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Sample records for helium radiation damage

  1. Interrogating the Effects of Radiation Damage Annealing on Helium Diffusion Kinetics in Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, C. D.; Fox, M.; Shuster, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Apatite (U-Th)/He thermochronology is commonly used to study landscape evolution and potential links between climate, erosion and tectonics. The technique relies on a quantitative understanding of (i) helium diffusion kinetics in apatite, (ii) an evolving 4He concentration, (iii) accumulating damage to the crystal lattice caused by radioactive decay[1], and (iv) the thermal annealing of such damage[2],[3], which are each functions of both time and temperature. Uncertainty in existing models of helium diffusion kinetics has resulted in conflicting conclusions, especially in settings involving burial heating through geologic time. The effects of alpha recoil damage annealing are currently assumed to follow the kinetics of fission track annealing (e.g., reference [3]), although this assumption is difficult to fully validate. Here, we present results of modeling exercises and a suite of experiments designed to interrogate the effects of damage annealing on He diffusivity in apatite that are independent of empirical calibrations of fission track annealing. We use the existing experimental results for Durango apatite[2] to develop and calibrate a new function that predicts the effects of annealing temperature and duration on measured diffusivity. We also present a suite of experiments conducted on apatite from Sierra Nevada, CA granite to establish whether apatites with different chemical compositions have the same behavior as Durango apatite. Crystals were heated under vacuum to temperatures between 250 and 500°C for 1, 10, or 100 hours. The samples were then irradiated with ~220 MeV protons to produce spallogenic 3He, the diffusant then used in step-heating diffusion experiments. We compare the results of these experiments and model calibrations to existing models. Citations: [1]Shuster, D., Flowers R., and Farley K., (2006), EPSL 249(3-4), 148-161; [2]Shuster, D. and Farley, K., (2009), GCA 73 (1), 6183-6196; [3]Flowers, R., Ketcham, R., Shuster, D. and Farley, K

  2. Modeling radiation damage near grain boundary in helium-doped α-iron

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C. P.; Liu, X. -Y.; Gao, F.; Li, Y. H.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate how Σ3<110> (121) symmetric tilt grain boundary (GB) affects point defects and defect clusters in He-doped α-iron at 300 K in picosecond time scales. Molecular statics calculations are also performed and show that the formation energy is reduced in the GB, and the GB acts as a good sink for point defects especially for interstitial He and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). It is observed that the average size of HenVm (m>n) clusters becomes smaller in the GB-containing Fe system. It is also found that the number of HenV (n=2, 3) clusters in the GB region decreases, while the number of the HeV clusters increases. The GBs loaded with substitutional or interstitial helium atoms are found to facilitate the growth of helium clusters in the GB region.

  3. Modeling radiation damage near grain boundary in helium-doped α-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. P.; Liu, X.-Y.; Gao, F.; Li, Y. H.; Wang, Y. Q.

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate how ∑3<1 1 0>(1 2 1) symmetric tilt grain boundary (GB) affects point defects and defect clusters in He-doped α-iron at 300 K in picosecond time scales. Molecular statics calculations are also performed and show that the formation energy is reduced in the GB, and the GB acts as a good sink for point defects, especially for interstitial He and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). It is observed that the average size of HenVm (m > n) clusters becomes smaller in the GB-containing Fe system, where m and n represent the number of vacancies and He atoms in the cluster, respectively. It is also found that the number of HenV (n = 2, 3) clusters in the GB region decreases, while the number of the HeV clusters increases. The GBs loaded with substitutional or interstitial helium atoms are found to facilitate the growth of helium clusters in the GB region.

  4. Radiation source for helium magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slocum, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A radiation source (12) for optical magnetometers (10) which use helium isotopes as the resonance element (30) includes an electronically pumped semiconductor laser (12) which produces a single narrow line of radiation which is frequency stabilized to the center frequency of the helium resonance line to be optically pumped. The frequency stabilization is accomplished using electronic feedback (34, 40, 42, 44) to control a current sources (20) thus eliminating the need for mechanical frequency tuning.

  5. Helium vs. Proton Induced Displacement Damage in Electronic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringo, Sawnese; Barghouty, A. F.

    2010-01-01

    In this project, the specific effects of displacement damage due to the passage of protons and helium nuclei on some typical electronic materials will be evaluated and contrasted. As the electronic material absorbs the energetic proton and helium momentum, degradation of performance occurs, eventually leading to overall failure. Helium nuclei traveling at the same speed as protons are expected to impart more to the material displacement damage; due to the larger mass, and thus momentum, of helium nuclei compared to protons. Damage due to displacement of atoms in their crystalline structure can change the physical properties and hence performance of the electronic materials.

  6. A review of helium-hydrogen synergistic effects in radiation damage observed in fusion energy steels and an interaction model to guide future understanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Jaime; Hoang, Tuan; Fluss, Michael; Hsiung, Luke L.

    2015-07-01

    Under fusion reactor conditions, large quantities of irradiation defects and transmutation gases are produced per unit time by neutrons, resulting in accelerated degradation of structural candidate ferritic (F) and ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels. Due to the lack of a suitable fusion neutron testing facility, we must rely on high-dose-rate ion-beam experiments and present-day crude modeling estimates. Of particular interest is the possibility of synergistic (positive feedback) effects on materials properties due to the simultaneous action of He, H, and displacement damage (dpa) during operation. In this paper we discuss the state-of-the-art in terms of the experimental understanding of synergistic effects and carry out simulations of triple-species irradiation under ion-beam conditions using first-of-its-kind modeling techniques. Although, state-of-the-art modeling and simulation is not sufficiently well developed to shed light on the experimental uncertainties, we are able to conclude that it is not clear whether synergistic effects, the evidence of which is still not conclusive, will ultimately play a critical role in material performance under fusion energy conditions. We review here some of the evidence for the synergistic effects of hydrogen in the presence of helium and displacement damage, and also include some recent data from our research. While the experimental results to date suggest possible mechanisms for the observed synergistic effects, it is only with more advanced modeling that we can hope to understand the details underlying the experimental observations. By employing modeling and simulation we propose an interaction model that is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations of dpa/He/H irradiation behavior. Our modeling, the results of which should be helpful to researchers going forward, points to gaps and voids in the current understanding of triple ion-beam irradiation effects (displacement damage produced simultaneously with

  7. Krypton and helium irradiation damage in neodymium-zirconolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, M.; Davoisne, C.; Stennett, M.; Hyatt, N.; Peng, N.; Jeynes, C.; Lee, W. E.

    2011-09-01

    A leading candidate for the immobilisation of actinides, zirconolite's suitability as a potential ceramic host for plutonium disposition, both in storage and geological disposal, has been the subject of much research. One key aim of this study is to understand the effects of radiation damage and noble gas accommodation within the zirconolite material. To this end, a series of ex situ irradiations have been performed on polycrystalline (Ca 0.8Nd 0.2)Zr(Ti 1.8Al 0.2)O 7 zirconolite samples. Zirconolite samples, doped with Nd 3+ (as a Pu surrogate) on the Ca-site and charge-balanced by substituting Al 3+ onto the Ti-site, were irradiated with 36Kr + (2 MeV) ions at fluences of 1 × 10 14 and 5 × 10 15 cm -2 and 4He + (200 keV) ions at fluences of 1 × 10 14, 5 × 10 15 and 1 × 10 17 cm -2 to simulate the impact of alpha decay on the microstructure. Microstructural analysis revealed no damage present at the lower Kr + fluence, but that the higher 36Kr + fluence rendered the zirconolite completely amorphous. Similarly, evidence of helium accumulation was only seen at the highest 4He + fluence (1 × 10 17 cm -2). Monte Carlo simulations using the TRIM code predict the highest concentration of helium accumulating at a depth of 720 nm, in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  8. Modifying Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwanghee; McBride, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation leaves a fairly characteristic footprint in biological materials, but this is rapidly all but obliterated by the canonical biological responses to the radiation damage. The innate immune recognition systems that sense “danger” through direct radiation damage and through associated collateral damage set in motion a chain of events that, in a tissue compromised by radiation, often unwittingly result in oscillating waves of molecular and cellular responses as tissues attempt to heal. Understanding “nature’s whispers” that inform on these processes will lead to novel forms of intervention targeted more precisely towards modifying them in an appropriate and timely fashion so as to improve the healing process and prevent or mitigate the development of acute and late effects of normal tissue radiation damage, whether it be accidental, as a result of a terrorist incident, or of therapeutic treatment of cancer. Here we attempt to discuss some of the non-free radical scavenging mechanisms that modify radiation responses and comment on where we see them within a conceptual framework of an evolving radiation-induced lesion. PMID:20583981

  9. Radiation Damage Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    The availability of data regarding the radiation behavior of GaAs and silicon solar cells is discussed as well as efforts to provide sufficient information. Other materials are considered too immature for reasonable radiation evaluation. The lack of concern over the possible catastrophic radiation degradation in cascade cells is a potentially serious problem. Lithium counterdoping shows potential for removing damage in irradiated P-type material, although initial efficiencies are not comparable to current state of the art. The possibility of refining the lithium doping method to maintain high initial efficiencies and combining it with radiation tolerant structures such as thin BSF cells or vertical junction cells could provide a substantial improvement in EOL efficiencies. Laser annealing of junctions, either those formed ion implantation or diffusion, may not only improve initial cell performance but might also reduce the radiation degradation rate.

  10. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  11. The expected radiation damage of CSNS target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, W.; Yu, Q. Z.; Lu, Y. L.; Wang, S. L.; Tong, J. F.; Liang, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The radiation damage to the tungsten target and its SS316 vessel for Chinese Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) has been estimated with a Monte-Carlo simulation code MCNPX2.5.0. We compare the effects on the radiation damage due to two different proton beam profiles: a uniform distribution and a Gaussian distribution. We also discuss the dependence of the radiation damage estimation on different physics models. The results show the peak displacement productions in vessel and the fourth target plate are 2.5 and 5.5 dpa/y, respectively, under a Gaussian proton beam. The peak helium productions in the vessel and the fourth target are 305 and 353 appm/y, respectively, under the same proton beam. Based on these results and the allowable dpa values we have estimated the lifetime of the tungsten target and its vessel.

  12. Blackbody-radiation correction to the polarizability of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Puchalski, M.; Jentschura, U. D.; Mohr, P. J.

    2011-04-15

    The correction to the polarizability of helium due to blackbody radiation is calculated near room temperature. A precise theoretical determination of the blackbody radiation correction to the polarizability of helium is essential for dielectric gas thermometry and for the determination of the Boltzmann constant. We find that the correction, for not too high temperature, is roughly proportional to a modified hyperpolarizability (two-color hyperpolarizability), which is different from the ordinary hyperpolarizability of helium. Our explicit calculations provide a definite numerical result for the effect and indicate that the effect of blackbody radiation can be excluded as a limiting factor for dielectric gas thermometry using helium or argon.

  13. Synergistic Effect of Triple Ion Beams on Radiation Damage in CLAM Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Da-Qing; Zheng, Yong-Nan; Zuo, Yi; Fan, Ping; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Qiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Qiang; Cui, Bao-Qun; Chen, Li-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Can; Huang, Qun-Ying; Peng, Lei; Cao, Xing-Zhong; Wang, Bao-Yi; Wei, Long; Zhu, Sheng-Yun

    2014-04-01

    The synergistic effect of triple ion beams is investigated by simultaneous and sequential irradiations of gold, hydrogen and helium ions on the low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) developed in China. The depth profile measurements of the positron annihilation Doppler broadening S parameter are carried out as a function of slow-positron beam energy to examine the produced radiation damage. The synergistic effect of displacement damage and hydrogen and helium on the formation of radiation damage is clearly observed. In the preset case, this effect suppresses the radiation damage in the CLAM steel due to the helium and/or hydrogen filling of vacancy clusters.

  14. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  15. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  16. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  17. Chemical Protection Against Radiation Damage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaigne, Ernest

    1969-01-01

    Discusses potential war time and medical uses for chemical compounds giving protection against radiation damage. Describes compounds known to protect, research aimed at discovering such compounds, and problems of toxicity. (EB)

  18. Nuclear Radiation Damages Minds!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Professors Ernest Sternglass (University of Pittsburgh) and Steven Bell (Berry College) have assembled cogent, conclusive evidence indicating that nuclear radiation is associated with impaired cognition. They suggest that Scholastic Aptitude Scores (SATs), which have declined steadily for 19 years, will begin to rise. Their prediction is based on…

  19. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ramaswami

    2009-09-15

    A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect accumulation and dynamic annealing in a number of ceramics, such as silicon carbide, zircon and zirconia. Under energetic particle irradiation, ceramics can undergo amorphization by the accumulation of point defects and defect clusters (silicon carbide) or direct impact amorphization (zircon). Ceramics that resist radiation-induced amorphization have mechanisms to dissipate the primary knock-on atom energy, such as replacement collision sequences that leave the lattice undisturbed and low-energy cation site exchange. The presence of engineered mobile defects, such as structural vacancies in stabilized zirconia, can dynamically anneal radiation damage. Thus, defect engineering is a promising strategy to design radiation tolerance for applications such as nuclear waste disposal.

  20. STS-118 Radiator Impact Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, Dana M.; Hyde, J.; Christiansen, E.; Herrin, J.; Lyons, F.

    2008-01-01

    During the August 2007 STS-118 mission to the International Space Station, a micro-meteoroid or orbital debris (MMOD) particle impacted and completely penetrated one of shuttle Endeavour s radiator panels and the underlying thermal control system (TCS) blanket, leaving deposits on (but no damage to) the payload bay door. While it is not unusual for shuttle orbiters to be impacted by small MMOD particles, the damage from this impact is larger than any previously seen on the shuttle radiator panels. A close-up photograph of the radiator impact entry hole is shown in Figure 1, and the location of the impact on Endeavour s left-side aft-most radiator panel is shown in Figure 2. The aft radiator panel is 0.5-inches thick and consists of 0.011 inch thick aluminum facesheets on the front and back of an aluminum honeycomb core. The front facesheet is additionally covered by a 0.005 inch thick layer of silver-Teflon thermal tape. The entry hole in the silver-Teflon tape measured 8.1 mm by 6.4 mm (0.32 inches by 0.25 inches). The entry hole in the outer facesheet measured 7.4 mm by 5.3 mm (0.29 inches by 0.21 inches) (0.23 inches). The impactor also perforated an existing 0.012 inch doubler that had been bonded over the facesheet to repair previous impact damage (an example that lightning can strike the same place twice, even for MMOD impact). The peeled-back edge around the entry hole, or lip , is a characteristic of many hypervelocity impacts. High velocity impact with the front facesheet fragmented the impacting particle and caused it to spread out into a debris cloud. The debris cloud caused considerable damage to the internal honeycomb core with 23 honeycomb cells over a region of 28 mm by 26 mm (1.1 inches by 1.0 inches) having either been completely destroyed or partially damaged. Figure 3 is a view of the exit hole in the rear facesheet, and partially shows the extent of the honeycomb core damage and clearly shows the jagged petaled exit hole through the backside

  1. Radiation damage of germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pehl, R. H.

    1978-01-01

    Energetic particles can produce interstitial-vacancy pairs in a crystal by knocking the atoms from their normal positions. Detectors are unique among semiconductor devices in depending on very low concentrations of electrically active impurities, and also on efficient transport of holes and electrons over relatively large distances. Because the dense regions of damage produced by energetic particles may result in donors and/or acceptors, and also provide trapping sites for holes and electrons, detectors are very sensitive to radiation damage. In addition to these effects occurring within the detector, radiation may also change the characteristics of the exposed surfaces causing unpredictable effects on the detector leakage current. Radiation-induced surface degradation has rarely, if ever, been observed for germanium detectors. The possibility of minimizing hole trapping in charge collection by the use of a high-purity germanium coaxial detector configured with the p (+) contact on the coaxial periphery is discussed.

  2. Damage thresholds for terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalzell, Danielle R.; McQuade, Jill; Vincelette, Rebecca; Ibey, Bennet; Payne, Jason; Thomas, Robert; Roach, W. P.; Roth, Caleb L.; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2010-02-01

    Several international organizations establish minimum safety standards to ensure that workers and the general population are protected against adverse health effects associated with electromagnetic radiation. Suitable standards are typically defined using published experimental data. To date, few experimental studies have been conducted at Terahertz (THz) frequencies, and as a result, current THz standards have been defined using extrapolated estimates from neighboring spectral regions. In this study, we used computational modeling and experimental approaches to determine tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies. For the computational modeling efforts, we used the Arrhenius damage integral to predict damage-thresholds. We determined thresholds experimentally for both long (minutes) and short (seconds) THz exposures. For the long exposure studies, we used an in-house molecular gas THz laser (υ= 1.89 THz, 189.92 mW/cm2, 10 minutes) and excised porcine skin. For the short exposure studies, we used the Free Electron Laser (FEL) at Jefferson Laboratory (υ= 0.1-1.0 THz, 2.0-14.0 mW/cm2, 2 seconds) and wet chamois cloths. Thresholds were determined using conventional damage score determination and probit analysis techniques, and tissue temperatures were measured using infrared thermographic techniques. We found that the FEL was ideal for tissue damage studies, while our in-house THz source was not suitable to determine tissue damage thresholds. Using experimental data, the tissue damage threshold (ED50) was determined to be 7.16 W/cm2. This value was in well agreement with that predicted using our computational models. We hope that knowledge of tissue-damage thresholds at THz frequencies helps to ensure the safe use of THz radiation.

  3. Extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave driven plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.; Alves, L. L.

    2016-06-01

    The extreme ultraviolet radiation emitted by helium microwave-driven (2.45 GHz) plasmas operating at low-pressure conditions was investigated. Novel data regarding emitted spectral lines of excited helium atoms and ions in the 20-33 nm wavelength range and their intensity behavior with variation of discharge operational conditions are presented. The intensity of all the spectral emissions was found to strongly increase with the microwave power delivered to the plasma. Furthermore, the intensity of the ionic spectral emissions decreases by nearly one order of magnitude as the pressure was raised from 0.2 to 0.5 mbar.

  4. Primordial helium and the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, Gary

    2010-04-01

    The products of primordial nucleosynthesis, along with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, are relics from the early evolution of the Universe whose observations probe the standard model of cosmology and provide windows on new physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and of particle physics. According to the standard, hot big bang cosmology, long before any stars have formed a significant fraction ( ∼ 25%) of the baryonic mass in the Universe should be in the form of helium-4 nuclei. Since current observations of {sup 4}He are restricted to low redshift regions where stellar nucleosynthesis has occurred, an observation of high redshift, prestellar, truly primordial {sup 4}He would constitute a fundamental test of the hot, big bang cosmology. At recombination, long after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) has ended, the temperature anisotropy spectrum imprinted on the CMB depends on the {sup 4}He abundance through its connection to the electron density and the effect of the electron density on Silk damping. Since the relic abundance of {sup 4}He is relatively insensitive to the universal density of baryons, but is sensitive to a non-standard, early Universe expansion rate, the primordial mass fraction of {sup 4}He, Yp, offers a test of the consistency of the standard models of BBN and the CMB and, provides constraints on non-standard physics. Here, the WMAP seven year data (supplemented by other CMB experiments), which lead to an indirect determination of Yp at high redshift, are compared to the BBN predictions and to the independent, direct observations of {sup 4}He in low redshift, extragalactic HII regions. At present, given the very large uncertainties in the CMB-determined primordial {sup 4}He abundance (as well as for the helium abundances inferred from HII region observations), any differences between the BBN predictions and the CMB observations are small, at a level ∼<1.5σ.

  5. Method and means of reducing erosion of components of plasma devices exposed to helium and hydrogen isotope radiation

    DOEpatents

    Kaminsky, Manfred S.; Das, Santosh K.; Rossing, Thomas D.

    1977-01-25

    Surfaces of components of plasma devices exposed to radiation by atoms or ions of helium or isotopes of hydrogen can be protected from damage due to blistering by shielding the surfaces with a structure formed by sintering a powder of aluminum or beryllium and its oxide or by coating the surfaces with such a sintered metal powder.

  6. Protein damage, radiation sensitivity and aging.

    PubMed

    Radman, Miroslav

    2016-08-01

    This paper promotes a concept that protein damage determines radiation resistance and underlies aging and age-related diseases. The first bottleneck in cell recovery from radiation damage is functional (proteome) rather than informational (DNA), since prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell death correlates with incurred protein, but not DNA, damage. Proteome protection against oxidative damage determines survival after ionizing or UV irradiation, since sufficient residual proteome activity is required to turn on the DNA damage response activating DNA repair and protein renewal processes. Extreme radiation and desiccation resistance of rare bacterial and animal species is accounted for by exceptional constitutive proteome protection against oxidative damage. After excessive radiation their well-protected proteome faithfully reconstitutes a transcription-competent genome from hundreds of DNA fragments. The observation that oxidative damage targeted selectively to cellular proteins results in aging-like phenotypes suggests that aging and age-related diseases could be phenotypic consequences of proteome damage patterns progressing with age. PMID:27264559

  7. Radiation damage effects in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trachenko, Kostya; Dove, Martin; Salje, Ekhard

    2002-03-01

    Zircon, ZrSiO_4, is important for geology and geochronology, and has been proposed as a host material to immobilize highly radioactive materials from dismantled weapons and nuclear waste from power stations [1]. In these applications zircon is exposed to alpha-irradiation. Computer simulations have started to be employed to simulate radiation damage in zircon [2], but the origin and microscopic mechanisms of the most important structural changes in zircon - unit cell expansion and large macroscopic swelling at higher doses, strong shear deformation of the crystalline lattice, and polymerization of SiOn units [3], remain unknown. Here, we perform the molecular dynamics simulation of highly energetic recoils in zircon. Basing on the simulation results, we propose the simple picture of the density change in the damaged region that consists of the depleted and densified matter. We find that the experimentally observed structural changes originate from the interaction of the damaged region with the surrounding crystalline lattice: the shear of the lattice around the damaged region causes shear deformation and expansion of the unit cells. The polymers of connected SiOn polyhedra are most commonly present in the densified shell at the periphery of the damaged region. [1] R C Ewing et al, J. Mater. Res. 10, 243 (1995); W J Weber et al, B E Burakov et al, in Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management XIX, 25-32 and 33-40 (Plenum, New York, 1996); R C Ewing, et al in Crystalline Ceramics: Waste Forms for the Disposal of Weapons Plutonium, NATO Workshop Proceedings 65 (Academic Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands, 1996). [2] B Park et al, Phys. Rev. B, 64, 174108 (1-16) (2001); J P Crocombette and D Ghaleb, J. Nucl. Mater., 295, 167 (2001); K Trachenko et al, J. Appl. Phys., 87, 7702 (2000); K Trachenko et al, J. Phys.: Cond. Matt., 13, 1947 (2001). [3] T Murakami et al, Am. Min., 76, 1510 (1991); H D Holland and D Gottfried, Acta Cryst. 8, 291 (1955).; W J Weber, J. Am

  8. Dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic interaction of helium bubble with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy has been studied using in situ irradiation and electron microscopy. During the irradiation of the alloy by 400 keV Fe{sup +} ions at temperatures where no thermal motion takes place, induced displacement of small helium bubbles was observed: the bubbles underwent sporadic and instant displacement. The displacement was of the order of a few nanometers. The experimentally determined displacement probability of helium bubbles is consistent with the calculated probability of their dynamic interaction with sub-cascades introduced by the irradiation. Furthermore, during the irradiation of the alloy at higher temperatures, both retarded and accelerated Brownian type motions were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of dynamic interaction of helium bubbles with point defects that survive through high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  9. Helium Reionization Simulations. I. Modeling Quasars as Radiation Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Plante, Paul; Trac, Hy

    2016-09-01

    We introduce a new project to understand helium reionization using fully coupled N-body, hydrodynamics, and radiative transfer simulations. This project aims to capture correctly the thermal history of the intergalactic medium as a result of reionization and make predictions about the Lyα forest and baryon temperature–density relation. The dominant sources of radiation for this transition are quasars, so modeling the source population accurately is very important for making reliable predictions. In this first paper, we present a new method for populating dark matter halos with quasars. Our set of quasar models includes two different light curves, a lightbulb (simple on/off) and symmetric exponential model, and luminosity-dependent quasar lifetimes. Our method self-consistently reproduces an input quasar luminosity function given a halo catalog from an N-body simulation, and propagates quasars through the merger history of halo hosts. After calibrating quasar clustering using measurements from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we find that the characteristic mass of quasar hosts is {M}h∼ 2.5× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the lightbulb model, and {M}h∼ 2.3× {10}12 {h}-1 {M}ȯ for the exponential model. In the latter model, the peak quasar luminosity for a given halo mass is larger than that in the former, typically by a factor of 1.5–2. The effective lifetime for quasars in the lightbulb model is 59 Myr, and in the exponential case, the effective time constant is about 15 Myr. We include semi-analytic calculations of helium reionization, and discuss how to include these quasars as sources of ionizing radiation for full hydrodynamics with radiative transfer simulations in order to study helium reionization.

