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Sample records for hematopoietic cell growth factors

  1. Regulation of cell surface receptors for different hematopoietic growth factors on myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1986-01-01

    There are clones of myeloid leukemic cells which are different from normal myeloid cells in that they have become independent of hematopoietic growth factor for cell viability and growth. The ability of these clones to bind three types of hematopoietic growth factors (MGI-1GM = GM-CSF, IL-3 = multi-CSF and MGI-1M = M-CSF = CSF-1) was measured using the method of quantitative absorption at 1 degree C and low pH elution of cell-bound biological activity. Results of binding to normal myeloid and lymphoid cells were similar to those obtained by radioreceptor assays. The results indicate that the number of receptors on different clones of these leukemic cells varied from 0 to 1,300 per cell. The receptors have a high binding affinity. Receptors for different growth factors can be independently expressed in different clones. There was no relationship between expression of receptors for these growth factors and the phenotype of the leukemic cells regarding their ability to be induced to differentiate. The number of receptors on the leukemic cells was lower than on normal mature macrophages. Myeloid leukemic cells induced to differentiate by normal myeloid cell differentiation factor MGI-2 (= DF), or by low doses of actinomycin D or cytosine arabinoside, showed an up-regulation of the number of MGI-1GM and IL-3 receptors. Induction of differentiation of leukemic cells by MGI-2 also induced production and secretion of the growth factor MGI-1GM, and this induced MGI-1GM saturated the up-regulated MGI-1GM receptors. It is suggested that up-regulation of these receptors during differentiation is required for the functioning of differentiated cells. PMID:3023059

  2. A novel technology for hematopoietic stem cell expansion using combination of nanofiber and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingwei; Aggarwal, Reeva; Pompili, Vincent J; Das, Hiranmoy

    2010-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been applied as a standard procedure of treatment for hematological disorders like multiple myeloma and leukemia for several decades. Various sources of stem cells like bone marrow, peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood are used for the transplantation. Among these umbilical cord blood is currently preferred due to the primitiveness of the derived stem cells and minimal possibilities of graft versus host disease or development of graft induced tumors. One of the problems for these sources is the procurement of sufficient number of donor stem cells. Inadequate number of cells may lead to delayed recovery and decrease survivability of the patient. Thus to overcome the limitation of stem cell number, development of an ex-vivo expansion technology is critically important. The recent emerging technology using nanofiber in combination with growth factors has made a significant improvement to the field of regenerative medicine and a couple of patents have been filed. In this review, we will focus on factors regulating hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and expansion emphasizing on nanofiber as a supporting matrix. PMID:20420564

  3. The role of hematopoietic growth factors in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, C F

    1995-02-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors have already had an enormous impact on transfusion practice by eliminating or reducing the need for red blood cell transfusions in a variety of anemic states characterized by an absolute or relative decrease in erythropoietin. In addition, GM-CSF and G-CSF have stimulated the production of autologous neutrophils in febrile neutropenic patients in whom granulocyte transfusions had been considered ineffective. With the discovery of c-Mpl ligand and the promising results obtained with IL-11 and IL-3, a combination of growth factors that successfully stimulate platelet production may soon be identified. This first era in the clinical application of hematopoietic growth factors has been characterized largely by treatment of the patient to stimulate production of autologous cells or to enhance the ability of transplanted hematopoietic progenitor cells to repopulate the patient. The use of G-CSF to increase the yield of granulocytes harvested by apheresis procedures and to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells in allogeneic donors has initiated a new era in which the cell donor is treated to enhance cell production and enhance the repopulating ability of hematopoietic progenitor cells. As our understanding of hematopoiesis grows, scientists will be able to identify growth factors to overcome or correct deficient hematopoiesis. Increasingly, component transfusions will be reserved for life-threatening situations in which endogenous cell production cannot be stimulated or cell production will be too slow to prevent life-threatening events. PMID:7737944

  4. Ras-induced reactive oxygen species promote growth factor-independent proliferation in human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hole, Paul S; Pearn, Lorna; Tonks, Amanda J; James, Philip E; Burnett, Alan K; Darley, Richard L; Tonks, Alex

    2010-02-11

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a feature of human malignancy and is often triggered by activation of oncogenes such as activated Ras. ROS act as second messengers and can influence a variety of cellular process including growth factor responses and cell survival. We have examined the contribution of ROS production to the effects of N-Ras(G12D) and H-Ras(G12V) on normal human CD34(+) progenitor cells. Activated Ras strongly up-regulated the production of both superoxide and hydrogen peroxide through the stimulation of NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, without affecting the expression of endogenous antioxidants or the production of mitochondrially derived ROS. Activated Ras also promoted both the survival and the growth factor-independent proliferation of CD34(+) cells. Using oxidase inhibitors and antioxidants, we found that excessive ROS production by these cells did not contribute to their enhanced survival; rather, ROS promoted their growth factor-independent proliferation. Although Ras-induced ROS production specifically activated the p38(MAPK) oxidative stress response, this failed to induce expression of the cell-cycle inhibitor, p16(INK4A); instead, ROS promoted the expression of D cyclins. These data are the first to show that excessive ROS production in the context of oncogene activation can promote proliferative responses in normal human hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:20007804

  5. In vitro expansion of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells under stimulation with hematopoietic growth factors on AGM-S3 cells in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, K; Kato, I; Daifu, T; Saida, S; Hiramatsu, H; Nishinaka, Y; Ebihara, Y; Ma, F; Matsuda, K; Saito, S; Hirabayashi, K; Kurata, T; Uyen, L T N; Nakazawa, Y; Tsuji, K; Heike, T; Nakahata, T; Koike, K

    2015-03-01

    Using serum-containing culture, we examined whether AGM-S3 stromal cells, alone or in combination with hematopoietic growth factor(s), stimulated the proliferation of CD34(+) cells from patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). AGM-S3 cells in concert with stem cell factor plus thrombopoietin increased the numbers of peripheral blood CD34(+) cells to approximately 20-fold of the input value after 2 weeks in nine JMML patients with either PTPN11 mutations or RAS mutations, who received allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) also augmented the proliferation of JMML CD34(+) cells on AGM-S3 cells. The expansion potential of CD34(+) cells was markedly low in four patients who achieved spontaneous hematological improvement. A large proportion of day-14-cultured CD34(+) cells were negative for CD38 and cryopreservable. Cultured JMML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells expressed CD117, CD116, c-mpl, CD123, CD90, but not CXCR4, and formed GM and erythroid colonies. Day-7-cultured CD34(+) cells from two of three JMML patients injected intrafemorally into immunodeficient mice stimulated with human GM-CSF after transplantation displayed significant hematopoietic reconstitution. The abilities of OP9 cells and MS-5 cells were one-third and one-tenth, respectively, of the value obtained with AGM-S3 cells. Our culture system may provide a useful tool for elucidating leukemogenesis and for therapeutic approaches in JMML. PMID:25102944

  6. Stroma-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor Maintains Cell Cycle Progression and Repopulation Activity of Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Istvánffy, Rouzanna; Vilne, Baiba; Schreck, Christina; Ruf, Franziska; Pagel, Charlotta; Grziwok, Sandra; Henkel, Lynette; Prazeres da Costa, Olivia; Berndt, Johannes; Stümpflen, Volker; Götze, Katharina S.; Schiemann, Matthias; Peschel, Christian; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are preserved in co-cultures with UG26-1B6 stromal cells or their conditioned medium. We performed a genome-wide study of gene expression changes of UG26-1B6 stromal cells in contact with Lineage− SCA-1+ KIT+ (LSK) cells. This analysis identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to be upregulated in response to LSK cells. We found that co-culture of HSCs on CTGF knockdown stroma (shCtgf) shows impaired engraftment and long-term quality. Further experiments demonstrated that CD34− CD48− CD150+ LSK (CD34− SLAM) cell numbers from shCtgf co-cultures increase in G0 and senescence and show delayed time to first cell division. To understand this observation, a CTGF signaling network model was assembled, which was experimentally validated. In co-culture experiments of CD34− SLAM cells with shCtgf stromal cells, we found that SMAD2/3-dependent signaling was activated, with increasing p27Kip1 expression and downregulating cyclin D1. Our data support the view that LSK cells modulate gene expression in the niche to maintain repopulating HSC activity. PMID:26527384

  7. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Mitigates Hematopoietic Toxicity After Lethal Total Body Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Dunhua; Deoliveira, Divino; Kang, Yubin; Choi, Seung S.; Li, Zhiguo; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether and how insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mitigates hematopoietic toxicity after total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: BALB/c mice were irradiated with a lethal dose of radiation (7.5 Gy) and treated with IGF-1 at a dose of 100 μg/dose intravenously once a day for 5 consecutive days starting within 1 hour after exposure. Survival and hematopoietic recovery were monitored. The mechanisms by which IGF-1 promotes hematopoietic recovery were also studied by use of an in vitro culture system. Results: IGF-1 protected 8 of 20 mice (40%) from lethal irradiation, whereas only 2 of 20 mice (10%) in the saline control group survived for more than 100 days after irradiation. A single dose of IGF-1 (500 μg) was as effective as daily dosing for 5 days. Positive effects were noted even when the initiation of treatment was delayed as long as 6 hours after irradiation. In comparison with the saline control group, treatment with IGF-1 significantly accelerated the recovery of both platelets and red blood cells in peripheral blood, total cell numbers, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in the bone marrow when measured at day 14 after irradiation. IGF-1 protected both hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and cell death. In addition, IGF-1 was able to facilitate the proliferation and differentiation of nonirradiated and irradiated hematopoietic progenitor cells. Conclusions: IGF-1 mitigates radiation-induced hematopoietic toxicity through protecting hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells from apoptosis and enhancing proliferation and differentiation of the surviving hematopoietic progenitor cells.

  8. Wnt3a Protein Reduces Growth Factor-Driven Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Serum-Free Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Duinhouwer, Lucia E.; Tüysüz, Nesrin; Rombouts, Elwin W. J. C.; ter Borg, Mariette N. D.; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Spanholtz, Jan; Cornelissen, Jan J.; ten Berge, Derk; Braakman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) is a promising approach to improve insufficient engraftment after umbilical cord blood stem cell transplantation (UCB-SCT). Although culturing HSPC with hematopoietic cytokines results in robust proliferation, it is accompanied with extensive differentiation and loss of self-renewal capacity. Wnt signaling has been implicated in regulating HSPC fate decisions in vivo and in promoting HSPC self-renewal by inhibition of differentiation, but the effects of Wnt on the ex vivo expansion of HSPC are controversial. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous Wnt3a protein suppresses rather than promotes the expansion of UCB-derived CD34+ cells in serum free expansion cultures. The reduced expansion was also observed in cultures initiated with Lin-CD34+CD38lowCD45RA-CD90+ cells which are highly enriched in HSC and was also observed in response to activation of beta-catenin signaling by GSK3 inhibition. The presence of Wnt3a protein during the culture reduced the frequency of multilineage CFU-GEMM and the long-term repopulation ability of the expanded HSPC. These data suggest that Wnt signaling reduces expansion of human HSPC in growth factor-driven expansion cultures by promoting differentiation of HSPC. PMID:25807521

  9. Identification of a Hematopoietic Cell Dedifferentiation-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunyuan; Adomat, Hans; Guns, Emma Tomlinson; Hojabrpour, Payman; Duronio, Vincent; Curran, Terry-Ann; Jalili, Reza Baradar; Jia, William; Delwar, Zahid; Zhang, Yun; Elizei, Sanam Salimi; Ghahary, Aziz

    2016-06-01

    It has long been realized that hematopoietic cells may have the capacity to trans-differentiate into non-lymphohematopoietic cells under specific conditions. However, the mechanisms and the factors for hematopoietic cell trans-differentiation remain unknown. In an in vitro culture system, we found that using a conditioned medium from proliferating fibroblasts can induce a subset of hematopoietic cells to become adherent fibroblast-like cells (FLCs). FLCs are not fibroblasts nor other mesenchymal stromal cells, based on their expression of type-1 collagen, and other stromal cell marker genes. To identify the active factors in the conditioned medium, we cultured fibroblasts in a serum-free medium and collected it for further purification. Using the fractions from filter devices of different molecular weight cut-offs, and ammonium sulfate precipitation collected from the medium, we found the active fraction is a protein. We then purified this fraction by using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and identified it by mass spectrometer as macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The mechanisms of M-CSF-inducing trans-differentiation of hematopoietic cells seem to involve a tyrosine kinase signalling pathway and its known receptor. The FLCs express a number of stem cell markers including SSEA-1 and -3, OCT3/4, NANOG, and SOX2. Spontaneous and induced differentiation experiments confirmed that FLCs can be further differentiated into cell types of three germ layers. These data indicate that hematopoietic cells can be induced by M-CSF to dedifferentiate to multipotent stem cells. This study also provides a simple method to generate multipotent stem cells for clinical applications. PMID:26529564

  10. Effects of hematopoietic growth factors following myeloablation in a primate model.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, R J; Gillio, A; Gasparetto, C

    1990-01-01

    The complex effects of hematopoietic growth factors (granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factors and interleukin 3 and interleukin 1 beta) following myeloablation in juvenile male cynomolgus monkeys was studied. Since the effects of a given cytokine in vivo do not necessarily reflect the in vitro situation, and since cytokines are frequently species specific, extrapolation from rodent models to man may be fraught with inaccuracies. A primate model, therefore, was developed which has provided useful preclinical information on hematopoietic responses, dose response relationships and toxicities associated with administration of recombinant hematopoietic growth factors. This information has direct application to human trials. PMID:1691247

  11. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M.; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Kingma, Douglas W.; Travis, Lois B.; Flowers, Mary E.; Martin, Paul J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19264919

  12. Hematopoietic stem cells: multiparameter regulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Wang, Yiwei; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are capable to self-renew with multi-potency which generated much excitement in clinical therapy. However, the main obstacle of HSCs in clinical application was insufficient number of HSCs which were derived from either bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood. This review briefly discusses the indispensable utility of growth factors and cytokines, stromal cells, extracellular matrix, bionic scaffold and microenvironment aiming to control the hematopoiesis in all directions and provide a better and comprehensive understanding for in vitro expansion of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26883144

  13. Association between Plasma Endothelin-1, Transforming Growth Factor-β, Fibroblast Growth Factor, and Nitric Oxide Levels and Liver Injury in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Recipients with Persistent Iron Overload after Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Akı, Şahika Zeynep; Suyanı, Elif; Cengiz, Mustafa; Özenirler, Seren; Elbeğ, Şehri; Paşaoğlu, Hatice; Sucak, Gülsan Türköz

    2015-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease, iron overload, and infections are the major causes of liver dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) recipients. We investigated the relationship between serum iron parameters and the levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and nitric oxide (NO) as predictors of chronic liver injury in 54 AHSCT recipients who survived at least a year after transplantation. Serum samples from patients were obtained for the evaluation of ET-1, TGF-β, FGF, NO, and nontransferrin bound iron at the first year follow-up visit using commercially available ELISA kits. Patients were categorized depending on serum ferritin and transferrin saturation levels. The parameters were compared between the groups, and survival analysis was also performed. Most of the AHSCT recipients (81.5%) were in complete remission during the study. After a median follow-up time of 73 months (range, 13 to 109 months), 72.2% of the patients were alive. Mean serum levels of ET-1, NO, TGF-β, and FGF were 81.54 ± 21.62 μmol/mL, 31.82 ± 26.42 μmol/mL, 2.56 ± 0.77 ng/mL, and 50.31 ± 32.69 pg/mL, respectively. Nineteen patients (35.2% of the cohort) had serum ferritin levels higher than 1000 ng/mL. Mean serum levels of ET-1, NO, TGF-β, and FGF were similar in patients with serum ferritin levels below or above 1000 ng/mL (P > .05). Serum ferritin levels were positively correlated with serum alanine aminotransferase (r = .284, P = .042) and γ-glutamyl transferase (r = .271, P = .05) levels and were negatively correlated with serum albumin levels (r = .295, P = .034). There was a significant positive correlation between serum transferrin saturation and alanine aminotransferase levels (r = .305, P = .03). Serum ET-1 level was positively correlated with alkaline phosphatase levels (r = .304, P = .026). In univariate Cox regression analysis serum levels of iron parameters, ET-1, NO, TGF-β, and

  14. Aberrant Levels of Hematopoietic/Neuronal Growth and Differentiation Factors in Euthyroid Women at Risk for Autoimmune Thyroid Disease

    PubMed Central

    Massolt, Elske T.; Effraimidis, Grigoris; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Visser, W. Edward; Peeters, Robin P.; Drexhage, Hemmo A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Subjects at risk for major mood disorders have a higher risk to develop autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and vice-versa, implying a shared pathogenesis. In mood disorder patients, an abnormal profile of hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is observed, suggesting that growth/differentiation abnormalities of these cell lineages may predispose to mood disorders. The first objective of our study was to investigate whether an aberrant profile of these hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors is also detectable in subjects at risk for AITD. A second objective was to study the inter relationship of these factors with previously determined and published growth factors/cytokines in the same subjects. Methods We studied 64 TPO-Ab-negative females with at least 1 first- or second-degree relative with AITD, 32 of whom did and 32 who did not seroconvert to TPO-Ab positivity in 5-year follow-up. Subjects were compared with 32 healthy controls (HCs). We measured serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), Stem Cell Factor (SCF), Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGFBP-2), Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and IL-7 at baseline. Results BDNF was significantly lower (8.2 vs 18.9 ng/ml, P<0.001), while EGF (506.9 vs 307.6 pg/ml, P = 0.003) and IGFBP-2 (388.3 vs 188.5 ng/ml, P = 0.028) were significantly higher in relatives than in HCs. Relatives who seroconverted in the next 5 years had significantly higher levels of SCF than non-seroconverters (26.5 vs 16.7 pg/ml, P = 0.017). In a cluster analysis with the previously published growth factors/cytokines SCF clustered together with IL-1β, IL-6 and CCL-3, of which high levels also preceded seroconversion. Conclusion Relatives of AITD patients show aberrant serum levels of 4 hematopoietic/neuronal growth factors similar to the aberrancies found in mood disorder patients, suggesting that shared growth and differentiation defects in both the hematopoietic and neuronal system may underlie thyroid

  15. Stem cell factor induces HIF-1{alpha} at normoxia in hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Malin; Loefstedt, Tobias; Sun Jianmin; Holmquist-Mengelbier, Linda; Pahlman, Sven; Roennstrand, Lars

    2008-12-05

    Signaling by the receptor for stem cell factor (SCF), c-Kit, is of major importance for hematopoiesis, melanogenesis and reproduction, and the biological responses are commonly proliferation and cell survival. Thus, constitutive activation due to c-Kit mutations is involved in the pathogenesis of several forms of cancer, e.g. leukemias, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and testicular tumors. Tumor survival requires oxygen supply through induced neovascularization, a process largely mediated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a prominent target of the transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2. Using Affymetrix microarrays we have identified genes that are upregulated following SCF stimulation. Interestingly, many of the genes induced were found to be related to a hypoxic response. These findings were corroborated by our observation that SCF stimulation of the hematopoietic cell lines M-07e induces HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-2{alpha} protein accumulation at normoxia. In addition, SCF-induced HIF-1{alpha} was transcriptionally active, and transcribed HIF-1 target genes such as VEGF, BNIP3, GLUT1 and DEC1, an effect that could be reversed by siRNA against HIF-1{alpha}. We also show that SCF-induced accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} is dependent on both the PI-3-kinase and Ras/MEK/Erk pathways. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of SCF/c-Kit signaling in angiogenesis and tumor progression.

  16. Exogenous endothelial cells as accelerators of hematopoietic reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Despite the successes of recombinant hematopoietic-stimulatory factors at accelerating bone marrow reconstitution and shortening the neutropenic period post-transplantation, significant challenges remain such as cost, inability to reconstitute thrombocytic lineages, and lack of efficacy in conditions such as aplastic anemia. A possible means of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution would be administration of cells capable of secreting hematopoietic growth factors. Advantages of this approach would include: a) ability to regulate secretion of cytokines based on biological need; b) long term, localized production of growth factors, alleviating need for systemic administration of factors that possess unintended adverse effects; and c) potential to actively repair the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Here we overview the field of hematopoietic growth factors, discuss previous experiences with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in accelerating hematopoiesis, and conclude by putting forth the rationale of utilizing exogenous endothelial cells as a novel cellular therapy for acceleration of hematopoietic recovery. PMID:23171397

  17. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment. PMID:16868724

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Cistrome: GATA Factor-Dependent cis-Regulatory Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, K J; Johnson, K D; Gao, X; Keles, S; Bresnick, E H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators mediate the genesis and function of the hematopoietic system by binding complex ensembles of cis-regulatory elements to establish genetic networks. While thousands to millions of any given cis-element resides in a genome, how transcriptional regulators select these sites and how site attributes dictate functional output is not well understood. An instructive system to address this problem involves the GATA family of transcription factors that control vital developmental and physiological processes and are linked to multiple human pathologies. Although GATA factors bind DNA motifs harboring the sequence GATA, only a very small subset of these abundant motifs are occupied in genomes. Mechanistic studies revealed a unique configuration of a GATA factor-regulated cis-element consisting of an E-box and a downstream GATA motif separated by a short DNA spacer. GATA-1- or GATA-2-containing multiprotein complexes at these composite elements control transcription of genes critical for hematopoietic stem cell emergence in the mammalian embryo, hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation, and erythroid cell maturation. Other constituents of the complex include the basic helix-loop-loop transcription factor Scl/TAL1, its heterodimeric partner E2A, and the Lim domain proteins LMO2 and LDB1. This chapter reviews the structure/function of E-box-GATA composite cis-elements, which collectively constitute an important sector of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cistrome. PMID:27137654

  19. Induction of hematopoietic and endothelial cell program orchestrated by ETS transcription factor ER71/ETV2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Li, Daofeng; Yu, Yik Yeung Lawrence; Kang, Inyoung; Cha, Min-Ji; Kim, Ju Young; Park, Changwon; Watson, Dennis K; Wang, Ting; Choi, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    The ETS factor ETV2 (aka ER71) is essential for the generation of the blood and vascular system, as ETV2 deficiency leads to a complete block in blood and endothelial cell formation and embryonic lethality in the mouse. However, the ETV2-mediated gene regulatory network and signaling governing hematopoietic and endothelial cell development are poorly understood. Here, we map ETV2 global binding sites and carry out in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells, and germ line and conditional knockout mouse studies to uncover mechanisms involved in the hemangiogenic fate commitment from mesoderm. We show that ETV2 binds to enhancers that specify hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. We find that the hemangiogenic progenitor population in the developing embryo can be identified as FLK1highPDGFRα−. Notably, these hemangiogenic progenitors are exclusively sensitive to ETV2-dependent FLK1 signaling. Importantly, ETV2 turns on other Ets genes, thereby establishing an ETS hierarchy. Consequently, the hematopoietic and endothelial cell program initiated by ETV2 is maintained partly by other ETS factors through an ETS switching mechanism. These findings highlight the critical role that transient ETV2 expression plays in the regulation of hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineage specification and stability. PMID:25802403

  20. Clonal-Level Responses of Functionally Distinct Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Trophic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mallaney, Cates; Kothari, Alok; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings from several groups have identified distinct classes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow, each with inherent functional biases in terms of their differentiation, self-renewal, proliferation and lifespan. It has previously been demonstrated that myeloid- and lymphoid-biased HSCs can be prospectively enriched based on their degree of Hoechst dye efflux. In the present study, we used differential Hoechst efflux to enrich lineage-biased HSC subtypes and analyzed their functional potentials. Despite similar outputs in vitro, bone marrow transplantation assays revealed contrasting lineage differentiation in vivo. To stratify the molecular differences underlying these contrasting functional potentials at the clonal level, single-cell gene expression analysis was performed using the Fluidigm Biomark system and revealed dynamic expression of genes including Meis1, CEBP/α, Sfpi1 and Dnmt3a. Finally, single-cell gene expression analysis was used to unravel the opposing proliferative responses of lineage-biased HSCs to the growth factor TGFβ1, revealing a potential role for the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1c as molecular mediator. This work lends further credence to the concept of HSC heterogeneity and presents unprecedented molecular resolution of the HSC response to trophic factors using single-cell gene expression analysis. PMID:24373928

  1. Clonal-level responses of functionally distinct hematopoietic stem cells to trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Mallaney, Cates; Kothari, Alok; Martens, Andrew; Challen, Grant A

    2014-04-01

    Recent findings from several groups have identified distinct classes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow, each with inherent functional biases in terms of their differentiation, self-renewal, proliferation, and lifespan. It has previously been demonstrated that myeloid- and lymphoid-biased HSCs can be prospectively enriched based on their degree of Hoechst dye efflux. In the present study, we used differential Hoechst efflux to enrich lineage-biased HSC subtypes and analyzed their functional potentials. Despite similar outputs in vitro, bone marrow transplantation assays revealed contrasting lineage differentiation in vivo. To stratify the molecular differences underlying these contrasting functional potentials at the clonal level, single-cell gene expression analysis was performed using the Fluidigm BioMark system and revealed dynamic expression of genes including Meis1, CEBP/α, Sfpi1, and Dnmt3a. Finally, single-cell gene expression analysis was used to unravel the opposing proliferative responses of lineage-biased HSCs to the growth factor TGF-β1, revealing a potential role for the cell cycle inhibitor Cdkn1c as molecular mediator. This work lends further credence to the concept of HSC heterogeneity, and it presents unprecedented molecular resolution of the HSC response to trophic factors using single-cell gene expression analysis. PMID:24373928

  2. A three-dimensional culture system for the growth of hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Naughton, B A; Jacob, L; Naughton, G K

    1990-01-01

    A physiological three-dimensional culture system was developed for the growth of human bone marrow. Bone marrow stromal cells were established on a nylon filtration screen template, suspended in liquid medium and grown to 70% confluence, and inoculated with hematopoietic cells. An intricate microenvironment is established to support hematopoiesis, which proceeds in a three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of the adherent zone of these cultures with flow cytometry and progenitor cell assays reveals multilineage hematologic expression and active proliferation of immature cells for the 12 week experimental period. Similar results were obtained with rat bone marrow cultures using this methodology. The suspended nylon mesh system is novel in that it supports the growth of several hematologic lineages concurrently. This system may lend itself to the growth of purged or untreated bone marrow for transplantation. PMID:2308994

  3. Hematopoietic expression of oncogenic BRAF promotes aberrant growth of monocyte-lineage cells resistant to PLX4720

    PubMed Central

    Kamata, Tamihiro; Dankort, David; Kang, Jing; Giblett, Susan; Pritchard, Catrin A.; McMahon, Martin; Leavitt, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Mutational activation of BRAF leading to expression of the BRAFV600E oncoprotein was recently identified in a high percentage of specific hematopoietic neoplasms in monocyte/histiocyte and mature B-cell lineages. Although BRAFV600E is a driver oncoprotein and pharmacological target in solid tumors such as melanoma, lung and thyroid cancer, it remains unknown whether BRAFV600E is an appropriate therapeutic target in hematopoietic neoplasms. To address this critical question, we generated a mouse model expressing inducible BRAFV600E in the hematopoietic system, and evaluated the efficacy of pathway-targeted therapeutics against primary hematopoietic cells. In this model, BRAFV600E expression conferred cytokine-independent growth to monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors leading to aberrant in vivo and in vitro monocyte/macrophage expansion. Furthermore, transplantation of BRAFV600E-expressing bone marrow cells promoted an in vivo pathology most notable for monocytosis in hematopoietic tissues and visceral organs. In vitro analysis revealed that MEK inhibition, but not RAF inhibition, effectively suppressed cytokine-independent clonal growth of monocyte/macrophage-lineage progenitors. However, combined RAF and PI3K inhibition effectively inhibited cytokine-independent colony formation, suggesting autocrine PI3K pathway activation. Taken together, these results provide evidence that constitutively activated BRAFV600E drives aberrant proliferation of monocyte-lineage cells. This study supports the development of pathway-targeted therapeutics in the treatment of BRAFV600E-expressing hematopoietic neoplasms in the monocyte/histiocyte lineage. PMID:24152792

  4. Reprogramming committed murine blood cells to induced hematopoietic stem cells with defined factors

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Jonah; Gazit, Roi; Garrison, Brian S.; Guo, Guoji; Saadatpour, Assieh; Mandal, Pankaj K.; Ebina, Wataru; Volchkov, Pavel; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.; Rossi, Derrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) sustain blood formation throughout life and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. We show that transient expression of six transcription factors RUNX1T1, HLF, LMO2, PRDM5, PBX1, and ZFP37 imparts multi-lineage transplantation potential onto otherwise committed lymphoid and myeloid progenitors, and myeloid effector cells. Inclusion of MYC-N and MEIS1, and use of polycistronic viruses increase reprogramming efficacy. The reprogrammed cells, designated induced-HSCs (iHSCs), possess clonal multi-lineage differentiation potential, reconstitute stem/progenitor compartments, and are serially transplantable. Single-cell analysis revealed that iHSCs derived under optimal conditions exhibit a gene expression profile that is highly similar to endogenous HSCs. These findings demonstrate that expression of a set of defined factors is sufficient to activate the gene networks governing HSC functional identity in committed blood cells. Our results raise the prospect that blood cell reprogramming may be a strategy for derivation of transplantable stem cells for clinical application. PMID:24766805

  5. [Polycythemia vera terminating in chronic neutrophilic leukemia: studies on in vitro growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells].

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, S; Matuzaki, M; Harano, H; Matomura, S; Okubo, T; Maruta, A; Kodama, F; Ikuta, K; Sasaki, H

    1992-12-01

    A 57-year-old man, diagnosed as Polycythemia vera (PV), had been treated with administrations of Busulfan since 1984. Three years later, the number of neutrophils in peripheral blood increased to 50,000/microliters with progression of splenomegaly, and the case was diagnosed as Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) based on the criteria by Miura et al, in November, 1989. In spite of 6MP and Busulfan therapy, marked neutrophilia and splenomegaly progressed, and the patient died due to liver dysfunction in June of 1991. To clarify the pathophysiology of PV and CNL, we studied the in vitro growth kinetics of hematopoietic progenitor cells in bone marrow of this unique case and made a comparison with those of 4 cases of PV and 4 normal volunteers employing methylcellulose culture. As in other cases of PV, erythroid colonies were formed in culture of bone marrow from this patient without addition of erythropoietin. Furthermore, spontaneous colonies derived from CFU-GM and CFU-Mix increased remarkably in this case only. The results suggest that the hematopoietic abnormalities in this case involve the multipotent stem cells as well as erythroid and granuloid-macrophage progenitors. PMID:1479700

  6. Distinct Stromal Cell Factor Combinations Can Separately Control Hematopoietic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Wohrer, Stefan; Knapp, David J.H.F.; Copley, Michael R.; Benz, Claudia; Kent, David G.; Rowe, Keegan; Babovic, Sonja; Mader, Heidi; Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Eaves, Connie J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are identified by their ability to sustain prolonged blood cell production in vivo, although recent evidence suggests that durable self-renewal (DSR) is shared by HSC subtypes with distinct self-perpetuating differentiation programs. Net expansions of DSR-HSCs occur in vivo, but molecularly defined conditions that support similar responses in vitro are lacking. We hypothesized that this might require a combination of factors that differentially promote HSC viability, proliferation, and self-renewal. We now demonstrate that HSC survival and maintenance of DSR potential are variably supported by different Steel factor (SF)-containing cocktails with similar HSC-mitogenic activities. In addition, stromal cells produce other factors, including nerve growth factor and collagen 1, that can antagonize the apoptosis of initially quiescent adult HSCs and, in combination with SF and interleukin-11, produce >15-fold net expansions of DSR-HSCs ex vivo within 7 days. These findings point to the molecular basis of HSC control and expansion. PMID:24910437

  7. Hematopoietic progenitor cells grow on 3T3 fibroblast monolayers that overexpress growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6).

    PubMed

    Dormady, S P; Zhang, X M; Basch, R S

    2000-10-24

    Pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells grow in close association with bone marrow stromal cells, which play a critical role in sustaining hematopoiesis in long-term bone marrow cultures. The mechanisms through which stromal cells act to support pluripotential hematopoietic stem cells are largely unknown. This study demonstrates that growth arrest-specific gene-6 (GAS6) plays an important role in this process. GAS6 is a ligand for the Axl (Ufo/Ark), Sky (Dtk/Tyro3/Rse/Brt/Tif), and Mer (Eyk) family of tyrosine kinase receptors and binds to these receptors via tandem G domains at its C terminus. After translation, GAS6 moves to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is extensively gamma-carboxylated. The carboxylation process is vitamin K dependent, and current evidence suggests that GAS6 must be gamma-carboxylated to bind and activate any of the cognate tyrosine kinase receptors. Here, we show that expression of GAS6 is highly correlated with the capacity of bone marrow stromal cells to support hematopoiesis in culture. Nonsupportive stromal cell lines express little to no GAS6, whereas supportive cell lines express high levels of GAS6. Transfection of the cDNA encoding GAS6 into 3T3 fibroblasts is sufficient to render this previously nonsupportive cell line capable of supporting long-term hematopoietic cultures. 3T3 cells, genetically engineered to stably express GAS6 (GAS6-3T3), produce a stromal layer that supports the generation of colony-forming units in culture (CFU-c) for up to 6 wk. Hematopoietic support by genetically engineered 3T3 is not vitamin K dependent, and soluble recombinant GAS6 does not substitute for coculturing the hematopoietic progenitors with genetically modified 3T3 cells. PMID:11050245

  8. The Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCC Binds to and Facilitates the Activation of STAT1 by Gamma Interferon and Hematopoietic Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Qishen; Fagerlie, Sara; Christianson, Tracy A.; Keeble, Winifred; Faulkner, Greg; Diaz, Jane; Rathbun, R. Keaney; Bagby, Grover C.

    2000-01-01

    growth and survival factor molecules, we reason that FA-C hematopoietic cells are excessively apoptotic because of an imbalance between survival cues (owing to a failure of STAT1 activation in FA-C cells) and apoptotic and mitogenic inhibitory cues (constitutively activated in FA-C cells in a STAT1-independent fashion). PMID:10848598

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  10. Suppression of Homeobox Transcription Factor VentX Promotes Expansion of Human Hematopoietic Stem/Multipotent Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hong; Wu, Xiaoming; Sun, Yan; Zhou, Shuanhu; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Zhu, Zhenglun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate proliferation and expansion of human hematopoietic stem/multipotent progenitor cells (HSC/MPPs) are targets of intensive investigations. Several cell intrinsic factors and signaling pathways have been implicated in the proliferation and differentiation of human HSC/MPPs. Nevertheless, expansion of human HSC/MPPs for clinical application remains a critical challenge. VentX is a human homeobox transcription factor that was recently identified as an anti-proliferation and pro-differentiation factor in human hematopoietic cells. Here, we report that VentX expression is up-regulated during ontogenesis of human hematopoietic cells. Strikingly, suppression of VentX expression led to significant expansion of HSC/MPPs ex vivo and a 20-fold increase in engraftment potential in the NOD/SCID/IL2Rγ2null mouse model. VentX suppression helped preserve the HSC/MPP pools and promote clonogenicity of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Mechanistically, we show that VentX regulates critical cell cycle regulators and Wnt downstream genes previously implicated in HSC/MPP proliferation and expansion. PMID:22791709

  11. Factors associated with optimized tacrolimus dosing in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Allison R; Brown, Victoria T; McBride, Lauren D; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Bryk, Amy W

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to analyze the initial tacrolimus concentrations achieved in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients using the institutional dosing strategy of 1 mg IV daily initiated on day +5. The secondary objectives were to ascertain the tacrolimus dose, days of therapy, and dose changes necessary to achieve a therapeutic concentration, and to identify patient-specific factors that influence therapeutic dose. The relationships between the number of pre-therapeutic days and incidence of graft-versus-host disease and graft failure were delineated. Methods A retrospective chart review included adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell patients who received tacrolimus for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in 2012. Descriptive statistics, linear and logistic regression, and graphical analyses were utilized. Results Ninety-nine patients met the inclusion criteria. The first concentration was subtherapeutic (<10 ng/ml) in 97 patients (98%). The median number of days of tacrolimus needed to achieve a therapeutic trough was 10 with a median of two dose changes. The median therapeutic dose was 1.6 mg IV daily. Approximately 75% of patients became therapeutic on ≤2 mg IV tacrolimus daily. No relationship was found between therapeutic dose and any patient-specific factor tested, including weight. No relationship was found between the number of days of therapy required to achieve a therapeutic trough and incidence of graft-versus-host disease or graft failure. Conclusion An initial flat tacrolimus dose of 1 mg IV daily is a suboptimal approach to achieve therapeutic levels at this institution. A dose of 1.6 mg or 2 mg IV daily is a reasonable alternative to the current institutional practice. PMID:25802301

  12. Risk Factors for Delirium in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Weckmann, Michelle T.; Gingrich, Roger; Mills, James A.; Hook, Larry; Beglinger, Leigh J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delirium is common following hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment have been shown to improve long term outcomes. We sought to investigate the relationship between potential risk-factors and the development of delirium following HSCT. Methods Fifty-four inpatients admitted for HSCT were assessed prospectively for delirium every 2-3 days through their inpatient stay using standardized delirium and neuropsychological measures. Patient’s self-reports of medical history, medical records, and neurocognitive and psychiatric assessments were used to identify risk factors. Both pre- and post-HSCT risk factors were examined. Results Delirium incidence was 35% and occurred with highest frequency in the 2 weeks following transplant. The only pre-transplantation risk factors was lower oxygen saturation (p=0.003). Post-transplantation risk factors for delirium included higher creatinine (p<0.0001), higher blood urea nitrogen levels (p=0.005), lower creatinine clearance (p=0.0006), lower oxygen saturation (p=0.001), lower hemoglobin (p=0.04) and lower albumin (p=0.03). There was no observed association with level of cognitive performance, transplant type, disease severity, medical co-morbidity index, age or conditioning regimen. Conclusion Routine laboratory values can assist in the identification of high risk patients before delirium onset to improve early detection and treatment of delirium following HSCT. PMID:22860240

  13. [Hematopoietic growth factor EPO has neuro-protective and neuro-trophic effects--review].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhuo-Yan; Yang, Mo; Fok, Tai-Fai

    2005-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is an acidic glycoprotein that was first detected as a hematopoietic factor and its synthesis is triggered in response to cellular hypoxia-sensing. EPO binds to type I cytokine receptors, which associate with the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Jak2, and thereby activate Stat 5a/5b, Ras/MAPK, and PI3-K/Akt signaling pathways. The recent discovery shows that there is a specific EPO/EPO-receptor system in the central nervous system (CNS), independently of the haematopoietic system. Hypoxia and anemia can up-regulate EPO/EPOR expressions in the CNS. Further studies demonstrate that EPO has substantial neuro-protective effects and acts as a neurotrophic factor on central cholinergic neurons, influencing their differentiation and regeneration. EPO also exerts neuro-protective activities in different models of brain damage in vivo and in vitro, such as hypoxia, cerebral ischaemia and sub-arachnoid haemorrhage. EPO may also be involved in synaptic plasticity via the inhibition or stimulation of various neurotransmitters. Therefore, human recombinant EPO that activate its receptors in the central nervous system might be utilized in the future clinical practice involving neuroprotection and brain repair. PMID:15854305

  14. Risk factors for syngeneic graft-versus-host disease after adult hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Kristina M; Holmberg, Leona A; Leisenring, Wendy; Fefer, Alexander; Guthrie, Katherine A; Tylee, Tracy S; McDonald, George B; Bensinger, William I; Nelson, J Lee

    2004-09-15

    Syngeneic graft-versus-host disease (sGVHD) has been described after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) but remains poorly defined. We retrospectively reviewed adult syngeneic HCTs at our center (1980-2002) for sGVHD to investigate incidence, morbidity, and risk factors with a primary focus on parity. Among 119 transplantations, there were 21 cases of biopsy-proven sGVHD. The cumulative incidence was 18%, with multiorgan involvement in 6 cases and 1 death. sGVHD was more frequent when the donor was parous (32%) than nulliparous (9%) or male (13%; P =.03) and when the recipient was parous (31%) than nulliparous (7%) or male (13%; P =.02). Other univariable risk factors included older age (P <.01), busulfan/melphalan/thiotepa conditioning (P <.01), interleukin-2 (P =.02), HLA-A26 (P =.03), and more recent transplantation year (P <.01). Overall, risk factors were similar to those described in GVHD. Although an independent effect of parity could not be completely separated from other factors, donor and recipient pregnancy history merits further investigation. PMID:15117763

  15. The use of covalently immobilized stem cell factor to selectively affect hematopoietic stem cell activity within a gelatin hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Mahadik, Bhushan P; Pedron Haba, Sara; Skertich, Luke J; Harley, Brendan A C

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare stem cell population found primarily in the bone marrow and responsible for the production of the body's full complement of blood and immune cells. Used clinically to treat a range of hematopoietic disorders, there is a significant need to identify approaches to selectively expand their numbers ex vivo. Here we describe a methacrylamide-functionalized gelatin (GelMA) hydrogel for in vitro culture of primary murine HSCs. Stem cell factor (SCF) is a critical biomolecular component of native HSC niches in vivo and is used in large dosages in cell culture media for HSC expansion in vitro. We report a photochemistry based approach to covalently immobilize SCF within GelMA hydrogels via acrylate-functionalized polyethylene glycol (PEG) tethers. PEG-functionalized SCF retains the native bioactivity of SCF but can be stably incorporated and retained within the GelMA hydrogel over 7 days. Freshly-isolated murine HSCs cultured in GelMA hydrogels containing covalently-immobilized SCF showed reduced proliferation and improved selectivity for maintaining primitive HSCs. Comparatively, soluble SCF within the GelMA hydrogel network induced increased proliferation of differentiating hematopoietic cells. We used a microfluidic templating approach to create GelMA hydrogels containing gradients of immobilized SCF that locally direct HSC response. Together, we report a biomaterial platform to examine the effect of the local presentation of soluble vs. matrix-immobilized biomolecular signals on HSC expansion and lineage specification. This approach may be a critical component of a biomaterial-based artificial bone marrow to provide the correct sequence of niche signals to grow HSCs in the laboratory. PMID:26232879

  16. Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Factors Associated with a Better HLA Match

    PubMed Central

    Dehn, Jason; Arora, Mukta; Spellman, Stephen; Setterholm, Michelle; Horowitz, Mary; Confer, Dennis; Weisdorf, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of non-HLA patient factors on the match of the selected unrelated donor (URD) for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has not been fully evaluated. National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) data for 7486 transplants using peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) or bone marrow from years 2000–2005 were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression to identify independent non-HLA patient factors associated with completing a more closely matched URD transplant. Results Advanced (intermediate and late stage) disease was significantly associated with an increased likelihood of transplant using a less-matched (partially-matched or mismatched) donor. Additionally, Black patients were 2.83 times, Asian 2.05 times, and Hispanic 1.73 times more likely to have a less-matched HCT donor than Caucasian patients. Younger patients, HCT at lower volume centers and in earlier years had significantly higher likelihood of having a less HLA matched URD transplant. Conclusion Our analysis provides encouraging evidence of HLA matching improvement in recent years. Initiating a patient’s URD search early in the disease process, especially for patients from non-Caucasian racial and ethnic groups, will provide the best likelihood for identifying the best available donor and making informed transplant decisions. PMID:19041054

  17. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Incidence, risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Yakushijin, K; Atsuta, Y; Doki, N; Yokota, A; Kanamori, H; Miyamoto, T; Ohwada, C; Miyamura, K; Nawa, Y; Kurokawa, M; Mizuno, I; Mori, T; Onizuka, M; Taguchi, J; Ichinohe, T; Yabe, H; Morishima, Y; Kato, K; Suzuki, R; Fukuda, T

    2016-03-01

    This retrospective study was conducted in Japan to determine the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Among 4290 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT between 1999 and 2010, 462 were diagnosed with SOS according to the Seattle criteria (cumulative incidence, 10.8%). The cumulative incidence of SOS diagnosed by the modified Seattle criteria was 9.3%. Of 462 patients, 107 met the Baltimore criteria and 168 had severe SOS with renal and/or respiratory failure. The median onset for SOS was 12 days after HSCT (range, -2-30). Overall survival at day 100 was 32% for SOS and 15% for severe SOS. Multivariate analyses showed that significant independent risk factors for SOS were the number of HSCTs, age, performance status, hepatitis C virus-seropositivity, advanced disease status and myeloablative regimen. SOS was highly associated with overall mortality (hazard ratio, 2.09; P<0.001). Our retrospective survey showed that the cumulative incidence of SOS in Japan was 10.8%, similar to that previously reported in Western countries, and that the overall survival of patients who developed SOS was low. Furthermore, several risk factors were identified. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for high-risk SOS patients must be established to improve overall survival. PMID:26595082

  18. Risk factors and prognosis of hepatic acute GvHD after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y; Kanda, J; Nakasone, H; Kondo, T; Uchida, N; Fukuda, T; Ohashi, K; Kaida, K; Iwato, K; Eto, T; Kanda, Y; Nakamae, H; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Morishima, Y; Hirokawa, M; Atsuta, Y; Murata, M

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic acute GvHD (aGvHD) is associated with high mortality owing to poor response to immunosuppressive therapy. The pathogenesis of hepatic aGvHD differs from that of other lesions, and specific risk factors related to pre-transplant liver conditions should be determined. We conducted a cohort study by using a Japanese transplant registry database (N=8378). Of these subjects, 1.5% had hepatitis C virus Ab (HCV-Ab) and 9.4% had liver dysfunction (elevated transaminase or bilirubin levels) before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). After HCT, the cumulative incidence of hepatic aGvHD was 6.7%. On multivariate analyses, HCV-Ab positivity (hazard ratio (HR), 1.93; P=0.02) and pre-transplant liver dysfunction (HR, 1.85; P<0.01), as well as advanced HCT risk, unrelated donors, HLA mismatch and cyclosporine as GvHD prophylaxis, were significant risk factors for hepatic aGvHD, whereas hepatitis B virus surface Ag was not. Hepatic aGvHD was a significant risk factor for low overall survival and high transplant-related mortality in all aGvHD grades (P<0.01). This study is the first to show the relationship between pre-transplant liver conditions and hepatic aGvHD. A prospective study is awaited to validate the results of this study and establish a new strategy especially for high-risk patients. PMID:26367230

  19. Symplekin, a polyadenylation factor, prevents MOZ and MLL activity on HOXA9 in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Largeot, Anne; Paggetti, Jérôme; Broséus, Julien; Aucagne, Romain; Lagrange, Brice; Martin, Romain Z; Berthelet, Jean; Quéré, Ronan; Lucchi, Géraldine; Ducoroy, Patrick; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent

    2013-12-01

    MOZ and MLL encoding a histone acetyltransferase and a histone methyltransferase, respectively, are targets for recurrent chromosomal translocations found in acute myeloblastic or lymphoblastic leukemia. We have previously shown that MOZ and MLL cooperate to activate HOXA9 gene expression in hematopoietic stem/progenitors cells. To dissect the mechanism of action of this complex, we decided to identify new proteins interacting with MOZ. We found that the scaffold protein Symplekin that supports the assembly of polyadenylation machinery was identified by mass spectrometry. Symplekin interacts and co-localizes with both MOZ and MLL in immature hematopoietic cells. Its inhibition leads to a decrease of the HOXA9 protein level but not of Hoxa9 mRNA and to an over-recruitment of MOZ and MLL onto the HOXA9 promoter. Altogether, our results highlight the role of Symplekin in transcription repression involving a regulatory network between MOZ, MLL and Symplekin. PMID:23994619

  20. Low c-Kit Expression Level Induced by Stem Cell Factor Does Not Compromise Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Ling; Faltusova, Katerina; Molik, Martin; Savvulidi, Filipp; Chang, Ko-Tung; Necas, Emanuel

    2016-07-01

    The c-Kit expression level is decreased in regenerating bone marrow, and such bone marrow performs poorly when co-transplanted with normal bone marrow. We asked whether diminished numbers of c-Kit receptors on hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) after their internalization induced by the binding of the cytokine stem cell factor (SCF) would jeopardize transplantability of HSPCs. We used a battery of functional assays to evaluate the capacity of HSPCs with markedly different c-Kit expression levels to be transplanted. Surprisingly, our experiments testing the homing of transplanted HSPCs to bone marrow of recipient mice and their short-term and long-term engraftment did not reveal any defects in HSPCs with severely reduced numbers of c-Kit receptor molecules. This unexpected result can be ascribed to the fact that HSPCs exposed to SCF replace the consumed c-Kit receptors rapidly. This article demonstrates that exposure of HSPCs to SCF and diminished number of c-Kit receptors in their cell membranes do not compromise the capacity of HSPCs to reconstitute damaged hematopoietic tissue. PMID:27040393

  1. The Biology of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shizuru, Judith A.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2016-01-01

    At the most basic level, success of an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) procedure relies upon the engraftment of recipients with donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that will generate blood formation for the life of that individual. The formula to achieve durable HSC engraftment involves multiple factors including the recipient conditioning regimen, the nature of the genetic disparity between donor and recipient, and the content of the hematopoietic graft. Animal and clinical studies have shown that the biology of host resistance is complex, involving both immune and nonimmune elements. In this article, we review the factors that contribute to host resistance, describe emerging concepts on the basic biology of resistance, and discuss hematopoietic resistance as it relates specifically to patients with severe combined immunodeficiencies (SCID)— disorders that bring unique insights into the dynamics of cell replacement by allogeneic HSCs and progenitor cells. PMID:19913629

  2. Hematopoietic and Leukemic Stem Cells Have Distinct Dependence on Tcf1 and Lef1 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuyang; Li, Fengyin; Xing, Shaojun; Zhao, Tianyan; Peng, Weiqun; Xue, Hai-Hui

    2016-05-20

    Hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells (HSCs and LSCs) have self-renewal ability to maintain normal hematopoiesis and leukemia propagation, respectively. Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors are expressed in HSCs, and targeting both factors modestly expanded the size of the HSC pool due to diminished HSC quiescence. Functional defects of Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs in multi-lineage blood reconstitution was only evident under competitive conditions or when subjected to repeated regenerative stress. These are mechanistically due to direct positive regulation of Egr and Tcf3 by Tcf1 and Lef1, and significantly, forced expression of Egr1 in Tcf1/Lef1-deficient HSCs restored HSC quiescence. In a preclinical CML model, loss of Tcf1/Lef1 did not show strong impact on leukemia initiation and progression. However, when transplanted into secondary recipients, Tcf1/Lef1-deficient LSCs failed to propagate CML. By induced deletion of Tcf1 and Lef1 in pre-established CML, we further demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for these factors in LSC self-renewal. When combined with imatinib therapy, genetic targeting of Tcf1 and Lef1 potently diminished LSCs and conferred better protection to the CML recipients. LSCs are therefore more sensitive to loss of Tcf1 and Lef1 than HSCs in their self-renewal capacity. The differential requirements in HSCs and LSCs thus identify Tcf1 and Lef1 transcription factors as novel therapeutic targets in treating hematological malignancies, and inhibition of Tcf1/Lef1-regulated transcriptional programs may thus provide a therapeutic window to eliminate LSCs with minimal side effect on normal HSC functions. PMID:27044748

  3. Risk factors for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Mani, S; Rybicki, L; Jagadeesh, D; Mossad, S B

    2016-05-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is one of the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in recent times. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) confers increased risk for CDI because of prolonged hospital stay, immunosuppression, the need to use broad-spectrum antibiotics and a complex interplay of preparative regimen and GvHD-induced gut mucosal damage. Our study evaluated risk factors (RF) for recurrent CDI in HSCT recipients given the ubiquity of traditional RF for CDI in this population. Of the 499 allogeneic HSCT recipients transplanted between 2005 and 2012, 61 (12%) developed CDI within 6 months before transplant or 2 years after transplant and were included in the analysis. Recurrent CDI occurred in 20 (33%) patients. One year incidence of CDI recurrence was 31%. Multivariable analyses identified the number of antecedent antibiotics other than those used to treat CDI as the only significant RF for recurrence (hazard ratio 1.96, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.52, P=0.025). Most recurrences occurred within 6 months of the first CDI, and the recurrence of CDI was associated with a trend for increased risk of mortality. This prompts the need for further investigation into secondary prophylaxis to prevent recurrent CDI. PMID:26726944

