the pressure rise due to the permeation of helium in the downstream chamber linearly increased with the pressure of the upstream chamber. Then, the permeability was roughly constant for the pressure range of the upstream chamber.The permeabilities of SiC/SiC composites produced by polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP), hot pressing (HP) and melt-infiltration-finished PIP were 5 x 10{sup -5}, 4 x 10{sup -6}, and 9 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/s, respectively. In the matrix structure of the SiC/SiC composite made by the PIP method with a high permeability, cracking in the matrix and pores of micron size were observed. Compared to these materials, SiC/SiC composites produced by liquid phase sintering using submicron or nanopowder of {beta}-SiC and the HP method had extremely low permeabilities. The permeability of the SiC/SiC composite made by using submicron or nanopowder of {beta}-SiC became 1.5 x 10{sup -9} or 4 x 10{sup -11} m{sup 2}/s.Based upon the present data, the helium gas flow was analyzed for a blanket module consisting of only SiC/SiC composite. If a vacuum pump is attached to the module, the helium leak into a plasma can be ignored, compared to the heliums produced by fusion reactions. Hence, the entire module can be made by only SiC/SiC composite, from a viewpoint of helium permeation.

  19. A helium gas scintillator active target for photoreaction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Jebali, Ramsey; Annand, John R. M.; Adler, Jan-Olof; Akkurt, Iskender; Buchanan, Emma; Brudvik, Jason; Fissum, Kevin; Gardner, Simon; Hamilton, David J.; Hansen, Kurt; Isaksson, Lennart; Livingston, Kenneth; Lundin, Magnus; McGeorge, John C.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; MacRae, Roderick; Middleton, Duncan G.; Reiter, Andreas J. H.; Rosner, Günther; Schröder, Bent; Sjögren, Johan; Sokhan, Daria; Strandberg, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    A multi-cell He gas scintillator active target, designed for the measurement of photoreaction cross sections, is described. The target has four main chambers, giving an overall thickness of 0.103 g/cm3 at an operating pressure of 2 MPa. Scintillations are read out by photomultiplier tubes and the addition of small amounts of N2 to the He, to shift the scintillation emission from UV to visible, is discussed. First results of measurements at the MAX IV Laboratory tagged-photon facility show that the target has a timing resolution of around 1 ns and can cope well with a high-flux photon beam. The determination of reaction cross sections from target yields relies on a Monte Carlo simulation, which considers scintillation light transport, photodisintegration processes in 4He, background photon interactions in target windows and interactions of the reaction-product particles in the gas and target container. The predictions of this simulation are compared to the measured target response.

  20. Transport of fission products with a helium gas-jet at TRIGA-SPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibach, M.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Herfurth, F.; Geppert, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Krämer, J.; Krieger, A.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.

    2010-02-01

    A helium gas-jet system for the transport of fission products from the research reactor TRIGA Mainz has been developed, characterized and tested within the TRIGA-SPEC experiment. For the first time at TRIGA Mainz carbon aerosol particles have been used for the transport of radionuclides from a target chamber with high efficiency. The radionuclides have been identified by means of γ-spectroscopy. Transport time, efficiency as well as the absolute number of transported radionuclides for several species have been determined. The design and the characterization of the gas-jet system are described and discussed.

  1. How to make Raman-inactive helium visible in Raman spectra of tritium-helium gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Schloesser, M.; Pakari, O.; Rupp, S.; Mirz, S.; Fischer, S.

    2015-03-15

    Raman spectroscopy, a powerful method for the quantitative compositional analysis of molecular gases, e.g. mixtures of hydrogen isotopologues, is not able to detect monoatomic species like helium. This deficit can be overcome by using radioluminescence emission from helium atoms induced by β-electrons from tritium decay. We present theoretical considerations and combined Raman/radioluminescence spectra. Furthermore, we discuss the linearity of the method together with validation measurements for determining the pressure dependence. Finally, we conclude how this technique can be used for samples of helium with traces of tritium, and vice versa. (authors)

  2. The effect on the transmission loss of a double wall panel of using helium gas in the gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of increasing the sound-power transmission loss of a double panel by using helium gas in the gap is investigated. The transmission loss of a panel is defined as ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of the sound power incident on the panel to the sound power transmitted to the space on the other side of the panel. The work is associated with extensive research being done to develop new techniques for predicting the interior noise levels on board high-speed advanced turboprop aircraft and reducing the noise levels with a minimum weight penalty. Helium gas was chosen for its inert properties and its low impedance compared with air. With helium in the gap, the impedance mismatch experienced by the sound wave will be greater than that with air in the gap. It is seen that helium gas in the gap increases the transmission loss of the double panel over a wide range of frequencies.

  3. The Descending Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2014-01-01

    I describe a simple and fascinating experiment wherein helium leaks out of a rubber balloon, thereby causing it to descend. An estimate of the volumetric leakage rate is made by measuring its rate of descent.

  4. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge working in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.

  5. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, William C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Farrar, C.D.; Hainsworth, L.J.; Hausback, B.

    1998-01-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source (??13C = -4.5 to -5???, 3He/4He = 4.5 to 6.7 RA) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO2 discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills are associated with CO2 concentrations of 30-90% in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 g m-2 d-1 at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO2 discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO2 flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30-50 t/d of CO2 are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO2 and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with some combination of magmatic degassing and thermal metamorphism of metasedimentary rocks. Furthermore, N2/Ar ratios and nitrogen isotopic values

  6. Helium circulator design considerations for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor plant

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.

    1986-12-01

    Efforts are in progress to develop a standard modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant that is amenable to design certification and serial production. The MHTGR reference design, based on a steam cycle power conversion system, utilizes a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Flexibility in power rating is afforded by utilizing a multiplicity of the standard module. The circulator, which is an electric motor-driven helium compressor, is a key component in the primary system of the nuclear plant, since it facilitates thermal energy transfer from the reactor core to the steam generator; and, hence, to the external turbo-generator set. This paper highlights the helium circulator design considerations for the reference MHTGR plant and includes a discussion on the major features of the turbomachine concept, operational characteristics, and the technology base that exists in the US.

  7. Prediction of central California earthquakes from soil-gas helium fluctuations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    The observations of short-term decreases in helium soil-gas concentrations along the San Andreas Fault in central California have been correlated with subsequent earthquake activity. The area of study is elliptical in shape with radii approximately 160??80 km, centered near San Benito, and with the major axis parallel to the Fault. For 83 percent of the M>4 earthquakes in this area a helium decrease preceded seismic activity by 1.5 to 6.5 weeks. There were several earthquakes without a decrease and several decreases without a corresponding earthquake. Owing to complex and unresolved interaction of many geophysical and geochemical parameters, no suitable model is yet developed to explain the observations. ?? 1985 Birkha??user Verlag.

  8. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas on Ultrathin Helium Films on Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Armbrust, N; Güdde, J; Höfer, U; Kossler, S; Feulner, P

    2016-06-24

    Electrons in image-potential states on the surface of bulk helium represent a unique model system of a two-dimensional electron gas. Here, we investigate their properties in the extreme case of reduced film thickness: a monolayer of helium physisorbed on a single-crystalline (111)-oriented Cu surface. For this purpose we have utilized a customized setup for time-resolved two-photon photoemission at very low temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We demonstrate that the highly polarizable metal substrate increases the binding energy of the first (n=1) image-potential state by more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the surface of liquid helium. An electron in this state is still strongly decoupled from the metal surface due to the large negative electron affinity of helium and we find that even 1 monolayer of helium increases its lifetime by 1 order of magnitude compared to the bare Cu(111) surface. PMID:27391738

  9. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas on Ultrathin Helium Films on Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrust, N.; Güdde, J.; Höfer, U.; Kossler, S.; Feulner, P.

    2016-06-01

    Electrons in image-potential states on the surface of bulk helium represent a unique model system of a two-dimensional electron gas. Here, we investigate their properties in the extreme case of reduced film thickness: a monolayer of helium physisorbed on a single-crystalline (111)-oriented Cu surface. For this purpose we have utilized a customized setup for time-resolved two-photon photoemission at very low temperatures under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. We demonstrate that the highly polarizable metal substrate increases the binding energy of the first (n =1 ) image-potential state by more than 2 orders of magnitude as compared to the surface of liquid helium. An electron in this state is still strongly decoupled from the metal surface due to the large negative electron affinity of helium and we find that even 1 monolayer of helium increases its lifetime by 1 order of magnitude compared to the bare Cu(111) surface.

  10. Leakage test concerns for packagings with three-O-ring closure seals

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Towell, R.H.; Wangler, M.E.

    1997-07-01

    Recent radioactive packagings with three-O-ring closure seals, the middle O-ring being the containment seal, have the potential for false positive results from leakage rate tests. The volume between the containment O-ring and the inner O-ring is used for the helium gas required for the leakage rate tests, to reduce both the amount of helium used and the time for the tests. False positive results can be caused by either a large leakage in the containment sea/l or a leakage in the inner seal. This paper describes the problem, together with possible solutions/areas that need to be addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging.

  11. Gas porosity evolution and ion-implanted helium behavior in reactor ferritic/martensitic and austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, I. I.; Kalin, B. A.; Staltsov, M. S.; Oo, Kyi Zin; Binyukova, S. Yu.; Staltsova, O. S.; Polyansky, A. A.; Ageev, V. S.; Nikitina, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The peculiarities of gas porosity formation and helium retention and release in reactor ferritic/martensitic EP-450 and EP-450-ODS and austenitic ChS-68 steels are investigated by transmission electron microscopy and helium thermal desorption spectrometry (HTDS). The samples were irradiated by 40 keV He+ ions up to a fluence of 5 · 1020 m-2 at 293 and 923 K. An nonuniform distribution of helium bubbles and high-level gas swelling in ferritic/martensitic steels were found at high-temperature helium implantation. The same irradiation conditions result in formation of uniformly distributed helium bubbles and low-level swelling in ChS-68 steel. Temperature range of helium release from EP-450-ODS steel was considerably wider in comparison to HTDS-spectra of the EP-450 steel. A considerable quantity of helium is released from ODS steel in the high-temperature range after the main peak of the HTDS-spectrum.

  12. High cycle fatigue behavior of Incoloy 800H in a simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium environment

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, P.; Sabatini, R.L.; Epel, L.G.; Hare, J.R. Sr.

    1980-01-01

    The current study was an attempt to evaluate the high cycle fatigue strength of Incoloy 800H in a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor helium environment containing significant quantities of moisture. As-heat-treated and thermally-aged materials were tested to determine the effects of long term corrosion in the helium test gas. Results from in-helium tests were compared to those from a standard air environment. It was found that the mechanisms of fatigue failure were very complex and involved recovery/recrystallization of the surface ground layer on the specimens, sensitization, hardness changes, oxide scale integrity, and oxidation at the tips of propagation cracks. For certain situations a corrosion-fatigue process seems to be controlling. However, for the helium environment studied, there was usually no aging or test condition for which air gave a higher fatigue strength.

  13. Helium-Recycling Plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    Proposed system recovers and stores helium gas for reuse. Maintains helium at 99.99-percent purity, preventing water vapor from atmosphere or lubricating oil from pumps from contaminating gas. System takes in gas at nearly constant low back pressure near atmospheric pressure; introduces little or no back pressure into source of helium. Concept also extended to recycling of other gases.

  14. Operation of an ADR using helium exchange gas as a substitute for a failed heat switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-11-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 × 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  15. Operation of an ADR Using Helium Exchange Gas as a Substitute for a Failed Heat Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, P.; DiPirro, M.; Kimball, M.; Sneiderman, G.; Porter, F. S.; Kilbourne, C.; Kelley, R.; Fujimoto, R.; Yoshida, S.; Takei, Y.; Mitsuda, K.

    2014-01-01

    The Soft X-ray Spectrometer (SXS) is one of four instruments on the Japanese Astro-H mission, which is currently planned for launch in late 2015. The SXS will perform imaging spectroscopy in the soft X-ray band (0.3-12 keV) using a 6 6 pixel array of microcalorimeters cooled to 50 mK. The detectors are cooled by a 3-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) that rejects heat to either a superfluid helium tank (at 1.2 K) or to a 4.5 K Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler. Four gas-gap heat switches are used in the assembly to manage heat flow between the ADR stages and the heat sinks. The engineering model (EM) ADR was assembled and performance tested at NASA/GSFC in November 2011, and subsequently installed in the EM dewar at Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Japan. During the first cooldown in July 2012, a failure of the heat switch that linked the two colder stages of the ADR to the helium tank was observed. Operation of the ADR requires some mechanism for thermally linking the salt pills to the heat sink, and then thermally isolating them. With the failed heat switch unable to perform this function, an alternate plan was devised which used carefully controlled amounts of exchange gas in the dewar's guard vacuum to facilitate heat exchange. The process was successfully demonstrated in November 2012, allowing the ADR to cool the detectors to 50 mK for hold times in excess of 10 h. This paper describes the exchange-gas-assisted recycling process, and the strategies used to avoid helium contamination of the detectors at low temperature.

  16. High-voltage electrical apparatus utilizing an insulating gas of sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    DOEpatents

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    High-voltage electrical apparatus includes an outer housing at low potential, an inner electrode disposed within the outer housing at high potential with respect thereto, and support means for insulatably supporting the inner electrode within the outer housing. Conducting particles contaminate the interior of the outer housing, and an insulating gas electrically insulates the inner electrode from the outer housing even in the presence of the conducting particles. The insulating gas is comprised of sulfur hexafluoride at a partial pressure of from about 2.9 to about 3.4 atmospheres absolute, and helium at a partial pressure from about 1.1 to about 11.4 atmospheres absolute. The sulfur hexafluoride comprises between 20 and 65 volume percent of the insulating gas.

  17. A gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method for helium detection in postmortem blood and tissue specimens.

    PubMed

    Schaff, Jason E; Karas, Roman P; Marinetti, Laureen

    2012-03-01

    In cases of death by inert gas asphyxiation, it can be difficult to obtain toxicological evidence supporting assignment of a cause of death. Because of its low mass and high diffusivity, and its common use as a carrier gas, helium presents a particular challenge in this respect. We describe a rapid and simple gas chromatography-thermal conductivity detection method to qualitatively screen a variety of postmortem biological specimens for the presence of helium. Application of this method is demonstrated with three case examples, encompassing an array of different biological matrices. PMID:22337780

  18. Flash pyrolysis of New Mexico sub-bituminous coal in helium-methane gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.T.; Steinberg, M.

    1986-04-01

    A New Mexico sub-bituminous coal was flash pyrolyzed in gas mixtures of helium and methane at 1000/sup 0/C and 50 psi in an 1-in. I.D. entrained down-flow tubular reactor. The mixture contained 0 to 40% helium in methane. Under tested experimental conditions, pyrolysis in gas mixtures resulted in higher yields of ethylene and BTX than in pure methane. For example, under a coal flow rate of 1.0 lb/hr and methane flow rate of 4.0 lb/hr, pyrolysis in pure methane produced 7.7% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 9.0% BTX on the basis of carbon contained in coal; under similar coal and methane flow rates, as high as 14.8% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 15.3% BTX were obtained on pyrolysis in 25% He + 75% CH/sub 4/ gas mixture. The data show that the coal flow rate and methane flow rate both independently effect the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTS. At constant methane flow rate, increase in coal flow rate decreases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX; at constant coal flow rate, increase in methane flow rate increases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Flash pyrolysis of New Mexico sub-bituminous coal in helium-methane gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.T.; Steinberg, M.

    1986-01-01

    A New Mexico sub-bituminous coal was flash pyrolyzed in gas mixtures of helium and methane at 1000/sup 0/C and 50 psi in an 1-in. I.D. entrained down-flow tubular reactor. The mixture contained 0 to 40% helium in methane. Under tested experimental conditions, pyrolysis in gas mixtures resulted in higher yields of ethylene and BTX than in pure methane. For example, under a coal flow rate of 1.0 lb/hr and methane flow rate of 4.0 lb/hr, pyrolysis in pure methane produced 7.7% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 9.0% BTX on the basis of carbon contained in coal; under similar coal and methane flow rates, as high as 14.8% C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and 15.3% BTX were obtained on pyrolysis in 25% He + 75% CH/sub 4/ gas mixture. The data show that the coal flow rate and methane flow rate both independently affect the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX. At constant methane flow rate, increase in coal flow rate decreases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX; at constant coal flow rate, increase in methane flow rate increases the yields of C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ and BTX.