  10. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  11. Radiation effects on microstructure and hardness of a titanium aluminide alloy irradiated by helium ions at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tao; Zhu, Hanliang; Ionescu, Mihail; Dayal, Pranesh; Davis, Joel; Carr, David; Harrison, Robert; Edwards, Lyndon

    2015-04-01

    A 45XD TiAl alloy possessing a lamellar microstructure was irradiated using 5 MeV helium ions to a fluence of 5 × 1021 ion m-2 (5000 appm) with a dose of about 1 dpa (displacements per atom). A uniform helium ion stopping damage region about 17 μm deep from the target surface was achieved by applying an energy degrading wheel. Radiation damage defects including helium-vacancy clusters and small helium bubbles were found in the microstructure of the samples irradiated at room temperature. With increasing irradiation temperature to 300 °C and 500 °C helium bubbles were clearly observed in both the α2 and γ phases of the irradiated microstructure. By means of nanoindentation significant irradiation hardening was measured. For the samples irradiated at room temperature the hardness increased from 5.6 GPa to 8.5 GPa and the irradiation-hardening effect reduced to approximately 8.0 GPa for the samples irradiated at 300 °C and 500 °C.

  12. Radiation damage in barium fluoride detector materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, P.W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Woody, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    To develop radiation hard detectors, particularly for high energy physics studies, radiation damage is being studied in BaF/sub 2/, both undoped and doped with La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Gd and Tm. Some dopants reduce radiation damage. In La doped BaF/sub 2/ they reduce the unwanted long lifetime luminescence which interferes with the short-lived fluorescence used to detect particles. Radiation induced coloring is being studied with facilities for making optical measurements before, during and after irradiation with /sup 60/C0 gamma rays. Doses of 10/sup 6/ rad, or less, create only ionization induced charge transfer effects since lattice atom displacement damage is negligible at these doses. All crystals studied exhibit color center formation, between approximately 200 and 800 nm, during irradiation and color center decay after irradiation. Thus only measurements made during irradiation show the total absorption present in a radiation field. Both undoped and La doped BaF/sub 2/ develop damage at minimum detectable levels in the UV---which is important for particle detectors. For particle detector applications these studies must be extended to high dose irradiations with particles energetic enough to cause lattice atom displacement damage. In principle, the reduction in damage provided by dopants could apply to other applications requiring radiation damage resistant materials.

  13. Gamma Radiation Damage in Silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chensen

    A theory for interpreting carrier removal in terms of trap production has been derived from the carrier distribution function, which provides a relationship between the carrier removal rate and trap production rates due to the radiation damage. The carrier removal rate is a function of trap production as well as Fermi level position. Also, the carrier removal rate depends on many parameters, which are the density of states of the valance band as well as the conduction band, density of doping impurities, temperature, location of donor and acceptor energy levels and location of trap energy levels. P-type and n-type silicon Schottky diodes are irradiated by cobalt 60 gamma rays. The experimental results show that the carrier removal rate is dependent on the initial carrier concentration. Carrier concentrations are determined by room temperature C-V measurements while the trap production rates are determined by DLTS from measurements from 50 K to room temperature. A model presented by Williams, et al. for the carrier concentration vs. fluence, has been rederived from simple semiconductor carrier statistical mechanics. This model has then been extended to yield an expression for the initial carrier removal rate which depends on the production rate of each defect trap level in the band gap. We have tested these models thoroughly for the first time by measuring the trap production rates by DLTS, and then, using this information to calculate carrier removal rate and carrier concentration vs. fluence, we have verified that the results of the model can explain these same relationships obtained experimentally by C-V measurements. We believe that this is the first time that DLTS results have been linked directly to such simple and useful measurements as carrier removal rate and carrier concentration vs. fluence in a convincing manner. The success of this procedure also suggests that there are no "hidden" levels or traps which contribute to carrier removal rate but which do not

  14. Seismic Radiation from Material Damage During Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A. J.; Ben-Zion, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Recent theoretical results on seismic representation from regions undergoing rapid material damage indicate that changes of elastic moduli can produce radiation that may be, in some cases, a significant portion of (or even larger than) the radiation from the standard moment source (Ben-Zion and Ampuero, 2009). The additional radiation is associated with a “damage-related source term” involving the product of the changes in the elasticity tensor and the total elastic strain tensor. The damage source term is non-zero in a certain volume where brittle damage occurs. The generated seismic motion can be computed, as for the classical moment source, by a convolution of the damage density in the affected volume with the spatial derivative of a Green’s functions for an earth model. Here we attempt to provide estimates of the amount and types (isotropic and deviatoric) of the damage related radiation for explosion scenarios. Using both analytic solutions and three-dimensional elastic finite difference calculations, we compute and compare the waves generated by the classical moment and damage related source terms in a full space. We assume a purely isotropic explosion of size corresponding to low-yield nuclear explosions, a granite (hard-rock) whole-space, and that the damage occurs instantaneously. Using a simple iterative approach, we adjust the strain ɛij where it exceeds the yield strength of the rock ɛij_c and reduce the local elastic moduli in proportion to the difference (ɛij - ɛij_c). The calculated adjustments to the strain and reduction of elastic moduli are used to estimate the additional moment contribution due to excess strain (ɛij - ɛij_c) and the associated damage source term in the yielding region. Finally, the seismic radiation from the brittle damage process is computed and compared to the radiation generated by the moment of the explosion source and the additional inelastic relaxation in the yielding region.

  15. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  16. Effect of 800 keV argon ions pre-damage on the helium blister formation of tungsten exposed to 60 keV helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of Ar8+ ions pre-damage on the following He2+ irradiation behavior of polycrystalline tungsten. We compared the irradiation resistance performance against 60 keV He2+ ions of undamaged tungsten samples with that of pre-damaged samples which were preliminarily exposed to 800 keV Ar8+ ions at a fluence of 4 × 1019 ions m-2. The experimental results indicate that the helium blistering of tungsten could be effectively relieved by the Ar8+ ions pre-damage, while the retention of helium around low energy desorption sites in the pre-damaged tungsten was larger than that of the undamaged samples. A strong orientation dependence of blistering had been observed, with the blister occurred preferentially on the surface of grains with normal direction close to <111>. The Ar8+ ions irradiation-induced damage altered the morphology of helium bubbles in tungsten exposed to the following He2+ irradiation significantly. The intensity of helium release peaks at relatively low temperatures (<600 K) was enhanced due to Ar8+ ions pre-damage.

  17. Detection of Lyman-beta and Helium Resonance Radiation in the Night Sky.

    PubMed

    Young, J M; Carruthers, G R; Holmes, J C; Johnson, C Y; Patterson, N P

    1968-05-31

    A rocket-borne photometer has detected far ultraviolet night glow radiations that are identified as Lyman-beta (HI 1026 angstroms), and the helium lines at 304 or 584 angstroms, or at both. At an altitude of 227 kilometers the measured intensity for Lyman-beta was about 10 rayleighs. The discrimination characteristics of the broad-band helium radiation filter give helium line intensities, at 227 kilometers, of 4.8 and 12 rayleighs, respectively, pending identification of the wavelength of the radiation as 304 or 584 angstroms. These ultraviolet radiations appear sufficient to maintain the night E and F(1) regions of the ionosphere. PMID:17768892

  18. Hydrogen and helium excitation by EUV radiation for the production of white-light flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, A. I.; Milkey, R. W.; Thompson, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    Non-LTE radiative transfer calculations for hydrogen and helium in a simple model atmosphere are used to demonstrate that EUV radiation cannot be the main energy source for white-light flares. The opacities in the Lyman continuum and the helium I and II continua are found to be much larger than the enhanced opacity in the visible hydrogen continuum. It is shown that the EUV radiation is absorbed before it can have a significant effect on the visible light continuum.

  19. The use of ion accelerators and synchrotron radiation to study the interactions of helium with metals

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, S.E.; Gilles, J.M.; Lucas, A.A.; Rife, J.C.

    1981-04-01

    A technique is described which examines the properties of helium trapped in bubbles in implanted metals. Helium implanted materials are characterized using resonant elastic proton backscattering and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Spectroscopic measurements using synchrotron radiation in the far vacuum ultraviolet are then performed to examine the density sensitive optical absorption resulting from the 1S - 2P transition in the implanted helium. Experimental data for helium implanted aluminum thin films are presented which indicate atomic densities in small (50A diameter) bubbles of the order of 10/sup 23/ atoms cm/sup -3/.

  20. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Engang; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena; Wang, Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis; Bringa, Eduardo M.; Baldwin, Jon K.; Caro, Jose A.

    2012-07-30

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  1. Radiation damage in MINP cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minahan, J. A.; Green, M. J.

    Experiments have been carried out to examine the effects of exposure to various fluence levels of 1 MeV electrons on 0.2 ohm-cm MINP silicon solar cell characteristics. Fluence levels ranged from 10 to the 14th e/sq cm to 3 x 10 to the 15th e/sq cm. Minority carrier diffusion lengths, Lbase, were derived from short circuit current calculations that included corrections for surface shadowing, reflection and emitter contribution to the short circuit current. From Lbase and fluences, a damage coefficient for diffusion length was calculated (1.4 x 10 to the -9th/electron) and compared with results obtained for other cell designs and base resistivities.

  2. Probing Radiation Damage at the Molecular Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, N. J.; Smialek, M. A.; Moore, S. A.; Folkard, M.; Hoffmann, S. V.

    2006-12-01

    Radiation damage of DNA and other cellular components has traditionally been attributed to ionisation via direct impact of high-energy quanta or by complex radical chemistry. However recent research has shown that strand breaks in DNA may be initiated by secondary electrons and is strongly dependent upon the target DNA base identity. Such research provides the fascinating perspective that it is possible that radiation damage may be described and understood at an individual molecular level introducing new possibilites for therapy and perhaps providing an insight into the origins of life.

  3. Radiation damage effects in polarized deuterated ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    P.M. McKee

    2003-07-01

    Solid polarized targets utilizing deuterated ammonia, {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, offer an attractive combination of high polarization, high dilution factor and high resistance to polarization losses from radiation damage. Jefferson Laboratory Experiment E93-026 used {sup 15}ND{sub 3} as a target material in a five-month form factor measurement, allowing a detailed study of it's performance. The dependence of the deuteron polarization on received dose by the ammonia and the effectiveness of annealing the material to recover performance lost to radiation damage will be discussed.

  4. Elastic softening of zircon by radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Salje, Ekhard K. H.

    2006-09-25

    The bulk modulus and the shear modulus of zircon soften by ca. 50% when zircon is amorphized by radiation damage. A theoretical description of the experimental findings is presented which shows that the elastic response on a zircon ceramics with radiation damage follows Hashin-Shtrikman [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 11, 127 (1963)] behavior with very narrow bounds. The elastic response depends, in good approximation, on the square of the volume fraction f{sub a} of the amorphized regions. In a slightly coarser approximation one finds an almost linear interpolation of the bulk and the shear modulus between those of the crystalline state and those of the fully amorphous state.

  5. Expansion of Collisional Radiative Model for Helium line ratio spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinquegrani, David; Cooper, Chris; Forest, Cary; Milhone, Jason; Munoz-Borges, Jorge; Schmitz, Oliver; Unterberg, Ezekial

    2015-11-01

    Helium line ratio spectroscopy is a powerful technique of active plasma edge spectroscopy. It enables reconstruction of plasma edge parameters like electron density and temperature by use of suitable Collisional Radiative Models (CRM). An established approach is successful at moderate plasma densities (~1018m-3 range) and temperature (30-300eV), taking recombination and charge exchange to be negligible. The goal of this work is to experimentally explore limitations of this approach to CRM. For basic validation the Madison Plasma Dynamo eXperiment (MPDX) will be used. MPDX offers a very uniform plasma and spherical symmetry at low temperature (5-20 eV) and low density (1016 -1017m-3) . Initial data from MPDX shows a deviation in CRM results when compared to Langmuir probe data. This discrepancy points to the importance of recombination effects. The validated model is applied to first time measurement of electron density and temperature in front of an ICRH antenna at the TEXTOR tokamak. These measurements are important to understand RF coupling and PMI physics at the antenna limiters. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the UW - Madison, USA and NSF CAREER award PHY-1455210.

  6. Neutron dosimetry, damage calculations, and helium measurements for the HFIR-MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 spectral tailoring experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Baldwin, C.A.; Oliver, B.M.

    1995-04-01

    The objective is to provide dosimetry and damage analysis for fusion materials irradiation experiments. Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the joint US -Japanese MFE-60J-1 and MFE-330J-1 experiments in the hafnium-lined removable beryllium (RB{sup *}) position of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These experiments were continuations of the ORR-6J and 7J irradiations performed in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The combination of irradiations was designed to tailor the neutron spectrum in order to achieve fusion reactor helium/dpa levels in stainless steel. These experiments produced maximum helium (appm)/dpa(displacement per atom) levels of 10.2 at 18.5 dpa for the ORR-6J and HFIR-MFE-60J-1 combination and 11.8 at 19.0 dpa for the ORR-7J and HFIR-MFE-330J-1 combination. A helium measurement in one JPCA sample was in good agreement with helium calculations.

  7. Radiation-Induced Helium Nanobubbles Enhance Ductility in Submicron-Sized Single-Crystalline Copper.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ming-Shuai; Du, Jun-Ping; Wan, Liang; Ogata, Shigenobu; Tian, Lin; Ma, Evan; Han, Wei-Zhong; Li, Ju; Shan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-07-13

    The workability and ductility of metals usually degrade with exposure to irradiation, hence the phrase "radiation damage". Here, we found that helium (He) radiation can actually enhance the room-temperature deformability of submicron-sized copper. In particular, Cu single crystals with diameter of 100-300 nm and containing numerous pressurized sub-10 nm He bubbles become stronger, more stable in plastic flow and ductile in tension, compared to fully dense samples of the same dimensions that tend to display plastic instability (strain bursts). The sub-10 nm He bubbles are seen to be dislocation sources as well as shearable obstacles, which promote dislocation storage and reduce dislocation mean free path, thus contributing to more homogeneous and stable plasticity. Failure happens abruptly only after significant bubble coalescence. The current findings can be explained in light of Weibull statistics of failure and the beneficial effects of bubbles on plasticity. These results shed light on plasticity and damage developments in metals and could open new avenues for making mechanically robust nano- and microstructures by ion beam processing and He bubble engineering. PMID:27249672

  8. Role of interfaces i nthe design of ultra-high strength, radiation damage tolerant nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Amit; Wang, Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael A; Baldwin, Jon K; Wei, Qiangmin; Li, Nan; Mara, Nathan; Zhang, Xinghang; Fu, Engang; Anderoglu, Osman; Li, Hongqi; Bhattacharyya, Dhriti

    2010-12-09

    The combination of high strength and high radiation damage tolerance in nanolaminate composites can be achieved when the individual layers in these composites are only a few nanometers thick and contain special interfaces that act both as obstacles to slip, as well as sinks for radiation-induced defects. The morphological and phase stabilities and strength and ductility of these nano-composites under ion irradiation are explored as a function of layer thickness, temperature and interface structure. Magnetron sputtered metallic multilayers such as Cu-Nb and V-Ag with a range of individual layer thickness from approximately 2 nm to 50 nm and the corresponding 1000 nm thick single layer films were implanted with helium ions at room temperature. Cross-sectional Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) was used to measure the distribution of helium bubbles and correlated with the helium concentration profile measured vis ion beam analysis techniques to obtain the helium concentration at which bubbles are detected in TEM. It was found that in multilayers the minimum helium concentration to form bubbles (approximately I nm in size) that are easily resolved in through-focus TEM imaging was several atomic %, orders of magnitude higher than that in single layer metal films. This observation is consistent with an increased solubility of helium at interfaces that is predicted by atomistic modeling of the atomic structures of fcc-bcc interfaces. At helium concentrations as high as 7 at.%, a uniform distribution of I nm diameter bubbles results in negligible irradiation hardening and loss of deformability in multi layers with layer thicknesses of a few nanometers. The control of atomic structures of interfaces to produce high helium solubility at interfaces is crucial in the design of nano-composite materials that are radiation damage tolerant. Reduced radiation damage also leads to a reduction in the irradiation hardening, particularly at layer thickness of approximately 5 run

  9. Undulator Radiation Damage Experience at LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Nuhn, H. D.; Field, C.; Mao, S.; Levashov, Y.; Santana, M.; Welch, J. N.; Wolf, Z.

    2015-01-06

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has been running the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the first x-ray Free Electron Laser since 2009. Undulator magnet damage from radiation, produced by the electron beam traveling through the 133-m long straight vacuum tube, has been and is a concern. A damage measurement experiment has been performed in 2007 in order to obtain dose versus damage calibrations. Radiation reduction and detection devices have been integrated into the LCLS undulator system. The accumulated radiation dose rate was continuously monitored and recorded. In addition, undulator segments have been routinely removed from the beamline to be checked for magnetic (50 ppm, rms) and mechanic (about 0.25 µm, rms) changes. A reduction in strength of the undulator segments is being observed, at a level, which is now clearly above the noise. Recently, potential sources for the observed integrated radiation levels have been investigated. The paper discusses the results of these investigation as well as comparison between observed damage and measured dose accumulations and discusses, briefly, strategies for the new LCLS-II upgrade, which will be operating at more than 300 times larger beam rate.

  10. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-11-20

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

  11. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  12. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  13. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, S. L.

    2013-07-01

    Density functional theory models developed over the past decade provide unique information about the structure of nanoscale defects produced by irradiation and about the nature of short-range interaction between radiation defects, clustering of defects, and their migration pathways. These ab initio models, involving no experimental input parameters, appear to be as quantitatively accurate and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage phenomena. Density functional theory models have effectively created a new paradigm for the scientific investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature- and dose-dependent response of materials to irradiation, a problem of pivotal significance for applications.

  14. Gravitational and radiative effects on the escape of helium from the moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, R. R., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    On the moon, and probably on Mercury and other similar regolith-covered bodies with tenuous atmosphere, the dominant gas is He-4. It arises as the radiogenic product of the decay of uranium and thorium within any planet, but its major source appears to be the alpha particle flux of the solar wind. The moon intercepts solar wind helium at an average rate of 1.1 times 10 to the 24th atom/sec, and loses it at the same rate. Some helium may escape directly as the result of the process of solar wind soil bombardment which may release previously trapped helium at superthermal speeds. Atmospheric models have been calculated with the total helium influx as source. Subsequent comparison of model and measured helium concentrations indicates that the fraction of helium escaping via the atmosphere may range from 20% to 100% of the solar wind influx. Of the escaping atmosphere, most of the helium (about 93%) becomes trapped in earth orbit, while about 5% gets trapped in satellite orbits about the moon. Owing to a 6 month lifetime for helium in solar radiation, the satellite atoms form a lunar corona that exceeds the lunar atmosphere in total abundance by a factor of 4 to 5.

  15. Radiation damage in nanostructured metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    High energy neutron and charged particle radiation cause microstructural and mechanical degradation in structural metals and alloys, such as phase segregation, void swelling, embrittlement and creep. Radiation induced damages typically limit nuclear materials to a lifetime of about 40 years. Next generation nuclear reactors require materials that can sustain over 60 - 80 years. Therefore it is of great significance to explore new materials with better radiation resistance, to design metals with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe. Such systems obtain high volume fraction of boundaries, which are considered sinks to radiation induced defects. From the viewpoint of nanomechanics, it is of interest to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of nanostructured films, which typically show strong size dependence. By controlling the feature size (layer thickness, twin spacing and grain size), it is applicable to picture a deformation mechanism map which also provides prerequisite information for subsequent radiation hardening study. And from the viewpoint of radiation effects, it is of interest to explore the fundamentals of radiation response, to examine the microstructural and mechanical variations of irradiated nanometals and to enrich the design database. More importantly, with the assistance of in situ techniques, it is appealing to examine the defect generation, evolution, annihilation, absorption and interaction with internal interfaces (layer interfaces, twin boundaries and grain boundaries). Moreover, well-designed nanostructures can also verify the speculation that radiation induced defect density and hardening show clear size dependence. The focus of this thesis lies in the radiation response of Ag/Ni multilayers and nanotwinned Ag

  16. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G.

    2014-08-15

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  17. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles.

    PubMed

    Danly, C R; Merrill, F E; Barlow, D; Mariam, F G

    2014-08-01

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL's pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components. PMID:25173260

  18. Radiation damage in Luna 20 soil.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phakey, P. P.; Price, P. B.

    1973-01-01

    As an extension of previous studies of radiation damage produced by heavy solar flare ions in lunar soils, high-voltage electron microscopy and electron diffraction procedures were used to rank a Luna 20 sample among the other soils returned by Soviet and American lunar missions. Micron-sized soil grains from the Luna 20 mission are the most lightly irradiated, in contrast to micron-sized grains from Luna 16 soil, which are the most heavily irradiated.

  19. Radiation-induced electrical breakdown of helium in fusion reactor superconducting magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, L.J.

    1983-12-02

    A comprehensive theoretical study has been performed on the reduction of the electrical breakdown potential of liquid and gaseous helium under neutron and gamma radiation. Extension of the conventional Townsend breakdown theory indicates that radiation fields at the superconducting magnets of a typical fusion reactor are potentially capable of significantly reducing currently established (i.e., unirradiated) helium breakdown voltages. Emphasis is given to the implications of these results including future deployment choices of magnet cryogenic methods (e.g., pool-boiling versus forced-flow), the possible impact on magnet shielding requirements and the analogous situation for radiation-induced electrical breakdown in fusion RF transmission systems.

  20. Comparison of Carbon and Main Ion Radiation Profiles in Matched Helium and Deuterium Plasmas in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Fenstermacher, M E; Lawson, K D; Porter, G D; Erents, S K; Ingesson, C; Mathews, G F; McCracken, G M; Philipps, V; Pitts, A; Stamp, M F

    2002-05-17

    This paper examines the radiation profiles and corresponding ionization source profiles of various carbon and main plasma ions in matched helium and deuterium L-mode plasmas in JET. Operation in helium should reduce chemical sputtering of carbon substantially compared with deuterium. The radiation intensities from C{sup 1+}, C{sup 2+} and C{sup 3+} in the helium plasmas showed reduction by factors of 8, 10 and 25 respectively along the inner SOL and divertor leg compared with the deuterium cases. However, the emission in the outer divertor leg was less than a factor of 2 lower in helium. Using photon efficiencies calculated by the UEDGE code for the spectrometer lines of sight, the calculated source rates of C{sup 1+} and C{sup 3+} along the inner SOL and inner divertor were reduced by a factors of 4 and 20 respectively in the helium plasmas. In the outer divertor leg the source rate of C{sup 3+} was reduced by a factor of 10 but the C{sup 1+} source rate did not change in helium. These measurements are consistent with a model that chemical sputtering of carbon dominates the source from the inner wall and inner divertor in deuterium L-mode plasmas while physical sputtering appears to dominate the source from the outer divertor.

  1. Radiation damage calculations for the LANSCE degrader

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, P.D.; Sommer, W.F.; Dudziak, D.J.; Wechsler, M.S.; Barnett, M.H.; Corzine, R.K.

    1998-09-01

    The A-6 water degrader at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) linear proton accelerator has an outer shell of Inconel 718. The degrader was irradiated by 800-MeV protons during 1988--1993 to an exposure of 5.3 ampere-hours (A h). As described in Ref. 1, material from the Inconel is currently being cut into specimens for microhardness, three-point bending, ball punch, microscopy, and corrosion tests. This paper is devoted to calculations of radiation damage, particularly displacement and He production, sustained by the degrader Inconel.