  4. Transcription factor SCL/TAL1 mediates the phosphorylation of MEK/ERK pathway in umbilical cord blood CD34⁺ stem cells during hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rui Qing; Wu, Jia Hui; Gong, Yu Ping; Guo, Yong; Xing, Hong Yun

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factor stem cell leukemia (SCL), also known as the T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL1), plays a key role in the regulation of hematopoiesis, but the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. The aim of the present study is to elucidate the effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal pathways underlying the biologic activity of SCL/TAL1 on normal hematopoietic development. Lentiviral vectors with up or down-regulation of SCL/TAL1 were transfected into umbilical cord blood CD34 stem cells. EGFR signaling pathways (including MEK/ERK and Akt/mTOR) and surface hematopoietic markers were analyzed in the process of hematopoietic differentiation. The data revealed that up or down-regulation of SCL/TAL1 gene was accompanied positively by the expressions of p-MEK and p-ERK1/2 protein, but the changes of Akt/mTOR were unobvious. MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 and SCL/TAL1 down-regulation showed similar inhibitory effects on erythroid, myeloid, and megakaryoid differentiation. However, Akt/mTOR pathway altered insignificantly. MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 could not affect the expression of SCL/TAL1 mRNA or protein. Taken together, these findings fully illustrated that SCL/TAL1 is located in the up-stream of MEK/ERK pathway and partially regulates hematopoiesis by modulating the phosphorylation level of the key proteins in MEK/ERK pathway. PMID:24405580

  5. Clinical characteristics and risk factors of Intracranial hemorrhage in patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Qian-Ming; Chen, Huan; Chen, Yu-Hong; Han, Wei; Wang, Feng-Rong; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan; Mo, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Yao; Wang, Yu; Chang, Ying-Jun; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) is one of the most life-threatening neurological complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although cerebral complications and its causes after allo-HSCT are well documented, assessment of the incidence and risk factors of intracranial hemorrhage following allo-HSCT are less discussed. A nested case-control study was conducted involving 160 subjects drawn from 2169 subjects who underwent HSCT at Peking University People's Hospital between 2004 and 2014. Thirty-two patients (1.5 %) with ICH were identified, and 128 controls were matched for age, gender, transplantation type, and time of transplantation. Intracranial hemorrhage was identified by CT scan and/or MRI by searching hospital records. Among the 32 ICH patients, 27 (82.9 %) developed intraparenchymal hemorrhages (IPH), 2 cases (5.7 %) suffered subdural hematomas (SDH), and 3 cases (8.6 %) had multiple hemorrhage lesions in the brain parenchyma. The median time of appearance for cerebral hemorrhages was 147.5 days. Multivariate analysis showed that systemic infections (hazard ratio 2.882, 95 % confidence interval 1.231-6.746), platelet count (5.894, 1.145-30.339), and fibrinogen levels (3.611, 1.528-8.532) were independent risk factors for intracranial hemorrhage among HSCT patients. The cumulative survival rate in the intracranial hemorrhage and control groups were 43.3 and 74.7 % (P = .001), respectively. Intracranial hemorrhage is associated with high mortality and a decreased overall survival rate. Systemic infections, platelet count, and fibrinogen levels were individual independent risk factors. PMID:27485455

  6. Risk factors for mortality in patients with bloodstream infections during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karpov, Igor; Milanovich, Natalia; Uss, Anatoly; Iskrov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Background Bloodstream infections (BSI) remain a frequent complication during the pre-engraftment period after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), resulting in high mortality rates. This study evaluated risk factors for mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period. Methods This prospective case control study was performed at the Center of Hematology and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Minsk, Republic of Belarus. Data relating to patient age and gender, date and type of transplantation, conditioning chemotherapy regimen, microorganisms isolated from blood, and antibacterial therapy were prospectively collected from all hematopoietic stem cell recipients with microbiologically proven cases of BSI in the pre-engraftment period. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality after onset of febrile neutropenia. Results A total of 135 adult patients with microbiologically proven BSI after HSCT were studied, with 65.2% of cases caused by gram-negative microorganisms and 21.5% by non-fermenting bacteria. Inadequate empiric antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant non-fermenting gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were independently associated with increased all-cause 30-day mortality in these patients. Conclusion The risk factors for mortality in adult patients with BSI in the pre-engraftment period after HSCT were inadequacy of empirical antibacterial therapy and isolation of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii or P. aeruginosa. PMID:27382554

  7. Factors affecting the outcome of related allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Ayas, Mouhab; Siddiqui, Khawar; Al-Jefri, Abdullah; El-Solh, Hassan; Al-Ahmari, Ali; Khairy, Ashraf; Markiz, Samer; Shahin, Hasan; Al-Musa, Abdulrahman; Al-Seraihy, Amal

    2014-10-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can cure bone marrow failure in patients with Fanconi Anemia (FA), and it is generally accepted that these patients should receive low-intensity conditioning because of the underlying DNA repair defect in their cells. Outcomes for recipients of matched related HCT have generally been favorable, but only a few studies have scrutinized the factors that may affect the eventual outcome of these patients. This retrospective analysis of 94 pediatric patients with FA who underwent related HCT at King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center was carried out to attempt to identify factors that may affect outcome. Results showed overall survival (OS) probabilities of 92.5%, 89%, and 86% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In univariate analysis, use of higher dose cyclophosphamide (CY) (60 mg/kg) conditioning was associated with a better 10-year OS than lower dose CY (20 mg/kg) conditioning (91% versus 82%, respectively; P = .035), and use of radiation-containing regimens was associated with a significantly lower 10-year OS than nonradiation regimens (76% versus 91%, respectively; P = .005). Of the 4 regimens used in this study, the fludarabine-based regimen was associated with the highest survival (95.2%; P = .034). The use of the higher dose CY (60 mg/kg) was associated with a significantly increased incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) (20% versus 5.6% respectively; P = .049). Three patients (3%) developed squamous cell carcinoma (2 oropharyngeal and 1 genitourinary), at 9.4, 5.4, and 13.3 years after HCT; 2 of them had radiation-containing conditioning. In conclusion, our data suggest that although using a higher dose CY (60 mg/kg) conditioning regimen may be associated with better survival, it is also associated with a significantly increased risk of HC. The addition of fludarabine to the low-dose CY (20 mg/kg) is associated with the best survival. On the other hand, radiation-containing regimens are associated with

  8. Hematopoietic stem cells: an overview.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Youssef Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Considerable efforts have been made in recent years in understanding the mechanisms that govern hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) origin, development, differentiation, self-renewal, aging, trafficking, plasticity and transdifferentiation. Hematopoiesis occurs in sequential waves in distinct anatomical locations during development and these shifts in location are accompanied by changes in the functional status of the stem cells and reflect the changing needs of the developing organism. HSCs make a choice of either self-renewal or committing to differentiation. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is considered to be critical to the maintenance of stem cell numbers. It is still under debate if HSC can rejuvenate infinitely or if they do not possess ''true" self-renewal and undergo replicative senescence such as any other somatic cell. Gene therapy applications that target HSCs offer a great potential for the treatment of hematologic and immunologic diseases. However, the clinical success has been limited by many factors. This review is intended to summarize the recent advances made in the human HSC field, and will review the hematopoietic stem cell from definition through development to clinical applications. PMID:25457002

  9. MicroRNA-30 inhibits antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 in mouse and human hematopoietic cells after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang Hong; Ha, Cam T; Xiao, Mang

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that microRNA-30 (miR-30) expression was initiated by radiation-induced proinflammatory factor IL-1β and NFkB activation in mouse and human hematopoietic cells. However, the downstream effectors of miR-30 and its specific role in radiation-induced cell death are not well understood. In the present study, we evaluated effects of radiation on miR-30 expression and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway Bcl-2 family factors in in vivo mouse and in vitro human hematopoietic cells. CD2F1 mice and human CD34+ cells were exposed to different doses of gamma-radiation. In addition to survival studies, mouse blood, bone marrow (BM) and spleen cells and human CD34+ cells were collected at 4 h, and 1, 3 and 4 days after irradiation to determine apoptotic and stress response signals. Our results showed that mouse serum miR-30, DNA damage marker γ-H2AX in BM, and Bim, Bax and Bak expression, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 and -7 activation in BM and/or spleen cells were upregulated in a radiation dose-dependent manner. Antiapoptotic factor Mcl-1 was significantly downregulated, whereas Bcl-2 was less changed or unaltered in the irradiated mouse cells and human CD34+ cells. Furthermore, a putative miR-30 binding site was found in the 3' UTR of Mcl-1 mRNA. miR-30 directly inhibits the expression of Mcl-1 through binding to its target sequence, which was demonstrated by a luciferase reporter assay, and the finding that Mcl-1 was uninhibited by irradiation in miR-30 knockdown CD34+ cells. Bcl-2 expression was not affected by miR-30. Our data suggest miR-30 plays a key role in radiation-induced apoptosis through directly targeting Mcl-1in hematopoietic cells. PMID:27032651

  10. β-Catenin-Independent Activation of TCF1/LEF1 in Human Hematopoietic Tumor Cells through Interaction with ATF2 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Grumolato, Luca; Liu, Guizhong; Haremaki, Tomomi; Mungamuri, Sathish Kumar; Mong, Phyllus; Akiri, Gal; Lopez-Bergami, Pablo; Arita, Adriana; Anouar, Youssef; Mlodzik, Marek; Ronai, Ze'ev A.; Brody, Joshua; Weinstein, Daniel C.; Aaronson, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    The role of Wnt signaling in embryonic development and stem cell maintenance is well established and aberrations leading to the constitutive up-regulation of this pathway are frequent in several types of human cancers. Upon ligand-mediated activation, Wnt receptors promote the stabilization of β-catenin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) family of transcription factors to regulate the expression of Wnt target genes. When not bound to β-catenin, the TCF/LEF proteins are believed to act as transcriptional repressors. Using a specific lentiviral reporter, we identified hematopoietic tumor cells displaying constitutive TCF/LEF transcriptional activation in the absence of β-catenin stabilization. Suppression of TCF/LEF activity in these cells mediated by an inducible dominant-negative TCF4 (DN-TCF4) inhibited both cell growth and the expression of Wnt target genes. Further, expression of TCF1 and LEF1, but not TCF4, stimulated TCF/LEF reporter activity in certain human cell lines independently of β-catenin. By a complementary approach in vivo, TCF1 mutants, which lacked the ability to bind to β-catenin, induced Xenopus embryo axis duplication, a hallmark of Wnt activation, and the expression of the Wnt target gene Xnr3. Through generation of different TCF1-TCF4 fusion proteins, we identified three distinct TCF1 domains that participate in the β-catenin-independent activity of this transcription factor. TCF1 and LEF1 physically interacted and functionally synergized with members of the activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) family of transcription factors. Moreover, knockdown of ATF2 expression in lymphoma cells phenocopied the inhibitory effects of DN-TCF4 on the expression of target genes associated with the Wnt pathway and on cell growth. Together, our findings indicate that, through interaction with ATF2 factors, TCF1/LEF1 promote the growth of hematopoietic malignancies in the absence of

  11. Use of recombinant factor VIIa in uncontrolled gastrointestinal bleeding after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation among patients with thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yaqiong; Wu, Qian; Wu, Xiaojin; Qiu, Huiying; Sun, Aining; Ruan, Changgeng; Wu, Depei; Han, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Recombinant-activated factor VII (rVIIa) is a vitamin K-dependent glycoprotein that is an analog of the naturally occurring protease. It has an off-label use to control life-threatening bleeding that is refractory to other measures and was shown to decrease transfusion requirements. Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a severe complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with thrombocytopenia, while hemostatic measures based on antifibrinolytic or transfusion therapy may not always be successful. The present study investigated the treatment with rFVIIa in severe GI bleeding among thrombocytopenia patients undergoing HSCT. Methods: rFVIIa was given as a single dose of 60μg/kg in patients with GI bleeding following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Results: Among all patients enrolled, 12 (75%) of 16 patients obtained a response, of which 5 achieved a complete response and 7 achieved a partial response. The 4 remiaing patients (25%) had no response. Nine patients (56.3%) died in a follow-up of 90 days. No thromboembolic events wereassociated with the drug administration occurred. Conclusions: Our study showed that rFVIIa may represent an additional therapeutic option in such cases. PMID:26870102

  12. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  13. Factors Associated With Parental Activation in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Pennarola, Brian W.; Rodday, Angie Mae; Mayer, Deborah K.; Ratichek, Sara J.; Davies, Stella M.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Patel, Sunita; Bingen, Kristin; Kupst, Mary Jo; Schwartz, Lisa; Guinan, Eva C.; Hibbard, Judith H.; Parsons, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    Patient activation, the extension of self-efficacy into self-management, is an essential component of effective chronic care. In pediatric populations, caregiver activation is also needed for proper disease management. This study investigates the relationships between parental activation and other characteristics of parent–child dyads (N = 198) presenting for pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplant. Parental activation concerning their child’s health was assessed using the Parent Patient Activation Measure (Parent-PAM), a modified version of the well-validated Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Using hierarchical linear regression and following the Belsky process model for determining parenting behaviors, a multivariate model was created for parental activation on behalf of their child that showed that the parent’s age, rating of their own general health, self-activation, and duration of the child’s illness were significantly related to Parent-PAM score. Our findings characterize a potentially distinct form of activation in a parent–child cohort preparing for a demanding clinical course. PMID:22203645

  14. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor for hematopoietic stem cell donation from healthy female donors during pregnancy and lactation: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Pessach, Ilias; Shimoni, Avichai; Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) are mostly used as supportive measures to reduce infectious complications associated with neutropenia. Over the past decade, the use of HGFs became a common method for mobilizing human CD34+ stem cells, either for autologous or allogeneic transplantation. However, since their introduction the long-term safety of the procedure has become a major focus of discussion and research. Most information refers to healthy normal donors and data concerning pregnant and lactating women are scarce. The clinical question, which is the core of this review, is whether stem cell donation, preceded by administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization, is a safe procedure for pregnant donors. METHODS Literature searches were performed in Pubmed for English language articles published before the end of May 2012, focusing on G-CSF administration during pregnancy, lactation and hematopoietic stem cell donation. Searches included animal and human studies. RESULTS Data from animals (n = 15 studies) and women (n = 46 studies) indicate that G-CSF crosses the placenta, stimulates fetal granulopoiesis, improves neonatal survival mostly for very immature infants, promotes trophoblast growth and placental metabolism and has an anti-abortive role. Granulocyte macrophage-CSF is a key cytokine in the maternal immune tolerance towards the implanted embryo and exerts protective long-term programming effects to preimplantation embryos. The available data suggest that probably CSFs should not be administered during the time of most active organogenesis (first trimester), except perhaps for the first week during which implantation takes place. Provided CSF is administered during the second and third trimesters, it appears to be safe, and pregnant women receiving the CSF treatment can become hematopoietic stem cell donors. There are also risks related to the anesthesia, which is required for the bone marrow aspiration. During

  15. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Michael G.; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Moore, Kateri A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gurudutta, Gangenahalli

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are endowed with a distinct potential to bolster self-renewal and to generate progeny that differentiate into mature cells of myeloid and lymphoid lineages. Both hematopoietic stem cells and mature cells have the same genome, but their gene expression is controlled by an additional layer of epigenetics such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications, enabling each cell-type to acquire various forms and functions. Until recently, several studies have largely focussed on the transcription factors andniche factors for the understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which hematopoietic cells replicate and differentiate. Several lines of emerging evidence suggest that epigenetic modifications eventually result in a defined chromatin structure and an “individual” gene expression pattern, which play an essential role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. Distinct epigenetic marks decide which sets of genes may be expressed and which genes are kept silent. Epigenetic mechanisms are interdependent and ensure lifelong production of blood and bone marrow, thereby contributing to stem cell homeostasis. The epigenetic analysis of hematopoiesis raises the exciting possibility that chromatin structure is dynamic enough for regulated expression of genes. Though controlled chromatin accessibility plays an essential role in maintaining blood homeostasis; mutations in chromatin impacts on the regulation of genes critical to the development of leukemia. In this review, we explored the contribution of epigenetic machinery which has implications for the ramification of molecular details of hematopoietic self-renewal for normal development and underlying events that potentially co-operate to induce leukemia. PMID:27426084

  17. Distribution of the hematopoietic growth factor G-CSF and its receptor in the adult human brain with specific reference to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridwan, Sami; Bauer, Henrike; Frauenknecht, Katrin; Hefti, Kyra; von Pein, Harald; Sommer, Clemens J

    2014-04-01

    The granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), being a member of the hematopoietic growth factor family, is also critically involved in controlling proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Treatment with G-CSF has been shown to result in substantial neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects in various experimental models of acute and chronic diseases of the central nervous system. Although G-CSF has been tested in a clinical study for treatment of acute ischemic stroke, there is only fragmentary data on the distribution of this cytokine and its receptor in the human brain. Therefore, the present study was focused on the immunohistochemical analysis of the protein expression of G-CSF and its receptor (G-CSF R) in the adult human brain. Since G-CSF has been shown not only to exert neuroprotective effects in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also to be a candidate for clinical treatment, we have also placed an emphasis on the regulation of these molecules in this neurodegenerative disease. One major finding is that both G-CSF and G-CSF R were ubiquitously but not uniformly expressed in neurons throughout the CNS. Protein expression of G-CSF and G-CSF R was not restricted to neurons but was also detectable in astrocytes, ependymal cells, and choroid plexus cells. However, the distribution of G-CSF and G-CSF R did not substantially differ between AD brains and control, even in the hippocampus, where early neurodegenerative changes typically occur. PMID:24387791

  18. Bag of Marbles controls the size and organization of the Drosophila hematopoietic niche through interactions with the Insulin-like growth factor pathway and Retinoblastoma-family protein.

    PubMed

    Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Hopkins, Dawn W; Schulz, Robert A

    2015-07-01

    Bag of Marbles (Bam) is known to function as a positive regulator of hematopoietic progenitor maintenance in the lymph gland blood cell-forming organ during Drosophila hematopoiesis. Here, we demonstrate a key function for Bam in cells of the lymph gland posterior signaling center (PSC), a cellular domain proven to function as a hematopoietic niche. Bam is expressed in PSC cells, and gene loss-of-function results in PSC overgrowth and disorganization, indicating that Bam plays a crucial role in controlling the proper development of the niche. It was previously shown that Insulin receptor (InR) pathway signaling is essential for proper PSC cell proliferation. We analyzed PSC cell number in lymph glands double-mutant for bam and InR pathway genes, and observed that bam genetically interacts with pathway members in the formation of a normal PSC. The elF4A protein is a translation factor downstream of InR pathway signaling, and functional knockdown of this crucial regulator rescued the bam PSC overgrowth phenotype, further supporting the cooperative function of Bam with InR pathway members. Additionally, we documented that the Retinoblastoma-family protein (Rbf), a proven regulator of cell proliferation, was present in cells of the PSC, with a bam function-dependent expression. By contrast, perturbation of Decapentaplegic or Wingless signaling failed to affect Rbf niche cell expression. Together, these findings indicate that InR pathway-Bam-Rbf functional interactions represent a newly identified means to regulate the correct size and organization of the PSC hematopoietic niche. PMID:26041767

  19. A Soluble Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor Decoy Receptor as a Novel Tool to Increase Hematopoietic Cell Homing and Reconstitution in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Audrey; Benabdallah, Basma; Palacio, Lina; Carbonneau, Cynthia L.; Le, Oanh N.; Haddad, Élie

    2013-01-01

    The relative ineffectiveness of hematopoietic stem cells in reaching the bone marrow upon transplantation combined with the limited number of these cells available is a major reason for graft failure and delayed hematopoietic recovery. Hence, the development of strategies that could enhance homing is of high interest. Here, we provide evidence that homing is severely impaired postexposure to ionizing radiation (IR) in mice, an effect we found was time dependent and could be partially rescued using mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) therapy. In an attempt to further increase homing, we took advantage of our observation that the granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known to induce cell mobilization, is increased in the marrow of mice shortly after their exposure to IR. As such, we developed a truncated, yet functional, soluble G-CSF receptor (solG-CSFR), which we hypothesized could act as a decoy and foster homing. Using MSCs or conditioned media as delivery vehicles, we show that an engineered solG-CSFR has the potential to increase homing and hematopoietic reconstitution in mice. Altogether, our results provide novel findings at the interplay of IR and stromal cell therapy and present the regulation of endogenous G-CSF as an innovative proof-of-concept strategy to manipulate hematopoietic cell homing. PMID:23205715

  20. Hematopoietic effect of deer antler extract fermented by Bacillus subtilis on murine marrow cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yooheon; Choi, Hyeon-Son; Lee, Hyun-Sun

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES We examined the chemical composition and the effect of fermented deer antler on hematopoietic factors in bone marrow cells. MATERIALS/METHODS For the preparation of fermented deer antler extract (FAB), fermentation was carried out using Bacillus subtilis at 30℃ for 7 days. The hematopoietic effect of FAB was investigated hematopoietic factors in marrow cells. RESULTS The contents of total sugar, sulfated glycosaminoglycans, and uronic acid and the dry weight gradually increased with fermentation time. The sialic acid content (from 0.14 mg/mL to 0.54 mg/mL) was the highest on the 4th day of fermentation after which it decreased. The proliferating activity of bone marrow cells increased with fermentation times. The levels of various hematopoietic growth factors were determined to verify the beneficial effect of deer antler extract fermented by B. subtilis on hematopoiesis. FAB increased the number of stem cell factors and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in bone marrow cells. In addition, FAB augmented the burst-forming unit erythroid and total colonies in splenocyte-conditioned medium compared with non-fermented antler extract (NFA). However, FAB did not affect the mRNA levels of erythropoietin, an important factor for erythropoiesis. CONCLUSIONS FAB, like NFA, did not directly affect hematopoiesis, but contributed to hematopoiesis by stimulating the production of hematopoietic factors. PMID:26425273

  1. Effect of The Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor кB and RANK Ligand on In Vitro Differentiation of Cord Blood CD133+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells to Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Kalantari, Nasim; Abroun, Saeid; Soleimani, Masoud; Kaviani, Saeid; Azad, Mehdi; Eskandari, Fatemeh; Habibi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) appears to be an osteoclast-activating factor, bearing an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma. Some studies demonstrated that U-266 myeloma cell line and primary myeloma cells expressed RANK and RANKL. It had been reported that the expression of myeloid and monocytoid markers was increased by co-culturing myeloma cells with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This study also attempted to show the molecular mechanism of RANK and RANKL on differentiation capability of human cord blood HSC to osteoclast, as well as expression of calcitonin receptor (CTR) on cord blood HSC surface. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood and cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL. Osteoclast differentiation was characterized by using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining, giemsa staining, immunophenotyping, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for specific genes. Results Hematopoietic stem cells expressed RANK before and after differentiation into osteoclast. Compared to control group, flow cytometric results showed an increased expression of RANK after differentiation. Expression of CTR mRNA showed TRAP reaction was positive in some differentiated cells, including osteoclast cells. Conclusion Presence of RANKL and M-CSF in bone marrow could induce HSCs differentiation into osteoclast. PMID:27602313

  2. Plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C; Mehrotra, Meenal

    2015-01-01

    Almost two decades ago, a number of cell culture and preclinical transplantation studies suggested the striking concept of the tissue-reconstituting ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While this heralded an exciting time of radically new therapies for disorders of many organs and tissues, the concept was soon mired by controversy and remained dormant. This chapter provides a brief review of evidence for HSC plasticity including our findings based on single HSC transplantation in mouse. These studies strongly support the concept that HSCs are pluripotent and may be the source for the majority, if not all, of the cell types in our body. PMID:26590762

  3. Risk factors for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia and its influence on survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tavadze, M; Rybicki, L; Mossad, S; Avery, R; Yurch, M; Pohlman, B; Duong, H; Dean, R; Hill, B; Andresen, S; Hanna, R; Majhail, N; Copelan, E; Bolwell, B; Kalaycio, M; Sobecks, R

    2014-10-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) is a well-known infectious complication among immunocompromised patients. We performed a retrospective analysis to identify risk factors for the development of VRE bacteremia (VRE-B) within 15 months after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) and to determine its prognostic importance for other post-transplant outcomes. Eight hundred consecutive adult patients who underwent alloHCT for hematologic diseases from 1997 to 2011 were included. Seventy-six (10%) developed VRE-B at a median of 46 days post transplant. Year of transplant, higher HCT comorbidity score, a diagnosis of ALL, unrelated donor and umbilical cord blood donor were all significant risk factors on multivariable analysis for the development of VRE-B. Sixty-seven (88%) died within a median of 1.1 months after VRE-B, but only four (6%) of these deaths were attributable to VRE. VRE-B was significantly associated with worse OS (hazard ratio 4.28, 95% confidence interval 3.23-5.66, P<0.001) in multivariable analysis. We conclude that the incidence of VRE-B after alloHCT has increased over time and is highly associated with mortality, although not usually attributable to VRE infection. Rather than being the cause, this may be a marker for a complicated post-transplant course. Strategies to further enhance immune reconstitution post transplant and strict adherence to infection prevention measures are warranted. PMID:25111516

  4. Pre- and Post-Transplantation Risk Factors for Delirium Onset and Severity in Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fann, Jesse R.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Roth-Roemer, Sari; Katon, Wayne J.; Syrjala, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine pre- and post-transplantation risk factors for delirium onset and severity during the acute phase of myeloablative hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Patients and Methods Ninety adult patients with malignancies admitted to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center for their first HSCT were assessed prospectively from 1 week before transplantation to 30 days after transplantation. Delirium was assessed three times per week using the Delirium Rating Scale and the Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale. Potential risk factors were assessed by patient self-report, charts, and computerized records. Multivariable analysis of time to onset of a delirium episode was undertaken using Cox proportional hazards regression with time-varying covariates. Analysis for delirium severity was carried out using a linear mixed effects model. Validation and sensitivity analyses were performed on the final models. Results Forty-five patients (50%) experienced a delirium episode. Pretransplantation risk factors for onset and higher severity of delirium were higher mean alkaline phosphatase and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. Poorer pretransplantation executive functioning was also associated with higher delirium severity. Higher doses of opioid medications were the only post-transplantation risk factor for delirium onset (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.08). Higher opioid doses, current and prior pain, and higher BUN levels were post-transplantation risk factors for greater delirium severity (all P < .01). Conclusion Pre- and post-transplantation factors can assist in identifying patients who are at risk for delirium during myeloablative HSCT and may enable clinical interventions to prevent delirium onset or decrease delirium symptoms. PMID:21263081

  5. Effects of growth hormone therapeutic supplementation on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in children with growth hormone deficiency: focus on proliferation and differentiation capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kawa, M P; Stecewicz, I; Piecyk, K; Pius-Sadowska, E; Paczkowska, E; Rogińska, D; Sobuś, A; Łuczkowska, K; Gawrych, E; Petriczko, E; Walczak, M; Machaliński, B

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the direct effects of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy (GH-RT) on hematopoiesis in children with GH deficiency (GHD) with the special emphasis on proliferation and cell cycle regulation. Peripheral blood (PB) was collected from sixty control individuals and forty GHD children before GH-RT and in 3rd and 6th month of GH-RT to measure hematological parameters and isolate CD34(+)-enriched hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Selected parameters of PB were analyzed by hematological analyzer. Moreover, collected HPCs were used to analyze GH receptor (GHR) and IGF1 expression, clonogenicity, and cell cycle activity. Finally, global gene expression profile of collected HPCs was analyzed using genome-wide RNA microarrays. GHD resulted in a decrease in several hematological parameters related to RBCs and significantly diminished clonogenicity of erythroid progenies. In contrast, GH-RT stimulated increases in clonogenic growth of erythroid lineage and RBC counts as well as significant up-regulation of cell cycle-propagating genes, including MAP2K1, cyclins D1/E1, PCNA, and IGF1. Likewise, GH-RT significantly modified GHR expression in isolated HPCs and augmented systemic IGF1 levels. Global gene expression analysis revealed significantly higher expression of genes associated with cell cycle, proliferation, and differentiation in HPCs from GH-treated subjects. (i) GH-RT significantly augments cell cycle progression in HPCs and increases clonogenicity of erythroid progenitors; (ii) GHR expression in HPCs is modulated by GH status; (iii) molecular mechanisms by which GH influences hematopoiesis might provide a basis for designing therapeutic interventions for hematological complications related to GHD. PMID:25920498

  6. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L.; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis1,2. While incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known crosstalk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic–adrenal–medullary axis, which controls stress–induced catecholamine release in support of the fight–or–flight reflex3,4. It remains unknown however if chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease–promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Sympathetic nerve fibers release surplus noradrenaline, which uses the β3 adrenergic receptor to signal bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels. Consequently, elevated hematopoietic stem cell proliferation increases output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis–prone ApoE−/− mice encounter chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promotes plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  7. Gene profiling of growth factor independence 1B gene (Gfi-1B) in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, Michael; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beelen, Dietrich W; Elmaagacli, Ahmet H

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular effects of growth factor independence 1B (Gfi-1B), a transcription factor essential for the development of hematopoietic cells and differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, the naturally Gfi-1B overexpressing cell line K562 was cultured in the presence of Gfi-1B target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). SiRNA treatment significantly knocked down Gfi-1B expression with an efficiency of nearly 90%. Analysis of the siRNA silencing protocol by colony-forming units ensured that it was not cytotoxic. Samples from Gfi-1B overexpressing cells and cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B were analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data; relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by reserve transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, including MYC/MYCBP and CDKN1A. Interestingly, transcripts within components of the signalling cascade of immune cells (PLD1, LAMP1, HSP90, IL6ST), of the tyrosine kinase pathway (TPR, RAC3) and of the transcription factors (RAC3, CEP290, JEM-1, ATR, MYC, SMC3, RARA, RBBP6) were found to be differentially expressed in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells compared to controls. Individual genes such as ZDHHC17, DMXL1, ZNF292 were found to be upregulated in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells. In addition, down-regulated transcripts showed cell signaling transcripts for several chemokine gene members including GNAL, CXCL5, GNL3L, GPR65, TMEM30, BCL11B and transcription factors (GTF2H3, ATXN3). In conclusion, several essential cell signalling factors, as well as transcriptional and post-translational regulation genes were differentially expressed in cells that overexpressed Gfi-1B compared to control cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B. Our data indicate that Gfi-1B signalling is important for commitment and maturation of hematopoietic cell populations. PMID:18224412

  8. Genetic modification of bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic cells with human coagulation factor IX-expressing plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sam, Mohammad Reza; Azadbakhsh, Azadeh Sadat; Farokhi, Farrah; Rezazadeh, Kobra; Sam, Sohrab; Zomorodipour, Alireza; Haddad-Mashadrizeh, Aliakbar; Delirezh, Nowruz; Mokarizadeh, Aram

    2016-05-01

    Ex-vivo gene therapy of hemophilias requires suitable bioreactors for secretion of hFIX into the circulation and stem cells hold great potentials in this regard. Viral vectors are widely manipulated and used to transfer hFIX gene into stem cells. However, little attention has been paid to the manipulation of hFIX transgene itself. Concurrently, the efficacy of such a therapeutic approach depends on determination of which vectors give maximal transgene expression. With this in mind, TF-1 (primary hematopoietic lineage) and rat-bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were transfected with five hFIX-expressing plasmids containing different combinations of two human β-globin (hBG) introns inside the hFIX-cDNA and Kozak element and hFIX expression was evaluated by different methods. In BMSCs and TF-1 cells, the highest hFIX level was obtained from the intron-less and hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids respectively. The highest hFIX activity was obtained from the cells that carrying the hBG intron-I,II containing plasmids. BMSCs were able to produce higher hFIX by 1.4 to 4.7-fold increase with activity by 2.4 to 4.4-fold increase compared to TF-1 cells transfected with the same constructs. BMSCs and TF-1 cells could be effectively bioengineered without the use of viral vectors and hFIX minigene containing hBG introns could represent a particular interest in stem cell-based gene therapy of hemophilias. PMID:26928674

  9. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  10. Cripto regulates hematopoietic stem cells as a hypoxic-niche-related factor through cell surface receptor GRP78.

    PubMed

    Miharada, Kenichi; Karlsson, Göran; Rehn, Matilda; Rörby, Emma; Siva, Kavitha; Cammenga, Jörg; Karlsson, Stefan

    2011-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are maintained in hypoxic niches in endosteal regions of bones. Here we demonstrate that Cripto and its receptor GRP78 are important regulators of HSCs in the niche. Flow cytometry analyses revealed two distinct subpopulations of CD34(-)KSL cells based on the expression of GRP78, and these populations showed different reconstitution potential in transplantation assays. GRP78(+)HSCs mainly reside in the endosteal area, are more hypoxic, and exhibit a lower mitochondrial potential, and their HSC capacity was maintained in vitro by Cripto through induction of higher glycolytic activity. Additionally, HIF-1α KO mice have decreased numbers of GRP78(+)HSCs and reduced expression of Cripto in the endosteal niche. Furthermore, blocking GRP78 induced a movement of HSCs from the endosteal to the central marrow area. These data suggest that Cripto/GRP78 signaling is an important pathway that regulates HSC quiescence and maintains HSCs in hypoxia as an intermediary of HIF-1α. PMID:21982233

  11. Plerixafor and abbreviated-course granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for mobilizing hematopoietic progenitor cells in light chain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Binod; Strouse, Christopher; D'Souza, Anita; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Esselman, Jeanie; Eastwood, Daniel; Pasquini, Marcelo; Saber, Wael; Drobyski, William; Rizzo, J Douglas; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    Cytokine-based mobilization in light chain (AL) amyloidosis is frequently complicated by fluid overload, weight gain, cardiac arrhythmias, and peri-mobilization mortality. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) mobilization outcomes in 49 consecutive AL amyloidosis patients at our institution between 2004 and 2013 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G) (10 μg/kg/day) (n = 25) versus an institutional protocol to limit G exposure using plerixafor (P) (.24 mg/kg s.c. starting day 3 of G 10 μg/kg) (n = 24). G+P strategy yielded higher total CD34(+) cells/kg (12.8 × 10(6) versus 6.3 × 10(6); P < .001) and CD34(+) cells/kg collected on day 1 (10.8 × 10(6) versus 4.9 × 10(6), P = .004) compared with the G cohort. More G+P patients collected ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (22 versus 16, P = .02) and ≥ 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (13 versus 5, P = .01). Four patients (16%) had mobilization failure with G; none with G+P. Peri-mobilization weight gain was lower with G+P strategy (median weight gain 1 versus 7 pounds, P = .009). Numbers of apheresis sessions (median, 1 versus 1, P = .52), number of hospitalization days (median, 1.1 versus 1.6, P = .52), transfusions, use of intravenous antibiotics, and cardiac arrhythmias were similar. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that upfront use of G+P as a mobilization strategy results in superior HPC collection, no mobilization failures, and less weight gain than G alone. PMID:25111581

  12. Physical Activity, Fitness, and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer with a History of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Slater, Megan E; Steinberger, Julia; Ross, Julie A; Kelly, Aaron S; Chow, Eric J; Koves, Ildiko H; Hoffmeister, Paul; Sinaiko, Alan R; Petryk, Anna; Moran, Antoinette; Lee, Jill; Chow, Lisa S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-07-01

    Along with other childhood cancer survivors (CCS), hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors are at high risk of treatment-related late effects, including cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Cardiometabolic risk factor abnormalities may be exacerbated by inadequate physical activity (PA). Relationships between PA and cardiometabolic risk factors have not been well described in CCS with HCT. PA (self reported), mobility (timed up and go test), endurance (6-minute walk test), handgrip strength, and cardiometabolic risk factors were measured in 119 HCT survivors and 66 sibling controls ages ≥18 years. Adjusted comparisons between HCT survivors and controls and between categories of low and high PA, mobility, endurance, and strength were performed with linear regression. Among HCT survivors, the high PA group had lower waist circumference (WC) (81.9 ± 2.5 versus 88.6 ± 3.1 cm ± standard error (SE), P = .009) than the low PA group, whereas the high endurance group had lower WC (77.8 ± 2.6 versus 87.8 ± 2.5 cm ± SE, P = .0001) and percent fat mass (33.6 ± 1.8 versus 39.4 ± 1.7% ± SE, P = .0008) and greater insulin sensitivity (IS) (10.9 ± 1.0 versus 7.42 ± 1.14 mg/kg/min ± SE via euglycemic insulin clamp, P = .001) than the low endurance group. Differences were greater in HCT survivors than in controls for WC between low and high PA groups, triglycerides between low and high mobility groups, and WC, systolic blood pressure, and IS between low and high endurance groups (all Pinteraction <.05). Higher endurance was associated with a more favorable cardiometabolic profile in HCT survivors, suggesting that interventions directed to increase endurance in survivors may reduce the risk of future cardiovascular disease. PMID:25865649

  13. Nerve growth factor: a neurotrophin with activity on cells of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Aloe, L; Simone, M D; Properzi, F

    Numerous studies published in the last two decades provide evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF), a polypeptide originally discovered because of its neurotrophic activity, acts on a variety of cells of the immune system, including mast cells, eosinophils, and B and T lymphocytes. NGF has been shown to increase during inflammatory responses, autoimmune disorders, parasitic infections, and allergic diseases. Moreover, stress, which is characterized also by activation of a variety of immune cells, causes a significant increase in basal plasma NGF levels. Recently published studies reveal that hematopoietic progenitor cells seem to be able to produce and/or respond to NGF. We report these data and discuss the hypothesis of the possible implication of NGF on the functional activities of immune cells. PMID:10383121

  14. The High Effect of Chemomobilization with High-Dose Etopside + Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Autologous Hematopoietic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yanmaz, Mustafa Teoman; Selvi, Ahmet; Usul, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HSCT) provides hematopoietic support after high-dose chemotherapy and is the standard of care for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), chemo sensitive relapsed high or intermediate grade non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL). However, yields of hematopoietic stem cells vary greatly between patients, and the optimal strategy to mobilize hematopoietic stem cells into peripheral blood for collection has not been defined yet. We investigated the efficacy and safety of chemo mobilization with an intermediate dose etoposide (VP-16; 200 mg/m2 on days 1-3) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)(5 µg/kg twice daily from day 4 through the final day of collection). We reviewed our institutional experience with 91 patients (71 MM, 12 HL, 8 NHL) mobilized with this regimen. VP-16 + G-CSF resulted in successful mobilization in 95.55% of the patients (on one patient stem cell collection with plerixafor was applied), including 76 patients (83.52%) whose stem cells were collected successfully in a single day. Collection was managed between min. D8 and max. D17. Patient age, gender, exposure to previous irradiation and chemotherapy, previous mobilization attempts, and disease characteristics were not considered during selection. Adverse effects of the regimen included supportive transfusions and fevers requiring hospitalization or intravenous antibiotics. VP-16 and G-CSF appears to be a safe and effective mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation, producing excellent stem cell yield with the majority of patients requiring 1 day of apheresis. PMID:27103979

  15. The homeodomain transcription factor Prep1 (pKnox1) is required for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell activity.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Patrizia; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Longobardi, Elena; Iotti, Giorgio; Ferretti, Elisabetta; Diaz, Victor M; Miccio, Annarita; Ferrari, Giuliana; Blasi, Francesco

    2007-11-15

    Most of the hypomorphic Prep1(i/i) embryos (expressing 3-10% of the Prep1 protein), die between E17.5 and P0, with profound anemia, eye malformations and angiogenic anomalies [Ferretti, E., Villaescusa, J.C., Di Rosa, P., Fernandez-Diaz, L.-C., Longobardi, E., Mazzieri, R., Miccio, A., Micali, N., Selleri, L., Ferrari G., Blasi, F. (2006). Hypomorphic mutation of the TALE gene Prep1 (pKnox1) causes a major reduction of Pbx and Meis proteins and a pleiotropic embryonic phenotype. Mol. Cell. Biol. 26, 5650-5662]. We now report on the hematopoietic phenotype of these embryos. Prep1(i/i) fetal livers (FL) are hypoplastic, produce less common myeloid progenitors colonies (CFU-GEMM) in cytokine-supplemented methylcellulose and have an increased number of B-cells precursors that differentiate poorly. Prep1(i/i) FL is able to protect lethally irradiated mice only at high cell doses but the few protected mice show major anomalies in all hematopoietic lineages in both bone marrow (BM) and peripheral organs. Prep1(i/i) FL cells compete inefficiently with wild type bone marrow in competitive repopulation experiments, suggesting that the major defect lies in long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LTR-HSC). Indeed, wt embryonic expression of Prep1 in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, fetal liver (FL), cKit(+)Sca1(+)Lin(-)AA4.1(+) (KSLA) cells and B-lymphocytes precursors agrees with the observed phenotype. We therefore conclude that Prep1 is required for a correct and complete hematopoiesis. PMID:17904118

  16. Transformation of human mesenchymal cells and skin fibroblasts into hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Harris, David M; Hazan-Haley, Inbal; Coombes, Kevin; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Liu, Jie; Liu, Zhiming; Li, Ping; Ravoori, Murali; Abruzzo, Lynne; Han, Lin; Singh, Sheela; Sun, Michael; Kundra, Vikas; Kurzrock, Razelle; Estrov, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    Patients with prolonged myelosuppression require frequent platelet and occasional granulocyte transfusions. Multi-donor transfusions induce alloimmunization, thereby increasing morbidity and mortality. Therefore, an autologous or HLA-matched allogeneic source of platelets and granulocytes is needed. To determine whether nonhematopoietic cells can be reprogrammed into hematopoietic cells, human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and skin fibroblasts were incubated with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine (Aza) and the growth factors (GF) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and stem cell factor. This treatment transformed MSCs to round, non-adherent cells expressing T-, B-, myeloid-, or stem/progenitor-cell markers. The transformed cells engrafted as hematopoietic cells in bone marrow of immunodeficient mice. DNA methylation and mRNA array analysis suggested that Aza and GF treatment demethylated and activated HOXB genes. Indeed, transfection of MSCs or skin fibroblasts with HOXB4, HOXB5, and HOXB2 genes transformed them into hematopoietic cells. Further studies are needed to determine whether transformed MSCs or skin fibroblasts are suitable for therapy. PMID:21731684

  17. Multipotent hematopoietic cell lines derived from C/EBPalpha(-/-) knockout mice display granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte- colony-stimulating factor, and retinoic acid-induced granulocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Collins, S J; Ulmer, J; Purton, L E; Darlington, G

    2001-10-15

    The transcription factor C/EBPalpha is an important mediator of granulocyte differentiation and regulates the expression of multiple granulocyte-specific genes including the granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptor, neutrophil elastase, and myeloperoxidase. Indeed C/EBPalpha knockout mice display a profound block in granulocyte differentiation. To study this block in granulocytic differentiation in more detail, retroviral vector-mediated transduction of a dominant-negative retinoic acid receptor was used to establish hematopoietic growth factor-dependent, lympho-myeloid progenitor cell lines from the fetal livers of both the C/EBPalpha knockout animals (C/EBPalpha(-/-)) and their heterozygous littermates (C/EBPalpha(+/-)). Surprisingly, the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cell lines displayed significant spontaneous granulocytic differentiation, and this differentiation was markedly enhanced when the cells were stimulated with granulocyte macrophage (GM)-CSF. This GM-CSF-mediated differentiation was associated with the up-regulation of G-CSF receptor mRNA, and the combination of GM-CSF and G-CSF generated more than 95% mature neutrophils in the C/EBPalpha(-/-) cultures. The addition of all-trans retinoic acid also enhanced this granulocytic differentiation of the cultured C/EBPalpha(-/-) cells, indicating that the activated retinoic acid receptors can enhance granulocytic differentiation through a molecular pathway that is independent of C/EBPalpha. These studies clearly indicate that terminal granulocytic differentiation associated with the up-regulation of C/EBPalpha-responsive genes can occur in the absence of C/EBPalpha, and they indicate the existence of multiple independent molecular pathways potentially used by primitive hematopoietic precursors that can lead to the development of mature granulocytes. PMID:11588034

  18. Motogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jennifer; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling and accurate spatio-temporal coordination of growth factor expression are two factors that are believed to regulate mitoses and cell migration in developing and regenerating tissues. The present quantitative videomicroscopical study examined the influence of some of the principal components of extracellular matrix and several growth factors that are known to be expressed in dermal wounds on three important facets of human skin cell behaviour in culture. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts (and myofibroblast controls) exhibited varying degrees of substrate adhesion, division and migration depending on the composition of the culture substrate. Substrates that are recognized components of transitional matrices generally accentuated cell adhesion and proliferation, and were motogenic, when compared with serum-treated control surfaces, whereas components of more stable structures such as basement membrane had less influence. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and α fibroblastic growth factor (αFGF) all promoted cell proliferation and were chemokinetic to dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). PDGF, EGF and KGF, but not TGFβ or αFGF, all enhanced proliferation of dermal keratinocytes. The same growth factors, and in addition KGF, all stimulated motility in keratinocytes, but TGFβ and αFGF again had no effect. Developing a better understanding of the interdependency of factors that control crucial cell behaviour may assist those who are interested in the regulation of histogenesis and also inform the development of rational therapeutic strategies for the management of chronic and poorly healed wounds. PMID:16011545

  19. Engineering Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Lessons from Development.

    PubMed

    Rowe, R Grant; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Zon, Leonard I; Daley, George Q

    2016-06-01

    Cell engineering has brought us tantalizingly close to the goal of deriving patient-specific hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). While directed differentiation and transcription factor-mediated conversion strategies have generated progenitor cells with multilineage potential, to date, therapy-grade engineered HSCs remain elusive due to insufficient long-term self-renewal and inadequate differentiated progeny functionality. A cross-species approach involving zebrafish and mammalian systems offers complementary methodologies to improve understanding of native HSCs. Here, we discuss the role of conserved developmental timing processes in vertebrate hematopoiesis, highlighting how identification and manipulation of stage-specific factors that specify HSC developmental state must be harnessed to engineer HSCs for therapy. PMID:27257760

  20. TAK1 is required for the survival of hematopoietic cells and hepatocytes in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Minghui; Wei, Xudong; Guo, Yinshi; Breslin, Peter; Zhang, Shubin; Zhang, Shanshan; Wei, Wei; Xia, Zhenbiao; Diaz, Manuel; Akira, Shizuo; Zhang, Jiwang

    2008-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β–activated kinase 1 (TAK1), a member of the MAPKKK family, is a key mediator of proinflammatory and stress signals. Activation of TAK1 by proinflammatory cytokines and T and B cell receptors induces the nuclear localization of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/AP1 and P38, which play important roles in mediating inflammation, immune responses, T and B cell activation, and epithelial cell survival. Here, we report that TAK1 is critical for the survival of both hematopoietic cells and hepatocytes. Deletion of TAK1 results in bone marrow (BM) and liver failure in mice due to the massive apoptotic death of hematopoietic cells and hepatocytes. Hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors were among those hematopoietic cells affected by TAK1 deletion–induced cell death. This apoptotic cell death is autonomous, as demonstrated by reciprocal BM transplantation. Deletion of TAK1 resulted in the inactivation of both JNK and NF-κB signaling, as well as the down-regulation of expression of prosurvival genes. PMID:18573910

  1. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  2. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  3. The role of CD44 in fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Huimin; Heazlewood, Shen Y.; Williams, Brenda; Cardozo, Daniela; Nigro, Julie; Oteiza, Ana; Nilsson, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout development, hematopoietic stem cells migrate to specific microenvironments, where their fate is, in part, extrinsically controlled. CD44 standard as a member of the cell adhesion molecule family is extensively expressed within adult bone marrow and has been previously reported to play important roles in adult hematopoietic regulation via CD44 standard-ligand interactions. In this manuscript, CD44 expression and function are further assessed and characterized on both fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cells. Using a CD44−/− mouse model, conserved functional roles of CD44 are revealed throughout development. CD44 is critical in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem and progenitor pools, as well as in hematopoietic stem cell migration. CD44 expression on hematopoietic stem cells as well as other hematopoietic cells within the bone marrow microenvironment is important in the homing and lodgment of adult hematopoietic stem cells isolated from the bone/bone marrow interface. CD44 is also involved in fetal hematopoietic stem cell migration out of the liver, via a process involving stromal cell-derived factor-1α. The absence of CD44 in neonatal bone marrow has no impact on the size of the long-term reconstituting hematopoietic stem cell pool, but results in an enhanced long-term engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26546504

  4. The SCL/TAL1 Transcription Factor Represses the Stress Protein DDiT4/REDD1 in Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Calvo, Julien; Renou, Laurent; Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; van den Heuvel, Anita; Amsellem, Sophie; Mehrpour, Maryam; Larghero, Jerome; Soler, Eric; Naguibneva, Irina; Pflumio, Francoise

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are regulated through numerous molecular mechanisms that have not been interconnected. The transcription factor stem cell leukemia/T-cell acute leukemia 1 (TAL1) controls human HSPC but its mechanism of action is not clarified. In this study, we show that knockdown (KD) or short-term conditional over-expression (OE) of TAL1 in human HSPC ex vivo, respectively, blocks and maintains hematopoietic potentials, affecting proliferation of human HSPC. Comparative gene expression analyses of TAL1/KD and TAL1/OE human HSPC revealed modifications of cell cycle regulators as well as previously described TAL1 target genes. Interestingly an inverse correlation between TAL1 and DNA damage-induced transcript 4 (DDiT4/REDD1), an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, is uncovered. Low phosphorylation levels of mTOR target proteins in TAL1/KD HSPC confirmed an interplay between mTOR pathway and TAL1 in correlation with TAL1-mediated effects of HSPC proliferation. Finally chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments performed in human HSPC showed that DDiT4 is a direct TAL1 target gene. Functional analyses showed that TAL1 represses DDiT4 expression in HSPCs. These results pinpoint DDiT4/REDD1 as a novel target gene regulated by TAL1 in human HSPC and establish for the first time a link between TAL1 and the mTOR pathway in human early hematopoietic cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:2268-2279. PMID:25858676

  5. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A.; Hardison, Ross C.; Bodine, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. PMID:26590403

  6. Analysis of incidence, risk factors and clinical outcome of thromboembolic and bleeding events in 431 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients

    PubMed Central

    Labrador, Jorge; Lopez-Anglada, Lucia; Perez-Lopez, Estefania; Lozano, Francisco S.; Lopez-Corral, Lucia; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermin M.; Vazquez, Lourdes; Perez Rivera, Jose Angel; Martin-Herrero, Francisco; Sanchez-Barba, Mercedes; Guerrero, Carmen; del Cañizo, Maria Consuelo; Caballero, Maria Dolores; San Miguel, Jesus Fernando; Alberca, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Porras, Jose Ramon

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients have an increasing risk of both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. However, the competing risks of two of these life-threatening complications in these complex patients have still not been well defined. We retrospectively analyzed data from 431 allogeneic transplantation recipients to identify the incidence, risk factors and mortality due to thrombosis and bleeding. Significant clinical bleeding was more frequent than symptomatic thrombosis. The cumulative incidence of a bleeding episode was 30.2% at 14 years. The cumulative incidence of a venous or arterial thrombosis at 14 years was 11.8% and 4.1%, respectively. The analysis of competing factors for venous thrombosis revealed extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease to be the only independent prognostic risk factor. By contrast, six factors were associated with an increased risk of bleeding; advanced disease, ablative conditioning regimen, umbilical cord blood transplantation, anticoagulation, acute III-IV graft-versus-host disease, and transplant-associated microangiopathy. The development of thrombosis did not significantly affect overall survival (P=0.856). However, significant clinical bleeding was associated with inferior survival (P<0.001). In allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, significant clinical bleeding is more common than thrombotic complications and affects survival. PMID:22899581

  7. Are hematopoietic stem cells involved in hepatocarcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Matteo; Del Prete, Valentina; Neve, Viviana; Scavo, Maria Principia; Barone, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The liver has three cell lineages able to proliferate after a hepatic injury: the mature hepatocyte, the ductular “bipolar” progenitor cell termed “oval cell” and the putative periductular stem cell. Hepatocytes can only produce other hepatocytes whereas ductular progenitor cells are considerate bipolar since they can give rise to biliary cells or hepatocytes. Periductular stem cells are rare in the liver, have a very long proliferation potential and may be multipotent, being this aspect still under investigation. They originate in the bone marrow since their progeny express genetic markers of donor hematopoietic cells after bone marrow transplantation. Since the liver is the hematopoietic organ of the fetus, it is possible that hematopoietic stem cells may reside in the liver of the adult. This assumption is proved by the finding that oval cells express hematopoietic markers like CD34, CD45, CD 109, Thy-1, c-kit, and others, which are also expressed by bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells (BMSCs). Few and discordant studies have evaluated the role of BMSC in hepatocarcinogenesis so far and further studies in vitro and in vivo are warranted in order to definitively clarify such an issue. PMID:25202697

  8. Second hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of graft failure, graft rejection or relapse after allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, S N

    2002-04-01

    Failure to engraft after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (graft dysfunction) or to sustain engraftment (graft rejection) is a formidable complication due to many possible factors. These include inadequate stem cell numbers, infections, graft-versus-host disease and immunological mediated processes. Fortunately, this complication is uncommon and can be overcome by additional hematopoietic stem cell infusions. Multiple treatment alternatives have been explored including hematopoietic growth factors, additional infusions of stem cells alone, with augmented immunosuppression or with additional cytotoxic therapy. Various sources of the additional stem cells are feasible including the original donor, using another donor, using stem cells collected from the marrow or after cytokine mobilization from the peripheral blood. This report will overview this complication and review the various studies that have attempted to define both cause and therapy. However, a lack of well-designed prospective studies has made definitive recommendations difficult although basic principles have been established. PMID:11979301

  9. Growth Factor-Free Pre-vascularization of Cell Sheets for Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marina; Pirraco, Rogério P; Cerqueira, Mariana T; Reis, Rui L; Marques, Alexandra P

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of tissue-engineered constructs is often compromised by inadequate inosculation and neo-vascularization. This problem is considered one of the biggest hurdles in the field and finding a solution is currently the focus of a great fraction of the research community. Many of the methodologies designed to address this issue propose the use of endothelial cells and angiogenic growth factors, or combinations of both, to accelerate neo-vascularization after transplantation. However, an adequate solution is still elusive. In this context, we describe a methodology that combines the use of the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) isolated from adipose tissue with low oxygen culture to produce pre-vascularized cell sheets as angiogenic tools for Tissue Engineering. The herein proposed approach takes advantage of the SVF angiogenic nature conferred by adipose stem cells, endothelial progenitors, endothelial and hematopoietic cells, and pericytes and further potentiates it using low oxygen, or hypoxic, culture. Freshly isolated nucleated SVF cells are cultured in hyperconfluent conditions under hypoxia (pO2 = 5 %) for up to 5 days in medium without extrinsic growth factors enabling the generation of contiguous sheets as described by the cell sheet engineering technique. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry allow confirming the phenotype of the different cell types composing the cell-sheets as well the organization of the CD31(+) cells in branched and highly complex tube-like structures. Overall, a simple and flexible approach to promote growth factor-free pre-vascularization of cell sheets for tissue engineering (TE) applications is described. PMID:27250706

  10. Cytokine signaling for proliferation, survival, and death in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, A; Ito, Y; Kinoshita, T

    1999-04-01

    The survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic cells are regulated by cytokines. In the absence of cytokines, hematopoietic cells not only stop proliferation, but undergo apoptosis. This strict dependency of hematopoietic cells on cytokines is an important mechanism that maintains the homeostasis of blood cells. Cytokines induce various intracellular signaling pathways by activating the receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jaks), and distinct signals are responsible for cell cycle progression and cell survival. Induction of signals for cell cycle progression without suppressing apoptosis results in apoptotic cell death, indicating the essential role of anti-apoptotic signaling for cell growth. In hematopoietic cells, Ras, a cellular protooncogen product, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase are involved in the suppression of apoptosis. Cytokine depletion not only turns off anti-apoptotic signaling, but also actively induces cell death by activating caspases, a distinct family of cysteine proteases. Alterations in the mechanisms of cytokine signaling for cell cycle progression and anti-apoptotic function are implicated in hematological disorders. PMID:10222650

  11. A network including TGFβ/Smad4, Gata2, and p57 regulates proliferation of mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Billing, Matilda; Rörby, Emma; May, Gillian; Tipping, Alex J; Soneji, Shamit; Brown, John; Salminen, Marjo; Karlsson, Göran; Enver, Tariq; Karlsson, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is a potent inhibitor of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell proliferation. However, the precise mechanism for this effect is unknown. Here, we have identified the transcription factor Gata2, previously described as an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell function, as an early and direct target gene for TGFβ-induced Smad signaling in hematopoietic progenitor cells. We also report that Gata2 is involved in mediating a significant part of the TGFβ response in primitive hematopoietic cells. Interestingly, the cell cycle regulator and TGFβ signaling effector molecule p57 was found to be upregulated as a secondary response to TGFβ. We observed Gata2 binding upstream of the p57 genomic locus, and importantly, loss of Gata2 abolished TGFβ-stimulated induction of p57 as well as the resulting growth arrest of hematopoietic progenitors. Our results connect key molecules involved in hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and reveal a functionally relevant network, regulating proliferation of primitive hematopoietic cells. PMID:26876150

  12. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  13. Production of minimally disturbed synchronous cultures of hematopoietic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Maureen; Eward, Kathryn Leigh; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Edward, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A method is describedforproducing sizable quantities of synchronously dividing, minimally disturbed mammalian cells. Cultures were grown immobilized on surfaces such that cell division within the population resulted in the continuous release of synchronous newborn cells. As judged by the quality and duration of synchronous growth, cell size distributions, and DNA compositions, newborn mouse L1210 cells grew with a very high level of synchrony without overt evidence of growth disturbances. The technology should be applicable to a variety of hematopoietic cells, as evidenced by similar results with human MOLT-4 and U937 cell lines.