  20. Intermediate energy proton stopping power for hydrogen molecules and monoatomic helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Y. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Stopping power in the intermediate energy region (100 keV to 1 MeV) was investigated, based on the work of Lindhard and Winther, and on the local plasma model. The theory is applied to calculate stopping power of hydrogen molecules and helium gas for protons of energy ranging from 100 keV to 2.5 MeV. Agreement with the experimental data is found to be within 10 percent. Previously announced in STAR as N84-16955

  1. Channel Formation in Long Laser Pulse Interaction with a Helium Gas Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Malka, V.; De Wispelaere, E.; Amiranoff, F.; Baton, S.; Bonadio, R.; Coulaud, C.; Haroutunian, R.; Modena, A.; Puissant, D.; Stenz, C.; Hueller, S.; Casanova, M.

    1997-10-01

    Experimental realization of an electron density channel created by a low intensity laser in a helium gas jet is presented. The long (2.5mm) plasma channel is fully ionized and thus prevents undesirable refraction effects for propagation and guiding of a subsequent high intensity laser pulse. The channel parameters are easily controlled and well suited for laser guiding. The radial plasma expansion and the temperature evolution have been measured and compared to hydrodynamic simulations which show that the plasma expansion is governed by a thermal wave during the laser pulse. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. NEBULAR: Spectrum synthesis for mixed hydrogen-helium gas in ionization equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, Mischa

    2016-08-01

    NEBULAR synthesizes the spectrum of a mixed hydrogen helium gas in collisional ionization equilibrium. It is not a spectral fitting code, but it can be used to resample a model spectrum onto the wavelength grid of a real observation. It supports a wide range of temperatures and densities. NEBULAR includes free-free, free-bound, two-photon and line emission from HI, HeI and HeII. The code will either return the composite model spectrum, or, if desired, the unrescaled atomic emission coefficients. It is written in C++ and depends on the GNU Scientific Library (GSL).

  3. 75 FR 75995 - Request for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging Industry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... for Comments on Helium-3 Use in the Oil and Natural Gas Well Logging Industry AGENCY: Office of Fossil... and gas well logging industry. DATES: Written comments and information are requested on or before 5 p...-3 for use by the well logging industry in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 and for projecting the FY...

  4. Numerical Simulation of Energy Balance in Argon-Helium Mixed Gas Tungsten Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Nakata, Kazuhiro; Koshiishi, Fusaki; Suzuki, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Kei

    High temperature arc plasma produced by employing Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) is highly controllable, since it is stabilized with a shielding gas. Additionally, GTA requires low cost for equipment investment. Therefore, it is widely utilized as a heat source for material processing such as melting, cutting and welding, or decomposition and detoxification of toxic waste. Energy source properties of GTA strongly depend on the physical properties of the shielding gas. For instance, helium (He) gas or admixture of He gas with argon gas is employed as the shielding gas for conditions requiring high productivity in GTA welding process. Since He has low electrical conductivity especially in low temperature range due to high ionization potential, the current channel in He arc plasma is constricted near the arc axis. Consequently, the enhanced heat input intensity into a base material by the constriction increases weld depth and, thus, leads to the high productivity. However, the effect of the admixture on the heat input characteristics to the base metal is still not clear. In this paper, energy source properties of Ar-He GTA are predicted. The properties of arc plasma and the heat input intensity into a water-cooled copper anode are numerically analyzed.

  5. Leakage testing of packagings with three-O-ring closure seals

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Towell, R.H.; Wangler, M.E.

    1997-10-01

    Both the American National Standard for Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment (ANSI N14.5) and the ISO 12807:1996 Safe Transport of Radioactive Materials--Leakage Testing on Packages provide guidance for leakage rate testing to show that a particular packaging complies with regulatory requirements; both also provide guidance for determining appropriate acceptance criteria. Recent radioactive packaging designs have incorporated three-O-ring closure seals, the middle O-ring being the containment seal. These designs have the potential for false positive results in leakage rate tests. The volume between the containment O-ring and the inner O-ring is used for the helium gas required for the leakage rate tests, in order to reduce both the amount of helium used and the time required to conduct the tests. A leak detector samples the evacuated volume between the outer O-ring and the containment O-ring. False positive results can have two causes: a large leakage in the containment seal or leakage in the inner seal. This paper describes the problem, together with possible solutions and areas that should be addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) before a particular packaging design can be certified for transport. Ultimately, the SARP should provide justification that the requirements for leakage rate testing procedures, including the length of time needed to conduct the tests, will ensure that the containment closure seal is properly tested.

  6. Underwater gas pipeline leakage source localization by distributed fiber-optic sensing based on particle swarm optimization tuning of the support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yue; Wang, Qiang; Shi, Lilian; Yang, Qihua

    2016-01-10

    Accurate underwater gas pipeline leak localization requires particular attention due to the sensitivity of environmental conditions. Experiments were performed to analyze the localization performance of a distributed optical fiber sensing system based on the hybrid Sagnac and Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The traditional null frequency location method does not easily allow accurate location of the leakage points. To improve the positioning accuracy, the particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO) tuning of the support vector machine (SVM) was used to predict the leakage points based on gathered leakage data. The PSO is able to optimize the SVM parameters. For the 10 km range chosen, the results show the PSO-SVM average absolute error of the leakage points predicted is 66 m. The prediction accuracy of leakage points is 98.25% by PSO tuning of the SVM processing. For 20 leakage test data points, the average absolute error of leakage point location is 124.8 m. The leakage position predicted by the PSO algorithm after optimization of the parameters is more accurate. PMID:26835758

  7. Gas Breakdown of Radio Frequency Glow Discharges in Helium at near Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinkun; Xu, Jinzhou; Cui, Tongfei; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Shi, Jianjun

    2013-07-01

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was developed for radio frequency glow discharge in helium at near atmospheric pressure, and was employed to study the gas breakdown characteristics in terms of breakdown voltage. The effective secondary electron emission coefficient and the effective electric field for ions were demonstrated to be important for determining the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge at near atmospheric pressure. The constant of A was estimated to be 64±4 cm-1Torr-1, which was proportional to the first Townsend coefficient and could be employed to evaluate the gas breakdown voltage. The reduction in the breakdown voltage of radio frequency glow discharge with excitation frequency was studied and attributed to the electron trapping effect in the discharge gap.

  8. A Method for Calculating Viscosity and Thermal Conductivity of a Helium-Xenon Gas Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Paul K.

    2006-01-01

    A method for calculating viscosity and thermal conductivity of a helium-xenon (He-Xe) gas mixture was employed, and results were compared to AiResearch (part of Honeywell) analytical data. The method of choice was that presented by Hirschfelder with Singh's third-order correction factor applied to thermal conductivity. Values for viscosity and thermal conductivity were calculated over a temperature range of 400 to 1200 K for He-Xe gas mixture molecular weights of 20.183, 39.94, and 83.8 kg/kmol. First-order values for both transport properties were in good agreement with AiResearch analytical data. Third-order-corrected thermal conductivity values were all greater than AiResearch data, but were considered to be a better approximation of thermal conductivity because higher-order effects of mass and temperature were taken into consideration. Viscosity, conductivity, and Prandtl number were then compared to experimental data presented by Taylor.

  9. Description and initial operating performance of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube using heated helium driver gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A general description of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube is presented along with discussion of the basic components, internal resistance heater, arc-discharge assemblies, instrumentation, and operating procedure. Preliminary results using unheated and resistance-heated helium as the driver gas are presented. The driver-gas pressure ranged from approximately 17 to 59 MPa and its temperature ranged from 300 to 510 K. Interface velocities of approximately 3.8 to 6.7 km/sec were generated between the test gas and the acceleration gas using air as the test gas and helium as the acceleration gas. Test flow quality and comparison of measured and predicted expansion-tube flow quantities are discussed.

  10. Carbon dioxide and helium emissions from a reservoir of magmatic gas beneath Mammoth Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.; Evans, W.C. Kennedy, B.M. Farrar, C.D. Hainsworth, L.J. Hausback, B.

    1998-07-01

    Carbon dioxide and helium with isotopic compositions indicative of a magmatic source ({delta}thinsp{sup 13}C={minus}4.5 to {minus}5{per_thousand}, {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He=4.5 to 6.7 R{sub A}) are discharging at anomalous rates from Mammoth Mountain, on the southwestern rim of the Long Valley caldera in eastern California. The gas is released mainly as diffuse emissions from normal-temperature soils, but some gas issues from steam vents or leaves the mountain dissolved in cold groundwater. The rate of gas discharge increased significantly in 1989 following a 6-month period of persistent earthquake swarms and associated strain and ground deformation that has been attributed to dike emplacement beneath the mountain. An increase in the magmatic component of helium discharging in a steam vent on the north side of Mammoth Mountain, which also began in 1989, has persisted until the present time. Anomalous CO{sub 2} discharge from soils first occurred during the winter of 1990 and was followed by observations of several areas of tree kill and/or heavier than normal needlecast the following summer. Subsequent measurements have confirmed that the tree kills arc associated with CO{sub 2} concentrations of 30{endash}90{percent} in soil gas and gas flow rates of up to 31,000 gthinspm{sup {minus}2}thinspd{sup {minus}1} at the soil surface. Each of the tree-kill areas and one area of CO{sub 2} discharge above tree line occurs in close proximity to one or more normal faults, which may provide conduits for gas flow from depth. We estimate that the total diffuse CO{sub 2} flux from the mountain is approximately 520 t/d, and that 30{endash}50 t/d of CO{sub 2} are dissolved in cold groundwater flowing off the flanks of the mountain. Isotopic and chemical analyses of soil and fumarolic gas demonstrate a remarkable homogeneity in composition, suggesting that the CO{sub 2} and associated helium and excess nitrogen may be derived from a common gas reservoir whose source is associated with

  11. A determination of the molar gas constant R by acoustic thermometry in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavioso, R. M.; Madonna Ripa, D.; Steur, P. P. M.; Gaiser, C.; Truong, D.; Guianvarc'h, C.; Tarizzo, P.; Stuart, F. M.; Dematteis, R.

    2015-10-01

    We have determined the acoustic and microwave frequencies of a misaligned spherical resonator maintained near the temperature of the triple point of water and filled with helium with carefully characterized molar mass M=≤ft(4.002 6032+/- 0.000 0015\\right) g mol-1, with a relative standard uncertainty {{u}\\text{r}}(M)=0.37× {{10}-6} . From these data and traceable thermometry we estimate the speed of sound in our sample of helium at {{T}\\text{TPW}}=273.16  K and zero pressure to be u02=≤ft(\\text{945} \\text{71}0.45+/- 0.85\\right)  m2 s-2 and correspondingly deduce the value R=≤ft(8.314 4743+/- 0.000 0088\\right)  J mol-1 K-1 for the molar gas constant. We estimate the value k=R/{{N}\\text{A}}=≤ft(1.380 650 8+/- 0.000 0015\\right)× {{10}-23}  J K-1 for the Boltzmann constant using the currently accepted value of the Avogadro constant NA. These estimates of R and k, with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.06  ×  10-6, are 1.47 parts in 106 above the values recommended by CODATA in 2010.

  12. Spectral Characteristics of Deuterium-, Helium- and Gas-Mixture-Discharges within PF-1000 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Tsarenko, A.; Malinowski, K.; Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M. J.; Scholz, M.; Paduch, M.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-01-15

    The paper reports on spectroscopic studies of high-current plasma discharges performed at different gas fillings within the large PF-1000 facility. To study visible radiation (VR) the use was made of a MECHELLE registered 900-spectrometer equipped with the CCD readout. The observations of a PF pinch column were performed at an angle of about 65 deg. to the z-axis, and the viewing field was at a distance of 40-50 mm from the electrode ends. Optical measurements were carried out at 0.5-{mu}s exposition synchronized with a chosen period of the investigated discharge. Differences in the optical spectra, recorded at various deuterium-helium mixtures, were analyzed. Intensities of HeI lines were computed for an assumed electron temperature and compared with the experiment. Estimated plasma concentration in pure-deuterium discharges amounted to 8x1018 cm-3, while that in pure helium shots was (4-7)x1017 cm-3 only. Estimates of the electron temperature, from the ratio of intensities of the chosen spectral lines and the continuum, gave values ranging from 5 eV to 50 eV. The paper presents also some spectra from 'weak shots', which show distinct impurity lines caused by different reasons.

  13. Diffusion coefficient of krypton atoms in helium gas at low and moderate temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazza, M. T.; Bouledroua, M.

    In the present work, using the Chapman-Enskog method for dilute gases, the diffusion coefficients of ground krypton atoms in a very weakly ionized helium buffer gas are revisited. The calculations are carried out quantum mechanically in the range of low and moderate temperatures. The 1 Σ+ potential-energy curve via which Kr approaches He is constructed from the most recent ab initio energy points. The reliable data points used in the construction are smoothly connected to adequate long- and short-range forms. The calculations of the classical second virial coefficients and the Boyle temperature of the helium-krypton mixture are also discussed. These coefficients and their variations in terms of temperature are analysed by adopting the constructed HeKr potential and the Lennard-Jones form that fits it. The diffusion and elastic cross sections are also explored and the resonance features they exhibit are closely examined. The variation law of the diffusion coefficients with temperature is determined for typical values of density and pressure. The coefficients show excellent agreement with the available experimental data; the discrepancies do not exceed 5%.

  14. Using Sulfur Hexafluoride to Quantify the Gas Leakage Rate within the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO) and the Diffusion Coefficient of the Crushed Basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barta, J.; Costa, M.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Pangle, L. A.; Troch, P. A. A.

    2014-12-01

    In order to understand the biological processes taking place on an experimental hillslope with vegetation, it is important to know the amount of gasses such as oxygen and carbon dioxide being produced and consumed. When studying the gas exchange rates in a closed system like the Landscape Evolution Observatory (LEO), one must take into account gas that is being lost or gained from other sources. Aside from biogeochemical processes, gas concentrations in the LEO atmosphere may change due to leakage to the outside environment and diffusion into the soil. To quantify these fluxes, two constants must be determined experimentally: the gas leakage constant L and the coefficient of diffusion for the hillslope soil. To accomplish this, a tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride, was injected into the sealed east bay chamber and syringes were used to take samples periodically from the airspace and from the hillslope soil. The relative sulfur hexafluoride concentrations were then analyzed with a SRI 8610c gas chromatograph. By analyzing both the the airspace concentration decay as well as the concentration in the soil, the chamber's leakage constant was determined to be and the soil diffusion coefficient was also determined. Once these values are experimentally quantified, they can be used in equations to quantify the rate of gas leakage and soil diffusion of more important gases such as carbon dioxide and oxygen.

  15. Fluid Leakages in Gas-Hydrate Systems at the Storegga Slide of the Mid-Norwegian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hustoft, S.; Mienert, J.; Buenz, S.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution 3D-seismic data has given new insight to the fluid flow regime at the well-documented gas-hydrate system along the northern flank of the Storegga Slide of the passive mid-Norwegian continental margin. Fluids are expelled from a widespread polygonal fault system of fine-grained, Miocene sediments of the lower Kai Formation that contribute to formation of gas hydrates in the study area. Previous work has mainly presumed a diffusive fluid flow regime above the polygonal fault system into the gas hydrate stability zone. However, 3D-seismic data indicates that migrating fluids above the polygonal fault system are focused trough imbricated small-offset fault zones in the upper stratigraphic level of the Kai Formation. Fluids seems to accumulate laterally within the lower level of the overlying Plio-Pleistocene Naust Formation, causing a small-scale dome structure with low frequency content, above the imbricated fault zones. Vertical fluid leakage originates from the extended dome structure causing fracturing in sediments throughout a ~200 m sedimentary sequence. The fluid leakage terminates within strata represented by negative amplitude anomalies located beneath a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). Free gas in relatively porous media is deflected laterally by impermeable hydrated sediments occurring down-slope, and less permeable glacigenic sediments up-slope. At the upper termination of the fractured sediments within the Plio-Pleistocene formation, a 3 km long channel is recognized showing a geometric shape opposite to the stratigraphic deep-seated dome structure, but having the same lateral extension. The presence of vertical blowout pipes in direct proximity to the channel, indicate high pore pressure build-up. Adding to the complexity of the fluid flow system in gas hydrate settings, the channel might be a seismic artefact due to the presence of gas (pushdown), rather than a morphological feature. Due to the low organic matter content (< 1 %) of

  16. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  17. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  18. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  19. Heat transfer in a compact tubular heat exchanger with helium gas at 3.5 MPa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Douglas A.; Glover, Michael P.