  2. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  3. Radiation damage in cubic-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Beuneu, Francois; Weber, William J

    2013-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) can be used for nuclear applications as an inert matrix for actinide immobilization or transmutation. Indeed, the large amount of native oxygen vacancies leads to a high radiation tolerance of this material owing to defect recombination occurring in the atomic displacements cascades induced by fast neutron irradiation or ion implantations, as showed by Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Amorphization cannot be obtained in YSZ either by nuclear-collision or electronic-excitation damage, just like in urania. A kind of polygonization structure with slightly disoriented crystalline domains is obtained in both cases. In the first steps of damage, specific isolated point defects (like F+-type color centers) and point-defect clusters are produced by nuclear collisions with charged particles or neutrons. Further increase of damage leads to dislocation-loop formation, then to collapse of the dislocation network into a polygonization structure. For swift heavy ion irradiations, a similar polygonization structure is obtained above a threshold stopping power value of about 20-30 keV nm-1.

  4. Radiation damage in zircon and monazite

    SciTech Connect

    Meldrum, A.; Boatner, L.A.; Weber, W.J.; Ewing, R.C.

    1998-07-01

    Monazite and zircon respond differently to ion irradiation and to thermal and irradiation-enhanced annealing. The damage process (i.e., elastic interactions leading to amorphization) in radioactive minerals (metamictization) is basically the same as for the ion-beam-irradiated samples with the exception of the dose rate which is much lower in the case of natural samples. The crystalline-to-metamict transition in natural samples with different degrees of damage, from almost fully crystalline to completely metamict, is compared to the sequence of microstructures observed for ion-beam-irradiated monazite and zircon. The damage accumulation process, representing the competing effects of radiation-induced structural disorder and subsequent annealing mechanisms (irradiation-enhanced and thermal) occurs at much higher temperatures for zircon than for monazite. The amorphization dose, expressed as displacements per atom, is considerably higher in the natural samples, and the atomic-scale process leading to metamictization appears to develop differently. Ion-beam-induced amorphization data were used to calculate the {alpha}-decay-event dose required for amorphization in terms of a critical radionuclide concentration, i.e., the concentration above which a sample of a given age will become metamict at a specific temperature. This equation was applied to estimate the reliability of U-Pb ages, to provide a qualitative estimate of the thermal history of high-U natural zircons, and to predict whether actinide-bearing zircon or monazite nuclear waste forms will become amorphous (metamict) over long timescales.

  5. Correlation between thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate

    SciTech Connect

    Melcher, C.L.

    1985-02-01

    Thermoluminescence properties of bismuth germanate and their relationship to radiation damage characteristics have been investigated. Thermoluminescence and radiation damage in bismuth germanate display several similar properties including similar responses as a function of radiation dose, similar saturation levels, and similar decay times. Also a correlation was found between the thermoluminescence sensitivities and radiation damage sensitivities of four different crystals. The traps responsible for the radiation damage and those which store the thermoluminescence signal appear to be either closely related or actually the same traps. Four trapping centers can be seen in the thermoluminescence glow curves. The depth of the dominant trap is 1.1 eV. 10 references.

  6. Optical diagnostics with radiation trapping effect in low density and low temperature helium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonwook; Park, Kyungdeuk; Kwon, Duck-Hee; Oh, Cha-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Low density (ne < 1011 cm-3) and low temperature (Te < 10 eV) helium plasma was generated by hot filament discharge. Electron temperature and density of neutral helium plasma were measured by Langmuir probe and were determined by line intensity ratio method using optical emission spectroscopy with population modelings. Simple corona model and collisional-radiative (CR) model without consideration for radiation trapping effect are applied. In addition, CR model taking into account the radiation trapping effect (RTE) is adopted. The change of single line intensity ratio as a function of electron temperature and density were investigated when the RTE is included and excluded. The changes of multi line intensity ratios as a function of electron temperature were scanned for various radiative-excitation rate coefficients from the ground state and the helium gas pressures related with the RTE. Our CR modeling with RTE results in fairly better agreement of the spectroscopic diagnostics for the plasma temperature or density with the Langmuir probe measurements for various helium gas pressures than corona modeling and CR modeling without RTE.

  7. Energy Distribution of Electrons in Radiation Induced-Helium Plasmas. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Energy distribution of high energy electrons as they slow down and thermalize in a gaseous medium is studied. The energy distribution in the entire energy range from source energies down is studied analytically. A helium medium in which primary electrons are created by the passage of heavy-charged particles from nuclear reactions is emphasized. A radiation-induced plasma is of interest in a variety of applications, such as radiation pumped lasers and gaseous core nuclear reactors.

  8. Radiation Damage In Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Naus, Dan J; Remec, Igor; Busby, Jeremy T; Rosseel, Thomas M; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has established a renewed focus on long-term aging of nuclear generating stations materials, and recently, on concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis (EMDA), jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete. Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure. To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, The Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working to disposition radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines the research program within this pathway including: (i) defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield concrete for extended operation (80 years of operation and beyond), (ii) determining the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation as well as extended time at temperature on concrete, (iii) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish a conservative bound and share data obtained from different flux, temperature, and fluence levels, (iv) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, (v) developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in the results from the various concretes and research reactors, (vi) furthering the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete (see companion paper) and (vii) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge.

  9. Surface damage in ultrafine and multimodal grained tungsten materials induced by low energy helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, Osman; Efe, Mert; Heim, Bryan; Allain, Jean Paul

    2013-03-01

    Although tungsten is considered the best candidate as a plasma facing component (PFC) in the divertor region in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), severe morphology changes such as cavities, blisters, bubbles and nanostructure formation are expected. Increasing defect sinks in the tungsten microstructure is one of the possible solutions to mitigate the irradiation damage. In this work, helium irradiation at low energy (50 and 200 eV) and temperatures of 600 (threshold of vacancy migration) and 950 °C were performed on multimodal and ultrafine grained tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering and severe plastic deformation (SPD), respectively. The multimodal samples consisted of small grains (300-700 nm size) juxtaposed to larger grains (1-3 μm size). Detachment of the small grains was observed in the multimodal grained tungsten irradiated at 600 °C and a fluence of 1 × 1022 m-2 due to grain boundary grooving. On the same sample but at 950 °C, detachment and nanostructuring of the small grains were observed together with recrystallization of the large grains. Irradiation of the SPD samples at 200 eV and 950 °C to a fluence of about 2 × 1022 m-2, resulted in nanostructuring of the ultrafine grained shear bands in the microstructure.

  10. Synergistic damage by UVA radiation and pollutants.

    PubMed

    Burke, K E; Wei, H

    2009-01-01

    Not only is skin cancer by far the most common human cancer but also the incidence of skin cancer has been increasing at an alarming rate in recent decades. Fortunately, most people now realize that sun exposure causes unattractive photoaging and skin cancer, so they do apply sunscreens conscientiously. However, until recently, most sunscreens did not adequately protect against ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation. Although UVA is indeed less erythrogenic and less carcinogenic than UVB, UVA directly causes photoaging and enhances UVB-induced skin cancer. Furthermore, recent research demonstrates that UVA combined with environmental pollutants (including cigarette smoke) significantly increases the risk of skin cancer. Similarly, previous research demonstrated another synergy between environmental pollutants and UV: When ozone exposure precedes UV exposure, there is enhancement of UV-induced depletion of protective vitamin E from the skin's stratum corneum. This article reviews experimental evidence that environmental pollutants (such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a commonly used index of environmental pollution) are photosensitizers that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) when exposed to UVA radiation. This in turn causes oxidative and genetic damage, leading to unattractive photodamage and carcinogenesis. PMID:19651790

  11. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  12. Radiation and gas conduction heat transport across a helium dewer multilayer insulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes a method for calculating mixed heat transfer through the multilayer insulation used to insulated a 4K liquid helium cryostat. The method described permits one to estimate the insulation potential for a multilayer insulation system from first principles. The heat transfer regimes included are: radiation, conduction by free molecule gas conduction, and conduction through continuum gas conduction. Heat transfer in the transition region between the two gas conduction regimes is also included.

  13. Radiation damage calculations for the APT materials test program

    SciTech Connect

    Corzine, R.K.; Wechsler, M.S.; Dudziak, D.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; James, M.R.

    1999-09-01

    A materials irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the fall of 1996 and spring of 1997 in support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. Testing of the irradiated materials is underway. In the proposed APT design, materials in the target and blanket are to be exposed to protons and neutrons over a wide range of energies. The irradiation and testing program was undertaken to enlarge the very limited direct knowledge presently available of the effects of medium-energy protons ({approximately}1 GeV) on the properties of engineering materials. APT candidate materials were placed in or near the LANSCE accelerator 800-MeV, 1-mA proton beam and received roughly the same proton current density in the center of the beam as would be the case for the APT facility. As a result, the proton fluences achieved in the irradiation were expected to approach the APT prototypic full-power-year values. To predict accurately the performance of materials in APT, radiation damage parameters for the materials experiment must be determined. By modeling the experiment, calculations for atomic displacement, helium and hydrogen cross sections and for proton and neutron fluences were done for representative samples in the 17A, 18A, and 18C areas. The LAHET code system (LCS) was used to model the irradiation program, LAHET 2.82 within LCS transports protons > 1 MeV, and neutrons >20 MeV. A modified version of MCNP for use in LCS, HMCNP 4A, was employed to tally neutrons of energies <20 MeV.

  14. Resonant two-photon absorption of extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser radiation in helium

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasono, Mitsuru; Suljoti, Edlira; Pietzsch, Annette; Hennies, Franz; Wellhoefer, Michael; Hoeft, Jon-Tobias; Martins, Michael; Wurth, Wilfried; Foehlisch, Alexander; Treusch, Rolf; Feldhaus, Josef; Schneider, Jochen R.

    2007-05-15

    We have investigated the nonlinear response of helium to intense extreme-ultraviolet radiation from the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH). We observe a spectral feature between 24 and 26 eV electron kinetic energy in photoemission which shows a quadratic fluence dependence. The feature is explained as a result of subsequent processes involving a resonant two-photon absorption process into doubly excited levels of even parity (N=5 and 6), radiative decay to the doubly excited states in the vicinity of the He{sup +} (N=2) ionization threshold and finally the photoionization of the inner electron by the radiation of the next microbunches. This observation suggests that even-parity states, which have been elusive to be measured with the low pulse energy of synchrotron radiation sources, can be investigated with the intense radiation of FLASH. This also demonstrates a first step to bring nonlinear spectroscopy into the xuv and soft-x-ray regime.

  15. UV Radiation Damage and Bacterial DNA Repair Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Guy, Daniel; Yarom, Ruth; Slesak, Michaela

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a simple hands-on laboratory procedure for high school students in studying both radiation damage and DNA repair systems in bacteria. The sensitivity to ultra-violet (UV) radiation of both "Escherichia coli" and "Serratia marcescens" is tested by radiating them for varying time periods. Two growth temperatures are used in…

  16. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  17. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacementmore » damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.« less

  18. Thermal conductivity measurements via time-domain thermoreflectance for the characterization of radiation induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gorham, Caroline S.; Misra, Amit; Hattar, Khalid; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-05-01

    The progressive build up of displacement damage and fission products inside different systems and components of a nuclear reactor can lead to significant defect formation, degradation, and damage of the constituent materials. This structural modification can highly influence the thermal transport mechanisms and various mechanical properties of solids. In this paper we demonstrate the use of time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR), a non-destructive method capable of measuring the thermal transport in material systems from nano to bulk scales, to study the effect of radiation damage and the subsequent changes in the thermal properties of materials. We use TDTR to show that displacement damage from ion irradiation can significantly reduce the thermal conductivity of Optimized ZIRLO, a material used as fuel cladding in several current nuclear reactors. We find that the thermal conductivity of copper-niobium nanostructured multilayers does not change with helium ion irradiation doses of up to 1015 cm-2 and ion energy of 200 keV suggesting that these structures can be used and radiation tolerant materials in nuclear reactors. We compare the effect of ion doses and ion beam energies on the measured thermal conductivity of bulk silicon. Results demonstrate that TDTR thermal measurements can be used to quantify depth dependent damage.

  19. Radiation Damage to Artemia Cysts:Effects of Water Vapor.

    PubMed

    Snipes, W C; Gordy, W

    1963-10-25

    Water vapor altered the form and greatly increased the rate of decay of the electron-spin resonance pattern of long-lived free radicals obtained upon gamma irradiation of Artemia salina cysts ( brine shrimp eggs). These results, combined with data on radiation survival, indicate that the water vapor protects the cysts from radiation damage, or heals the damage. They also indicate that water protects the cysts from the effect of oxygen by neutralizing the radiation-induced free radicals before they can interact with oxygen to produce irreversible damage. PMID:17748168

  20. Influence of Detector Radiation Damage on CR Mammography Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsumi; Ishii, Mie; Terazono, Shiho; Arao, Keiko; Ishii, Rie; Sanada, Taizo; Yoshida, Akira

    2016-05-01

    Recently, radiation damage to the detector apparatus employed in computed radiography (CR) mammography has become problematic. The CR system and the imaging plate (IP) applied to quality control (QC) program were also used in clinical mammography in our hospital, and the IP to which radiation damage has occurred was used for approximately 5 years (approximately 13,000 exposures). We considered using previously acquired QC image data, which is stored in a server, to investigate the influence of radiation damage to an IP. The mammography unit employed in this study was a phase contrast mammography (PCM) Mermaid (KONICA MINOLTA) system. The QC image was made newly, and it was output in the film, and thereafter the optical density of the step-phantom image was measured. An input (digital value)-output (optical density) conversion curve was plotted using the obtained data. The digital values were then converted to optical density values using a reference optical density vs. digital value curve. When a high radiation dose was applied directly, radiation damage occurred at a position on the IP where no object was present. Daily QC for mammography is conducted using an American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation phantom and acrylic disc, and an environmental background density measurement is performed as one of the management indexes. In this study, the radiation damage sustained by the acrylic disc was shown to differ from that of the background. Thus, it was revealed that QC results are influenced by radiation damage. PMID:27211088

  1. Enhanced annealing of GaAs solar cell radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loo, R.; Knechtli, R. C.; Kamath, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    Solar cells are degraded by radiation damage in space. Investigations have been conducted concerning possibilities for annealing this radiation damage in GaAs solar cells, taking into account the conditions favoring such annealing. It has been found that continuous annealing as well as the combination of injection annealing with thermal annealing can lead to recovery from radiation damage under particularly favorable conditions in GaAs solar cells. The damage caused by both electrons and protons in GaAs solar cells can be substantially reduced by annealing at temperatures as low as 150 C, under appropriate conditions. This possibility makes the GaAs solar cells especially attractive for long space missions, or for missions in severe radiation environments. Attention is given to results concerning periodic thermal annealing, continuous annealing, and injection annealing combined with thermal annealing.

  2. Computer simulation of radiation damage in gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stith, John J.; Davenport, James C.; Copeland, Randolph L.

    1989-01-01

    A version of the binary-collision simulation code MARLOWE was used to study the spatial characteristics of radiation damage in proton and electron irradiated gallium arsenide. Comparisons made with the experimental results proved to be encouraging.

  3. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Garlick, G. F. J.

    1987-01-01

    High-efficiency gallium arsenide cells, made by the liquid epitaxy method (LPE), have been irradiated with 1-MeV electrons up to fluences of 10 to the 16th e/sq cm. Measurements have been made of cell spectral response and dark and light-excited current-voltage characteristics and analyzed using computer-based models to determine underlying parameters such as damage coefficients. It is possible to use spectral response to sort out damage effects in the different cell component layers. Damage coefficients are similar to other reported in the literature for the emitter and buffer (base). However, there is also a damage effect in the window layer and possibly at the window emitter interface similar to that found for proton-irradiated liquid-phase epitaxy-grown cells. Depletion layer recombination is found to be less than theoretically expected at high fluence.

  4. Radiation damage effects on solid state detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trainor, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Totally depleted silicon diodes are discussed which are used as nuclear particle detectors in investigations of galactic and solar cosmic radiation and trapped radiation. A study of radiation and chemical effects on the diodes was conducted. Work on electron and proton irradiation of surface barrier detectors with thicknesses up to 1 mm was completed, and work on lithium-drifted silicon devices with thicknesses of several millimeters was begun.

  5. Effects Of Dose Rates On Radiation Damage In CMOS Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goben, Charles A.; Coss, James R.; Price, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes measurements of effects of ionizing-radiation dose rate on consequent damage to complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) electronic devices. Depending on irradiation time and degree of annealing, survivability of devices in outer space, or after explosion of nuclear weapons, enhanced. Annealing involving recovery beyond pre-irradiation conditions (rebound) detrimental. Damage more severe at lower dose rates.

  6. Assessment of Radiation Damage to the Structural Material of EAST Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yixue; Wu, Yican

    2005-08-01

    Radiation damage to structural material of fusion facilities is of high concern for safety. The superconducting tokamak EAST will conduct D-D plasma experiments with the neutron production of 1015 neutrons per second. To evaluate the material radiation damage a programme system has been devised with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP-4C, the inventory code FISPACT99, a specific interface, and the fusion evaluated nuclear data library FENDL-2. The key nuclear responses, i.e. fast neutron flux, displacement per atom, and the helium and hydrogen production, are calculated for the structural material SS-316L of the first wall, and the vacuum vessel, using this programme. The results demonstrate that the radiation damage to the structural material is so little that it will not lead to any significant change of material properties according to the reference design. This indicates that there is a large potential space for EAST to test advanced operation regime from the viewpoint of structural material safety.

  7. Collisional-Radiative Model for Spectroscopic Diagnostic of Optically Thick Helium Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, Keiji; Yamada, Yusuke; Miyachika, Takamasa; Ezumi, Naomichi; Iwamae, Atsushi; Goto, Motoshi

    We have included the effect of radiation trapping in a collisional-radiative model of neutral helium atoms developed by Goto [M. Goto, JQSRT 76, 331 (2003)], which is used to determine the electron temperature and density in plasmas from visible emission line intensities of atoms. In addition to the electron temperature and density, photo-excitation events from the ground state 11S to the 21P, 31P, and 41P states per second per one atom are treated as fitting parameters to reproduce the population density obtained by spectroscopic measurement. The model has been applied to an RF plasma at Shinshu University, Japan. The electron temperature and density and the contribution of radiation trapping to the population density of excited states are evaluated.

  8. COSMOSPEC: fast and detailed computation of the cosmological recombination radiation from hydrogen and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Jens; Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2016-03-01

    We present the first fast and detailed computation of the cosmological recombination radiation released during the hydrogen (redshift z ≃1300) and helium (z ≃2500 and 6000) recombination epochs, introducing the code COSMOSPEC. Our computations include important radiative transfer effects, 500-shell bound-bound and free-bound emission for all three species, the effects of electron scattering and free-free absorption as well as interspecies (He II⇒ He I⇒ H I) photon feedback. The latter effect modifies the shape and amplitude of the recombination radiation and COSMOSPEC improves significantly over previous treatments of it. Utilizing effective multilevel atom and conductance approaches, one calculation takes only ≃15 s on a standard laptop as opposed to days for previous computations. This is an important step towards detailed forecasts and feasibility studies considering the detection of the cosmological recombination lines and what one may hope to learn from the ≃6.1 photons emitted per hydrogen atom in the three recombination eras. We briefly illustrate some of the parameter dependences and discuss remaining uncertainties in particular related to collisional processes and the neutral helium atom model.

  9. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  10. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Weber, William J.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in themore » molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.« less

  11. Electronic effects in high-energy radiation damage in tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Nordlund, Kai; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Weber, William J.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2015-01-01

    Even though the effects of the electronic excitations during high-energy radiation damage processes are not currently understood, it is shown that their role in the interaction of radiation with matter is important. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of high-energy collision cascades in bcc-tungsten using the coupled two-temperature molecular dynamics (2T-MD) model that incorporates both the effects of electronic stopping and electron–phonon interaction. We compare the combination of these effects on the induced damage with only the effect of electronic stopping, and conclude in several novel insights. In the 2T-MD model, the electron–phonon coupling results in less damage production in the molten region and in faster relaxation of the damage at short times. We show these two effects lead to a significantly smaller amount of the final damage at longer times.

  12. Release of helium from irradiation damage in Fe?9Cr ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, K.; Arakawa, K.; Shibasaki, H.; Kurata, H.; Nakamichi, I.; Yoshida, N.

    2004-08-01

    Thermal desorption of helium from Fe-9Cr and pure Fe which were irradiated with 5 keV He + ions at 85 or 473 K have been studied by thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) at temperatures from room temperature to 1270 K and related microstructure changes by TEM. It is found that five TDS peaks appear in Fe-9Cr specimen and these peaks are well correlated with microstructure changes. From these results, the five peaks I Cr, II Cr, III Cr, IV Cr and V Cr may be attributed to release of trapped helium atoms by the break-up of vacancy-helium-self-interstitial atom complexes or very tiny loops, glide to the specimen surface or coalescence of interstitial type dislocation loops, shrinkage of dislocation loops, bubble migration to the specimen surface and α-γ phase transformation, respectively. Precipitation of Cr around the loops and bubbles in Fe-9Cr is revealed by STEM-EELS and this could shift the related TDS peaks to higher temperatures.

  13. Radiation damage in charge-coupled devices.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels

    2010-08-01

    Due to their high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio, charge-coupled devices (CCDs) have been the preferred optical photon detectors of astronomers for several decades. CCDs are flown in space as the main detection instrument on several well-known missions, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, XMM-Newton or the Cassini Probe. Also, CCDs are frequently used in satellite star trackers which provide attitude information to the satellite orientation system. However, one major drawback is their extreme vulnerability to radiation, which is readily abundant in space. Here, we shall give a brief overview of the radiation effects on CCDs, and mention ways how to mitigate the effects in other ways than merely increase shielding, such as cooling and annealing. As an example, we have investigated the radiation hardness of a particular CCD, the so-called CCD47-20 from Marconi Applied Technologies (now E2V), by exposing it to radiation fields representing the radiation environment found in a highly elliptic orbit crossing the Van-Allen radiation belts. Two engineering-grade CCDs were irradiated with proton beams and photons, and effects of increased bulk dark current, surface dark current and inversion threshold voltage shifts were observed and are quantified. PMID:20238121

  14. Radiation damage to scintillator in the D0 luminosity monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, Brendan; DeVaughan, Kayle; Enari, Yuji; Partridge, Richard; Yacoob, Sahal; /Northwestern U.

    2006-12-01

    We report the result of evaluating radiation damage to Bicron BC408 plastic scintillator used in the D0 Luminosity Monitor during Run IIa. The Luminosity Monitor provides pseudo-rapidity coverage over the range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4, with the radiation dose in Run IIa estimated to be 0.5 MRad for the region closest to the beams. We find the light yield is degraded by 10-15% due to radiation damage by comparing new and old scintillator in four observables: (1) visual inspection, (2) optical transmittance, (3) response to the radioactive source of {sup 90}Sr and (4) light yield for cosmic rays.

  15. Radiation damage to nucleoprotein complexes in macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles; Garman, Elspeth F.; Ginn, Helen Mary; Ravelli, Raimond B. G.; Carmichael, Ian; Kneale, Geoff; McGeehan, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in macromolecular crystallography over recent years in both the understanding and mitigation of X-ray induced radiation damage when collecting diffraction data from crystalline proteins. In contrast, despite the large field that is productively engaged in the study of radiation chemistry of nucleic acids, particularly of DNA, there are currently very few X-ray crystallographic studies on radiation damage mechanisms in nucleic acids. Quantitative comparison of damage to protein and DNA crystals separately is challenging, but many of the issues are circumvented by studying pre-formed biological nucleoprotein complexes where direct comparison of each component can be made under the same controlled conditions. Here a model protein–DNA complex C.Esp1396I is employed to investigate specific damage mechanisms for protein and DNA in a biologically relevant complex over a large dose range (2.07–44.63 MGy). In order to allow a quantitative analysis of radiation damage sites from a complex series of macromolecular diffraction data, a computational method has been developed that is generally applicable to the field. Typical specific damage was observed for both the protein on particular amino acids and for the DNA on, for example, the cleavage of base-sugar N1—C and sugar-phosphate C—O bonds. Strikingly the DNA component was determined to be far more resistant to specific damage than the protein for the investigated dose range. At low doses the protein was observed to be susceptible to radiation damage while the DNA was far more resistant, damage only being observed at significantly higher doses. PMID:25723923

  16. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  17. Space solar cells - High efficiency and radiation damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Bernatowicz, D. T.