  14. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  15. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

  16. Effects of growth factors on temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2004-07-01

    The effects of growth factors on cartilaginous tissues are well documented. An exception is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, where data for growth factor effects on proliferation and biosynthesis are very limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify proliferation of and synthesis by TMJ disc cells cultured in monolayer with either platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), at either a low (10 ng/ml) or high (100 ng/ml) concentration. Proliferation was assessed with a DNA quantitation technique, collagen synthesis was measured via a hydroxyproline assay, and GAG synthesis was determined with a dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay at 14 days. Overall, the most beneficial growth factor was bFGF, which was most potent in increasing proliferation and GAG synthesis, and also effective in promoting collagen synthesis. At the high concentration, bFGF resulted in 96% more cells than the control and 30 to 45% more cells than PDGF and IGF. PDGF and bFGF were the most potent upregulators of GAG synthesis, producing 2-3 times more GAG than the control. IGF had no significant effect on GAG production, although at its higher concentration it increased collagen production by 4.5 times over the control. Collagen synthesis was promoted by bFGF at its lower concentration, with levels 4.2 times higher than the control, whereas PDGF had no significant effect on collagen production. In general, higher concentrations increased proliferation, whereas lower concentrations favoured biosynthesis. PMID:15126139

  17. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  18. Ongoing graft-versus-host disease is a risk factor for azoospermia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a survey of the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Rovó, Alicia; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Chiodi, Sandra; Spinelli, Simonetta; Salooja, Nina; Sucak, Gülsan; Hunter, Ann; Kim, Tan Swee; Socié, Gérard; van Lint, Maria Teresa; Passweg, Jakob R.; Arat, Mutlu; Badoglio, Manuela; Tichelli, André

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the degree of spermatogenesis defects in sperm analysis in long-term male survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in order to identify the risk factors related to potential infertility after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and to provide data on longitudinal sperm recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here, the Late Effects Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation reports data of sperm analysis from 224 males who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Median time between transplantation and sperm analysis was 63 months (8–275 months). At last sperm analysis, presence of any degree of spermatozoa was reported in 70 (31%) and complete azoospermia in 154 (69%) patients. In multivariate analysis, being conditioned with total body irradiation (RR 7.1; 95% CI: 3.4–14.8) and age over 25 years at transplantation (RR 2.4; 95% CI: 1.09–5.2) were significantly associated with higher risk for azoospermia. In patients not conditioned with total body irradiation, ongoing chronic graft-versus-host disease is the main adverse factor for sperm recovery (RR of 3.11; 95% CI: 1.02–9.47; P=0.045). Already established risk factors, such as total body irradiation and age older than 25 years at hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, were seen to be the most relevant adverse risk factor for sperm production after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Furthermore, for the first time, ongoing graft-versus-host disease has been shown to be the most relevant adverse factor for sperm recovery, particularly in patients conditioned without total body irradiation. We also introduce a useful scoring system to predict the probability of male long-term survivors’ azoospermia. PMID:22929982

  19. Harnessing endogenous growth factor activity modulates stem cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hudalla, Gregory A.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Koepsel, Justin T.; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of specific serum-borne biomolecules (e.g. heparin) on growth factor-dependent cell behavior is often difficult to elucidate in traditional cell culture due to the random, non-specific nature of biomolecule adsorption from serum. We hypothesized that chemically well-defined cell culture substrates could be used to study the influence of sequestered heparin on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. Specifically, we used bio-inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) chemically modified with a bioinspired heparin-binding peptide (termed “HEPpep”) and an integrin-binding peptide (RGDSP) as stem cell culture substrates. Our results demonstrate that purified heparin binds to HEPpep SAMs in a dose-dependent manner, and serum-borne heparin binds specifically and in a dose-dependent manner to HEPpep SAMs. These heparin-sequestering SAMs enhance hMSC proliferation by amplifying endogenous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and enhance hMSC osteogenic differentiation by amplifying endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The effects of heparin-sequestering are similar to the effects of supraphysiologic concentrations of recombinant FGF-2. hMSC phenotype is maintained over multiple population doublings on heparin-sequestering substrates in growth medium, while hMSC osteogenic differentiation is enhanced in a bone morphogenetic protein-dependent manner on the same substrates during culture in osteogenic induction medium. Together, these observations demonstrate that the influence of the substrate on stem cell phenotype is sensitive to the culture medium formulation. Our results also demonstrate that enhanced hMSC proliferation can be spatially localized by patterning the location of HEPpep on the substrate. Importantly, the use of chemically well-defined SAMs in this study eliminated the confounding factor of random, non-specific biomolecule adsorption, and identified serum-borne heparin as a key mediator of hMSC response to endogenous

  20. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  1. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  2. Melanoma Stem Cells and Metastasis: Mimicking Hematopoietic Cell Trafficking?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Barthel, Steven R.; Schatton, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly metastatic cancer that bears responsibility for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Amidst the research efforts to better understand melanoma progression, there has been increasing evidence that hints at a role for a subpopulation of virulent cancer cells, termed malignant melanoma stem or initiating cells (MMICs), in metastasis formation. MMICs are characterized by their preferential ability to initiate and propagate tumor growth and their selective capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into less tumorigenic melanoma cells. The frequency of MMICs has been shown to correlate with poor clinical prognosis in melanoma. Additionally, MMICs are enriched among circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, suggesting that MMICs may be a critical player in the metastatic cascade. Although these links exist between MMICs and metastatic disease, the mechanisms by which MMICs may advance metastatic progression are only beginning to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that MMICs express molecules critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and trafficking, providing a possible explanation for how circulating MMICs could drive melanoma dissemination. We therefore propose that MMICs might fuel melanoma metastasis by exploiting homing mechanisms commonly utilized by hematopoietic cells. Here we review the biological properties of MMICs and the existing literature on their metastatic potential. We will discuss possible mechanisms by which MMICs might initiate metastases in the context of established knowledge of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in other cancers and of hematopoietic homing molecules, with a particular focus on selectins, integrins, chemokines, and chemokine receptors known to be expressed by melanoma cells. Biological understanding of how these molecules might be utilized by MMICs to propel the metastatic cascade could critically impact the development of more effective therapies for advanced

  3. Dasatinib promotes the activation of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Duyvestyn, Johanna M; Taylor, Samuel J; Dagger, Samantha A; Langdon, Wallace Y

    2016-05-01

    Dasatinib is an orally available broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. It is also in clinical trials for the treatment of other malignancies, including solid tumors. Despite its wide use, little is known of its effects on normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Here, we study wild-type mice dosed with dasatinib and find that it causes the transient induction of proliferation of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This finding was unexpected given the ability of dasatinib to inhibit c-Kit signaling and promote cell cycle arrest in many cell types. The transient induction of HSC proliferation in dasatinib-dosed mice coincided with a marked induction in the expression of Sca-1 and phospho-S6. Also evident at this time was a rapid but transient loss of lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors that express high levels of c-Kit and the induction of stem cell factor in the serum. These findings suggest that activation of quiescent HSCs is part of a rapid rescue response that restores hematopoietic progenitors to pretreatment levels. This restoration coincides with HSCs returning to quiescence, and the expression of Sca-1 and phospho-S6 reverting to pre-treatment levels, even though dasatinib dosing is maintained. These data suggest that equilibrium is reached between the opposing forces of dasatinib and hematopoietic growth factors. The transient induction of HSC proliferation provided a window of opportunity whereby these cells became sensitive to killing by the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. PMID:26921649

  4. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  5. Immunoselection techniques in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Biagini, Simone; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Merli, Pietro; Brescia, Letizia Pomponia; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Montanari, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation (HSCT) is an effective treatment for hematological and non-hematological diseases. The main challenge in autologous HSCT is purging of malignant cells to prevent relapse. In allogeneic HSCT graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and opportunistic infections are frequent complications. Two types of graft manipulation have been introduced: the first one in the autologous context aimed at separating malignant cells from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and the second one in allogeneic HSCT aimed at reducing the incidence of GvHD and at accelerating immune reconstitution. Here we describe the manipulations used for cell purging in autologous HSCT or for T Cell Depletion (TCD) and T cell selection in allogeneic HSCT. More complex manipulations, requiring a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility, are briefly mentioned. PMID:27209628

  6. Common marmoset CD117+ hematopoietic cells possess multipotency.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shin; Nunomura, Satoshi; Mori, Shuya; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Takabayashi, Shuji; Okada, Yoshinori; Yahata, Takashi; Shiina, Takashi; Katoh, Hideki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tani, Kenzaburo; Ando, Kiyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Sasaki, Erika; Kametani, Yoshie

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the hematopoiesis of non-human primates is important to clarify the evolution of primate-specific hematopoiesis and immune regulation. However, the engraftment and development of the primate hematopoietic system are well-documented only in humans and are not clear in non-human primates. Callithrix jacchus (common marmoset, CM) is a New World monkey with a high rate of pregnancy and small size that lives in closed colonies. As stem cell factor (SCF) is an essential molecule for hematopoietic stem cell development in mice and humans, we focused on CD117, the SCF receptor, and examined whether CD117-expressing cells possess the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell characteristics of newborn marmoset-derived hematopoietic cells that can develop into T cells and B cells. When CD117(+) cell fractions of the bone marrow were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD (non-obese diabetic)/Shi-scid, common γc-null (NOG) mice, these cells engrafted efficiently in the bone marrow and spleens of the NOG mice. The CD117(+) cells developed into myeloid lineage cells, CD20(+) B cells and CD3(+) T cells, which could express CM cytokines in vivo. The development of B cells did not precede that of T cells. The development of CD8(+) T cells was dominant in NOG mice. The engraftment was comparable for both CD117(+)CD34(+) cells and CD117(+)CD34(-) cells. These results suggest that the CD117(+) cell fraction can differentiate into all three cell lineages, and the development of marmoset immunity in the xenogeneic environment follows diverse developmental pathways compared with human immunity. PMID:25977306

  7. Supportive Care of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S. L.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Rizzo, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant survivors face a number of challenges including low energy and stamina, “chemo-brain” and emotional distress, and late effects that can compromise functioning or lead to early mortality. This session will review the most recent interventions and recommendations to avoid or mitigate these complications. PMID:22226095

  8. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor and angiogenesis in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Koukourakis, M I; Giatromanolaki, A; Cox, G; Turley, H; Steward, W P; Gatter, K; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    High microvessel density, an indirect measure of angiogenesis, has been shown to correlate with increased tumour size, lymph node involvement and poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumour cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) expression correlate with angiogenesis and a poor outcome in this disease. In a retrospective study VEGF and PD-ECGF expression and microvessel density were evaluated immunohistochemically in surgically resected specimens (T1–3, N0–2) from 223 patients with operable NSCLC using the VG1, P-GF.44C and JC70 monoclonal antibodies respectively. High VEGF immunoreactivity was seen in 104 (46.6%) and PD-ECGF in 72 (32.3%) cases and both were associated with high vascular grade tumours (P = 0.009 and P = 0.05 respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed a weak positive correlation between VEGF and PD-ECGF expression in cancer cells (r = 0.21;P = 0.002). Co-expression of VEGF and PD-ECGF was not associated with a higher microvessel density than VEGF or PD-ECGF only expressing tumours. Furthermore a proportion of high vascular grade tumours expressed neither growth factor. Univariate analysis revealed tumour size, nodal status, microvessel density and VEGF and PD-ECGF expression as significant prognostic factors. Tumour size (P< 0.02) and microvessel density (P< 0.04) remained significant on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, VEGF and PD-ECGF are important angiogenic growth factors and have prognostic significance in NSCLC. Furthermore the study underlines the prognostic significance of microvessel density in operable NSCLC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780522

  10. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-01-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34+ cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34+ cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  11. Nerve growth factor-induced migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Rezvan, Amir; Allen, Fred D; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2005-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a well known neurotropic and neurotrophic agonist in the nervous system, which recently was shown to also induce angiogenic effects in endothelial cells (ECs). To measure NGF effects on the migration of cultured ECs, an important step in neoangiogenesis, we optimized an omnidirectional migration assay using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and validated the assay with human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) and human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF). The potencies of nerve growth factor purified from various species (viper, mouse, and recombinant human) to stimulate HAEC migration was similar to that of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (EC50 of approximately 0.5 ng/ml). Recombinant human bFGF was significantly more efficacious than either viper NGF or rhVEGF, both of which stimulated HAEC migration by approximately 30% over basal spontaneous migration. NGF-mediated stimulation of HAEC migration was completely blocked by the NGF/TrkA receptor antagonist K252a [(8R*,9S*,11S*)-(/)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy-1H,-8H,11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo(a,g)cycloocta(c,d,e)trindene-1-one] (30 nM) but not by the VEGF/Flk receptor antagonist SU-5416 [3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl) methylidenyl]-indolin-2-one] (250 nM), indicating a direct effect of NGF via TrkA receptor activation on HAEC migration. Viper NGF stimulation of HAEC migration was additively increased by either rhVEGF or rhbFGF, suggesting a potentiating interaction between their tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways. Viper NGF represents a novel pharmacological tool to investigate possible TrkA receptor subtypes in endothelial cells. The ability of NGF to stimulate migration of HAEC cells in vitro implies that this factor may play an important role in the cardiovascular system besides its well known effects in the nervous system. PMID:16123305

  12. Expression and function of hematopoiesis-stimulating factor receptors on the GPI− and GPI+ hematopoietic stem cells of patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    FU, RONG; DING, SHAO-XUE; LIU, YI; LI, LI-JUAN; LIU, HUI; WANG, HONG-LEI; ZHANG, TIAN; SHAO, ZONG-HONG

    2016-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia (PNH/AA) syndrome presents a markedly increased population of cells deficient in glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI− cells) and signs of bone marrow failure, which requires treatment with hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, such as granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF). However, little is known about the effects of these stimulating factors on GPI− cells. In order to explore the effects of stimulating factors in PNH/AA, G-CSF receptor (CD114) and SCF receptor (CD117) expression levels on GPI+ and GPI− hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) were measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) and phosphorylated (P)-STAT5 were measured in GPI+ and GPI− HSCs by FCM following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF in vitro. The expression levels of CD114 and CD117 on GPI− HSCs were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those on GPI+ HSCs in PNH/AA patients and normal controls. The MFI values of STAT5 in the GPI− and GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls were not significantly different. However, the MFI values of P-STAT5 in the GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients were significantly lower than those in the GPI+ HSCs of PNH/AA patients and normal controls prior to and following stimulation with G-CSF or SCF (P<0.01). The GPI− HSCs of PNH/AA patients responded poorly to stimulation by hematopoiesis-stimulating factors, which indicates that these factors can be used safely in patients with PNH/AA. PMID:27168787

  13. FGF7 supports hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and niche-dependent myeloblastoma cells via autocrine action on bone marrow stromal cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ishino, Ruri; Minami, Kaori; Tanaka, Satowa; Nagai, Mami; Matsui, Keiji; Hasegawa, Natsumi; Roeder, Robert G.; Asano, Shigetaka; Ito, Mitsuhiro

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •FGF7 is downregulated in MED1-deficient mesenchymal cells. •FGF7 produced by mesenchymal stromal cells is a novel hematopoietic niche molecule. •FGF7 supports hematopoietic progenitor cells and niche-dependent leukemia cells. •FGF7 activates FGFR2IIIb of bone marrow stromal cells in an autocrine manner. •FGF7 indirectly acts on hematopoietic cells lacking FGFR2IIIb via stromal cells. -- Abstract: FGF1 and FGF2 support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) under stress conditions. In this study, we show that fibroblast growth factor (FGF7) may be a novel niche factor for HSPC support and leukemic growth. FGF7 expression was attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) deficient for the MED1 subunit of the Mediator transcriptional coregulator complex. When normal mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were cocultured with Med1{sup +/+} MEFs or BM stromal cells in the presence of anti-FGF7 antibody, the growth of BM cells and the number of long-time culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) decreased significantly. Anti-FGF7 antibody also attenuated the proliferation and cobblestone formation of MB1 stromal cell-dependent myeloblastoma cells. The addition of recombinant FGF7 to the coculture of BM cells and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs increased BM cells and LTC-ICs. FGF7 and its cognate receptor, FGFR2IIIb, were undetectable in BM cells, but MEFs and BM stromal cells expressed both. FGF7 activated downstream targets of FGFR2IIIb in Med1{sup +/+} and Med1{sup −/−} MEFs and BM stromal cells. Taken together, we propose that FGF7 supports HSPCs and leukemia-initiating cells indirectly via FGFR2IIIb expressed on stromal cells.

  14. The regulation of hematopoietic stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Mayani, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Evidence presented over the last few years indicates that the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment comprises not just one but a number of different cell populations. Based on HSCs’ proliferation and engraftment potential, it has been suggested that there are two classes of HSC, with long- and short-term engraftment potential. HSC heterogeneity seems to involve differentiation capacities as well, since it has been shown that some HSC clones are able to give rise to both myeloid and lymphoid progeny, whereas others are lymphoid deficient. It has been recognized that HSC function depends on intrinsic cell regulators, which are modulated by external signals. Among the former, we can include transcription factors and non-coding RNAs as well as epigenetic modifiers. Among the latter, cytokines and extracellular matrix molecules have been implicated. Understanding the elements and mechanisms that regulate HSC populations is of significant relevance both in biological and in clinical terms, and research in this area still has to face several complex and exciting challenges. PMID:27408695

  15. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  16. Correction of murine hemophilia A following nonmyeloablative transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells engineered to encode an enhanced human factor VIII variant using a safety-augmented retroviral vector

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors is a major impediment to the clinical application of hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer for the treatment of hematologic disorders. We recently developed an insulated self-inactivating gammaretroviral vector, RMSinOFB, which uses a novel enhancer-blocking element that significantly decreases genotoxicity of retroviral integration. In this study, we used the RMSinOFB vector to evaluate the efficacy of a newly bioengineered factor VIII (fVIII) variant (efVIII)—containing a combination of A1 domain point mutations (L303E/F309S) and an extended partial B domain for improved secretion plus A2 domain mutations (R484A/R489A/P492A) for reduced immunogenicity—toward successful treatment of murine hemophilia A. In cell lines, efVIII was secreted at up to 6-fold higher levels than an L303E/F309S A1 domain–only fVIII variant (sfVIIIΔB). Most important, when compared with a conventional gammaretroviral vector expressing sfVIIIΔB, lower doses of RMSin-efVIII-OFB–transduced hematopoietic stem cells were needed to generate comparable curative fVIII levels in hemophilia A BALB/c mice after reduced-intensity total body irradiation or nonmyeloablative chemotherapy conditioning regimens. These data suggest that the safety-augmented RMSin-efVIII-OFB platform represents an encouraging step in the development of a clinically appropriate gene addition therapy for hemophilia A. PMID:19470695

  17. Cutting the brakes on hematopoietic regeneration by blocking TGFβ to limit chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Brenet, Fabienne; Scandura, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stressors such as infection, bleeding, or toxic injury trigger a hematopoietic adaptation that sacrifices hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) quiescence to meet an urgent need for new blood cell production. Once the hematopoietic demands are adequately met, homeostasis must be restored. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling is a central mediator mandating the return of HSPCs to quiescence after stress. Blockade of TGFβ signaling after hematopoietic stress delays the return of cycling HSPCs to quiescence and in so doing promotes hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal and accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution. These findings open the door to new therapeutics that modulate the hematopoietic adaptation to stress. In this review, we will discuss the complex context-dependent activities of TGFβ in hematopoiesis and the potential benefits and limitations of using TGFβ pathway inhibitors to promote multilineage hematopoietic reconstitution after myelosuppressive chemotherapy. PMID:27308454

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell engineering at a crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Isabelle; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic engineering of hematopoietic stem cells is the basis for potentially treating a large array of hereditary and acquired diseases, and stands as the paradigm for stem cell engineering in general. Recent clinical reports support the formidable promise of this approach but also highlight the limitations of the technologies used to date, which have on occasion resulted in clonal expansion, myelodysplasia, or leukemogenesis. New research directions, predicated on improved vector designs, targeted gene delivery or the therapeutic use of pluripotent stem cells, herald the advent of safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell therapies that may transform medical practice. In this review, we place these recent advances in perspective, emphasizing the solutions emerging from a wave of new technologies and highlighting the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:22096239

  19. Risk factors and outcome of graft failure after HLA matched and mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a study on behalf of SFGM-TC and SFHI.

    PubMed

    Cluzeau, T; Lambert, J; Raus, N; Dessaux, K; Absi, L; Delbos, F; Devys, A; De Matteis, M; Dubois, V; Filloux, M; Fort, M; Hau, F; Jollet, I; Labalette, M; Masson, D; Mercier, B; Pedron, B; Perrier, P; Picard, C; Quainon, F; Ramounau-Pigot, A; Renac, V; Van Endert, P; Charron, D; Peffault de la Tour, R; Taupin, J L; Loiseau, P

    2016-05-01

    Graft failure remains a severe complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Several risk factors have already been published. In this study, we re-evaluated them in a large cohort who had the benefit of the recent experience in HSCT (2006-2012). Data from 4684 unrelated donor HSCT from 2006 to 2012 were retrospectively collected from centers belonging to the French Society for Stem Cell Transplantation. Among the 2716 patients for whom HLA typing was available, 103 did not engraft leading to a low rate of no engraftment at 3.8%. In univariate analysis, only type of disease and status of disease at transplant for malignant diseases remained significant risk factors (P=0.04 and P<0.0001, respectively). In multivariate analysis, only status of disease was a significant risk factor (P<0.0001). Among the 61 patients who did not engraft and who were mismatched for 1 HLA class I and/or HLA-DP, 5 donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) were detected but only 1 was clearly involved in graft failure, for the others their role was more questionable. Second HSCT exhibited a protective although not statistically significant effect on OS (hazard ratio=0.57 [0.32-1.02]). In conclusion, only one parameter (disease status before graft) remains risk factor for graft failure in this recent cohort. PMID:26855158

  20. NCI, NHLBI/PBMTC first international conference on late effects after pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation: endocrine challenges-thyroid dysfunction, growth impairment, bone health, & reproductive risks.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Christopher C; Gracia, Clarisa R; Sanders, Jean E; Cheng, Edward Y; Baker, K Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A; Petryk, Anna

    2011-12-01

    The endocrine system is highly susceptible to damage by high-dose chemotherapy and/or irradiation before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) during childhood. The specific endocrine organs most affected by HCT include the thyroid gland, the pituitary, and the gonads. In addition, hormones that support development and stability of the skeletal system are also affected. Insufficiency of thyroid hormone is 1 of the most common late sequelae of HCT, and occurs more often in young children. Deficiency in the pituitary's production of growth hormone is a problem of unique concern to the pediatric population. The reproductive risks of HCT depend on the patient's gender and pubertal status at the time of HCT. Pubertal or gonadal failure frequently occurs, especially in females. Infertility risks for both genders remain high, whereas methods of fertility preservation are limited in all but postpubertal males. Bone health post-HCT can be compromised by low bone mineral density as well as avascular necrosis, but the data on both problems in the pediatric HCT population are limited. In this paper, the current state of knowledge, gaps in that knowledge, and recommendations for future research are addressed in detail for each of these systems. PMID:22005649

  1. NCI, NHLBI/PBMTC First International Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Endocrine Challenges--Thyroid Dysfunction, Growth Impairment, Bone Health, & Reproductive Risks

    PubMed Central

    Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gracia, Clarisa R.; Sanders, Jean E.; Cheng, Edward Y.; Baker, K. Scott; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Petryk, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The endocrine system is highly susceptible to damage by high-dose chemotherapy and/or irradiation prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) during childhood. The specific endocrine organs most affected by HCT include the thyroid gland, the pituitary, and the gonads. In addition, hormones that support development and stability of the skeletal system are also affected. Insufficiency of thyroid hormone is one of the most common late sequelae of HCT, and occurs more often in young children. Deficiency in the pituitary’s production of growth hormone is a problem of unique concern to the pediatric population. The reproductive risks of HCT depend on the patient’s gender and pubertal status at the time of HCT. Pubertal or gonadal failure frequently occurs, especially in females. Infertility risks for both genders remain high, while methods of fertility preservation are limited in all but post-pubertal males. Bone health post-HCT can be compromised by low bone mineral density as well as avascular necrosis, but the data on both problems in the pediatric HCT population are limited. In this paper, the current state of knowledge, gaps in that knowledge, and recommendations for future research are addressed in detail for each of these systems. PMID:22005649

  2. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gratwohl, Alois; Baldomero, Helen; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Bouzas, Luis Fernando; Yoshimi, Ayami; Szer, Jeff; Lipton, Jeff; Schwendener, Alvin; Gratwohl, Michael; Frauendorfer, Karl; Niederwieser, Dietger; Horowitz, Mary; Kodera, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Context Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires significant infrastructure. Little is known on its use and the factors associated with it on a global level. Objective To determine current use of HSCT, to assess differences in its application and to explore associations of macroeconomic factors with transplant rates on a global level. Design Structured worldwide collection of numbers of allogeneic and autologous HSCT by main indication, donor type and stem cell source for the year 2006. Setting Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT), a global non-profit umbrella organization for clinical HSCT. Patients All patients with an allogeneic or autologous HSCT for any indication transplanted in 2006 within any of the participating countries. Interventions none Main Outcome measures Transplant rates (number of HSCT per 10 million inhabitants) by indication, donor type and country; description of main differences in HSCT use; macroeconomic factors of reporting countries associated with transplant rates. Results There were 50’417 first HSCT, 21’516 allogeneic (43%), 28’901 autologous (57%) reported from 1’327 centers in 71 countries for leukemia (17’049 (34%; 89% allogeneic)), lymphoma (27’492 (54%; 87% autologous)), solid tumors (2’925 (6%, 95% autologous)), non-malignant disorder (2’593 (5%; 92% allogeneic)) or, “others” 358 (1%). Use of allogeneic or autologous HSCT, use of unrelated or family donors for allogeneic HSCT and proportions of disease indications varied significantly between countries and continental regions. In linear regression analyses, Government Health Care Expenditures (r2 = 77.33), team density (r2 =76.28), Human Development Index (r2 = 74.36) and Gross National Income /Capita (r2 = 74.04) showed the highest association with transplant rates. Conclusions HSCT is an accepted therapy today with different use and needs worldwide. Availability of resources, Governmental support and, access for

  3. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  4. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L; Campbell, Clyde A; García-Moreno, Diana; Del Cid, Natasha; Kim, Albert D; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-11-20

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNF? activates the Notch and NF-?B signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNF?, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  5. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNFα activates the Notch and NF-κB signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNFα, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  6. Genetic control of quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Takeshi; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, H Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible cell cycle arrest that is poised to re-enter the cell cycle in response to a combination of cell-intrinsic factors and environmental cues. In hematopoietic stem cells, a coordinated balance between quiescence and differentiating proliferation ensures longevity and prevents both genetic damage and stem cell exhaustion. However, little is known about how all these processes are integrated at the molecular level. We will briefly review the environmental and intrinsic control of stem cell quiescence and discuss a new model that involves a protein-to-protein interaction between G0S2 and the phospho-nucleoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol. PMID:23839041

  7. Genetic control of quiescence in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Park, Chun Shik; Lacorazza, H Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible cell cycle arrest that is poised to re-enter the cell cycle in response to a combination of cell-intrinsic factors and environmental cues. In hematopoietic stem cells, a coordinated balance between quiescence and differentiating proliferation ensures longevity and prevents both genetic damage and stem cell exhaustion. However, little is known about how all these processes are integrated at the molecular level. We will briefly review the environmental and intrinsic control of stem cell quiescence and discuss a new model that involves a protein-to-protein interaction between G0S2 and the phospho-nucleoprotein nucleolin in the cytosol. PMID:23839041

  8. Endocrinopathies after allogeneic and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Orio, Francesco; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90-99% of women and 60-90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40-50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  9. Endocrinopathies after Allogeneic and Autologous Transplantation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Palomba, Stefano; Serio, Bianca; Sessa, Mariarosaria; Giudice, Valentina; Ferrara, Idalucia; Tauchmanovà, Libuse; Colao, Annamaria; Selleri, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Early and late endocrine disorders are among the most common complications in survivors after hematopoietic allogeneic- (allo-) and autologous- (auto-) stem cell transplant (HSCT). This review summarizes main endocrine disorders reported in literature and observed in our center as consequence of auto- and allo-HSCT and outlines current options for their management. Gonadal impairment has been found early in approximately two-thirds of auto- and allo-HSCT patients: 90–99% of women and 60–90% of men. Dysfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-growth hormone/insulin growth factor-I axis, hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis, and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis were documented as later complicances, occurring in about 10, 30, and 40–50% of transplanted patients, respectively. Moreover, overt or subclinical thyroid complications (including persistent low-T3 syndrome, chronic thyroiditis, subclinical hypo- or hyperthyroidism, and thyroid carcinoma), gonadal failure, and adrenal insufficiency may persist many years after HSCT. Our analysis further provides evidence that main recognized risk factors for endocrine complications after HSCT are the underlying disease, previous pretransplant therapies, the age at HSCT, gender, total body irradiation, posttransplant derangement of immune system, and in the allogeneic setting, the presence of graft-versus-host disease requiring prolonged steroid treatment. Early identification of endocrine complications can greatly improve the quality of life of long-term survivors after HSCT. PMID:24883377

  10. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha})-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect.

  11. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kukreja, Manisha; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Szer, Jeffrey; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Buser, Andreas; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) has led some clinicians to recommend allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). However, the data to support this approach is limited to case-reports and small case-series. We reviewed the database of the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research to determine outcomes after allotransplant for patients with PLL. We identified 47 patients with a median age of 54 years (range, 30–75). With a median follow-up of 13 months, progression-free survival was 33% (95% Confidence Interval 20–47%) at 2 years. The most common cause of death was relapse or progression in 49%. The cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality at 1-year post transplant was 28%. The small patient population prohibited prognostic factor analysis but these data support consideration of allotransplant for PLL. Further study of a larger population of patients is needed to determine which patients are more likely to benefit. PMID:19961946

  12. Fertility issues following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tichelli, André; Rovó, Alicia

    2013-08-01

    With the improvement of the outcome, the number of long-term survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is continuously increasing. However, there is still a high burden of late morbidity and mortality. Two-thirds of the transplant survivors develop at least one late effect interfering with their physical or psychological health. Infertility is common after myeloablative HSCT conditioned with total body irradiation and high doses of gonadotoxic drugs. Other factors, such as the age of the patient at transplantation, the treatment modality received before HSCT or the onset of chronic graft versus host disease, may play an additional role. Accordingly, the number of pregnancies observed after HSCT is very low when compared to a general population in childbearing age. Furthermore, complications during pregnancy and at delivery occur significantly more frequently, probably because of the uterine damages caused by irradiation therapy. However, there is no excess of congenital abnormalities observed among newborn children. Today there are good possibilities for fertility preservation. In male patients cryopreservation of sperm, and in female patients cryopreservation of fertilized embryos or of mature oocytes, are well-established treatment options. Patients' and physicians' attitude toward discussion on fertility issues play a key role in the success of fertility preservation after HSCT. PMID:23991924

  13. Signaling pathways implicated in hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Diana; Krstic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Vlaski, Marija; Petakov, Marijana; Jovcic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Nevenka; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the signal transduction pathways associated with the clonal development of myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells. The contribution of particular signaling molecules of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and PI-3 kinase signaling to the growth of murine bone marrow colony forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and erythroid (burst forming unit-erythroid [BFU-E] and colony forming unit-erythroid [CFU-E]) progenitors was examined in studies performed in the presence or absence of specific signal transduction inhibitors. The results clearly pointed to different signal transducing intermediates that are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation depending on the cell lineage, as well as on the progenitors' maturity. Lineage-specific differences were obtained when chemical inhibitors specific for receptor- or nonreceptor-PTKs, as well as for the main groups of distinctly regulated MAPK cascades, were used because all of these compounds suppressed the growth of erythroid progenitors, with no major effects on myeloid progenitors. At the same time, differential involvement of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK transduction pathway was observed in the proliferation and/or differentiation of early, BFU-E, and late, CFU-E, erythroid progenitor cells. The results also demonstrated that phosphatydylinositol (PI)-3 kinase and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcriptional factor were required for maintenance of both myeloid and erythroid progenitor cell function. Overall, the data obtained indicated that committed hematopoietic progenitors express a certain level of constitutive signaling activity that participates in the regulation of normal steady-state hematopoiesis and point to the importance of evaluating the impact of signal transduction inhibitors on normal bone marrow when used as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:17202596

  14. The biology of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Szilvassy, Stephen J

    2003-01-01

    Rarely has so much interest from the lay public, government, biotechnology industry, and special interest groups been focused on the biology and clinical applications of a single type of human cell as is today on stem cells, the founder cells that sustain many, if not all, tissues and organs in the body. Granting organizations have increasingly targeted stem cells as high priority for funding, and it appears clear that the evolving field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine will require as its underpinning a thorough understanding of the molecular regulation of stem cell proliferation, differentiation, self-renewal, and aging. Despite evidence suggesting that embryonic stem (ES) cells might represent a more potent regenerative reservoir than stem cells collected from adult tissues, ethical considerations have redirected attention upon primitive cells residing in the bone marrow, blood, brain, liver, muscle, and skin, from where they can be harvested with relative sociological impunity. Among these, it is arguably the stem and progenitor cells of the mammalian hematopoietic system that we know most about today, and their intense study in rodents and humans over the past 50 years has culminated in the identification of phenotypic and molecular genetic markers of lineage commitment and the development of functional assays that facilitate their quantitation and prospective isolation. This review focuses exclusively on the biology of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their immediate progeny. Nevertheless, many of the concepts established from their study can be considered fundamental tenets of an evolving stem cell paradigm applicable to many regenerating cellular systems. PMID:14734085

  15. Divergent effects of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factors on a human endometrial carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Haussler, C A; Trookman, N S

    1987-09-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), at concentrations ranging from 0.83 to 4.98 nM, markedly inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at low plating densities (4.7 X 10(3) cells/cm2). Under the same incubation conditions, 16.6 pM EGF enhanced cell proliferation. At high plating densities (2.5 X 10(4) cells/cm2) 0.83 nM EGF also stimulated cell proliferation. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of EGF were mimicked by transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). However, the inhibitory action of TGF-alpha was always greater that of EGF. Binding studies with 125I-labeled TGF-alpha indicated that maximal cell surface binding of TGF-alpha occurred at 15 min, whereas maximal internalization occurred at 45 min. Both cell surface and internalized radioactivity declined sharply thereafter. Analysis of radioactivity released into the incubation medium during pulse-chase experiments indicated that RL95-2 cells extensively degraded both TGF-alpha and EGF. The lysosomotropic compound methylamine arrested the generation of low-molecular-weight degradation products of EGF, but not of TGF-alpha. In contrast to EGF and TGF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at either low or high plating densities. Further, transforming growth factor-beta induced the appearance of large cuboidal cells that were readily distinguished from cells treated with either EGF or TGF-alpha. These findings point to complex regulatory actions of growth factors on the proliferation of RL95-2 cells and suggest that the processing of TGF-alpha following EGF receptor activation is distinct from the processing of EGF. PMID:3497713

  16. Growth and differentiation in cultured human thyroid cells: effects of epidermal growth factor and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Errick, J E; Ing, K W; Eggo, M C; Burrow, G N

    1986-01-01

    Human thyroid cells were grown and subcultured in vitro to examine their responses to known hormones and growth factors, and to serum. The cells were obtained from surgical specimens and were either neoplastic or nonneoplastic. The effects of culture conditions on cell growth were measured by changes in cell numbers and by stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation. The results showed that serum (0.5%) was essential for cell proliferation, and that a mixture of insulin (10 micrograms/ml), transferrin (5 micrograms/ml), hydrocortisone (10 micrograms/ml), somatostatin (10 ng/ml), and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (10 ng/ml) enhanced the effect of serum. Maximum growth of the cells was obtained when epidermal growth factor was present at 10(-9) M. Differentiation was measured by production of thyroglobulin, which was found to be stimulated by thyrotropin. This system provides a means to study the hormonal control of growth and differentiation in human thyroid cells. PMID:3511027

  17. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A Regulates the Secretion of Different Angiogenic Factors in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Frezzetti, Daniela; Gallo, Marianna; Roma, Cristin; D'Alessio, Amelia; Maiello, Monica R; Bevilacqua, Simona; Normanno, Nicola; De Luca, Antonella

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is one of the main mediators of angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Recently, it has been described an autocrine feed-forward loop in NSCLC cells in which tumor-derived VEGFA promoted the secretion of VEGFA itself, amplifying the proangiogenic signal. In order to investigate the role of VEGFA in lung cancer progression, we assessed the effects of recombinant VEGFA on proliferation, migration, and secretion of other angiogenic factors in A549, H1975, and HCC827 NSCLC cell lines. We found that VEGFA did not affect NSCLC cell proliferation and migration. On the other hand, we demonstrated that VEGFA not only produced a strong and persistent increase of VEGFA itself but also significantly induced the secretion of a variety of angiogenic factors, including follistatin (FST), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), angiopoietin-2 (ANGPT2), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), interleukin (IL)-8, leptin (LEP), platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), and platelet-derived growth factor bb (PDGF-BB). PI3K/AKT, RAS/ERK, and STAT3 signalling pathways were found to mediate the effects of VEGFA in NSCLC cell lines. We also observed that VEGFA regulation mainly occurred at post-transcriptional level and that NSCLC cells expressed different isoforms of VEGFA. Collectively, our data suggested that VEGFA contributes to lung cancer progression by inducing a network of angiogenic factors, which might offer potential for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26542886

  18. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  19. Prognostic Factors on the Graft-versus-Host Disease-Free and Relapse-Free Survival after Adult Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao-Chung; Chien, Sheng-Hsuan; Fan, Nai-Wen; Hu, Ming-Hung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Chia-Jen; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai; Chen, Po-Min; Liu, Jin-Hwang

    2016-01-01

    The cure of hematologic disorders by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often associated with major complications resulting in poor outcome, including graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), relapse, and death. A novel composite endpoint of GVHD-free/relapse-free survival (GRFS) in which events include grades 3-4 acute GVHD, chronic GVHD requiring systemic therapy, relapse, or death is censored to completely characterize the survival without mortality or ongoing morbidity. In this regard, studies attempting to identify the prognostic factors of GRFS are quite scarce. Thus, we reviewed 377 adult patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT between 2003 and 2013. The 1- and 2-year GRFS were 40.8% and 36.5%, respectively, significantly worse than overall survival and disease-free survival (log-rank p < 0.001). European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) risk score > 2 (p < 0.001) and hematologic malignancy (p = 0.033) were poor prognostic factors for 1-year GRFS. For 2-year GRFS, EBMT risk score > 2 (p < 0.001), being male (p = 0.028), and hematologic malignancy (p = 0.010) were significant for poor outcome. The events between 1-year GRFS and 2-year GRFS predominantly increased in relapsed patients. With prognostic factors of GRFS, we could evaluate the probability of real recovery following HSCT without ongoing morbidity. PMID:27123006

  20. Aging, Clonality, and Rejuvenation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Akunuru, Shailaja; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with reduced organ function and increased disease incidence. Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) aging driven by both cell intrinsic and extrinsic factors is linked to impaired HSC self-renewal and regeneration, aging-associated immune remodeling, and increased leukemia incidence. Compromised DNA damage responses and the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been previously causatively attributed to HSC aging. However, recent paradigm-shifting concepts, such as global epigenetic and cytoskeletal polarity shifts, cellular senescence, as well as the clonal selection of HSCs upon aging, provide new insights into HSC aging mechanisms. Rejuvenating agents that can reprogram the epigenetic status of aged HSCs or senolytic drugs that selectively deplete senescent cells provide promising translational avenues for attenuating hematopoietic aging and, potentially, alleviating aging-associated immune remodeling and myeloid malignancies. PMID:27380967

  1. CD166-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation promotes the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guodong; Wang, Xu; Yan, Ming; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    CD166 has been considered a relatively specific marker of stem cells and cancer stem cells, and the altered expression of CD166 has also been reported as a prognostic marker of several other types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of CD166 in these cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, we found that CD166 significantly enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation and prolonged epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EGFR signalling activation. In addition, EGF stimulation in CD166-overexpressing oral squamous carcinoma cells led to enhanced colony formation, invasion capacity and cytoskeletal re-organization in vitro and elevated tumourigenesis in vivo. Taken together, the results of our study identify CD166 as an intriguing therapeutic target for patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). PMID:27424177

  2. In vivo gene targeting of IL-3 into immature hematopoietic cells through CD117 receptor mediated antibody gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Deas, Olivier; Bensidhoum, Morad; François, Sabine; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Poncet, Pascal; Dürrbach, Antoine; Aigueperse, Jocelyne; Gourmelon, Patrick; Gorin, Norbert C; Hirsch, François; Thierry, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Background Targeted gene transfection remains a crucial issue to permit the real development of genetic therapy. As such, in vivo targeted transfection of specific subsets of hematopoietic stem cells might help to sustain hematopoietic recovery from bone marrow aplasia by providing local production of growth factors. Methods Balb/C mice were injected intravenously, with an anti-mouse c-kit (CD117) monoclonal antibody chemically coupled to a human IL-3 gene-containing plasmid DNA. Mice were sacrificed for tissue analyses at various days after injection of the conjugates. Results By ELISA, the production of human IL-3 was evidenced in the sera of animals 5 days after treatment. Cytofluorometric analysis after in vivo transfection of a reporter gene eGFP demonstrated transfection of CD117+/Sca1+ hematopoietic immature cells. By PCR analysis of genomic DNA and RNA using primer specific pIL3 sequences, presence and expression of the human IL-3-transgene were detected in the bone marrow up to 10 days in transfected mice but not in control animals. Conclusions These data clearly indicate that antibody-mediated endocytosis gene transfer allows the expression of the IL-3 transgene into hematopoietic immature cells, in vivo. While availability of marketed recombinant growth factors is restricted, this targeting strategy should permit delivery of therapeutic genes to tissues of interest through systemic delivery. In particular, the ability to specifically target growth factor expression into repopulating hematopoietic stem cells may create new opportunities for the treatment of primary or radiation-induced marrow failures. PMID:15509303

  3. Poor growth, thyroid dysfunction and vitamin D deficiency remain prevalent despite reduced intensity chemotherapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Myers, K C; Howell, J C; Wallace, G; Dandoy, C; El-Bietar, J; Lane, A; Davies, S M; Jodele, S; Rose, S R

    2016-07-01

    Myeloablative conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) are known to affect endocrine function, but little is known regarding reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. We retrospectively reviewed 114 children and young adults after single RIC HSCT. The analysis was grouped by age (<2 and ⩾2 years) and diagnosis (hemophagocytic lymphohistiocystosis/X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome (HLH/XLP), other immune disorders, metabolic/genetic disorders). All groups displayed short stature by mean height-adjusted Z-score (HAZ) before (-1.29) and after HSCT (HAZ -1.38, P=0.47). After HSCT, younger children with HLH/XLP grew better (HAZ -3.41 vs -1.65, P=0.006), whereas older subjects had decline in growth (HAZ -0.8 vs -1.01, P=0.06). Those with steroid therapy beyond standard GVHD prophylaxis were shorter than those without (P 0.04). After HSCT, older subjects with HLH/XLP became thinner with a mean body mass index (BMI) Z-score of 1.20 vs 0.64, P=0.02, and similar to metabolic/genetic disorders (BMI-Z= 0.59 vs -0.99, P<0.001). BMI increased among younger children in these same groups. Thyroid function was abnormal in 24% (18/76). 25-OH vitamin D levels were insufficient in 73% (49/65), with low bone mineral density in 8 of 19 evaluable subjects. Despite RIC, children and young adults still have significant late endocrine effects. Further research is required to compare post-transplant endocrine effects after RIC to those after standard chemotherapy protocols. PMID:26974276

  4. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity: Biobehavioral influences on recovery following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Cancer.gov

    Review of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and its potential “window of opportunity” during which interventions targeting stress-related behavioral factors can influence the survival, health, and well-being of recipients.

  5. Influence of different growth factors on a rat choriocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Verstuyf, A; Goebels, J; Sobis, H; Vandeputte, M

    1993-01-01

    The influence of epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin, transforming growth factor beta 1 and transferrin on the growth of a postgestational rat choriocarcinoma was examined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. The cell line was cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with fetal calf serum, beta-mercaptoethanol, glucose, sodium pyruvate and antibiotics. The experiments were done in media supplemented with 10% (optimal) or 3% (suboptimal) fetal calf serum. Among the different growth factors tested, only epidermal growth factor and to a certain extent insulin had a growth-promoting effect by themselves. The other growth factors had either an additive effect in the presence of epidermal growth factor or no effect at all. The cytotrophoblast cells expressed both epidermal growth factor and transferrin receptors whereas the more differentiated giant cells expressed only transferrin receptors. PMID:8493450

  6. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  7. Sleep disruption impairs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W.; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H. Craig; Weissman, Irving L.; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor’s sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  8. Agitation increases expansion of cord blood hematopoietic cells and promotes their differentiation into myeloid lineage.