    1990-01-01

    A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of circular tubes in parallel brazed to a grooved base plate. This tube specimen heat exchanger was tested in an apparatus which radiatively heated the specimen on one side at a heat flux of up to 54 W/sq cm, and cooled the specimen with helium gas at 3.5 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 3000 to 35,000. The measured friction factor of the tube specimen was lower than that of a circular tube with fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to entrance and exit losses. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in circular tubes.

  20. Cryogenic and Simulated Fuel Jet Breakup in Argon, Helium and Nitrogen Gas Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1995-01-01

    Two-phase flow atomization of liquid nitrogen jets was experimentally investigated. They were co-axially injected into high-velocity gas flows of helium, nitrogen and argon, respectively, and atomized internally inside a two-fluid fuel nozzle. Cryogenic sprays with relatively high specific surface areas were produced, i.e., ratios of surface area to volume were fairly high. This was indicated by values of reciprocal Sauter mean diameters, RSMD's, as measured with a scattered- light scanning instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center. Correlating expressions were derived for the three atomizing gases over a gas temperature range of 111 to 422 K. Also, the correlation was extended to include waterjet breakup data that had been previously obtained in simulating fuel jet breakup in sonic velocity gas flow. The final correlating expression included a new dimensionless molecular-scale acceleration group. It was needed to correlate RSMD data, for LN2 and H2O sprays, with the fluid properties of the liquid jets and atomizing gases used in this investigation.

  1. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  2. An Advanced Helium Buffer Seal for the SSME, ATD Oxygen Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    2006-01-01

    The present configuration of Helium Buffer Seal on the ATD oxygen pump consists of a pair of opposed carbon rings are forced axially against their containment housings. Leakage occurs through the clearance between the rings and the shaft. The total helium leakage through both sides is approximately 239 SCFM. A reduction in leakage to 50 SCFM will result in less helium storage and consequently permit a substantial increase in payload. Under Phase 1 NASA SBIR, a solid T-Ring seal was analyzed and designed that could satisfy the criteria of reducing leakage to 50 SCFM or less. The design makes maximum use of available length and employs a mid length row of hydrostatic orifaces that feed buffer helium directly into a 2 to 3 mil clearance region. The flow splits into opposite paths to buffer oxygen gas on one side and hydrogen gas on the turbine side. The seal employs opposed hydrostatic tapered land secondary seals that provide friction free support of the primary seal and allows the primary seal to follow rotor excursion and maintain concentric operating clearance . The predicted performance of the T-seal is excellent with operation at a safe film thickness of 2 to 2.5 mils and leakage less than 50 SCFM.

  3. Chemochromic detector for sensing gas leakage and process for producing the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Captain, Janine E. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Tate, LaNetra Clayton (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A chemochromic sensor for detecting a combustible gas, such as hydrogen, includes a chemochromic pigment mechanically mixed with a polymer and formed into a rigid or pliable material. In a preferred embodiment, the chemochromic detector includes aerogel material. The detector is robust and easily modifiable for a variety of applications and environmental conditions, such as atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases, or in environments that have variable temperature, including high temperatures such as above 100.degree. C. and low temperatures such as below -196.degree. C.

  4. Chemochromic Detector for Sensing Gas Leakage and Process for Producing the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Captain, Janine E. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Smith, Trent M. (Inventor); Tate, LaNetra Clayton (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A chemochromic sensor for detecting a combustible gas, such as hydrogen, includes a chemochromic pigment mechanically mixed with a polymer and molded into a rigid or pliable shape. In a preferred embodiment, the chemochromic detector is within the material which is molded into a manufactured part, said part becoming the detector itself. The detector is robust and easily modifiable for a variety of applications and environmental conditions, such as atmospheres of inert gas, hydrogen gas, or mixtures of gases, or in environments that have variable temperature, including high temperatures such as above 100 C. and low temperatures such as below -196 C.

  5. Shroud leakage flow discouragers

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, Jeremy Clyde; Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2002-01-01

    A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  6. Chemochromic Detector for Sensing Gas Leakage and Process for Producing the Same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, Luke B. (Inventor); Captain, Janine E. (Inventor); Williams, Martha K. (Inventor); Tate, LaNetra Clayton (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A chemochromic sensor for detecting a combustible gas, such as hydrogen, includes a chemochromic pigment and a textile polymer. The textile material includes a chemochromic pigment operably responsive to a combustible gas. The combustible gas sensing textile material can be made by melt spinning, solution spinning, or other similar techniques. In a preferred embodiment carbon nanotubes are used with the textile material which will increase the material strength and alter the thermal and/or electrical properties. These textiles woven into fabrics can provide garments not only with hydrogen sensing capabilities but the carbon nanotubes will allow for a range of sensing capabilities to be embedded (i.e. gas, health, and electronic monitors) within the garments.

  7. a Real-Time GIS Platform for High Sour Gas Leakage Simulation, Evaluation and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Liu, H.; Yang, C.

    2015-07-01

    The development of high-sulfur gas fields, also known as sour gas field, is faced with a series of safety control and emergency management problems. The GIS-based emergency response system is placed high expectations under the consideration of high pressure, high content, complex terrain and highly density population in Sichuan Basin, southwest China. The most researches on high hydrogen sulphide gas dispersion simulation and evaluation are used for environmental impact assessment (EIA) or emergency preparedness planning. This paper introduces a real-time GIS platform for high-sulfur gas emergency response. Combining with real-time data from the leak detection systems and the meteorological monitoring stations, GIS platform provides the functions of simulating, evaluating and displaying of the different spatial-temporal toxic gas distribution patterns and evaluation results. This paper firstly proposes the architecture of Emergency Response/Management System, secondly explains EPA's Gaussian dispersion model CALPUFF simulation workflow under high complex terrain and real-time data, thirdly explains the emergency workflow and spatial analysis functions of computing the accident influencing areas, population and the optimal evacuation routes. Finally, a well blow scenarios is used for verify the system. The study shows that GIS platform which integrates the real-time data and CALPUFF models will be one of the essential operational platforms for high-sulfur gas fields emergency management.

  8. Measurement of Tritium in Gas Phase Soil Moisture and Helium-3 in Soil Gas at the Hanford Townsite and 100 K Area

    SciTech Connect

    KB Olsen; GW Patton; R Poreda; PE Dresel; JC Evans

    2000-07-05

    In 1999, soil gas samples for helium-3 measurements were collected at two locations on the Hanford Site. Eight soil gas sampling points ranging in depth from 1.5 to 9.8 m (4.9 to 32 ft) below ground surface (bgs) in two clusters were installed adjacent to well 699-41-1, south of the Hanford Townsite. Fifteen soil gas sampling points, ranging in depth from 2.1 to 3.2 m (7 to 10.4 ft) bgs, were installed to the north and east of the 100 KE Reactor. Gas phase soil moisture samples were collected using silica gel traps from all eight sampling locations adjacent to well 699-41-1 and eight locations at the 100 K Area. No detectable tritium (<240 pCi/L) was found in the soil moisture samples from either the Hanford Townsite or 100 K Area sampling points. This suggests that tritiated moisture from groundwater is not migrating upward to the sampling points and there are no large vadose zone sources of tritium at either location. Helium-3 analyses of the soil gas samples showed significant enrichments relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations with a depth dependence consistent with a groundwater source from decay of tritium. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) at the Hanford Townsite ranged from 1.012 at 1.5 m (5 ft) bgs to 2.157 at 9.8 m (32 ft) bgs. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios at the 100 K Area ranged from 0.972 to 1.131. Based on results from the 100 K Area, the authors believe that a major tritium plume does not lie within that study area. The data also suggest there may be a tritium groundwater plume or a source of helium-3 to the southeast of the study area. They recommend that the study be continued by placing additional soil gas sampling points along the perimeter road to the west and to the south of the initial study area.

  9. The gas turbine-modular helium reactor (GT-MHR), high efficiency, cost competitive, nuclear energy for the next century

    SciTech Connect

    Zgliczynski, J.B.; Silady, F.A.; Neylan, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    The Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is the result of coupling the evolution of a small passively safe reactor with key technology developments in the US during the last decade: large industrial gas turbines, large active magnetic bearings, and compact, highly effective plate-fin heat exchangers. The GT-MHR is the only reactor concept which provides a step increase in economic performance combined with increased safety. This is accomplished through its unique utilization of the Brayton cycle to produce electricity directly with the high temperature helium primary coolant from the reactor directly driving the gas turbine electrical generator. This cannot be accomplished with another reactor concept. It retains the high levels of passive safety and the standardized modular design of the steam cycle MHTGR, while showing promise for a significant reduction in power generating costs by increasing plant net efficiency to a remarkable 47%.

  10. Rotational relaxation of fluoromethane molecules in low-temperature collisions with buffer-gas helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingjia; Xu, Liang; Yin, Yanning; Xu, Supeng; Xia, Yong; Yin, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to study the rotational relaxation of polar molecules [here taking fluoromethane (CH3F ) as an example] in collisions with 3.5 K buffer-gas helium (He) atoms by using an electrostatic guiding technique. The dependence of the guiding signal of CH3F on the injected He flux and the dependence of the guiding efficiency of CH3F on its rotational temperature are investigated both theoretically and experimentally. By comparing the experimental and simulated results, we find that the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled CH3F molecules can reach to about 5.48 and 0.60 K, respectively, and the ratio between the translational and average rotational collisional cross sections of CH3F -He is γ =σt/σr=36.49 ±6.15 . In addition, the slowing, cooling, and boosting effects of the molecular beam with different injected He fluxes are also observed and their forming conditions are investigated in some detail. Our study shows that our proposed method can not only be used to measure the translational and rotational temperatures of the buffer-gas cooled molecules, but also to measure the ratio of the translational collisional cross section to the average rotational collisional cross section, and even to measure the average rotational collisional cross section when the translational collisional cross section is measured by fitting the lifetime of molecule signal to get a numerical solution from the diffusion equation of buffer-gas He atoms in the cell.

  11. Preliminary safety evaluation of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR)

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, T.D.; Lommers, L.J.; Tangirala, V.E.

    1994-04-01

    A qualitative comparison between the safety characteristics of the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) and those of the steam cycle shows that the two designs achieve equivalent levels of overall safety performance. This comparison is obtained by applying the scaling laws to detailed steam-cycle computations as well as the conclusions obtained from preliminary GT-MHR model simulations. The gas turbine design is predicted to be superior for some event categories, while the steam cycle design is better for others. From a safety perspective, the GT-MHR has a modest advantage for pressurized conduction cooldown events. Recent computational simulations of 102 column, 550 MW(t) GT-MHR during a depressurized conduction cooldown show that peak fuel temperatures are within the limits. The GT-MHR has a significantly lower risk due to water ingress events under operating conditions. Two additional scenarios, namely loss of load event and turbine deblading event that are specific to the GT-MHR design are discussed. Preliminary evaluation of the GT-MHR`s safety characteristics indicate that the GT-MHR can be expected to satisfy or exceed its safety requirements.

  12. Helium Isotopes and Noble Gas Abundances of Cave Dripping Water in Three Caves in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. T.; Shen, C. C.; Tan, M.; Li, T.; Uemura, R.; Asami, R.

    2015-12-01

    Paleo-temperature recorded in nature archives is a critical parameter to understand climate change in the past. With advantages of unique inert chemical characteristics and sensitive solubilities with temperature, dissolved noble gases in speleothem inclusion water were recently proposed to retrieve terrestrial temperature history. In order to accurately apply this newly-developed speleothem noble gas temperature (NGT) as a reliable proxy, a fundamental issue about behaviors of noble gases in the karst should be first clarified. In this study, we measured noble gas contents in air and dripping water to evaluate any ratio deviation between noble gases. Cave dripping water samples was collected from three selected caves, Shihua Cave in northern China, Furong Cave in southwestern, and Gyukusen Cave in an island located in the western Pacific. For these caves are characterized by a thorough mixing and long-term storage of waters in a karst aquifer by the absence of seasonal oxygen isotope shifts. Ratios of dripping water noble gases are statistically insignificant from air data. Helium isotopic ratios in the dripping water samples match air value. The results indicate that elemental and isotopic signatures of noble gases from air can be frankly preserved in the epikarst and support the fidelity of NGT techniques.

  13. Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to H{alpha} at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and H{alpha} intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e{sup -}{yields} O + H + e{sup -}.

  14. A New Method of Using Sensor Arrays for Gas Leakage Location Based on Correlation of the Time-Space Domain of Continuous Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xu; Zhang, Yu; Li, Yibo; Gong, Xiaoyue; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a time-space domain correlation-based method for gas leakage detection and location. It acquires the propagated signal on the skin of the plate by using a piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensor array. The signal generated from the gas leakage hole (which diameter is less than 2 mm) is time continuous. By collecting and analyzing signals from different sensors’ positions in the array, the correlation among those signals in the time-space domain can be achieved. Then, the directional relationship between the sensor array and the leakage source can be calculated. The method successfully solves the real-time orientation problem of continuous ultrasonic signals generated from leakage sources (the orientation time is about 15 s once), and acquires high accuracy location information of leakage sources by the combination of multiple sets of orientation results. According to the experimental results, the mean value of the location absolute error is 5.83 mm on a one square meter plate, and the maximum location error is generally within a ±10 mm interval. Meanwhile, the error variance is less than 20.17. PMID:25860070

  15. 49 CFR 176.605 - Care following leakage or sifting of Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) and Division 6.1 (poisonous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) and Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials. 176.605 Section 176.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  16. 49 CFR 176.605 - Care following leakage or sifting of Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) and Division 6.1 (poisonous...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Care following leakage or sifting of Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) and Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials. 176.605 Section 176.605 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  17. Regulating Greenhouse Gas 'Leakage': How California Can Evade the Impending Constitutional Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, Brian H.

    2006-06-15

    Federalist greenhouse gas regulation poses many constitutional pitfalls, and some fear that California's cap-and-trade and procurement cap proposals are vulnerable to constitutional challenge. An attack under the commerce clause seems to pose the biggest threat, but the author proposes an alternative that can eliminate this threat: market participation. (author)

  18. Regulating greenhouse gas 'leakage': how California can evade the impending constitutional attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Brian H. Potts

    2006-06-15

    Federalist greenhouse gas regulation poses many constitutional pitfalls, and some fear that California's cap-and-trade and procurement cap proposals are vulnerable to constitutional challenge. An attack under the commerce clause seems to pose the biggest threat, but the author proposes an alternative that can eliminate this threat: market participation.

  19. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  20. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; et al

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure themore » average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.« less

  1. Characterization of deuterium clusters mixed with helium gas for an application in beam-target-fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.; Quevedo, H. J.; Bernstein, A. C.; Dyer, G.; Ihn, Y. S.; Cortez, J.; Aymond, F.; Gaul, E.; Donovan, M. E.; Barbui, M.; Bonasera, A.; Natowitz, J. B.; Albright, B. J.; Fernández, J. C.; Ditmire, T.

    2014-12-10

    We measured the average deuterium cluster size within a mixture of deuterium clusters and helium gas by detecting Rayleigh scattering signals. The average cluster size from the gas mixture was comparable to that from a pure deuterium gas when the total backing pressure and temperature of the gas mixture were the same as those of the pure deuterium gas. According to these measurements, the average size of deuterium clusters depends on the total pressure and not the partial pressure of deuterium in the gas mixture. To characterize the cluster source size further, a Faraday cup was used to measure the average kinetic energy of the ions resulting from Coulomb explosion of deuterium clusters upon irradiation by an intense ultrashort pulse. The deuterium ions indeed acquired a similar amount of energy from the mixture target, corroborating our measurements of the average cluster size. As the addition of helium atoms did not reduce the resulting ion kinetic energies, the reported results confirm the utility of using a known cluster source for beam-target-fusion experiments by introducing a secondary target gas.