    1980-01-01

    The proceedings of the Third Solar Cell High Efficiency and Radiation Damage Meeting are outlined. The topics covered included high efficiency silicon solar cells, silicon solar cell radiation damage, GaAs solar cell performance, and 30 percent conversion devices. The study of radiation damage from a fundamental defect-centered basis is discussed and evaluated as a focus of future work. 18% AM0 efficiency and 0.7 V open-circuit voltages are designated as achievable goals for silicon solar cells, and the potential for 30% AM0 efficiencies from monolithic tandem cell designs without sunlight concentration is noted. In addition to its potential for 20% AM0 efficiencies, the GaAs cell offers the possibility of a radiation-insensitive power supply when operated at temperatures near 200 C.

  18. Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

    2010-04-21

    A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

  19. Spectrum of complex DNA damages depends on the incident radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hada, M.; Sutherland, B.

    Ionizing radiation induces clustered DNA damages in DNA-two or more abasic sites oxidized bases and strand breaks on opposite DNA strands within a few helical turns Clustered damages are considered to be difficult to repair and therefore potentially lethal and mutagenic damages Although induction of single strand breaks and isolated lesions has been studied extensively little is known of factors affecting induction of clusters other than double strand breaks DSB The aim of the present study was to determine whether the type of incident radiation could affect yield or spectra of specific clusters Genomic T7 DNA a simple 40 kbp linear blunt-ended molecule was irradiated in non-scavenging buffer conditions with Fe 970 MeV n Ti 980 MeV n C 293 MeV n Si 586 MeV n ions or protons 1 GeV n at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory or with 100 kVp X-rays Irradiated DNA was treated with homogeneous Fpg or Nfo proteins or without enzyme treatment for DSB quantitation then electrophoresed in neutral agarose gels DSB Fpg-OxyPurine clusters and Nfo-Abasic clusters were quantified by number average length analysis The results show that the yields of all these complex damages depend on the incident radiation Although LETs are similar protons induced twice as many DSBs than did X-rays Further the spectrum of damage also depends on the radiation The yield damage Mbp Gy of all damages decreased with increasing linear energy transfer LET of the radiation The relative frequencies of DSBs to Abasic- and OxyBase clusters were higher

  20. Radiation-damaged tyrosinase molecules are inactive

    SciTech Connect

    Kempner, E.S.; Miller, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Target analysis of radiation inactivation of mushroom tyrosinase yields different target sizes for diphenoloxidase and monophenoloxidase activities, which correspond to the subunits H and HL2 (or HL), respectively. After gel electrophoresis of irradiated samples, all diphenoloxidase activity is observed at the same position as seen in the original material. Radiolytic fragments contain no detectable activity, consistent with a fundamental assumption of target theory.

  1. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  2. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Yu, K Y; Liu, Y; Shao, S; Wang, H; Kirk, M A; Wang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials. PMID:25906997

  3. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-01

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  4. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from highmore » density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.« less

  5. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  6. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  7. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  8. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  9. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Turner, Nancy D; Braby, Leslie A; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R

    2002-10-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations. PMID:12361786

  10. Opportunities for nutritional amelioration of radiation-induced cellular damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Nancy D.; Braby, Leslie A.; Ford, John; Lupton, Joanne R.

    2002-01-01

    The closed environment and limited evasive capabilities inherent in space flight cause astronauts to be exposed to many potential harmful agents (chemical contaminants in the environment and cosmic radiation exposure). Current power systems used to achieve space flight are prohibitively expensive for supporting the weight requirements to fully shield astronauts from cosmic radiation. Therefore, radiation poses a major, currently unresolvable risk for astronauts, especially for long-duration space flights. The major detrimental radiation effects that are of primary concern for long-duration space flights are damage to the lens of the eye, damage to the immune system, damage to the central nervous system, and cancer. In addition to the direct damage to biological molecules in cells, radiation exposure induces oxidative damage. Many natural antioxidants, whether consumed before or after radiation exposure, are able to confer some level of radioprotection. In addition to achieving beneficial effects from long-known antioxidants such as vitamins E and C and folic acid, some protection is conferred by several recently discovered antioxidant molecules, such as flavonoids, epigallocatechin, and other polyphenols. Somewhat counterintuitive is the protection provided by diets containing elevated levels of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, considering they are thought to be prone to peroxidation. Even with the information we have at our disposal, it will be difficult to predict the types of dietary modifications that can best reduce the risk of radiation exposure to astronauts, those living on Earth, or those enduring diagnostic or therapeutic radiation exposure. Much more work must be done in humans, whether on Earth or, preferably, in space, before we are able to make concrete recommendations.

  11. Experimental study of the effects of helium-neon laser radiation on repair of injured tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong-Qing; Li, Zhu-Yi; Weng, Long-Jiang; An, Mei; Li, Kai-Yun; Chen, Shao-Rong; Wang, Jian-Xin; Lu, Yu

    1993-03-01

    Despite extensive research into the biology of tendon healing, predictably restoring normal function to a digit after a flexor tendon laceration remains one of the most difficult problems facing the hand surgeon. The challenge of simultaneously achieving tendon healing while minimizing the peritendinous scar formation, which limits tendon gliding, has captured the attention of investigators for many years. It has been said that low-power density helium-neon laser radiation had effects on anti-inflammation, detumescence, progressive wound healing, and reducing intestinal adhesions. This experimental study aims at whether helium-neon laser can reduce injured tendon adhesions and improve functional recovery of the injured tendon. Fifty white Leghorn hens were used. Ten were randomly assigned as a normal control group, the other forty were used in the operation. After anesthetizing them with Amytal, a half of the profundus tendons of the second and third foretoes on both sides of the feet were cut. Postoperatively, the hens moved freely in the cages. One side of the toes operated on were randomly chosen as a treatment group, the other side served as an untreated control group. The injured tendon toes in the treatment group were irradiated for twenty minutes daily with a fiber light needle of helium-neon laser therapeutic apparatus (wavelength, 6328 angstroms) at a constant power density of 12.74 mW/cm2, the first exposure taking place 24 hours after the operation. The longest course of treatment was 3 weeks. The control group was not irradiated. At 3 days, 1, 2, 3, and 5 weeks after surgery, 8 hens were sacrificed and their tendons were examined. The experimental results: (1) active, passive flexion and tendon gliding functional recovery were significantly better in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (2) width and thickness of the tendon at the cut site were significantly smaller in the treatment group (p < 0.01); (3) degrees of tendon adhesions were significantly lighter

  12. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J.; Seaton, Michael; Todorov, Ilian; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T.; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia has been viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and was consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as a nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with the account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely disjoint from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  13. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  14. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Evangelia; Devanathan, Ram; Weber, William J; Seaton, M; Todorov, I T; Nordlund, Kai; Dove, Martin T; Trachenko, Kostya

    2014-01-01

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1-0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We nd that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  15. High-energy radiation damage in zirconia: Modeling results

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, E.; Devanathan, R.; Weber, W. J.; Seaton, M. A.; Todorov, I. T.; Nordlund, K.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.

    2014-02-28

    Zirconia is viewed as a material of exceptional resistance to amorphization by radiation damage, and consequently proposed as a candidate to immobilize nuclear waste and serve as an inert nuclear fuel matrix. Here, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of radiation damage in zirconia in the range of 0.1–0.5 MeV energies with account of electronic energy losses. We find that the lack of amorphizability co-exists with a large number of point defects and their clusters. These, importantly, are largely isolated from each other and therefore represent a dilute damage that does not result in the loss of long-range structural coherence and amorphization. We document the nature of these defects in detail, including their sizes, distribution, and morphology, and discuss practical implications of using zirconia in intense radiation environments.

  16. Studying Radiation Damage in Structural Materials by Using Ion Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosemann, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Radiation damage in structural materials is of major concern and a limiting factor for a wide range of engineering and scientific applications, including nuclear power production, medical applications, or components for scientific radiation sources. The usefulness of these applications is largely limited by the damage a material can sustain in the extreme environments of radiation, temperature, stress, and fatigue, over long periods of time. Although a wide range of materials has been extensively studied in nuclear reactors and neutron spallation sources since the beginning of the nuclear age, ion beam irradiations using particle accelerators are a more cost-effective alternative to study radiation damage in materials in a rather short period of time, allowing researchers to gain fundamental insights into the damage processes and to estimate the property changes due to irradiation. However, the comparison of results gained from ion beam irradiation, large-scale neutron irradiation, and a variety of experimental setups is not straightforward, and several effects have to be taken into account. It is the intention of this article to introduce the reader to the basic phenomena taking place and to point out the differences between classic reactor irradiations and ion irradiations. It will also provide an assessment of how accelerator-based ion beam irradiation is used today to gain insight into the damage in structural materials for large-scale engineering applications.

  17. Raman study of radiation-damaged zircon under hydrostatic compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasdala, Lutz; Miletich, Ronald; Ruschel, Katja; Váczi, Tamás

    2008-12-01

    Pressure-induced changes of Raman band parameters of four natural, gem-quality zircon samples with different degrees of self-irradiation damage, and synthetic ZrSiO4 without radiation damage, have been studied under hydrostatic compression in a diamond anvil cell up to ~10 GPa. Radiation-damaged zircon shows similar up-shifts of internal SiO4 stretching modes at elevated pressures as non-damaged ZrSiO4. Only minor changes of band-widths were observed in all cases. This makes it possible to estimate the degree of radiation damage from the width of the ν3(SiO4) band of zircon inclusions in situ, almost independent from potential “fossilized pressures” or compressive strain acting on the inclusions. An application is the non-destructive analysis of gemstones such as corundum or spinel: broadened Raman bands are a reliable indicator of self-irradiation damage in zircon inclusions, whose presence allows one to exclude artificial color enhancement by high-temperature treatment of the specimen.

  18. ANL/WSU radiation damage studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, D.; Lopiano, D.; Proudfoot, J.; Underwood, D.; Miles, L.; Neidiger, J.; Tripard, G.

    1993-12-31

    We report preliminary results for the radiation hardness of (polystryrene) plastic scintillator stacks using a spectrum of energy hardened neutrons from a MARK-III TRIGA reactor. The total dose ranged from 100 KRad to 3MRad. The corresponding fluence was 3.8 {times} 10{sup 13} to 3.8 {times} 10{sup 14} (n/cm/cm) with the gamma contribution on the order 2--3% (of fluence). The measurements used Li-6, Li-7 Thermo-luminescence dosimeters. Radiochromic/GaF- Chromic film, and activated foils simultaneously allowing an inter-comparison of these various methods of dosimetry.

  19. Proton radiation damage in optical filter glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grillot, Patrick N.; Rosenberg, William J.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Schott BG-39 and Hoya CM-500 blue-green filter glass were subjected to proton radiation to determine their acceptability for spaceflight. Initial testing done with 2.7 MeV protons showed negligible change in optical transmittance with doses as high as 5.2 x 10 to the 14th protons per sq cm. Irradiation with protons of energy up to 63 MeV caused a significant reduction in transmittance in the Schott samples at doses of 5.3 x 10 to the 12th protons per sq cm, while negligible change occurred in the Hoya samples.

  20. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    SciTech Connect

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-04-19

    We review a multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. We briefly overview its history and present the current stage of its development. The differences of the multiscale approach from other methods of understanding and assessment of radiation damage are discussed as well as its relationship to other branches of physics, chemistry and biology.

  1. Assessing the Effects of Radiation Damage on Ni-base Alloys for the Prometheus Space Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    T Angeliu; J Ward; J Witter

    2006-04-04

    Ni-base alloys were considered for the Prometheus space reactor pressure vessel with operational parameters of {approx}900 K for 15 years and fluences up to 160 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). This paper reviews the effects of irradiation on the behavior of Ni-base alloys and shows that radiation-induced swelling and creep are minor considerations compared to significant embrittlement with neutron exposure. While the mechanism responsible for radiation-induced embrittlement is not fully understood, it is likely a combination of helium embrittlement and solute segregation that can be highly dependent on the alloy composition and exposure conditions. Transmutation calculations show that detrimental helium levels would be expected at the end of life for the inner safety rod vessel (thimble) and possibly the outer pressure vessel, primarily from high energy (E > 1 MeV) n,{alpha} reactions with {sup 58}Ni. Helium from {sup 10}B is significant only for the outer vessel due to the proximity of the outer vessel to the BeO control elements. Recommendations for further assessments of the material behavior and methods to minimize the effects of radiation damage through alloy design are provided.

  2. Assessing the Effects of Radiation Damage on Ni-base Alloys for the Prometheus Space Reactor System

    SciTech Connect

    T. Angeliu

    2006-01-19

    Ni-base alloys were considered for the Prometheus space reactor pressure vessel with operational parameters of {approx}900 K for 15 years and fluences up to 160 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). This paper reviews the effects of irradiation on the behavior of Ni-base alloys and shows that radiation-induced swelling and creep are minor considerations compared to significant embrittlement with neutron ,exposure. While the mechanism responsible for radiation-induced embrittlement is not fully understood, it is likely a combination of helium embrittlement and solute segregation that can be highly dependent on the alloy composition and exposure conditions. Transmutation calculations show that detrimental helium levels would be expected at the end of life for the inner safety rod vessel (thimble) and possibly the outer pressure vessel, primarily from high energy (E > 1 MeV) n,{alpha} reactions with {sup 58}Ni. Helium from {sup 10}B is significant only for the outer vessel due to the proximity of the outer vessel to the Be0 control elements. Recommendations for further assessments of the material behavior and methods to minimize the effects of radiation damage through alloy design are provided.

  3. Computer simulation radiation damages in condensed matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchishin, A. I.; Kupchishin, A. A.; Voronova, N. A.; Kirdyashkin, V. I.; Gyngazov, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    As part of the cascade-probability method were calculated the energy spectra of primary knocked-out atoms and the concentration of radiation-induced defects in a number of metals irradiated by electrons. As follows from the formulas, the number of Frenkel pairs at a given depth depends on three variables having certain physical meaning: firstly, Cd (Ea h) is proportional to the average energy of the considered depth of the PKA (if it is higher, than the greater number of atoms it will displace); secondly is inversely proportional to the path length λ2 for the formation of the PKA (if λ1 is higher than is the smaller the probability of interaction) and thirdly is inversely proportional to Ed. In this case calculations are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data (for example, copper and aluminum).

  4. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  5. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage.

    PubMed

    Bury, Charles S; McGeehan, John E; Antson, Alfred A; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B; Garman, Elspeth F

    2016-05-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3-25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein-DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density. PMID:27139628

  6. RNA protects a nucleoprotein complex against radiation damage

    PubMed Central

    Bury, Charles S.; McGeehan, John E.; Antson, Alfred A.; Carmichael, Ian; Gerstel, Markus; Shevtsov, Mikhail B.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation damage during macromolecular X-ray crystallographic data collection is still the main impediment for many macromolecular structure determinations. Even when an eventual model results from the crystallographic pipeline, the manifestations of radiation-induced structural and conformation changes, the so-called specific damage, within crystalline macromolecules can lead to false interpretations of biological mechanisms. Although this has been well characterized within protein crystals, far less is known about specific damage effects within the larger class of nucleoprotein complexes. Here, a methodology has been developed whereby per-atom density changes could be quantified with increasing dose over a wide (1.3–25.0 MGy) range and at higher resolution (1.98 Å) than the previous systematic specific damage study on a protein–DNA complex. Specific damage manifestations were determined within the large trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) bound to a single-stranded RNA that forms a belt around the protein. Over a large dose range, the RNA was found to be far less susceptible to radiation-induced chemical changes than the protein. The availability of two TRAP molecules in the asymmetric unit, of which only one contained bound RNA, allowed a controlled investigation into the exact role of RNA binding in protein specific damage susceptibility. The 11-fold symmetry within each TRAP ring permitted statistically significant analysis of the Glu and Asp damage patterns, with RNA binding unexpectedly being observed to protect these otherwise highly sensitive residues within the 11 RNA-binding pockets distributed around the outside of the protein molecule. Additionally, the method enabled a quantification of the reduction in radiation-induced Lys and Phe disordering upon RNA binding directly from the electron density. PMID:27139628

  7. Radiation damage studies of silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, P.; Clough, A.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Rohlf, J.; Freeman, J.; Los, S.; Cascio, E.; Kuleshov, S.; Musienko, Y.; Piemonte, C.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the radiation hardness of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) manufactured by Fondazione Bruno Kessler in Italy (1 and 6.2 mm2), Center of Perspective Technology and Apparatus in Russia (1 and 4.4 mm2), and Hamamatsu Corporation in Japan (1 mm2). The SiPMs were irradiated using a beam of 212 MeV protons at Massachusetts General Hospital, receiving fluences of up to 3×1010 protons per cm2 with the SiPMs at operating voltage. Leakage currents were read continuously during the irradiation. The delivery of the protons was paused periodically to record scope traces in response to calibrated light pulses to monitor the gains, photon detection efficiencies, and dark counts of the SiPMs. The leakage current and dark noise are found to increase with fluence. The leakage current is found to be proportional to the mean square deviation of the noise distribution, indicating the dark counts are due to increased random individual pixel activation, while SiPMs remain fully functional as photon detectors. The SiPMs are found to anneal at room temperature with a reduction in the leakage current by a factor of 2 in about 100 days.

  8. Radiation damage aspects of the chernobyl accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J. C.

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power station, about 150km north of Kiev, in the Ukraine. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 × 10 4 man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  9. On the Use of SRIM for Computing Radiation Damage Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, Roger E.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Was, Gary S.; Certain, Alicia G.; Dwaraknath, S.; Garner, Frank A.

    2013-09-01

    The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons have been made with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made. In particular, it is recommended that when direct comparisons between ion and neutron data are intended, the Kinchin-Pease option of SRIM should be selected.

  10. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    SciTech Connect

    Benko', Klara; Pintye, Eva; Szabo, Boglarka; Geresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benko, Ilona

    2008-12-08

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of {gamma}--irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD{sub 50} values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  11. On the use of SRIM for computing radiation damage exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, R. E.; Toloczko, M. B.; Was, G. S.; Certain, A. G.; Dwaraknath, S.; Garner, F. A.

    2013-09-01

    The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons have been made with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made. In particular, it is recommended that when direct comparisons between ion and neutron data are intended, the Kinchin-Pease option of SRIM should be selected.

  12. Effect of Rosiglitazone on Radiation Damage in Bone Marrow Hemopoiesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkő, Klára; Pintye, Éva; Szabó, Boglárka; Géresi, Krisztina; Megyeri, Attila; Benkő, Ilona

    2008-12-01

    To study radiobiological effects and drugs, which can modify radiation injury, has an importance if we would like to avoid harmful effects of radiation due to emergency situations or treat patients with malignant diseases by radiotherapy. During the long treatment schedules patients may be treated by not only anticancer but many other drugs because of accompanying diseases. These drugs may also modify radiobiological effects. Rosiglitazone pre-treatment proved to be myeloprotective and accelerated recovery of 5-fluorouracil-damaged bone marrow in our previous experiments. Our new studies are designed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone has similar beneficial effects in radiation-damaged hemopoiesis. Bone marrow damage was precipitated by total body irradiation (TBI) using single increasing doses (2-10 Gy) of γ—irradiation in groups of mice. Lethality was well correlated with damage in hemopoiesis measured by cellularity of bone marrow (LD50 values were 4.8 and 5.3 gray respectively). Rosiglitazone, an insulin-sensitizing drug, had no significant effect on bone marrow cellularity. Insulin resistance associated with obesity or diabetes mellitus type 2 is intensively growing among cancer patients requiring some kind of radiotherapy. Therefore it is important to know whether drugs used for their therapy can modify radiation effects.

  13. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  14. Radiation damage effects in candidate titanates for Pu disposition: Pyrochlore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.; Buck, E. C.; Icenhower, J. P.; Kozelisky, A. E.; Sell, R. L.; Elovich, R. J.; Buchmiller, W. C.

    2005-10-01

    Laboratory experiments on titanate ceramics were performed to verify whether certain assumptions are valid regarding the swelling, chemical durability, and microcracking that might occur as 239Pu decays. Titanate ceramics are the material of choice for the immobilization of surplus weapons-grade Pu. The short-lived isotope 238Pu, was incorporated into the ceramic formulation to accelerate the effects of radiation-induced damage. We report on the effects of this damage on the density (volumetric swelling <6%), crystal structure of pyrochlore-bearing specimens (amorphous after about 2 × 1018 α/g), and dissolution (no change from the fully crystalline specimen). Even though the specimens became amorphous during the tests, there was no evidence for microcracking in the photomicrographs from the scanning electron microscope. Thus, although pyrochlore is susceptible to radiation-induced damage, the material remains chemically and physically viable as a material for immobilizing surplus weapons-grade Pu.

  15. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner, J.; Korfer, M.; Wanke, H. , Mainz ); Schroeder, A.N.F. ); Figes, D.; Dragovitsch, P. ); Englert, P.A.J. ); Starr, R.; Trombka, J.I. . Goddard Space Flight Center); Taylor, I. ); Drake, D.M.; Shunk, E.R. )

    1991-04-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10{sub 8} protons cm{sup {minus}2} (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific as well as engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage the detectors were stepwise annealed at temperatures T {le} 110{degrees}C while staying specially designed cryostats. This paper shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged particles environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  16. Proton-induced radiation damage in germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brueckner, J.; Koerfer, M.; Waenke, H.; Schroeder, A. N. F.; Filges, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P. A. J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1991-01-01

    High-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors will be used in future space missions for gamma-ray measurements and will be subject to interactions with energetic particles. To simulate this process, several large-volume n-type HPGe detectors were incrementally exposed to a particle fluence of up to 10 to the 8th protons/sq cm (proton energy: 1.5 GeV) at different operating temperatures (90 to 120 K) to induce radiation damage. Basic scientific and engineering data on detector performance were collected. During the incremental irradiation, the peak shape produced by the detectors showed a significant change from a Gaussian shape to a broad complex structure. After the irradiation, all detectors were thoroughly characterized by measuring many parameters. To remove the accumulated radiation damage, the detectors were stepwise-annealed at temperatures below 110 C, while kept in their specially designed cryostats. This study shows that n-type HPGe detectors can be used in charged-particle environments as high-energy resolution devices until a certain level of radiation damage is accumulated and that the damage can be removed at moderate annealing temperatures and the detector returned to operating condition.

  17. GUI to Facilitate Research on Biological Damage from Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Frances A.; Ponomarev, Artem Lvovich

    2010-01-01

    A graphical-user-interface (GUI) computer program has been developed to facilitate research on the damage caused by highly energetic particles and photons impinging on living organisms. The program brings together, into one computational workspace, computer codes that have been developed over the years, plus codes that will be developed during the foreseeable future, to address diverse aspects of radiation damage. These include codes that implement radiation-track models, codes for biophysical models of breakage of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) by radiation, pattern-recognition programs for extracting quantitative information from biological assays, and image-processing programs that aid visualization of DNA breaks. The radiation-track models are based on transport models of interactions of radiation with matter and solution of the Boltzmann transport equation by use of both theoretical and numerical models. The biophysical models of breakage of DNA by radiation include biopolymer coarse-grained and atomistic models of DNA, stochastic- process models of deposition of energy, and Markov-based probabilistic models of placement of double-strand breaks in DNA. The program is designed for use in the NT, 95, 98, 2000, ME, and XP variants of the Windows operating system.

  18. DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, A.; Shikazono, N.; Fujii, K.; Urushibara, A.; Akamatsu, K.; Watanabe, R.

    2008-10-01

    We have studied the nature of DNA damage induced by the direct effect of radiation. The yields of single- (SSB) and double-strand breaks (DSB), base lesions and clustered damage were measured using the agarose gel electrophoresis method after exposing to various kinds of radiations to a simple model DNA molecule, fully hydrated closed-circular plasmid DNA (pUC18). The yield of SSB does not show significant dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) values. On the other hand, the yields of base lesions revealed by enzymatic probes, endonuclease III (Nth) and formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg), which excise base lesions and leave a nick at the damage site, strongly depend on LET values. Soft X-ray photon (150 kVp) irradiation gives a maximum yield of the base lesions detected by the enzymatic probes as SSB and clustered damage, which is composed of one base lesion and proximate other base lesions or SSBs. The clustered damage is visualized as an enzymatically induced DSB. The yields of the enzymatically additional damages strikingly decrease with increasing levels of LET. These results suggest that in higher LET regions, the repair enzymes used as probes are compromised because of the dense damage clustering. The studies using simple plasmid DNA as a irradiation sample, however, have a technical difficulty to detect multiple SSBs in a plasmid DNA. To detect the additional SSBs induced in opposite strand of the first SSB, we have also developed a novel technique of DNA-denaturation assay. This allows us to detect multiply induced SSBs in both strand of DNA, but not induced DSB.