    PubMed

    Hosseinizand, Hasti; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Abdekhodaie, Mohammad J

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stress caused by agitation is one of the factors that can affect hematopoietic stem cell expansion in suspension bioreactors. Therefore, we have investigated the effects of agitation on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cell (UCB-HSC) growth and differentiation. A comparison was made between various agitation rates (20, 40 and 60 rpm) in spinner-flask and cells cultured in glass petri dish as a static culture. Moreover, the fluid dynamic at various agitation rates of spinner-flask was analyzed to determine shear stress. The spinner-flask contained a rotational moving mixer with glass ball and was kept in tissue culture incubator. To reduce consumption of cytokines, UCB-serum was used which widely decreased the costs. Our results determined that, agitation rate at 40 rpm promoted UCB-HSCs expansion and their colony forming potential. Myeloid progenitors were the main type of cells at 40 rpm agitation rate. The results of glucose consumption and lactic acid production were in complete agreement with colony assay and expansion data and indicated the superiority of culture in spinner-flask when agitated at 40 rpm over to other agitation speeds and also static culture. Cell viability and colony count was affected by changing the agitation speed. We assume that changes in cell growth resulted from the effect of shear stress directly on cell viability, and indirectly on signaling pathways that influence the cells to differentiate. PMID:26264594

  9. An expandable, inducible hemangioblast state regulated by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vereide, David T; Vickerman, Vernella; Swanson, Scott A; Chu, Li-Fang; McIntosh, Brian E; Thomson, James A

    2014-12-01

    During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that "trap" murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These "expandable" hemangioblasts (eHBs) are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines. PMID:25458896

  10. bantam miRNA is important for Drosophila blood cell homeostasis and a regulator of proliferation in the hematopoietic progenitor niche

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, Victoria; Tokusumi, Tsuyoshi; Tokusumi, Yumiko; Schulz, Robert A.

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • bantam miRNA is endogenously expressed in the hematopoietic progenitor niche. • bantam is necessary and sufficient to induce cellular proliferation in the PSC. • bantam is upstream of the Insulin Receptor signaling pathway. • A model for positive regulation of hematopoietic niche growth is proposed. - Abstract: The Drosophila hematopoietic system is utilized in this study to gain novel insights into the process of growth control of the hematopoietic progenitor niche in blood development. The niche microenvironment is an essential component controlling the balance between progenitor populations and differentiated, mature blood cells and has been shown to lead to hematopoietic malignancies in humans when misregulated. MicroRNAs are one class of regulators associated with blood malignancies; however, there remains a relative paucity of information about the role of miRNAs in the niche. Here we demonstrate that bantam miRNA is endogenously active in the Drosophila hematopoietic progenitor niche, the posterior signaling center (PSC), and functions in the primary hematopoietic organ, the lymph gland, as a positive regulator of growth. Loss of bantam leads to a significant reduction in the PSC and overall lymph gland size, as well as a loss of the progenitor population and correlative premature differentiation of mature hemocytes. Interestingly, in addition to being essential for proper lymph gland development, we have determined bantam to be a novel upstream component of the insulin signaling cascade in the PSC and have unveiled dMyc as one factor central to bantam activity. These important findings identify bantam as a new hematopoietic regulator, place it in an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway, present one way in which it is regulated, and provide a mechanism through which it facilitates cellular proliferation in the hematopoietic niche.

  11. Cryopreservation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berz, David; McCormack, Elise M.; Winer, Eric S.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation represents a critical approach for the treatment of many malignant and non-malignant diseases. The foundation for these approaches is the ability to cryopreserve marrow cells for future use. This technique is routinely employed in all autologous settings and is critical for cord blood transplantation. A variety of cryopreservatives have been used with multiple freezing and thawing techniques as outlined in the later chapters. Freezing efficiency has been proven repeatedly and the ability of long-term stored marrow to repopulate has been established. Standard approaches outlined here are used in many labs as the field continues to evolve. PMID:17266054

  12. Foxo-mediated Bim transcription is dispensable for the apoptosis of hematopoietic cells that is mediated by this BH3-only protein

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Marco J; Rohrbeck, Leona; Lang, Mathias J; Grumont, Raelene; Gerondakis, Steve; Tai, Lin; Bouillet, Philippe; Kaufmann, Thomas; Strasser, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The BH3-only protein Bim is a critical initiator of apoptosis in hematopoietic cells. Bim is upregulated in response to growth factor withdrawal and in vitro studies have implicated the transcription factor Foxo3a as a critical inducer. To test the importance of this regulation in vivo, we generated mice with mutated Foxo-binding sites within the Bim promoters (BimΔFoxo/ΔFoxo). Contrary to Bim-deficient mice, BimΔFoxo/ΔFoxo mice had a normal hematopoietic system. Moreover, cytokine-dependent haematopoietic cells from BimΔFoxo/ΔFoxo and wt mice died at similar rates. These results indicate that regulation of Bim by Foxo transcription factors is not critical for the killing of hematopoietic cells. PMID:24060902

  13. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-MET receptor tyrosine kinase signaling pathway: Diverse roles in modulating immune cell functions.

    PubMed

    Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Villalobos-Hernandez, Alberto; Bobbala, Diwakar; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-06-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) signaling via the MET receptor is essential for embryonic development and tissue repair. On the other hand, deregulated MET signaling promotes tumor progression in diverse types of cancers. Even though oncogenic MET signaling remains the major research focus, the HGF-MET axis has also been implicated in diverse aspects of immune cell development and functions. In the presence of other hematopoietic growth factors, HGF promotes the development of erythroid, myeloid and lymphoid lineage cells and thrombocytes. In monocytes and macrophages responding to inflammatory stimuli, induction of autocrine HGF-MET signaling can contribute to tissue repair via stimulating anti-inflammatory cytokine production. HGF-MET signaling can also modulate adaptive immune response by facilitating the migration of Langerhans cells and dendritic cells to draining lymph nodes. However, MET signaling has also been shown to induce tolerogenic dendritic cells in mouse models of graft-versus-host disease and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. HGF-MET axis is also implicated in promoting thymopoiesis and the survival and migration of B lymphocytes. Recent studies have shown that MET signaling induces cardiotropism in activated T lymphocytes. Further understanding of the HGF-MET axis in the immune system would allow its therapeutic manipulation to improve immune cell reconstitution, restore immune homeostasis and to treat immuno-inflammatory diseases. PMID:26822708

  14. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  15. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb−/y) mice and found that Fancb−/y mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb−/y mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb−/y mice. Furthermore, Fancb−/y BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb−/y HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb−/y mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  16. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  17. Endothelial cells mitigate DNA damage and promote the regeneration of hematopoietic stem cells after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Zachman, Derek K.; Leon, Ronald P.; Das, Prerna; Goldman, Devorah C.; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Guha, Chandan; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are an essential component of the hematopoietic microenvironment, which maintains and regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although ECs can support the regeneration of otherwise lethally-irradiated HSCs, the mechanisms are not well understood. To further understand this phenomenon, we studied HSC regeneration from irradiated bone marrow using co-culture with human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Co-culture with HAECs induced a 24-fold expansion of long-term HSCs (CD150+, lineagelo, Sca-1+, c-Kit+; CD150+LSK cells) in vitro. These cells gave rise to functional hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with colony-forming activity, multilineage reconstitution and serial transplantation potential. Furthermore, HAECs significantly reduced DNA damage in irradiated LSK cells within 24 hours. Remarkably, we were able to delay the exposure of irradiated bone marrow to the regenerative, HAEC-derived signals for up to 48 hours and still rescue functional HSCs. G-CSF is the gold standard for promoting hematopoietic regeneration in vivo. However, when compared to HAECs, in vitro G-CSF treatment promoted lineage differentiation and regenerated 5-fold fewer CD150+LSK cells. Together, our results show that HAECs are powerful, direct mitigators of HSC injury and DNA damage. Identification of the HAEC-derived factors that rescue HSCs may lead to improved therapies for hematopoietic regeneration after radiation injury. PMID:23939266

  18. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. PMID:26044357

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta and transforming growth factor beta-receptor expression in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Federspiel, C. F.; Gold, L. I.; Moses, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) family in mammals includes three closely related peptides that influence proliferation and numerous physiologic processes in most mesenchymal cells. In this study, Northern blots, immunohistochemistry, TGF beta radioreceptor assays, TGF beta receptor affinity labeling and [3H] thymidine incorporation were used to evaluate whether primary cell cultures of human meningiomas synthesize the three TGF beta isoforms, bear TGF beta receptors, and respond to TGF beta. Transcripts for TGF beta 1 and 2 were detected in the three cases analyzed. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 immunoreactivity was detected in three of six cases, and TGF beta 2 and 3 immunoreactivity were detected in each case analyzed. Media conditioned by cells cultured from six meningiomas also contained latent TGF beta-like activity. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor cross-linking studies identified TGF beta binding sites corresponding to the type 1, type 2, and type 3 receptors on meningioma cells. Treatment with active TGF beta 1 produced a statistically significant reduction in [3H] thymidine incorporation after stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum and epidermal growth factor in all six cases studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1325741

  20. Stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds in craniofacial regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tollemar, Viktor; Collier, Zach J.; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Lee, Michael J.; Ameer, Guillermo A.; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Current reconstructive approaches to large craniofacial skeletal defects are often complicated and challenging. Critical-sized defects are unable to heal via natural regenerative processes and require surgical intervention, traditionally involving autologous bone (mainly in the form of nonvascularized grafts) or alloplasts. Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard of care in spite of the associated risk of donor site morbidity. Tissue engineering approaches represent a promising alternative that would serve to facilitate bone regeneration even in large craniofacial skeletal defects. This strategy has been tested in a myriad of iterations by utilizing a variety of osteoconductive scaffold materials, osteoblastic stem cells, as well as osteoinductive growth factors and small molecules. One of the major challenges facing tissue engineers is creating a scaffold fulfilling the properties necessary for controlled bone regeneration. These properties include osteoconduction, osetoinduction, biocompatibility, biodegradability, vascularization, and progenitor cell retention. This review will provide an overview of how optimization of the aforementioned scaffold parameters facilitates bone regenerative capabilities as well as a discussion of common osteoconductive scaffold materials. PMID:27239485

  1. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  2. Hematopoietic Expression of Hoxb4 Is Regulated in Normal and Leukemic Stem Cells through Transcriptional Activation of the Hoxb4 Promoter by Upstream Stimulating Factor (Usf)-1 and Usf-2

    PubMed Central

    Giannola, Diane M.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Jegathesan, Mithila; Liebowitz, David; Abrams, Charles S.; Kadesch, Tom; Dancis, Andrew; Emerson, Stephen G.

    2000-01-01

    The homeobox genes encode a family of transcription factors that regulate development and postnatal tissue homeostasis. Since HOXB4 plays a key role in regulating the balance between hematopoietic stem cell renewal and differentiation, we studied the molecular regulation of HOXB4 expression in human hematopoietic stem cells. HOXB4 expression in K562 cells is regulated at the level of transcription, and transient transfection defines primary HOXB4 regulatory sequences within a 99-bp 5′ promoter. Culture of highly purified human CD34+ bone marrow cells in thrombopoietin/Flt-3 ligand/stem cell factor induced HOXB4 3–10-fold, whereas culture in granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, only increased HOXB4/luciferase expression 20–50%. Mutations within the HOXB4 promoter identified a potential E box binding site (HOX response element [HXRE]-2) as the most critical regulatory sequence, and yeast one hybrid assays evaluating bone marrow and K562 libraries for HXRE-2 interaction identified upstream stimulating factor (USF)-2 and micropthalmia transcription factor (MITF). Electrophoretic mobility shift assay with K562 extracts confirmed that these proteins, along with USF-1, bind to the HOXB4 promoter in vitro. Cotransfection assays in both K562 and CD34+ cells showed that USF-1 and USF-2, but not MITF, induce the HOXB4 promoter in response to signals stimulating stem cell self-renewal, through activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Thus hematopoietic expression of the human HOXB4 gene is regulated by the binding of USF-1 and USF-2, and this process may be favored by cytokines promoting stem cell self-renewal versus differentiation. PMID:11085749

  3. Enhancing T cell reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a brief update of the latest trends

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Smith, Odette M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with a period of immune incompetence that particularly affects the T cell lineage. Strategies to enhance T cell reconstitution could significantly improve the survival of HSCT recipients by decreasing the incidence of fatal infectious complications and by enhancing graft-versus-tumor activity. In recent years, a variety of promising strategies have been established in preclinical models to improve T cell recovery in particular after allogeneic T cell-depleted HSCT, without aggravating graft-versus-host disease while preserving or even improving graft-versus-tumor activity. These therapies include treatment with keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), growth hormone (GH), LHRH agonists, interleukin 7 (IL-7) and interleukin 15 (IL-15). Thanks to the establishment of Notch-based culture systems, adoptive cellular therapies with T lineage-committed precursor cells have become feasible, since early T cell progenitors can now easily be generated in vitro in large quantities and have been proven to be very effective in enhancing T cell reconstitution and anti-tumor activity after allogeneic T cell-depleted HSCT. The translation of most of these strategies into clinical trials is likely and in some cases Phase I/II studies are already underway. PMID:17905611

  4. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2003-01-01

    It is hypothesized that the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) might countermeasure various space-caused disorders so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using animal models of disorders (hindlimb suspension unloading system and beta-thalassemia), the HSCT was tested for muscle loss, immunodeficiency and space anemia. The results indicate feasibility of HSCT for these disorders. To facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs were optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  5. Hepatoma-derived growth factor stimulates smooth muscle cell growth and is expressed in vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Allen D.; Lobe, David R.; Matsumura, Martin E.; Nakamura, Hideji; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is the first member identified of a new family of secreted heparin-binding growth factors highly expressed in the fetal aorta. The biologic role of HDGF in vascular growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HDGF mRNA is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), most prominently in proliferating SMCs, 8–24 hours after serum stimulation. Exogenous HDGF and endogenous overexpression of HDGF stimulated a significant increase in SMC number and DNA synthesis. Rat aortic SMCs transfected with a hemagglutinin-epitope–tagged rat HDGF cDNA contain HA-HDGF in their nuclei during S-phase. We also detected native HDGF in nuclei of cultured SMCs, of SMCs and endothelial cells from 19-day fetal (but not in the adult) rat aorta, of SMCs proximal to abdominal aortic constriction in adult rats, and of SMCs in the neointima formed after endothelial denudation of the rat common carotid artery. Moreover, HDGF colocalizes with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in SMCs in human atherosclerotic carotid arteries, suggesting that HDGF helps regulate SMC growth during development and in response to vascular injury. PMID:10712428

  6. Carbachol stimulates a different phospholipid metabolism than nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pessin, M S; Altin, J G; Jarpe, M; Tansley, F; Bradshaw, R A; Raben, D M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined 1,2-diglycerides (DGs) generated in PC12 cells in response to the muscarinic agonist carbachol and compared them with those generated in response to the differentiation factors nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Whereas carbachol stimulates a greater release of inositol phosphates, all three agonists generate similar levels of DGs. In this report, we have analyzed the molecular species of PC12 DGs generated in response to these three agonists. Additionally, we have analyzed the molecular species of PC12 phospholipids. The data indicate that 1) after 1 min of either nerve growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation, DGs arise primarily from phosphoinositide hydrolysis; 2) in contrast, after 1 min of carbachol stimulation, DG are generated equally by both phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis; and 3) after 15 min of stimulation by any of these agonists, DGs are generated largely by phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, with a smaller component arising from the phosphoinositides. These results suggest that at least part of the mechanism by which PC12 cells distinguish between different agonists is via alterations in phospholipid sources and kinetics of DG generation. PMID:1892912

  7. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  8. Donor Dependent Variations in Hematopoietic Differentiation among Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Féraud, Olivier; Valogne, Yannick; Melkus, Michael W.; Zhang, Yanyan; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Haddad, Rima; Daury, Aurélie; Rocher, Corinne; Larbi, Aniya; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Divers, Dominique; Gobbo, Emilie; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Louache, Fawzia; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Mitjavila-Garcia, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoiesis generated from human embryonic stem cells (ES) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) are unprecedented resources for cell therapy. We compared hematopoietic differentiation potentials from ES and iPS cell lines originated from various donors and derived them using integrative and non-integrative vectors. Significant differences in differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage were observed among ES and iPS. The ability of engraftment of iPS or ES-derived cells in NOG mice varied among the lines with low levels of chimerism. iPS generated from ES cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) reproduce a similar hematopoietic outcome compared to their parental ES cell line. We were not able to identify any specific hematopoietic transcription factors that allow to distinguish between good versus poor hematopoiesis in undifferentiated ES or iPS cell lines. There is a relatively unpredictable variation in hematopoietic differentiation between ES and iPS cell lines that could not be predicted based on phenotype or gene expression of the undifferentiated cells. These results demonstrate the influence of genetic background in variation of hematopoietic potential rather than the reprogramming process. PMID:26938212

  9. Non-Hematopoietic and Hematopoietic SIRPα Signaling Differently Regulates Murine B Cell Maturation in Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Lejon, Kristina; Koskinen Holm, Cecilia; Sulniute, Rima; Lundberg, Pernilla; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocyte development occurs in the bone marrow, while final differentiation and maturation can occur in both the bone marrow and the spleen. Here we provide evidence that signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), an Ig-superfamily ITIM-receptor expressed by myeloid but not by lymphoid cells, is involved in regulating B cell maturation. Lack of SIRPα signaling in adult SIRPα-mutant mice resulted in a reduced maturation of B cells in the bone marrow, evident by reduced numbers of semi-mature IgD+IgMhi follicular type-II (F-II) and mature IgD+IgMlo follicular type-I (F-I) B cells, as well as reduced blood B cell numbers. In addition, lack of SIRPα signaling also impaired follicular B cell maturation in the spleen. Maturing BM or splenic B cells of SIRPα-mutant mice were found to express higher levels of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM and apoptosis was increased among these B cells. Bone marrow reconstitution experiments revealed that the B cell maturation defect in bone marrow and blood was due to lack of SIRPα signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, while hematopoietic SIRPα signaling was important for follicular B cell maturation in the spleen. Adding on to our previous findings of a stromal cell defect in SIRPα-mutant mice was the finding that gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-ĸB ligand (RANKL) was significantly lower in cultured bone marrow stromal cells of SIRPα mutant mice. These data suggest a novel and opposite contribution of SIRPα signaling within non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic cells, respectively, to maintain B cell maturation and to prevent apoptosis in the bone marrow and spleen of adult mice. PMID:26222253

  10. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Muller, Laurent; Chaussain, Catherine; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. PMID:26798059

  11. c-Abl Activates Janus Kinase 2 in Normal Hematopoietic Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Wenjing; Leng, Xiaohong; Chakraborty, Sandip N.; Ma, Helen; Arlinghaus, Ralph B.

    2014-01-01

    Jak2 is involved in cytokine growth factor-stimulated signal transduction, but the mechanism of its activation is largely unknown. Here, we investigated Jak2 activation in a normal hematopoietic cell line, 32D mouse myeloid cells. The bimolecular fluorescence complementation studies showed that c-Abl formed a stable complex with Jak2 in live cells. Co-immunoprecipitation results showed that c-Abl bound to the βc chain of IL-3/IL-5/GM-CSF receptors. The kinase activities of both c-Abl and Jak2 were stimulated by IL-3 in 32D cells. Decreasing c-Abl protein expression in 32D cells by inducible shRNA decreased Jak2 activity and resulted in the failure of Jak2 activation in response to IL-3. Treatment of IL-3 and serum-starved 32D cells with 1 μm imatinib mysylate inhibited IL-3 stimulated kinase activities of both c-Abl and Jak2. In addition, the kinase-deficient Bcr-Abl mutant (p210K1172R) was defective for activation of Jak2 in 32D cells and impaired IL-3 independent growth, which was rescued by overexpression of c-Abl (+Abl). IL-3 efficiently inhibited apoptosis of 32Dp210K/R+Abl cells induced by imatinib mysylate but not Jak2 kinase inhibitor TG101209. In summary, our findings provide evidence that the kinase function of c-Abl and its C-terminal CT4 region is crucial for its interaction with Jak2 and its activation. c-Abl kinase activity induced by IL-3 is required for IL-3-stimulated Jak2 and Jak1 activation. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory role of c-Abl in Jak2 activation induced by IL-3 cytokine growth factor in 32D hematopoietic cells. PMID:24923444

  12. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Allana Nicole; Brezo, Jelena

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. While the cause of these symptoms are not yet fully delineated, one possible explanation could be the inhibition of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) growth and hematopoiesis in space. HSCs differentiate into all types of blood cells, and growing evidence indicates that the HSCs also have the ability to transdifferentiate to various tissues, including muscle, skin, liver, neuronal cells and possibly bone. Therefore, a hypothesis was advanced in this laboratory that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), could mitigate some of the disorders described above. Due to the magnitude of this project our laboratory has subdivided it into 3 sections: a) HSCT for space anemia; b) HSCT for muscle and bone losses; and c) HSCT for immunodeficiency. Toward developing the HSCT protocol for space anemia, the HSC transplantation procedure was established using a mouse model of beta thalassemia. In addition, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system was used to grow HSCs in space condition. To investigate the HSCT for muscle loss and bone loss, donor HSCs were genetically marked either by transfecting the beta-galactosidase-containing plasmid, pCMV.SPORT-beta-gal or by preparing from b-galactosidase transgenic mice. The transdifferentiation of HSCs to muscle is traced by the reporter gene expression in the hindlimb suspended mice with some positive outcome, as studied by the X-gal staining procedure. The possible structural contribution of HSCs against muscle loss is being investigated histochemically.

  13. Hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) as a therapeutic target in immune and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R.; O'Donoghue, Robert J.J.; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) is a member of the SRC family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (SFKs), and is expressed in cells of the myeloid and B-lymphocyte cell lineages. Excessive HCK activation is associated with several types of leukemia and enhances cell proliferation and survival by physical association with oncogenic fusion proteins, and with functional interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. Elevated HCK activity is also observed in many solid malignancies, including breast and colon cancer, and correlates with decreased patient survival rates. HCK enhances the secretion of growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines from myeloid cells, and promotes macrophage polarization towards a wound healing and tumor-promoting alternatively activated phenotype. Within tumor associated macrophages, HCK stimulates the formation of podosomes that facilitate extracellular matrix degradation, which enhance immune and epithelial cell invasion. By virtue of functional cooperation between HCK and bona fide oncogenic tyrosine kinases, excessive HCK activation can also reduce drug efficacy and contribute to chemo-resistance, while genetic ablation of HCK results in minimal physiological consequences in healthy mice. Given its known crystal structure, HCK therefore provides an attractive therapeutic target to both, directly inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and indirectly curb the source of tumor-promoting changes in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26087188

  14. Circulation and Chemotaxis of Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The major site of hematopoiesis transitions from the fetal liver to the spleen and bone marrow late in fetal development. To date, experiments have not been performed to evaluate functionally the migration and seeding of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during this period in ontogeny. It has been proposed that developmentally timed waves of HSCs enter the bloodstream only during distinct windows to seed the newly forming hematopoietic organs. Using competitive reconstitution assays to measure HSC activity, we determined the localization of HSCs in the mid-to-late gestation fetus. We found that multilineage reconstituting HSCs are present at low numbers in the blood at all timepoints measured. Seeding of fetal bone marrow and spleen occurred over several days, possibly while stem cell niches formed. In addition, using dual-chamber migration assays, we determined that like bone marrow HSCs, fetal liver HSCs migrate in response to stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α); however, unlike bone marrow HSCs, the migratory response of fetal liver HSCs to SDF-1α is greatly increased in the presence of Steel factor (SLF), suggesting an important role for SLF in HSC homing to and seeding of the fetal hematopoietic tissues. Together, these data demonstrate that seeding of fetal organs by fetal liver HSCs does not require large fluxes of HSCs entering the fetal bloodstream, and that HSCs constitutively circulate at low levels during the gestational period from 12 to 17 days postconception. Newly forming hematopoietic tissues are seeded gradually by HSCs, suggesting initial seeding is occurring as hematopoietic niches in the spleen and bone marrow form and become capable of supporting HSC self-renewal. We demonstrate that fetal and adult HSCs exhibit specific differences in chemotactic behavior. While both migrate in response to SDF-1α, fetal HSCs also respond significantly to the cytokine SLF. In addition, the combination of SDF-1α and SLF results in substantially enhanced

  15. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

    PubMed Central

    Coste, Cécile; Neirinckx, Virginie; Gothot, André; Wislet, Sabine; Rogister, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL) 12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs). Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26136659

  16. Risk Factors and Utility of a Risk-Based Algorithm for Monitoring Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections in Pediatric Recipients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rustia, Evelyn; Violago, Leah; Jin, Zhezhen; Foca, Marc D; Kahn, Justine M; Arnold, Staci; Sosna, Jean; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L; George, Diane; Garvin, James H; Satwani, Prakash

    2016-09-01

    Infectious complications, particularly viral infections, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Only a handful of studies in children have analyzed the risks for and impact of viremia on alloHCT-related outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study of 140 pediatric patients undergoing alloHCT to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia and viral disease after alloHCT. Furthermore, we assessed the impact of viremia on days of hospitalization and develop an algorithm for routine monitoring of viremia. Patients were monitored before alloHCT and then weekly for 180 days after alloHCT. Patients were considered to have viremia if CMV were > 600 copies/mL, EBV were > 1000 copies/mL, or ADV were > 1000 copies/mL on 2 consecutive PCRs. The overall incidences of viremia and viral disease in all patients from day 0 to +180 after alloHCT were 41.4% (n = 58) and 17% (n = 24), respectively. The overall survival for patients with viremia and viral disease was significantly lower compared with those without viremia (58% versus 74.2%, P = .03) and viral disease (48.2% versus 71.2%, P = .024). We identified that pretransplantation CMV risk status, pre-alloHCT viremia, and use of alemtuzumab were associated with the risk of post-alloHCT viremia. The average hospitalization days in patients with CMV risk (P = .011), viremia (P = .024), and viral disease (P = .002) were significantly higher. The algorithm developed from our data can potentially reduce viral PCR testing by 50% and is being studied prospectively at our center. Improved preventative treatment strategies for children at risk of viremia after alloHCT are needed. PMID:27252110

  17. The transcription factor early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) promotes apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Luna-Medina, Rosario; Pérez-Rendón, Arturo; Santos, Angel; Perez-Castillo, Ana

    2003-01-01

    Early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) is an immediate early gene, which is rapidly activated in quiescent cells by mitogens or in postmitotic neurons after depolarization. EGR-1 has been involved in diverse biological functions such as cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. Here we report that enforced expression of the EGR-1 gene induces apoptosis, as determined by flow cytometry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-fluorescein nick-end labelling (TUNEL) analysis, in murine Neuro2A cells. In accordance with this role of EGR-1 in cell death, antisense oligonucleotides increase cell viability in cells cultured in the absence of serum. This apoptotic activity of the EGR-1 appears to be mediated by p73, a member of the p53 family of proteins, since an increase in the amount of p73 is observed in clones stably expressing the EGR-1 protein. We also observed an increase in the transcriptional activity of the mdm2 promoter in cells overexpressing EGR-1, which is paralleled by a marked decrease in the levels of p53 protein, therefore excluding a role of this protein in mediating EGR-1-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that EGR-1 is an important factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. PMID:12755686

  18. Stimulation of proliferation of a human osteosarcoma cell line by exogenous acidic fibroblast growth factor requires both activation of receptor tyrosine kinase and growth factor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedłocha, A; Falnes, P O; Rapak, A; Muñoz, R; Klingenberg, O; Olsnes, S

    1996-01-01

    U2OS Dr1 cells, originating from a human osteosarcoma, are resistant to the intracellular action of diphtheria toxin but contain toxin receptors on their surfaces. These cells do not have detectable amounts of fibroblast growth factor receptors. When these cells were transfected with fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, the addition of acidic fibroblast growth factor to the medium induced tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. A considerable fraction of the cell-associated growth factor was found in the nuclear fraction. When the growth factor was fused to the diphtheria toxin A fragment, it was still bound to the growth factor receptor and induced tyrosine phosphorylation but did not induce DNA synthesis or cell proliferation, nor was any fusion protein recovered in the nuclear fraction. On the other hand, when the fusion protein was associated with the diphtheria toxin B fragment to allow translocation to the cytosol by the toxin pathway, the fusion protein was targeted to the nucleus and stimulated both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In untransfected cells containing toxin receptors but not fibroblast growth factor receptors, the fusion protein was translocated to the cytosol and targeted to the nucleus, but in this case, it stimulated only DNA synthesis. These data indicate that the following two signals are required to stimulate cell proliferation in transfected U2OS Dr1 cells: the tyrosine kinase signal from the activated fibroblast growth factor receptor and translocation of the growth factor into the cell. PMID:8524304

  19. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    PubMed Central

    Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Contreras-Quiroz, Adriana; Dorantes-Acosta, Elisa; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Quintela-Nuñez del Prado, Henry Martin; Venegas-Vázquez, Jorge; Mayani, Hector; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney; López-Martínez, Briceida; Pelayo, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintenance of neoplastic cells. We report here that hematopoietic cells from bone marrow B-ALL have the ability to produce proinflammatory and growth factors, including TNFα, IL-1β, IL-12, and GM-CSF that stimulate proliferation and differentiation of normal stem and progenitor cells. Our findings suggest an apparently distinct CD13+CD33+ population of leukemic cells contributing to a proinflammatory microenvironment that may be detrimental to long-term normal hematopoiesis within B-ALL bone marrow. PMID:26090405

  20. Insulinlike growth factor-1 is a progression factor for human mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Doi, T.; Striker, L. J.; Elliot, S. J.; Conti, F. G.; Striker, G. E.

    1989-01-01

    Mesangial cell hyperplasia is a feature common to several human glomerular diseases. The cause of this increased cell number is unknown. The authors assessed human mesangial cells in vitro and found that they possessed an insulinlike growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptor consisting of alpha and beta units (Mr, 130 k and 90 k respectively). Fifty percent inhibition of IGF-1 specific binding to the receptor required 1 X 10(-9) M IGF-1, greater than 1 X 10(-6) M insulin and 1 X 10(-7) M multiplication stimulating activity (MSA). Analysis of binding by the method of Scatchard revealed one type of IGF-1 receptor with a Kd of 1.35 X 10(-9) M, and a number per cell of 1.04 X 10(5). Binding studies on whole glomeruli had similar specificity and there were 7.17 X 10(7) receptors per glomerulus (Kd, 1.12 X 10(-9) M). Examination of the effect of IGF-1 on the cell cycle revealed that exposure of cells to both IGF-1 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) led to a significant increase in 3H-thymidine incorporation into cell layers. Antibody to PDGF abolished only that response due to PDGF. Similarly, the labeling index of cells pretreated with PDGF, washed, and then exposed to IGF-1 was increased, whereas if the order of ligand exposure was reversed, there was no such additive effect. Finally, PDGF increased RNA and protein synthesis, and this response was not enhanced by IGF-1. In summary, human mesangial cells and whole glomeruli possess IGF-1-specific receptors and IGF-1 was found to act as a progression factor in the cell cycle. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2464943

  1. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  2. The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease

    PubMed Central

    Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M.; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R.; Walkley, Carl R.; Karlsson, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease. PMID:24415629

  3. Growth differentiation factor 15 stimulates rapamycin-sensitive ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Griner, Samantha E; Joshi, Jayashree P; Nahta, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel molecular markers and therapeutic targets may improve survival rates for patients with ovarian cancer. In the current study, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of two human ovarian tumor tissue arrays showed high staining for GDF15 in a majority of tissues. Exogenous stimulation of ovarian cancer cell lines with recombinant human GDF15 (rhGDF15) or stable over-expression of a GDF15 expression plasmid promoted anchorage-independent growth, increased invasion, and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). MMP inhibition suppressed GDF15-mediated invasion. In addition, IHC analysis of human ovarian tumor tissue arrays indicated that GDF15 expression correlated significantly with high MMP2 and MMP9 expression. Exogenous and endogenous GDF15 over-expression stimulated phosphorylation of p38, Erk1/2, and Akt. Pharmacologic inhibition of p38, MEK, or PI3K suppressed GDF15-stimulated growth. Further, proliferation, growth, and invasion of GDF15 stable clones were blocked by rapamycin. IHC analysis demonstrated significant correlation between GDF15 expression and phosphorylation of mTOR. Finally, knockdown of endogenous GDF15 or neutralization of secreted GDF15 suppressed invasion and growth of a GDF15-over-expressing ovarian cancer cell line. These data indicate that GDF15 over-expression, which occurred in a majority of human ovarian cancers, promoted rapamycin-sensitive invasion and growth of ovarian cancer cells. Inhibition of mTOR may be an effective therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancers that over-express GDF15. Future studies should examine GDF15 as a novel molecular target for blocking ovarian cancer progression. PMID:23085437

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes survival of retinal vascular endothelial cells via vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bojun; Smith, Gill; Cai, Jun; Ma, Aihua; Boulton, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Aim To determine vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF‐C) expression in retinal endothelial cells, its antiapoptotic potential and its putative role in diabetic retinopathy. Method Cultured retinal endothelial cells and pericytes were exposed to tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α and VEGF‐C expression determined by reverse transcriptase‐polymerase chain reaction. Secreted VEGF‐C protein levels in conditioned media from endothelial cells were examined by western blotting analysis. The ability of VEGF‐C to prevent apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia in endothelial cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The expression of VEGF‐C in diabetic retinopathy was studied by immunohistochemistry of retinal tissue. Result VEGF‐C was expressed by both vascular endothelial cells and pericytes. TNFα up regulated both VEGF‐C and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor‐2 (VEGFR)‐2 expression in endothelial cells in a dose‐dependent manner, but had no effect on VEGFR‐3. Flow cytometry results showed that VEGF‐C prevented endothelial cell apoptosis induced by TNFα and hyperglycaemia and that the antiapoptotic effect was mainly via VEGFR‐2. In pericytes, the expression of VEGF‐C mRNA remained stable on exogenous TNFα treatment. VEGF‐C immunostaining was increased in retinal vessels in specimens with diabetes compared with retinal specimens from controls without diabetes. Conclusion In retinal endothelial cells, TNFα stimulates the expression of VEGF‐C, which in turn protects endothelial cells from apoptosis induced by TNFα or hyperglycaemia via VEGFR‐2 and thus helps sustain retinal neovascularisation. PMID:16943230

  5. Activation of adenosine A(3) receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Vacek, A; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2009-01-01

    Adenosine A(3) receptor agonist N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) has been tested from the point of view of potentiating the effects of hematopoietic growth factors interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on the growth of hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC) in suspension of normal mouse bone marrow cells in vitro. IB-MECA alone induced no GM-CFC growth. Significant elevation of numbers of GM-CFC evoked by the combinations of IB-MECA with IL-3, SCF, or GM-CSF as compared with these growth factors alone has been noted. Combination of IB-MECA with G-CSF did not induce significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with G-CSF alone. Joint action of three drugs, namely of IB-MECA + IL-3 + GM-CSF, produced significantly higher numbers of GM-CFC in comparison with the combinations of IB-MECA + IL-3, IB-MECA + GM-CSF, or IL-3 + GM-CSF. These results give evidence of a significant role of selective activation of adenosine A(3) receptors in stimulation of the growth of granulocyte/ macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:18380545

  6. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, T; Torjemane, L; Abdelkefi, A; Lakhal, A; Ladeb, S; Ben Hamed, L; Slama, H; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2008-08-01

    In 1998, the Tunisian team of the 'Centre National de Greffe de Moelle Osseuse' initiated allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (AHSCT) in Tunisia. As of June 2007, information was collected about 299 patients with a first AHSCT and 12 additional retransplants. The median age was 19 years (range 2-49 years). The main indications were aplastic anemia (n=106, 36%), leukemia and nonmalignant disorders (n=153, 51%), Fanconi anemia (n=26, 9%) and other nonmalignant disorders (n=14, 4%). Preparative regimens depended on indication. All donors were HLA geno-identical. The stem cell sources were BM (87%) and PBSCs (13%). At the time of analysis, 200 patients (67%) were alive after a median follow-up of 42 months (range 3-112 months). The overall TRM rate was 17%. Outcome depended on indication. According to our results, allogeneic HSCT is potentially curative for hematological diseases, but it is a toxic approach for malignant disorders. PMID:18724288

  7. Persistent Disparities in Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David G; Loberiza, Fausto R

    2015-09-01

    The use of large databases has provided advancements in the understanding of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in the field of adult hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT). Disparities exist on individual, institutional, and systemic levels for both allogeneic and autologous HCT. We reviewed the most recent publications that utilized large databases to elucidate disparities in HCT and placed them into historical context of the other major studies in the field. Two emerging themes were identified. These themes are persistent inequalities in both allogeneic HCT and autologous HCT for myeloma and the importance of improving homogeneity of care in HCT. Minimization of inequalities can be achieved only with an understanding of the persistent barriers that exist in the field. PMID:26104908

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta as a differentiating factor for cultured smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gawaziuk, J P; X; Sheikh, F; Cheng, Z-Q; Cattini, P A; Stephens, N L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the development of supercontractile smooth muscle cells, contributing to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways in asthmatic patients, is due to transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. In cultured smooth muscle cells starved by removal of 10% foetal bovine serum for 7 days, growth arrest was seen; 30% became elongated and demonstrated super contractility. Study of conditioned medium suggested that the differentiating factor was TGF-beta. Sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was carried out on conditioned medium from the arrested cells. Two protein bands were identified as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and TGF-beta1. To determine second messenger signalling by SMAD2, Western blotting and confocal microscopy were employed. Conditioned medium from arrested cultures showed the presence of MMP-2 and TGF-beta1, as revealed by SDS-PAGE; 68- and 25-kDa bands were seen. Differentiation was confirmed by upregulation of marker proteins, smooth muscle type myosin heavy chain and myosin light chain kinase. Confirmation was obtained by downregulating these proteins with decorin treatment, which reduces the levels of active TGF-beta and an adenoviral dominant-negative vector coding for a mutated type II TGF-beta-receptor. Activation of second messenger signalling was demonstrated immunocytochemically by the presence of phosphorylated SMAD2 and SMAD4. Transforming growth factor-beta is likely to be the differentiating factor responsible for the development of these supercontractile smooth muscle cells. The development of such cells in vivo after cessation of an asthmatic attack could contribute to the nonspecific hyperreactivity of airways seen in patients. PMID:17596270

  9. [Origin of Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Bone Marrow--Endothelial to Hematopoietic Transition (EHT)?].

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Yuan, Yan; Chen, Tong

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to primitive hematopoiesis, during embryonic definitive hematopoiesis, it has been demonstrated that multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) arise from hemogenic endothelium, and the endothelial to hematopoietic transition (EHT) exists within the yolk sac, placenta, AGM, mouse head vascular and extraembryonic vessels. However, whether hemogenic endothelial cells contribute to blood cell development at other sites of definitive hematopoiesis, including fetal liver and bone marrow, remains largely unknown. Recently, more and more researches showed that hematopoiesis within bone marrow had a close relationship with vascular endothelium development, too. This review summarizes the mechanism of EHT during embryo development, and discuss whether EHT exists in adult hematopoiesis. PMID:26117052

  10. Heparin Affinity: Purification of a Tumor-Derived Capillary Endothelial Cell Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shing, Y.; Folkman, J.; Sullivan, R.; Butterfield, C.; Murray, J.; Klagsbrun, M.

    1984-03-01

    A tumor-derived growth factor that stimulates the proliferation of capillary endothelial cells has a very strong affinity for heparin. This heparin affinity makes it possible to purify the growth factor to a single-band preparation in a rapid two-step procedure. The purified growth factor is a cationic polypeptide, has a molecular weight of about 18,000, and stimulates capillary endothelial cell proliferation at a concentration of about 1 nanogram per milliliter.

  11. Protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on aging Sca-1⁺ hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yue; Liu, Jun; Cai, Shizhong; Liu, Dianfeng; Jiang, Rong; Wang, Yaping

    2015-09-01

    In adults, bone hematopoietic cells are responsible for the lifelong production of all blood cells. It is affected in aging, with progressive loss of physiological integrity leading to impaired function by cellular intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, intervention measures, which directly inhibit the aging of hematopoietic cells, remain to be investigated. In the present study, 10 µmol/l ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1) markedly alleviated the aging phenotypes of Sca‑1+ hematopoietic cells following in vitro exposure. In addition, the protective effects of ginsenoside Rg1 on the aging of Sca‑1+ hematopoietic cells was confirmed using a serial transplantation assay in C57BL/6 mice. The mechanistic investigations revealed that Rg1‑mediated Sca‑1+ hematopoietic cell aging alleviation was linked to a series of characteristic events, including telomere end attrition compensation, telomerase activity reconstitution and the activation of genes involved in p16‑Rb signaling pathways. Based on the above results, it was concluded that ginsenoside Rg1 is a potent agent, which acts on hematopoietic cells to protect them from aging, which has implications for therapeutic approaches in hemopoietic diseases. PMID:26045300

  12. Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Micera, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate. PMID:27439311

  13. Divergent functions of hematopoietic transcription factors in lineage priming and differentiation during erythro-megakaryopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Pimkin, Maxim; Kossenkov, Andrew V; Mishra, Tejaswini; Morrissey, Christapher S; Wu, Weisheng; Keller, Cheryl A; Blobel, Gerd A; Lee, Dongwon; Beer, Michael A; Hardison, Ross C; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2014-12-01

    Combinatorial actions of relatively few transcription factors control hematopoietic differentiation. To investigate this process in erythro-megakaryopoiesis, we correlated the genome-wide chromatin occupancy signatures of four master hematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, GATA2, TAL1, and FLI1) and three diagnostic histone modification marks with the gene expression changes that occur during development of primary cultured megakaryocytes (MEG) and primary erythroblasts (ERY) from murine fetal liver hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We identified a robust, genome-wide mechanism of MEG-specific lineage priming by a previously described stem/progenitor cell-expressed transcription factor heptad (GATA2, LYL1, TAL1, FLI1, ERG, RUNX1, LMO2) binding to MEG-associated cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in multipotential progenitors. This is followed by genome-wide GATA factor switching that mediates further induction of MEG-specific genes following lineage commitment. Interaction between GATA and ETS factors appears to be a key determinant of these processes. In contrast, ERY-specific lineage priming is biased toward GATA2-independent mechanisms. In addition to its role in MEG lineage priming, GATA2 plays an extensive role in late megakaryopoiesis as a transcriptional repressor at loci defined by a specific DNA signature. Our findings reveal important new insights into how ERY and MEG lineages arise from a common bipotential progenitor via overlapping and divergent functions of shared hematopoietic transcription factors. PMID:25319996

  14. Regulation of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Activity by Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schuettpelz, Laura G.; Link, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are quiescent cells with self-renewal capacity and the ability to generate all mature blood cells. HSCs normally reside in specialized niches in the bone marrow that help maintain their quiescence and long-term repopulating activity. There is emerging evidence that certain cytokines induced during inflammation have significant effects on HSCs in the bone marrow. Type I and II interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) directly stimulate HSC proliferation and differentiation, thereby increasing the short-term output of mature effector leukocytes. However, chronic inflammatory cytokine signaling can lead to HSC exhaustion and may contribute the development of hematopoietic malignancies. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF can also indirectly affect HSCs by altering the bone marrow microenvironment, disrupting the stem cell niche, and leading to HSC mobilization into the blood. Herein, we review our current understanding of the effects of inflammatory mediators on HSCs, and we discuss the potential clinical implications of these findings with respect to bone marrow failure and leukemogenesis. PMID:23882270

  15. Age-Related Changes of Healthy Bone Marrow Cell Signaling in Response to Growth Factors Provide Insight into Low Risk MDS

    PubMed Central

    Kornblau, Steven M.; Cohen, Aileen C.; Soper, David; Huang, Ying-Wen; Cesano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Single Cell Network Profiling (SCNP) is a multiparametric flow cytometry-based assay that quantifiably and simultaneously measures changes in intracellular signaling proteins in response to in vitro extracellular modulators at the single cell level. Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder of hematopoietic stem cells that occurs in elderly subjects and is characterized by dysplasia and ineffective hematopoiesis. The functional responsiveness of MDS bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells, including functionally distinct myeloid and erythroid precursor subsets, to hematopoietic growth factors (HGF) and the relationship of modulated signaling to disease characteristics is poorly understood. Methods SCNP was used first to examine the effects of age on erythropoietin (EPO) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF)-induced signaling in myeloid, nucleated red blood cells (nRBC), and CD34 expressing cell subsets in healthy BM (n=15). SCNP was then used to map functional signaling profiles in low risk (LR) MDS (n=7) for comparison to signaling in samples from healthy donors and to probe signaling associations within clinically defined subgroups. Results In healthy BM samples, signaling responses to HGF were quite homogeneous (i.e. tightly regulated) with age-dependent effects observed in response to EPO but not to GCSF. Despite the relatively small number of samples assayed in the study, LR MDS could be classified into distinct subgroups based on both cell subset frequency and signaling profiles. Conclusion As a correlate of underlying genetic abnormalities, signal transduction analyses may provide a functional and potentially clinically relevant classification of MDS. Further evaluation in a larger cohort is warranted. PMID:24106013

  16. Dexamethasone facilitates erythropoiesis in murine embryonic stem cells differentiating into hematopoietic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anand S; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Mishra, Rangnath; Lane, Thomas A; Carrier, Ewa

    2006-07-28

    Differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells are increasingly emerging as an important source of hematopoietic progenitors with a potential to be useful for both basic and clinical research applications. It has been suggested that dexamethasone facilitates differentiation of ES cells towards erythrocytes but the mechanism responsible for sequential expression of genes regulating this process are not well-understood. Therefore, we in vitro induced differentiation of murine ES cells towards erythropoiesis and studied the sequential expression of a set of genes during the process. We hypothesized that dexamethasone-activates its cognate nuclear receptors inducing up-regulation of erythropoietic genes such as GATA-1, Flk-1, Epo-R, and direct ES cells towards erythropoietic differentiation. ES cells were cultured in primary hematopoietic differentiation media containing methyl-cellulose, IMDM, IL-3, IL-6, and SCF to promote embryoid body (EB) formation. Total RNA of day 3, 5, and 9-old EBs was isolated for gene expression studies using RT-PCR. Cells from day 9 EBs were subjected to secondary differentiation using three different cytokines and growth factors combinations: (1) SCF, EPO, dexamethasone, and IGF; (2) SCF, IL-3, IL-6, and TPO; and, (3) SCF IL-3, IL-6, TPO, and EPO. Total RNA from day 12 of secondary differentiated ES cells was isolated to study the gene expression pattern during this process. Our results demonstrate an up-regulation of GATA-1, Flk-1, HoxB-4, Epo-R, and globin genes (alpha-globin, betaH-1 globin, beta-major globin, epsilon -globin, and zeta-globin) in the 9-day-old EBs, whereas, RNA from 5-day-old EBs showed expression of HoxB-4, epsilon-globin, gamma-globin, betaH1-globin, and Flk-1. Three-day-old EBs showed only HoxB-4 and Flk-1 gene expression and lacked expression of all globin genes. These findings indicate that erythropoiesis-specific genes are activated later in the course of differentiation. Gene expression studies on the ES cells of

  17. Dexamethasone facilitates erythropoiesis in murine embryonic stem cells differentiating into hematopoietic cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Anand S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Mishra, Rangnath; Lane, Thomas A.; Carrier, Ewa . E-mail: assrivastava@ucsd.edu

    2006-07-28

    Differentiating embryonic stem (ES) cells are increasingly emerging as an important source of hematopoietic progenitors with a potential to be useful for both basic and clinical research applications. It has been suggested that dexamethasone facilitates differentiation of ES cells towards erythrocytes but the mechanism responsible for sequential expression of genes regulating this process are not well-understood. Therefore, we in vitro induced differentiation of murine ES cells towards erythropoiesis and studied the sequential expression of a set of genes during the process. We hypothesized that dexamethasone-activates its cognate nuclear receptors inducing up-regulation of erythropoietic genes such as GATA-1, Flk-1, Epo-R, and direct ES cells towards erythropoietic differentiation. ES cells were cultured in primary hematopoietic differentiation media containing methyl-cellulose, IMDM, IL-3, IL-6, and SCF to promote embryoid body (EB) formation. Total RNA of day 3, 5, and 9-old EBs was isolated for gene expression studies using RT-PCR. Cells from day 9 EBs were subjected to secondary differentiation using three different cytokines and growth factors combinations: (1) SCF, EPO, dexamethasone, and IGF; (2) SCF, IL-3, IL-6, and TPO; and (3) SCF IL-3, IL-6, TPO, and EPO. Total RNA from day 12 of secondary differentiated ES cells was isolated to study the gene expression pattern during this process. Our results demonstrate an up-regulation of GATA-1, Flk-1, HoxB-4, Epo-R, and globin genes ({alpha}-globin, {beta}H-1 globin, {beta}-major globin, {epsilon} -globin, and {zeta}-globin) in the 9-day-old EBs, whereas, RNA from 5-day-old EBs showed expression of HoxB-4, {epsilon}-globin, {gamma}-globin, {beta}H1-globin, and Flk-1. Three-day-old EBs showed only HoxB-4 and Flk-1 gene expression and lacked expression of all globin genes. These findings indicate that erythropoiesis-specific genes are activated later in the course of differentiation. Gene expression studies on the

  18. MiR-24 Promotes the Survival of Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tan; Rich, Audrey; Dahl, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The microRNA, miR-24, inhibits B cell development and promotes myeloid development of hematopoietic progenitors. Differential regulation of cell survival in myeloid and lymphoid cells by miR-24 may explain how miR-24′s affects hematopoietic progenitors. MiR-24 is reported to regulate apoptosis, either positively or negatively depending on cell context. However, no role for miR-24 in regulating cell death has been previously described in blood cells. To examine miR-24′s effect on survival, we expressed miR-24 via retrovirus in hematopoietic cells and induced cell death with cytokine or serum withdrawal. We observed that miR-24 enhanced survival of myeloid and B cell lines as well as primary hematopoietic cells. Additionally, antagonizing miR-24 with shRNA in hematopoietic cells made them more sensitive to apoptotic stimuli, suggesting miR-24 functions normally to promote blood cell survival. Since we did not observe preferential protection of myeloid over B cells, miR-24′s pro-survival effect does not explain its promotion of myelopoiesis. Moreover, expression of pro-survival protein, Bcl-xL, did not mimic miR-24′s impact on cellular differentiation, further supporting this conclusion. Our results indicate that miR-24 is a critical regulator of hematopoietic cell survival. This observation has implications for leukemogenesis. Several miRNAs that regulate apoptosis have been shown to function as either tumor suppressors or oncogenes during leukemogenesis. MiR-24 is expressed highly in primary acute myelogenous leukemia, suggesting that its pro-survival activity could contribute to the transformation of hematopoietic cells. PMID:23383180

  19. Cell growth on immobilized cell growth factor. 7. Protein-free cell culture by using growth-factor-immobilized polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Ito, Y; Imanishi, Y

    1993-02-01

    A protein-free culture of anchorage-dependent cells, mouse fibroblast cells, STO and 3T3-L1 and fibroic sarcoma cells, Swiss albino HSDM1C1, grown on a cell-growth protein, insulin, and/or a cell-adhesion protein, collagen, which are immobilized or coimmobilized on surface-hydrolyzed poly(methyl methacrylate) membrane, was investigated. By adding metal ions and lipids to the culture medium, a protein-free culture medium was composed, which was potent in promoting cell proliferation similarly to serum-containing culture medium. In particular, with insulin/collagen-coimmobilized membrane, a protein-free culture was established without detachment of growing cells over a long period. These protein-immobilized membranes could be used repeatedly. PMID:7763456

  20. Peptide growth factors, part B

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: Platelet-Derived Growth Factor;Nerve and Glial Growth Factors;PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Genetic Approaches and Biological Effects.