  2. Regulatory concerns for leakage testing of packagings with three O-ring closure seals

    SciTech Connect

    Oras, J.J.; Towell, R.H.; Wangler, M.E.

    1997-09-01

    The American National Standard for Radioactive Materials--Leakage Tests on Packages for Shipment (ANSI N14.5) provides guidance for leakage rate testing to show that a particular packaging complies with regulatory requirements and also provides guidance in determining appropriate acceptance criteria. Recent radioactive packagings designs have incorporated three O-ring closure seals, the middle O-ring being the containment seal. These designs have the potential for false positive results of leakage rate tests. The volume between the containment O-ring and the inner O-ring is used for the helium gas required for the leakage rate tests to reduce both the amount of helium used and the time required to conduct the tests. A leak detector samples the evacuated volume between the outer O-ring and the containment O-ring. False positive results can be caused in two ways, a large leakage in the containment seal or leakage in the inner seal. This paper will describe the problem together with possible solutions/areas that need to be addressed in a Safety Analysis Report for Packagings before a particular packaging design can be certified for transport.

  3. Studies of Helium Based Gas Mixtures Using a Small Cell Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Heise, Jaret; /British Columbia U.

    2006-07-07

    An international collaboration is currently working on the construction and design of an asymmetric B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that will be ready to collect data in 1999. The main physics motivation for such a facility is to test the description and mechanism of CP violation in the Standard Model of particle physics and provide insight into the question of why more matter than antimatter is observed in the universe today. In particular, this experiment will measure CP violation in the decay of B mesons. In the early stages of this effort, the Canadian contingent proposed to build the central tracking chamber for the BaBar detector. Presently, a prototype drift chamber is in operation and studies are being performed to test some of the unique features of drift chamber design dictated by the conditions of the experiment. Using cosmic muons, it is possible to study tracking and pattern recognition in the prototype chamber, and therefore calculate the efficiency and spatial resolution of the prototype chamber cells. These performance features will be used to test whether or not the helium-based gas mixtures proposed for the BaBar drift chamber are a viable alternative to the more traditional argon-based gases.

  4. Heat transfer in a compact heat exchanger containing rectangular channels and using helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1991-01-01

    Development of a National Aerospace Plane (NASP), which will fly at hypersonic speeds, require novel cooling techniques to manage the anticipated high heat fluxes on various components. A compact heat exchanger was constructed consisting of 12 parallel, rectangular channels in a flat piece of commercially pure nickel. The channel specimen was radiatively heated on the top side at heat fluxes of up to 77 W/sq cm, insulated on the back side, and cooled with helium gas flowing in the channels at 3.5 to 7.0 MPa and Reynolds numbers of 1400 to 28,000. The measured friction factor was lower than that of the accepted correlation for fully developed turbulent flow, although the uncertainty was high due to uncertainty in the channel height and a high ratio of dynamic pressure to pressure drop. The measured Nusselt number, when modified to account for differences in fluid properties between the wall and the cooling fluid, agreed with past correlations for fully developed turbulent flow in channels. Flow nonuniformity from channel-to-channel was as high as 12 pct above and 19 pct below the mean flow.

  5. Cryodeposition of nitrogen gas on a surface cooled by helium II

    SciTech Connect

    Dhuley, R. C.; Bosque, E. S.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2014-01-29

    Catastrophic loss of beam tube vacuum in a superconducting particle accelerator can be simulated by sudden venting of a long high vacuum channel cooled on its outer surface by He II. The rapid rush of atmospheric air in such an event shows an interesting propagation effect, which is much slower than the shock wave that occurs with vacuum loss at ambient conditions. This is due to flash frosting/deposition of air on the cold walls of the channel. Hence to characterize the propagation as well as the associated heat transfer, it is first necessary to understand the deposition process. Here we attempt to model the growth of nitrogen frost layer on a cold plate in order to estimate its thickness with time. The deposition process can be divided into two regimes- free molecular and continuum. It is shown that in free molecular regime, the frost growth can be modeled reasonably well using cryopump theory and general heat transfer relations. The continuum regime is more complex to model, given the higher rate of gas incident on cryosurface causing a large heat load on helium bath and changing cryosurface temperature. Results from the continuum regime are discussed in the context of recent experiments performed in our laboratory.

  6. Regional soil-gas helium distribution of the Ely and Delta 1° x 2° quadrangles, Basin and Range Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Bowles, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    A reconnaissance soil-gas helium survey was made in the Ely, Nevada and Delta, Utah 1° × 2° quadrangles in the Basin and Range Province. Helium concentrations in 510 samples ranged from −147 to 441 ppb He with respect to ambient air. The median helium value for the study area was 36 ppb. Concentrations of more than 100 ppb He and less than −20 ppb He occur more commonly in the Ely quadrangle and are especially numerous in the western one-half of this quadrangle. Interpretation of the data reveals that the helium concentrations reflect the rock type, particularly the silicic volcanic occurrences, and the geological structure of the area created by crustal extension. The regional soil-gas helium distribution is important information to consider when interpreting anomalies from detailed surveys.

  7. A Location Method Using Sensor Arrays for Continuous Gas Leakage in Integrally Stiffened Plates Based on the Acoustic Characteristics of the Stiffener.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xu; Li, Yibo; Feng, Hao; Wang, Jiaqiang; Qi, Lei; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a continuous leakage location method based on the ultrasonic array sensor, which is specific to continuous gas leakage in a pressure container with an integral stiffener. This method collects the ultrasonic signals generated from the leakage hole through the piezoelectric ultrasonic sensor array, and analyzes the space-time correlation of every collected signal in the array. Meanwhile, it combines with the method of frequency compensation and superposition in time domain (SITD), based on the acoustic characteristics of the stiffener, to obtain a high-accuracy location result on the stiffener wall. According to the experimental results, the method successfully solves the orientation problem concerning continuous ultrasonic signals generated from leakage sources, and acquires high accuracy location information on the leakage source using a combination of multiple sets of orienting results. The mean value of location absolute error is 13.51 mm on the one-square-meter plate with an integral stiffener (4 mm width; 20 mm height; 197 mm spacing), and the maximum location absolute error is generally within a ±25 mm interval. PMID:26404316

  8. A Location Method Using Sensor Arrays for Continuous Gas Leakage in Integrally Stiffened Plates Based on the Acoustic Characteristics of the Stiffener

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xu; Li, Yibo; Feng, Hao; Wang, Jiaqiang; Qi, Lei; Jin, Shijiu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a continuous leakage location method based on the ultrasonic array sensor, which is specific to continuous gas leakage in a pressure container with an integral stiffener. This method collects the ultrasonic signals generated from the leakage hole through the piezoelectric ultrasonic sensor array, and analyzes the space-time correlation of every collected signal in the array. Meanwhile, it combines with the method of frequency compensation and superposition in time domain (SITD), based on the acoustic characteristics of the stiffener, to obtain a high-accuracy location result on the stiffener wall. According to the experimental results, the method successfully solves the orientation problem concerning continuous ultrasonic signals generated from leakage sources, and acquires high accuracy location information on the leakage source using a combination of multiple sets of orienting results. The mean value of location absolute error is 13.51 mm on the one-square-meter plate with an integral stiffener (4 mm width; 20 mm height; 197 mm spacing), and the maximum location absolute error is generally within a ±25 mm interval. PMID:26404316

  9. Observations of interstellar helium with a gas absorption cell - Implications for the structure of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J.; Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1980-01-01

    A photometer sensitive at the 584 A line of He 1, incorporating a helium gas resonance absorption cell, was flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The instrument observed much of the night-time sky, and returned 42 min of usable data. The data were analyzed by fitting to a model of resonant scattering of solar 584 A flux from nearby interstellar helium. Good model fits were obtained for an interstellar gas bulk velocity vector pointing toward alpha = 72 deg, delta = +15 deg, with speed 20 km/s, with interstellar medium temperatures from 5000 to 20,000 K and with neutral interstellar helium density (8.9 plus or minus 10 to the -3rd/cu cm). In the context of theoretical studies of the interstellar medium by McKee and Ostriker (1977), the results may indicate that the sun lies in the warm, partially ionized periphery of a cold interstellar cloud, surrounded by a high-temperature gas heated by old supernova remnants.

  10. Rejection of seamless pipe noise in magnetic flux leakage data obtained from gas pipeline inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Muhammad; Udpa, Satish; Udpa, Lalita; Lord, William

    2000-05-01

    Natural gas is traditionally transmitted from production facilities to customer locations through a vast pipeline network. A major segment of this network employs seamless pipes. This is especially true for smaller diameter transmission and distribution lines. Manufacturing process associated with the production of seamless pipes contribute to a helical variation in the pipe along the axis. The deformation introduces an artifact in the data obtained from MFL inspection of these pipelines. This seamless pipe noise is usually correlated with signals generated by defects and other elements (joints, tees, etc.) in pipelines, and can therefore, mask their indications in MFL data. This warrants the need for methods to improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in MFL data from seamless pipes. This paper presents a technique for detecting signals in MFL data from seamless pipes. The approach processes the data in various steps. First, a wavelet based denoising technique is applied to reduce the noise due to instrumentation and other sources. An adaptive filtering approach is then applied to reject seamless noise in the data. Since the inspection of pipelines typically generates vast amounts of data, it is imperative that the algorithm be computationally efficient. The processing method has to be robust in that it should be data independent. The approach described in this paper meet these criteria. Results from application of the approach to data from field tests are presented.

  11. Helium atoms in interstellar and interplanetary space. II: Determination of direction of interstellar gas motion relative to Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, V. G.; Mironova, Y. N.; Berto, Z. L.; Dalodye, F.

    1985-02-01

    The far ultraviolet photometer on board the Prognoz-6 satellite measured the brightness distribution in the 584 A line of atomic helium in interplanetary space. Since atoms of neutral helium penetrate deeper into the solar system than neutral hydrogen and are focused by the Sun's gravitational field, it is possible to determine the direction of the vector Vw, which is the sum of the interstellar gas velocity vector Vt and the vector -Vs which is the velocity vector of the Sun relative to several hundreds of the closest stars. The scanning geometry of the photometer system is illustrated graphically and the data from seven observational sessions between 29 Sep. 1977 and 15 Jan. 1978 are summarized in tabular form. The velocity vector projected onto the celestial sphere (Vs) has a right ascension of 77 plus or minus 2 deg and a declination of 17 plus or minus 2.5 deg.

  12. Detection of trace concentrations of helium and argon in gas mixtures by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNaghten, E. D.; Parkes, A. M.; Griffiths, B. C.; Whitehouse, A. I.; Palanco, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report what we believe to be the first demonstration of the detection of trace quantities of helium and argon in binary and ternary gas mixtures with nitrogen by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). Although significant quenching of helium transitions due to collisional deactivation of excited species was observed, it was found that losses in analytical sensitivity could be minimized by increasing the laser irradiance and decreasing the pressure at which the analyses were performed. In consequence, limits of detection of parts-per-million and tens of parts-per-million and linear dynamic ranges of several orders of magnitude in analyte concentration were obtained. The results of this study suggest that LIBS may have potential applications in the detection of other noble gases at trace concentrations.

  13. Linear-traverse surveys of helium and radon in soil gas as a guide for uranium exploration, central Weld County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G. Michael; Rice, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    Linear-traverse surveys of helium and radon in soil gas were performed and evaluated as a guide for uranium exploration in central Weld County, Colo. Repeated sampling over a 5-month period eventually delineated a helium anomaly along the main 11.2 km traverse, and that anomaly may be related to a uranium occurrence. A single traverse is difficult to interpret. A grid sampling pattern, no more time consuming than a repeated linear traverse, is preferred. Radon anomalies along the traverses are from radon-220, the thorium decay series member, and do not show a positive correlation with the helium analyses.

  14. An helium microwave-induced plasma Fourier transform atomic emission spectrometer as a novel two-dimensional detector for gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.D.

    1989-01-01

    The helium microwave-induced plasma (MIP) emission excitation source is a sensitive, element selective detector for gas chromatography. Fourier transform (FT) spectrometry is a technique that allows rapid simultaneous monitoring of the full spectrum of a light source. The combination of the MIP excitation course with an FT spectrometer provides a versatile simultaneous multielement gas chromatography detector. The design and construction of a helium microwave-induced plasma/Fourier transform atomic emission detector for gas chromatography is described. Examples of the operation of this instrument are given.

  15. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol in helium: the effect of carrier gas pressure.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Stratmann, Frank

    2006-04-28

    Kinetics of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapor of 1-propanol was studied using an upward thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a noncondensable carrier gas and the influence of its pressure on observed nucleation rates was investigated. The isothermal nucleation rates were determined by a photographic method that is independent on any nucleation theory. In this method, the trajectories of growing droplets are recorded using a charge coupled device camera and the distribution of local nucleation rates is determined by image analysis. The nucleation rate measurements of 1-propanol were carried out at four isotherms 260, 270, 280, and 290 K. In addition, the pressure dependence was investigated on the isotherms 290 K (50, 120, and 180 kPa) and 280 K (50 and 120 kPa). The isotherm 270 K was measured at 25 kPa and the isotherm 260 K at 20 kPa. The experiments confirm the earlier observations from several thermal diffusion chamber investigations that the homogeneous nucleation rate of 1-propanol tends to increase with decreasing total pressure in the chamber. In order to reduce the possibility that the observed phenomenon is an experimental artifact, connected with the generally used one-dimensional description of transfer processes in the chamber, a recently developed two-dimensional model of coupled heat, mass, and momentum transfer inside the chamber was used and results of both models were compared. It can be concluded that the implementation of the two-dimensional model does not explain the observed effect. Furthermore the obtained results were compared both to the predictions of the classical theory and to the results of other investigators using different experimental devices. Plotting the experimental data on the so-called Hale plot shows that our data seem to be consistent both internally and also with the data of others. Using the nucleation theorem the critical cluster sizes were obtained from the slopes of the individual isotherms

  16. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Gas Helium Storage Tank Pressure Vessel Engineering Note

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1996-11-11

    This is to certify that Beaird Industries, Inc. has done a white metal blast per SSPC-SP5 as required per specifications on the vessel internal. Following the blast, a black light inspection was performed by Beaird Quality Control personnel to assure that all debris, grease, etc. was removed and interior was clean prior to closing vessel for helium test.

  17. Determination of the Boltzmann constant k from the speed of sound in helium gas at the triple point of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitre, L.; Risegari, L.; Sparasci, F.; Plimmer, M. D.; Himbert, M. E.; Giuliano Albo, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    The Boltzmann constant k has been determined from a measurement of the speed of sound in helium gas in a quasi-spherical resonator (volume 0.5 l) maintained at a temperature close to the triple point of water (273.16 K). The acoustic velocity c is deduced from measured acoustic resonance frequencies and the dimensions of the quasi-sphere, the latter being obtained via simultaneous microwave resonance. Values of c are extrapolated to the zero pressure limit of ideal gas behaviour. We find k=1.380 6487(14)× {{10}-23} JṡK-1, a result consistent with previous measurements in our group and elsewhere. The value for k, which has a relative standard uncertainty of 1.02 ppm, lies 0.02 ppm below that of the CODATA 2010 adjustment.

  18. The measurement of electron number density in helium micro hollow gas discharge using asymmetric He I lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovović, J.; Šišović, N. M.

    2015-09-01

    The electron number density N e in helium micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) is measured by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) techniques. The structure of MHGD is a gold-alumina-gold sandwich with 250 μm alumina thickness and 100 μm diameter hole. The electron temperature T e and gas temperature T g in the discharge is determined using the relative intensity of He I lines and {{\\text{N}}2}+≤ft({{\\text{B}}2}Σ\\text{u}+- {{X}2}Σ\\text{g}+\\right) R branch lines in the frame of BP technique, respectively. The simple procedure based on spectral line broadening theory was developed in MATLAB to generate synthetic neutral line asymmetric profiles. The synthetic profiles were compared with an experimental He I 447.1 nm and He I 492.2 nm line to obtain N e from the centre of a micro hollow gas discharge (MHGD) source in helium. The N e results were compared with N e values obtained from the forbidden-to-allowed (F/A) intensity ratio technique. The comparison confirmed higher N e determined using a F/A ratio due to large uncertainty of the method. Applying the fitting formula for a He I 492.2 nm line derived from computer simulation (CS) gives the same N e values as the one determined using the MATLAB procedure in this study. The dependence of N e on gas pressure and electric current is investigated as well.