  19. Induced swelling in radiation damaged ZrSiO 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exarhos, G. J.

    1984-02-01

    A hydrothermal gelation method was used to prepare phase pure polycrystalline ZrSiO 4 which was sintered to 95% theoretical density. Actinide doped samples containing 10 wt% 238Pu were prepared by an analogous procedure and incurred bulk radiation damage through internal alpha-decay processes. Undoped samples were subjected to external irradiation from 5.5 MeV alpha sources, and from a 60Co gamma source. Actinide doped ZrSiO 4 exhibits dose dependent swelling caused by displacement processes leading to ingrowth of amorphous regions. Bulk density and XRD measurements, as a function of dose, showed first order exponential ingrowth behavior similar to that observed in other actinide doped materials. Results are compared with reported data for naturally damaged crystals subjected to significantly lower alpha decay rates. No significant dose rate dependence on damage ingrowth has been observed. Kinetic models for the observed dose dependent swelling are proposed and rate constants for damage ingrowth in synthetic and natural crystals are compared. To study localized damage induced by both external alpha and gamma irradiation, vibrational Raman measurements were obtained for several accumulated doses. Results indicate that the initial stage of damage ingrowth is confined to the silicate sublattice. Vibrational results will be discussed in terms of microstructural changes which result from irradiation.

  20. Damage-tolerant nanotwinned metals with nanovoids under radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Yu, K. Y.; Liu, Y.; Shao, S.; Wang, H.; Kirk, M. A.; Wang, J.; Zhang, X.

    2015-04-24

    Material performance in extreme radiation environments is central to the design of future nuclear reactors. Radiation induces significant damage in the form of dislocation loops and voids in irradiated materials, and continuous radiation often leads to void growth and subsequent void swelling in metals with low stacking fault energy. Here we show that by using in situ heavy ion irradiation in a transmission electron microscope, pre-introduced nanovoids in nanotwinned Cu efficiently absorb radiation-induced defects accompanied by gradual elimination of nanovoids, enhancing radiation tolerance of Cu. In situ studies and atomistic simulations reveal that such remarkable self-healing capability stems from high density of coherent and incoherent twin boundaries that rapidly capture and transport point defects and dislocation loops to nanovoids, which act as storage bins for interstitial loops. This study describes a counterintuitive yet significant concept: deliberate introduction of nanovoids in conjunction with nanotwins enables unprecedented damage tolerance in metallic materials.

  1. Radiation damage studies of detector-compatible Si JFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Boscardin, Maurizio; Candelori, Andrea; Pancheri, Lucio; Piemonte, Claudio; Ratti, Lodovico; Zorzi, Nicola

    2007-03-01

    We have largely improved the performance of our detector-compatible Si JFETs by optimizing the fabrication technology. New devices feature thermal noise values close to the theoretical ones, and remarkably low 1/ f noise figures. In view of adopting these JFETs for X-ray imaging and HEP applications, bulk and surface radiation damage tests have been carried out by irradiating single transistors and test structures with neutrons and X-rays. Selected results from static and noise characterization of irradiated devices are discussed in this paper, and the impact of radiation effects on the performance of JFET-based circuits is addressed.

  2. Proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Liyuan; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Kapustinsky, Jon; Nelson, Ron; Wang, Zhehui

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports proton induced radiation damage in fast crystal scintillators. A 20 cm long LYSO crystal, a 15 cm long CeF3 crystal and four liquid scintillator based sealed quartz capillaries were irradiated by 800 MeV protons at Los Alamos up to 3.3 ×1014 p /cm2. Four 1.5 mm thick LYSO plates were irradiated by 24 GeV protons at CERN up to 6.9 ×1015 p /cm2. The results show an excellent radiation hardness of LYSO crystals against charged hadrons.

  3. Extreme radiation damage in soil from Mare Fecunditatis.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phakey, P. P.; Price, P. B.

    1972-01-01

    High-voltage electron microscopy has been used to compare radiation effects in micron-size soil grains from the Luna 16 site (Mare Fecunditatis) and the four Apollo landing sites. Radiation damage by heavy solar particles is strikingly greater in the Luna 16 sample than in the other four samples. It is suggested that less movement of the soil at Mare Fecunditatis has taken place, perhaps because of its proximity to the limb and consequent lower exposure to energetic electrons in the earth's magnetospheric tail, which would cause electrostatic agitation of fine particles.

  4. Helium Plasma Damage of Low-k Carbon Doped Silica Film: the Effect of Si Dangling Bonds on the Dielectric Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hailing; Wang, Qing; Ba, Dechun

    2014-11-01

    The low-k carbon doped silica film has been modified by radio frequency helium plasma at 5 Pa pressure and 80 W power with subsequent XPS, FTIR and optical emission spectroscopy analysis. XPS data indicate that helium ions have broken Si-C bonds, leading to Si-C scission with C(1s) lost seriously. The Si(2p), O(1s), peak obviously shifted to higher binding energies, indicating an increasingly oxidized Si(2p). FTIR data also show that the silanol formation increased with longer exposure time up to a week. Contrarily, the CH3 stretch, Si-C stretching bond and the ratio of the Si-O-Si cage and Si-O-Si network peak sharply decreased upon exposure to helium plasma. The OES result indicates that monovalent helium ions in plasma play a key role in damaging carbon doped silica film. So it can be concluded that the monovalent helium ions besides VUV photons can break the weak Si-C bonds to create Si dangling bonds and free methyl radicals, and the latter easily reacts with O2 from the atmosphere to generate CO2 and H2O. The bonds change is due to the Si dangling bonds combining with H2O, thereby, increasing the dielectric constant k value.

  5. A stochastic model of radiation-induced bone marrow damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cotlet, G.; Blue, T.E.

    2000-03-01

    A stochastic model, based on consensus principles from radiation biology, is used to estimate bone-marrow stem cell pool survival (CFU-S and stroma cells) after irradiation. The dose response model consists of three coupled first order linear differential equations which quantitatively describe time dependent cellular damage, repair, and killing of red bone marrow cells. This system of differential equations is solved analytically through the use of a matrix approach for continuous and fractionated irradiations. The analytic solutions are confirmed through the dynamical solution of the model equations using SIMULINK. Rate coefficients describing the cellular processes of radiation damage and repair, extrapolated to humans from animal data sets and adjusted for neutron-gamma mixed fields, are employed in a SIMULINK analysis of criticality accidents. The results show that, for the time structures which may occur in criticality accidents, cell survival is established mainly by the average dose and dose rate.

  6. Radiation damage in zircon by high-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Nan; Spence, John C. H.

    2009-06-15

    Radiation damage induced by high-energy (200 keV) electron irradiation in zircon has been studied thoroughly using imaging, diffraction, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy techniques in transmission electron microscopy. Both structural and compositional changes during the damage were measured using the above techniques in real time. It was found that the damage was mainly caused by the preferential sputtering of O. The loss of O occurred initially within small sporadic regions with dimension of several nanometers, resulting in the direct transformation of zircon into Zr{sub x}Si{sub y}. These isolated patches gradually connect each other and eventually cover the whole area of the electron beam. These differ from the previous observations either in the self-irradiated natural and synthetic zircon or in ion-beam irradiated thin zircon specimen.

  7. Effects of helium ion damage on the two-band superconductivity in MgB2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, L. H.; Park, W. K.; Lu, X.; Moeckly, B.; Singh, R.; Newman, N.; Rowell, J. M.

    2006-03-01

    While the two-band superconductivity in MgB2 has been well established, it remains controversial whether disorder in the Mg and B planes causes enhanced interband scattering, band filling or both. To address this, we have performed electronic transport and point-contact spectroscopy measurements on helium-ion irradiated MgB2 thin films. Two sets of samples are prepared using: a) 1 MeV He^+ ions with uniform doses ranging from 1x10^15 to 1x10^17 ions/cm^2; b) 2 MeV alpha particles with gradient doses. The resistivity (Tc) is observed to increase (decrease) monotonically with increasing dose. The conductance spectra are taken from point-contact junctions between MgB2 thin films and Au tips. The Tc is determined by the onset of enhanced conductance at zero bias. Our preliminary results show that the two gaps tend to merge into one gap with increasing ion damage. Detailed results including Tc vs. energy gap will be presented and discussed in terms of the electronic structure change caused by ion-induced point defects. WKP acknowledges Pavel Krasnochtchekov and Robert Averback for ion irradiation experiments at UIUC. This work is supported by the DoE DEFG02-91ER45439, through the FSMRL and the Center for Microanalysis of Materials at UIUC.

  8. Pluripotent Stem Cells and DNA Damage Response to Ionizing Radiations.

    PubMed

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Butler, E Brian; Pandita, Raj K; Hunt, Clayton R; Pandita, Tej K

    2016-07-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, functional genomics, toxicological studies and cell-based therapeutics due to their unique characteristics of self-renewal and pluripotency. Novel methods for generation of pluripotent stem cells and their differentiation to the specialized cell types such as neuronal cells, myocardial cells, hepatocytes and beta cells of the pancreas and many other cells of the body are constantly being refined. Pluripotent stem cell derived differentiated cells, including neuronal cells or cardiac cells, are ideal for stem cell transplantation as autologous or allogeneic cells from healthy donors due to their minimal risk of rejection. Radiation-induced DNA damage, ultraviolet light, genotoxic stress and other intrinsic and extrinsic factors triggers a series of biochemical reactions known as DNA damage response. To maintain genomic stability and avoid transmission of mutations into progenitors cells, stem cells have robust DNA damage response signaling, a contrast to somatic cells. Stem cell transplantation may protect against radiation-induced late effects. In particular, this review focuses on differential DNA damage response between stem cells and derived differentiated cells and the possible pathways that determine such differences. PMID:27332952

  9. Pluripotent stem cells and DNA damage response to ionizing radiations

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Butler, E. Brian; Pandita, Raj K.; Hunt, Clayton R.; Pandita, Tej K.

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) hold great promise in regenerative medicine, disease modeling, functional genomics, toxicological studies and cell-based therapeutics due to their unique characteristics of self-renewal and pluripotency. Novel methods for generation of pluripotent stem cells and their differentiation to the specialized cell types such as neuronal cells, myocardial cells, hepatocytes, and beta cells of the pancreas and many other cells of the body are constantly being refined. Pluripotent stem cell derived differentiated cells, including neuronal cells or cardiac cells are ideal for stem cell transplantation as autologous or allogeneic cells from healthy donors due to their minimum risks of rejection. DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet (UV) light, genotoxic stress, and other intrinsic and extrinsic factors trigger a series of biochemical reactions termed as DNA damage response (DDR). In order to maintain genomic stability, and avoid transmission of mutations into progenitors cells, stem cells have robust DNA damage response signaling – a contrast to somatic cells. Stem cell transplantation may over come the late effects related to radiation. This review will particularly focus on differential DNA damage response between stem cells and derived differentiated cells and the possible pathways that determine such differences. PMID:27332952

  10. Multiscale approach to the physics of radiation damage with ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-11-01

    The multiscale approach to the assessment of biodamage resulting upon irradiation of biological media with ions is reviewed, explained and compared to other approaches. The processes of ion propagation in the medium concurrent with ionization and excitation of molecules, transport of secondary products, dynamics of the medium, and biological damage take place on a number of different temporal, spatial and energy scales. The multiscale approach, a physical phenomenon-based analysis of the scenario that leads to radiation damage, has been designed to consider all relevant effects on a variety of scales and develop an approach to the quantitative assessment of biological damage as a result of irradiation with ions. Presently, physical and chemical effects are included in the scenario while the biological effects such as DNA repair are only mentioned. This paper explains the scenario of radiation damage with ions, overviews its major parts, and applies the multiscale approach to different experimental conditions. On the basis of this experience, the recipe for application of the multiscale approach is formulated. The recipe leads to the calculation of relative biological effectiveness.

  11. Radiation damage of a glass-bonded zeolite waste form using ion irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T. R.; Storey, B. G.

    1997-12-05

    Glass-bonded zeolite is being considered as a candidate ceramic waste form for storing radioactive isotopes separated from spent nuclear fuel in the electrorefining process. To determine the stability of glass-bonded zeolite under irradiation, transmission electron microscope samples were irradiated using high energy helium, lead, and krypton. The major crystalline phase of the waste form, which retains alkaline and alkaline earth fission products, loses its long range order under both helium and krypton irradiation. The dose at which the long range crystalline structure is lost is about 0.4 dpa for helium and 0.1 dpa for krypton. Because the damage from lead is localized in such a small region of the sample, damage could not be recognized even at a peak damage of 50 dpa. Because the crystalline phase loses its long range structure due to irradiation, the effect on retention capacity needs to be further evaluated.

  12. Radiation damage effects in candidate titanates for Pu disposition: Zirconolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, D. M.; Scheele, R. D.; Buck, E. C.; Kozelisky, A. E.; Sell, R. L.; Elovich, R. J.; Buchmiller, W. C.

    2008-01-01

    Results from studies of radiation-induced damage from the alpha decay of 238Pu on the density and crystal structure of a nominally phase-pure zirconolite and two other zirconolite-bearing ceramics are discussed. Macro and micro swelling were found to be temperature independent, whereas the density determined with He gas pycnometry was temperature dependent. Approximately 2.6 × 10 18 α/g were needed to render the specimens X-ray amorphous- more to saturate the swelling. Unlike pyrochlore-based ceramics, we did not observe any phase changes associated with storage temperature and damage ingrowth. The forward dissolution rate at a pH value of 2 for material containing essentially all zirconolite is 1.7(4) × 10 -3 g/(m 2 d) with very little pH dependence and no dependence on the amount of radiation-induced damage. Even after the radiation-induced swelling saturated, the specimens remained physically intact with no evidence for microcracking. Thus, the material remains physically a viable material for the disposition of surplus weapons-grade Pu.

  13. Ascorbic acid (AA) metabolism in protection against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, R.C.; Koch, M.J.

    1986-03-05

    The possibility is considered that AA protects tissues against radiation damage by scavenging free radicals that result from radiolysis of water. A physiologic buffer (pH 6.7) was incubated with /sup 14/C-AA and 1 mM thiourea (to slow spontaneous oxidation of AA). Aliquots were assayed by HPLC and scintillation spectrometry to identify the /sup 14/C-label. Samples exposed to Cobalt-60 radiation had a half time of AA decay of < 3 minutes compared with nonirradiated samples (t/sub 1/2/ > 30 minutes) indicating that AA scavenges radiation-induced free radicals and forms the ascorbate free radical (AFR). Pairs of /sup 14/C-AFR disproportionate, with the net effect of /sup 14/C-dehydroascorbic acid formation from /sup 14/C-AA. Having established that AFR result from ionizing radiation in an aqueous solution, the possibility was evaluated that a tissue factor reduces AFR. Cortical tissue from the kidneys of male rats was minced, homogenized in buffer and centrifuged at 8000 xg. The supernatant was found to slow the rate of radiation-induced AA degradation by > 90% when incubated at 23/sup 0/C in the presence of 15 ..mu..M /sup 14/C-AA. Samples of supernatant maintained at 100/sup 0/C for 10 minutes or precipitated with 5% PCA did not prevent radiation-induced AA degradation. AA may have a specific role in scavenging free radicals generated by ionizing radiation and thereby protect body tissues.

  14. Radiative properties of molecular nitrogen ions produced by helium Penning ionization and argon effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, George, III; Song, Kyo-Dong

    1994-01-01

    The development of hypersonic aerospace vehicles requires a better understanding on the thermal and chemical nonequilibrium kinetics of participating species in shock layers. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes developed for such flowfields overestimate the radiation in the spectral region of 300 - 600 nm. A speculation for this overestimation is that inclusion of Ar, CO2, and H2O at the upper atmosphere flight region makes a significant impact on radiative kinetics of molecular nitrogen ions. To define the effects of minority species on the radiative kinetics of N2(+), an experimental setup was made by using the helium Penning ionization. The vibrational and rotational temperature were measured by mapping the vibrational and rotational distributions of N2(+) emission with high spectroscopic resolution and absolute intensity measurements. Measured vibrational temperatures were in the range from 18,000 to 36,000 K, and rotational temperatures were in the range from 300 to 370 K. The irradiance of 391.44 nm line and rotational and vibrational temperatures were analyzed to define argon and CO2 effects on the N2(+) emission. When Ar or CO2 is injected with N2, the rotational temperature did not change. The irradiances were reduced by 34 percent and 78 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. The vibrational temperatures were increased by 24.1 percent and 82.9 percent for the 50 percent of mixture of Ar and CO2, respectively. It appears that there are no significant effects from small concentrations of Ar and CO2 at the upper atmosphere flight region.

  15. Collisional-radiative model of helium microwave discharges at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, M.; Alves, L. L.; Gadonna, K.; Belmonte, T.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together with diffusion and dissociative recombination. The He2*is produced by a 3-body reaction involving the 23P states and by the electron-stabilized recombination of He2+and is lost by electron dissociation. This paper presents a stationary collisional-radiative model to describe the behavior of helium microwave discharges (2.45 GHz), produced in cylindrical geometry (1 mm radius) at atmospheric pressure. The model couples the rate balance equations for the charged particles (electrons, He+ and He2+ions), the He(n <= 6) excited states and the He2*excimers, to the two-term homogeneous and stationary electron Boltzmann equation,. The latter is solved using a coherent set of electron cross sections, adjusted to ensure good predictions of the swarm parameters and the Townsend ionization coefficient. The model was solved for typical 5x1014 cm-3 electron density and 2500 K gas temperature, yielding [He2+]/[He+] ~ 0.92 and [He2*]/[He] ~ 3.4x10-8. Results show also that the He2+ions are produced mainly from the 3-body conversion of He+ ions and lost by the corresponding reverse reaction together

  16. Radiation damage effects in CZT drift strip detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Joergensen, Carl; Korsbech, Uffe; Jensen, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    At DSRI, in collaboration with the cyclotron facility at Copenhagen University Hospital, we have performed a study of radiation effects exposing a 2.7 mm thick CZT drift strip detector to 30 MeV protons. The detector characteristics were evaluated after exposure to a number of dose loads in the range from 2*108 to 60*108 p+/cm2. Even for the highest dose loads, which had a dramatic effect on the spectroscopic performance, we were able to recover the detectors after an appropriate annealing procedure. The radiation damage was studied as function of depth inside the detector material. A numerical model that emulates the physical processes of the charge transport in the CZT detector was used to derive the charge trapping parameter , μτe (the product of charge mobility and trapping time) as function of dose. The analysis showed that the electron trapping increased proportional with the proton dose. The radiation contribution to the electron trapping was found to obey the following relation: (μτe)-1rad =(2.5±0.2)*10-7*Φ (V/cm2) with the proton fluence, Φ in p+/cm2. The trapping depth dependence, however, did not agree well the damage profile calculated using the standard Monte Carlo simulations, TRIM for the proton induced radiation effects. The present results suggest that proton induced nuclear reactions contribute significantly to the radiation damage. Further work will elaborate on these effects. The detector energy resolution was investigated as function of proton dose. It was found that the observed degradation is well explained by the decrease of μτe when the fluctuations of the electron path length are taken into account. The proton irradiation produced In meta stable isotopes in the CZT material. Their decay and production yield as function of depth were analyzed.

  17. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

  18. PREFACE: Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM07)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuigan, Kevin G.

    2008-03-01

    The annual meeting of the COST P9 Action `Radiation damage in biomolecular systems' took place from 19-22 June 2007 in the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, in Dublin. The conference was structured into 5 Working Group sessions: Electrons and biomolecular interactions Ions and biomolecular interactions Radiation in physiological environments Theoretical developments for radiation damage Track structure in cells Each of the five working groups presented two sessions of invited talks. Professor Ron Chesser of Texas Tech University, USA gave a riveting plenary talk on `Mechanisms of Adaptive Radiation Responses in Mammals at Chernobyl' and the implications his work has on the Linear-No Threshold model of radiation damage. In addition, this was the first RADAM meeting to take place after the Alexander Litvenenko affair and we were fortunate to have one of the leading scientists involved in the European response Professor Herwig Paretzke of GSF-Institut für Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg, Germany, available to speak. The remaining contributions were presented in the poster session. A total of 72 scientific contributions (32 oral, 40 poster), presented by 97 participants from 22 different countries, gave an overview on the current progress in the 5 different subfields. A 1-day pre-conference `Early Researcher Tutorial Workshop' on the same topic kicked off on 19 June attended by more than 40 postgrads, postdocs and senior researchers. Twenty papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. All the contributions in this volume were fully refereed, and they represent a sample of the courses, invited talks and contributed talks presented during RADAM07. The interdisciplinary RADAM07 conference brought together researchers from a variety of different fields with a common interest in biomolecular radiation damage. This is reflected by the disparate backgrounds of the authors of the papers presented in these proceedings

  19. [The application of helium-neon laser radiation for the combined treatment of the patients with atrophic rhinitis].

    PubMed

    Sharipov, R A; Sharipova, E R

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to improve the efficacy of the treatment of the patients presenting with atrophic rhinitis (ozena) of the upper respiratory tract by the application of helium-neon laser radiation. A total of 120 patients aged from 15 to 53 years were treated based at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, G.G. Kuvatov Republican Clinical Hospital, Ufa. All these patients underwent routine clinical, roentgenological, microbiological, and rheographic examination. The method for the treatment of atrophic rhinitis is described; it includes the application of helium-neon laser radiation in combination with the administration of the purified preparation of liquid polyvalent Klebsiella bacteriophage. The positive results of the treatment by the proposed method were documented in 90% of the patients. PMID:23268248

  20. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating α-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  1. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in coolingmore » to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.« less

  2. MD simulations of phase stability of PuGa alloys: Effects of primary radiation defects and helium bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Dremov, V. V.; Sapozhnikov, F. A.; Ionov, G. V.; Karavaev, A. V.; Vorobyova, M. A.; Chung, B. W.

    2013-05-14

    We present classical molecular dynamics (MD) with Modified Embedded Atom Model (MEAM) simulations to investigate the role of primary radiation defects and radiogenic helium as factors affecting the phase stability of PuGa alloys in cooling–heating cycles at ambient pressure. The models of PuGa alloys equilibrated at ambient conditions were subjected to cooling–heating cycles in which they were initially cooled down to 100 K and then heated up to 500 K at ambient pressure. The rate of temperature change in the cycles was 10 K/ns. The simulations showed that the initial FCC phase of PuGa alloys undergo polymorphous transition in cooling to a lower symmetry α'-phase. All the alloys undergo direct and reverse polymorphous transitions in the cooling–heating cycles. The alloys containing vacancies shift in both transitions to lower temperatures relative to the defect-free alloys. The radiogenic helium has much less effect on the phase stability compared to that of primary radiation defects (in spite of the fact that helium concentration is twice of that for the primary radiation defects). Lastly, this computational result agrees with experimental data on unconventional stabilization mechanism of PuGa alloys.

  3. Influence of radiation damage on xenon diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Gärtner, K.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Thabethe, T. T.

    2014-08-01

    Diffusion of xenon in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide and the possible influence of radiation damage on it are investigated. For this purpose 360 keV xenon ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and xenon retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1500 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channelling. No diffusion or xenon loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature serious erosion of the implanted surface occurred, which made any analysis impossible. No diffusion or xenon loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC.

  4. Radiation damage in PVT (Polyvinyltoluene) induced by energetic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.

    Polyvinyltoluene (PVT) is an organic polymer employed as base material for many plastic scintillators useful to detect charged particles. Radiation damage in PVT is investigated irradiating the polymer in vacuum with different ion beams (H+, He+, N+ and Ar+) as a function of their ion stopping power. The structural modifications indced in the polymer are deduced by monitoring in situ, during the ion irradiation, the molecular desorption from the polymer by a highly sensitive mass-quadrupole spectrometer. The desorbed molecules are detected in the mass range 1-100 amu and the chemical yields are measured with respect to the calibrated gas leaks. Main emitted species are H2, C2H2 and C3H5, the yields of which strongly depend on the ion stopping power. As will be discussed, the investigation of radiation damage in PVT permits to extend the results to the damage undergone by plastic scintillators during the detection of charged particles at high energy, such as protons of 10-100 MeV, an energy range useful in nuclear physics and in proton-therapy.