  1. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  2. Circulating Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells are Decreased in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, William J.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Muldrow, Alaina; Kearns, Mark T.; Kloepfer, Angela; Barthel, Lea; Bratton, Donna L.; Bowler, Russell P.; Henson, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Bone marrow derived progenitor cells participate in the repair of injured vessels. The lungs of individuals with emphysema have reduced alveolar capillary density and increased endothelial apoptosis. We hypothesized that circulating levels of endothelial and hematopoietic progenitor cells would be reduced in this group of patients. Objectives The goal of this study was to measure circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in subjects with COPD and to determine if progenitor levels correlated with disease severity and the presence of emphysema. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 61 patients with COPD and 32 control subjects. Levels of EPCs (CD45dim CD34+ ) and HPCs (CD45+ CD34+ VEGF-R2+) were quantified using multi-parameter flow cytometry. Progenitor cell function was assessed using cell culture assays. All subjects were evaluated with spirometry and CT scanning. Measurements and Main Results HPC levels were reduced in subjects with COPD compared to controls, whereas circulating EPC levels were similar between the two groups. HPC levels correlated with severity of obstruction and were lowest in subjects with severe emphysema. These associations remained after correction for factors known to affect progenitor cell levels including age, smoking status, the use of statin medications and the presence of coronary artery disease. The ability of mononuclear cells to form endothelial cell colony forming units (EC-CFU) was also reduced in subjects with COPD. Conclusions HPC levels are reduced in subjects with COPD and correlate with emphysema phenotype and severity of obstruction. Reduction of HPCs may disrupt maintenance of the capillary endothelium, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:24182349

  3. Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rh-G-CSF) may accelerate hematopoietic recovery after HLA-identical sibling allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, M; Ustün, C; Akçağlayan, E; Akan, H; Arslan, O; Ilhan, O; Beksaç, M; Gürman, G; Demirer, T; Arat, M; Celebi, H; Konuk, N; Uysal, A; Koç, H

    2001-03-01

    We studied the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on hematopoietic recovery and clinical outcome in patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. Fifty-six patients with hematological malignancies who underwent allogeneic PBSC transplantation between 1995 and 1998 were entered into this study. Twenty-eight patients who received daily G-CSF from day +1 after allogeneic PBSC transplantation until the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) reached >0.5 x 10(9)/l for 3 consecutive days were compared with 28 patients (control group) who did not receive G-CSF in a non-randomized manner. The study group and the control group were comparable with respect to baseline patient and transplantation characteristics. Median times to ANC of >0.5 x 10(9)/l and 1 x 10(9)/l with or without G-CSF were 12 days (range 8-21), 13 days (10-32) (P = 0.04) and 13 days (9-21), 15 days (11-44) (P = 0.02), respectively. Median times to reach a platelet count of >20 x 10(9)/l with and without G-CSF were 11 days (0-20) and 13 days (9-26), respectively (P = 0.03). The incidence of febrile episodes was significantly lower with G-CSF, 75% vs 100% (P = 0.008). Patients receiving G-CSF had less grade III-IV mucositis than those who did not receive G-CSF (P = 0.01). There was also no increase in the incidence and severity of acute GVHD in patients using G-CSF (P = 0.22). Although the number of relapsing patients was greater in the G-CSF group (seven vs three patients), this was not statistically significant (P = 0.24). Disease-free and overall survival rates did not differ between the two groups (P = 0.58 and 0.53, respectively). The administration of G-CSF after allogeneic PBSC transplantation provided faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment associated with less severe mucositis and less febrile episodes. PMID:11313683

  4. RARalpha is a regulatory factor for Am-80-induced cell growth inhibition of hematologic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Jimi, Shiro; Mashima, Kota; Matsumoto, Taichi; Hara, Shuji; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Retinoids are used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Am-80, Tamibarotene, binds to retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) more specifically than all-trans retinoic acid. We studied the tumor cell suppressive effects of Am-80, with respect to cytotoxicity and growth inhibition using eight myeloid and lymphoid malignant cells in culture (HL-60, HL-60R, K-562, Kasumi-1, MEG01, Raji, U266B1, and U937). The effects of Am-80 were examined during 9 days of incubation with 10(-7)-10(-5) M of Am-80 in culture medium, which was changed every 3 days. HL-60 were the only cells sensitive to Am-80-induced cytotoxicity; the latter reached more than 95% after 9 days of incubation, and death was primarily through apoptosis. The total mass of RARalpha in HL-60 was significantly greater (p<0.006) than in ATRA-resistant HL-60 (HL-60R) as well as all of other cells tested. However, in all cells excluding HL-60, Am-80 induced time- and dose-dependent cell growth inhibition without noticeable cytotoxicity. TGF-beta2 was released into the media containing cells incubated with Am-80 for 3 days. A dose-dependent increment of phosphorylation of Smad-2 was also detected. The relative amount of secreted TGF-beta2 correlated with the growth inhibition rates in all cells tested excluding HL-60, and with the total mass of RARalpha in the cells (p=0.0137). Our results indicate that Am-80-induced cell-type non-specific growth inhibition is mediated by TGF-beta2, where the total mass of RARalpha could be an important regulatory factor in hematologic malignant cells. PMID:17611697

  5. Structural and Functional Properties of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor and Stem Cell Factor Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Lennartsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and stem cell factor (SCF) are members of the type III class of PTK receptors, which are characterized by five Ig-like domains extracellularly and a split kinase domain intracellularly. The receptors are activated by ligand-induced dimerization, leading to autophosphorylation on specific tyrosine residues. Thereby the kinase activities of the receptors are activated and docking sites for downstream SH2 domain signal transduction molecules are created; activation of these pathways promotes cell growth, survival, and migration. These receptors mediate important signals during the embryonal development, and control tissue homeostasis in the adult. Their overactivity is seen in malignancies and other diseases involving excessive cell proliferation, such as atherosclerosis and fibrotic diseases. In cancer, mutations of PDGF and SCF receptors—including gene fusions, point mutations, and amplifications—drive subpopulations of certain malignancies, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, hypereosinophilic syndrome, glioblastoma, acute myeloid leukemia, mastocytosis, and melanoma. PMID:23906712

  6. The effects of vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor and colony-stimulating factor-1 on hematopoietic cells in normal and osteopetrotic rats.

    PubMed

    Benis, K A; Schneider, G B

    1996-10-15

    Osteopetrosis is a heterogeneous group of bone disorders characterized by the failure of osteoclasts to resorb bone and by several immunological defects including macrophage dysfunction. Two compounds, colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) and vitamin D-binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-MAF) were used in the present study to evaluate their effects on the peritoneal population of cells and on cells within the bone marrow microenvironment in normal and incisors absent (ia) osteopetrotic rats. Previous studies in this laboratory have demonstrated that administration of DBP-MAF to newborn ia animals results in a substantial increase in bone marrow cavity size due to upregulated osteoclast function. To study the effects of these compounds on the macrophage/osteoclast precursors, DBP-MAF, CSF-1, and the combination of these compounds were given to newborn ia and normal littermate animals. Both the normal and mutant phenotypes responded similarly when treated with these compounds. Rats exhibited a profound shift toward the macrophage lineage from the neutrophil lineage when compared with vehicle-treated control animals after treatment with these compounds. In the in vivo peritoneal lavage study, animals received injections of CSF-1, DBP-MAF or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 over a 4-week period. The various types of cells in the peritoneal cavity were then enumerated. The in vitro study consisted of cells isolated from the bone marrow microenvironment and cultured on feeder layers of CSF-1, DBP-MAF, or DBP-MAF/CSF-1 for colony enumeration. The increase in macrophage numbers at the expense of neutrophil numbers could be seen in both the in vivo and in vitro experiments. The macrophage/osteoclast and neutrophil lineages have a common precursor, the granulocyte/macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC). With the addition of CSF-1, the GM-CFC precursor may be induced into the macrophage/osteoclast lineage rather than the granulocyte lineage. This increased pool of cells in the

  7. The pros and cons of split-dose granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone rather than a single high dose for hematopoietic progenitor cell mobilization in small children (< 15 kg) with solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Etienne; Piguet, Christophe; Auvrignon, Anne; Rubie, Hervé; Deméocq, François; Kanold, Justyna

    2006-07-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells were mobilized in 34 children with solid tumors weighing < or = 15 kg using granulocyte colony-stimulating factor alone at the doses of 10, 20 or 2 x 12 microg/kg/day. The mobilization with 2 x 12 microg/kg/day was more efficient than that with 10 mg/kg/day. Although the superiority of the split-dose compared to the single, high daily dose (20 microg/kg/day) was not statistically significant, our results suggest that the 2 x 12 microg/kg/day regimen is interesting. PMID:16818292

  8. [Umbilical cord hematopoietic progenitor cells bank].

    PubMed

    Morales, V H; Milone, J; Etchegoyen, O; Bordone, J; Uranga, A

    2001-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) from bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood is a standard therapy in malignant and non malignant diseases. The lack of suitable donors is an important limitation. The discovery that umbilical cord blood (CB) contains high numbers of HPC that can be used as an alternative source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation led ITMO to establish BANCEL, the first Argentine and Latinoamerican experience of its kind. The blood remaining in the umbilical cord and in the placenta was requested from women who were in the last quarter of pregnancy. An informed consent together with a medical record focused on family disease was completed. Out of 65 donations, 55 (85%) were collected and 51 (78%) were cryopreserved. Mean collected volume was 110 ml with 68% (75 ml) reduction and mean cryopreservation of 35 ml; ABO and Rh blood group systems were determined, HLA, class I, A and B loci, and class II, DR locus were typed by molecular biology methods using PCR-SSOP. Infectious disease screening was carried out for brucellosis, syphilis, Chagas, hepatitis B and C, HIV I and II, HTLV I and II, toxoplasmosis and cytomegalovirus. Two positive units for hepatitis B (anticore) and two positive units for Chagas were discarded. The quantity of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ cells and the clonogenic capacity were determined twice at the collection and after the procedures of volume reduction previous to cryopreservation. A 5% reduction in both TNC and CD34 cells and a 10% in the colony forming units (CFU) were detected. A good correlation coefficient between TNC and CFU was obtained. PMID:11808425

  9. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y J; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin(-)CD34(+) cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  10. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E.; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y.J.; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin−CD34+ cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  11. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  12. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  13. Human Olfactory Mucosa Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Survival, Proliferation, and Differentiation of Human Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Solano, Dylana; Wittig, Olga; Ayala-Grosso, Carlos; Pieruzzini, Rosalinda

    2012-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from the human olfactory mucosa (OM) are cells that have been proposed as a niche for neural progenitors. OM-MSCs share phenotypic and functional properties with bone marrow (BM) MSCs, which constitute fundamental components of the hematopoietic niche. In this work, we investigated whether human OM-MSCs may promote the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). For this purpose, human bone marrow cells (BMCs) were co-cultured with OM-MSCs in the absence of exogenous cytokines. At different intervals, nonadherent cells (NACs) were harvested from BMC/OM-MSC co-cultures, and examined for the expression of blood cell markers by flow cytometry. OM-MSCs supported the survival (cell viability >90%) and proliferation of BMCs, after 54 days of co-culture. At 20 days of co-culture, flow cytometric and microscopic analyses showed a high percentage (73%) of cells expressing the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, and the presence of cells of myeloid origin, including polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, basophils, eosinophils, erythroid cells, and megakaryocytes. Likewise, T (CD3), B (CD19), and NK (CD56/CD16) cells were detected in the NAC fraction. Colony-forming unit–granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) progenitors and CD34+ cells were found, at 43 days of co-culture. Reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies showed that OM-MSCs constitutively express early and late-acting hematopoietic cytokines (i.e., stem cell factor [SCF] and granulocyte- macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). These results constitute the first evidence that OM-MSCs may provide an in vitro microenvironment for HSCs. The capacity of OM-MSCs to support the survival and differentiation of HSCs may be related with the capacity of OM-MSCs to produce hematopoietic cytokines. PMID:22471939

  14. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  15. Hematopoietic stem cells: can old cells learn new tricks?

    PubMed

    Ho, Anthony D; Punzel, Michael

    2003-05-01

    Since the establishment of cell lines derived from human embryonic stem (ES) cells, it has been speculated that out of such "raw material," we could some day produce all sorts of replacement parts for the human body. Human pluripotent stem cells can be isolated from embryonic, fetal, or adult tissues. Enormous self-renewal capacity and developmental potential are the characteristics of ES cells. Somatic stem cells, especially those derived from hematopoietic tissues, have also been reported to exhibit developmental potential heretofore not considered possible. The initial evidences for the plasticity potential of somatic stem cells were so encouraging that the opponents of ES cell research used them as arguments for restricting ES cell research. In the past months, however, critical issues have been raised challenging the validity and the interpretation of the initial data. Whereas hematopoietic stem-cell therapy has been a clinical reality for almost 40 years, there is still a long way to go in basic research before novel therapy strategies with stem cells as replacement for other organ systems can be established. Given the present status, we should keep all options open for research in ES cells and adult stem cells to appreciate the complexity of their differentiation pathways and the relative merits of various types of stem cells for regenerative medicine. PMID:12714568

  16. Role of osteoclasts in regulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) cavities are utilized for hematopoiesis and to maintain hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HSCs have the ability to self-renew as well as to differentiate into multiple different hematopoietic lineage cells. HSCs produce their daughter cells throughout the lifespan of individuals and thus, maintaining HSCs is crucial for individual life. BM cavities provide a specialized microenvironment termed “niche” to support HSCs. Niches are composed of various types of cells such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells and reticular cells. Osteoclasts are unique cells which resorb bones and are required for BM cavity formation. Loss of osteoclast function or differentiation results in inhibition of BM cavity formation, an osteopetrotic phenotype. Osteoclasts are also reportedly required for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) mobilization to the periphery from BM cavities. Thus, lack of osteoclasts likely results in inhibition of HSC maintenance and HSPC mobilization. However, we found that osteoclasts are dispensable for hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and mobilization by using three independent osteoclast-less animal models. In this review, I will discuss the roles of osteoclasts in hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and mobilization. PMID:24147255

  17. Regulation of Tenon's Capsule Fibroblast Cell Proliferation by the Opioid Growth Factor and the Opioid Growth Factor Receptor Axis

    PubMed Central

    Klocek, Matthew S.; Sassani, Joseph W.; Donahue, Renee N.; McLaughlin, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma filtration surgery often fails because of the fibrotic reaction from Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (TCFs). This study examined whether the interaction of the opioid growth factor (OGF) [Met5]-enkephalin with its receptor (OGFr) is a regulator of TCF proliferation. Methods. The presence of OGF and its receptor (OGFr) was determined in rabbit TCFs (RTCFs) by immunocytochemistry. The kinetics of OGFr were established in receptor binding assays. The ability of OGF to inhibit RTCF proliferation was assessed with dose–response, receptor mediation, and reversibility studies. Dependence on OGF and OGFr was ascertained by antibody neutralization and siRNA studies, respectively. The mechanism of action of the OGF–OGFr axis on survival (apoptosis, necrosis) and DNA synthesis of RTCFs was elucidated. Results. OGF and OGFr were detected in RTCF cells, and specific and saturable binding to OGFr was recorded. Exogenous OGF had a dose-dependent, reversible, and receptor-mediated inhibitory effect on cell proliferation. Endogenous OGF was found to be constitutively produced and tonically active in cell replication, with neutralization of this peptide causing acceleration of cell proliferation. The silencing of OGFr by using siRNA technology stimulated cell replication, validating OGFr's integral role. The mechanism of OGF–OGFr action was not related to cell survival, but rather to DNA synthesis—specifically, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory pathway. Knockdown of p16 or p21 eliminated OGF's inhibitory effect on growth. Conclusions. The OGF–OGFr system is a native biological regulator of cell proliferation in RTCFs and may offer a means of improving the success of glaucoma filtration surgery in a safe and nontoxic manner. PMID:20463323

  18. Mesenchymal stromal cells: a novel and effective strategy for facilitating engraftment and accelerating hematopoietic recovery after transplantation?

    PubMed

    Bernardo, M E; Cometa, A M; Locatelli, F

    2012-03-01

    MSCs are multipotent cells that can be isolated from several human tissues and expanded ex vivo for clinical use. They comprise a heterogeneous population of cells, which, through production of growth factors, cell-to-cell interactions and secretion of matrix proteins, has a role in the regulation of hematopoiesis. In recent years, several experimental studies have shown that MSCs are endowed with immunomodulatory properties and with the capacity to promote graft survival in animal models. In view of these properties, MSCs have been tested in pilot studies aimed at preventing/treating graft rejection and at accelerating recovery after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The available clinical evidence deriving from these studies indicates that MSC infusion is safe and promising in terms of capacity of preventing graft failure. More debated is the effect of MSCs for what concerns their capacity of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution after HCT. Whether the favorable effect of MSCs largely depends on the type of transplantation remains also a field of future investigation. Moreover, future researches should be oriented to gain more insights on MSC biological and functional mechanisms relevant for exploiting their use in the modulation of alloreactivity and in the promotion of hematopoietic reconstitution. PMID:21552300

  19. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Rashedul; Yamagami, Kazuki; Yoshii, Yuka; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-06-17

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  20. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; YAMAGAMI, Kazuki; YOSHII, Yuka; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  1. Iron overload in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Lazarus, H M; Burns, L J

    2008-06-01

    Iron overload, primarily related to RBC transfusions, is a relatively common complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Iron overload increases the risk of infections, veno-occlusive disease and hepatic dysfunction post transplant. Elevated pretransplant ferritin levels have been reported to increase the risk of nonrelapse mortality following HCT and might influence the risk of acute and chronic GVHD. Serum ferritin is sensitive but not specific for iron overload and is a poor predictor of body iron burden. Estimation of hepatic iron content with a liver biopsy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered prior to initiating therapy for post transplant iron overload. A subgroup of transplant survivors with mild iron overload and no end-organ damage may not need therapy. Phlebotomy is the treatment of choice with iron-chelation therapy reserved for patients not eligible for phlebotomy. Natural history, evolution and treatment of iron overload in transplant survivors have not been adequately investigated and more studies are needed to determine its impact on short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:18438425

  2. TGFβ inhibition enhances the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human ES cell-derived hemogenic endothelial cells using a stepwise strategy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chengyan; Tang, Xuming; Sun, Xiaomeng; Miao, Zhenchuan; Lv, Yaxin; Yang, Yanlei; Zhang, Huidan; Zhang, Pengbo; Liu, Yang; Du, Liying; Gao, Yang; Yin, Ming; Ding, Mingxiao; Deng, Hongkui

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic hematopoiesis is a complex process. Elucidating the mechanism regulating hematopoietic differentiation from pluripotent stem cells would allow us to establish a strategy to efficiently generate hematopoietic cells. However, the mechanism governing the generation of hematopoietic progenitors from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remains unknown. Here, on the basis of the emergence of CD43+ hematopoietic cells from hemogenic endothelial (HE) cells, we demonstrated that VEGF was essential and sufficient, and that bFGF was synergistic with VEGF to specify the HE cells and the subsequent transition into CD43+ hematopoietic cells. Significantly, we identified TGFβ as a novel signal to regulate hematopoietic development, as the TGFβ inhibitor SB 431542 significantly promoted the transition from HE cells into CD43+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) during hESC differentiation. By defining these critical signaling factors during hematopoietic differentiation, we can efficiently generate HPCs from hESCs. Our strategy could offer an in vitro model to study early human hematopoietic development. PMID:21862970

  3. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  4. Unrelated hematopoietic stem cell registry and the role of the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Bank

    PubMed Central

    Beom, Su-Hee; Kim, Eung Jo; Kim, Miok

    2016-01-01

    Background The hematopoietic stem cell bank has been actively recruiting registrants since 1994. This study systematically reviews its operations and outcomes over the last 20 years. Methods Retrospective data on a total of 47,711 registrants were reviewed. Relevant data were processed using PASW Statistics for Windows, version 18.0. Results As of 2013, the Korean Network for Organ Sharing database contained 265,307 registrants. Of these, 49,037 (18%) registrants committed to hematopoietic cell donation from 1994 to 2013. Fifty-seven percent of the registrants were men, and 43% were women. The reasons for opting out of the registry included refusal to donate (70%), family refusal (28%), and others (2%). The donation willingness of registrants was significantly higher than those who refused to receive a mail to confirm their continued enrollment (χ2=6.103, P=0.013). The bank successfully coordinated a total of 512 donors among newly matched donors from 1995 to 2013, of which the bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell accounted for 40.8% and 59.2% of the total donations, respectively. Conclusion Our recruitment activities focus on promoting voluntary registration and the importance of updating personal contact information. We expect that these data may be useful for diverse studies and demonstrate the positive impacts on the donation program. PMID:27382555

  5. Dual Control of Muscle Cell Survival by Distinct Growth Factor-Regulated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Feng, Xiuhong; Everding, Daniel R.; Sieger, Kerry; Stewart, Claire E. H.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    In addition to their ability to stimulate cell proliferation, polypeptide growth factors are able to maintain cell survival under conditions that otherwise lead to apoptotic death. Growth factors control cell viability through regulation of critical intracellular signal transduction pathways. We previously characterized C2 muscle cell lines that lacked endogenous expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). These cells did not differentiate but underwent apoptotic death in low-serum differentiation medium. Death could be prevented by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor or by unrelated growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). Here we analyze the signaling pathways involved in growth factor-mediated myoblast survival. PDGF treatment caused sustained activation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1 and -2), while IGF-I only transiently induced these enzymes. Transient transfection of a constitutively active Mek1, a specific upstream activator of ERKs, maintained myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of Mek1 by the drug UO126 blocked PDGF-mediated but not IGF-stimulated survival. Although both growth factors activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase) to similar extents, only IGF-I treatment led to sustained stimulation of its downstream kinase, Akt. Transient transfection of a constitutively active PI3-kinase or an inducible Akt promoted myoblast viability in the absence of growth factors, while inhibition of PI3-kinase activity by the drug LY294002 selectively blocked IGF- but not PDGF-mediated muscle cell survival. In aggregate, these observations demonstrate that distinct growth factor-regulated signaling pathways independently control myoblast survival. Since IGF action also stimulates muscle differentiation, these results suggest a means to regulate myogenesis through selective manipulation of different signal transduction pathways. PMID:10757809

  6. Growth factor and ultrasound-assisted bioreactor synergism for human mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Thakurta, Sanjukta Guha; Budhiraja, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound at 5.0 MHz was noted to be chondro-inductive, with improved SOX-9 gene and COL2A1 protein expression in constructs that allowed for cell-to-cell contact. To achieve tissue-engineered cartilage using macroporous scaffolds, it is hypothesized that a combination of ultrasound at 5.0 MHz and transforming growth factor-β3 induces human mesenchymal stem cell differentiation to chondrocytes. Expression of miR-145 was used as a metric to qualitatively assess the efficacy of human mesenchymal stem cell conversion. Our results suggest that in group 1 (no transforming growth factor-β3, no ultrasound), as anticipated, human mesenchymal stem cells were not efficiently differentiated into chondrocytes, judging by the lack of decrease in the level of miR-145 expression. Human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes in group 2 (transforming growth factor-β3, no ultrasound) and group 3 (transforming growth factor-β3, ultrasound) with group 3 having a 2-fold lower miR-145 when compared to group 2 at day 7, indicating a higher conversion to chondrocytes. Transforming growth factor-β3–induced chondrogenesis with and without ultrasound stimulation for 14 days in the ultrasound-assisted bioreactor was compared and followed by additional culture in the absence of growth factors. The combination of growth factor and ultrasound stimulation (group 3) resulted in enhanced COL2A1, SOX-9, and ACAN protein expression when compared to growth factor alone (group 2). No COL10A1 protein expression was noted. Enhanced cell proliferation and glycosaminoglycan deposition was noted with the combination of growth factor and ultrasound stimulation. These results suggest that ultrasound at 5.0 MHz could be used to induce chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25610590

  7. Effects of Cyclic Strain and Growth Factors on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kona, Soujanya; Chellamuthu, Prithiviraj; Xu, Hao; Hills, Seth R; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

    2009-01-01

    Under physiological and pathological conditions, vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) are exposed to different biochemical factors and biomechanical forces. Previous studies pertaining to SMC responses have not investigated the effects of both factors on SMCs. Thus, in our research we investigated the combined effects of growth factors like Bfgf (basic fibroblast growth factor), TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) and PDGF (platelet-derived growth factor) along with physiological cyclic strain on SMC responses. Physiological cyclic strain (10% strain) significantly reduced SMC proliferation compared to static controls while addition of growth factors bFGF, TGF-β or PDGF-AB had a positive influence on SMC growth compared to strain alone. Microarray analysis of SMCs exposed to these growth factors and cyclic strain showed that several bioactive genes (vascular endothelial growth factor, epidermal growth factor receptor, etc.) were altered upon exposure. Further work involving biochemical and pathological cyclic strain stimulation will help us better understand the role of cyclic strain and growth factors in vascular functions and development of vascular disorders. PMID:19812708

  8. Embryonic hematopoiesis in vertebrate somites gives rise to definitive hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Juhui; Fan, Xiaoying; Wang, Yixia; Jin, Hongbin; Song, Yixiao; Han, Yang; Huang, Shenghong; Meng, Yaping; Tang, Fuchou; Meng, Anming

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) replenish all types of blood cells. It is debating whether HSCs in adults solely originate from the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, more specifically, the dorsal aorta, during embryogenesis. Here, we report that somite hematopoiesis, a previously unwitnessed hematopoiesis, can generate definitive HSCs (dHSCs) in zebrafish. By transgenic lineage tracing, we found that a subset of cells within the forming somites emigrate ventromedially and mix with lateral plate mesoderm-derived primitive hematopoietic cells before the blood circulation starts. These somite-derived hematopoietic precursors and stem cells (sHPSCs) subsequently enter the circulation and colonize the kidney of larvae and adults. RNA-seq analysis reveals that sHPSCs express hematopoietic genes with sustained expression of many muscle/skeletal genes. Embryonic sHPSCs transplanted into wild-type embryos expand during growth and survive for life time with differentiation into various hematopoietic lineages, indicating self-renewal and multipotency features. Therefore, the embryonic origin of dHSCs in adults is not restricted to the AGM. PMID:27252540

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Kfoury, Youmna; Scadden, David T

    2016-05-23

    Regulation of stem cells in adult tissues is a key determinant of how well an organism can respond to the stresses of physiological challenge and disease. This is particularly true of the hematopoietic system, where demands on host defenses can call for an acute increase in cell production. Hematopoietic stem cells receive the regulatory signals for cell production in adult mammals in the bone marrow, a tissue with higher-order architectural and functional organization than previously appreciated. Here, we review the data defining particular structural components and heterologous cells in the bone marrow that participate in hematopoietic stem cell function. Further, we explore the case for stromal-hematopoietic cell interactions contributing to neoplastic myeloid disease. As the hematopoietic regulatory networks in the bone marrow are revealed, it is anticipated that strategies will emerge for how to enhance or inhibit production of specific blood cells. In that way, the control of hematopoiesis will enter the domain of therapies to modulate broad aspects of hematopoiesis, both normal and malignant. PMID:27193455

  10. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, S.

    Departments of Biochemistry &Molecular Biology, Genetics &Human Genetics, Pediatrics &Child Long-duration space missions require countermeasures against severe/invasive disorders in astronauts that are caused by space environments, such as hematological/cardiac abnormalities, bone/muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders, and cancer. Some, if not all, of these disorders may be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy and gene therapy. Growing evidence indicates that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess extraordinary plasticity to differentiate not only to all types of blood cells but also to various tissues, including bone, muscle, skin, liver and neuronal cells. Therefore, our working hypothesis is that the hematopoietic stem cell-based therapy, herein called as the hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT), might provide countermeasure/prevention for hematological abnormalities, bone and muscle losses in space, thereby maintaining astronauts' homeostasis. Our expertise lies in recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV)-mediated gene therapy for the hemoglobinopathies, -thalassemia and sickle cell disease (Ohi S, Kim BC, J Pharm Sci 85: 274-281, 1996; Ohi S, et al. Grav Space Biol Bull 14: 43, 2000). As the requisite steps in this protocol, we established procedures for purification of HSCs from both mouse and human bone marrow in 1 G. Furthermore, we developed an easily harvestable, long-term liquid suspension culture system, which lasts more than one year, for growing/expanding HSCs without stromal cells. Human globin cDNAs/gene were efficiently expressed from the rAAVs in the mouse HSCs in culture. Additionally, the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture system is being optimized for the HSC growth/expansion. Thus, using these technologies, the above hypothesis is being investigated by the ground-based experiments as follows: 1) -thalassemic mice (C57BL/6-Hbbth/Hbbth, Hbd-minor) are transplanted with normal isologous HSCs to correct the

  11. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Yi, Ho-Keun; Nam, Sang-Yun; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  12. Transfer of hematopoietic stem cells encoding autoantigen prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Raymond J; Ritchie, Janine M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-05-01

    Bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment for autoimmune disease. The clinical application of this approach is, however, limited by the risks associated with allogeneic transplantation. In contrast, syngeneic transplantation would be safe and have wide clinical application. Because T cell tolerance can be induced by presenting antigen on resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we reasoned that hematopoietic stem cells engineered to express autoantigen in resting APCs could be used to prevent autoimmune disease. Proinsulin is a major autoantigen associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in humans with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in autoimmune NOD mice. Here, we demonstrate that syngeneic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells encoding proinsulin transgenically targeted to APCs totally prevents the development of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. This antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategy could be applied to prevent T1D and other autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:12727927

  13. Heparin Binds Endothelial Cell Growth Factor, the Principal Endothelial Cell Mitogen in Bovine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciag, Thomas; Mehlman, Tevie; Friesel, Robert; Schreiber, Alain B.

    1984-08-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF), an anionic polypeptide mitogen, binds to immobilized heparin. The interaction between the acidic polypeptide and the anionic carbohydrate suggests a mechanism that is independent of ion exchange. Monoclonal antibodies to purified bovine ECGF inhibited the biological activity of ECGF in crude preparations of bovine brain. These data indicate that ECGF is the principal mitogen for endothelial cells from bovine brain, that heparin affinity chromatography may be used to purify and concentrate ECGF, and that the affinity of ECGF for heparin may have structural and perhaps biological significance.

  14. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  15. Transfer of spleen cells expanded by T cell growth factor suppresses arthritis induced in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, H; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-01-01

    The effects of transfer of T cell growth factor (TCGF)-expanded spleen cells after concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation into syngeneic Lewis rats were studied. The recipient rats were immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant for induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA) or chick type II collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant for induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) on day 0. Each of 5 X 10(7) cultured cells without mitogenic stimulation, 2 X 10(7) Con A-stimulated cells, or 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells cultured for 8 days (4 days X 2 culture cycles) after Con A stimulation was given on days 0 and 7. Both transfers of the cultured cells without stimulation and TCGF-expanded cells markedly diminished the severity of AA and CIA. On the contrary, transfer of Con A-stimulated cells led to no suppressive activity. In addition, transfer to TCGF-expanded cells significantly lowered the titre of anti-type II collagen antibody compared to that of control rats. The transfer of 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells was optimal for suppressing AA, in terms of cell number. This observation suggests that these cells were much more effective than were the unstimulated cultured cells, for which more than five times the number was required for the same suppressive activity. As far as the phenotypic proportion of helper (W3/13) and suppressor (OX-8) cells is concerned, we found no significant differences between the cultured cell groups and the freshly separated spleen cell group. The precise mechanism of these suppressive effects is the subject of further study. The transfer of TCGF-expanded cells appears to have a potent immunomodulatory effect. PMID:3497743

  16. Pharmacokinetics and distribution of heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor) in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengart, T.K.; Kuperschmid, J.P.; Maciag, T.; Clark, R.E.

    1989-02-01

    Heparin-binding growth factor I (HBGF I), previously designated as endothelial cell growth factor, is a potent mitogen for endothelial cells in vitro, which may prove useful for promoting endothelial regeneration in vivo. Analysis of the pharmacokinetics and organ distribution of HBGF I is necessary before use of HBGF I as a pharmacological agent. Consequently, pharmacological studies were carried out with (125I)HBGF I in the rat. Intravenous injections of HBGF I were given with or without heparin (2.5 units/ng HBGF I). Blood concentrations of HBGF I decreased by one half 17 seconds after HBGF I bolus. This time was prolonged to 60 seconds when HBGF I was injected with heparin. The elimination half-life of HBGF I was 14 minutes in the presence of heparin. The highest concentrations of HBGF I following intravenous bolus were found in kidney, liver, and spleen, and the lowest in fat and brain. Heparin increased HBGF I concentrations in blood and all organs measured except kidney, which was significantly decreased (p less than 0.01). Intact HBGF I was recoverable from blood 5 minutes following intravenous administration. HBGF I underwent near-complete proteolytic digestion after more prolonged ex vivo incubation with rat plasma, but HBGF I was protected from proteolysis when incubations were conducted in the presence of heparin. Thus, it is feasible that HBGF I can be administered as a pharmacological agent in the presence of heparin. Further studies assessing acceleration of in vivo endothelial growth using HBGF I with heparin appear warranted.

  17. Changes in the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a model for diffusion of medical technology

    PubMed Central

    Gratwohl, Alois; Schwendener, Alvin; Baldomero, Helen; Gratwohl, Michael; Apperley, Jane; Niederwieser, Dietger; Frauendorfer, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Background Innovations in hematology spread rapidly. Factors affecting the speed of introduction, international diffusion, and durability of use of innovations are, however, poorly understood. Design and Methods We used data on 251,106 hematopoietic stem cell transplants from 591 teams in 36 European countries to analyze the increase and decrease in such transplants for breast cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia and the replacement of bone marrow by peripheral blood as the source of stem cells as processes of diffusion. Regression analyses were used to measure the quantitative impact of defined macro- and microeconomic factors, to look for significant associations (t-test), and to describe the coefficient of determination or explanatory content (R2). Results Gross national income per capita, World Bank category, team density, team distribution, team size, team experience and, team innovator status were all significantly associated with some or all of the changes. The analyses revealed different patterns of associations and a wide range of explanatory content. Macro- and micro-economic factors were sufficient to explain the increase of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants in general (R2 = 78.41%) and for chronic myeloid leukemia in particular (R2 = 79.39%). They were insufficient to explain the changes in stem cell source (R2 =26.79% autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplants; R2 = 9.67% allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants) or the decreases in hematopoietic stem cell transplants (R2 =10.22% breast cancer; R2=33.17% chronic myeloid leukemia). Conclusions The diffusion of hematopoietic stem cell transplants is more complex than previously thought. Availability of resources, evidence, external regulations and, expectations were identified as key determinants. These data might serve as a model for diffusion of medical technology in general. PMID:20378578

  18. The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Therapy for Exploration of Deep Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohi, Seigo; Roach, Allana-Nicole; Ramsahai, Shweta; Kim, Bak C.; Fitzgerald, Wendy; Riley, Danny A.; Gonda, Steven R.

    2004-02-01

    Astronauts experience severe/invasive disorders caused by space environments. These include hematological and cardiac abnormalities, bone and muscle losses, immunodeficiency, neurological disorders and cancer. Exploiting the extraordinary plasticity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which differentiate not only to all types of blood cells, but also to various tissues, including muscle, bone, skin, liver, and neuronal cells, we advanced a hypothesis that some of the space-caused disorders might be amenable to hematopoietic stem cell therapy (HSCT) so as to maintain astronauts' homeostasis. If this were achievable, the HSCT could promote human exploration of deep space. Using mouse models of human anemia (β-thalassemia) and spaceflight (hindlimb suspension unloading system), we have obtained feasibility results of HSCT for space anemia, muscle loss, and immunodeficiency. For example, the β-thalassemic mice were successfully transplanted with isologous HSCs, resulting in chimerism of hemoglobin species and alleviation of the hemoglobinopathy. In the case of HSCT for muscle loss, β-galactosidase-marked HSCs, which were prepared from β-galactosidase-transgenic mice, were detected by the X-gal wholemount staining procedure in the hindlimbs of unloaded mice following transplantation. Histochemical and physical analyses indicated structural contribution of HSCs to the muscle. To investigate HSCT for immunodeficiency, β-galactosidase-transformed Escherichia coli was used as the reporter bacteria, and infected to control and the hindlimb suspended mice. Results of the X-gal stained tissues indicated that the HSCT could help eliminate the E. coli infection. In an effort to facilitate the HSCT in space, growth of HSCs has been optimized in the NASA Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) culture systems, including Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB).

  19. Concise review: Blood relatives: formation and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors stem cell leukemia and lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1.

    PubMed

    Curtis, David J; Salmon, Jessica M; Pimanda, John E

    2012-06-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a large family of transcription factors that regulate the formation and fate of tissue stem cells. In hematopoiesis, the two major bHLH factors are stem cell leukemia (SCL) and lymphoblastic leukemia-derived sequence 1 (LYL1), both identified more than 20 years ago in chromosomal translocations occurring in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. SCL was termed the master regulator of hematopoiesis following the observation that SCL knockout mice die from complete lack of blood formation. However, once established, SCL is no longer required for maintenance of hematopoiesis. Pull-down experiments together with add-back experiments in SCL-null embryonic stem cells and generation of mice carrying a germline DNA binding mutation of SCL demonstrates that most of SCL function is mediated through the formation of a large DNA binding multiprotein complex with both repressor and activator potential. Recent genome-wide binding studies in a hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line suggest that SCL and LYL1 preferentially bind target DNA sequences as components of a heptad of transcription factors. LYL1, a paralog of SCL has been the forgotten sibling until recent mouse studies demonstrated that LYL1 replaced the function of SCL in adult hematopoiesis. Why LYL1 can replace the function of SCL for the maintenance but not formation of hematopoiesis remains a fundamental question. This review will compare and contrast the roles of these two transcription factors in hematopoiesis focusing on recent functional and genome-wide binding studies. PMID:22593015

  20. Hematological Parameters, and Hematopoietic Growth Factors: Epo and IL-3 in Response to Whole-Body Cryostimulation (WBC) in Military Academy Students

    PubMed Central

    Szygula, Zbigniew; Lubkowska, Anna; Giemza, Czesław; Skrzek, Anna; Bryczkowska, Iwona; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extreme cold on the human body are not fully understood, there are also no reports on the effect of cryogenic temperatures on the levels of erythropoietin (EPO) and interleukin 3 (IL-3), two important factors that regulate hematopoiesis. Aim: determination of changes in peripheral blood cell counts and EPO and IL-3 levels induced by a series of 10, 20 and 30 standard whole-body cryostimulation (WBC) treatments. The study involved 45 men, experimental group (EXP, n = 30) subjected to 30 WBC treatments (−130°C, treatment duration: 3 minutes) and a control group (CON, n = 15). Blood samples were collected before the series of treatments and after 10, 20 and 30 treatments. After 10 and 20 treatments we observed lower red blood cell counts and hematocrit and hemoglobin levels compared to baseline (p<0.05) and the control group (p<0.05). Additionally we observed an increase in hemoglobin concentration in plasma (p<0.05), and bilirubin after 10 and 20 treatments, and a decrease in plasma concentration of haptoglobin after 10, 20 and 30 treatments (p<0.05). The number of leukocytes was higher after 10 and 20 WBC treatments compared to baseline and the CON group. EPO concentration in plasma was elevated and the concentration of IL-3 was lower after 10, 20 and 30 WBC treatments. The decrease in indices of the erythrocytic system, plasma hemoglobin and bilirubin, with a simultaneous decrease in haptoglobin concentrations after 10 and 20 WBC treatments, may be due to increased intravascular hemolysis. At the same time there was a small, but statistically significant increase in the concentration of EPO stimulated erythropoiesis which could facilitate a return of erythrocytic system indices to initial levels after 30 WBC treatments. Changes in the white blood cell system showed transient mobilization of this system under the influence of WBC. PMID:24695100

  1. Effect of endogenous insulin-like growth factor and stem cell factor on diabetic colonic dysmotility

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun; Xu, Xin-Yu; Tang, Yu-Rong; Yang, Wei-Wei; Yuan, Yu-Feng; Ning, Yue-Ji; Yu, Yin-Juan; Lin, Lin

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the reduction of stem cell factor (SCF) is mediated by decreased endogenous insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 in diabetic rat colon smooth muscle. METHODS: Sixteen Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group and streptozotocin-induced diabetic group. After 8 wk of streptozotocin administration, colonic motility function and contractility of circular muscle strips were measured. The expression of endogenous IGF-1 and SCF was tested in colonic tissues. Colonic smooth muscle cells were cultured from normal adult rats. IGF-1 siRNA transfection was used to investigate whether SCF expression was affected by endogenous IGF-1 expression in smooth muscle cells, and IGF-1 induced SCF expression effects were studied. The effect of high glucose on the expression of endogenous IGF-1 and SCF was also investigated. RESULTS: Diabetic rats showed prolonged colonic transit time (252 ± 16 min vs 168 ± 9 min, P < 0.01) and weakness of circular muscle contraction (0.81 ± 0.09 g vs 2.48 ± 0.23 g, P < 0.01) compared with the control group. Endogenous IGF-1 and SCF protein expression was significantly reduced in the diabetic colonic muscle tissues. IGF-1 and SCF mRNA expression also showed a paralleled reduction in diabetic rats. In the IGF-1 siRNA transfected smooth muscle cells, SCF mRNA and protein expression was significantly decreased. IGF-1 could induce SCF expression in a concentration and time-dependent manner, mainly through the extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signal pathway. High glucose inhibited endogenous IGF-1 and SCF expression and the addition of IGF-1 to the medium reversed the SCF expression. CONCLUSION: Myopathy may resolve in colonic motility dysfunction in diabetic rats. Deficiency of endogenous IGF-1 in colonic smooth muscle cells leads to reduction of SCF expression. PMID:23745035

  2. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  3. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Steensma, David P

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers the only potential cure for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, with current approaches to HCT, many older patients with comorbidities are poor HCT candidates, and treatment-related morbidity and mortality may offset benefit for patients with lower-risk disease. Consequently, selection of patients with MDS for HCT should take into consideration disease risk category including mutational status, HCT comorbidity index, functional status, donor options, and available institutional resources. Formal geriatric assessment may further guide use of HCT and, if HCT is chosen, selection of conditioning intensity. Patients with higher-risk MDS should be considered for HCT at the time of diagnosis, whereas expectant nontransplant management is more appropriate for those with lower-risk disease. A high blast burden at the time of HCT increases the risk of subsequent relapse; however, the role of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy and the regimen of choice remain controversial. Patients with MDS younger than 65 years and with an HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 may benefit from more intense conditioning regimens. The presence of complex or monosomal karyotype or mutations in TP53, DNMT3A, or other genes identify patients with poorer outcomes following HCT. Patients with TP53 mutations have particularly poor survival, and should be enrolled in clinical trials whenever possible. Several important HCT studies are ongoing and will better define the role of HCT in MDS as well as the value of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy or post-transplant relapse-prevention strategies. Given the apparent underuse of HCT in eligible patients and low enrollment in MDS HCT clinical trials to date, timely referral of patients with MDS to such trials and HCT programs is critical. PMID:27621329

  4. Sensitivity of human granulosa cell tumor cells to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Noora; Anttonen, Mikko; Färkkilä, Anniina; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Bützow, Ralf; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2014-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the progression of many human cancers, but its significance in ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) pathobiology remains poorly understood. We assessed the EGFR gene copy number, surveyed the mRNA and protein expression patterns of EGFR in 90 adult GCTs, and assessed the in vitro sensitivity of GCT cells to EGFR inhibition. Low-level amplification of EGFR gene was observed in five GCTs and high-level amplification in one sample. EGFR mRNA was robustly expressed in GCTs. Most tumors expressed both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated EGFR protein, but the protein expression did not correlate with clinical parameters, including the risk of recurrence. Small-molecule EGFR inhibitors reduced the EGF-induced activation of EGFR and its downstream signaling molecules at nanomolar doses, but cell viability was reduced, and caspase-3/7 was activated in GCT cells only at micromolar doses. Based on the present results, EGFR is active and abundantly expressed in the majority of GCTs, but probably has only minor contribution to GCT cell growth. Given the high doses of EGFR inhibitors required to reduce GCT cell viability in vitro, they are not likely to be effective for GCT treatment as single agents; they should rather be tested as part of combination therapies for these malignancies. PMID:24463098

  5. Novel approaches and mechanisms in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, Brian W; Wynn, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy is one of the most exciting clinical tools to emerge from the gene therapy stable. This technology combines the expansion capability of hematopoietic stem cells, capable of replacing the entire blood and immune system of an individual, with the capacity for long-term replacement of one or more gene copies using integrating gene therapy vectors. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits significantly from the pre-existing experience of standard blood and marrow transplantation, whilst at the same time having the capacity to deliver a safer and more effective therapy to a wider range of diseases. In this review we summarize the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to expand the scope of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, including the evolution of vector delivery systems and the success and failures of current clinical experience with this treatment. In particular we deal with the incidence of vector mediated transformation in patients and the steps that have been taken to minimize this risk. Finally we discuss the innovations in preclinical development that are likely to drive the future of this field, including the expansion to many more genetic diseases, particularly those affecting the brain. PMID:24759625

  6. Unraveling Growth Factor Signaling and Cell Cycle Progression in Individual Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cultured cells require the actions of growth factors to enter the cell cycle, but how individual members of a population respond to the same stimulus remains unknown. Here we have employed continuous monitoring by live cell imaging in a dual-reporter cell model to investigate the regulation of short-term growth factor signaling (protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activity) and longer-term progression through the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity). In the total population, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-enhanced cell cycle entry by >5-fold compared with serum-free medium (from 13.5 to 78%), but at the single cell level we observed a broad distribution in the timing of G1 exit (4-24 h, mean ∼12 h) that did not vary with either the amount or duration of IGF-I treatment. Cells that failed to re-enter the cell cycle exhibited similar responses to IGF-I in terms of integrated Akt activity and migration distance compared with those that did. We made similar observations with EGF, PDGF-AA, and PDGF-BB. As potential thresholds of growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression appeared to be heterogeneous within the population, the longer-term proliferative outcomes of individual cells to growth factor stimulation could not be predicted based solely on acute Akt signaling responses, no matter how robust these might be. Thus, although we could define a relationship at the population level between growth factor-induced Akt signaling dynamics and cell cycle progression, we could not predict the fate of individual cells. PMID:27226630

  7. Regulation of hematopoietic development by ZBTB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic development is governed by the coordinated expression of lineage- and differentiation stage-specific genes. Transcription factors play major roles in this process and their perturbation may underlie hematologic and immunologic disorders. Nearly 1900 transcription factors are encoded in the human genome: of these, 49 BTB (for broad-complex, tram-track and bric à brac)-zinc finger transcription factors referred to as ZBTB or POK proteins have been identified. ZBTB proteins, including BCL6, PLZF, ThPOK and LRF, exhibit a broad spectrum of functions in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This review summarizes developmental and molecular functions of ZBTB proteins relevant to hematology. PMID:27250345

  8. Thyrotropin (TSH)-induced production of vascular endothelial growth factor in thyroid cancer cells in vitro: evaluation of TSH signal transduction and of angiogenesis-stimulating growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Sebastian; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Scharrenbach, Vera; Wunderlich, Anette; Hassan, Iyad; Lingelbach, Susanne; Zielke, Andreas

    2004-12-01

    Thyroid tumor growth requires angiogenesis, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been shown to be the most important endothelial mitogen. TSH is the major thyrotropic hormone, but its impact to modulate VEGF production has not yet been studied. Several other growth factors have also been shown to affect thyroid cancer cell growth and function in vitro. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to 1) establish the effect of TSH on VEGF as well as 2) evaluate the TSH signal transduction of this effect, and 3) screen other growth factors for the ability to modulate VEGF in thyroid cancer cell lines. HTC, a follicular cancer cell line lacking endogenous TSH receptor (TSHr), its receptor positive variant (HTC TSHr), and a cell line of Huerthle cell origin (XTC) were used. After stimulation with growth factors in vitro [TSH; epidermal growth factor (EGF), IGF, placenta growth factor, TGF-alpha, TGF-beta1, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor] cells were analyzed for VEGF gene expression by Northern blotting and for VEGF protein by enzyme immunoassay. TSHr signal transduction was evaluated by analyzing the effect of stimulators (cholera toxin, 8-bromo-cAMP, forskolin, and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate) and inhibitors (2',5'-dideoxyadenosine and staurosporine) on VEGF protein levels under basal and TSH-stimulated conditions. TSH increased VEGF mRNA and protein in a dose-dependent manner in HTC TSHr and XTC cells by up to 40%. The effects of TSH were mediated by protein kinase C (PKC), rather than protein kinase A (PKA), stimulation, because inhibition of PKC by staurosporine resulted in a decrease in VEGF production of up to 65%, whereas inhibition of the PKA signal transduction pathway (2',5'-dideoxyadenosine) resulted in only a minor decrease. TSH was not the most powerful stimulator of VEGF production. TGF-beta1 and EGF were 1.5- to 2-fold more potent. Placenta growth factor and TGF-alpha did not

  9. Different Protein Kinase C Isoforms Determine Growth Factor Specificity in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corbit, Kevin C.; Soh, Jae-Won; Yoshida, Keiko; Eves, Eva M.; Weinstein, I. Bernard; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2000-01-01

    Although mitogenic and differentiating factors often activate a number of common signaling pathways, the mechanisms leading to their distinct cellular outcomes have not been elucidated. In a previous report, we demonstrated that mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (ERK) activation by the neurogenic agents fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and nerve growth factor is dependent on protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), whereas MAP kinase activation in response to the mitogen epidermal growth factor (EGF) is independent of PKCδ in rat hippocampal (H19-7) and pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. We now show that EGF activates MAP kinase through a PKCζ-dependent pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and PDK1 in H19-7 cells. PKCζ, like PKCδ, acts upstream of MEK, and PKCζ can potentiate Raf-1 activation by EGF. Inhibition of PKCζ also blocks EGF-induced DNA synthesis as monitored by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation in H19-7 cells. Finally, in embryonic rat brain hippocampal cell cultures, inhibitors of PKCζ or PKCδ suppress MAP kinase activation by EGF or FGF, respectively, indicating that these factors activate distinct signaling pathways in primary as well as immortalized neural cells. Taken together, these results implicate different PKC isoforms as determinants of growth factor signaling specificity within the same cell. Furthermore, these data provide a mechanism whereby different growth factors can differentially activate a common signaling intermediate and thereby generate biological diversity. PMID:10891480

  10. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Liu-lin; Chen, Zhi-wei; Wang, Ting-hua

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  11. Nerve growth factor promotes in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells from tree shrews.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Liu-Lin; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Neural stem cells promote neuronal regeneration and repair of brain tissue after injury, but have limited resources and proliferative ability in vivo. We hypothesized that nerve growth factor would promote in vitro proliferation of neural stem cells derived from the tree shrews, a primate-like mammal that has been proposed as an alternative to primates in biomedical translational research. We cultured neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews at embryonic day 38, and added nerve growth factor (100 μg/L) to the culture medium. Neural stem cells from the hippocampus of tree shrews cultured without nerve growth factor were used as controls. After 3 days, fluorescence microscopy after DAPI and nestin staining revealed that the number of neurospheres and DAPI/nestin-positive cells was markedly greater in the nerve growth factor-treated cells than in control cells. These findings demonstrate that nerve growth factor promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells derived from tree shrews. PMID:27212919

  12. Notch signaling in hematopoietic cell transplantation and T cell alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ebens, Christen; Maillard, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling can regulate both hematopoietic progenitors and alloimmune T cells in the setting of allogeneic bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Ex vivo culture of multipotent blood progenitors with immobilized Delta-like ligands induces supraphysiological Notch signals and can markedly enhance progenitor expansion. Infusion of Notch-expanded progenitors shortened myelosuppression in preclinical and early clinical studies, while accelerating T cell reconstitution in preclinical models. Notch also plays an essential role in vivo to regulate pathogenic alloimmune T cells that mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the most severe complication of allo-HCT. In mouse allo-HCT models, Notch inhibition in donor-derived T cells or transient blockade of Delta-like ligands after transplantation profoundly decreased GVHD incidence and severity, without causing global immunosuppression. These findings identify Notch in T cells as an attractive therapeutic target to control GVHD. In this review, we discuss these contrasting functions of Notch signaling with high translational significance in allo-HCT patients. PMID:24050990

  13. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mediastinal extramedullary plasmocytoma.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahmene; Ben Othman, Tarek; Torjman, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Ghorbel, Imed; Lakhal, Amed; Ben Amor, Ramzi; Miled, Mohamed; Kchir, Mohamed-Nidhameddine; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2003-07-01

    Extramedullary plasmocytoma (EMP) is a rare cell neoplasm most frequently localised in the upper respiratory tract. We report the case of a 43 year-old-man, with an unusual presentation of EMP developing in the mediastinum, two years after a diagnosis of solitary plasmocytoma of the bone which was successfully treated by local irradiation. In this aggressive presentation, we decided to perform an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Two months after transplantation, CT scan showed disappearance of the mediastinal mass and immunofixation of the serum was normal. Selected cases of diffuse EMP, could benefit from intensive treatment followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:14534964

  14. Sexual health in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S M; Shaw, Bronwen E; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S; Savani, Bipin N; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  15. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  16. Late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sâmara Grapiuna; de Matos, Sócrates Bezerra; Botura, Mônica Borges; Meyer, Roberto; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is related to high rates of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report highlights the importance of adequate monitoring and management of this infection. We report on two cases of patients with late subclinical cytomegalovirus infection. These patients were monitored for antigenemia by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Active cytomegalovirus infection is most common in the first three months after transplantation however the cases reported herein show the importance of monitoring for active infection after Day +100 post-transplantation. Early detection of active infection enables quick preemptive therapy. In conclusion, we emphasize that patients with risk factors for developing severe or late cytomegalovirus disease should be monitored for more than 100 post-transplant days as late active infection is a reality. PMID:24478611

  17. Venous thromboembolism in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Neff, A; Nagler, A; Savani, U; Mohty, M; Savani, B N

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an increasingly recognized problem in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting, with a lack of high-quality evidence-based data to recommend best practices. Few patients with hematologic malignancies and even fewer post-HSCT patients were included in randomized trials of VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Prior VTE, GVHD, infections and indwelling venous catheters are risk factors for thrombosis. The increasing use of post-transplant maintenance therapy with lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma adds to this risk after autologous HSCT. These patients are also at high risk of bleeding complications because of prolonged thrombocytopenia and managing the competing risks of bleeding and thrombosis can be challenging. This review aims to provide a practical, clinician-focused approach to the prevention and treatment of VTE in the post-HSCT setting. PMID:26691425

  18. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Rovó, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  19. Effect of Growth Factors on the Proliferation and Gene Expression of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaohui; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Hatton, Mark P.; Sullivan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that growth factors, including epidermal growth factor (EGF) and bovine pituitary extract (BPE), induce proliferation, but not differentiation (e.g., lipid accumulation), of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. We also hypothesize that these actions involve a significant upregulation of genes linked to cell cycle processes, and a significant downregulation of genes associated with differentiation. Our objective was to test these hypotheses. Methods. Immortalized human meibomian gland and conjunctival epithelial cells were cultured for varying time periods in the presence or absence of EGF, BPE, EGF + BPE, or serum, followed by cell counting, neutral lipid staining, or RNA isolation for molecular biological procedures. Results. Our studies show that growth factors stimulate a significant, time-dependent proliferation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. These effects are associated with a significant upregulation of genes linked to cell cycle, DNA replication, ribosomes, and translation, and a significant decrease in those related to cell differentiation, tissue development, lipid metabolic processes, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling. Serum-induced differentiation, but not growth factor-related proliferation, elicits a pronounced lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This lipogenic response is unique, and is not duplicated by human conjunctival epithelial cells. Conclusions. Our results demonstrate that EGF and BPE stimulate human meibomian gland epithelial cells to proliferate. Further, our findings show that action is associated with an upregulation of cell cycle and translation ontologies, and a downregulation of genetic pathways linked to differentiation and lipid biosynthesis. PMID:23493293

  20. [HOXB gene family and functions of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells--review].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yu-Hong; Wang, Cheng-Ya

    2005-04-01

    Recently, many researches indicated the important role played by homeobox (HOX) gene family in normal hematopoiesis. As a kind of transcription factors, HOX gene products regulate and control the expression of target genes by binding to special DNA sequences. HOXB, a member of HOX gene family, especially HOXB(4), interests people greatly. It has been found that its expression relates closely to the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and effective proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. This review presents some new research progress in this area. PMID:15854307

  1. Control of proliferation of human vascular endothelial cells. Characterization of the response of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and thrombin.