  19. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lee, Yong Inn; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H--He and F--He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  20. Excitation Mechanism of H, He, C, and F Atoms in Metal-Assisted Atmospheric Helium Gas Plasma Induced by Transversely Excited Atmospheric-Pressure CO2 Laser Bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukra Lie, Zener; Khumaeni, Ali; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Hendrik Kurniawan, Koo; Inn Lee, Yong; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Niki, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    To clarify the excitation mechanism of hydrogen in transversely excited atmospheric-pressure (TEA) CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma, atomic emission characteristics of H, C, F, and He were studied using a Teflon sheet (thickness of 2 mm) attached to a metal subtarget. The TEA CO2 laser (750 mJ, 200 ns) was focused on the Teflon sheet in the surrounding He gas at 1 atm. Atomic emissions of H, C, F, and He occurred with a long lifetime, a narrow spectrum width, and a low-background spectrum. The correlation emission intensity curves of H-He and F-He indicated a parabolic functions. To explain the emission characteristics, we offered a model in which helium metastable atoms (He*) play an important role in the excitation processes; namely, atoms collide with helium metastable atoms (He*) to be ionized by the Penning effect, and then recombine with electrons to produce excited states, from which atomic emissions occur.

  1. The footprint of CO2 leakage in the water-column: Insights from numerical modeling based on a North Sea gas release experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Wallmann, K.; McGinnis, D. F.; Haeckel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of potential CO2 leakage from offshore carbon dioxide storage sites necessitates the investigation of the corresponding pH change in the water-column. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the buoyant rise and dissolution of CO2 bubbles in the water-column and the subsequent near-field dispersion of dissolved CO2 in seawater under ocean current and tidal forcing. In order to test and improve numerical models a gas release experiment has been conducted at 80 m water-depth within the Sleipner area (North Sea). CO2 and Kr (used as inert tracer gas) were released on top of a benthic lander at varying gas flows (<140 kg/day) and bubble sizes (de: 1-6 mm). pCO2 and pH were measured by in situ sensors to monitor the spread of the solute in different vertical heights and distances downstream of the artificial leak. The experiment and numerical analysis show that the impact of such leakage rates is limited to the near-field bottom waters, due to the rapid dissolution of CO2 bubbles in seawater (CO2 is being stripped within the first two to five meters of bubble rise). In particular, small bubbles, which will dissolve close to the seafloor, may cause a dangerous low-pH environment for the marine benthos. However, on the larger scale, the advective transport by e.g. tidal currents, dominates the CO2 dispersal in the North Sea and dilutes the CO2 peak quickly. The model results show that at the small scales (<100 m) of the CO2 plume the lateral eddy diffusion (~0.01 m2/s) has only a negligible effect. Overall, we can postulate that CO2 leakage at a rate of ~ 100 kg per day as in our experiment will only have a localized impact on the marine environment, thereby reducing pH substantially (by 0.4 units) within a diameter of less than 50 m around the release spot (depending on the duration of leakage and the current velocities). Strong currents and tidal cycles significantly reduce the spreading of low-pH water masses into the far

  2. Direct and indirect indicators to identify potential leakage of contaminants associated with unconventional oil and gas development based on conceptual geochemical and isotopic monitoring approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humez, P.; Mayer, B.; Negrel, P. J.; Lions, J.; Lagneau, V.; Kloppmann, W.; Ing, J.; Becker, V.; Nightingale, M.

    2014-12-01

    The extraction of tightly bound natural gas and oil raises environmental concerns regarding shallow drinking water resources. These concerns include impacts of migration of contaminants through induced and natural fractures, drilling imperfections, wastewater discharge and accidental spills. Improved understanding of the fate and transport of contaminants through long-term monitoring, and sharing of data between industry, regulators and researchers will help to effectively manage risks for shallow water resources associated with the unconventional gas and oil industry. Based on the North-American experiences related to unconventional oil and gas resources and monitoring approaches developed in the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) context, we suggest conceptual models for monitoring the potential contamination of shallow aquifers overlying production zones. The strength of sensitive geochemical tracers is demonstrated based on conceptual approaches (e.g. diffusion model) and field and tracer studies (e.g. geochemical and isotopic monitoring) with three objectives: 1) characterize subsurface derived contaminants as direct geochemical and isotopic indicators; 2) assess geochemical processes enhanced by the fluid intrusion; 3) understand parameters and processes which could impact or alter the geochemical and isotopic signatures of the contaminants (e.g. microbial oxidation, migration or transport processes etc.) to determine indirect indicators of potential contaminant leakage. This comprehensive geochemical and isotope approach using direct and indirect indicators with the analyses of major and minor ions, trace elements, and δ11B, δ7Li, δ34SSO4, δ18OSO4, 87Sr/86Sr, δ18OH2O, and δ2HH2O values in the CO2FIELDLAB project (Humez et al., 2014) allowed discriminating reactive mechanisms from non-reactive mixing processes associated with gas leakage within a shallow aquifer. These and other results indicate that this conceptual approach is promising for monitoring

  3. Synthesis of nanowires via helium and neon focused ion beam induced deposition with the gas field ion microscope.

    PubMed

    Wu, H M; Stern, L A; Chen, J H; Huth, M; Schwalb, C H; Winhold, M; Porrati, F; Gonzalez, C M; Timilsina, R; Rack, P D

    2013-05-01

    The ion beam induced nanoscale synthesis of platinum nanowires using the trimethyl (methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV) (MeCpPt(IV)Me3) precursor is investigated using helium and neon ion beams in the gas field ion microscope. The He(+) beam induced deposition resembles material deposited by electron beam induced deposition with very small platinum nanocrystallites suspended in a carbonaceous matrix. The He(+) deposited material composition was estimated to be 16% Pt in a matrix of amorphous carbon with a large room-temperature resistivity (∼3.5 × 10(4)-2.2 × 10(5) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent transport behavior consistent with a granular material in the weak intergrain tunnel coupling regime. The Ne(+) deposited material has comparable composition (17%), however a much lower room-temperature resistivity (∼600-3.0 × 10(3) μΩ cm) and temperature-dependent electrical behavior representative of strong intergrain coupling. The Ne(+) deposited nanostructure has larger platinum nanoparticles and is rationalized via Monte Carlo ion-solid simulations which show that the neon energy density deposited during growth is much larger due to the smaller ion range and is dominated by nuclear stopping relative to helium which has a larger range and is dominated by electronic stopping. PMID:23548767

  4. Optically pumped alkali laser and amplifier using helium-3 buffer gas

    DOEpatents

    Beach, Raymond J.; Page, Ralph; Soules, Thomas; Stappaerts, Eddy; Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2010-09-28

    In one embodiment, a laser oscillator is provided comprising an optical cavity, the optical cavity including a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas, the buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Additionally, an optical excitation source is provided. Furthermore, the laser oscillator is capable of outputting radiation at a first frequency. In another embodiment, an apparatus is provided comprising a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  5. The interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow and the inferred interstellar gas properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the interplanetary hydrogen and helium glow have been obtained by a number of spacecraft and rocket experiments during the past fifteen years. Important results have been established on the temperature, density, velocity, spatial dependence, and hydrogen to helium ratio. However, only four spacecraft launched to date are investigating the outer solar system and of these four the Pioneer 10 spacecraft is the farthest out at 28 A.U. Observations from this spacecraft at great distances have permitted an improved analysis of the effects which are only evident at large distances from the Sun. Perhaps the most significant result in this regard is the clear evidence of the importance of multiple scattering of solar Ly-alpha; an effect which has not been observed in earlier work. Ignoring this effect can lead to a gross overestimate of the local galactic glow. Current best estimates of the galactic glow and the local interstellar wind parameters obtained by the Pioneer 10 photometer at great distances are presented, in addition to complementary experimental observations of particular interest.

  6. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure distribution, and rotordynamic coefficients for annular gas seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicks, C. O.; Childs, D. W.

    1984-01-01

    The importance of seal behavior in rotordynamics is discussed and current annular seal theory is reviewed. A Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for this type of compressible-flow seal is outlined. Various means for the experimental identification of the dynamic coefficients are given, and the method employed at the Texas A and M University (TAMU) test facility is explained. The TAMU test apparatus is described, and the test procedures are discussed. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and rotordynamic coefficients for a smooth and a honeycomb constant-clearance seal are presented and compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis. The results for both seals show little sensitivity to the running speed over the test range. Agreement between test results and theory for leakage through the seal is satisfactory. Test results for direct stiffness show a greater sensitivity to fluid pre-rotation than predicted. Results also indicate that the deliberately roughened surface of the honeycomb seal provides improved stability versus the smooth seal.

  7. Helium and carbon gas geochemistry of pore fluids from the sediment-rich hydrothermal system in Escanaba Trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ishibashi, J.-I.; Sato, M.; Sano, Y.; Wakita, H.; Gamo, T.; Shanks, Wayne C., III

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 169, which was conducted in 1996 provided an opportunity to study the gas geochemistry in the deeper part of the sediment-rich hydrothermal system in Escanaba Trough. Gas void samples obtained from the core liner were analyzed and their results were compared with analytical data of vent fluid samples collected by a submersible dive program in 1988. The gas geochemistry of the pore fluids consisted mostly of a hydrothermal component and was basically the same as that of the vent fluids. The He isotope ratios (R/RA = 5.6-6.6) indicated a significant mantle He contribution and the C isotopic compositions of the hydrocarbons [??13C(CH4) = -43???, ??13C(C2H6) = -20???] were characterized as a thermogenic origin caused by hydrothermal activity. On the other hand, the pore fluids in sedimentary layers away from the hydrothermal fields showed profiles which reflected lateral migration of the hydrothermal hydrocarbons and abundant biogenic CH4. Helium and C isotope systematics were shown to represent a hydrothermal component and useful as indicators for their distribution beneath the seafloor. Similarities in He and hydrocarbon signatures to that of the Escanaba Trough hydrothermal system were found in some terrestrial natural gases, which suggested that seafloor hydrothermal activity in sediment-rich environments would be one of the possible petroleum hydrocarbon generation scenarios in unconventional geological settings. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Numerical simulation of the helium gas spin-up channel performance of the relativity gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karr, Gerald R.; Edgell, Josephine; Zhang, Burt X.

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of the spin-up system efficiency on each geometrical parameter of the spin-up channel and the exhaust passage of the Gravity Probe-B (GPB) is individually investigated. The spin-up model is coded into a computer program which simulates the spin-up process. Numerical results reveal optimal combinations of the geometrical parameters for the ultimate spin-up performance. Comparisons are also made between the numerical results and experimental data. The experimental leakage rate can only be reached when the gap between the channel lip and the rotor surface increases beyond physical limit. The computed rotating frequency is roughly twice as high as the measured ones although the spin-up torques fairly match.

  9. Gas Diffusion in Metals: Fundamental Study of Helium-Point Defect Interactions in Iron and Kinetics of Hydrogen Desorption from Zirconium Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang

    The behavior of gaseous foreign species (e.g., helium and hydrogen), which are either generated, adsorbed or implanted within the structural materials (e.g., iron and zirconium) exposed to irradiation environments, is an important and largely unsolved topic, as they intensively interact with the irradiation-induced defects, or bond with the lattice atoms to form new compounds, and impose significant effects on their microstructural and mechanical properties in fission and fusion reactors. This research investigates two cases of gas diffusion in metals (i.e., the helium-point defect interactions in iron and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from zirconium hydride) through extensive experimental and modeling studies, with the objective of improving the understanding of helium effects on the microstructures of iron under irradiation and demonstrating the kinetics of hydrogen diffusion and precipitation behavior in zirconium that are crucial to predict cladding failures and hydride fuel performance. The study of helium effects in structural materials aims to develop a self-consistent, experimentally validated model of helium---point defect, defect cluster and intrinsic defects through detailed inter-comparisons between experimental measurements on helium ion implanted iron single crystals and computational models. The combination of thermal helium desorption spectrometry (THDS) experiment with the cluster dynamic model helps to reveal the influence of impurities on the energetics and kinetics of the He-defect interactions and to realize the identification of possible mechanisms governing helium desorption peaks. Positron annihilation spectroscopy is employed to acquire additional information on He-vacancy cluster evolution, which provides an opportunity to validate the model qualitatively. The inclusion of He---self-interstitial clusters extends the cluster dynamic model while MD simulations explore the effects of dislocation loops on helium clustering. In addition, the

  10. Use of a torsional pendulum as a high-pressure gage and determination of viscosity of helium gas at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.; Webeler, R. W. H.; Grimes, H. H.

    1973-01-01

    Three torsional crystal parameters were examined for suitability in sensing pressure in gases up to 131 million newtons per square meter. The best parameters were found to be the change in crystal decrement at resonance and the change in crystal electrical resistance at resonance. The change in crystal resonant frequency did not appear to be a reliable pressure measuring parameter. Pure argon and pure helium gases were studied for use as working fluids. Helium functioned better over a wider pressure range. Calibration of the gage also provided a measure of the viscosity-density product of the gas as a function of pressure. These data, together with known extrapolated density data, permitted the determination of the viscosity of helium to 131 million N/square meter.

  11. MR imaging of the lungs with hyperpolarized helium-3 gas transported by air.

    PubMed

    Wild, J M; Schmiedeskamp, J; Paley, M N J; Filbir, F; Fichele, S; Kasuboski, L; Knitz, F; Woodhouse, N; Swift, A; Heil, W; Mill, G H; Wolf, M; Griffiths, P D; Otten, E; van Beek, E J R

    2002-07-01

    Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI shows promise in the functional imaging of the pulmonary air spaces. The production of hyperpolarized (HP) gas requires specialized laser optical pumping apparatus, which is not likely to be home built in the majority of clinical MRI radiology centres. There are two routes through which HP gas will be made available to hospitals for clinical use: either the apparatus will be installed locally at a considerable expense to the centre, or a central facility will produce the gas and then deliver it to remote MRI sites as and when required. In this study, the feasibility of transporting large quantities of HP gas for in vivo MR imaging from a remote production facility in Mainz, Germany, by airfreight to Sheffield, UK, was successfully demonstrated. PMID:12164592

  12. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor helium compatibility studies: results of 10,000-hour exposure of selected alloys in simulated reactor helium

    SciTech Connect

    Lechtenberg, T.A.; Stevenson, R.D.; Johnson, W.R.

    1980-05-01

    Work on the HTGR Helium Compatibility Task accomplished during the period March 31, 1977 through September 30, 1979, is documented in this report. Emphasis is on the results and analyses of creep data to 10,000 h and the detailed metallurgical evaluations performed on candidate alloy specimens tested for up to 10,000 h. Long-term creep and unstressed aging data in controlled-impurity helium and in air at 800, 900, and 1000/sup 0/C are reported for alloys included in the program in FY-76, including the wrought solid-solution-strengthened alloys, Hastelloy X, Hastelloy S, RA 333, and HD 556, and the centrifugally cast austenitic alloys, HK 40, Supertherm, Manaurite 36X, Manaurite 36XS, and Manaurite 900.