  5. Radiation damage of the HEAO C-1 germanium detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiation damage from proton bombardment of the four HEAO C-1 high purity germanium detectors have been measured and compared to predictions. Because of the presence of numerous gamma-ray lines in the detector background spectra and because of the relatively long exposure time of the HEAO 3 satellite to cosmic-ray and trapped protons, it has been possible to measure both the energy and time dependence of radiation damage. After 100 d in orbit, each of the four detectors has been exposed to approximately 3 x 10 to the 7th protons/sq cm, and the average energy resolution at 1460 keV had degraded from 3.2 keV fwhm to 8.6 keV fwhm. The lines were all broadened to the low energy side although the line profile was different for each of the four detectors. The damage-related contribution to the degradation in energy resolution was found to be linear in energy and proton influence.

  6. In Situ Measurement of Radiation Damage in Scintillating Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, Ar.; Holm, U.; Latuske, N.; Wick, K.; Zoufal, T.

    2002-11-01

    The radiation induced degradation of the optical transmission of the fibers SCSF-38M, SCSF-81M (Kuraray), BCF-60 and BCF-98 (Bicron) with polystyrene core (PS) was studied. During and after irradiation with a 100 kV X-ray source, a 137Cs source and a 60Co source the effects depend on the fiber type: (1) The permanent damage for BCF-98 (clear PS) is smaller than for the scintillators. (2) The BCF-60 is radiation harder than the other two scintillators but very light sensitive. Temperature treatments (up to 68°C) of SCSF-38M, without irradiation showed a transmission loss which clearly rises with the increasing temperature. This accelerated ageing phenomenon does not recover and the fiber is permanently damaged. In an additional experiment it was studied whether the transmission damage can be influenced by short illuminations with visible light during and after irradiation. For SCSF-38M a strong reduction of the permanent induced absorption remaining after the end of the recovery process was observed.

  7. Radiation damage and derivatization in macromolecular crystallography: a structure factor’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Robin L.; Sherrell, Darren A.

    2016-01-01

    During, or even after, data collection the presence and effects of radiation damage in macromolecular crystallography may not always be immediately obvious. Despite this, radiation damage is almost always present, with site-specific damage occurring on very short time (dose) scales well before global damage becomes apparent. A result of both site-specific radiation damage and derivatization is a change in the relative intensity of reflections. The size and approximate rate of onset of X-ray-induced transformations is compared with the changes expected from derivatization, and strategies for minimizing radiation damage are discussed. PMID:26960125

  8. Torin2 Suppresses Ionizing Radiation-Induced DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Udayakumar, Durga; Pandita, Raj K; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Liu, Yan; Liu, Qingsong; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Hunt, Clayton R; Gray, Nathanael S; Minna, John D; Pandita, Tej K; Westover, Kenneth D

    2016-05-01

    Several classes of inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) have been developed based on its central role in sensing growth factor and nutrient levels to regulate cellular metabolism. However, its ATP-binding site closely resembles other phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members, resulting in reactivity with these targets that may also be therapeutically useful. The ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitor, Torin2, shows biochemical activity against the DNA repair-associated proteins ATM, ATR and DNA-PK, which raises the possibility that Torin2 and related compounds might radiosensitize cancerous tumors. In this study Torin2 was also found to enhance ionizing radiation-induced cell killing in conditions where ATM was dispensable, confirming the requirement for multiple PIKK targets. Moreover, Torin2 did not influence the initial appearance of γ-H2AX foci after irradiation but significantly delayed the disappearance of radiation-induced γ-H2AX foci, indicating a DNA repair defect. Torin2 increased the number of radiation-induced S-phase specific chromosome aberrations and reduced the frequency of radiation-induced CtIP and Rad51 foci formation, suggesting that Torin2 works by blocking homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA repair resulting in an S-phase specific DNA repair defect. Accordingly, Torin2 reduced HR-mediated repair of I-Sce1-induced DNA damage and contributed to replication fork stalling. We conclude that radiosensitization of tumor cells by Torin2 is associated with disrupting ATR- and ATM-dependent DNA damage responses. Our findings support the concept of developing combination cancer therapies that incorporate ionizing radiation therapy and Torin2 or compounds with similar properties. PMID:27135971

  9. Recent Advances in Understanding Radiation Damage in Reactor Cavity Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Rosseel, Thomas M; Field, Kevin G; Le Pape, Yann; Remec, Igor; Giorla, Alain B; Wall, Dr. James Joseph

    2015-01-01

    License renewal up to 60 years and the possibility of subsequent license renewal to 80 years has resulted in a renewed focus on long-term aging of materials at nuclear power plants (NPPs) including concrete. Large irreplaceable sections of most nuclear generating stations include concrete. The Expanded Materials Degradation Analysis, jointly performed by the Department of Energy, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Nuclear Industry, identified the urgent need to develop a consistent knowledge base on irradiation effects in concrete (Graves et al., (2014)). Much of the historical mechanical performance data of irradiated concrete (Hilsdorf et al., (1978)) does not accurately reflect typical radiation conditions in NPPs or conditions out to 60 or 80 years of radiation exposure (Kontani et al., (2011)). To address these potential gaps in the knowledge base, the Electric Power Research Institute and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are working to better understand radiation damage as a degradation mechanism. This paper outlines recent progress toward: 1) assessing the radiation environment in concrete biological shields and defining the upper bound of the neutron and gamma dose levels expected in the biological shield for extended operation, and estimating adsorbed dose, 2) evaluating opportunities to harvest and test irradiated concrete from international NPPs, 3) evaluating opportunities to irradiate prototypical concrete and its components under accelerated neutron and gamma dose levels to establish conservative bounds and inform damage models, 4) developing improved models to enhance the understanding of the effects of radiation on concrete and 5) establishing an international collaborative research and information exchange effort to leverage capabilities and knowledge including developing cooperative test programs to improve confidence in data obtained from various concretes and from accelerated irradiation experiments.

  10. Absolute Measurements of Radiation Damage in Nanometer Thick Films

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2013-01-01

    We address the problem of absolute measurements of radiation damage in films of nanometer thicknesses. Thin films of DNA (~ 2–160nm) are deposited onto glass substrates and irradiated with varying doses of 1.5 keV X-rays under dry N2 at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. For each different thickness, the damage is assessed by measuring the loss of the supercoiled configuration as a function of incident photon fluence. From the exposure curves, the G-values are deduced, assuming that X-ray photons interacting with DNA, deposit all of their energy in the film. The results show that the G-value (i.e., damage per unit of deposited energy) increases with film thickness and reaches a plateau at 30±5 nm. This thickness dependence provides a correction factor to estimate the actual G-value for films with thicknesses below 30nm thickness. Thus, the absolute values of damage can be compared with that of films of any thickness under different experimental conditions. PMID:22562941

  11. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  12. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  13. A radiation damage repair model for normal tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Mike

    2008-07-01

    A cellular Monte Carlo model describing radiation damage and repair in normal epithelial tissues is presented. The deliberately simplified model includes cell cycling, cell motility and radiation damage response (cell cycle arrest and cell death) only. Results demonstrate that the model produces a stable equilibrium system for mean cell cycle times in the range 24-96 h. Simulated irradiation of these stable equilibrium systems produced a range of responses that are shown to be consistent with experimental and clinical observation, including (i) re-epithelialization of radiation-induced lesions by a mixture of cell migration into the wound and repopulation at the periphery; (ii) observed radiosensitivity that is quantitatively consistent with both rate of induction of irreparable DNA lesions and, independently, with the observed acute oral and pharyngeal mucosal reactions to radiotherapy; (iii) an observed time between irradiation and maximum toxicity that is consistent with experimental data for skin; (iv) quantitatively accurate predictions of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity; (v) Gomperzian repopulation for very small lesions (~2000 cells) and (vi) a linear rate of re-epithelialization of 5-10 µm h-1 for large lesions (>15 000 cells).

  14. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  15. Radiation Damages in Aluminum Alloy SAV-1 under Neutron Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhbaev, Umar; Akhmedzhanov, Farkhad; Alikulov, Sherali; Baytelesov, Sapar; Boltabaev, Azizbek

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of neutron irradiation on the kinetics of radiation damages in the SAV-1 alloy, which belongs to the group of aluminum alloys of the ternary system Al-Mg-Si. For fast-neutron irradiation by different doses up to fluence 1019 cm-2 the SAV-1 samples were placed in one of the vertical channels of the research WWR type reactor (Tashkent). The temperature dependence of the electrical resistance of the alloy samples was investigated in the range 290 - 490 K by the four-compensation method with an error about 0.1%. The experimental results were shown that at all the temperatures the dependence of the SAV-1 alloy resistivity on neutron fluence was nonlinear. With increasing neutron fluence the deviation from linearity and the growth rate of resistivity with temperature becomes more appreciable. The observed dependences are explained by means of martensitic transformations and the radiation damages in the studied alloy under neutron irradiation. The mechanisms of radiation modification of the SAV-1 alloy structure are discussed.

  16. Retinal damage from long-term exposure to laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, W D; Allen, R G

    1977-06-01

    The maculae of rhesus monkeys were exposed to an argon-ion lazer operated in the TEM00 continuous wave mode at a wavelength of 514.5 nm. Both ophthalmoscopic and histopathologic evaluations of exposure sites were obtained. Threshold (ED50) values were obtained for 0.5, 5, 30, 120, and 1,000 sec. exposure times. Presence of minimum visible lesions was assessed ophthalmoscopically at both 1 hour and 24 hours after exposure. With increasing exposure times, a 24 hr. lesion-appearance criterion resulted in ED50 values too low to be consistent with a thermal damage mechanism. In contrast, exposure to neodymium laser radiation at a 1,060 nm. wavelength for 120 sec. produced only ED50 values consistent with those associated with thermal injury. These results suggest that the damage mechanisms for long-duration exposures to visible light may involve photochemical processes initiated by the interaction of visible light with the retinal photopigments. PMID:405344

  17. A Mathematical Model for Estimating Biological Damage Caused by Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manabe, Yuichiro; Ichikawa, Kento; Bando, Masako

    2012-10-01

    We propose a mathematical model for estimating biological damage caused by low-dose irradiation. We understand that the linear non threshold (LNT) hypothesis is realized only in the case of no recovery effects. In order to treat the realistic living objects, our model takes into account various types of recovery as well as proliferation mechanism, which may change the resultant damage, especially for the case of lower dose rate irradiation. It turns out that the lower the radiation dose rate, the safer the irradiated system of living object (which is called symbolically ``tissue'' hereafter) can have chances to survive, which can reproduce the so-called dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF).

  18. Analytical modeling for gamma radiation damage on silicon photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, H.; Feghhi, S. A. H.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation-induced damage in PIN silicon photodiode induces degradation of the photodiode parameters. In this work, by presenting an analytical model, the effect of gamma dose on the dark current in a PIN photodiode array was investigated. Geant4 was used to obtain the damage constant as a result of primary incident particle fluence and NIEL distribution calculations. Experimental measurements as well as numerical simulation of the semiconductor with ATLAS were carried out to verify and parameterize the analytical model calculations. A reasonable agreement has been found between analytical results and experimental data for BPX65 silicon photodiodes irradiated by a Co-60 gamma source at total doses up to 500 krad under different reverse voltages. Moreover, the results showed that the dark current of each photodiode array pixel has considerably increased by gamma dose irradiation.

  19. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianoncelli, A.; Vaccari, L.; Kourousias, G.; Cassese, D.; Bedolla, D. E.; Kenig, S.; Storici, P.; Lazzarino, M.; Kiskinova, M.

    2015-05-01

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies.

  20. Soft X-Ray Microscopy Radiation Damage On Fixed Cells Investigated With Synchrotron Radiation FTIR Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gianoncelli, A.; Vaccari, L.; Kourousias, G.; Cassese, D.; Bedolla, D. E.; Kenig, S.; Storici, P.; Lazzarino, M.; Kiskinova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage of biological samples remains a limiting factor in high resolution X-ray microscopy (XRM). Several studies have attempted to evaluate the extent and the effects of radiation damage, proposing strategies to minimise or prevent it. The present work aims to assess the impact of soft X-rays on formalin fixed cells on a systematic manner. The novelty of this approach resides on investigating the radiation damage not only with XRM, as often reported in relevant literature on the topic, but by coupling it with two additional independent non-destructive microscopy methods: Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and FTIR Microscopy (FTIRM). Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells were exposed to different radiation doses at 1 keV. In order to reveal possible morphological and biochemical changes, the irradiated cells were systematically analysed with AFM and FTIRM before and after. Results reveal that while cell morphology is not substantially affected, cellular biochemical profile changes significantly and progressively when increasing dose, resulting in a severe breakdown of the covalent bonding network. This information impacts most soft XRM studies on fixed cells and adds an in-depth understanding of the radiation damage for developing better prevention strategies. PMID:25974639

  1. Multiscale physics of ion-induced radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surdutovich, Eugene; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2013-06-01

    A multiscale approach to the physics of ion-beam cancer therapy, an approach suggested in order to understand the interplay of a large number of phenomena involved in radiation damage scenario occurring on a range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales, is being reviewed. The scenario is described along with a variety of effects that take place on different temporal, spatial, and energy scales and play major roles in the scenario of interaction of ions with tissue. The understanding of these effects leads to a quantitative assessment of relative biological effectiveness that relates the physical quantities, such as dose, to the biological values, such as the probability of cell survival.

  2. Protection of radiation detectors from fast neutron damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1984-01-30

    A circuit for biasing a solid state crystal used as a radiation detector in which the passage of the initial gamma ray pulse from the explosion of a nearby tactical nuclear weapon is utilized to temporarily remove the bias from said crystal for a time sufficient to permit the fast neutron pulse from the same explosion to pass by without permanently damaging the counter crystal. The circuit comprises an RC circuit between the bias supply and the crystal with a reverse biased diode across the capacitor.

  3. Radiation damage and annealing of amorphous silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Slemp, W. S.; Smith, B. T.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at the Space Environmental Effects Laboratory of the NASA Langley Research Center. The cells accumulated a total fluence of 10 to the 14th, 10 to the 15th, and 10 to the 16th electrons per square centimeter and exhibited increasing degradation with each irradiation. This degradation was tracked by evaluating the I-V curves for AM0 illumination and the relative spectral response. The observed radiation damage was reversed following an anneal of the cells under vacuum at 200 C for 2 hours.

  4. Effects of radiation damage on the silicon lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, Katherine A.; Lowry, Lynn; Russo, O. Louis

    1987-01-01

    Silicon was irradiated with both proton and electron particle beams in order to investigate changes in the structural and optical properties of the lattice as a result of the radiation damage. Lattice expansions occurred when large strain fields (+0.34 percent) developed after 1- and 3-MeV proton bombardment. The strain was a factor of three less after 1-MeV electron irradiation. Average increases of approximately 22 meV in the 3.46-eV interband energy gap and 14 meV in the Lorentz broadening parameter were measured after the electron irradiation.

  5. A new mechanism for radiation damage processes in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Turkin, A. A.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    We present a theory of radiation damage formation in alkali halides based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb, which involves the production of VF centers (self-trapped hole neighboring a cation vacancy) as a result of the absorption of H centers of dislocation lines. We consider the evolution of all experimentally observed extended defects: metal colloids, gas bubbles, and vacancy voids. Voids are shown to arise and grow large due to the reaction between F and VF centers at the surface of halogen bubbles. Voids can ignite a back reaction between the radiolytic products resulting in decomposition of the irradiated material.

  6. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  7. The energy dependence of refractory metals and alloys radiation damageability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukashev, K. M.; Umarov, F. F.

    2015-04-01

    In this work the systematical investigation of the radiation defects distribution profile energy dependence in three different materials - tantalum, molybdenum and 10X18H10T-VD stainless steel irradiated by high energy protons has been performed. It has been shown that in stainless steel and tantalum, independently of proton energy, the vacancy complexes related by configuration appear which are described by the slightly expressed elastic channel. The defects are recovered in one annealing stage with different migration activation energy. At the same time the molybdenum radiation damageability is composed of two components in each of which its specified defects formation mechanism takes action. For high energy protons the inelastic channel of interaction is the basic and subcascades appearance is created by primary knocked-on atoms of considerable energies. For low energy protons the processes of elastic interaction with lattice atoms and atomic hydrogen in the end of run creation are major.

  8. Molecular dynamics simulation of radiation damage cascades in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Buchan, J. T.; Robinson, M.; Christie, H. J.; Roach, D. L.; Ross, D. K.; Marks, N. A.

    2015-06-28

    Radiation damage cascades in diamond are studied by molecular dynamics simulations employing the Environment Dependent Interaction Potential for carbon. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies up to 2.5 keV are considered and a uniformly distributed set of 25 initial PKA directions provide robust statistics. The simulations reveal the atomistic origins of radiation-resistance in diamond and provide a comprehensive computational analysis of cascade evolution and dynamics. As for the case of graphite, the atomic trajectories are found to have a fractal-like character, thermal spikes are absent and only isolated point defects are generated. Quantitative analysis shows that the instantaneous maximum kinetic energy decays exponentially with time, and that the timescale of the ballistic phase has a power-law dependence on PKA energy. Defect recombination is efficient and independent of PKA energy, with only 50% of displacements resulting in defects, superior to graphite where the same quantity is nearly 75%.

  9. Medicinal protection with Chinese herb-compound against radiation damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, R.J.; Qian, J.K.; Yang, G.H.; Wang, B.Z.; Wen, X.L. )

    1990-08-01

    Experiments were carried out on mice and the subjects irradiated for cancer therapy to evaluate the protective efficacy of a Chinese medicinal herb-compound (CMHC). The lethality and the degree of leucopenia caused by radiation in mice medicated with CMHC were significantly less in comparison with control mice (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). CMHC significantly improved the WBC and the thrombocytes in irradiated workers (p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). The WBC count of 40 patients under radiotherapy while treated with CMHC recovered from 3450 +/- 77/c.mm to 5425 +/- 264/c.mm (p less than 0.001); whereas, in the control group, without any medication, the WBC count dropped significantly (p less than 0.001). Our results revealed the applicabilities of CMHC in protection against radiation damage in spaceflight and in other fields.

  10. Radiation-induced lung damage: dose-time-fractionation considerations.

    PubMed

    Van Dyk, J; Mah, K; Keane, T J

    1989-01-01

    The comparison of different dose-time-fractionation schedules requires the use of an isoeffect formula. In recent years, the NSD isoeffect formula has been heavily criticized. In this report, we consider an isoeffect formula which is specifically developed for radiation-induced lung damage. The formula is based on the linear-quadratic model and includes a factor for overall treatment time. The proposed procedures allow for the simultaneous derivation of an alpha/beta ratio and a gamma/beta time factor. From animal data in the literature, the derived alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios for acute lung damage are 5.0 +/- 1.0 Gy and 2.7 +/- 1.4 Gy2/day respectively, while for late damage the suggested values are 2.0 Gy and 0.0 Gy2/day. Data from two clinical studies, one prospective and the other retrospective, were also analysed and corresponding alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were determined. For the prospective clinical study, with a limited range of doses per fraction, the resultant alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios were 0.9 +/- 2.6 Gy and 2.6 +/- 2.5 Gy2/day. The combination of the retrospective and prospective data yielded alpha/beta and gamma/beta ratios of 3.3 +/- 1.5 Gy and 2.4 +/- 1.5 Gy2/day, respectively. One potential advantage of this isoeffect formalism is that it might possibly be applied to both acute and late lung damage. The results of this formulation for acute lung damage indicate that time-dependent effects such as slow repair or proliferation might be more important in determining isoeffect doses than previously predicted by the estimated single dose (ED) formula. Although we present this as an alternative approach, we would caution against its clinical use until its applicability has been confirmed by additional clinical data. PMID:2928557

  11. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  12. Identifying and quantifying radiation damage at the atomic level

    PubMed Central

    Gerstel, Markus; Deane, Charlotte M.; Garman, Elspeth F.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation damage impedes macromolecular diffraction experiments. Alongside the well known effects of global radiation damage, site-specific radiation damage affects data quality and the veracity of biological conclusions on protein mechanism and function. Site-specific radiation damage follows a relatively predetermined pattern, in that different structural motifs are affected at different dose regimes: in metal-free proteins, disulfide bonds tend to break first followed by the decarboxylation of aspartic and glutamic acids. Even within these damage motifs the decay does not progress uniformly at equal rates. Within the same protein, radiation-induced electron density decay of a particular chemical group is faster than for the same group elsewhere in the protein: an effect known as preferential specific damage. Here, B Damage, a new atomic metric, is defined and validated to recognize protein regions susceptible to specific damage and to quantify the damage at these sites. By applying B Damage to a large set of known protein structures in a statistical survey, correlations between the rates of damage and various physicochemical parameters were identified. Results indicate that specific radiation damage is independent of secondary protein structure. Different disulfide bond groups (spiral, hook, and staple) show dissimilar radiation damage susceptibility. There is a consistent positive correlation between specific damage and solvent accessibility. PMID:25723922

  13. Genetic damage in subjects exposed to radiofrequency radiation.

    PubMed

    Verschaeve, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Despite many research efforts and public debate there is still great concern about the possible adverse effects of radiofrequency (RF) radiation on human health. This is especially due to the enormous increase of wireless mobile telephones and other telecommunication devices throughout the world. The possible genetic effects of mobile phone radiation and other sources of radiofrequencies constitute one of the major points of concern. In the past several review papers were published on laboratory investigations that were devoted to in vitro and in vivo animal (cyto)genetic studies. However, it may be assumed that some of the most important observations are those obtained from studies with individuals that were exposed to relatively high levels of radiofrequency radiation, either as a result of their occupational activity or as frequent users of radiofrequency emitting tools. In this paper the cytogenetic biomonitoring studies of RF-exposed humans are reviewed. A majority of these studies do show that RF-exposed individuals have increased frequencies of genetic damage (e.g., chromosomal aberrations) in their lymphocytes or exfoliated buccal cells. However, most of the studies, if not all, have a number of shortcomings that actually prevents any firm conclusion. Radiation dosimetry was lacking in all papers, but some of the investigations were flawed by much more severe imperfections. Large well-coordinated multidisciplinary investigations are needed in order to reach any robust conclusion. PMID:19073278

  14. Radiation Damage Effects in Far Ultraviolet Filters and Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keffer, Charles E.; Torr, Marsha R.; Zukic, Muamer; Spann, James F.; Torr, Douglas G.; Kim, Jongmin

    1993-01-01

    New advances in VUV thin film filter technology have been made using filter designs with multilayers of materials such as Al2O3, BaF2, CaF2, HfO2, LaF3, MgF2, and SiO2. Our immediate application for these filters will be in an imaging system to be flown on a satellite where a 2 X 9 R(sub E) orbit will expose the instrument to approximately 275 krads of radiation. In view of the fact that no previous studies have been made on potential radiation damage of these materials in the thin film format, we report on such an assessment here. Transmittances and reflectances of BaF2, CaF2, HfO2, LaF3, MgF2, and SiO2 thin films on MgF2 substrates, Al2O3 thin films on fused silica substrates, uncoated fused silica and MgF2, and four multilayer filters made from these materials were measured from 120 nm to 180 nm before and after irradiation by 250 krads from a Co-60 gamma radiation source. No radiation-induced losses in transmittance or reflectance occurred in this wavelength range. Additional postradiation measurements from 160 nm to 300 nm indicated a 3 - 5% radiation-induced absorption near 260 nm in some of the samples with MgF2 substrates. From these measurements it is concluded that far ultraviolet filters made from the materials tested should experience less that 5% change from exposure to up to 250 krads of high energy radiation in space applications.

  15. [The effect of helium-neon laser radiation on the energy metabolic indices of the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Chizhov, G K; Koval'skaia, N I; Kozlov, V I

    1991-03-01

    It was shown in experiments on white rats, that intravenous and direct myocardium helium-neon laser irradiation leads to the some activation of lactate, glucose-6-phosphate, succinate and reduced NAD degydrogenases. During direct myocardium irradiation these changes are in a less degree. It is suggested that helium-neon laser irradiation displays some active influence on the energy metabolism enzymes of the myocardium, and the mechanisms of this action are discussed. PMID:2054512

  16. Grad-Level Radiation Damage of SIO2 Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Atoian, G.; Ludewig, H; White, S; O'Conor, J; Mokhov, N.V.