    PubMed

    Gospodarowicz, D; Brown, K D; Birdwell, C R; Zetter, B R

    1978-06-01

    Because the response of human endothelial cells to growth factors and conditioning agents has broad implications for our understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and human atherogenesis, we have investigated the responses of these cells to the fibroblast (FGF) and epidermal growth factors (EGF), as well as to the protease thrombin, which has been previously shown to potentiate the growth response of other cell types of FGF and EGF. Because the vascular endothelial cells that form the inner lining of blood vessels may be expected to be exposed to high thrombin concentrations after trauma or in pathological states associated with thrombosis, they are of particular interest with respect to the physiological role of this protease in potentiating cell proliferation. Our results indicate that human vascular endothelial cells respond poorly to either FGF or thrombin alone. In contrast, when cells are maintained in the presence of thrombin, their proliferative response to FGF is greatly increased even in cultures seeded at a density as low as 3 cells/mm2. Human vascular endothelial cells also respond to EGF and thrombin, although their rate of proliferation is much slower than when maintained with FGF and thrombin. In contrast, bovine vascular endothelial cells derived from vascular territories as diverse as the bovine heart, aortic arch, and umbilical vein respond maximally to FGF alone and neither respond to nor bind EGF. Furthermore, the response of bovine vascular endothelial cells to FGF was not potentiated by thrombin, indicating that the set of factors controlling the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells could be species-dependent. The requirement of cultured human vascular endothelial cells for thrombin could explain why the human cells, in contrast to bovine endothelial cells, are so difficult to maintain in tissue culture. Our results demonstrate that by using FGF and thrombin one can develop cultures of human vascular endothelial cells capable of

  2. Sequential recovery of NK cell receptor repertoire after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT.

    PubMed

    Giebel, S; Dziaczkowska, J; Czerw, T; Wojnar, J; Krawczyk-Kulis, M; Nowak, I; Holowiecka, A; Segatti, A; Kyrcz-Krzemien, S; Kusnierczyk, P; Holowiecki, J

    2010-06-01

    Alloreactivity of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to the GVL reaction after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (allo-HSCT). However, various procedure-related factors may affect NK cell maturation and their ability to recognize and kill leukemic cells. In this study, we prospectively evaluated expression of NK cell inhibitory receptors in 83 adults treated with myeloablative, killer cell Ig-like receptor (KIR)-ligand-matched allo-HSCT. NK cell maturation was evaluated by comparing the phenotypic patterns after allo-HSCT with the donor ones. The frequencies of KIR3DL1 were comparable to the donor ones on day +28, while they decreased significantly starting from day +100. The expression of KIR2DL2/3 was significantly lower in patients compared with donors up to day +100. The expression of KIR2DL1, despite continues growth, remained significantly decreased for 1 year after allo-HSCT. NKG2A was over-expressed up to day +180. Within 1 year after allo-HSCT, the NK cell phenotypic pattern tended to recapitulate the donor type. The process was disturbed by the use of steroids with significant differences observed on days +56 (P=0.01) and +100 (P=0.04). Up to day +100, reconstitution of NK cell receptor repertoire correlated with the absolute numbers of circulating CD3(+), CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) cells. Our observations should be taken into account when trying to predict potential benefit from NK cell alloreactivity. PMID:20118994

  3. Hepatocyte growth factor/hepatopoietin A is expressed in fat-storing cells from rat liver but not myofibroblast-like cells derived from fat-storing cells.

    PubMed

    Schirmacher, P; Geerts, A; Pietrangelo, A; Dienes, H P; Rogler, C E

    1992-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/hepatopoietin A is a complete mitogen for parenchymal liver cells, and its expression is increased as an early response to acute liver injury. To identify the liver cell population responsible for hepatocyte growth factor gene expression, we investigated tissue sections and isolated and purified cell fractions from normal rat liver by in situ and Northern blot hybridization. Hepatocyte growth factor transcripts were present in sinusoidal liver cells, which were preferentially located in the periportal parenchyma. Northern hybridization analysis of RNA isolated from purified liver cell fractions demonstrated that HGF messenger RNA is present only in fat-storing cells. No specific hepatocyte growth factor gene expression was detected in parenchymal cells, endothelial cells and Kupffer cells. Myofibroblast-like transition of fat-storing cells, which is linked to fibrogenesis in chronic liver disease, results in the loss of hepatocyte growth factor expression. Hepatocyte growth factor gene expression in the normal liver, a new function of fat-storing cells, suggests that this growth factor may play a role in the physiological balance between cell death and replacement in the liver and that hepatocyte growth factor may also act in a paracrine manner. Furthermore, loss of hepatocyte growth factor expression in myofibroblast-like cells derived from fat-storing cells may be responsible for reduced parenchymal cell regeneration in chronic liver disease. PMID:1530788

  4. Major Pulmonary Complications After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Diab, Maria; ZazaDitYafawi, Jihane; Soubani, Ayman O

    2016-06-01

    Both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are important therapeutic options for several benign and malignant disorders. Pulmonary complications, although they have become less frequent, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These complications range from bacterial, fungal, and viral pulmonary infections to noninfectious conditions such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is the primary chronic pulmonary complication, and treatment of this condition remains challenging. This report highlights the advances in the diagnosis and management of the major pulmonary complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It also underscores the need for prospective and multicenter research to have a better understanding of the mechanisms behind these complications and to obtain more effective diagnostic tool and therapeutic options. PMID:27040986

  5. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Advanced Systemic Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Ustun, Celalettin; Reiter, Andreas; Scott, Bart L.; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Damaj, Gandhi; Kreil, Sebastian; Shanley, Ryan; Hogan, William J.; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Shore, Tsiporah; Baurmann, Herrad; Stuart, Robert; Gruhn, Bernd; Doubek, Michael; Hsu, Jack W.; Tholouli, Eleni; Gromke, Tanja; Godley, Lucy A.; Pagano, Livio; Gilman, Andrew; Wagner, Eva Maria; Shwayder, Tor; Bornhäuser, Martin; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Böhm, Alexandra; Vercellotti, Gregory; Van Lint, Maria Teresa; Schmid, Christoph; Rabitsch, Werner; Pullarkat, Vinod; Legrand, Faezeh; Yakoub-agha, Ibrahim; Saber, Wael; Barrett, John; Hermine, Olivier; Hagglund, Hans; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Popat, Uday; Alyea, Edwin P.; Devine, Steven; Deeg, H. Joachim; Weisdorf, Daniel; Akin, Cem; Valent, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Advanced systemic mastocytosis (SM), a fatal hematopoietic malignancy characterized by drug resistance, has no standard therapy. The effectiveness of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (alloHCT) in SM remains unknown. Patients and Methods In a global effort to define the value of HCT in SM, 57 patients with the following subtypes of SM were evaluated: SM associated with clonal hematologic non–mast cell disorders (SM-AHNMD; n = 38), mast cell leukemia (MCL; n = 12), and aggressive SM (ASM; n = 7). Median age of patients was 46 years (range, 11 to 67 years). Donors were HLA-identical (n = 34), unrelated (n = 17), umbilical cord blood (n = 2), HLA-haploidentical (n = 1), or unknown (n = 3). Thirty-six patients received myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and 21 patients received reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). Results Responses in SM were observed in 40 patients (70%), with complete remission in 16 patients (28%). Twelve patients (21%) had stable disease, and five patients (9%) had primary refractory disease. Overall survival (OS) at 3 years was 57% for all patients, 74% for patients with SM-AHNMD, 43% for those with ASM, and 17% for those with MCL. The strongest risk factor for poor OS was MCL. Survival was also lower in patients receiving RIC compared with MAC and in patients having progression compared with patients having stable disease or response. Conclusion AlloHCT was associated with long-term survival in patients with advanced SM. Although alloHCT may be considered as a viable and potentially curative therapeutic option for advanced SM in the meantime, given that this is a retrospective analysis with no control group, the definitive role of alloHCT will need to be determined by a prospective trial. PMID:25154823

  6. Long-term maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells does not require contact with embryo-derived stromal cells in cocultures.

    PubMed

    Oostendorp, Robert A J; Robin, Catherine; Steinhoff, Christine; Marz, Stefanie; Bräuer, Rosalinde; Nuber, Ulrike A; Dzierzak, Elaine A; Peschel, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We recently established that two midgestation-derived stromal clones--UG26-1B6, urogenital ridge-derived, and EL08-1D2, embryonic liver-derived--support the maintenance of murine adult bone marrow and human cord blood hematopoietic repopulating stem cells (HSCs). In this study, we investigate whether direct HSC-stroma contact is required for this stem cell maintenance. Adult bone marrow ckit+ Ly-6C- side population (K6-SP) cells and stromal cells were cocultured under contact or noncontact conditions. These experiments showed that HSCs were maintained for at least 4 weeks in culture and that direct contact between HSCs and stromal cells was not required. To find out which factors might be involved in HSC maintenance, we compared the gene expression profile of EL08-1D2 and UG26-1B6 with four HSC-nonsupportive clones. We found that EL08-1D2 and UG26-1B6 both expressed 21 genes at a higher level, including the putative secreted factors fibroblast growth factor-7, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins 3 and 4, pleiotrophin, pentaxin-related, and thrombospondin 2, whereas 11 genes, including GPX-3 and HSP27, were expressed at a lower level. In summary, we show for the first time long-term maintenance of adult bone marrow HSCs in stroma noncontact cultures and identify some secreted molecules that may be involved in this support. PMID:15917480

  7. Pharmacological inhibition of EGFR signaling enhances G-CSF-induced hematopoietic stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Marnie A; Nattamai, Kalpana J; Xing, Ellen; Schleimer, David; Daria, Deidre; Sengupta, Amitava; Köhler, Anja; Liu, Wei; Gunzer, Matthias; Jansen, Michael; Ratner, Nancy; Le Cras, Timothy D; Waterstrat, Amanda; Van Zant, Gary; Cancelas, Jose A; Zheng, Yi; Geiger, Hartmut

    2010-10-01

    Mobilization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow into peripheral blood by the cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has become the preferred source of HSPCs for stem cell transplants. However, G-CSF fails to mobilize sufficient numbers of stem cells in up to 10% of donors, precluding autologous transplantation in those donors or substantially delaying transplant recovery time. Consequently, new regimens are needed to increase the number of stem cells in peripheral blood upon mobilization. Using a forward genetic approach in mice, we mapped the gene encoding the epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr) to a genetic region modifying G-CSF-mediated HSPC mobilization. Amounts of EGFR in HSPCs inversely correlated with the cells' ability to be mobilized by G-CSF, implying a negative role for EGFR signaling in mobilization. In combination with G-CSF treatment, genetic reduction of EGFR activity in HSPCs (in waved-2 mutant mice) or treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib increased mobilization. Increased mobilization due to suppression of EGFR activity correlated with reduced activity of cell division control protein-42 (Cdc42), and genetic Cdc42 deficiency in vivo also enhanced G-CSF-induced mobilization. Our findings reveal a previously unknown signaling pathway regulating stem cell mobilization and provide a new pharmacological approach for improving HSPC mobilization and thereby transplantation outcomes. PMID:20871610

  8. Whole-transcriptome analysis of endothelial to hematopoietic stem cell transition reveals a requirement for Gpr56 in HSC generation

    PubMed Central

    Solaimani Kartalaei, Parham; Yamada-Inagawa, Tomoko; Vink, Chris S.; de Pater, Emma; van der Linden, Reinier; Marks-Bluth, Jonathon; van der Sloot, Anthon; van den Hout, Mirjam; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; van Schaick-Solernó, M. Lucila; Delwel, Ruud; Pimanda, John E.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are generated via a natural transdifferentiation process known as endothelial to hematopoietic cell transition (EHT). Because of small numbers of embryonal arterial cells undergoing EHT and the paucity of markers to enrich for hemogenic endothelial cells (ECs [HECs]), the genetic program driving HSC emergence is largely unknown. Here, we use a highly sensitive RNAseq method to examine the whole transcriptome of small numbers of enriched aortic HSCs, HECs, and ECs. Gpr56, a G-coupled protein receptor, is one of the most highly up-regulated of the 530 differentially expressed genes. Also, highly up-regulated are hematopoietic transcription factors, including the “heptad” complex of factors. We show that Gpr56 (mouse and human) is a target of the heptad complex and is required for hematopoietic cluster formation during EHT. Our results identify the processes and regulators involved in EHT and reveal the surprising requirement for Gpr56 in generating the first HSCs. PMID:25547674

  9. Factors Predicting Graft-versus-Host Disease-Free, Relapse-Free Survival after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Multivariable Analysis from a Single Center.

    PubMed

    Solh, Melhem; Zhang, Xu; Connor, Katelin; Brown, Stacey; Solomon, Scott R; Morris, Lawrence E; Holland, H Kent; Bashey, Asad

    2016-08-01

    The ideal outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is based on survival that is free of morbidity. The most common causes of treatment failure and morbidity after HCT are relapse, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and nonrelapse death. A composite endpoint that measures survival free of clinically significant negative events may be a useful way to determine the success of allo-HCT. We assessed GVHD and relapse-free survival (GRFS) where the events were acute GVHD grades III to IV, chronic GVHD requiring immunosuppression, relapse, or death in 531 consecutive adult patients who received an allo-HCT between 2006 and 2014 at our center. Median follow-up of living patients was 46 months (range, 12 to 123). HLA matched related donor (MRD, n = 198, 37%), matched unrelated donor (MUD, n = 205, 39%), and haploidentical donor with post-transplant cyclophosphamide (HID, n = 128, 24%) were used. Thirty-six percent of patients had a high/very-high Dana Farber disease risk index (DRI). Estimated rates of GRFS at 1 and 2 years after MRD, MUD, and HID transplantations were 34% and 26%, 26% and 17%, and 33% and 31%, respectively, with MRD recipients having a better GRFS than MUD (P < .05). On multivariable analysis, peripheral blood stem cell source (HR, 1.34; P = .04), MUD (HR, 1.41; P = .003), and high/very high DRI (HR, 1.66; P = .001) were all associated with a worse GFRS post-HCT. These data suggest that GRFS can be predicted by patient disease risk, stem cell source, and donor type. Importantly, MUDs produce inferior GRFS to MRDs, whereas HIDs do not. PMID:27095692

  10. BACTERIAL FOODBORNE INFECTIONS AFTER HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nicole; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence post-transplant within a single-center population of HCT recipients. Methods All HCT recipients transplanted from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA were followed for one year post-transplant. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplant, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli 0157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within one-year post-transplant. Non-foodborne infections with these agents and patients with preexisting bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplant) were excluded from analyses. Results A total of 12/4069 (0.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within one year post-transplant. Patients with infections had a median age at transplant of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 35–57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9/12 [75%]), male gender (8/12 [67%]) and post-allogeneic transplant (8/12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI: 0.5–1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplant (IQR: 26–58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was Campylobacter jejuni/coli (5/12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3/12 [25%]), while Salmonella (2/12 [17%]) and Listeria (2/12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella, Vibrio, or E. coli 0157:H7 were detected. Most patients were diagnosed via stool

  11. Lineage-instructive function of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic cells and early thymic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wölfler, Albert; Danen-van Oorschot, Astrid A; Haanstra, Jurgen R; Valkhof, Marijke; Bodner, Claudia; Vroegindeweij, Eric; van Strien, Paulette; Novak, Alexandra; Cupedo, Tom; Touw, Ivo P

    2010-11-18

    Hematopoiesis is tightly controlled by transcription regulatory networks, but how and when specific transcription factors control lineage commitment are still largely unknown. Within the hematopoietic stem cell (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) compartment these lineage-specific transcription factors are expressed at low levels but are up-regulated with the process of lineage specification. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) represents one of these factors and is involved in myeloid development and indispensable for formation of granulocytes. To track the cellular fate of stem and progenitor cells, which express C/EBPα, we developed a mouse model expressing Cre recombinase from the Cebpa promoter and a conditional EYFP allele. We show that Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells represent a significant subset of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which predominantly give rise to myeloid cells in steady-state hematopoiesis. C/EBPα induced a strong myeloid gene expression signature and down-regulated E2A-induced regulators of early lymphoid development. In addition, Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells compose a fraction of early thymic progenitors with robust myeloid potential. However, Cebpa/EYFP(+) multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and early thymic progenitors retained the ability to develop into erythroid and T-lymphoid lineages, respectively. These findings support an instructive but argue against a lineage-restrictive role of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic and thymic progenitors. PMID:20807890

  12. Myelosuppression in HCL: role of hairy cells, T cells and haematopoietic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmeier, J D; Gasché, C G; Hilgarth, M F; Reinisch, W W; Göbl, S; Berger, R

    1994-05-01

    To elucidate mechanisms which may be responsible for the haematopoietic insufficiency in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), we investigated in an autologous in vitro system the influence of haematopoietic growth factors (CSFs) and the effects of hairy cells (HCs) as well as T cells on the formation of haematopoietic colonies (CFU). Colony forming assays were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 6 HCL patients. To remove HCs, PBMCs were subjected to complement-mediated lysis, T cells were removed by E-rosette formation. Assays were done with and without recombinant human (rh) interleukin-3 (IL-3) and rh granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). All 6 patients exhibited a severe reduction of their circulating progenitor cell (CPC) compartment. There was no correlation between the degree of colony reduction and the number of HCs. However, a correlation was found between the numbers of CPCs of HCL patients and healthy donors and the monocyte counts in these groups (r = 0.8573, p < 0.001). The removal of autologous HCs, but also of T cells, resulted in a significant increase in colony formation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-mix). In none of the experiments, however, did colony numbers come close to the normal range. This was only achieved by supplementation of the culture medium with rh IL-3 and rh GM-CSF. The results suggest that the haematopoietic failure observed in HCL patients is probably due to an inadequate supply of CSFs as well as to an inhibitory activity of HCs and T cells which might exert their effects in a synergistic fashion. There is also evidence that the lack of monocytes plays a role in the development of the haematopoietic insufficiency in HCL. PMID:8020624

  13. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    PubMed

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing. PMID:27221660

  14. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Carol Ann Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  15. Involvement of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) in Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF1) Stimulation of Proliferation of a Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cell Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF1) plays an important role in mammary gland development and lactation in part by stimulating proliferation of the milk-producing epithelial cells. In this study, we used the bovine mammary epithelial cell line MAC-T cells as a model to understand the mechanism by whi...

  16. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) isomers influence cell detachment of MG-63 bone cells.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Nejatian, Touraj; Genedy, Mohammed; Abdeldayem, Ali; Moghaddam, Zoha Salehi; Denyer, Morgan C T; Youseffi, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    Bone repair and wound healing are modulated by different stimuli. There is evidence that Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family of cytokines have significant effects on bone structure by regulating the replication and differentiation of chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. There is also significant evidence that interactions with extracellular matrix molecules influence cell behaviour. In this study cell surface attachment was examined via a trypsinization assay using various TGF-β isomers in which the time taken to trypsinize cells from the surface provided a means of assessing the strength of attachment. Three TGF-β isomers (TGF-β1, 2 and 3), four combined forms (TGF-β(1+2), TGF-β(1+3), TGF-β(2+3) and TGF-β(1+2+3)) along with four different controls (BSA, HCl, BSA/HCl and negative control) were investigated in this study. The results indicated that treatment with TGF-β1, 2, 3 and HCl decreased cell attachment, however, this effect was significantly greater in the case of TGF-β3 (p<0.001) indicating perhaps that TGF-β3 does not act alone in cell detachment, but instead functions synergistically with signalling pathways that are dependent on the availability of hydrogen ions. Widefield Surface Plasmon Resonance (WSPR) microscope was also used to investigate cell surface interactions. PMID:26372305

  17. Control of AC133/CD133 and impact on human hematopoietic progenitor cells through nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Reister, S; Mahotka, C; Meisel, R; Borkhardt, A; Grinstein, E

    2015-11-01

    AC133 is a prominent surface marker of CD34+ and CD34- hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) subsets. AC133+ HSPCs contain high progenitor cell activity and are capable of hematopoietic reconstitution. Furthermore, AC133 is used for prospective isolation of tumor-initiating cells in several hematological malignancies. Nucleolin is a multifunctional factor of growing and cancer cells, which is aberrantly active in certain hematological neoplasms, and serves as a candidate molecular target for cancer therapy. Nucleolin is involved in gene transcription and RNA metabolism and is prevalently expressed in HSPCs, as opposed to differentiated hematopoietic tissue. The present study dissects nucleolin-mediated activation of surface AC133 and its cognate gene CD133, via specific interaction of nucleolin with the tissue-dependent CD133 promoter P1, as a mechanism that crucially contributes to AC133 expression in CD34+ HSPCs. In mobilized peripheral blood (MPB)-derived HSPCs, nucleolin elevates colony-forming unit (CFU) frequencies and enriches granulocyte-macrophage CFUs. Furthermore, nucleolin amplifies long-term culture-initiating cells and also promotes long-term, cytokine-dependent maintenance of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Active β-catenin, active Akt and Bcl-2 levels in MPB-derived HSPCs are nucleolin-dependent, and effects of nucleolin on these cells partially rely on β-catenin activity. The study provides new insights into molecular network relevant to stem/progenitor cells in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:26183533

  18. Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) is a growth factor for human, ovine and porcine thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Amphoux-Fazekas, T; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1996-03-01

    Hexamethylenebisacetamide (HMBA) provokes in murine erythroleukemia cells (MELC) a commitment to terminal differentiation leading to the activation of the expression of hemoglobin. HMBA has been tested also in other cells from colon cancer, melanoma or lung cancer. However it has not yet been tested in the thyroid. We demonstrate in this paper that HMBA in kinetics and concentration-response experiments increases the proliferation of human thyroid cells isolated from Graves'-Basedow patients. It also acts like a growth factor for ovine and porcine thyroid cells, respectively, from the OVNIS line and the ATHOS line. This molecule which is a differentiating factor in the MELC system and a growth factor in human thyroid cell cultures represents a potential to get human thyroid cell lines expressing specialized functions. PMID:8734479

  19. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  20. The Interplay between Stem Cells, Microenvironment Mechanics, and Growth Factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    Physicochemical features of a cell’s microenvironment can exert important effects on cell behavior and include the effects of matrix elasticity on cell differentiation processes, but molecular mechanisms are largely mysterious. Here we highlight recent reports of a mechanical dependence to growth factor activation, with a particular focus on release of TGFβ (Transforming Growth Factor β) from its large latent complex via forced unfolding. We discuss these processes and pathways in the contexts of matrix adhesion and fluid shearing as they might relate to stem cell differentiation and other mechanisms in development, disease, and repair. PMID:19615877

  1. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment. PMID:18092247

  2. Crosstalk between adipose-derived stem cells and chondrocytes: when growth factors matter.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Juan; Guo, Bin; Xie, Jing; Deng, Shuwen; Fu, Na; Lin, Shiyu; Li, Guo; Lin, Yunfeng; Cai, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tissue repair because of their multilineage differentiation capacity. Our previous data confirmed that the implantation of mixed ASCs and chondrocytes into cartilage defects induced desirable in vivo healing outcomes. However, the paracrine action of ASCs on chondrocytes needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we established a co-culture system to achieve cell-to-cell and cell-to-tissue crosstalk and explored the soluble growth factors in both ASCs and chondrocytes supplemented with 1% fetal bovine serum to mimic the physiological microenvironment. In ASCs, we screened for growth factors by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and transforming growth factor-β1 significantly increased after co-culture in comparison with mono-culture. In chondrocytes, VEGFA was significantly enhanced after co-culture. Unexpectedly, the expression of collagen II and aggrecan was significantly down-regulated in the co-culture group compared with the mono-culture group. Meanwhile, among all the growth factors screened, we found that the BMP family members BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-5 were down-regulated and that VEGFB, HIF-1α, FGF-2, and PDGF were significantly decreased after co-culture. These results suggest that crosstalk between ASCs and chondrocytes is a pathway through the regulated growth factors that might have potential in cartilage repair and regeneration and could be useful for tissue engineering. PMID:26848404

  3. Crosstalk between adipose-derived stem cells and chondrocytes: when growth factors matter

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Juan; Guo, Bin; Xie, Jing; Deng, Shuwen; Fu, Na; Lin, Shiyu; Li, Guo; Lin, Yunfeng; Cai, Xiaoxiao

    2016-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and mesenchymal stem cells are promising for tissue repair because of their multilineage differentiation capacity. Our previous data confirmed that the implantation of mixed ASCs and chondrocytes into cartilage defects induced desirable in vivo healing outcomes. However, the paracrine action of ASCs on chondrocytes needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we established a co-culture system to achieve cell-to-cell and cell-to-tissue crosstalk and explored the soluble growth factors in both ASCs and chondrocytes supplemented with 1% fetal bovine serum to mimic the physiological microenvironment. In ASCs, we screened for growth factors by semi-quantitative PCR and quantitative real-time PCR and found that the expression of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), vascular endothelial growth factor B (VEGFB), hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), and transforming growth factor-β1 significantly increased after co-culture in comparison with mono-culture. In chondrocytes, VEGFA was significantly enhanced after co-culture. Unexpectedly, the expression of collagen II and aggrecan was significantly down-regulated in the co-culture group compared with the mono-culture group. Meanwhile, among all the growth factors screened, we found that the BMP family members BMP-2, BMP-4, and BMP-5 were down-regulated and that VEGFB, HIF-1α, FGF-2, and PDGF were significantly decreased after co-culture. These results suggest that crosstalk between ASCs and chondrocytes is a pathway through the regulated growth factors that might have potential in cartilage repair and regeneration and could be useful for tissue engineering. PMID:26848404

  4. L-arginine is a radioprotector for hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Linda L; Zheng, Xichen; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Kerr, Patrick P; Khlangwiset, Pornsri; Epperly, Michael W; Fink, Mitchell P; Greenberger, Joel S; Peterson, Jim

    2012-06-01

    L-arginine is shown to protect hematopoietic progenitor (32D cl 3) cells from death due to exposure to γ radiation ((137)Cs). Some of the other intermediates in the urea cycle, namely ornithine and citrulline, plus urea itself, were not found to have any significant impact on cell survival after irradiation. Intriguingly, supplementation of irradiated cells with L-arginine results in decreased production of peroxynitrite, suggesting that suppression of superoxide generation by nitric oxide synthase in one or more microenvironments is an important factor in the observed radioprotection. The absence of any radioprotective effect of L-arginine in cells at 3% oxygen also confirms the involvement of one or more oxygen-derived species. Knockdown experiments with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) siRNAs in cells and NOS knockout animals confirm that the observed radioprotection is associated with nNOS (NOS-1). L-arginine also ameliorates the transient inhibition of the electron-transport chain complex I that occurs within 30 min of completing the dose (10 Gy) and that appears to be a functional marker for postirradiation mitochondrial oxidant production. PMID:22175298

  5. EBV Lymphoproliferative Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Rouce, Rayne H; Louis, Chrystal U; Heslop, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW EBV reactivation can cause significant morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT). Delays in reconstitution of EBV-specific T lymphocyte activity can lead to life-threatening EBV lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-PTLD). This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology, risk factors, diagnosis, and management of EBV viremia and PTLD. RECENT FINDINGS During the past decade, early detection strategies, such as serial measurement of EBV-DNA load, have helped to identify high-risk patients and to diagnose early lymphoproliferation. The most significant advances have come in the form of innovative treatment options, including manipulation of the balance between outgrowing EBV-infected B cells and the EBV cytotoxic T lymphocyte (EBV-CTL) response, and targeting infected B cells with monoclonal antibodies, chemotherapy, unmanipulated donor lymphocytes, and donor or more recently third party EBV-CTLs. Defining criteria for preemptive therapy and remains a challenge. SUMMARY EBV reactivation is a significant complication after SCT. Continued improvements in risk-stratification and treatment options are required to improve the morbidity and mortality caused by EBV associated diseases. Current approaches use Rituximab to deplete B cells or adoptive transfer of EBV-CTL to reconstitute immunity. The availability of rapid EBV specific T cell products offers the possibility of improved outcomes. PMID:25159713

  6. l-Arginine is a Radioprotector for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Linda L.; Zheng, Xichen; Martinez-Bosch, Sandra; Kerr, Patrick P.; Khlangwiset, Pornsri; Epperly, Michael W.; Fink, Mitchell P.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Peterson, Jim

    2012-01-01

    l-Arginine is shown to protect hematopoietic progenitor (32D cl 3) cells from death due to exposure to γ radiation (137Cs). Some of the other intermediates in the urea cycle, namely ornithine and citrulline, plus urea itself, were not found to have any significant impact on cell survival after irradiation. Intriguingly, supplementation of irradiated cells with l-arginine results in decreased production of peroxynitrite, suggesting that suppression of superoxide generation by nitric oxide synthase in one or more microenvironments is an important factor in the observed radioprotection. The absence of any radioprotective effect of l-arginine in cells at 3% oxygen also confirms the involvement of one or more oxygen-derived species. Knockdown experiments with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) siRNAs in cells and NOS knockout animals confirm that the observed radioprotection is associated with nNOS (NOS-1). l-Arginine also ameliorates the transient inhibition of the electron-transport chain complex I that occurs within 30 min of completing the dose (10 Gy) and that appears to be a functional marker for postirradiation mitochondrial oxidant production. PMID:22175298

  7. Effects of transforming growth factor beta and epidermal growth factor on cell proliferation and the formation of bone nodules in isolated fetal rat calvaria cells.

    PubMed

    Antosz, M E; Bellows, C G; Aubin, J E

    1989-08-01

    When cells enzymatically isolated from fetal rat calvaria (RC cells) are cultured in vitro in the presence of ascorbic acid and Na beta-glycerophosphate, discrete three-dimensional nodules form with the histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of bone (Bellows et al; Calcified Tissue International 38:143-154, 1986; Bhargava et al., Bone, 9:155-163, 1988). Quantitation of the number of bone nodules that forms provides a colony assay for osteoprogenitor cells present in the RC population (Bellows and Aubin, Develop. Biol., 133:8-13, 1989). Continuous culture with either epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) results in dose-dependent inhibition of bone nodule formation; however, the former causes increased proliferation and saturation density, while the latter reduces both parameters. Addition of EGF (48 h pulse, 2-200 ng/ml) to RC cells at day 1 after plating results in increased proliferation and population saturation density and an increased number of bone nodules formed. Similar pulses at confluence and in postconfluent multilayered cultures when nodules first begin forming (approx. day 11) inhibited bone nodule formation and resulted in a smaller stimulation of cell proliferation. Forty-eight hour pulses of TGF-beta (0.01-1 ng/ml) reduced bone nodule formation and proliferation at all times examined, with pulses on day 1 causing maximum inhibition. The effects of pulses with TGF-beta and EGF on inhibition of nodule formation are independent of the presence of serum in the culture medium during the pulse. The data suggest that whereas EGF can either stimulate or inhibit the formation of bone nodules depending upon the time and duration of exposure, TGF-B inhibits bone nodule formation under all conditions tested. Moreover, these effects on osteoprogenitor cell differentiation do not always correlate with the effects of the growth factors on RC cell proliferation. PMID:2787326

  8. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  9. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  10. CD34+ hematopoietic precursors are present in human decidua and differentiate into natural killer cells upon interaction with stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Paola; Vitale, Chiara; Montaldo, Elisa; Conte, Romana; Cantoni, Claudia; Fulcheri, Ezio; Darretta, Valeria; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2011-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the main lymphoid population in the maternal decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy. Decidual NK (dNK) cells display a unique functional profile and play a key role in promoting tissue remodeling, neoangiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, little information exists on their origin and development. Here we discovered CD34(+) hematopoietic precursors in human decidua (dCD34(+)). We show that dCD34(+) cells differ from cord blood- or peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) precursors. The expression of IL-15/IL-2 receptor common β-chain (CD122), IL-7 receptor α-chain (CD127), and mRNA for E4BP4 and ID2 transcription factors suggested that dCD34(+) cells are committed to the NK cell lineage. Moreover, they could undergo in vitro differentiation into functional (i.e., IL-8- and IL-22-producing) CD56(bright)CD16(-)KIR(+/-) NK cells in the presence of growth factors or even upon coculture with decidual stromal cells. Their NK cell commitment was further supported by the failure to undergo myeloid differentiation in the presence of GM-CSF. Our findings strongly suggest that decidual NK cells may directly derive from CD34(+) cell precursors present in the decidua upon specific cellular interactions with components of the decidual microenvironment. PMID:21248224

  11. Non-Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Umbilical Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Taro; Mugishima, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation has been used to treat a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Recent studies show convincing evidence that UCB contains not only hematopoietic progenitors, but also several types of stem and progenitor cells providing a high proliferative capacity and a variety of differentiation potentials. UCB-derived cells offer multiple advantages over adult stem cells from other sources like bone marrow (BM), because UCB can be collected without painful procedure, easily available in virtually unlimited supply, and has not been exposed to immunologic challenge. In addition, cord blood transplantation is now an established field with great potential and no serious ethical issue by establishment of public UCB banks throughout the world. Therefore UCB-derived non-hematopoietic stem cells may provide an attractive cell source for tissue repair and regeneration. It is generally accepted that UCB contains endothelial progenitor cells (EPC), mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSC), very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSEL), multilineage progenitor cells (MLPC), and neuronal progenitor cells. This review focuses on biological properties of these non-hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells derived from human UCB and their potential use in cell based therapies. PMID:24855525

  12. Perivascular support of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Corselli, Mirko; Chin, Chee Jia; Parekh, Chintan; Sahaghian, Arineh; Wang, Wenyuan; Ge, Shundi; Evseenko, Denis; Wang, Xiaoyan; Montelatici, Elisa; Lazzari, Lorenza; Crooks, Gay M.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) emerge and develop adjacent to blood vessel walls in the yolk sac, aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, embryonic liver, and fetal bone marrow. In adult mouse bone marrow, perivascular cells shape a “niche” for HSPCs. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), which support hematopoiesis in culture, are themselves derived in part from perivascular cells. In order to define their direct role in hematopoiesis, we tested the ability of purified human CD146+ perivascular cells, as compared with unfractionated MSCs and CD146− cells, to sustain human HSPCs in coculture. CD146+ perivascular cells support the long-term persistence, through cell-to-cell contact and at least partly via Notch activation, of human myelolymphoid HSPCs able to engraft primary and secondary immunodeficient mice. Conversely, unfractionated MSCs and CD146− cells induce differentiation and compromise ex vivo maintenance of HSPCs. Moreover, CD146+ perivascular cells express, natively and in culture, molecular markers of the vascular hematopoietic niche. Unexpectedly, this dramatic, previously undocumented ability to support hematopoietic stem cells is present in CD146+ perivascular cells extracted from the nonhematopoietic adipose tissue. PMID:23412095

  13. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  14. Growth factors and hormones which affect survival, growth, and differentiation of the MCF-7 stem cells and their descendants

    SciTech Connect

    Resnicoff, M.; Medrano, E.E. )

    1989-03-01

    The human breast tumor cell line was separated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation into six different subpopulations, A to F, of which (E) appears to contain the stem cells on the basis of several criteria. The authors analyzed the response of the isolated subpopulations to insulin, thrombin, PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, estradiol, and 13-cis-retinal. They demonstrate that the first two growth factors stimulate ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the more differentiated subpopulations (D and F), while PGF{sub 2{alpha}} has mitogenic activity in subpopulations C and D. In the absence of any added growth factor, estradiol has the extreme and transient capacity of allowing the stem cell to detach from the tissue culture dish and to grow in suspension as multicellular aggregates (MCF-7/SE cells). 13-cis-Retinal acts as a negative modulator of differentiation and protects the cells from the inhibitory and differentiation activity in Na-butyrate.

  15. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  16. Heterogeneity of cytokine and growth factor gene expression in human melanoma cells with different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Gutman, M; Radinsky, R

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mRNA expression level of multiple cytokine and growth factor genes in human malignant melanoma. Melanoma cells were isolated from several surgical specimens, adapted to growth in culture, characterized for their ability to produce experimental metastases in nude mice, and assessed for cytokine and growth factor steady-state gene expression. Highly metastatic in vivo- and in vitro-derived variants isolated from a single melanoma, A375, were also analyzed. Northern blot analyses revealed that all melanomas analyzed constitutively expressed steady-state mRNA transcripts for the growth and angiogenic factors, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), which correlated with metastatic propensity. Only one highly metastatic melanoma, TXM-1, originally isolated from a lymph node metastasis, expressed mRNA transcripts specific for monocyte chemotactic and activating factor (MCAF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Similarly, of the nine melanomas examined, only TXM-1 expressed interleukin (IL)-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6, important immunomodulatory cytokines. These data demonstrate the differential and heterogeneous expression of cytokine and growth factor genes in human malignant melanoma. PMID:7648437

  17. Megakaryocytes regulate the quiescence of hematopoietic stem cells through PF4: 2013 ASH meeting highlights

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yamei

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) can take one of the three different pathways: quiescence, self-renewal and differentiation. Mechanisms that control the tight balance to maintain lifelong hematopoietic homeostasis have been a major interest of research. Platelet factor-4 (PF4), a weak chemokine, is synthesized exclusively by megakaryocytes and sequestered in platelets. This meeting report highlights a novel study presented at 2013 ASH annual meeting. This study found that megakaryocyte, a progeny of HSC, was involved in maintaining quiescence of HSCs via PF4 in a feedback loop.

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor enhances in vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    D' Alimonte, I; Nargi, E; Mastrangelo, F; Falco, G; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Robuffo, I; Capogreco, M; Buccella, S; Caputi, S; Caciagli, F; Tetè, S; Ciccarelli, R

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), isolated from dental tissues, are largely studied for future application in regenerative dentistry. In this study, we used MSC obtained from human dental pulp (DPSC) of normal impacted third molars that, when cultured in lineage-specific inducing media, differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes (evaluated by Alizarin Red S and Red Oil O stainings, respectively), thus showing a multipotency. We confirmed that DPSC, grown under undifferentiating conditions, are negative for hematopoietic (CD45, CD31, CD34, CD144) and positive for mesenchymal (CD29, CD90, CD105, CD166, CD146, STRO-1) markers, that underwent down-regulation when cells were grown in osteogenic medium for 3 weeks. In this condition, they also exhibit an increase in the expression of osteogenic markers (RUNX-2, alkaline phosphatase) and extracellular calcium deposition, whereas the expression of receptors (VEGFR-1 and -2) for vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and related VEGF binding proteins was similar to that found in undifferentiated DPSC. Exposure of DPSC growing under undifferentiating or osteogenic conditions to VEGF-A165 peptide (10-40 ng/ml) for 8 days dose- and time-dependently increased the number of proliferating cells without inducing differentiation towards endothelial lineage, as evaluated by the lack of expression of specific markers (CD31, CD34, CD144). Additionally, exposure of DPSC cultured in osteogenic medium to VEGF-A165 for a similar period enhanced cell differentiation towards osteoblasts as evaluated after 14 and 21 days by Alizarin Red S staining and alkaline phosphatase activity quantification. These findings may have clinical implications possibly facilitating tissue repair and remodeling. PMID:21382274

  20. The microRNA-132 and microRNA-212 cluster regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and survival with age by buffering FOXO3 expression

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Arnav; Zhao, Jimmy L.; Sinha, Nikita; Marinov, Georgi K.; Mann, Mati; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Galimidi, Rachel P.; Du, Xiaomi; Erikci, Erdem; Regev, Aviv; Chowdhury, Kamal; Baltimore, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs are critical post-transcriptional regulators of hematopoietic cell-fate decisions, though little remains known about their role in aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We found that the microRNA-212/132 cluster (Mirc19) is enriched in HSCs and is up-regulated during aging. Both over-expression and deletion of microRNAs in this cluster leads to inappropriate hematopoiesis with age. Enforced expression of miR-132 in the bone marrow of mice led to rapid HSC cycling and depletion. A genetic deletion of Mirc19 in mice resulted in HSCs that had altered cycling, function, and survival in response to growth factor starvation. We found that miR-132 exerted its effect on aging HSCs by targeting the transcription factor FOXO3, a known aging associated gene. Our data demonstrates that Mirc19 plays a role in maintaining balanced hematopoietic output by buffering FOXO3 expression. We have thus identified it as a potential target that may play a role in age-related hematopoietic defects. PMID:26084022

  1. Nanofiber Expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, F; Allahverdi, A; Nasiri, H; Azad, M; Kalantari, N; Soleimani, M; Zare-Zardini, H

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was the ex vivo expansion of Umbilical Cord Blood hematopoietic stem cells on biocompatible nanofiber scaffolds. Materials and Methods CD133+ hematopoietic stem cells were separated from umbilical cord blood using MidiMacs (positive selection) system by means of monocolonal antibody CD133 (microbeads); subsequently, flowcytometry method was done to assess the purity of separated cells. Isolated cells were cultured on plate (2 Dimensional) and fibronectin conjugated polyethersulfon nanofiber scaffold, simultaneously (3 Dimensional). Colony assay test was performed to show colonization ability of expanded cells. Results Cell count analysis revealed that expansion of hematopoietic stem cells in 2dimensional (2D) environment was greater than 3dimensional (3D) condition (p= 0.01). Assessment of stem cell- phenotype after expansions was performed by flowcytometric analysis which is showed that the maintenance of CD133 marker in expanded cells in 3 dimensional condition were higher than expanded cells in 2 dimensional condition (p=0.01). Moreover, colony assay test was performed before and after of expansion to show colonization ability of expanded cells both in 3D and 2D culture and results revealed more ability of 3D culture compared with 2D culture (p= 0.03). Conclusion The results of current study confirmed that umbilical cord blood CD133+ haematopoietic stem cells are able to expand on fibronectin conjugated polyethersulfon scaffold. These findings indicated that 3D is a proper and valuable cell culture system for hematopoietic stem cells expansion, compared to 2D in invitro situation. PMID:26985349

  2. Antagonism between MCL-1 and PUMA governs stem/progenitor cell survival during hematopoietic recovery from stress

    PubMed Central

    Delbridge, Alex R. D.; Opferman, Joseph T.; Grabow, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the critical factors that govern recovery of the hematopoietic system from stress, such as during anticancer therapy and bone marrow transplantation, is of clinical significance. We investigated the importance of the prosurvival proteins myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) and B-cell lymphoma–extra large (BCL-XL) in stem/progenitor cell survival and fitness during hematopoietic recovery from stress. Loss of a single Mcl-1 allele, which reduced MCL-1 protein levels, severely compromised hematopoietic recovery from myeloablative challenge and following bone marrow transplantation, whereas BCL-XL was dispensable in both contexts. We identified inhibition of proapoptotic p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) as the key role of MCL-1 in both settings, with Mcl-1+/−;Puma−/− mice completely protected from the deleterious effects of loss of 1 Mcl-1 allele. These results reveal the molecular mechanisms that govern cell survival during hematopoietic recovery from stress. PMID:25847014

  3. Hematopoietic activity in putative mouse primordial germ cell populations.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Maria Lucia; Klinger, Francesca Gioia; Farini, Donatella; Di Carlo, Anna; Carsetti, Rita; Giorda, Ezio; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, starting from the observation of heterogeneous expression of the GOF-18ΔPE-GFP Pou5f1 (Oct3/4) transgene in putative mouse PGC populations settled in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, we identified various OCT3/4 positive populations showing distinct expression of PGC markers (BLIMP-1, AP, TG-1, STELLA) and co-expressing several proteins (CD-34, CD-41, FLK-1) and genes (Brachyury, Hox-B4, Scl/Tal-1 and Gata-2) of hematopoietic precursors. Moreover, we found that Oct3/4-GFP(weak) CD-34(weak/high) cells possess robust hematopoietic colony forming activity (CFU) in vitro. These data indicate that the cell population usually considered PGCs moving toward the gonadal ridges encompasses a subset of cells co-expressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. These results are discussed within of the current model of germline segregation. PMID:25684074

  4. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  5. Epidermal growth factor promotes proliferation of dermal papilla cells via Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihua; Nan, Weixiao; Wang, Shiyong; Zhang, Tietao; Si, Huazhe; Wang, Datao; Yang, Fuhe; Li, Guangyu

    2016-08-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on the development and growth of hair follicle is controversial. In the present study, 2-20 ng/ml EGF promoted the growth of mink hair follicles in vitro, whereas 200 ng/ml EGF inhibited follicle growth. Further, dermal papilla (DP) cells, a group of mesenchymal cells that govern hair follicle development and growth, were isolated and cultured in vitro. Treatment with or forced expression of EGF accelerated proliferation and induced G1/S transition in DP cells. Moreover, EGF upregulated the expression of DP mesenchymal genes, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), as well as the Notch pathway molecules including Notch1, Jagged1, Hes1 and Hes5. In addition, inhibition of Notch signaling pathway by DAPT significantly reduced the basal and EGF-enhanced proliferation rate, and also suppressed cell cycle progression. We also show that the expression of several follicle-regulatory genes, such as Survivin and Msx2, were upregulated by EGF, and was inhibited by DAPT. In summary, our study demonstrates that the concentration of EGF is critical for the switch between hair follicle growth and inhibition, and EGF promotes DP cell proliferation via Notch signaling pathway. PMID:27109378

  6. In vitro production of functional immune cells derived from human hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Payuhakrit, Witchuda; Panichakul, Tasanee; Charoenphon, Natthawut; Chalermsaenyakorn, Panus; Jaovisidha, Adithep; Wongborisuth, Chokdee; Udomsangpetch, Rachanee

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) from cord blood are potentially high sources for transplantation due to their low immunogenicity and the presence of the multipotent cells. These cells are capable of differentiating to produce various lineages of blood cells under specific conditions. We have enriched highly purified CD34+ cells from cord blood, determined in vitro growth of the cells in culture systems in the absence (condition A) or presence of GM-CSF and G-CSF (condition B), and determined the profile of immune cells during the period of cultivation by using flow cytometry. PhytohemagglutininA (PHA) was used as a mitogen to stimulate T lymphocytes derived from hematopoietic stem cells. GM-CSF and G-CSF prolonged the survival of the growing cells and also maintained expansion of cells in blastic stage. By day 12 of cultivation, when cell numbers peaked, various types of immune cells had appeared (CD14+ cells, CD40+HLA-DR+ cells, CD3+CD56+ cells, CD19+ cells, CD3+CD4+ cells, CD3+CD8+cells and CD3-CD56+). A significantly higher percentage of monocytes (p = 0.002) were observed under culture with GM-CSF, G-CSF when compared with culture without GM-CSF, G-CSF. In addition, T lymphocytes derived from HSC responded to 50 µg/ml of PHA. This is the first report showing the complete differentiation and proliferation of immune cells derived from CD34+ HSC under in vitro culture conditions. Lymphocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells and polymorph nuclear cells derived from HSC in vitro are unique, and thus may benefit various studies such as innate immunity and pathophysiology of immune disorders. PMID:26933404

  7. Hematopoietic Signaling Mechanism Revealed from a Stem/Progenitor Cell Cistrome.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Kim, Duk Hyoung; Devadas, Prithvia; Prathibha, Rajalekshmi; Zuo, Chandler; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Johnson, Kirby D; Kang, Yoon-A; Kim, Jin-Soo; Dewey, Colin N; Keles, Sunduz; Bresnick, Emery H

    2015-07-01

    Thousands of cis-elements in genomes are predicted to have vital functions. Although conservation, activity in surrogate assays, polymorphisms, and disease mutations provide functional clues, deletion from endogenous loci constitutes the gold-standard test. A GATA-2-binding, Gata2 intronic cis-element (+9.5) required for hematopoietic stem cell genesis in mice is mutated in a human immunodeficiency syndrome. Because +9.5 is the only cis-element known to mediate stem cell genesis, we devised a strategy to identify functionally comparable enhancers ("+9.5-like") genome-wide. Gene editing revealed +9.5-like activity to mediate GATA-2 occupancy, chromatin opening, and transcriptional activation. A +9.5-like element resided in Samd14, which encodes a protein of unknown function. Samd14 increased hematopoietic progenitor levels/activity and promoted signaling by a pathway vital for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell regulation (stem cell factor/c-Kit), and c-Kit rescued Samd14 loss-of-function phenotypes. Thus, the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell cistrome revealed a mediator of a signaling pathway that has broad importance for stem/progenitor cell biology. PMID:26073540

  8. Transplantation Dose Alters the Differentiation Program of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Casey; Chu, Elizabeth; Chin, Mike; Lu, Rong

    2016-05-24

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the most prevalent stem cell therapy, but it remains a risky procedure. To improve this treatment, it is important to understand how transplanted stem cells rebuild the blood and immune systems and how this process is impacted by transplantation variables such as the HSC dose. Here, we find that, in the long term following transplantation, 70%-80% of donor-HSC-derived clones do not produce all measured blood cell types. High HSC doses lead to more clones that exhibit balanced lymphocyte production, whereas low doses produce more T-cell-specialized clones. High HSC doses also produce significantly higher proportions of early-differentiating clones compared to low doses. These complex differentiation behaviors uncover the clonal-level regeneration dynamics of hematopoietic regeneration and suggest that transplantation dose can be exploited to improve stem cell therapy. PMID:27184851

  9. Improved Survival and Hematopoietic Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells on Electrospun Polycaprolactone Nanofiber

    PubMed Central

    Dehdilani, Nima; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Akbarzadehlaleh, Parvin; Amoughli Tabrizi, Bahram; Parsa, Hamed; Sabagi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional (3D) biomimetic nanofiber scaffolds have widespread ap- plications in biomedical tissue engineering. They provide a suitable environment for cel- lular adhesion, survival, proliferation and differentiation, guide new tissue formation and development, and are one of the outstanding goals of tissue engineering. Electrospinning has recently emerged as a leading technique for producing biomimetic scaffolds with mi- cro to nanoscale topography and a high porosity similar to the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). These scaffolds are comprised of synthetic and natural polymers for tissue engi- neering applications. Several kinds of cells such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and mouse ESCs (mESCs) have been cultured and differentiated on nanofiber scaffolds. mESCs can be induced to differentiate into a particular cell lineage when cultured as em- bryoid bodies (EBs) on nano-sized scaffolds. Materials and Methods We cultured mESCs (2500 cells/100 µl) in 96-well plates with knockout Dulbecco’s modified eagle medium (DMEM-KO) and Roswell Park Memorial Institute-1640 (RPMI-1640), both supplemented with 20% ESC grade fetal bovine serum (FBS) and essential factors in the presence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). mESCs were seeded at a density of 2500 cells/100 µl onto electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibers in 96-well plates. The control group comprised mESCs grown on tissue cul- ture plates (TCP) at a density of 2500 cells/100 µl. Differentiation of mESCs into mouse hematopoietic stem cells (mHSCs) was performed by stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6 and Fms-related tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3-L) cytokines for both the PCL and TCP groups. We performed an experimental study of mESCs differentiation. Results PCL was compared to conventional TCP for survival and differentiation of mESCs to mHSCs. There were significantly more mESCs in the PCL group. Flowcyto- metric analysis revealed differences in hematopoietic

  10. Binding, internalization, and degradation of basic fibroblast growth factor in human microvascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bikfalvi, A.; Dupuy, E.; Inyang, A.L.; Tobelem, G. ); Fayein, N.; Courtois, Y. ); Leseche, G. )

    1989-03-01

    The binding, internalization, and degradation of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in human omental microvascular endothelial cells (HOME cells) were investigated. Binding studies of bFGF in human endothelial cells have not yet been reported. Basic FGF bound to HOME cells. The number of low-affinity binding sites was found to be variable. Washing the cells with 2 M phosphate-buffered saline removed completely {sup 125}I-bFGF bound to low-affinity binding sites but decreased also the high-affinity binding. The majority of the surface-bound {sup 125}I-bFGF was removed by washing the cells with acetic acid buffer at pH 3. At this temperature, degradation of the internalized ligand was followed after 1 hour by the appearance of three major bands of 15,000 10,000, and 8,000 Da and was inhibited by chloroquine. These results demonstrated two classes of binding sites for bFGF in HOME cells; the number of high-affinity binding sites being larger than the number reported for bovine capillary endothelial cells. The intracellular processing of bFGF in HOME cells seems to be different from that of heparin binding growth factor-1 in murine lung capillary endothelial cells and of eye-derived growth factor-1 in Chinese hamster fibroblasts.