  13. The carrier gas pressure effect in a laminar flow diffusion chamber, homogeneous nucleation of n-butanol in helium.

    PubMed

    Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jiri; Kulmala, Markku; Viisanen, Yrjö; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2006-06-14

    Homogeneous nucleation rate isotherms of n-butanol+helium were measured in a laminar flow diffusion chamber at total pressures ranging from 50 to 210 kPa to investigate the effect of carrier gas pressure on nucleation. Nucleation temperatures ranged from 265 to 280 K and the measured nucleation rates were between 10(2) and 10(6) cm(-3) s(-1). The measured nucleation rates decreased as a function of increasing pressure. The pressure effect was strongest at pressures below 100 kPa. This negative carrier gas effect was also temperature dependent. At nucleation temperature of 280 K and at the same saturation ratio, the maximum deviation between nucleation rates measured at 50 and 210 kPa was about three orders of magnitude. At nucleation temperature of 265 K, the effect was negligible. Qualitatively the results resemble those measured in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Also the slopes of the isothermal nucleation rates as a function of saturation ratio were different as a function of total pressure, 50 kPa isotherms yielded the steepest slopes, and 210 kPa isotherms the shallowest slopes. Several sources of inaccuracies were considered in the interpretation of the results: uncertainties in the transport properties, nonideal behavior of the vapor-carrier gas mixture, and shortcomings of the used mathematical model. Operation characteristics of the laminar flow diffusion chamber at both under-and over-pressure were determined to verify a correct and stable operation of the device. We conclude that a negative carrier gas pressure effect is seen in the laminar flow diffusion chamber and it cannot be totally explained with the aforementioned reasons. PMID:16784271

  14. A method to investigate inter-aquifer leakage using hydraulics and multiple environmental tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestley, Stacey; Love, Andrew; Wohling, Daniel; Post, Vincent; Shand, Paul; Kipfer, Rolf; Tyroller, Lina

    2016-04-01

    Informed aquifer management decisions regarding sustainable yields or potential exploitation require an understanding of the groundwater system (Alley et al. 2002, Cherry and Parker 2004). Recently, the increase in coal seam gas (CSG) or shale gas production has highlighted the need for a better understanding of inter-aquifer leakage and contaminant migration. In most groundwater systems, the quantity or location of inter-aquifer leakage is unknown. Not taking into account leakage rates in the analysis of large scale flow systems can also lead to significant errors in the estimates of groundwater flow rates in aquifers (Love et al. 1993, Toth 2009). There is an urgent need for robust methods to investigate inter-aquifer leakage at a regional scale. This study builds on previous groundwater flow and inter-aquifer leakage studies to provide a methodology to investigate inter-aquifer leakage in a regional sedimentary basin using hydraulics and a multi-tracer approach. The methodology incorporates geological, hydrogeological and hydrochemical information in the basin to determine the likelihood and location of inter-aquifer leakage. Of particular benefit is the analysis of hydraulic heads and environmental tracers at nested piezometers, or where these are unavailable bore couplets comprising bores above and below the aquitard of interest within a localised geographical area. The proposed methodology has been successful in investigating inter-aquifer leakage in the Arckaringa Basin, South Australia. The suite of environmental tracers and isotopes used to analyse inter-aquifer leakage included the stable isotopes of water, radiocarbon, chloride-36, 87Sr/86Sr and helium isotopes. There is evidence for inter-aquifer leakage in the centre of the basin ~40 km along the regional flow path. This inter-aquifer leakage has been identified by a slight draw-down in the upper aquifer during pumping in the lower aquifer, overlap in Sr isotopes, δ2H, δ18O and chloride

  15. Investigation of helium addition for laser-induced plasma spectroscopy of pure gas phase systems: Analyte interactions and signal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, C. A.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hahn, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    The role of helium addition on the analyte signal enhancement in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for analysis of pure gaseous systems was examined using carbon and hydrogen atomic emission lines. Increased analyte response, as measured by peak-to-base and signal-to-noise ratios, was observed with increasing helium addition, with maximum enhancement approaching a factor of 7. Additional measurements revealed a significant decrease in plasma electron density with increasing helium addition. To explore the mechanisms of analyte signal enhancement, the helium emission lines were also examined and found to be effectively quenched with nitrogen addition. In consideration of the data, it is concluded that the role of metastable helium is not as important as the overall changes in plasma properties, namely electron density and laser-plasma coupling. Helium addition is concluded to affect the electron density via Penning ionization, as well as to play a role in the initial plasma breakdown processes.

  16. Methane Leakage from Oil & Gas Operations. What have we learned from recent studies in the U.S.?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Hamburg, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Methane, the principal component of natural gas, is a powerful greenhouse gas. Methane losses from the natural gas supply chain erode the climate benefits of fuel switching to natural gas from other fossil fuels, reducing or eliminating them for several decades or longer. Global data on methane emissions from the oil and gas sector is uncertain and as a consequence, measuring and characterizing methane emissions is critical to the design of effective mitigation strategies. In this work, we synthesize lessons learned from dozens of U.S. studies that characterized methane emissions along each stage of the natural gas supply chain. These results are relevant to the design of methane measurement campaigns outside the U.S. A recurring theme in the research conducted in the U.S. is that public emissions inventories (e.g., The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Greenhouse gas Inventory) tend to underestimate emissions for two key reasons: (1) use of non-representative emission factors and (2) inaccurate activity data (incomplete counts of facilities and equipment). Similarly, the accuracy of emission factors and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies are heavily affected by the existence of low-probability, unpredictable high emitters-which have been observed all along the supply chain- and are spatiotemporally variable. We conducted a coordinated campaign to measure methane emissions in a major gas producing region of the U.S. (Barnett Shale region of Texas) using a diversity of approaches. As part of this study we identified methods for effective quantification of regional fossil methane emissions using atmospheric data (through replicate mass balance flights and source apportionment using methane to ethane ratios) as well as how to build an accurate inventory that includes a statistical estimator that more rigorously captures the magnitude and frequency of high emitters. We found agreement between large-scale atmospheric sampling estimates and source

  17. Advanced helium purge seals for Liquid Oxygen (LOX) turbopumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, Wilbur; Lee, Chester C.

    1989-01-01

    Program objectives were to determine three advanced configurations of helium buffer seals capable of providing improved performance in a space shuttle main engine (SSME), high-pressure liquid oxygen (LOX) turbopump environment, and to provide NASA with the analytical tools to determine performance of a variety of seal configurations. The three seal designs included solid-ring fluid-film seals often referred to as floating ring seals, back-to-back fluid-film face seals, and a circumferential sectored seal that incorporated inherent clearance adjustment capabilities. Of the three seals designed, the sectored seal is favored because the self-adjusting clearance features accommodate the variations in clearance that will occur because of thermal and centrifugal distortions without compromising performance. Moreover, leakage can be contained well below the maximum target values; minimizing leakage is important on the SSME since helium is provided by an external tank. A reduction in tank size translates to an increase in payload that can be carried on board the shuttle. The computer codes supplied under this program included a code for analyzing a variety of gas-lubricated, floating ring, and sector seals; a code for analyzing gas-lubricated face seals; a code for optimizing and analyzing gas-lubricated spiral-groove face seals; and a code for determining fluid-film face seal response to runner excitations in as many as five degrees of freedom. These codes proved invaluable for optimizing designs and estimating final performance of the seals described.

  18. Use of nonlocal helium microplasma for gas impurities detection by the collisional electron spectroscopy method

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly A.; Stefanova, Margarita S.; Pramatarov, Petko M.

    2015-10-15

    The collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, which lays the ground for a new field for analytical detection of gas impurities at high pressures, has been verified. The CES method enables the identification of gas impurities in the collisional mode of electron movement, where the advantages of nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are fulfilled. Important features of dc negative glow microplasma and probe method for plasma diagnostics are applied. A new microplasma gas analyzer design is proposed. Admixtures of 0.2% Ar, 0.6% Kr, 0.1% N{sub 2}, and 0.05% CO{sub 2} are used as examples of atomic and molecular impurities to prove the possibility for detecting and identifying their presence in high pressure He plasma (50–250 Torr). The identification of the particles under analysis is made from the measurements of the high energy part of the EEDF, where maxima appear, resulting from the characteristic electrons released in Penning reactions of He metastable atoms with impurity particles. Considerable progress in the development of a novel miniature gas analyzer for chemical sensing in gas phase environments has been made.

  19. Use of nonlocal helium microplasma for gas impurities detection by the collisional electron spectroscopy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly A.; Stefanova, Margarita S.; Pramatarov, Petko M.

    2015-10-01

    The collisional electron spectroscopy (CES) method, which lays the ground for a new field for analytical detection of gas impurities at high pressures, has been verified. The CES method enables the identification of gas impurities in the collisional mode of electron movement, where the advantages of nonlocal formation of the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) are fulfilled. Important features of dc negative glow microplasma and probe method for plasma diagnostics are applied. A new microplasma gas analyzer design is proposed. Admixtures of 0.2% Ar, 0.6% Kr, 0.1% N2, and 0.05% CO2 are used as examples of atomic and molecular impurities to prove the possibility for detecting and identifying their presence in high pressure He plasma (50-250 Torr). The identification of the particles under analysis is made from the measurements of the high energy part of the EEDF, where maxima appear, resulting from the characteristic electrons released in Penning reactions of He metastable atoms with impurity particles. Considerable progress in the development of a novel miniature gas analyzer for chemical sensing in gas phase environments has been made.

  20. A comparison of experimental and theoretical results for leakage, pressure gradients, and rotordynamic coefficients for tapered annular gas seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, D. A.; Childs, D. W.

    1986-01-01

    A brief review of current annular seal theory and a discussion of the predicted effect on stiffness of tapering the seal stator are presented. An outline of Nelson's analytical-computational method for determining rotordynamic coefficients for annular compressible-flow seals is included. Modifications to increase the maximum rotor speed of an existing air-seal test apparatus at Texas A&M University are described. Experimental results, including leakage, entrance-loss coefficients, pressure distributions, and normalized rotordynamic coefficients, are presented for four convergent-tapered, smooth-rotor, smooth-stator seals. A comparison of the test results shows that an inlet-to-exit clearance ratio of 1.5 to 2.0 provides the maximum direct stiffness, a clearance ratio of 2.5 provides the greatest stability, and a clearance ratio of 1.0 provides the least stability. The experimental results are compared to theoretical results from Nelson's analysis with good agreement. Test results for cross-coupled stiffness show less sensitivity of fluid prerotation than predicted.

  1. Detection of individual atoms in helium buffer gas and observation of their real-time motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, C. L.; Prodan, J. V.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.; She, C. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Single atoms are detected and their motion measured for the first time to our knowledge by the fluorescence photon-burst method in the presence of large quantities of buffer gas. A single-clipped digital correlator records the photon burst in real time and displays the atom's transit time across the laser beam. A comparison is made of the special requirements for single-atom detection in vacuum and in a buffer gas. Finally, the probability distribution of the bursts from many atoms is measured. It further proves that the bursts observed on resonance are due to single atoms and not simply to noise fluctuations.

  2. 75 FR 53353 - Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 “Pressure and Helium...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... COMMISSION Notice of Availability of Final Interim Staff Guidance Document No. 25 ``Pressure and Helium... Guidance Document No. 25 (ISG-25) ``Pressure and Helium Leakage Testing of the Confinement Boundary of... helium leakage testing and ASME Code required pressure (hydrostatic/pneumatic) testing that is...

  3. A heat exchanger between forced flow helium gas at 14 to 18 K andliquid hydrogen at 20 K circulated by natural convection

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) has three 350-mm long liquid hydrogen absorbers to reduce the momentum of 200 MeV muons in all directions. The muons are then re-accelerated in the longitudinal direction by 200 MHz RF cavities. The result is cooled muons with a reduced emittance. The energy from the muons is taken up by the liquid hydrogen in the absorber. The hydrogen in the MICE absorbers is cooled by natural convection to the walls of the absorber that are in turn cooled by helium gas that enters at 14 K. This report describes the MICE liquid hydrogen absorber and the heat exchanger between the liquid hydrogen and the helium gas that flows through passages in the absorber wall.

  4. Polarization of the light from the 3P(1)-2S(1) transition in proton beam excited helium. Ph.D. Thesis; [target gas pressure effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinhous, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of the polarization of the light from the 3 1p-2 1s transition in proton beam excited Helium have shown both a proton beam energy and Helium target gas pressure dependence. Results for the linear polarization fraction range from +2.6% at 100 keV proton energy to -5.5% at 450 keV. The zero crossover occurs at approximately 225 keV. This is in good agreement with other experimental work in the field, but in poor agreement with theoretical predictions. Measurements at He target gas pressures as low as .01 mtorr show that the linear polarization fraction is still pressure dependent at .01 mtorr.

  5. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, Danny S.; Pazuchanics, Peter; Johnson, Randall P.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-25

    An Ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles will also be described. Finally, results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn ejecta experiments will be presented. Particle size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double pulsed experiment will be described.

  6. Ejecta Particle-Size Measurements in Vacuum and Helium Gas using Ultraviolet In-Line Fraunhofer Holography

    SciTech Connect

    Sorenson, D. S.; Pazuchanics, P.; Johnson, R.; Malone, R. M.; Kaufman, M. I.; Tibbitts, A.; Tunnell, T.; Marks, D.; Capelle, G. A.; Grover, M.; Marshall, B.; Stevens, G. D.; Turley, W. D.; LaLone, B.

    2014-06-30

    An ultraviolet (UV) in-line Fraunhofer holography diagnostic has been developed for making high-resolution spatial measurements of ejecta particles traveling at many mm/μsec. This report will discuss the development of the diagnostic, including the high-powered laser system and high-resolution optical relay system. In addition, we will also describe the system required to reconstruct the images from the hologram and the corresponding analysis of those images to extract particles. Finally, we will present results from six high-explosive (HE), shock-driven Sn-ejecta experiments. Particle-size distributions will be shown that cover most of the ejecta velocities for experiments conducted in a vacuum, and helium gas environments. In addition, a modification has been made to the laser system that produces two laser pulses separated by 6.8 ns. This double-pulsed capability allows a superposition of two holograms to be acquired at two different times, thus allowing ejecta velocities to be measured directly. Results from this double-pulsed experiment will be described.

  7. Comparison of shallow aquifer and soil gas monitoring approaches for detecting CO2 leakage at a natural analogue site in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widory, D.; Gal, F.; Proust, E.; Mayer, B.

    2011-12-01

    Natural analogue sites where geologic CO2 is leaking to the surface provide excellent opportunities to test approaches suitable for monitoring for potential CO2 leakage at carbon capture and storage sites. We tested isotope monitoring approaches for CO2 detection in shallow aquifers and the overlying soil zone at a CO2 analogue site near Sainte-Marguerite in the Massif Central (France). The Sainte-Marguerite area is located in the southern part of the Limagne graben (French Massif Central). The basement, composed of highly fractured granite, outcrops toward the west of the study area, notably around the Saladis spring. An intercalated arkosic permeable interval between fractured granite and Oligocene marls and limestones acts as a stratiform drain for fluid migration while the overlying thick Oligocene interval is impermeable and acts as a seal. The Allier river bed is located near the contact between the basement and the sedimentary rocks. Deep CO2-ladden fluids migrate through the arkose interval toward the Sainte-Marguerite area and sustain a number of local springs. The Sainte-Marguerite area is known for the travertine deposits associated with the CO2-rich natural springs. We collected water samples and effervescent gases at the springs as well as soil gases for chemical and isotopic analyses. The analytical parameters included major anions and cations, δ13C & δ18O of CO2, δD & δ18O of H2O and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). Preliminary results revealed that δ13C values of CO2 in most groundwater and soil samples were similar. Oxygen isotope measurements revealed equilibrium between CO2 and H2O-oxygen in most samples, but except for a limited number of samples, δ18O values of water did not deviate significantly from the local meteoric water line. Our preliminary results suggest that both the groundwater and the soil sampling approaches should be capable of detecting leakage of CO2 provided that the leaking gas has a distinct isotopic

  8. Xenon Additives Detection in Helium Micro-Plasma Gas Analytical Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsyganov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy; Mustafaev, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Electron energy spectra of Xe atoms at He filled micro-plasma afterglow gas analyzer were observed using Collisional Electron Spectroscopy (CES) method [1]. According to CES, diffusion path confinement for characteristic electrons makes it possible to measure electrons energy distribution function (EEDF) at a high (up to atmospheric) gas pressure. Simple geometry micro-plasma CES sensor consists of two plane parallel electrodes detector and microprocessor-based acquisition system providing current-voltage curve measurement in the afterglow of the plasma discharge. Electron energy spectra are deduced as 2-nd derivative of the measured current-voltage curve to select characteristic peaks of the species to be detected. Said derivatives were obtained by the smoothing-differentiating procedure using spline least-squares approximation of a current-voltage curve. Experimental results on CES electron energy spectra at 10-40 Torr in pure He and in admixture with 0.3% Xe are discussed. It demonstrates a prototype of the new miniature micro-plasma sensors for industry, safety and healthcare applications. [1]. A.A.Kudryavtsev, A.B.Tsyganov. US Patent 7,309,992. Gas analysis method and ionization detector for carrying out said method, issued December 18, 2007.