    2009-05-04

    Radiation effects and levels to detectors. SiO{sub 2} quartz fibers of the LHC ATLAS Zero-degree Calorimeter (ZDC) anticipated to experience integrated doses of a few Grad at their closest position were exposed to 200 MeV protons and neutrons at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Linac. Specifically, 1 mm- and 2mm-diameter quartz (GE 124) rods were exposed to direct 200 MeV protons during the first phase of exposure leading to peak integrated dose of {approx}28 Grad. Exposure to a primarily neutron flux of 1mm-diameter SiO{sub 2} fibers was also achieved with a special neutron source arrangement. In a post-irradiation analysis the quartz fiber transmittance was evaluated as a function of the absorbed dose. Dramatic degradation of the transmittance property was observed with increased radiation damage. In addition, detailed evaluation of the fibers under the microscope revealed interesting micro-structural damage features and irradiation-induced defects.

  17. 3D radiative transfer simulations of Eta Carinae's inner colliding winds - II. Ionization structure of helium at periastron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementel, N.; Madura, T. I.; Kruip, C. J. H.; Paardekooper, J.-P.

    2015-06-01

    Spectral observations of the massive colliding wind binary Eta Carinae show phase-dependent variations, in intensity and velocity, of numerous helium emission and absorption lines throughout the entire 5.54-yr orbit. Approaching periastron, the 3D structure of the wind-wind interaction region (WWIR) gets highly distorted due to the eccentric (e ˜ 0.9) binary orbit. The secondary star (ηB) at these phases is located deep within the primary's dense wind photosphere. The combination of these effects is thought to be the cause of the particularly interesting features observed in the helium lines at periastron. We perform 3D radiative transfer simulations of η Car's interacting winds at periastron. Using the SIMPLEX radiative transfer algorithm, we post-process output from 3D smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations of the inner 150 au of the η Car system for two different primary star mass-loss rates (dot{M}_{η A}). Using previous results from simulations at apastron as a guide for the initial conditions, we compute 3D helium ionization maps. We find that, for higher dot{M}_{η A}, ηB He0+-ionizing photons are not able to penetrate into the pre-shock primary wind. He+ due to ηB is only present in a thin layer along the leading arm of the WWIR and in a small region close to the stars. Lowering dot{M}_{η A} allows ηB's ionizing photons to reach the expanding unshocked secondary wind on the apastron side of the system, and create a low fraction of He+ in the pre-shock primary wind. With apastron on our side of the system, our results are qualitatively consistent with the observed variations in strength and radial velocity of η Car's helium emission and absorption lines, which helps better constrain the regions where these lines arise.

  18. Imperfection and radiation damage in protein crystals studied with coherent radiation

    PubMed Central

    Nave, Colin; Sutton, Geoff; Evans, Gwyndaf; Owen, Robin; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian; Stuart, David Ian

    2016-01-01

    Fringes and speckles occur within diffraction spots when a crystal is illuminated with coherent radiation during X-ray diffraction. The additional information in these features provides insight into the imperfections in the crystal at the sub-micrometre scale. In addition, these features can provide more accurate intensity measurements (e.g. by model-based profile fitting), detwinning (by distinguishing the various components), phasing (by exploiting sampling of the molecular transform) and refinement (by distinguishing regions with different unit-cell parameters). In order to exploit these potential benefits, the features due to coherent diffraction have to be recorded and any change due to radiation damage properly modelled. Initial results from recording coherent diffraction at cryotemperatures from polyhedrin crystals of approximately 2 µm in size are described. These measurements allowed information about the type of crystal imperfections to be obtained at the sub-micrometre level, together with the changes due to radiation damage. PMID:26698068

  19. Positron annihilation lifetime study of radiation-damaged natural zircons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Gaugliardo, P.; Farnan, I.; Zhang, M.; Vance, E. R.; Davis, J.; Karatchevtseva, I.; Knott, R. B.; Mudie, S.; Buckman, S. J.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2016-04-01

    Zircons are a well-known candidate waste form for actinides and their radiation damage behaviour has been widely studied by a range of techniques. In this study, well-characterised natural single crystal zircons have been studied using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). In some, but not all, of the crystals that had incurred at least half of the alpha-event damage of ∼1019 α/g required to render them structurally amorphous, PALS spectra displayed long lifetimes corresponding to voids of ∼0.5 nm in diameter. The long lifetimes corresponded to expectations from published Small-Angle X-ray Scattering data on similar samples. However, the non-observation by PALS of such voids in some of the heavily damaged samples may reflect large size variations among the voids such that no singular size can be distinguished or. Characterisation of a range of samples was also performed using scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy, Raman scattering and X-ray scattering/diffraction, with the degree of alpha damage being inferred mainly from the Raman technique and X-ray diffraction. The observed void diameters and intensities of the long lifetime components were changed somewhat by annealing at 700 °C; annealing at 1200 °C removed the voids entirely. The voids themselves may derive from He gas bubbles or voids created by the inclusion of small quantities of organic and hydrous matter, notwithstanding the observation that no voidage was evidenced by PALS in two samples containing hydrous and organic matter.

  20. Use of Displacement Damage Dose in an Engineering Model of GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, T. L.; Chock, R.; Long, K. J.; Bailey, S.; Messenger, S. R.; Walters, R. J.; Summers, G. P.

    2005-01-01

    Current methods for calculating damage to solar cells are well documented in the GaAs Solar Cell Radiation Handbook (JPL 96-9). An alternative, the displacement damage dose (D(sub d)) method, has been developed by Summers, et al. This method is currently being implemented in the SAVANT computer program.

  1. Radiation Damage on Multiple Length Scales in Uranium Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mahima

    Radiation damage in UO2 has been well studied but there exists little correlation between point defect accumulation, lattice structure changes and microstructure. This is partly because irradiated nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and its defect chemistry is extremely complicated resulting from fission of the material and consequent fission products being embedded in the fuel matrix [Olander1976]. To adequately study the evolution of defects from point defects through to microstructure features, the resulting defects have to be intentionally simplified for characterization. Ion accelerators have the unique capability of creating simple microstructure features using specific ions, without the added complication of fission and neutron activation from nuclear reactors. As an example, H+ ions have been used to create (only) a distribution of dislocations that were studied using various techniques. The ability to tune the energy or type of the ion to achieve desirable implantation depth and ideally simple microstructure renders it a lucrative instrument for this type of analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been utilized to study extended structure changes and microstructure evolution. Ion beam irradiations create displacements and displacement networks, voids, surface fracturing, gas bubbles and several other microstructure changes to model nuclear reactor damage [Noris1972]. Using an ion accelerator, it has been possible to isolate these radiation induced defects and study their subsequent evolution with increasing dose. Insofar, since all of the phenomena caused by radiation damage originate from point defects, the elucidation of radiation effects on the atomic scale is crucial. This is rendered complicated due to aperiodic irradiation defects. This lack of periodicity renders standard approaches, such as TEM and XRD ineffective, as these methods probe average structure over tens of Angstroms. Therefore, techniques

  2. Development of resistant materials to beam impact and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Akira; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hara, Nobuyoshi; Akao, Noboru; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Materials that have strong resistance to both beam impact (or shock-wave) and radiation damage are required for the beam target of an intense accelerator and space applications. Recently, Futakawa et al. found in their experiments that Kolsterising specimens have a stronger resistance to pitting than SS316 CW. A similar effect can be expected for other hardening treatments, and new material development is hopeful. Accordingly, we have started the development of high-performance materials by organizing the project team from KEK, JAEA and universities. In this paper, the scope of the project is introduced. Recent topics involve the development of intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless-steel, AlN-TiN ceramics and cladding techniques of thin tantalum or CrN film on a tungsten target by means of a molten-salt method and ion-beam-enhanced deposition. New observations on corrosion resistance are presented.

  3. Weak-localization effect in superconductors from radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Mi-Ae; Kim, Yong-Jihn

    2000-06-01

    Large reductions of the superconducting transition temperature Tc and the accompanying loss of the thermal electrical resistivity (electron-phonon interaction) due to radiation damage have been observed for several A15 compounds, Chevrel phase and ternary superconductors, and NbSe2 in the high-fluence regime. We examine these behaviors based on a recent theory of the weak localization effect in superconductors. We find a good fitting to the experimental data. In particular, the weak localization correction to the phonon-mediated interaction is derived from the density correlation function. It is shown that weak localization has a strong influence on both the phonon-mediated interaction and the electron-phonon interaction, which leads to the universal correlation of Tc and the resistance ratio.

  4. Chromatin Compaction Protects Genomic DNA from Radiation Damage

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Hideaki; Hanafusa, Tomo; Mori, Toshiaki; Shimura, Mari; Iida, Yutaka; Ishikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three-dimensionally in the nucleus, and is thought to form compact chromatin domains. Although chromatin compaction is known to be essential for mitosis, whether it confers other advantages, particularly in interphase cells, remains unknown. Here, we report that chromatin compaction protects genomic DNA from radiation damage. Using a newly developed solid-phase system, we found that the frequency of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in compact chromatin after ionizing irradiation was 5–50-fold lower than in decondensed chromatin. Since radical scavengers inhibited DSB induction in decondensed chromatin, condensed chromatin had a lower level of reactive radical generation after ionizing irradiation. We also found that chromatin compaction protects DNA from attack by chemical agents. Our findings suggest that genomic DNA compaction plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:24130727

  5. Proton radiation damage in bulk n-GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, D. C.; Blue, J. W.; Flood, D. J.; Stanchina, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Bulk samples of Te-doped n-type GaAs were irradiated using 10 MeV to 24 MeV protons to fluences between 2 x 10 to the 11th power protons/sq cm and 2 x 10 to the 14th power protons/sq cm. Majority carrier electrical effects were measured using the vanderPauw techniques and it was observed that radiation damage was minimal at the 10 to the 11th power proton/sq cm fluence. For the higher fluences, carrier removal was proportional to Delta E/Delta x for the protons indicating ionization interactions between the protons and atoms. Thermal annealing was observed at 155 C.

  6. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  7. Dislocation dynamics modelling of radiation damage in thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a key tool for the extraction of information on radiation damage, the understanding of which is critical for materials development for nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Dislocations in TEM samples are subject to strong image forces, owing to the nanometric sample thicknesses, which may introduce artifacts in the damage analysis. Using dislocation dynamics, we elucidate the roles played by dislocation-surface interactions, dislocation-dislocation interactions and self-interactions due to climb for loop types observed in TEM. Comparisons with analytic solutions for a dislocation loop and an edge dislocation in a half-space are included, and the relationship between glide force and loop tilt examined. The parameters for convergence of the zero-traction boundary conditions are obtained, after which the evolution of dislocation structures in a thin film is studied. It is found that three main length scales govern the physical processes: the image force is governed by the distance of the loop from the surface and scales with the film thickness; the glide force is governed by the image stress as well as the loop-loop interaction stress which is in turn governed by the loop spacing L\\sim 1/\\sqrt{\\rho} , where ρ is the loop density; finally, the climb force depends on the loop size. The three forces compete and their relative magnitudes define the evolution pathway of the dislocation structure.

  8. Effect of electron excitation on radiation damage in fce metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, A.; Iwata, T.

    1994-05-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in several fcc metals (Al, Cu, Ni, Ag and Pt) irradiated with low-energy (˜ 1 MeV) and high-energy (˜ 100 MeV) ions. Irradiation of the metals with strong electron-lattice interaction (Al, Ni and Pt) by ˜ 100 MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of stage-I recovery. This experimental result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of single interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large cross section for radiation annealing, and a decrease of the damage efficiency. On the other hand, in Cu and Ag thin foils, we find that lattice defects are produced not only through elastic interactions, but also through a process strongly associated with electron excitation. In the latter process, the defect production cross section is proportional to Se1.7 in Cu and Se1.5 in Ag. The nearly quadratic dependence of the cross section on Se suggests that the mutual Coulomb repulsion of ions positively charged by electron excitation causes the defect production.

  9. Acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage: a clinical study on the response to fractionated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Mah, K; Van Dyk, J; Keane, T; Poon, P Y

    1987-02-01

    Acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage can be a significant cause of morbidity in radiation therapy of the thorax. A prospective, clinical study was conducted to obtain dose-response data on acute pulmonary damage caused by fractionated radiation therapy. The endpoint was a visible increase in lung density within the irradiated volume on a computed tomographic (CT) examination as observed independently by three diagnostic radiologists. Fifty-four patients with various malignancies of the thorax completed the study. CT chest scans were taken before and at preselected times following radiotherapy. To represent different fractionation schedules of equivalent biological effect, the estimated single dose (ED) model, ED = D X N-0.377 X T-0.058 was used in which D was the average lung dose within the high dose region in cGy, N was the number of fractions, and T was the overall treatment time in days. Patients were grouped according to ED and the percent incidence of pulmonary damage for each group was determined. Total average lung doses ranged from 29.8 Gy to 53.6 Gy given in 10 to 30 fractions over a range of 12 to 60 days. Five patient groups with incidence ranging from 30% (ED of 930) to 90% (ED of 1150) were obtained. The resulting dose-response curve predicted a 50% incidence level at an ED value (ED50) of 1000 +/- 40 ED units. This value represents fractionation schedules equivalent to a total average lung dose of 32.9 Gy given in 15 fractions over 19 days. Over the linear portion of the dose-response curve, a 5% increase in ED (or total dose if N and T remain constant), predicts a 12% increase in the incidence of acute radiation-induced pulmonary damage. PMID:3818385

  10. INVESTIGATION OF MICROSCOPIC RADIATION DAMAGE IN WASTE FORMS USING ODNMR AND AEM TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proposed project addresses DOE nuclear waste problems that are currently intractable without achieving a fundamental understanding of radiation effects on high level waste (HLW) forms. This project will investigate the microscopic effects of radiation damage in crystalline an...

  11. Transmission electron microscope study of fusion-environment radiation damage in iron and iron-chromium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.S.

    1982-07-01

    A transmission electron microscopy study of radiation damage microstructures in iron and iron-chromium alloys has been performed. This study consisted of both qualitative and quantitative characterization of the dislocation and cavity microstructures, including determination of vacancy/interstitial character and Burgers vectors for dislocation loops and analysis of the cavity morphology. The effects of irradiation temperature, fluence, helium implantation, and chromium content were investigated. Neutron irradiation (iron specimens, 1 dpa, 455 to 1000 K) and triple-beam ion irradiation (Fe-10% Cr specimens, 10 dpa, 725 to 950 K; Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 0.3 to 100 dpa; and Fe, Fe-5% Cr, Fe-10% Cr specimens, 850 K, 10 dpa) were employed. In the triple-beam ion irradiation procedure, simultaneous bombardment with 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions and energetic He/sup +/ and D/sub 2//sup +/ ions was used to simulate the fusion environment (10 at. ppM He/dpa and 41 at. ppM D/dpa). In addition, single-beam 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ion irradiations of Fe-10% Cr both with and without pre-injection of helium and deuterium were performed.

  12. A FLUORESCENCE BASED ASSAY FOR DNA DAMAGE: INDUCED BY RADIATION, CHEMICALS AND ENZYMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A simple and rapid assay to detect DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on the ability of certain dyes to fluoresce upon intercalation with dsDNA. Damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, chemicals or restriction enzymes is detected using this assay. UV radiation at...

  13. Primary radiation damage of protein crystals by an intense synchrotron X-ray beam.

    PubMed

    Teng, T Y; Moffat, K

    2000-09-01

    X-ray radiation damage of a lysozyme single crystal by an intense monochromatic beam from a third-generation radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source has been studied. The results show that primary radiation damage is linearly dependent on the X-ray dose even when the crystal is at cryogenic temperatures. The existence of an upper limit for the primary radiation damage was observed. Above the threshold of approximately 1 x 10(7) Gy, excessive damage of the crystal develops which is interpreted as the onset of secondary and/or tertiary radiation damage. This upper limit of X-ray dose is compared with Henderson's limit [Henderson (1990). Proc. R. Soc. London, B241, 6-8], and its implication for the amount of useful X-ray diffraction data that can be obtained for crystals of a given scattering power is also discussed. PMID:16609214

  14. Clustered DNA damages induced in human hematopoietic cells by low doses of ionizing radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutherland, Betsy M.; Bennett, Paula V.; Cintron-Torres, Nela; Hada, Megumi; Trunk, John; Monteleone, Denise; Sutherland, John C.; Laval, Jacques; Stanislaus, Marisha; Gewirtz, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces clusters of DNA damages--oxidized bases, abasic sites and strand breaks--on opposing strands within a few helical turns. Such damages have been postulated to be difficult to repair, as are double strand breaks (one type of cluster). We have shown that low doses of low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induce such damage clusters in human cells. In human cells, DSB are about 30% of the total of complex damages, and the levels of DSBs and oxidized pyrimidine clusters are similar. The dose responses for cluster induction in cells can be described by a linear relationship, implying that even low doses of ionizing radiation can produce clustered damages. Studies are in progress to determine whether clusters can be produced by mechanisms other than ionizing radiation, as well as the levels of various cluster types formed by low and high LET radiation.

  15. Radiation damage of BGO and CsI(Tl) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, Ch.; Burkart, D.; Marks, J.; Riebesell, M.; Spitzer, H.; Wittenburg, K.; Winter, G.-G.

    1985-02-01

    We have measured the response of five 10-20 cm long BGO crystals from different manufacturers to irradiation with 137Cs γ-rays at doses of 40 and 85 rad. Immediately after irradiation the pulse height drops by 26-38% and recovers only partially with time. 110 d after irradiation the remaining damage is between 1 and 13%. A 10 cm long CsI (Tl) crystal shows pulse height reductions after irradiation which do not recover with time. The cumulative effect of a continuous irradiation on a BGO crystal (1 × 1× 15 cm 3) in a partially shielded position on the beam pipe of PETRA was measured over a period of 53 d. At an average daily dose of 1.9 rad the pulse height dropped continuously resulting in an overall pulse height loss of 9% in 7 weeks. This indicates that BGO when applied in long and narrow shapes is more sensitive to small radiation doses than previously assumed.

  16. Potential vascular damage from radiation in the space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griem, M. L.; Robotewskyj, A.; Nagel, R. H.

    1994-10-01

    Cultured endothelial cells of blood vessels have a Do of 2 Gy for X-rays. A dose of 0.5 Gy of X-rays has an acute effect on vessel diameter. The vessels may show other acute effects such as change in permeability including a change in the blood brain barrier. Changes occurring from late effects of chronic exposure in vascular architecture include telangiectasia and decrease in vascular density. Changes in the perivascular connective tissue particularly collagen may play a role in these changes. After charged particle exposure of 15 and 30 Gy, radiation changes in the blood brain barrier and vascular changes are noted in the nervous system. These long term changes are recorded by PET, MRI, and CT imaging. Chronic exposure to alpha particles causes vascular damage in compact bone resulting in bone infarcts. Using tandem scanning confocal microscopy in-situ imaging of the capillaries and collagen of the papillary dermis provides a non-invasive method of serial recording of changes in irradiated microvasculature.

  17. UV radiation and freshwater zooplankton: damage, protection and recovery

    PubMed Central

    Rautio, Milla; Tartarotti, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    While many laboratory and field studies show that zooplankton are negatively affected when exposed to high intensities of ultraviolet radiation (UVR), most studies also indicate that zooplankton are well adapted to cope with large variations in their UVR exposure in the pelagic zone of lakes. The response mechanisms of zooplankton are diverse and efficient and may explain the success and richness of freshwater zooplankton in optically variable waters. While no single behavioural or physiological protection mechanism seems to be superior, and while several unexplained and contradictory patterns exist in zooplankton UVR ecology, recent increases in our understanding are consistent with UVR playing an important role for zooplankton. This review examines the variability in freshwater zooplankton responses to UVR, with a focus on crustacean zooplankton (Cladocera and Copepoda). We present an overview of UVR-induced damages, and the protection and recovery mechanisms freshwater zooplankton use when exposed to UVR. We review the current knowledge of UVR impact on freshwater zooplankton at species and community levels, and discuss briefly how global change over the last three decades has influenced the UVR milieu in lakes. PMID:21516254

  18. Effect of boundary conditions on the kinetics of helium release from structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaluzhnyi, A. G.

    2015-11-01

    Gaseous products of nuclear reactions (specifically, helium) play a significant part in altering the material properties upon irradiation. It is known that atoms of inert gases promote the generation and growth of pores in irradiated materials and affect phenomena such as swelling, high-temperature irradiation embrittlement, etc. Therefore, a study of the behavior of helium (its production, accumulation, retention, and release) within structural materials is fairly topical. In order to validate the methods of express imitation of accumulation and retention of helium within structural materials under reactor irradiation, we perform a comparative analysis of the spectra of the rate of gas release from samples of austenitic steel 0Kh16N15M3B that were saturated with helium in different ways, i.e., through irradiation in a cyclotron, a magnetic massseparation setup, the IRT-2000 reactor, the BOR-60 reactor, and using the so-called tritium trick technique. The effect of the presence of dislocations and grain boundaries on the release of helium from materials is evaluated. The results of the research conducted show that the kinetics of helium release from samples saturated with helium through the bombardment with alpha particles of different energies, which ensures the simultaneous introduction of helium and radiation defects (in wide ranges of helium concentration and radiation damage) into the material lattice, is similar to the kinetics of helium release from samples irradiated in reactors.

  19. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  20. Micro-inhomogeneity effects and radiation damage in semi-insulating GaAs radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, R.; O`Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Smith, K.M.; Didziulis, R.; Kazukauskas, V.; Rinkevicius, V.; Storasta, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    1998-06-01

    Thermally-stimulated current (TSC) measurements and a detailed analysis of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics have been made on semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs) Schottky diode particle detectors, fabricated on substrates from several supplies, before and after irradiation with 24 GeV protons and 300 MeV pions. The analysis of I-V characteristics allows the determination of the barrier height and bulk resistance in detectors. Changes observed in I-V characteristics and TSC spectra after irradiation are described and a dislocation-net model of radiation-damaged devices is proposed.

  1. Research progress in radiation detectors, pattern recognition programs, and radiation damage determination in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The radiological implications of statistical variations in energy deposition by ionizing radiation were investigated in the conduct of the following experiments: (1) study of the production of secondary particles generated by the passage of the primary radiation through bone and muscle; (2) the study of the ratio of nonreparable to reparable damage in DNA as a function of different energy deposition patterns generated by X rays versus heavy fast charged particles; (3) the use of electronic radiography systems for direct fluoroscopic tomography and for the synthesis of multiple planes and; (4) the determination of the characteristics of systems response to split fields having different contrast levels, and of minimum detectable contrast levels between the halves under realistic clinical situations.

  2. Radiation damage studies related to nuclear waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.J.; Wald, J.W.; Turcotte, R.P.

    1981-12-01

    Much of the previously reported work on alpha radiation effects on crystalline phases of importance to nuclear waste forms has been derived from radiation effects studies of composite waste forms. In the present work, two single-phase crystalline materials, Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (pyrochlore) and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/ (zirconolite), of relative importance to current waste forms were studied independently by doping with /sup 244/Cm at the 3 wt % level. Changes in the crystalline structure measured by x-ray diffraction as a function of dose show that damage ingrowth follows an expected exponential relationship of the form ..delta..V/V/sub 0/ = A(1-exp(-BD)). In both cases, the materials became x-ray amorphous before the estimated saturation value was reached. The predicted magnitudes of the unit cell volume changes at saturation are 5.4% and 3.5%, respectively, for Gd/sub 2/Ti/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and CaZrTi/sub 2/O/sub 7/. The later material exhibited anisotropic behavior in which the expansion of the monoclinic cell in the c/sub 0/ direction was over five times that of the a/sub 0/ direction. The effects of transmutations on the properties of high-level waste solids have not been studied until now because of the long half-lives of the important fission products. This problem was circumvented in the present study by preparing materials containing natural cesium and then irradiating them with neutrons to produce /sup 134/Cs, which has only a 2y half-life. The properties monitored at about one year intervals following irradiation have been density, leach rate and microstructure. A small amount of x-ray diffraction work has also been done. Small changes in density and leach rate have been observed for some of the materials, but they were not large enough to be of any consequence for the final disposal of high level wastes.