  11. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. PMID:24974736

  12. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W.; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  13. Distinguishing autocrine and paracrine signals in hematopoietic stem cell culture using a biofunctional microcavity platform.

    PubMed

    Müller, Eike; Wang, Weijia; Qiao, Wenlian; Bornhäuser, Martin; Zandstra, Peter W; Werner, Carsten; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in the mammalian bone marrow stem cell niche is regulated by signals of the local microenvironment. Besides juxtacrine, endocrine and metabolic cues, paracrine and autocrine signals are involved in controlling quiescence, proliferation and differentiation of HSC with strong implications on expansion and differentiation ex vivo as well as in vivo transplantation. Towards this aim, a cell culture analysis on a polymer microcavity carrier platform was combined with a partial least square analysis of a mechanistic model of cell proliferation. We could demonstrate the discrimination of specific autocrine and paracrine signals from soluble factors as stimulating and inhibitory effectors in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell culture. From that we hypothesize autocrine signals to be predominantly involved in maintaining the quiescent state of HSC in single-cell niches and advocate our analysis platform as an unprecedented option for untangling convoluted signaling mechanisms in complex cell systems being it of juxtacrine, paracrine or autocrine origin. PMID:27535453

  14. Isolation and Assessment of Single Long-Term Reconstituting Hematopoietic Stem Cells from Adult Mouse Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Kent, David G; Dykstra, Brad J; Eaves, Connie J

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with long-term repopulating activity can now be routinely obtained at purities of 40% to 50% from suspensions of adult mouse bone marrow. Here we describe robust protocols for both their isolation as CD45(+) EPCR(+) CD150(+) CD48(-) (ESLAM) cells using multiparameter cell sorting and for tracking their clonal growth and differentiation activity in irradiated mice transplanted with single ESLAM cells. The simplicity of these procedures makes them attractive for characterizing the molecular and biological properties of individual hematopoietic stem cells with unprecedented power and precision. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532815

  15. Targeted Genome Editing in Human Repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Genovese, Pietro; Tomaso, Tiziano Di; Firrito, Claudia; Calabria, Andrea; Moi, Davide; Mazzieri, Roberta; Bonini, Chiara; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; van der Burg, Mirjam; Gentner, Bernhard; Montini, Eugenio; Lombardo, Angelo; Naldini, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genome editing by artificial nucleases has brought the goal of site-specific transgene integration and gene correction within the reach of gene therapy. However, its application to long-term repopulating Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) has remained elusive. Here we show that poor permissiveness to gene transfer and limited proficiency of the homology directed DNA repair pathway constrain gene targeting in human HSCs. By tailoring delivery platforms and culture conditions we overcame these barriers and provide stringent evidence of targeted integration in human HSCs by long-term multilineage repopulation of transplanted mice. We demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our strategy by targeting a corrective cDNA into the IL2RG gene of HSCs from healthy donors and a subject with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID-X1). Gene edited HSCs sustained normal hematopoiesis and gave rise to functional lymphoid cells that possess a selective growth advantage over those carrying disruptive IL2RG mutations. These results open new avenues for treating SCID-X1 and other diseases. PMID:24870228

  16. Keratinocyte growth factor 1 inhibits wound edge epithelial cell apoptosis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Firth, James D; Putnins, Edward E

    2004-01-01

    The ability of keratinocyte growth factor 1 to modulate apoptosis in the absence of proliferation was studied in vitro. A HaCaT scrape wound model was developed in which dense monolayers prior to wounding were cultured to quiescence in defined media with hydroxyurea at concentrations that blocked proliferation without loss of cell viability. Scrape wounding was then found to induce apoptosis, originating at the wound edge, but subsequently radiating away over a 24 h period to encompass areas not originally damaged. Keratinocyte growth factor 1 inhibited this radial progression of apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner up to 20 ng per mL with induced migration present at the wound edge. The extent of this rescue was modulated by the concentration of Ca2+ prior to wounding. In control wound cultures apoptotic bodies were found in cells adjacent to the wound interface but were greatly reduced in keratinocyte-growth-factor-1-treated groups. Keratinocyte growth factor 1 receptor expression was significantly induced within two to three cell widths of the scraped wound edge, at levels far exceeding those found at the leading edge of a nonwounded epithelial sheet. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (1-5 ng per mL) or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (10-50 ng per mL) exacerbated scrape-induced early apoptosis (1-4 h), but was largely ameliorated by coculture with keratinocyte growth factor 1. Keratinocyte growth factor 1 protection was associated with a reduction in both caspase-3 activation and cytokeratin-19 loss. Protected wound edges were also associated with the maintenance of e-cadherin expression and induction of beta1 integrin and actin stress fiber organization. These results suggest that keratinocyte growth factor 1 may play a role in limiting mechanically induced apoptotic processes at the epithelial wound edge in a manner that is distinct from its proliferative function. PMID:14962112

  17. Stromal inhibition of prostatic epithelial cell proliferation not mediated by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A.; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A. J.; Klaij, I. A.; Romijn, J. C.; Schröder, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    The paracrine influence of prostatic stroma on the proliferation of prostatic epithelial cells was investigated. Stromal cells from the human prostate have previously been shown to inhibit anchorage-dependent as well as anchorage-independent growth of the prostatic tumour epithelial cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Antiproliferative activity, mediated by a diffusible factor in the stromal cell conditioned medium, was found to be produced specifically by prostatic stromal cells. In the present study the characteristics of this factor were examined. It is demonstrated that prostate stroma-derived inhibiting factor is an acid- and heat-labile, dithiothreitol-sensitive protein. Although some similarities with type beta transforming growth factor (TGF-beta)-like inhibitors are apparent, evidence is presented that the factor is not identical to TGF-beta or to the TGF-beta-like factors activin and inhibin. Absence of TGF-beta activity was shown by the lack of inhibitory response of the TGF-beta-sensitive mink lung cell line CCL-64 to prostate stromal cell conditioned medium and to concentrated, partially purified preparations of the inhibitor. Furthermore, neutralising antibodies against TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 did not cause a decline in the level of PC-3 growth inhibition caused by partially purified inhibitor. Using Northern blot analyses, we excluded the involvement of inhibin or activin. It is concluded that the prostate stroma-derived factor may be a novel growth inhibitor different from any of the currently described inhibiting factors. Images Figure 5 PMID:7543773

  18. Proliferative signals for suppressor T cells. Helper cells stimulated with pokeweed mitogen in vitro produce a suppressor cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, E J; Cook, R G; Lewis, D E; Rich, R R

    1986-01-01

    To define molecular signals elaborated by inducer populations supporting growth or differentiation of T8+ cells, we collected supernatants of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures depleted of T8+ cells. When added to purified T8+ cells, these supernatants caused significant proliferation. PWM plus interleukin 2 (IL-2) in amounts equivalent to those in the supernatant could not reconstitute the response caused by the supernatant. T8+ cells activated by supernatants obtained from PWM-pulsed T4+ cells suppressed fresh PWM cultures. Although exhibiting little proliferation, T8+ cells cultured for 6 d in PWM plus IL-2 still suppressed a fresh PWM response. The supernatants therefore contain an additional T suppressor cell growth factor (TsGF). Elaboration of TsGF required radiosensitive T4+Leu8+ cells. Molecular weight determination by high performance liquid chromatography gave a single peak of TsGF activity at approximately 8,000. Finally, whereas TsGF in the absence of IL-2 could not support the proliferation of T suppressor cells, it did cause T8+ cells to become strongly IL-2 receptor-positive. PMID:2941453

  19. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  20. Interaction of insulin-like growth factor I with porcine thyroid cells cultured in monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    Saji, M.; Tsushima, T.; Isozaki, O.; Murakami, H.; Ohba, Y.; Sato, K.; Arai, M.; Mariko, A.; Shizume, K.

    1987-08-01

    The interaction of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) with porcine thyroid cells cultured in monolayer was studied. Specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to thyroid cells was a reversible process dependent on the time and temperature of incubation. A steady state was achieved in 18 h at 4 C and averaged 14.2 +/- 2% (mean +/- SD)/10(6) cells. Binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I was inhibited by unlabeled IGF-I; half-maximal inhibition occurred at concentrations of 2-5 ng/ml. Multiplication-stimulating activity (rat IGF-II) and pork insulin had relative potencies of 1:20 and 1:300 compared with IGF-I. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed a single class of IGF-I receptors with a Ka of 4.3 X 10(10) M-1, 49,000 binding sites were estimated per cell. Affinity cross-linking and autoradiography demonstrated the presence of type I IGF receptors. Thyroid cells also had specific receptors for insulin, but specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin was much lower than that of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I. Preincubation of thyroid cells with IGF-I or insulin caused a concentration-dependent decrease in (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I binding due to an apparent loss of receptors. Preincubation with epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, or TSH did not alter subsequent binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I. Low concentrations of IGF-I stimulated DNA synthesis and proliferation of thyroid cells and acted synergistically with epidermal growth factor. Multiplication-stimulating activity and insulin had relative potencies in stimulating DNA synthesis comparable to their abilities to inhibit the binding of (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to thyroid cells.

  1. Reduction of Nup107 attenuates the growth factor signaling in the senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sung Young; Kang, Hyun Tae; Choi, Hae Ri; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Decreased expression of Nup107 in aged cells and organs. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 results in impaired nuclear translocation of p-ERK. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 affects downstream effectors of ERK signaling. {yields} Depletion of Nup107 inhibits cell proliferation of oligodendroglioma cells. -- Abstract: Hypo-responsiveness to growth factors is a fundamental feature of cellular senescence. In this study, we found markedly decreased level of Nup107, a key scaffold protein in nuclear pore complex assembly, in senescent human diploid fibroblasts as well as in organs of aged mice. Depletion of Nup107 by specific siRNA in young human diploid fibroblasts prevented the effective nuclear translocation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) following epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation, and decreased the expression of c-Fos in consequence. The disturbances in ERK signaling in Nup107 depleted cells closely mirror the similar changes in senescent cells. Knockdown of Nup107 in anaplastic oligodendroglioma cells caused cell death, rather than growth retardation, indicating a greater sensitivity to Nup107 depletion in cancer cells than in normal cells. These findings support the notion that Nup107 may contribute significantly to the regulation of cell fate in aged and transformed cells by modulating nuclear trafficking of signal molecules.

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cell: Self-renewal versus Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seita, Jun; Weissman, Irving L.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian blood system, containing more than ten distinct mature cell types, stands on one specific cell type, hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). Within the system, only HSC possess the ability of both multi-potency and self-renewal. Multi-potency is the ability to differentiate into all functional blood cells. Self-renewal is the ability to give rise to HSC itself without differentiation. Since mature blood cells are predominantly short lived, HSC continuously provide more differentiated progenitors while properly maintaining the HSC pool size properly throughout life by precisely balancing self-renewal and differentiation. Thus, understanding the mechanisms of self-renewal and differentiation of HSC has been a central issue. In this review, we focus on the hierarchical structure of the hematopoietic system, the current understanding of microenvironment and molecular cues regulating self-renewal and differentiation of adult HSC, and the currently emerging systems approaches to understand HSC biology. PMID:20890962

  3. Serum and growth factor requirements for proliferation of human adrenocortical cells in culture: comparison with bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, P J; Sturek, M; Harris, S E; Simonian, M H

    1983-11-01

    Although bovine adrenocortical cells proliferate readily in cell culture, proliferation of fetal or adult human adrenocortical cells has been observed to be limited and preparation of pure proliferating cultures of human adrenocortical cells has not been reported. The growth requirements of fetal human definitive zone adrenocortical cells in culture were compared to the established requirements of bovine adrenocortical cells. The medium used was 1:1 Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with transferrin and insulin. Earlier experiments showed that human cells had a greater proliferative response to horse serum than to fetal bovine serum, whereas the opposite was true for bovine cells. When plated on fibronectin-coated dishes and exposed to varying concentrations of horse serum in the presence of 100 ng/ml fibroblast growth factor (FGF), increasing cell growth was observed up to a serum concentration of 50%. When 50% fetal bovine serum was used instead of horse serum proliferation was less. In contrast, bovine adrenocortical cells showed a maximal proliferative response to either fetal bovine serum or horse serum at 10%. Human adrenocortical cells thus have a very high requirement for serum; 50% is the highest level that may be practically used, but the shape of the dose-response curve suggests that this concentration is still suboptimal. Growth was less in the absence of FGF. Epidermal growth factor can partially substitute for FGF. No response to 100 nM placental lactogen was observed. Less growth was observed when dishes were not coated with fibronectin. The factors present in horse serum that are evidently needed in high amounts by human cells are unknown. Despite this lack of knowledge, use of 50% horse serum enabled long-term growth of human adrenocortical cells that are pure by the criterion of retraction in response to ACTH. Nonadrenocortical cells do not show a retraction response. Such long-term cultures may be useful in studies of

  4. Growth factors in haemopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Millar, J L

    1989-01-01

    Haemopoietic growth factors have for over two decades allowed experimentalists to grow haemopoietic bone marrow cells in vitro. With refinements in technique and the discovery of novel growth factors, all of the known haemopoietic lineages can now be grown in vitro. This has allowed a much greater understanding of the complex process of haemopoiesis from the haemopoietic stem cell to the mature, functioning end-cell. The in vivo action of these growth factors has been harder to investigate. Although recombinant technology has afforded us the much greater quantities necessary for in vivo work, problems remain with administration because of effects on other tissues. Interpretation of results is difficult because of the complex inter-relationships which exist between factors. Some of these have been defined in vitro and it appears likely that they also operate in vivo. Erythropoietin is a physiological regulator of erythropoiesis. It has been detected in vivo with levels responding appropriately to stress (i.e. elevated in anaemia) and, when administered in pharmacological doses, has been shown to correct anaemia. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been detected in vivo and may influence the production and function of granulocytes and macrophages, although how it is regulated is unknown. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor are ore lineage-specific. Interleukin 3 (IL-3), although it has not been detected in vivo, may act on a primitive marrow precursor by expanding the population and making these cells more susceptible to other growth factors, such as GM-CSF. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) has been detected in vivo, does not appear to have any isolated action on bone marrow (except possibly radioprotection) but probably acts synergistically with other growth factors, such as G-CSF. Interleukins 2, 4, 5 and 6 have not been detected in vivo. All have effects on B-cells. In addition IL-2 is an essential

  5. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients’ functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients’ functional status at the time of critical illness. PMID:26862493

  6. TGF-β Inhibition Rescues Hematopoietic Stem Cell Defects and Bone Marrow Failure in Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haojian; Kozono, David E; O'Connor, Kevin W; Vidal-Cardenas, Sofia; Rousseau, Alix; Hamilton, Abigail; Moreau, Lisa; Gaudiano, Emily F; Greenberger, Joel; Bagby, Grover; Soulier, Jean; Grompe, Markus; Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited DNA repair disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure (BMF) from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) attrition. A greater understanding of the pathogenesis of BMF could improve the therapeutic options for FA patients. Using a genome-wide shRNA screen in human FA fibroblasts, we identify transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway-mediated growth suppression as a cause of BMF in FA. Blocking the TGF-β pathway improves the survival of FA cells and rescues the proliferative and functional defects of HSPCs derived from FA mice and FA patients. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in FA HSPCs results in elevated homologous recombination (HR) repair with a concomitant decrease in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), accounting for the improvement in cellular growth. Together, our results suggest that elevated TGF-β signaling contributes to BMF in FA by impairing HSPC function and may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of FA. PMID:27053300

  7. Intracellular insulin-like growth factor-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chand, Hitendra S; Harris, Jennifer Foster; Mebratu, Yohannes; Chen, Yangde; Wright, Paul S; Randell, Scott H; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2012-05-01

    Bcl-2, a prosurvival protein, regulates programmed cell death during development and repair processes, and it can be oncogenic when cell proliferation is deregulated. The present study investigated what factors modulate Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells and identified the pathways involved. Microarray analysis of mRNA from airway epithelial cells captured by laser microdissection showed that increased expression of IL-1β and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) coincided with induced Bcl-2 expression compared with controls. Treatment of cultured airway epithelial cells with IL-1β and IGF-1 induced Bcl-2 expression by increasing Bcl-2 mRNA stability with no discernible changes in promoter activity. Silencing the IGF-1 expression using short hairpin RNA showed that intracellular IGF-1 (IC-IGF-1) was increasing Bcl-2 expression. Blocking epidermal growth factor receptor or IGF-1R activation also suppressed IC-IGF-1 and abolished the Bcl-2 induction. Induced expression and colocalization of IC-IGF-1 and Bcl-2 were observed in airway epithelial cells of mice exposed to LPS or cigarette smoke and of patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis but not in the respective controls. These studies demonstrate that IC-IGF-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in epithelial cells via IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, and targeting IC-IGF-1 could be beneficial to treat chronic airway diseases. PMID:22461702

  8. Non-genotoxic conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a hematopoietic-cell-specific internalizing immunotoxin.

    PubMed

    Palchaudhuri, Rahul; Saez, Borja; Hoggatt, Jonathan; Schajnovitz, Amir; Sykes, David B; Tate, Tiffany A; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Kfoury, Youmna; Ruchika, Fnu; Rossi, Derrick J; Verdine, Gregory L; Mansour, Michael K; Scadden, David T

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers curative therapy for patients with hemoglobinopathies, congenital immunodeficiencies, and other conditions, possibly including AIDS. Autologous HSCT using genetically corrected cells would avoid the risk of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but the genotoxicity of conditioning remains a substantial barrier to the development of this approach. Here we report an internalizing immunotoxin targeting the hematopoietic-cell-restricted CD45 receptor that effectively conditions immunocompetent mice. A single dose of the immunotoxin, CD45-saporin (SAP), enabled efficient (>90%) engraftment of donor cells and full correction of a sickle-cell anemia model. In contrast to irradiation, CD45-SAP completely avoided neutropenia and anemia, spared bone marrow and thymic niches, enabling rapid recovery of T and B cells, preserved anti-fungal immunity, and had minimal overall toxicity. This non-genotoxic conditioning method may provide an attractive alternative to current conditioning regimens for HSCT in the treatment of non-malignant blood diseases. PMID:27272386

  9. Chimeric Aptamer-Gelatin Hydrogels as an Extracellular Matrix Mimic for Loading Cells and Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Battig, Mark R.; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R.; Duncan, Katelyn L.; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to synthesize materials to recapitulate critical functions of biological systems for a variety of applications such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a chimeric hydrogel as a promising extracellular matrix (ECM) mimic using gelatin, a nucleic acid aptamer and polyethylene glycol (PEG). This hydrogel had a macroporous structure that was highly permeable for fast molecular transport. Despite its high permeability, it could strongly sequester and sustainably release growth factors with high bioactivity. Notably, growth factors retained in the hydrogel could maintain ~50% bioactivity during a 14-day release test. It also provided cells with effective binding sites, which led to high efficiency of cell loading into the macroporous hydrogel matrix. When cells and growth factors were co-loaded into the chimeric hydrogel, living cells could still be observed by day 14 in a static serum-reduced culture condition. Thus, this chimeric aptamer-gelatin hydrogel constitutes a promising biomolecular ECM mimic for loading cells and growth factors. PMID:26791559

  10. [Effects of growth factors on multipotent bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells].

    PubMed

    Molchanova, E A; Paiushina, O V; Starostin, V I

    2008-01-01

    Multipotent bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells are progenitors of various cell types capable of long-term self-maintenance. These cells are an adequate model for studying the most important problems in cell biology, such as self-maintenance of stem cells and regulation of their differentiation. Moreover, these cells are a promising resource for regenerative medicine. In this context, isolation of the earliest multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells, their in vitro maintenance in an undifferentiated state, and stimulation of their differentiation in a desired direction appear to be most important. To successfully use the multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells both in fundamental studies and in therapy, it is necessary to modify and standardize the composition of culture medium, replacing blood serum with certain growth factors. These factors have influence on the proliferation and differentiation of most cell types, including multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. This paper is a review of available data concerning the effects of some growth factors on the multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells of the bone marrow. PMID:19198070

  11. Clinicopathological implications of vascular endothelial growth factor 165b expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma stroma.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Masahiro; Kondo, Seiji; Mukudai, Yoshiki; Kamatani, Takaaki; Akizuki, Ayako; Yaso, Atsushi; Shimane, Toshikazu; Shirota, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the most important angiogenic factors. VEGF165b was recently isolated as the anti-angiogenic VEGF splice variant. In the present study, we examined the association between VEGF165b expression and clinicopathological characteristics in order to determine how VEGF165b produced from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) affects the stromal cell biological activity. We examined the relationships between the expressions of both VEGF isoforms in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs) and OSCC cell lines (HSC2, 3, 4 and SAS). Our analyses indicated that both the mRNA and protein expression levels of VEGF165b in the HSC2 and SAS cells were higher than those in the NHDFs. VEGF165b did not promote cell growth or invasive capabilities, but it induced the cell adhesive capabilities to ECM. Although strong expression of the VEGF165 isoforms in tumor cells of OSCC tissues was observed, there was no significant difference in the VEGF165b expression level among the various degrees of malignancy. OSCC cells secrete VEGF165b into the stroma, and this factor may contribute to the process of anti-angiogenesis by inhibiting gelatinase-expressing cells and activating cell adhesive capabilities to ECM, such as that of fibroblasts surrounding tumor cells. PMID:27221145

  12. Growth factor regulation of remyelination: behind the growing interest in endogenous cell repair of the CNS.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Regina C

    2007-11-01

    Remyelination facilitates recovery of saltatory conduction along demyelinated axons and may help prevent axon damage in patients with demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The extent of remyelination in multiple sclerosis lesions varies dramatically, indicating a capacity for repair that is not fulfilled in lesions with poor remyelination. In experimental models of demyelinating disease, remyelination is limited by chronic disease that depletes the oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) population, inhibits OP differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes and/or perturbs cell survival in the lesion environment. Manipulating the activity of growth factor signaling pathways significantly improves the ability of endogenous OP cells to accomplish extensive remyelination. Specifically, growth factors have been identified that can regulate OP proliferation, differentiation and survival in demyelinated lesions. Therefore, growth factors may be key signals for strategies to improve conditions with poor remyelination. PMID:19079759

  13. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. PMID:21640721

  14. Hematopoietic stem cells give rise to osteo-chondrogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Mehrotra, Meenal; Williams, Christopher R.; Ogawa, Makio; LaRue, Amanda C.

    2012-01-01

    Repair of bone fracture requires recruitment and proliferation of stem cells with the capacity to differentiate to functional osteoblasts. Given the close association of bone and bone marrow (BM), it has been suggested that BM may serve as a source of these progenitors. To test the ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to give rise to osteo-chondrogenic cells, we used a single HSC transplantation paradigm in uninjured bone and in conjunction with a tibial fracture model. Mice were lethally irradiated and transplanted with a clonal population of cells derived from a single enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (eGFP+) HSC. Analysis of paraffin sections from these animals showed the presence of eGFP+ osteocytes and hypertrophic chondrocytes. To determine the contribution of HSC-derived cells to fracture repair, non-stabilized tibial fracture was created. Paraffin sections were examined at seven days, two weeks and two months after fracture and eGFP+ hypertrophic chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteocytes were identified at the callus site. These cells stained positive for Runx-2 or osteocalcin and also stained for eGFP demonstrating their origin from the HSC. Together, these findings strongly support the concept that HSCs generate bone cells and suggest therapeutic potentials of HSCs in fracture repair. PMID:22954476

  15. Erythropoietin guides multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells toward an erythroid fate

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Amit; Mancini, Elena; Moore, Susan; Mead, Adam J.; Atkinson, Deborah; Rasmussen, Kasper D.; O’Carroll, Donal; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2014-01-01

    The erythroid stress cytokine erythropoietin (Epo) supports the development of committed erythroid progenitors, but its ability to act on upstream, multipotent cells remains to be established. We observe that high systemic levels of Epo reprogram the transcriptomes of multi- and bipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in vivo. This induces erythroid lineage bias at all lineage bifurcations known to exist between hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and committed erythroid progenitors, leading to increased erythroid and decreased myeloid HSC output. Epo, therefore, has a lineage instructive role in vivo, through suppression of non-erythroid fate options, demonstrating the ability of a cytokine to systematically bias successive lineage choices in favor of the generation of a specific cell type. PMID:24493804

  16. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  17. Expression of hematopoietic transcription factors Runt, CBFβ and GATA during ontogenesis of scallop Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Hao; Song, Linsheng

    2016-08-01

    Transcription factors Runx1, CBFβ and GATA1/2/3 play essential roles in regulating hematopoietic development during embryogenesis of vertebrate. In previous study, the orthologous genes of Runt, CBFβ and GATA1/2/3 have been identified from scallop Chlamys farreri and proved to have conserved function in regulating hemocyte production. Here, these three transcription factors were selected as hematopoietic markers to explore potential developmental events of hematopoiesis during ontogenesis of scallop. The transcripts of CfRunt, CfCBFβ and CfGATA were detected abundantly after 32-cell embryo, trochophore and morula stage, and reached to a peak level in 32-cell embryos and D-shaped veligers, pediveligers or gastrula respectively. Further whole-mount immunofluorescence assay showed that the immunoreactivity of CfRunt was firstly observed at 32-cell stage and then its distribution was specialized gradually to the mesoderm during gastrulation. By trochophore, the expression of CfRunt, CfCBFβ and CfGATA proteins occurred coincidently in two specific symmetry cell mass located bilaterally on prototroch, and then disappeared rapidly in D-shaped or umbonal vliger, respectively. However, remarkable expressions of the three transcription factors were observed consistently in a new sinus structure appeared at the dorsal anterior side of D-shaped and umbonal veliger. After bacterial challenge, the mRNA expression levels of the three transcription factors were up-regulated or down-regulated significantly in trochophore, D-shaped veliger and pediveliger, indicating the available hematopoietic regulation in scallop larvae. The results revealed that scallop might experience two waves of hematopoiesis during early development, which occurred in the bilateral symmetry cell mass of trochophore and the sinus structure of veliger. PMID:27012994

  18. Effect of growth factors on oocyte maturation and allocations of inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells of cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Arat, Sezen; Caputcu, Arzu Tas; Cevik, Mesut; Akkoc, Tolga; Cetinkaya, Gaye; Bagis, Haydar

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the additive effects of exogenous growth factors during in vitro oocyte maturation (IVM) and the sequential culture of nuclear transfer (NT) embryos. Oocyte maturation and culture of reconstructed embryos derived from bovine granulosa cells were performed in culture medium supplemented with either epidermal growth factor (EGF) alone or a combination of EGF with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). The maturation rates of oocytes matured in the presence of EGF or the EGF + IGF-I combination were significantly higher than those of oocytes matured in the presence of only fetal calf serum (FCS) (P 0.05). IGF-I alone or in combination with EGF in sequential embryo culture medium significantly increased the ratio of inner cell mass (ICM) to total blastocyst cells (P < 0.05). Our results showed that the addition of growth factors to IVM and sequential culture media of cloned bovine embryos increased the ICM without changing the total cell number. These unknown and uncontrolled effects of growth factors can alter the allocation of ICM and trophectoderm cells (TE) in NT embryos. A decrease in TE cell numbers could be a reason for developmental abnormalities in embryos in the cloning system. PMID:26444069

  19. The role of biosimilar granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) Zarzio for progenitor cell mobilization and the treatment of therapy-induced neutropenia in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Severson, Cherie C

    2015-01-01

    Originator GCSF (Neupogen) has been used to mobilize progenitor stem cells and treat therapy-induced neutropenia in Canadian stem cell transplant settings for years. Although its benefit is not in question, viable alternatives are available. Biosimilar GCSF (Zarzio) is widely in use in Europe since 2009 and was recently approved in the U.S.for the same five indications as Neupogen. Zarzio is reported as safe, equally efficacious, more accessible and cost effective without negatively impacting patient outcomes. This paper summarizes the supporting evidence. PMID:26897866

  20. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  1. In vivo demonstration of cell types in bone that harbor epidermal growth factor receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau-Doize, B.; Lai, W.H.; Warshawsky, H.; Bergeron, J.J.

    1988-08-01

    The binding and internalization of (/sup 125/I)iodoepidermal growth factor (EGF) by bone cells of the rat was demonstrated in situ by quantitative radioautography. Specific binding sites were observed on a cell profile enriched in endocytic components, including lysosome-like structures, a rough endoplasmic reticulum-rich cell profile, and a cell profile that histologically resembles an undifferentiated precursor cell. By the criteria of gel filtration and precipitability by trichloroacetic acid, most of the bound (/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF was considered intact. By morphological criteria none of the cell profiles that bound (/sup 125/I)iodo-EGF corresponded to fully formed osteoclasts or osteoblasts. The endocytic cell was found in the epiphyseal plate between the invading capillary and the transverse and longitudinal cartilage septa as well as near osteoclasts in the zone of mixed spicules. The rough endoplasmic reticulum-rich cell was present in vacated chondrocyte lacunae of the epiphyseal plate close to the metaphysis, and the poorly differentiated cell was observed between the mixed spicules of the metaphysis. Similar cell types were also found in the alveolar bone surrounding the incisors. These cells may be the origin of established bone cell lines that harbor high concentrations of EGF receptors and may also be responsible for the humoral hypercalcemia in response to the reported actions of injected EGF or transforming growth factor-alpha as well as that of malignancy.

  2. Hematopoietic Cell and Renal Transplantation in Plasma Cell Dyscrasia Patients.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Olga; Grandinetti, Valeria; Donati, Gabriele; Comai, Giorgia; Battaglino, Giuseppe; Cuna, Vania; Capelli, Irene; Sala, Elisa; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Gammopathies, multiple myeloma, and amyloidosis are plasma dyscrasias characterized by clonal proliferation and immunoglobulin overproduction. Renal impairment is the most common and serious complication with an incidence of 20-30% patients at the diagnosis. Kidney transplant has not been considered feasible in the presence of plasma dyscrasias because the immunosuppressive therapy may increase the risk of neoplasia progression, and paraproteins may affect the graft. However, recent advances in clinical management of multiple myeloma and other gammopathies allow considering kidney transplant as a possible alternative to dialysis. Numerous evidence indicates the direct relationship between hematological remission and renal function restoring. The combination of kidney and hematopoietic cell transplant has been reported as a promising approach to reestablish end-organ function and effectively treat the underlying disease. This review describes current protocols used to perform kidney transplantation in patients with plasma dyscrasias. PMID:26160700

  3. Second Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Primary Graft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schriber, Jeffrey; Agovi, Manza-A.; Ho, Vincent; Ballen, Karen K.; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Gupta, Vikas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Hale, Gregory A.; Litzow, Mark R.; Logan, Brent; Bornhauser, Martin; Giller, Roger H.; Isola, Luis; Marks, David I.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2010-01-01

    Failure to engraft donor cells is a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We describe the results of 122 patients reported to the National Marrow Donor Program between 1990 and 2005, who received a second unrelated donor HCT after failing to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 500/ μL without recurrent disease. Patients were transplanted for leukemia (n=83), myelodysplastic disorders (n=16), severe aplastic anemia (n=20) and other diseases (n=3). The median age was 29 years. Twenty-four patients received second grafts from a different unrelated donor. Among 98 patients who received a second graft from the same donor, 28 received products that were previously collected and cryopreserved for the first transplantation. One-year overall survival after second transplant was 11% with 10 patients alive at last follow up. We observed no differences between patients who received grafts from the same or different donors, or in those who received fresh or cryopreserved product. The outcomes after a second allogeneic HCT for primary graft failure are dismal. Identifying risk factors for primary graft failure can decrease the incidence of this complication. Further studies are needed to test whether early recognition and hastened procurement of alternative grafts can improve transplant outcomes for primary graft failure. PMID:20172038

  4. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  5. Engraftment syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation predicts poor outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lawrence; Frame, David; Braun, Thomas; Gatza, Erin; Hanauer, David A; Zhao, Shuang; Magenau, John M; Schultz, Kathryn; Tokala, Hemasri; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E; Reddy, Pavan; Paczesny, Sophie; Choi, Sung Won

    2014-09-01

    Engraftment syndrome (ES), characterized by fever, rash, pulmonary edema, weight gain, liver and renal dysfunction, and/or encephalopathy, occurs at the time of neutrophil recovery after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In this study, we evaluated the incidence, clinical features, risk factors, and outcomes of ES in children and adults undergoing first-time allogeneic HCT. Among 927 patients, 119 (13%) developed ES at a median of 10 days (interquartile range 9 to 12) after HCT. ES patients experienced significantly higher cumulative incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD at day 100 (75% versus 34%, P < .001) and higher nonrelapse mortality at 2 years (38% versus 19%, P < .001) compared with non-ES patients, resulting in lower overall survival at 2 years (38% versus 54%, P < .001). There was no significant difference in relapse at 2 years (26% versus 31%, P = .772). Suppression of tumorigenicity 2, interleukin 2 receptor alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 plasma biomarker levels were significantly elevated in ES patients. Our results illustrate the clinical significance and prognostic impact of ES on allogeneic HCT outcomes. Despite early recognition of the syndrome and prompt institution of corticosteroid therapy, outcomes in ES patients were uniformly poor. This study suggests the need for a prospective approach of collecting clinical features combined with correlative laboratory analyses to better characterize ES. PMID:24892262

  6. Identification of angiogenic activity and the cloning and expression of platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Fuyuki; Miyazono, Kohei; Hellman, Ulf; Drexler, Hannes; Wernstedt, Christer; Hagiwara, Koichi; Usuki, Kensuke; Takaku, Fumimaro; Risau, Werner; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    1989-04-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the complementary DNA for platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor indicates that it is a novel factor distinct from previously characterized proteins. The factor, a protein with a relative molecular mass of about 45,000, stimulates endothelial cell growth and chemotaxis in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo.

  7. Experiments on gene transferring to primary hematopoietic cells by liposome.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, B

    2000-01-01

    Liposomes have showed many advantages in mediating exogenous gene into many cell types in vitro and in vivo. But few data are available concerning gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. In this report, we described two-marker genes (Neo R and Lac Z) co-transferred into hematopoietic cells of human and mouse by using liposome in vitro. The efficiency of gene transfer was tested by X-gal staining and observation of colony formation. The X-gal blue staining rate of transduced cells was about (13.33 +/- 2.68)% in human and about (16.28 +/- 2.95)% in mouse without G418 selection. After G418 selection, the blue cell rate was (46.06 +/- 3.47)% in human and (43.45 +/- 4.1)% in mouse, which were markedly higher than those before selection, suggesting that high-efficiency gene transfer and expression could be attained in primary hematopoietic cells using this easy and harmless transduction protocol. At the same time, this protocol provided experimental data for clinicians to investigate the biology of marrow reconstitution and trace the origin of relapse after autologous bone marrow transplantation for the patients with leukemia. PMID:12840913

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression in primary cultured human colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tong, W. M.; Ellinger, A.; Sheinin, Y.; Cross, H. S.

    1998-01-01

    In situ hybridization on human colon tissue demonstrates that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA expression is strongly increased during tumour progression. To obtain test systems to evaluate the relevance of growth factor action during carcinogenesis, primary cultures from human colorectal carcinomas were established. EGFR distribution was determined in 2 of the 27 primary cultures and was compared with that in well-defined subclones derived from the Caco-2 cell line, which has the unique property to differentiate spontaneously in vitro in a manner similar to normal enterocytes. The primary carcinoma-derived cells had up to three-fold higher total EGFR levels than the Caco-2 subclones and a basal mitotic rate at least fourfold higher. The EGFR affinity constant is 0.26 nmol l(-1), which is similar to that reported in Caco-2 cells. The proliferation rate of Caco-2 cells is mainly induced by EGF from the basolateral cell surface where the majority of receptors are located, whereas primary cultures are strongly stimulated from the apical side also. This corresponds to a three- to fivefold higher level of EGFR at the apical cell surface. This redistribution of EGFR to apical plasma membranes in advanced colon carcinoma cells suggests that autocrine growth factors in the colon lumen may play a significant role during tumour progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9667648

  9. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A HEPATOCYTE GROWTH FACTOR PRODUCED BY RAT HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum-free medium conditioned by confluent cultures of JM1 or JM2 rat hepatocellular carcinoma cells stimulated DNA synthesis in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes in a dose-dependent, saturable manner and in the absence of epidermal growth factor. The hepatotrophic activi...

  10. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Growth Factors and Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Tiffany N.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    The controlled delivery of growth factors and cells within biomaterial carriers can enhance and accelerate functional bone formation. The carrier system can be designed with preprogrammed release kinetics to deliver bioactive molecules in a localized, spatiotemporal manner most similar to the natural wound healing process. The carrier can also act as an extracellular matrix-mimicking substrate for promoting osteoprogenitor cellular infiltration and proliferation for integrative tissue repair. This review discusses the role of various regenerative factors involved in bone healing and their appropriate combinations with different delivery systems for augmenting bone regeneration. The general requirements of protein, cell and gene therapy are described, with elaboration on how the selection of materials, configurations and processing affects growth factor and cell delivery and regenerative efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo applications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22342771

  11. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tissue specific in vivo growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Krupski, T; Harding, M A; Herce, M E; Gulding, K M; Stoler, M H; Theodorescu, D

    2001-01-01

    Despite the fact that cancer cells can be found in many vascular beds, continued growth of the metastatic tumor focus exhibits a significant degree of 'organ tropism', with only certain organs exhibiting the ravages of metastatic disease. Since a limiting factor to the growth of metastases beyond 2 mm in diameter, may be a lack of angiogenesis, we sought to determine whether tumor overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic factor related to prostate cancer metastasis, is causally related to organ specific tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model. LnCaP-C4-2 is a subline of the human prostate cancer cell line LnCaP which unlike its parent, has a predilection for growth in bone, a common site for human prostate cancer metastasis. LnCaP-C4-2, is tumorigenic when injected intrafemorally in mice but requires co-injection of stromal components (Matrigel) to be tumorigenic in the subcutaneous site. Because of this site-specific tumorigenicity profile and relatively low VEGF mRNA and protein expression, this line was transfected with a full length cDNA encoding the 165 isoform of VEGF. Cells either overexpressing or not expressing the transfected gene were selected for study in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF did not seem to affect in vitro cell growth. Such overexpression did affect tumorigenicity and in vivo tumor growth rates when cells were inoculated in the subcutaneus site. Interestingly, the dependency of subcutaneous tumorigenicity on Matrigel co-inoculation was still observed in cells overexpressing VEGF. In contrast to the impact that VEGF overexpression has on subcutaneous tumorigenicity, no such effect was observed when cells were inoculated in orthotopic/prostate (primary) or intrafemoral (metastatic) sites. In view of the importance of tumor-stromal interactions in growth of xenografts, we sought to determine if the host strain is important to the observed tumorigenicity effects of VEGF overexpression

  12. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  13. Cancer drug troglitazone stimulates the growth and response of renal cells to hypoxia inducible factors.

    PubMed

    Taub, Mary

    2016-03-11

    Troglitazone has been used to suppress the growth of a number of tumors through apoptosis and autophagy. However, previous in vitro studies have employed very high concentrations of troglitazone (≥10(-5) M) in order to elicit growth inhibitory effects. In this report, when employing lower concentrations of troglitazone in defined medium, troglitazone was observed to stimulate the growth of primary renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. Rosiglitazone, like troglitazone, is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) that is known to activate Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Υ (PPARΥ). Notably, rosiglitazone also stimulates RPT cell growth, as does Υ-linolenic acids, another PPARΥ agonist. The PPARΥ antagonist GW9662 inhibited the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In addition, troglitazone stimulated transcription by a PPAR Response Element/Luciferase construct. These results are consistent with the involvement of PPARΥ as a mediator of the growth stimulatory effect of troglitazone. In a number of tumor cells, the expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is increased, promoting the expression of HIF inducible genes, and vascularization. Troglitazone was observed to stimulate transcription by a HIF/luciferase construct. These observations indicate that troglitazone not only promotes growth, also the survival of RPT cells under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:26869517

  14. Effect of basic fibroblast growth factor in mouse embryonic stem cell culture and osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Laura C; Fitzsimmons, Ross; Lee, Poh; Krawetz, Roman; Rancourt, Derrick E; Uludağ, Hasan

    2013-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively explored as a cell source in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine involving bone repair. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been a valuable growth factor to support the culture of human stem cells as well as their osteogenic differentiation, but the influence of bFGF on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells is not known. Towards this goal, D3 cells were treated with bFGF during maintenance conditions and during spontaneous and osteogenic differentiation. In feeder-free monolayers, up to 40 ng/ml of exogenous bFGF did not support self-renewal of mES without LIF during cell expansion. During spontaneous differentiation in high-density cultures, bFGF stimulated cell proliferation under certain conditions but did not influence differentiation, as judged by stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 expression. The addition of bFGF reduced the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity associated with osteoblast activity during differentiation induced by osteogenic supplements, although the extent of mineralization was unaffected by bFGF. The bFGF increased the mesenchymal stem cell marker Sca-1 in an mES cell population and led to an enhanced increase in osteocalcin and runx2 expression in combination with BMP-2. These results suggest that bFGF could be utilized to expand the cell population in high-density cultures in addition to enriching the BMP-2 responsiveness of mES cells. PMID:22674886

  15. Microvesicles Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Tubular Epithelial Cell Dedifferentiation and Growth via Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuai; Zou, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Guang-yuan; Gu, Di; Miao, Shuai; Zhu, Ying-jian; Sun, Jie; Du, Tao

    2015-01-01

    During acute kidney injury (AKI), tubular cell dedifferentiation initiates cell regeneration; hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in modulating cell dedifferentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived microvesicles (MVs) deliver RNA into injured tubular cells and alter their gene expression, thus regenerating these cells. We boldly speculated that MVs might induce HGF synthesis via RNA transfer, thereby facilitating tubular cell dedifferentiation and regeneration. In a rat model of unilateral AKI, the administration of MVs promoted kidney recovery. One of the mechanisms of action is the acceleration of tubular cell dedifferentiation and growth. Both in vivo and in vitro, rat HGF expression in damaged rat tubular cells was greatly enhanced by MV treatment. In addition, human HGF mRNA present in MVs was delivered into rat tubular cells and translated into the HGF protein as another mechanism of HGF induction. RNase treatment abrogated all MV effects. In the in vitro experimental setting, the conditioned medium of MV-treated injured tubular cells, which contains a higher concentration of HGF, strongly stimulated cell dedifferentiation and growth, as well as Erk1/2 signaling activation. Intriguingly, these effects were completely abrogated by either c-Met inhibitor or MEK inhibitor, suggesting that HGF induction is a crucial contributor to the acceleration of cell dedifferentiation and growth. All these findings indicate that MV-induced HGF synthesis in damaged tubular cells via RNA transfer facilitates cell dedifferentiation and growth, which are important regenerative mechanisms. PMID:25793303

  16. Cross talk among tyrosine kinase receptors in PC12 cells: desensitization of mitogenic epidermal growth factor receptors by the neurotrophic factors, nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, I; Ballotti, R; Tartare, S; Kowalski-Chauvel, A; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-01-01

    We have studied the effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding to PC12 cells. We show that NGF and bFGF rapidly induce a reduction in 125I-EGF binding to PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This decrease amounts to 50% for NGF and 35% for bFGF. Both factors appear to act through a protein kinase C(PKC)-independent pathway, because their effect persists in PKC-downregulated PC12 cells. Scatchard analysis indicates that NGF and bFGF decrease the number of high affinity EGF binding sites. In addition to their effect on EGF binding, NGF and bFGF activate in intact PC12 cells one or several serine/threonine kinases leading to EGF receptor threonine phosphorylation. Using an in vitro phosphorylation system, we show that NGF- or bFGF-activated extracellular regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) is able to phosphorylate a kinase-deficient EGF receptor. Phosphoamino acid analysis indicates that this phosphorylation occurs mainly on threonine residues. Furthermore, two comparable phosphopeptides are observed in the EGF receptor, phosphorylated either in vivo after NGF treatment or in a cell-free system by NGF-activated ERK1. Finally, a good correlation was found between the time courses of ERK1 activation and 125I-EGF binding inhibition after NGF or bFGF treatment. In conclusion, in PC12 cells the NGF- and bFGF-stimulated ERK1 appears to be involved in the induction of the threonine phosphorylation of the EGF receptor and the decrease in the number of high affinity EGF binding sites. Images PMID:8400459

  17. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    SciTech Connect

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function that occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.