  9. Development of a coolant channel helium and nitrogen gas ratio sensor for a high temperature gas reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cadell, S. R.; Woods, B. G.

    2012-07-01

    To measure the changing gas composition of the coolant during a postulated High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) accident, an instrument is needed. This instrument must be compact enough to measure the ratio of the coolant versus the break gas in an individual coolant channel. This instrument must minimally impact the fluid flow and provide for non-direct signal routing to allow minimal disturbance to adjacent channels. The instrument must have a flexible geometry to allow for the measurement of larger volumes such as in the upper or lower plenum of a HTGR. The instrument must be capable of accurately functioning through the full operating temperature and pressure of a HTGR. This instrument is not commercially available, but a literature survey has shown that building off of the present work on Capacitance Sensors and Cross-Capacitors will provide a basis for the development of the desired instrument. One difficulty in developing and instrument to operate at HTGR temperatures is acquiring an electrical conductor that will not melt at 1600 deg. C. This requirement limits the material selection to high temperature ceramics, graphite, and exotic metals. An additional concern for the instrument is properly accounting for the thermal expansion of both the sensing components and the gas being measured. This work covers the basic instrument overview with a thorough discussion of the associated uncertainty in making these measurements. (authors)

  10. Surface Region of Superfluid Helium as an Inhomogeneous Bose-Condensed Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, A.; Stringari, S.

    1996-01-01

    We present arguments that the low density surface region of self-bounded superfluid 4He systems is an inhomogeneous dilute Bose gas, with almost all of the atoms occupying the same single-particle state at T = 0. Numerical evidence for this complete Bose-Einstein condensation was first given by the many-body variational calculations of 4He droplets by Lewart, Pandharipande, and Pieper in 1988 [Phys. Rev. B 37, 4950 (1988)]. We show that the low density surface region can be treated rigorously using a generalized Gross-Pitaevskii equation for the Bose order parameter.

  11. Light noble gas chemistry: Structures, stabilities, and bonding of helium, neon and argon compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Frenking, G. ); Koch, W. ); Reichel, F. ); Cremer, D. )

    1990-05-23

    Theoretically determined geometries are reported for the light noble gas ions Ng{sub 2}C{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}N{sup 2+}, Ng{sub 2}O{sup 2+}, NgCCNg{sup 2+}, NgCCH{sup +}, NgCN{sup +}, and NgNC{sup +} (Ng = He, Ne, Ar) at the MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. In a few cases, optimizations were carried out at CASSCF/6-31G(d,p). The thermodynamic stability of the Ng compounds is investigated at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(2df,2pd) for Ng = He, Ne and at MP4(SDTQ)/6-311G(d,p) for Ng = Ar. The structures and stabilities of the molecules are discussed in terms of donor-acceptor interactions between Ng and the respective fragment cation, by using molecular orbital arguments and utilizing the analysis of the electron density distribution and its associated Laplace field. Generally, there is an increase in Ng,X binding interactions of a noble gas molecule NgX with increasing atomic size of Ng. In some cases the Ne,X stabilization energies are slightly smaller than the corresponding He,X values because of repulsive p-{pi} interactions in the neon compounds. The argon molecules are in all cases significantly stronger bound.

  12. Fundamental Study on the Dynamics of Heterogeneity-Enhanced CO2 Gas Evolution in the Shallow Subsurface During Possible Leakage from Deep Geologic Storage Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Sakaki, T.; Pawar, R.; Jensen, K.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    A concern for geologic carbon sequestration is the potential for CO2 stored in deep geologic formations to leak upward into shallow freshwater aquifers where it can have potentially detrimental impacts to the environment and human health. Understanding the mechanisms of CO2 exsolution, migration and accumulation (collectively referred to as 'gas evolution') in the shallow subsurface is critical to predict and mitigate the environmental impacts. During leakage, CO2 can move either as free-phase or as a dissolved component of formation brine. CO2 dissolved in brine may travel upward into shallow freshwater systems, and the gas may be released from solution. In the shallow aquifer, the exsolved gas may accumulate near interfaces between soil types, and/or create flow paths that allow the gas to escape through the vadose zone to the atmosphere. The process of gas evolution in the shallow subsurface is controlled by various factors, including temperature, dissolved CO2 concentration, water pressure, background water flow rate, and geologic heterogeneity. However, the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution have not yet been precisely defined and can therefore not yet be incorporated into models used for environmental risk assessment. The primary goal of this study is to conduct controlled laboratory experiments to help fill this knowledge gap. With this as a goal, a series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were conducted to observe CO2 gas evolution in porous media at multiple scales. Deionized water was saturated with dissolved CO2 gas under a specified pressure (the saturation pressure) before being injected at a constant volumetric flow rate into the bottom of a 1.7 meter-tall by 5.7 centimeter-diameter column or a 2.4 meter-tall by 40 centimeter-wide column that were both filled with sand in various heterogeneous packing configurations. Both test systems were initially saturated with fresh water and instrumented with soil

  13. Active neutron methods for nuclear safeguards applications using Helium-4 gas scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Jason M.

    Active neutron methods use a neutron source to interrogate fissionable material. In this work a 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detection system is used to measure neutrons created by the interrogation. Three new applications of this method are developed: spent nuclear fuel assay, fission rate measurement, and special nuclear material detection. Three active neutron methods are included in this thesis. First a non-destructive plutonium assay technique called Multispectral Active Neutron Interrogation Analysis is developed. It is based on interrogating fuel with neutrons at several different energies. The induced fission rates at each interrogation energy are compared with results from a neutron transport model of the irradiation geometry in a system of equations to iteratively solve the inverse problem for isotopic composition. The model is shown to converge on the correct composition for a material with 3 different fissionable components, a representative neutron absorber, and any neutron transparent material such as oxygen in a variety of geometries. Next an experimental fission rate measurement technique is developed using 4He gas scintillation fast neutron detector. Several unique features of this detector allow it to detect and provide energy information on fast neutrons with excellent gamma discrimination efficiency. The detector can measure induced fission rate by energetically differentiating between interrogation neutrons and higher energy fission neutrons. The detector response to a mono-energetic deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a 252Cf source are compared to examine the difference in detected energy range. Finally we demonstrate a special nuclear material detection technique by detecting an unambiguous fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium neutron generator and a high pressure 4He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. Energy histograms resulting from this

  14. Theoretical calculations of pressure broadening coefficients for H2O perturbed by hydrogen or helium gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamache, Robert R.; Pollack, James B.

    1995-01-01

    Halfwidths were calculated for H2O with H2 as a broadening gas and were estimated for He as the broadening species. The calculations used the model of Robert and Bonamy with parabolic trajectories and all relevant terms in the interaction potential. The calculations investigated the dependence of the halfwidth on the order of the atom-atom expansion, the rotational states, and the temperature in the range 200 to 400K. Finally, calculations were performed for many transitions of interest in the 5 micrometer window region of the spectrum. The resulting data will be supplied to Dr. R. Freedman for extracting accurate water mixing ratios from the analysis of the thermal channels for the Net Flux experiment on the Galileo probe.

  15. Interferometric technique for the calibration of the helium gas jet spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sands, R. R.; Scott, W. R.; Ehrenfeuchter, P. A.

    An interferometric technique is described for making absolute measurements of the frequency spectrum of the stress waves produced in an Al cylinder by an He jet which is a candidate for calibration instrument for acoustic emission (AE) NDE. A stabilized heterodyne interferometer (SHI) is employed to measure the surface displacements in the face of the Al cylinder opposite the He jet. The measured waveforms were analyzed by Fourier transformations and stored for comparisons with previous findings by McBride (1976). The gas jet, although lacking the characteristics of a white broadband noise spectrum, was found to be reproducible. The spectrum was determined to be controlled by the Al cylinder, implying that alternate, tailored spectra that includes white noise could be obtained with an appropriate choice of materials.

  16. Design and demonstration of an analysis Information system for magnetic flux leakage inspection of natural gas pipeline. Final letter report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, G.J.; Saffell, B.A.

    1996-10-01

    A staff exchange was conducted for the mutual benefit of the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Vetco Pipeline Services Inc. (VPSI), and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This staff exchange provided direct exposure by a Laboratory staff member knowledgeable in inspection, integrity assessment, and robotic capabilities of the Laboratory to the needs of the natural gas pipeline industry. The project included an assignment to the GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) during the period preceding the commissioning of the flow loop. GRI is interested in exploiting advanced technology at the National Laboratories. To provide a sense of the market impact, it is estimated that $3 billion was spent in 1993 for the repair, renovation, and replacement of distribution piping. GRI has goals of saving the distribution industry $500 million in Operations and Maintenance costs and having an additional $250M savings impact on transmission pipelines. The objectives of the project included: (1) For PNNL staff to present technology to GRI and PSF staff on non- destructive evaluation, robotics, ground penetrating radar, and risk based inspection guidelines for application to the operation and maintenance of natural gas pipelines. (2) For GRI and PSF staff to discuss with PNNL staff opportunities for improving the industrial competitiveness of operation and maintenance services. (3) To explore the basis for partnership with GRI and PSF staff on technology transfer topics. In this project, staff exchanges were conducted to GRI`s Pipeline Simulation Facility and to VPSI. PNNL . staff had access to the $10M GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) at West Jefferson, Ohio. The facility has a 4,700-ft. long pipe loop, an NDE laboratory, and a data analysis laboratory. PNNL staff had access to the VPSI`s facility in Houston, TX. VPSI has developed some of the most sophisticated inspection tools currently used in the pipeline inspection industry.

  17. Fission signal detection using helium-4 gas fast neutron scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J. M. Kelley, R. P.; Jordan, K. A.; Murer, D.

    2014-07-07

    We demonstrate the unambiguous detection of the fission neutron signal produced in natural uranium during active neutron interrogation using a deuterium-deuterium fusion neutron generator and a high pressure {sup 4}He gas fast neutron scintillation detector. The energy deposition by individual neutrons is quantified, and energy discrimination is used to differentiate the induced fission neutrons from the mono-energetic interrogation neutrons. The detector can discriminate between different incident neutron energies using pulse height discrimination of the slow scintillation component of the elastic scattering interaction between a neutron and the {sup 4}He atom. Energy histograms resulting from this data show the buildup of a detected fission neutron signal at higher energies. The detector is shown here to detect a unique fission neutron signal from a natural uranium sample during active interrogation with a (d, d) neutron generator. This signal path has a direct application to the detection of shielded nuclear material in cargo and air containers. It allows for continuous interrogation and detection while greatly minimizing the potential for false alarms.

  18. Using helium as background gas to avoid hydrogen brittleness for MgB2 film fabrication on niobium substrate by HPCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xin; Ni, Zhimao; Chen, Lizhi; Hu, Hui; Yang, Can; Feng, Qingrong; Liu, Kexin

    2016-05-01

    Magnesium diboride has shown potential as an alternative material for the application of superconducting RF cavities. However, if MgB2 films are fabricated on niobium substrates with HPCVD method, hydrogen brittleness will cause cracks on MgB2 film when it is bent. In this work, we have investigated the possibility of depositing MgB2 film on niobium in other background gases rather than hydrogen to avoid hydrogen brittleness. Though MgB2 films fabricated in nitrogen and argon have impurities and show poor superconducting properties, the MgB2 film fabricated in helium has similar morphology and superconducting properties of that prepared in hydrogen and no cracks are observed after bending. The problem of hydrogen brittleness can be solved by using helium as the background gas when fabricating MgB2 films on niobium substrates.

  19. Pipeline leakage detection using distributed fibre optical temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosswig, S.; Hurtig, E.; Luebbecke, S.; Vogel, B.

    2005-05-01

    The leakage detection system based on the distributed fibre optical temperature measurement method is an analysing method for continuous detection and localization of leakages at pipelines in the steady and unsteady operation states according to the German rules for pipelines TRbF 301/TRFL which is valid in Germany since April 2003. The leakage detection system is useable under the precondition that there is a sufficient large temperature gradient between the leakage area and the unaffected environment. This can be caused by the medium itself or through a physical effect due to the leakage, e.g. gas expansion, evaporation. It's a very sensitive method, so also creeping leakages can be detected.

  20. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  1. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  2. 30 CFR 256.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Helium. 256.11 Section 256.11 Mineral Resources... Sulphur Management, General § 256.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations... of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the...

  3. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  4. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  5. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  6. 30 CFR 556.11 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Helium. 556.11 Section 556.11 Mineral Resources... § 556.11 Helium. (a) Each lease issued or continued under these regulations shall be subject to a... helium from all gas produced from the leased area. (b) In case the United States elects to take...

  7. 43 CFR 3100.1 - Helium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Helium. 3100.1 Section 3100.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Helium. The ownership of and the right to extract helium from all gas produced from lands leased...

  8. Expiratory flow limitation and the response to breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture in a canine model of pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed Central

    Mink, S N

    1984-01-01

    The pathophysiology of reduced maximum expiratory flow in a canine model of pulmonary emphysema was studied, and the results interpreted in terms of the wave-speed theory of flow limitation. According to this theory, maximum expiratory flow is related both to the cross-sectional area and compliance at an airway site where a critical gas velocity is first reached ("choke-point") and to gas density. Pulmonary emphysema was produced by the repeated instillations of the enzyme papain into the airways of six dogs. In five control dogs, a saline solution was instilled. During forced vital capacity deflation, in an open-chest preparation, maximum expiratory flow, choke-point locations, and the response to breathing an 80:20 helium/oxygen gas mixture were determined at multiple lung volumes. To locate choke-points, a pressure measuring device was positioned in the airway to measure lateral and end-on intrabronchial pressures, from which the relevant wave-speed parameters were obtained. In general, the reduced maximum expiratory flow in emphysema can be explained by diminished lung elastic recoil pressure and by altered bronchial pressure-area behavior, which results in a more peripheral location of choke-points that have smaller cross-sectional areas than controls. With respect to the density dependence of maximum expiratory flow, this response did not differ from control values in four dogs with emphysema in which frictional pressure losses upstream from choke-points did not differ on the two gas mixtures. In two dogs with emphysema, however, upstream frictional pressure losses were greater on helium/oxygen than on air, which resulted in a smaller cross-sectional area on helium/oxygen; hence density dependence decreased. PMID:6715539

  9. Intermolecular dispersion interactions of normal alkanes with rare gas atoms: van der Waals complexes of n-pentane with helium, neon, and argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balabin, Roman M.

    2008-09-01

    Interaction energies of normal pentane with three rare gas atoms (helium, neon, and argon) were calculated using ab initio methods: the second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2), the fourth-order Møller-Plesset (MP4), and coupled cluster with single and double substitutions with noniterative triple excitation (CCSD(T)) levels of theory. Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ were applied. Eight profiles (246 points for each rare gas atom) of potential energy surface (PES) of all-trans (anti-anti) conformation of n-pentane were scanned. Optimal distances for complex formation were found. MP2 interaction energies at the basis set limit were evaluated by three different methods (Feller's, Helgaker's, and Martin's). The MP2 interaction energy at the basis set limit for a global minimum of n-pentane complex with argon was more than 400 cm -1, so formation of a stable complex (at least at low temperature) can be expected. A comparison with previously published data on propane complexes with rare gas atoms (both computational and experimental) was done. The MP4 level of theory was found to be sufficient for a description of C 5H 12 complexes with helium, neon, and argon.

  10. Emission of mercury monobromide exciplex in gas-discharge plasma based on mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, A. A.; Shuaibov, A. K.