  3. Molecular responses of radiation-induced liver damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, WEI; XIAO, LEI; AINIWAER, AIMUDULA; WANG, YUNLIAN; WU, GE; MAO, RUI; YANG, YING; BAO, YONGXING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular responses involved in radiation-induced liver damage (RILD). Sprague-Dawley rats (6-weeks-old) were irradiated once at a dose of 20 Gy to the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. The rats were then sacrificed 3 days and 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after irradiation and rats, which were not exposed to irradiation were used as controls. Weight measurements and blood was obtained from the rats and liver tissues were collected for histological and apoptotic analysis. Immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis were performed to measure the expression levels of mRNAs and proteins, respectively. The serum levels of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were increased significantly in the RILD rats. Histological investigation revealed the proliferation of collagen and the formation of fibrotic tissue 12 weeks after irradiation. Apoptotic cells were observed predominantly 2 and 4 weeks after irradiation. The immunohistochemistry, RT-qPCR and western blot analysis all revealed the same pattern of changes in the expression levels of the molecules assessed. The expression levels of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), nuclear factor (NF)-κB65, mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3 (Smad3) and Smad7 and connective tissue growth factor were increased during the recovery period following irradiation up to 12 weeks. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, Smad7 and Smad4 were only increased during the early phase (first 4 weeks) of recovery following irradiation. In the RILD rat model, the molecular responses indicated that the TGF-β1/Smads and NF-κB65 signaling pathways are involved in the mechanism of RILD recovery. PMID:25483171

  4. Recent radiation damage studies and developments of the Marlowe code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.; Domain, C.; Hou, M.

    2014-07-01

    Radiation damage in materials relevant to applications evolves over time scales spanning from the femtosecond - the characteristic time for an atomic collision - to decades - the aging time expected for nuclear materials. The relevant kinetic energies of atoms span from thermal motion to the MeV range.The question motivating this contribution is to identify the relationship between elementary atomic displacements triggered by irradiation and the subsequent microstructural evolution of metals in the long term. The Marlowe code, based on the binary collision approximation (BCA) is used to simulate the sequences of atomic displacements generated by energetic primary recoils and the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA, parameterized on a range of ab initio calculations, is used to predict the subsequent long-term evolution of point defect and clusters thereof. In agreement with full Molecular Dynamics, BCA displacement cascades in body-centered cubic (BCC) Fe and a face-centered cubic (FCC) Febond Nibond Cr alloy display recursive properties that are found useful for predictions in the long term.The case of defects evolution in W due to external irradiation with energetic H and He is also discussed. To this purpose, it was useful to extend the inelastic energy loss model available in Marlowe up to the Bethe regime. The last version of the Marlowe code (version 15) was delivered before message passing instructions softwares (such as MPI) were available but the structure of the code was designed in such a way to permit parallel executions within a distributed memory environment. This makes possible to obtain N different cascades simultaneously using N independent nodes without any communication between processors. The parallelization of the code using MPI was recently achieved by one author of this report (C.J.O.). Typically, the parallelized version of Marlowe allows simulating millions of displacement cascades using a limited number of processors (<64) within only

  5. Use of the tritium trick for analysis of the influence that hydrogen and helium exert on the mechanical properties of radiation-resistant precipitation-hardening FCC steels

    SciTech Connect

    Goshchitskii, B.N.; Sagaradze, V.V.; Arbuzov, V.L.; Zuev, Y.N.; Markelov, N.N.; Zimin, A.V.

    1995-10-01

    The aging austenitic stainless steel Crl6Nil5Mo3Til is shown to possess a high resistance to the radiation void formation under irradiation with fast neutrons (60 dpa, 753K). The influence of tritium introduced from the gaseous phase and radiogenic helium on the mechanical properties is analysed. 3 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Influence of hydrogen isotopes and radiogenic helium on the structure and mechanical properties of radiation-resistant steels with a composite alpha/gamma structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sagaradze, V.V.; Arbuzov, V.L.; Lapin, S.S.; Zuev, Y.N.; Markelov, N.N.; Dolinski, Y.N.

    1995-10-01

    It is shown that the Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel with a fine-plate austenitic-martensitic structure has a high resistance to radiation swelling. The influence of small amounts of tritium (0.015 at.%) and radiogenic helium (approx.2.5 appm) on the mechanical proper ties of the steel is analysed. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Protection of radiation detectors from fast neutron damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, S.

    1986-09-02

    A device is described for measuring radiation emitted from a nuclear explosion, the radiation having a comparatively fast moving gamma ray component and a comparatively slower neutron component. The device consists of: a solid state crystal radiation detector; a voltage source applied to bias the detector; and means responsive to the gamma ray component for removing the bias voltage for a predetermined time period whereby the crystal radiation detector is rendered less sensitive to the passage of the neutron radiation component.

  8. Infrared A radiation promotes survival of human melanocytes carrying ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Kimeswenger, Susanne; Schwarz, Agatha; Födinger, Dagmar; Müller, Susanne; Pehamberger, Hubert; Schwarz, Thomas; Jantschitsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The link between solar radiation and melanoma is still elusive. Although infrared radiation (IR) accounts for over 50% of terrestrial solar energy, its influence on human skin is not well explored. There is increasing evidence that IR influences the expression patterns of several molecules independently of heat. A previous in vivo study revealed that pretreatment with IR might promote the development of UVR-induced non-epithelial skin cancer and possibly of melanoma in mice. To expand on this, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of IR on UVR-induced apoptosis and DNA repair in normal human epidermal melanocytes. The balance between these two effects is a key factor of malignant transformation. Human melanocytes were exposed to physiologic doses of IR and UVR. Compared to cells irradiated with UVR only, simultaneous exposure to IR significantly reduced the apoptotic rate. However, IR did not influence the repair of UVR-induced DNA damage. IR partly reversed the pro-apoptotic effects of UVR via modification of the expression and activity of proteins mainly of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. In conclusion, IR enhances the survival of melanocytes carrying UVR-induced DNA damage and thereby might contribute to melanomagenesis. PMID:26844814

  9. Radiation-Induced Liver Damage: Correlation of Histopathology with Hepatobiliary Magnetic Resonance Imaging, a Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Seidensticker, Max; Burak, Miroslaw; Kalinski, Thomas; Garlipp, Benjamin; Koelble, Konrad; Wust, Peter; Antweiler, Kai; Seidensticker, Ricarda; Mohnike, Konrad; Pech, Maciej; Ricke, Jens

    2015-02-15

    PurposeRadiotherapy of liver malignancies shows promising results (radioembolization, stereotactic irradiation, interstitial brachytherapy). Regardless of the route of application, a certain amount of nontumorous liver parenchyma will be collaterally damaged by radiation. The functional reserve may be significantly reduced with an impact on further treatment planning. Monitoring of radiation-induced liver damage by imaging is neither established nor validated. We performed an analysis to correlate the histopathological presence of radiation-induced liver damage with functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilizing hepatobiliary contrast media (Gd-BOPTA).MethodsPatients undergoing local high-dose-rate brachytherapy for whom a follow-up hepatobiliary MRI within 120 days after radiotherapy as well as an evaluable liver biopsy from radiation-exposed liver tissue within 7 days before MRI were retrospectively identified. Planning computed tomography (CT)/dosimetry was merged to the CT-documentation of the liver biopsy and to the MRI. Presence/absence of radiation-induced liver damage (histopathology) and Gd-BOPTA uptake (MRI) as well as the dose applied during brachytherapy at the site of tissue sampling was determined.ResultsFourteen biopsies from eight patients were evaluated. In all cases with histopathological evidence of radiation-induced liver damage (n = 11), no uptake of Gd-BOPTA was seen. In the remaining three, cases no radiation-induced liver damage but Gd-BOPTA uptake was seen. Presence of radiation-induced liver damage and absence of Gd-BOPTA uptake was correlated with a former high-dose exposition.ConclusionsAbsence of hepatobiliary MRI contrast media uptake in radiation-exposed liver parenchyma may indicate radiation-induced liver damage. Confirmatory studies are warranted.

  10. Radiation damage in protein serial femtosecond crystallography using an x-ray free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Lomb, Lukas; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Aquila, Andrew; Epp, Sascha W.; Erk, Benjamin; Foucar, Lutz; Hartmann, Robert; Rudek, Benedikt; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Shoeman, Robert L.; Andreasson, Jakob; Bajt, Sasa; Barthelmess, Miriam; Barty, Anton; Bogan, Michael J.; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Caleman, Carl; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Nicola; DePonte, Daniel P.; Doak, R. Bruce; Ekeberg, Tomas; Fleckenstein, Holger; Fromme, Petra; Gebhardt, Maike; Graafsma, Heinz; Gumprecht, Lars; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hartmann, Andreas; Hauser, Günter; Hirsemann, Helmut; Holl, Peter; Holton, James M.; Hunter, Mark S.; Kabsch, Wolfgang; Kimmel, Nils; Kirian, Richard A.; Liang, Mengning; Maia, Filipe R. N. C.; Meinhart, Anton; Marchesini, Stefano; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Reich, Christian; Schulz, Joachim; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sierra, Raymond; Soltau, Heike; Spence, John C. H.; Steinbrener, Jan; Stellato, Francesco; Stern, Stephan; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Xiaoyu; Weidenspointner, Georg; Weierstall, Uwe; White, Thomas A.; Wunderer, Cornelia; Chapman, Henry N.; Ullrich, Joachim; Strüder, Lothar; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers deliver intense femtosecond pulses that promise to yield high resolution diffraction data of nanocrystals before the destruction of the sample by radiation damage. Diffraction intensities of lysozyme nanocrystals collected at the Linac Coherent Light Source using 2 keV photons were used for structure determination by molecular replacement and analyzed for radiation damage as a function of pulse length and fluence. Signatures of radiation damage are observed for pulses as short as 70 fs. Parametric scaling used in conventional crystallography does not account for the observed effects. PMID:24089594

  11. Radiation damage in protein crystals is reduced with a micron-sized X-ray beam

    PubMed Central

    Sanishvili, Ruslan; Yoder, Derek W.; Pothineni, Sudhir Babu; Rosenbaum, Gerd; Xu, Shenglan; Vogt, Stefan; Stepanov, Sergey; Makarov, Oleg A.; Corcoran, Stephen; Benn, Richard; Nagarajan, Venugopalan; Smith, Janet L.; Fischetti, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damage is a major limitation in crystallography of biological macromolecules, even for cryocooled samples, and is particularly acute in microdiffraction. For the X-ray energies most commonly used for protein crystallography at synchrotron sources, photoelectrons are the predominant source of radiation damage. If the beam size is small relative to the photoelectron path length, then the photoelectron may escape the beam footprint, resulting in less damage in the illuminated volume. Thus, it may be possible to exploit this phenomenon to reduce radiation-induced damage during data measurement for techniques such as diffraction, spectroscopy, and imaging that use X-rays to probe both crystalline and noncrystalline biological samples. In a systematic and direct experimental demonstration of reduced radiation damage in protein crystals with small beams, damage was measured as a function of micron-sized X-ray beams of decreasing dimensions. The damage rate normalized for dose was reduced by a factor of three from the largest (15.6 μm) to the smallest (0.84 μm) X-ray beam used. Radiation-induced damage to protein crystals was also mapped parallel and perpendicular to the polarization direction of an incident 1-μm X-ray beam. Damage was greatest at the beam center and decreased monotonically to zero at a distance of about 4 μm, establishing the range of photoelectrons. The observed damage is less anisotropic than photoelectron emission probability, consistent with photoelectron trajectory simulations. These experimental results provide the basis for data collection protocols to mitigate with micron-sized X-ray beams the effects of radiation damage. PMID:21444772

  12. Electron energy distribution in a helium plasma created by nuclear radiations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, R. H.; Miley, G. H.

    1974-01-01

    An integral balance technique for calculation of the electron energy distribution in a radiation-induced plasma is described. Results predict W-values reasonably well and compare favorably with more complicated Monte-Carlo calculations. The distribution found differs from that in a normal electrical discharge and is of interest in radiation-pumped laser research.

  13. The Radiation environment and damage in the CDF tracking volume

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Tesarek et al.

    2003-12-16

    The authors present direct measurements of the spatial distribution of ionizing radiation and low energy neutrons (E{sub n} < 200 keV) inside the tracking volume of the collider detector at Fermilab (CDF). Using data from multiple exposures, the radiation field can be separated into components from beam losses and collisions and can be checked for consistency between the measurements. They compare the radiation measurements with an increase in the leakage currents of the CDF silicon detectors and find reasonable agreement.

  14. Radiation damage to tetramethlysilane and tetramethlygermanium ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K.; Akaishi, H.; Yuta, H.; Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Nagamine, T.; Kawamura, N.

    1994-08-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane(TMS) and tetramethylgermanium(TMG) were exposed to y radiation from a (sup 60)Co source up to dose 579Gray and 902Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation dose was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers.

  15. Does iodinated contrast medium amplify DNA damage during exposure to radiation.

    PubMed

    Riley, Peter

    2015-01-01

    There is a recognized increased risk of cancer following exposure of humans to ionizing radiation; this is felt to be most likely due to damage to DNA strands during exposure. Damage to DNA strands can be demonstrated microscopically following exposure to X-rays, and new evidence is emerging that this effect may be compounded by administration of iodinated contrast agents. PMID:26234959

  16. Annealing radiation damaged silicon solar cells with a copper halide laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.

    1980-01-01

    The use of a multiply pulsed copper halide laser to significantly anneal out the damage to silicon solar cells caused by a simulated space radiation environment is investigated. Preliminary experiments demonstrate that the amount of damage can be decreased by 41% as measured by the maximum power generated.

  17. The Effects of Interfaces on Radiation Damage Production in Layered Metal Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, Howard L.; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2003-12-07

    The objective of this research is to use molecular dynamics modeling to explore the effects of interfaces on cascade-producing radiation damage in nanolayered metal composites and to assess the resistance of these composites to damage by neutrons in fusion devices.

  18. Characterization of a compact ECR plasma source and its applications to studies of helium ion damage to tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, D.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.; Friddle, R.

    2016-02-01

    Exposure of tungsten to low energy (<100 eV) helium plasmas at temperatures between 900-1900 K in both laboratory experiments and tokamaks has been shown to cause severe nanoscale modification of the near surface resulting in the growth of tungsten tendrils. Tendril formation can lead to non-sputtered erosion and dust formation. Here we report on characterization of a compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) He plasma source with an ion flux of ˜2.5 × 1019 ions m-2 s-1, average fluence of 3 × 1024 ions m-2, and the surface morphology changes seen on the exposed tungsten surfaces. Exposures of polished tungsten disks at temperatures up to 1270 K have been performed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) scans. Bubbles and craters have been seen on the exposed tungsten surface growing to up to 150 nm in diameter. The ECR source has been tested for eventual use on a scanning tunneling microscopy experiment intended to study the early stages of surface morphology change due to He ion exposure.

  19. Helium-neon laser radiation effect on fish embryos and larvae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    1994-09-01

    Helium-neon laser irradiation (HNLI) is an effective biostimulating agent but its influence on embryonal processes is almost unknown. We have studied fish embryos and larvae development, viability, and growth after HNLI of fish eggs at different stages. With this aim carp, grass carp, sturgeon, and stellared sturgeon eggs were incubated in Petri plates or in fish-breeding apparatuses and were irradiated in situ with different exposures. Then we studied hutchling percentage, larvae survival and growth dynamics, and morphological anomalies percentage. HNLI effect depended on irradiation exposures and intensity, embryonal stages, and fish species. Laser eggs irradiation essentially affected larvae viability and growth in the postembryonal phase. For example, HNLI of sturgeon spawn at cleavage stage or grass carp at organogenesis decreased larvae survival rate. On the contrary HNLI at gastrulation or embryonal motorics stages markedly increased larvae survival rate and decreased the morphological anomalies percentage. We determined most effective irradiation regimes depending of fish species which may be used in practical fish-breeding.

  20. Evolution of defects in silicon carbide implanted with helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Song, Yin; Yang, Yitao; Zhou, Chunlan; Wei, Long; Ma, Hongji

    2014-05-01

    Effects of accumulation of radiation damage in silicon carbide are important concerns for the use of silicon carbide in advanced nuclear energy systems. In the present work lattice damage in silicon carbide crystal (4H type) implanted with 100 keV 4He+ ions was investigated with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/c) and positron beam Doppler broadening spectrometry (PBDB). Helium implantation was performed at the specimen temperature of 510 K to avoid amorphization of the SiC crystal. Fluences of helium ions were selected to be in the range from 1 × 1016 to 3 × 1016 ions cm-2, around the dose threshold for the formation of observable helium bubbles under transmission electron microscopes (TEM). The RBS/c measurements show distinctly different annealing behavior of displaced Si atoms at doses below or above the threshold for helium bubble formation. The RBS/c yield in the peak damage region of the specimen implanted to 3 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 shows an increase on the subsequently thermal annealing above 873 K, which is readily ascribed to the extra displacement of Si atoms due to helium bubble growth. The RBS/c yield in the specimen implanted to a lower ion fluence of 1.5 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 decreases monotonously on annealing from ambient temperatures up to 1273 K. The PBDB measurements supply evidence of clustering of vacancies at temperatures from 510 to 1173 K, and dissociation of vacancy clusters above 1273 K. The similarity of annealing behavior in PBDB profiles for helium implantation to 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions cm-2 is ascribed to the saturation of trapping of positrons in vacancy type defects in the damaged layers in the specimens helium-implanted to the two dose levels.

  1. Calculation of hydrogen and helium concentrations for CSNS target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Dong-Dong; Liang, Tai-Ran; Yin, Wen; Yao, Ze-En

    2016-03-01

    The China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is driven by protons whose energies are about 1.6 GeV. At such high energies, the spallation neutrons lead to the formation of large amounts of helium, hydrogen and new heavier species in the form of transmutation products. These hydrogen, helium and transmutation products have a critical effect on the mechanical properties on the one hand and exacerbate the displacement radiation damage on the other hand. In this paper, the background hydrogen/helium concentrations and the maximum hydrogen/helium concentrations near cracks in a tungsten target for CSNS have been calculated at temperatures of 100°C and 300°C by applying a theoretical model. For the CSNS tungsten target plate, we find the maximum hydrogen concentration near the tips of cracks ranges from 3.0 × 10-2-2 × 10-1, which exceeds the hydrogen background concentration by 1.2-1.8 times; the maximum helium concentration near the tips of cracks ranges from 3.0 × 10-4 -1.2 × 10-3, which exceeds the helium background concentration by 2-4 times; the maximum hydrogen/helium concentration increases with the increase of the transfer length across the surfaces of the target and it decreases with the increase of temperature. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (51371195, 11174358)

  2. Radiation Damage to the Nervous System: a delayed therapeutic hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, H.A.; Kagan, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    This volume represents a good overview of an important issue - late effects of radiation on the nervous system, a topic of interest to everybody who deals with neurooncologic problems. The book is well edited and includes almost all relevant subjects ranging from diagnostic and dosimetric considerations to treatment of radiation brain necrosis.

  3. Cranial Radiation Therapy and Damage to Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monje, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy is associated with a progressive decline in cognitive function, prominently memory function. Impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis is thought to be an important mechanism underlying this cognitive decline. Recent work has elucidated the mechanisms of radiation-induced failure of neurogenesis. Potential therapeutic…

  4. Depopulation of metastable helium by radiative association with hydrogen and lithium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Augustovičová, L.; Soldán, P.; Kraemer, W. P.

    2014-02-10

    Depopulation of metastable He(2{sup 3}S) by radiative association with hydrogen and lithium ions is investigated using a fully quantal approach. Rate coefficients for spontaneous and stimulated radiative association of the HeH{sup +}, HeD{sup +}, and LiHe{sup +} molecular ions on the spin-triplet manifold are presented as functions of temperature considering the association to rotational-vibrational states of the lowest triplet electronic states a {sup 3}Σ{sup +} and b {sup 3}Σ{sup +} from the continuum states of the b {sup 3}Σ{sup +} electronic state. Evaluation of the rate coefficients is based on highly accurate quantum calculations, taking into account all possible state-to-state transitions at thermal energies (for spontaneous association) or at higher background energies (stimulated association). As expected, calculations show that the rate coefficients for radiative association to the a state are several orders of magnitude larger than the one for the b state formation. A noticeable effect by blackbody background radiation on the radiative association is only obtained for the b → b process. Aspects of the formation and abundance of the metastable HeH{sup +}(a {sup 3}Σ{sup +}) in astrophysical environments are briefly discussed.

  5. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92-1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  6. Both Complexity and Location of DNA Damage Contribute to Cellular Senescence Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xurui; Ye, Caiyong; Sun, Fang; Wei, Wenjun; Hu, Burong; Wang, Jufang

    2016-01-01

    Persistent DNA damage is considered as a main cause of cellular senescence induced by ionizing radiation. However, the molecular bases of the DNA damage and their contribution to cellular senescence are not completely clear. In this study, we found that both heavy ions and X-rays induced senescence in human uveal melanoma 92–1 cells. By measuring senescence associated-β-galactosidase and cell proliferation, we identified that heavy ions were more effective at inducing senescence than X-rays. We observed less efficient repair when DNA damage was induced by heavy ions compared with X-rays and most of the irreparable damage was complex of single strand breaks and double strand breaks, while DNA damage induced by X-rays was mostly repaired in 24 hours and the remained damage was preferentially associated with telomeric DNA. Our results suggest that DNA damage induced by heavy ion is often complex and difficult to repair, thus presents as persistent DNA damage and pushes the cell into senescence. In contrast, persistent DNA damage induced by X-rays is preferentially associated with telomeric DNA and the telomere-favored persistent DNA damage contributes to X-rays induced cellular senescence. These findings provide new insight into the understanding of high relative biological effectiveness of heavy ions relevant to cancer therapy and space radiation research. PMID:27187621

  7. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium Caused by Radiation and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Najeeb; Sirajuddin, Syed; Biswas, Shriparna; Rafiuddin, Syed; Apine, Ashwini

    2015-01-01

    The radio-sensitivity of a tissue or organ is measured by its response to irradiation. Loss of moderate numbers of cells does not affect the function of most organs. However, with loss of large numbers of cells, all affected organisms display a clinical result. The severity of this change depends on the dosage and thus the extent of cell loss. Moderate doses to a localized area may lead to repairable damage. Comparable doses to a whole organism may result in death from damage to the most sensitive systems in the body. PMID:26312083

  8. Radiation Damage Calculations for the FUBR and BEATRIX Irradiations of Lithium Compounds in EBR-II and FFTF

    SciTech Connect

    LR Greenwood

    1999-06-17

    The Fusion Breeder Reactor (FUBR) and Breeder Exchange Matrix (BEATRIX) experiments were cooperative efforts by members of the International Energy Agency to investigate the irradiation behavior of solid breeder materials for tritium production to support future fusion reactors. Lithium ceramic materials including Li{sub 2}O, LiAlO{sub 2}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with varying {sup 6}Li enrichments from 0 to 95% were irradiated in a series of experiments in the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR II) and in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) over a period of about 10 years from 1982 to 1992. These experiments were characterized in terms of the nominal fast neutron fluences and measured {sup 6}Li burnup factors, as determined by either mass spectrometry or helium measurements. Radiation damage in these compounds is caused by both the {sup 6}Li-burnup reaction and by all other possible neutron reactions with the atoms in the compound materials. In this report, displacements per atom (dpa) values have been calculated for each type of material in each of the various irradiations that were conducted. Values up to 11% {sup 6}Li-burnup and 130 dpa are predicted for the longest irradiations. The dpa cross sections were calculated for each compound using the SPECOMP computer code. Details of the dpa calculations are presented in the report. Total dpa factors were determined with the SPECTER computer code by averaging the dpa cross sections over the measured or calculated neutron flux spectra for each series of irradiations. Using these new calculations, previously measured radiation damage effects in these lithium compounds can be compared or correlated with other irradiation data on the basis of the dpa factor as well as {sup 6}Li-burnup.

  9. Evidence of Dopant Type-Inversion and Other Radiation Damage Effects of the CDF Silicon Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Ballarin, Roberto

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this document is to study the effect of radiation damage on the silicon sensors. The reflection of the effect of radiation can be observed in two fundamental parameters of the detector: the bias current and the bias voltage. The leakage current directly affects the noise, while the bias voltage is required to collect the maximum signal deposited by the charged particle.

  10. DETECTION OF LOW DOSE RADIATION INDUCED DNA DAMAGE USING TEMPERATURE DIFFERENNTIAL FLUORESENCE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for radiation-induced DNA damage is reported. Changes in temperature-induced strand separation in both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from Escherichia coli) were measured after exposure to low doses of radiation. Exposures...