    2011-02-01

    We present the results of investigations of an emission of a mercury monobromide exciplex in gas-discharge plasma of an atmospheric pressure barrier discharge based on a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor, sulfur hexafluoride, and helium. We optimized the emission power of mercury monobromide exciplexes with respect to the partial pressures of the working mixture. An average emission power of 0.42 W (λmax = 502 nm) is achieved in a cylindrical emission source with a small working volume (0.8 cm3) at a pumping pulse repetition rate of 6 kHz. We determined electron energy distribution functions, transport characteristics, specific discharge power losses for electron processes, electron concentration and temperature, as well as rate constants of elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons by components of the working mixture in relation to the ratio of the field strength to the total concentration of components of the working mixture. We discuss processes that increase the population of the mercury monobromide exciplex. Gas-discharge plasma created in a mixture of mercury dibromide vapor with sulfur hexafluoride and helium can be used as a working medium of an emission source in the blue-green spectral range for the use in scientific research in biotechnology, photonics, and medicine, as well as for creating indicator gas-discharge panels.

  11. Helium cryopumping for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sedgley, D.W.; Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1988-05-01

    Large quantities of helium and hydrogen isotopes will be exhausted continuously from fusion power reactors. This paper summarizes two development programs undertaken to address vacuum pumping for this application: (i) A continuous duty cryopump for pumping helium and/or hydrogen species using charcoal sorbent and (ii) a cryopump configuration with an alternative shielding arrangement using charcoal sorbent or argon spray. A test program evaluated automatic pumping of helium, helium pumping by charcoal cryosorption and with argon spray, and cryosorption of helium/hydrogen mixtures. The continuous duty cryopump pumped helium continuously and conveniently. Helium pumping speed was 7.7 l/s/cm/sup 2/ of charcoal, compared to 5.8 l/s/cm/sup 2/ for the alternative pump. Helium speed using argon spray was 18% of that obtained by charcoal cryosorption in the same (W-panel) pump. During continuous duty cryopump mixture tests with helium and hydrogen copumped on charcoal, gas was released sporadically. Testing was insufficient to explain this unacceptable event.

  12. Measurement of void volume of a fuel rod and the exchange of occluded gases from mixed carbide fuel with filling gas helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, G. A. Rama; Kukarni, S. G.; Venugoopal, V.; Manchanda, V. K.; Goswami, G. L.

    1995-02-01

    The presence of gaseous impurities in the filling gas of a fuel pin is detriental to the thermal performance of a nuclear reactor fuel. The composition of the filling gas does not remain constant throughout the life of the fuel pin. The gas exchange phenomena that occur between the cover gas and impurity gases affect the fuel performance more severely in (U, Pu)O 2 fuel pin due to its inherently poor thermal conductivity than in advanced fuels such as mixed carbides and nitrides. In the present study the exchange phenomenon of the occluded gases present in our Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel pellets [(U 0.30, Pu 0.70)C with 6500 ppm o] with the cover gas helium was observed as a function of time and temperature. Quantitative analysis of the released gases namely H 2, O 2 + Ar, N 2, CH 4 and CO was carried out at subambient pressure by gas chromatography. The void volume of the fuel element is determined experimentally by gas equilibration with known volume.

  13. Quantitative analysis of deuterium in zircaloy using double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) and helium gas plasma without a sample chamber.

    PubMed

    Suyanto, H; Lie, Z S; Niki, H; Kagawa, K; Fukumoto, K; Rinda, Hedwig; Abdulmadjid, S N; Marpaung, A M; Pardede, M; Suliyanti, M M; Hidayah, A N; Jobiliong, E; Lie, T J; Tjia, M O; Kurniawan, K H

    2012-03-01

    A crucial safety measure to be strictly observed in the operation of heavy-water nuclear power plants is the mandatory regular inspection of the concentration of deuterium penetrated into the zircaloy fuel vessels. The existing standard method requires a tedious, destructive, and costly sample preparation process involving the removal of the remaining fuel in the vessel and melting away part of the zircaloy pipe. An alternative method of orthogonal dual-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) is proposed by employing flowing atmospheric helium gas without the use of a sample chamber. The special setup of ps and ns laser systems, operated for the separate ablation of the sample target and the generation of helium gas plasma, respectively, with properly controlled relative timing, has succeeded in producing the desired sharp D I 656.10 nm emission line with effective suppression of the interfering H I 656.28 nm emission by operating the ps ablation laser at very low output energy of 26 mJ and 1 μs ahead of the helium plasma generation. Under this optimal experimental condition, a linear calibration line is attained with practically zero intercept and a 20 μg/g detection limit for D analysis of zircaloy sample while creating a crater only 10 μm in diameter. Therefore, this method promises its potential application for the practical, in situ, and virtually nondestructive quantitative microarea analysis of D, thereby supporting the more-efficient operation and maintenance of heavy-water nuclear power plants. Furthermore, it will also meet the anticipated needs of future nuclear fusion power plants, as well as other important fields of application in the foreseeable future. PMID:22283593

  14. Measuring Heat-Exchanger Water Leakage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampiceni, J.

    1986-01-01

    Water leakage in heat exchanger measured directly with help of electroytic hygrometer. In new technique, flow of nitrogen gas set up in one loop of heat exchanger. Other loop filled with water under pressure. Water concentration produced by leakage of water into nitrogen flow measured by hygrometer. New measurement method determines water concentrations up to 2,000 parts per million with accuracy of +/- 5 percent.

  15. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Walsh, A J; Tielens, A G G M; Ruth, A A

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles' spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp(3)/sp(2) hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ. PMID:27421401

  16. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Ruth, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles' spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp3/sp2 hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  17. Design of oil-free simple turbo type 65 K/6 KW helium and neon mixture gas refrigerator for high temperature superconducting power cable cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saji, N.; Asakura, H.; Yoshinaga, S.; Ishizawa, T.; Miyake, A.; Obata, M.; Nagaya, S.

    2002-05-01

    For the requirement of HTS facility cooling, we propose oil-free simple turbo-type refrigerator. The working gas is a helium and neon mixture. Two single-stage turbo compressors and two expansion turbines are applied to the cycle. The rotor consists of the compressor impeller, turbine impeller and driving motor, and is supported by foil type gas bearing. The refrigerator requires two rotating machines with excellent reliability and compactness, and the motor power required is 72.5 kW for a refrigeration load of 6 kW. For the cooling of power cable, sub-cooled pressurized liquid nitrogen and a circulation pump must be provided. If the estimated distance between inter-cooling stations is quite long, for example 5 km, plural refrigerators may be set up on one cooling station.

  18. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-LO observations: What are the reasons for the differences?

    SciTech Connect

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Wood, B. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  19. Neutral Interstellar Helium Parameters Based on Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo Observations: What are the Reasons for the Differences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katushkina, O. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Wood, B. E.; McMullin, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent analysis of the interstellar helium fluxes measured in 2009-2010 at Earth's orbit by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has suggested that the interstellar velocity (both direction and magnitude) is inconsistent with that derived previously from Ulysses/GAS observations made in the period from 1990 to 2002 at 1.5-5.5 AU from the Sun. Both results are model dependent, and models that were used in the analyses are different. In this paper, we perform an analysis of the Ulysses/GAS and IBEX-Lo data using our state-of-the-art three-dimensional time-dependent kinetic model of interstellar atoms in the heliosphere. For the first time, we analyze Ulysses/GAS data from year 2007, the closest available Ulysses/GAS observations in time to the IBEX observations. We show that the interstellar velocity derived from the Ulysses 2007 data is consistent with previous Ulysses results and does not agree with the velocity derived from IBEX. This conclusion is very robust since, as is shown in the paper, it does not depend on the ionization rates adopted in theoretical models. We conclude that Ulysses data are not consistent with the new local interstellar medium (LISM) velocity vector from IBEX. In contrast, IBEX data, in principle, could be explained with the LISM velocity vector derived from the Ulysses data. This is possible for the models where the interstellar temperature increased from 6300 K to 9000 K. There is a need to perform further studies of possible reasons for the broadening of the helium signal core measured by IBEX, which could be an instrumental effect or could be due to unconsidered physical processes.

  20. Cooling rates of living and killed chicken and quail eggs in air and in helium-oxygen gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, H; Turner, J S; Paganelli, C V

    1988-01-01

    1. In a helium atmosphere, heat is dissipated from a surface 3.5 times faster than it is in air. Eggs in a helium-oxygen atmosphere cool only 1.4 times faster than they cool in air. This signifies that internal resistance to heat flow is a significant factor in the cooling rates of eggs. 2. Heat flow occurs inside an egg in two ways: by conduction through the tissues and in flowing blood. Killing an embryo stops the latter, but not the former. Eggs cool more slowly after they have been killed, signifying that blood flow can be an important component in an egg's internal flows of heat. 3. Blood flow should be a relatively more important component of heat flow in large eggs than in small eggs. The difference in conductance between living and killed eggs is larger in 60 g chicken eggs than it is in 10 g quail eggs. PMID:2900113

  1. Predicting Leakage in Labyrinth Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, G. L.; Rhode, D. L.; Cogan, K. C.; Chi, D.; Demko, J.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and empirical methods evaluated. 264-page report presents comprehensive information on leakage in labyrinth seals. Summarizes previous analyses of leakage, reviews leakage tests conducted by authors and evaluates various analytical and experimental methods of determining leakage and discusses leakage prediction techniques.

  2. Improving the performance of stainless-steel DC high voltage photoelectron gun cathode electrodes via gas conditioning with helium or krypton

    SciTech Connect

    BastaniNejad, M.; Elmustafa, A. A.; Forman, E.; Clark, J.; Covert, S.; Grames, J.; Hansknecht, J.; Hernandez-Garcia, C.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2014-10-01

    Gas conditioning was shown to eliminate field emission from cathode electrodes used inside DC high voltage photoelectron guns, thus providing a reliable means to operate photoguns at higher voltages and field strengths. Measurements and simulation results indicate that gas conditioning eliminates field emission from cathode electrodes via two mechanisms: sputtering and implantation, with the benefits of implantation reversed by heating the electrode. We have studied five stainless steel electrodes (304L and 316LN) that were polished to approximately 20 nm surface roughness using diamond grit, and evaluated inside a high voltage apparatus to determine the onset of field emission as a function of voltage and field strength. The field emission characteristics of each electrode varied significantly upon the initial application of voltage but improved to nearly the same level after gas conditioning using either helium or krypton, exhibiting less than 10 pA field emission at -225 kV bias voltage with a 50 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to a field strength of ~13 MV/m. Finally, field emission could be reduced with either gas, but there were conditions related to gas choice, voltage and field strength that were more favorable than others.

  3. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Liu, L. Q.; Wang, P.

    2014-01-29

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  4. Measurement and control system for cryogenic helium gas bearing turbo-expander experimental platform based on Siemens PLC S7-300

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Xiong, L. Y.; Peng, N.; Dong, B.; Wang, P.; Liu, L. Q.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental platform for cryogenic Helium gas bearing turbo-expanders is established at the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This turbo-expander experimental platform is designed for performance testing and experimental research on Helium turbo-expanders with different sizes from the liquid hydrogen temperature to the room temperature region. A measurement and control system based on Siemens PLC S7-300 for this turbo-expander experimental platform is developed. Proper sensors are selected to measure such parameters as temperature, pressure, rotation speed and air flow rate. All the collected data to be processed are transformed and transmitted to S7-300 CPU. Siemens S7-300 series PLC CPU315-2PN/DP is as master station and two sets of ET200M DP remote expand I/O is as slave station. Profibus-DP field communication is established between master station and slave stations. The upper computer Human Machine Interface (HMI) is compiled using Siemens configuration software WinCC V6.2. The upper computer communicates with PLC by means of industrial Ethernet. Centralized monitoring and distributed control is achieved. Experimental results show that this measurement and control system has fulfilled the test requirement for the turbo-expander experimental platform.

  5. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Arthur W; Diehl, J Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  6. Helium and methane anomalies in domestic well waters in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, and their relationship to other dissolved constituents, oil and gas fields, and tectonic patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyck, Willy; Dunn, Colin E.

    1986-11-01

    During the summer of 1976 a regional groundwater survey was undertaken in an area of 18,000 km2 in southwestern Saskatchewan. Approximately 940 domestic wells and springs were sampled at a density of 1 per 13 km2, where possible. The samples were analyzed for up to 30 variables, including He, CH4, and many trace and minor elements. The results of the survey are related to regional topographic, geological, and hydrological features. Of particular interest are CH4 and He anomalies associated with known gas and oil reservoirs in the region. Several anomalies of similar magnitude occur away from known reservoirs and hence may point to new ones. The close association of CH4 with He, sample depth and deeper "softer" waters, as indicated by the positive correlations of CH4 with He, Na, CO2-3, HCO-3 and sample depth is postulated to be a good criterion for distinguishing between reservoir CH4 and marsh gas. The coincidence of CH4 and He anomalies with known tectonic features also indicates fracture leakage from depth and the possible existence of oil and gas fields. Regional surveys of domestic well waters can be of use in delineating areas with proven and potential oil and gas reservoirs at depth.

  7. A comprehensive study of H emission in a TEA CO2 laser-induced helium gas plasma for highly sensitive analysis of hydrogen in metal samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, Zener Sukra; Khumaeni, Ali; Niki, Hideaki; Kurihara, Kazuyoshi; Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Hedwig, Rinda; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lee, Yong Inn

    2012-07-01

    Our previous work on an innovative method of hydrogen (H) analysis using the specific characteristics of a TEA CO2 laser, "selective detection method of H", has been improved to realize a high H sensitive analysis with a detection limit of several µg/g. For this purpose, first, we clarified the origin of the H emission disturbance coming from H2O molecules; namely, we showed that most of the H emission came from H2O on the metal surface and not from H2O existing in the surrounding gas when we formed a laser-induced gas plasma. Second, the difference in the emission characteristics between the H emission from H2O on the metal surface and H emission from inside in sample was studied to determine the optimum gating time of the optical multi-channel analyzer (OMA). Third, the gas plasma was totally covered by fresh helium gas using a big pipe (5 mm in diameter) and by flowing a high amount of He (10 l/min). Also, we demonstrated that our methods could potentially be applied to H analysis in steel samples, where an H analysis with a sensitivity of less than 1 µg/g is required without employing a heating process, by removing H2O on the sample surface with the aid of defocused TEA CO2 laser irradiation. Thus, we stress that our method can be used for a highly sensitive, in-situ analysis of H for metal samples.

  8. Helium Leak Measurements Using CO2 as a Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, B. C.; Camarillo, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Detection delay defects are omitted by using helium mass spectrometer leak detector combined with several known procedures. Technique combines carbon dioxide purging, cryogenic separating helium accumulation, and use of carbon dioxide as carrier gas.

  9. Evanescent straight tapered-fiber coupling of ultra-high Q optomechanical micro-resonators in a low-vibration helium-4 exchange-gas cryostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, R.; Arcizet, O.; Schliesser, A.; Kippenberg, T. J.

    2013-04-01

    We developed an apparatus to couple a 50-μm diameter whispering-gallery silica microtoroidal resonator in a helium-4 cryostat using a straight optical tapered-fiber at 1550 nm wavelength. On a top-loading probe specifically adapted for increased mechanical stability, we use a specifically-developed "cryotaper" to optically probe the cavity, allowing thus to record the calibrated mechanical spectrum of the optomechanical system at low temperatures. We then demonstrate excellent thermalization of a 63-MHz mechanical mode of a toroidal resonator down to the cryostat's base temperature of 1.65 K, thereby proving the viability of the cryogenic refrigeration via heat conduction through static low-pressure exchange gas. In the context of optomechanics, we therefore provide a versatile and powerful tool with state-of-the-art performances in optical coupling efficiency, mechanical stability, and cryogenic cooling.

  10. Description and operating performance of a parallel-rail electric-arc system with helium driver gas for the Langley 6-inch expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    A parallel-rail arc-discharge system to heat and pressurize the initial helium driver gas of the Langley 6-inch expansion tube is described. This system was designed for a 2.44-m-long driver vessel rated at 138 MPa, with a distance between rails of 20.3 cm. Electric energy was obtained from a capacitor storage system rated at 12,000 V with a maximum energy of 5 MJ. Tests were performed over a range of energy from 1.74 MJ to the maximum value. The operating experience and system performance are discussed, along with results from a limited number of expansion-tube tests with air and carbon dioxide as test gases.