  18. The effect of retinal pigment epithelial cell patch size on growth factor expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vargis, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Cristen B.; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L.; Retterer, Scott T.; Collier, Charles Patrick

    2014-01-30

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. As a result, up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor protects human endothelial cells against advanced glycation end products-induced apoposis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yijun . E-mail: zhou-yijun@hotmail.com; Wang Jiahe; Zhang Jin

    2006-06-02

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) form by a non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and biological proteins, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, we assessed AGEs effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Additionally, we investigated whether hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), an anti-apoptotic factor for endothelial cells, prevents AGEs-induced apoptosis of HUVECs. HUVECs were treated with AGEs in the presence or absence of HGF. Treatment of HUVECs with AGEs changed cell morphology, decreased cell viability, and induced DNA fragmentation, leading to apoptosis. Apoptosis was induced by AGEs in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. AGEs markedly elevated Bax and decreased NF-{kappa}B, but not Bcl-2 expression. Additionally, AGEs significantly inhibited cell growth through a pro-apoptotic action involving caspase-3 and -9 activations in HUVECs. Most importantly, pretreatment with HGF protected against AGEs-induced cytotoxicity in the endothelial cells. HGF significantly promoted the expression of Bcl-2 and NF-{kappa}B, while decreasing the activities of caspase-3 and -9 without affecting Bax level. Our data suggest that AGEs induce apoptosis in endothelial cells. HGF effectively attenuate AGEs-induced endothelial cell apoptosis. These findings provide new perspectives in the role of HGF in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Controlling Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Patch Size Influences Growth Factor Expression

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vargis, Elizabeth A; Peterson, Cristen B; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Retterer, Scott T; Collier, Pat

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells grown in culture was controlled using micropatterning techniques in order to examine the effect of patch size on cell health and differentiation. Understanding this effect is a critical step in the development of multiplexed high throughput fluidic assays and provides a model for replicating disease states associated with the deterioration of retinal tissue during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Microcontact printing of fibronectin on polystyrene and glass substrates was used to promote cell attachment, forming RPE patches of controlled size and shape. These colonies mimic the effect of atrophy and loss-of-function thatmore » occurs in the retina during degenerative diseases such as AMD. After 72 hours of cell growth, levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an important biomarker of AMD, were measured. Cells were counted and morphological indicators of cell viability and tight junction formation were assessed via fluorescence microscopy. Up to a twofold increase of VEGF expression per cell was measured as colony size decreased, suggesting that the local microenvironment of, and connections between, RPE cells influences growth factor expression leading to the initiation and progression of diseases such as AMD.« less

  1. Adipose Stem Cell Microbeads as Production Sources for Chondrogenic Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher S.D.; Nicolini, Anthony M.; Watkins, Elyse A.; Burnsed, Olivia A.; Boyan, Barbara D.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    Microencapsulating stem cells in injectable microbeads can enhance delivery and localization, but their ability to act as growth factor production sources is still unknown. To address this concern, growth factor mRNA levels and production from alginate microbeads with encapsulated human adipose stem cells (ASC microbeads) cultured in both growth and chondrogenic media (GM and CM) were measured over a two week period. Human ASCs in microbeads were either commercially purchased (Lonza) or isolated from six human donors and compared to human ASCs on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The effects of crosslinking and alginate compositions on growth factor mRNA levels and production were also determined. Secretion profiles of IGF-I, TGF-β3 and VEGF-A from commercial human ASC microbeads were linear and at a significantly higher rate than TCPS cultures over two weeks. For human ASCs derived from different donors, microencapsulation increased pthlh and both IGF-I and TGF-β3 secretion. CM decreased fgf2 and VEGF-A secretion from ASC microbeads derived from the same donor population. Crosslinking microbeads in BaCl2 instead of CaCl2 did not eliminate microencapsulation’s beneficial effects, but did decrease IGF-I production. Increasing the guluronate content of the alginate microbead increased IGF-I retention. Decreasing alginate molecular weight eliminated the effects microencapsulation had on increasing IGF-I secretion. This study demonstrated that microencapsulation can enhance chondrogenic growth factor production and that chondrogenic medium treatment can decrease angiogenic growth factor production from ASCs, making these cells a potential source for paracrine factors that can stimulate cartilage regeneration. PMID:25705097

  2. Gene marking and gene therapy directed at primary hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C E; Young, N S

    1996-11-01

    The past year has been a very active one in the field of gene transfer to hematopoietic targets, specifically stem cells and T cells. A number of clinical trials were published that both demonstrated progress as well as identified problems that investigators will face in trying to make the technology therapeutically applicable. Important laboratory and animal experiments focused on predictive models for human stem cell behavior, methods for culturing and expanding primitive cells ex vivo, immune responses against transgenes, in vitro and in vivo selection of transduced cells, and alternatives to standard retroviral vectors. PMID:9372114

  3. Heparan Sulfate Inhibits Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration and Engraftment in Mucopolysaccharidosis I*

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H. Angharad; Holley, Rebecca J.; Langford-Smith, Kia J.; Wilkinson, Fiona L.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Wynn, Robert F.; Wraith, J. Edmond; Merry, Catherine L. R.; Bigger, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis I Hurler (MPSI-H) is a pediatric lysosomal storage disease caused by genetic deficiencies in IDUA, coding for α-l-iduronidase. Idua−/− mice share similar clinical pathology with patients, including the accumulation of the undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) heparan sulfate (HS), and dermatan sulfate (DS), progressive neurodegeneration, and dysostosis multiplex. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the most effective treatment for Hurler patients, but reduced intensity conditioning is a risk factor in transplantation, suggesting an underlying defect in hematopoietic cell engraftment. HS is a co-receptor in the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) migration to the bone marrow (BM), but the effect of HS alterations on HSPC migration, or the functional role of HS in MPSI-H are unknown. We demonstrate defective WT HSPC engraftment and migration in Idua−/− recipient BM, particularly under reduced intensity conditioning. Both intra- but especially extracellular Idua−/− BM HS was significantly increased and abnormally sulfated. Soluble heparinase-sensitive GAGs from Idua−/− BM and specifically 2-O-sulfated HS, elevated in Idua−/− BM, both inhibited CXCL12-mediated WT HSPC transwell migration, while DS had no effect. Thus we have shown that excess overly sulfated extracellular HS binds, and sequesters CXCL12, limiting hematopoietic migration and providing a potential mechanism for the limited scope of HSCT in Hurler disease. PMID:25359774

  4. GATA-3 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and cell-cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Hosoya, Tomonori; Maillard, Ivan; Engel, James Douglas

    2012-03-01

    Maintaining hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence is a critical property for the life-long generation of blood cells. Approximately 75% of cells in a highly enriched long-term repopulating HSC (LT-HSC) pool (Lin(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(hi)CD150(+)CD48(-)) are quiescent, with only a small percentage of the LT-HSCs in cycle. Transcription factor GATA-3 is known to be vital for the development of T cells at multiple stages in the thymus and for Th2 differentiation in the peripheral organs. Although it is well documented that GATA-3 is expressed in HSCs, a role for GATA-3 in any prethymic progenitor cell has not been established. In the present study, we show that Gata3-null mutant mice generate fewer LT-HSCs and that fewer Gata3-null LT-HSCs are in cycle. Furthermore, Gata3 mutant hematopoietic progenitor cells fail to be recruited into an increased cycling state after 5-fluorouracil-induced myelosuppression. Therefore, GATA-3 is required for the maintenance of a normal number of LT-HSCs and for their entry into the cell cycle. PMID:22267605

  5. GATA-3 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and cell-cycle entry

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chia-Jui; Hosoya, Tomonori; Maillard, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence is a critical property for the life-long generation of blood cells. Approximately 75% of cells in a highly enriched long-term repopulating HSC (LT-HSC) pool (Lin−Sca1+c-KithiCD150+CD48−) are quiescent, with only a small percentage of the LT-HSCs in cycle. Transcription factor GATA-3 is known to be vital for the development of T cells at multiple stages in the thymus and for Th2 differentiation in the peripheral organs. Although it is well documented that GATA-3 is expressed in HSCs, a role for GATA-3 in any prethymic progenitor cell has not been established. In the present study, we show that Gata3-null mutant mice generate fewer LT-HSCs and that fewer Gata3-null LT-HSCs are in cycle. Furthermore, Gata3 mutant hematopoietic progenitor cells fail to be recruited into an increased cycling state after 5-fluorouracil–induced myelosuppression. Therefore, GATA-3 is required for the maintenance of a normal number of LT-HSCs and for their entry into the cell cycle. PMID:22267605

  6. The growth factor inhibitor suramin reduces apoptosis and cell aggregation in protein-free CHO cell batch cultures.

    PubMed

    Zanghi, J A; Renner, W A; Bailey, J E; Fussenegger, M

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells capable of growing in medium free of exogenous proteins die by apoptosis during all stages of a batch culture (Zanghi et al., 1999). On the basis of the hypothesis that extracellular death factors might be important in apoptosis under these conditions, we examined the effect of the growth factor inhibitor and antitumor agent suramin on CHO cell growth and apoptosis in serum-free culture. Suramin protected against apoptosis during exponential growth, as indicated by the absence of DNA laddering and an increase in cell viability from roughly 70% to above 95%. Suramin also effectively dispersed cell aggregates so that single-cell suspension culture was possible. However, suramin did not protect against apoptosis during the death phase, in contrast to serum, suggesting that antiapoptotic factors in the serum remain to be discovered. The increased viable cell yield following suramin supplementation resulted in a 40% increase in product yield, based on results with cells expressing recombinant secreted alkaline phosphatase. Polysulfated compounds dextran sulfate and polyvinyl sulfate worked nearly as well as suramin in dispersing cell clumps and increasing viable cell yield, which implies that suramin's high sulfate group density may be responsible for its effects in cell culture. In addition, suramin was beneficial for long-term adaptation of CHO cells to protein-free media suspension culture, and the compound was synergistic with insulin in accelerating this adaptation time. PMID:10835230

  7. Dental pulp stem cells suppress the proliferation of lymphocytes via transforming growth factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Ding, Gang; Niu, Jianyi; Liu, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) possess self-renewal capability, multi-lineage differentiation potential, and can generate a dentin-pulp-like tissue in vivo, which is promising for tooth regeneration. To enlarge the cells resource of DPSCs and explore the feasibility of DPSCs-mediated immune therapy, it is prerequisite to investigate the immunological properties of DPSCs and the underlying mechanisms. Human DPSCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and cultured. Then we used lymphocytes proliferation assays, cytokines detection, Transwell cultures, neutralization experiments, and flow cytometry to examine the in vitro immune characteristics of DPSCs. We found that DPSCs failed to stimulate allogeneic T cells proliferation and suppressed T cells proliferation, B cells proliferation, and mixed lymphocyte reaction. In addition, DPSCs could up-regulate IL-10, down-regulate the production of IL-2, IL-17, and IFN-γ, and did not affect the production of IL-6. Monoclonal antibody against transforming growth factor-β1 restored the T cells proliferation inhibited by DPSCs. Moreover, the population of regulatory T cells increased significantly and T-helper 17 cells decreased significantly in peripheral blood mononuclear cells co-cultured with DPSCs. These data confirmed that DPSCs are low immunogenic, could inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes, regulate the production of cytokines in vitro, and the secretion of transforming growth factor-β1 may be involved in this event. PMID:25605036

  8. A sensitive electrochemiluminescence cytosensor for quantitative evaluation of epidermal growth factor receptor expressed on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yanjuan; Zhang, Shaolian; Wen, Qingqing; Huang, Hongxing; Yang, Peihui

    2015-06-30

    A sensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) strategy for evaluating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression level on cell surfaces was designed by integrating the specific recognition of EGFR expressed on MCF-7 cell surfaces with an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-funtionalized CdS quantum dots (CdSQDs)-capped magnetic bead (MB) probe. The high sensitivity of ECL probe of EGF-funtionalized CdSQD-capped-MB was used for competitive recognition with EGFR expressed on cell surfaces with recombinant EGFR protein. The changes of ECL intensity depended on both the cell number and the expression level of EGFR receptor on cell surfaces. A wide linear response to cells ranging from 80 to 4×10(6)cellsmL(-1) with a detection limit of 40cellsmL(-1) was obtained. The EGF-cytosensor was used to evaluate EGFR expression levels on MCF-7 cells, and the average number of EGFR receptor on single MCF-7 cells was 1.35×10(5) with the relative standard deviation of 4.3%. This strategy was further used for in-situ and real-time evaluating EGFR receptor expressed on cell surfaces in response to drugs stimulation at different concentration and incubation time. The proposed method provided potential applications in the detection of receptors on cancer cells and anticancer drugs screening. PMID:26041531

  9. Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation with nonmyeloablative conditioning.

    PubMed

    Masmas, Tania N; Petersen, Søren L; Madsen, Hans O; Ryder, Lars P; Kornblit, Brian; Svejgaard, Arne; Andersen, Pernille; Dickmeiss, Ebbe; Vindeløv, Lars L

    2008-07-01

    Graft rejection after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with nonmyeloablative conditioning is a rare but serious clinical problem. Graft rejection and salvage therapy in eight patients in a retrospective analysis of 124 consecutive patients is reported. The patients were conditioned with low-dose fludarabine and total body irradiation (TBI). The association of pretransplantation risk factors with rejection and the effect of chimerism and graft-versus-host disease on rejection were analyzed. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were compared between patients with and without rejection. Retransplantation was performed with increased TBI conditioning for all patients, and with increased mycophenolate mofetil doses for recipients with HLA-identical sibling donors. No known pretransplantation risk factors were confirmed in this study. Rejection episodes were unevenly distributed over time. The storage temperature of the apheresis products was identified as a risk factor for rejection. Storage of the apheresis products at 5 degrees C diminished the risk of rejection. Low donor T cell chimerism at Day +14 significantly increased the risk of rejection. Seven patients were retransplanted. All but one engrafted successfully, but with decreased OS and PFS. Two patients received pentostatin infusion prior to donor lymphocyte infusions in unsuccessful attempts at reversing rejection. Storage temperature and donor chimerism had a significant effect on rejection. Following rejection, patients are at greater risk of dying from infections and progression/relapse of their malignancy. Retransplantation is feasible and well tolerated after HCT with nonmyeloablative conditioning and should be performed without delay in patients with imminent and manifest graft rejection. PMID:18383319

  10. Solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Rochelle E.; Socié, Gérard; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Landgren, Ola; Travis, Lois B.; Travis, William D.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Friedman, Debra L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Wingard, John R.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Transplant recipients have been reported to have an increased risk of solid cancers but most studies are small and have limited ability to evaluate the interaction of host, disease, and treatment-related factors. In the largest study to date to evaluate risk factors for solid cancers, we studied a multi-institutional cohort of 28 874 allogeneic transplant recipients with 189 solid malignancies. Overall, patients developed new solid cancers at twice the rate expected based on general population rates (observed-to-expected ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.5), with the risk increasing over time (P trend < .001); the risk reached 3-fold among patients followed for 15 years or more after transplantation. New findings showed that the risk of developing a non–squamous cell carcinoma (non-SCC) following conditioning radiation was highly dependent on age at exposure. Among patients irradiated at ages under 30 years, the relative risk of non-SCC was 9 times that of nonirradiated patients, while the comparable risk for older patients was 1.1 (P interaction < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease and male sex were the main determinants for risk of SCC. These data indicate that allogeneic transplant survivors, particularly those irradiated at young ages, face increased risks of solid cancers, supporting strategies to promote lifelong surveillance among these patients. PMID:18971419

  11. Myocardial infarction activates CCR2+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Partha; Sager, Hendrik B.; Stengel, Kristy R.; Naxerova, Kamila; Courties, Gabriel; Saez, Borja; Silberstein, Lev; Heidt, Timo; Sebas, Matthew; Sun, Yuan; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Feruglio, Paolo Fumene; King, Kevin; Baker, Joshua N.; van der Laan, Anja M.; Borodovsky, Anna; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Hulsmans, Maarten; Hoyer, Friedrich; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Vinegoni, Claudio; Brown, Dennis; Di Carli, Marcelo; Libby, Peter; Hiebert, Scott; Scadden, David; Swirski, Filip K.; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Following myocardial infarction (MI), myeloid cells derived from the hematopoietic system drive a sharp increase in systemic leukocyte levels that correlate closely with mortality. The origin of these myeloid cells, and the response of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to MI, however, is unclear. Here, we identify a CCR2+CD150+CD48− LSK hematopoietic subset as the most upstream contributor to emergency myelopoiesis after ischemic organ injury. CCR2+ HSPC have fourfold higher proliferation rates than CCR2−CD150+CD48− LSK cells, display a myeloid differentiation bias, and dominate the migratory HSPC population. We further demonstrate the myeloid translocation gene 16 (Mtg16) regulates CCR2+ HSPC emergence. Mtg16−/− mice have decreased levels of systemic monocytes and infarct-associated macrophages and display compromised tissue healing and post-MI heart failure. Together, these data provide insights into regulation of emergency hematopoiesis after ischemic injury, and identify potential therapeutic targets to modulate leukocyte output after MI. PMID:25957903

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Atalla, Angelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Siqueira, Denise Bittencourt; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is typically an indolent disease in early stages. However, approximately 30% of patients have advanced staged disease at presentation and 20% will develop it at some time. These patients have a poorer prognosis with a median survival of 2-4 years. The only curative option for mycosis fungoides may be hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We report the case of a patient with mycosis fungoides in an advanced stage (IIB), refractory to treatment options. She underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The patient remains in complete remission nineteen months after allo-HSCT. Allogeneic transplantation can alter the natural history of mycosis fungoides and should be considered in patients who have refractory disease or short-lived responses with standard therapies. PMID:24346924

  13. Murine Hematopoietic Stem cells and Progenitors Express Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Kuzhali; Iyer, Sivaraman; He, L-K.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Shankar, Ravi; Jones, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    Association between the nervous and immune system is well documented. Immune cells originate within the bone marrow that is innervated. Thermal injury induces adrenergic stimulation, augments monocytopoiesis and alters the β-adrenergic receptor (AR) profile of bone marrow monocyte committed progenitors. This provides an impetus to study AR expression in hematopoietic progenitors along myeloid lineage. Using FACS analysis and confocal microscopy, we report the expression of α1-, α2- and β2- AR in enriched populations of ER-MP20+ and ER-MP12+ myeloid progenitors, CD117+ and CD34+ multi-potential progenitors and more importantly pluripotent stem cells suggesting a plausible role for catecholamine in hematopoietic development. PMID:17428548

  14. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  15. Stimulation of protein phosphatase activity by insulin and growth factors in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; McNall, S.J.; Krebs, E.G.; Fischer, E.H. )

    1988-09-01

    Incubation of Swiss mouse 3T3-D1 cells with physiological concentrations of insulin resulted in a rapid and transient activation of protein phosphatase activity as measure by using ({sup 32}P)phosphorylase {alpha} as substrate. Activation reached a maximum level (140% of control value) within 5 min of addition and returned to control levels within 20 min. The effect of insulin was dose-dependent with half-maximal activation occurring at {approx}5 nM insulin. This activity could be completely inhibited by addition of the heat-stable protein inhibitor 2, which suggests the presence of an activated type-1 phosphatase. Similar effects on phosphatase activity were seen when epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor were tested. These results suggest that some of the intracellular effects caused by insulin and growth factors are mediated through the activation of a protein phosphatase.

  16. Synthesis and secretion of platelet-derived growth factor by human breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Bronzert, D.A.; Pantazis, P.; Antoniades, H.N.; Kasid, A.; Davidson, N.; Dickson, R.B.; Lippman, M.E.

    1987-08-01

    The authors report that human breast cancer cells secrete a growth factor that is biologically and immunologically similar to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Serum-free medium conditioned by estrogen-independent MDA-MB-231 or estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells contains a mitogenic or competence activity that is capable of inducing incorporation of (/sup 3/H) thymidine into quiescent Swiss 3T3 cells in the presence of platelet-poor plasma. Like authentic PDGF, the PDGF-like activity produced by breast cancer cells is stable after acid and heat treatment (95/sup 0/C) and inhibited by reducing agents. The mitogenic activity comigrates with a material of approx. =30 kDa on NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with PDGF antiserum of proteins from metabolically labeled cell lysates and conditioned medium followed by analysis on nonreducing NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gels identified proteins of 30 and 34 kDa. Upon reduction, the 30- and 34-kDa bands were converted to 15- and 16-kDa bands suggesting that the immunoprecipitated proteins were made up of two disulfide-linked polypeptides similar to PDGF. Hybridization studies with cDNA probes for the A chain PDGF and the B chain of PDGF/SIS identified transcripts for both PDGF chains in the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The data summarized above provide conclusive evidence for the synthesis and hormonally regulated secretion of a PDGF-like mitogen by breast carcinoma cells. Production of a PDGF-like growth factor by breast cancer cell lines may be important in mediating paracrine stimulation of tumor growth.

  17. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 facilitates the growth and chemo-resistance of leukemia cells in the bone marrow by modulating osteoblast functions

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Takayuki; Saito, Shigeki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells and osteoblasts play major roles in forming and modulating the bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic microenvironment. We have reported that FGF2 compromises stromal cell support of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we examined the effects of FGF2 on the leukemia microenvironment. In vitro, FGF2 significantly decreased the number of stromal-dependent and stromal-independent G0-leukemia cells in the stromal layers. Accordingly, CML cells placed on FGF2-treated stromal layers were more sensitive to imatinib. Conversely, FGF2 increased the proliferation of osteoblasts via FGFR1 IIIc, but its effects on osteoblast support of leukemia cell growth were limited. We next treated a human leukemia mouse model with Ara-C with/without systemic FGF2 administration. BM sections from FGF2-treated mice had thickened bone trabeculae and increased numbers of leukemia cells compared to controls. Leukemia cell density was increased, especially in the endosteal region in FGF2/Ara-C -treated mice compared to mice treated with Ara-C only. Interestingly, FGF2 did not promote leukemia cell survival in Ara-C treated spleen. Microarray analysis showed that FGF2 did not alter expression of many genes linked to hematopoiesis in osteoblasts, but modulated regulatory networks involved in angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation. These observations suggest that FGF2 promotes leukemia cell growth in the BM by modulating osteoblast functions. PMID:27481339

  18. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 facilitates the growth and chemo-resistance of leukemia cells in the bone marrow by modulating osteoblast functions.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Keiki; Miyata, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Takayuki; Saito, Shigeki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Nishiwaki, Satoshi; Mizuno, Hiroki; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Kato, Hidefumi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Takami, Akiyoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Stromal cells and osteoblasts play major roles in forming and modulating the bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic microenvironment. We have reported that FGF2 compromises stromal cell support of normal hematopoiesis. Here, we examined the effects of FGF2 on the leukemia microenvironment. In vitro, FGF2 significantly decreased the number of stromal-dependent and stromal-independent G0-leukemia cells in the stromal layers. Accordingly, CML cells placed on FGF2-treated stromal layers were more sensitive to imatinib. Conversely, FGF2 increased the proliferation of osteoblasts via FGFR1 IIIc, but its effects on osteoblast support of leukemia cell growth were limited. We next treated a human leukemia mouse model with Ara-C with/without systemic FGF2 administration. BM sections from FGF2-treated mice had thickened bone trabeculae and increased numbers of leukemia cells compared to controls. Leukemia cell density was increased, especially in the endosteal region in FGF2/Ara-C -treated mice compared to mice treated with Ara-C only. Interestingly, FGF2 did not promote leukemia cell survival in Ara-C treated spleen. Microarray analysis showed that FGF2 did not alter expression of many genes linked to hematopoiesis in osteoblasts, but modulated regulatory networks involved in angiogenesis and osteoblastic differentiation. These observations suggest that FGF2 promotes leukemia cell growth in the BM by modulating osteoblast functions. PMID:27481339

  19. Identification and partial characterization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor of baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neufeld, G.; Gospodarowicz, D.

    1985-11-05

    The binding of biologically active, SVI-labeled basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to baby hamster kidney-derived cell line cells (BHK-21) was studied at 4 degrees C. Unlabeled FGF displaced cell surface bound SVI-FGF, but platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, insulin, or transferrin did not. Binding was saturable both as a function of time and as a function of increasing SVI-FGF concentrations. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of about 1.2 X 10(5) binding sites/cell with an apparent KD of 270 pM. The number of the binding sites was down-regulated following preincubation of the cells with FGF. The density of binding sites/cell also decreased as an inverse function of cell density. When SVI-FGF binding was studied in a BHK-21 cell membrane preparation, it was found that the membranal binding site displayed a lower KD of 21 pM. SVI-FGF was covalently cross-linked to its cell surface receptor on intact BHK-21 cells using the homobifunctional agent disuccinimidyl suberate. Two macromolecular species with an apparent molecular weight of 145,000 and SV,000, respectively, were labeled under both reducing and nonreducing conditions. Unlabeled FGF competed with SVI-FGF for binding to both macromolecular species. The labeling of the macromolecules was also inhibited by heparin. No labeling was observed in the absence of the cross-linkers or when heat-inactivated SVI-FGF was used instead of radiolabeled, biologically active FGF.

  20. Clinical guide to fertility preservation in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S; Savani, B N; Chow, E J; Gilleece, M H; Halter, J; Jacobsohn, D A; Pidala, J; Quinn, G P; Cahn, J-Y; Jakubowski, A A; Kamani, N R; Lazarus, H M; Rizzo, J D; Schouten, H C; Socie, G; Stratton, P; Sorror, M L; Warwick, A B; Wingard, J R; Loren, A W; Majhail, N S

    2014-04-01

    With broadening indications, more options for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and improvement in survival, the number of long-term HCT survivors is expected to increase steadily. Infertility is a frequent problem that long-term HCT survivors and their partners face and it can negatively impact on the quality of life. The most optimal time to address fertility issues is before the onset of therapy for the underlying disease; however, fertility preservation should also be addressed before HCT in all children and patients of reproductive age, with referral to a reproductive specialist for patients interested in fertility preservation. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue banking are acceptable methods for fertility preservation in adult women/pubertal females. Sperm banking is the preferred method for adult men/pubertal males. Frequent barriers to fertility preservation in HCT recipients may include the perception of lack of time to preserve fertility given an urgency to move ahead with transplant, lack of patient-physician discussion because of several factors (for example, time constraints, lack of knowledge), inadequate access to reproductive specialists, and costs and lack of insurance coverage for fertility preservation. There is a need to raise awareness in the medical community about fertility preservation in HCT recipients. PMID:24419521

  1. Clinical guide to fertility preservation in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S; Savani, BN; Chow, EJ; Gilleece, MH; Halter, J; Jacobsohn, DA; Pidala, J; Quinn, GP; Cahn, J-Y; Jakubowski, AA; Kamani, NR; Lazarus, HM; Rizzo, JD; Schouten, HC; Socie, G; Stratton, P; Sorror, ML; Warwick, AB; Wingard, JR; Loren, AW; Majhail, NS

    2014-01-01

    With broadening indications, more options for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) and improvement in survival, the number of long-term HCT survivors is expected to increase steadily. Infertility is a frequent problem that long-term HCT survivors and their partners face and it can negatively impact on the quality of life. The most optimal time to address fertility issues is before the onset of therapy for the underlying disease; however, fertility preservation should also be addressed before HCT in all children and patients of reproductive age, with referral to a reproductive specialist for patients interested in fertility preservation. In vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo cryopreservation, oocyte cryopreservation and ovarian tissue banking are acceptable methods for fertility preservation in adult women/pubertal females. Sperm banking is the preferred method for adult men/pubertal males. Frequent barriers to fertility preservation in HCT recipients may include the perception of lack of time to preserve fertility given an urgency to move ahead with transplant, lack of patient–physician discussion because of several factors (for example, time constraints, lack of knowledge), inadequate access to reproductive specialists, and costs and lack of insurance coverage for fertility preservation. There is a need to raise awareness in the medical community about fertility preservation in HCT recipients. PMID:24419521

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in canine oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    MARTANO, MANUELA; RESTUCCI, BRUNELLA; CECCARELLI, DORA MARIA; LO MUZIO, LORENZO; MAIOLINO, PAOLA

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is crucial for the growth and metastasis of malignant tumours, and various proangiogenic factors promote this process. One of these factors is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which appears to play a key role in tumour angiogenesis. The aim of the present study was to assess whether VEGF expression is associated with angiogenesis, disease progression and neoplastic proliferation in canine oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissue. VEGF immunoreactivity was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 30 specimens, including normal oral mucosa and OSCC tissues graded as well, moderately or poorly differentiated. VEGF expression was correlated with tumour cell proliferation, as assessed using the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) marker and microvessel density (data already published). The present results revealed that VEGF and PCNA expression increased significantly between normal oral tissue and neoplastic tissue, and between well and moderately/poorly differentiated tumours. In addition, VEGF expression was strongly correlated with PCNA expression and microvessel density. It was concluded that VEGF may promote angiogenesis through a paracrine pathway, stimulating endothelial cell proliferation and, similarly, may induce tumour cell proliferation through an autocrine pathway. The present results suggest that the evaluation of VEGF may be a useful additional criterion for estimating malignancy and growth potential in canine OSCCs. PMID:26870224

  3. Increased growth factor expression and cell proliferation after contusive spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zai, Laila J; Yoo, Soonmoon; Wrathall, Jean R

    2005-08-01

    The damage caused by traumatic central nervous system (CNS) injury can be divided into two phases: primary and secondary. The initial injury destroys many of the local neurons and glia and triggers secondary mechanisms that result in further cell loss. Approximately 50% of the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in the spared white matter of the epicenter die by 24 h after spinal cord injury (SCI), but their densities return to normal levels by 6 weeks. This repopulation is largely due to the proliferation of local progenitors that divide in response of CNS injury. Previous studies indicate that the secondary events that cause cell death after SCI also increase the local levels of several growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of these endogenous progenitors. We compared the spatial pattern of the post-injury up-regulation of the pro-mitotic growth factors with that of 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation to determine if each could play a role in proliferation. Three days after a standard contusive SCI or laminectomy, animals received intraperitoneal BrdU injections to label dividing cells and were perfused 2 h after the last injection. Immunohistochemistry for BrdU and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) and in situ hybridization for ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and glial growth factor (GGF2) mRNA were used to compare the number of dividing cells with growth factor levels in sections 2 and 4 mm from the epicenter. All three growth factors are significantly up-regulated 3 days after SCI, when cell proliferation is maximal. The increase in GGF2 and FGF2 levels is highest in sections 2 mm rostral to the epicenter, mimicking BrdU incorporation. Addition of rhGGF2 to cultured cells isolated from the spinal cord 3 days after SCI increased the number of NG2+ glial progenitors. These data suggest that FGF2 and GGF2 may contribute to the spontaneous recovery observed after SCI by stimulating the proliferation of local progenitors that help repopulate the

  4. Oak ellagitannins suppress the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, Diana; Glabasnia, Arne; Fritz, Jessica; Esselen, Melanie; Pahlke, Gudrun; Hofmann, Thomas; Marko, Doris

    2008-05-14

    The ellagitannins castalagin and vescalagin, and the C-glycosides grandinin and roburin E as well as ellagic acid were found to potently inhibit the growth of human colon carcinoma cells (HT29) in vitro. In a cell-free system these compounds were identified as potent inhibitors of the protein tyrosine kinase activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with IC 50 values in the low nanomolar range. To address the question of whether the interference with the activity of the isolated EGFR also plays a role within intact cells, effects on the phosphorylation status of the EGFR, as a measure for its activity, were determined in HT29 cells. As exemplified for castalagin and grandinin, both the nonglycosylated and the glycosylated ellagitannins effectively suppressed EGFR phosphorylation, but only at concentrations > or =10 microM, thus, in a concentration range where growth inhibition was observed. These results indicate that the suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling might contribute to the growth inhibitory effects of these compounds present in oak-matured wines and spirits such as whiskey. In contrast, despite substantial growth inhibitory properties, ellagic acid did not significantly affect EGFR phosphorylation in HT29 cells up to 100 microM. PMID:18419129

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Paul J; Fasth, Anders L; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K; Kapoor, Neena; O'Brien, Tracey A; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A; Eapen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  7. Combination of basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor enhances proliferation and neuronal/glial differential of postnatal human enteric neurosphere cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei-Kang; Yu, Hui; Wu, A-Li; Gao, Ya; Zheng, Bai-Jun; Li, Peng; Yang, Wei-Li; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Huai-Jie; Ge, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Human enteric neural stem cells (hENSCs) proliferate and differentiate into neurons and glial cells in response to a complex network of neurotrophic factors to form the enteric nervous system. The primary aim of this study was to determine the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) on in-vitro expansion and differentiation of postnatal hENSCs-containing enteric neurosphere cells. Enteric neurosphere cells were isolated from rectal polyp specimens of 75 children (age, 1-13 years) and conditioned with bFGF, EGF, bFGF+EGF, or plain culture media. Proliferation of enteric neurosphere cells was examined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium colorimetric assay over 7 days of culture. Fetal bovine serum (10%) was added to induce the differentiation of parental enteric neurosphere cells, and differentiated offspring cells were immunophenotyped against p75 neutrophin receptor (neural stem cells), peripherin (neuronal cells), and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cells). Combining bFGF and EGF significantly improved the proliferation of enteric neurosphere cells compared with bFGF or EGF alone (both P<0.01) throughout 7 days of culture. The addition of bFGF drove a significantly greater proportion of enteric neurosphere cells to differentiate into neuronal cells than that of EGF (P<0.01), whereas addition of EGF resulted in significantly more glial differentiation compared with addition of bFGF (P<0.01). Combining bFGF and EGF drove enteric neurosphere cells to differentiate into neuronal cells in a proportion similar to glial cells. Our results showed that the combination of bFGF and EGF significantly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of postnatal hENSCs-containing enteric neurosphere cells in vitro. PMID:27306591

  8. Enhanced Generation of Myeloid Lineages in Hematopoietic Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells by Silencing Transcriptional Repressor Twist-2

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A.; Huang, Xue F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1+ and F4/80+ cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor. PMID:20025523

  9. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1988-06-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGM-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet miniosmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated in this paper.

  10. Recovery from severe hematopoietic suppression using recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Monroy, R.L.; Skelly, R.R.; Taylor, P.; Dubois, A.; Donahue, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of recombinant human granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) to enhance recovery of a radiation-suppressed hematopoietic system was evaluated in a nonuniform radiation-exposure model using the rhesus monkey. Recombinant human GM-CSF treatment for 7 days after a lethal, nonuniform radiation exposure of 800 cGy was sufficient to enhance hematopoietic reconstitution, leading to an earlier recovery. Monkeys were treated with 72,000 U/kg/day of rhGm-CSF delivered continuously through an Alzet mini-osmotic pump implanted subcutaneously on day 3. Treated monkeys demonstrated effective granulocyte and platelet levels in the peripheral blood, 4 and 7 days earlier, respectively, than control monkeys. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming unit (CFU-GM) activity in the bone marrow was monitored to evaluate the effect of rhGM-CSF on marrow recovery. Treatment with rhGM-CSF led to an early recovery of CFU-GM activity suggesting that rhGM-CSF acted on an earlier stem cell population to generate CFU-GM. Thus, the effect of rhGM-CSF on hematopoietic regeneration, granulocyte recovery, and platelet recovery are evaluated.

  11. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bin; Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Wu, Bin; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. {yields} mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. {yields} Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). {yields} Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  12. Recurrent growth factor starvation promotes drug resistance in human leukaemic cells

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, K; Okuma, E; Yuo, A

    2002-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance can be induced by various environmental stresses including an exposure to chemical drugs and X-ray irradiation. In addition, hypo-nutritive conditions are known to promote multi-drug resistance in solid tumours. To understand the importance of nutritive conditions in the development of drug resistance in non-solid tumours and to know whether a transient malnutrition could induce a permanent reduction in drug sensitivity, leukaemic cells were transiently cultured under growth factor-starved conditions. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-dependent human leukaemic MO7e cells were cultured in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for 2 weeks, during which the majority of the cells died, and the minor viable cells were expanded in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor for following 1 week. This procedure was repeated three times, and the surviving cells were cloned by limiting dilution. These clones underwent G1 arrest in the absence of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor, while parental cells underwent apoptosis. Interestingly, activities of the downstream targets of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor were regulated in a granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor-independent manner, indicating that the ligand-independent activation of granulocyte-macrophage colon-stimulating factor receptor had not taken place. Moreover, the 4–7-fold increases in IC50 for etoposide and the 2–6-fold increase in IC90 for doxorubicin was observed. Furthermore, Bcl-2 protein expression was significantly up-regulated in the clones while no significant changes in Bax, Bcl-xL, P-glycoprotein and Hsp70 protein expression and no consistent changes in p53 expression were detected. We propose that recurrent growth factor starvation, which may occur in vivo when stromal function is damaged after intensive chemotherapy or bone marrow occupation by malignant cells, causes

  13. Hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index is predictive of survival after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Saad, Ayman; Mahindra, Anuj; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhong, Xiaobo; Costa, Luciano J; Dispenzieri, Angela; Drobyski, William R; Freytes, Cesar O; Gale, Robert Peter; Gasparetto, Cristina J; Holmberg, Leona A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Krishnan, Amrita Y; Kyle, Robert A; Marks, David; Nishihori, Taiga; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Lonial, Sagar; Savani, Bipin N; Saber, Wael; Sharma, Manish; Sorror, Mohamed L; Wirk, Baldeep M; Hari, Parameswaran N

    2014-03-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT) improves survival in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) but is associated with morbidity and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Hematopoietic cell transplant comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was shown to predict risk of NRM and survival after allogeneic transplantation. We tested the utility of HCT-CI as a predictor of NRM and survival in patients with MM undergoing AHCT. We analyzed outcomes of 1156 patients of AHCT after high-dose melphalan reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research. Individual comorbidities were prospectively collected at the time of AHCT. The impact of HCT-CI and other potential prognostic factors, including Karnofsky performance score (KPS), on NRM and survival were studied in multivariate Cox regression models. HCT-CI score was 0, 1, 2, 3, and >3 in 42%, 18%, 13%, 13%, and 14% of the study cohort, respectively. Subjects were stratified into 3 risk groups: HCT-CI score of 0 (42%) versus HCT-CI score of 1 to 2 (32%) versus HCT-CI score > 2 (26%). Higher HCT-CI was associated with lower KPS < 90 (33% of subjects score of 0 versus 50% in HCT-CI score > 2). HCT-CI score > 2 was associated with melphalan dose reduction (22% versus 10% in score 0 cohort). One-year NRM was low at 2% (95% confidence interval, 1% to 4%) and did not correlate with HCT-CI score (P = .9). On multivariate analysis, overall survival was inferior in groups with HCT-CI score of 1 to 2 (relative risk, 1.37, [95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.87], P = .04) and HCT-CI score > 2 (relative risk, 1.5 [95% confidence interval, 1.09 to 2.08], P = .01). Overall survival was also inferior with KPS < 90 (P < .001), IgA subtype (P ≤ .001), those receiving >1 pretransplant induction regimen (P = .007), and those with resistant disease at the time of AHCT (P < .001). AHCT for MM is associated with low NRM, and death is predominantly related to disease progression. Although a higher HCT-CI score did not

  14. Spleens of myelofibrosis patients contain malignant hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Prakash, Sonam; Lu, Min; Tripodi, Joseph; Ye, Fei; Najfeld, Vesna; Li, Yan; Schwartz, Myron; Weinberg, Rona; Roda, Paul; Orazi, Attilio; Hoffman, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cell behavior is thought to be largely determined by intrinsic properties and by regulatory signals provided by the microenvironment. Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by hematopoiesis occurring not only in the marrow but also in extramedullary sites such as the spleen. In order to study the effects of these different microenvironments on primitive malignant hematopoietic cells, we phenotypically and functionally characterized splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34+ cells from patients with MF. MF spleens contained greater numbers of malignant primitive HPCs than PB. Transplantation of PB MF CD34+ cells into immunodeficient (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull) mice resulted in a limited degree of donor cell chimerism and a differentiation program skewed toward myeloid lineages. By contrast, transplanted splenic MF CD34+ cells achieved a higher level of chimerism and generated both myeloid and lymphoid cells that contained molecular or cytogenetic abnormalities indicating their malignant nature. Only splenic MF CD34+ cells were able to sustain hematopoiesis for prolonged periods (9 months) and were able to engraft secondary recipients. These data document the existence of MF stem cells (MF-SCs) that reside in the spleens of MF patients and demonstrate that these MF-SCs retain a differentiation program identical to that of normal hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:23023702

  15. Mutual Interference between Cytomegalovirus and Reconstitution of Protective Immunity after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reddehase, Matthias J

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a therapy option for aggressive forms of hematopoietic malignancies that are resistant to standard antitumoral therapies. Hematoablative treatment preceding HCT, however, opens a "window of opportunity" for latent Cytomegalovirus (CMV) by releasing it from immune control with the consequence of reactivation of productive viral gene expression and recurrence of infectious virus. A "window of opportunity" for the virus represents a "window of risk" for the patient. In the interim between HCT and reconstitution of antiviral immunity, primarily mediated by CD8(+) T cells, initially low amounts of reactivated virus can expand exponentially, disseminate to essentially all organs, and cause multiple organ CMV disease, with interstitial pneumonia (CMV-IP) representing the most severe clinical manifestation. Here, I will review predictions originally made in the mouse model of experimental HCT and murine CMV infection, some of which have already paved the way to translational preclinical research and promising clinical trials of a preemptive cytoimmunotherapy of human CMV disease. Specifically, the mouse model has been pivotal in providing "proof of concept" for preventing CMV disease after HCT by adoptive transfer of preselected, virus epitope-specific effector and memory CD8(+) T cells bridging the critical interim. However, CMV is not a "passive antigen" but is a pathogen that actively interferes with the reconstitution of protective immunity by infecting bone marrow (BM) stromal cells that otherwise form niches for hematopoiesis by providing the structural microenvironment and by producing hematopoietically active cytokines, the hemopoietins. Depending on the precise conditions of HCT, reduced homing of transplanted hematopoietic stem- and progenitor cells to infected BM stroma and impaired colony growth and lineage differentiation can lead to "graft failure." In consequence, uncontrolled virus spread causes morbidity and

  16. Autocrine and exogenous transforming growth factor beta control cell cycle inhibition through pathways with different sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sergina, Natalia; Ko, Tien C; Gong, Jiangeng; Brattain, Michael G

    2004-09-17

    Human colon carcinoma cells HCT116 that lack transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) type II receptor (RII) demonstrated restoration of autocrine TGF-beta activity upon reexpression of RII without restoring inhibitory responses to exogenous TGF-beta treatment. RII transfectants (designated RII Cl 37) had a longer lag phase relative to NEO-transfected control cells (designated NEO pool) before entering exponential growth in tissue culture. The prolonged growth arrest of RII Cl 37 cells was associated with markedly reduced cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 activity. Our results demonstrate that p21 induction by autocrine TGF-beta is responsible for reduced CDK2 activity, which at least partially contributes to prolonged growth arrest and reduced cell proliferation in RII Cl 37 cells. In contrast to RII transfectants, HCT116 cells transfected with chromosome 3 (designated HCT116Ch3), which bears the RII gene, restored the response to exogenous TGF-beta as well as autocrine TGF-beta activity. Autocrine TGF-beta activity in HCT116Ch3 cells induced p21 expression as seen in RII Cl 37 cells; however, in addition to autocrine activity, HCT116Ch3 cells responded to exogenous TGF-beta as decreased CDK4 expression and reduced pRb phosphorylation mediated a TGF-beta inhibitory response in these cells. These results indicate that autocrine TGF-beta regulates the cell cycle through a pathway different from exogenous TGF-beta in the sense that p21 is a more sensitive effector of the TGF-beta signaling pathway, which can be induced and saturated by autocrine TGF-beta, whereas CDK4 inhibition is a less sensitive effector, which can only be activated by high levels of exogenous TGF-beta PMID:15271980

  17. Adenovirus-mediated expression of growth and differentiation factor-5 promotes chondrogenesis of adipose stem cells

    PubMed Central

    FENG, GANG; WAN, YUQING; BALIAN, GARY; LAURENCIN, CATO T.; LI, XUDONG

    2010-01-01

    The repair of articular cartilage injuries is impeded by the avascular and non-innervated nature of cartilage. Transplantation of autologous chondrocytes has a limited ability to augment the repair process due to the highly differentiated state of chondrocytes and the risks of donor-site morbidity. Mesenchymal stem cells can undergo chondrogenesis in the presence of growth factors for cartilage defect repair. Growth and differentiation factor-5 (GDF5) plays an important role in chondrogenesis. In this study, we examined the effects of GDF5 on chondrogenesis of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and evaluate the chondrogenic potentials of GDF5 genetically engineered ADSCs using an in vitro pellet culture model. Rat ADSCs were grown as pellet cultures and treated with chondrogenic media (CM). Induction of GDF5 by an adenovirus (Ad-GDF5) was compared with exogenous supplementation of GDF5 (100 ng/ml) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1; 10 ng/ml). The ADSCs underwent chondrogenic differentiation in response to GDF5 exposure as demonstrated by production of proteoglycan, and up-regulation of collagen II and aggrecan at the protein and mRNA level. The chondrogenic potential of a one-time infection with Ad-GDF5 was weaker than exogenous GDF5, but equal to that of TGF-β1. Stimulation with growth factors or CM alone induced transient expression of the mRNA for collagen X, indicating a need for optimization of the CM. Our findings indicate that GDF5 is a potent inducer of chondrogenesis in ADSCs, and that ADSCs genetically engineered to express prochondrogenic growth factors, such as GDF5, may be a promising therapeutic cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:18569021

  18. Release of angiogenic growth factors from cells encapsulated in alginate beads with bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Keshaw, Hussila; Forbes, Alastair; Day, Richard M

    2005-07-01

    Attempts to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis using gene therapy or delivery of recombinant growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), have failed to demonstrate unequivocal efficacy in human trials. Bioactive glass stimulates fibroblasts to secrete significantly increased amounts of angiogenic growth factors and therefore has a number of potential applications in therapeutic angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess whether it is possible to encapsulate specific quantities of bioactive glass and fibroblasts into alginate beads, which will secrete growth factors capable of stimulating angiogenesis. Human fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) were encapsulated in alginate beads with specific quantities of 45S5 bioactive glass and incubated in culture medium (0-17 days). The conditioned medium was collected and assayed for VEGF or used to assess its ability to stimulate angiogenesis by measuring the proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. At 17 days the beads were lysed and the amount of VEGF retained by the beads measured. Fibroblasts encapsulated in alginate beads containing 0.01% and 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles secreted increased quantities of VEGF compared with cells encapsulated with 0% or 1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles. Lysed alginate beads containing 0.01% and 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass contained significantly more VEGF (p<0.01) compared with beads containing no glass particles. Endothelial cell proliferation was significantly increased (p<0.01) by conditioned medium collected from alginate beads containing 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles. The results of this study demonstrate that bioactive glass and fibroblasts can be successfully incorporated into alginate beads for use in delivering angiogenic growth factors. With further optimization, this technique offers a novel delivery device for stimulating therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:15664644

  19. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  20. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  1. [Recent studies on PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Chi; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-02-01

    PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway plays an essential role in the growth, proliferation and survival of various type of cells and also hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway leads to exhaustion of HSC, while the inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway results in blocking of B cell differentiation. This article reviews the latest advances on the role of key components involved in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, including PI3K, AKT, mTOR, FoxO and GSK-3 in HSC. PMID:23484729

  2. Thyrotropin inhibits while insulin, epidermal growth factor and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate stimulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein secretion from sheep thyroid cells.

    PubMed

    Eggo, M C; Bachrach, L K; Brown, A L; Burrow, G N

    1991-01-01

    Six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) have been identified in the conditioned medium from sheep thyroid cells cultured under serum-free conditions. IGFBPs of 32, 28, 23 and 19 kDa were secreted by cells cultured for 14 days in serum-free and hormone-free medium. The constitutive secretion of IGFBP was inhibited by thyrotropin (TSH, 0.3 mU per mL). The effect was most marked on the secretion of the 28 kDa BP. High insulin concentrations stimulated the secretion of this IGFBP. The stimulatory effects of insulin were inhibited by TSH. Growth hormone treatment decreased the secretion of the 28 kDa protein. Tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both of which stimulate thyroid cell growth but inhibit differentiated function, markedly stimulated IGFBP secretion and induced the appearance of a 46 and a 150 kDa IGFBP. The effects of EGF and TPA were not identical. A rat IGFBP-2 cDNA reacted with sheep thyroid RNA of approximate size 1.6 kb. TPA treatment increased IGFBP-2 mRNA. Other hormones used to enhance differentiation and growth in thyroid cells in culture i.e. transferrin, somatostatin, cortisol and glycyl-histidyl-lysine acetate had no marked effects on IGFBP secretion nor on TSH-dependent, insulin-mediated iodide uptake and organification and cell growth. We show a correlation between secretion of high molecular weight IGFBP with enhanced growth but decreased function. Conversely, we find a correlation between decreased secretion of the 28 kDa BP and increased growth and function. PMID:1722684

  3. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    PubMed

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  4. Runx1 deficiency decreases ribosome biogenesis and confers stress resistance to hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiongwei; Gao, Long; Teng, Li; Ge, Jingping; Oo, Zaw Min; Kumar, Ashish R.; Gilliland, D. Gary; Mason, Philip J.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The transcription factor RUNX1 is frequently mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia. RUNX1 mutations can be early events, creating pre-leukemic stem cells that expand in the bone marrow. Here we show, counter-intuitively, that Runx1 deficient hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have a slow growth, low biosynthetic, small cell phenotype and markedly reduced ribosome biogenesis (Ribi). The reduced Ribi involved decreased levels of rRNA and many mRNAs encoding ribosome proteins. Runx1 appears to directly regulate Ribi; Runx1 is enriched on the promoters of genes encoding ribosome proteins, and binds the ribosomal DNA repeats. Runx1 deficient HSPCs have lower p53 levels, reduced apoptosis, an attenuated unfolded protein response, and accordingly are resistant to genotoxic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The low biosynthetic activity and corresponding stress resistance provides a selective advantage to Runx1 deficient HSPCs, allowing them to expand in the bone marrow and outcompete normal HSPCs. PMID:26165925

  5. Surviving change: the metabolic journey of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Latika; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a rare population of somatic stem cells that maintain blood production and are uniquely wired to adapt to diverse cellular fates during the lifetime of an organism. Recent studies have highlighted a central role for metabolic plasticity in facilitating cell fate transitions and in preserving HSC functionality and survival. This review summarizes our current understanding of the metabolic programs associated with HSC quiescence, self-renewal, and lineage commitment, and highlights the mechanistic underpinnings of these changing bioenergetics programs. It also discusses the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic drivers in the context of blood malignancies. PMID:24768033

  6. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene. PMID:24398603

  7. Microliter-bioreactor array with buoyancy-driven stirring for human hematopoietic stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Luni, Camilla; Feldman, Hope C.; Pozzobon, Michela; De Coppi, Paolo; Meinhart, Carl D.; Elvassore, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the development of an array of bioreactors where finely controlled stirring is provided at the microliter scale (100–300 μl). The microliter-bioreactor array is useful for performing protocol optimization in up to 96 parallel experiments of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) cultures. Exploring a wide range of experimental conditions at the microliter scale minimizes cost and labor. Once the cell culture protocol is optimized, it can be applied to large-scale bioreactors for stem cell production at the clinical level. The controlled stirring inside the wells of a standard 96-well plate is provided by buoyancy-driven thermoconvection. The temperature and velocity fields within the culture volume are determined with numerical simulations. The numerical results are verified with experimental velocity measurements using microparticle image velocimetry (μPIV) and are used to define feasible experimental conditions for stem cell cultures. To test the bioreactor array’s functionality, human umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells were cultured for 7 days at five different stirring conditions (0.24–0.58 μm∕s) in six repeated experiments. Cells were characterized in terms of proliferation, and flow cytometry measurements of viability and CD34 expression. The microliter-bioreactor array demonstrates its ability to support HSC cultures under stirred conditions without adversely affecting the cell behavior. Because of the highly controlled operative conditions, it can be used to explore culture conditions where the mass transport of endogenous and exogenous growth factors is selectively enhanced, and cell suspension provided. While the bioreactor array was developed for culturing HSCs, its application can be extended to other cell types. PMID:20824067

  8. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Lorioli, Laura; Cesani, Martina; Fumagalli, Francesca; Plati, Tiziana; Baldoli, Cristina; Martino, Sabata; Calabria, Andrea; Canale, Sabrina; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Vallanti, Giuliana; Biasco, Luca; Leo, Simone; Kabbara, Nabil; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Rizzo, William B; Mehta, Nalini A L; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Boelens, Jaap J; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Assanelli, Andrea; Neduva, Victor; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gardner, Jason; von Kalle, Christof; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Rovelli, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Sessa, Maria; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency. Patients with MLD exhibit progressive motor and cognitive impairment and die within a few years of symptom onset. We used a lentiviral vector to transfer a functional ARSA gene into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from three presymptomatic patients who showed genetic, biochemical, and neurophysiological evidence of late infantile MLD. After reinfusion of the gene-corrected HSCs, the patients showed extensive and stable ARSA gene replacement, which led to high enzyme expression throughout hematopoietic lineages and in cerebrospinal fluid. Analyses of vector integrations revealed no evidence of aberrant clonal behavior. The disease did not manifest or progress in the three patients 7 to 21 months beyond the predicted age of symptom onset. These findings indicate that extensive genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis can be achieved with lentiviral vectors and that this approach may offer therapeutic benefit for MLD patients. PMID:23845948

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical use and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Ramírez, Pablo; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the accepted therapy of choice for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases in children and adults. Initially developed as rescue therapy for a patient with cancer after high doses of chemotherapy and radiation as well as the correction of severe deficiencies in the hematopoietic system, it has evolved into an adoptive immune therapy for malignancies and autoimmune disorders. The procedure has helped to obtain key information about the bone marrow environment, the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and histocompatibility. The development of this new discipline has allowed numerous groups working around the world to cure patients of diseases previously considered lethal. Together with the ever growing list of volunteer donors and umbilical cord blood banks, this has resulted in life saving therapy for thousands of patients yearly. We present an overview of the procedure from its cradle to the most novel applications, as well as the results of the HSC transplant program developed at our institution since 1989. PMID:23283440

  10. The transcriptional landscape of hematopoietic stem cell ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon; Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Lacadie, Scott A.; Huang, Hsuan-Ting; Curran, Matthew; Loewer, Sabine; Naveiras, Olaia; Kathrein, Katie L.; Konantz, Martina; Langdon, Erin M.; Lengerke, Claudia; Zon, Leonard I.; Collins, James J.; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny has revealed mechanisms of blood differentiation and leukemogenesis, but a similar analysis of HSC development is lacking. Here, we acquired the transcriptomes of developing HSC purified from >2500 murine embryos and adult mice. We found that embryonic hematopoietic elements clustered into three distinct transcriptional states characteristic of the definitive yolk sac, HSCs undergoing specification, and definitive HSCs. We applied a network biology-based analysis to reconstruct the gene regulatory networks of sequential stages of HSC development and functionally validated candidate transcriptional regulators of HSC ontogeny by morpholino-mediated knock-down in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, we found that HSCs from in vitro differentiated embryonic stem cells closely resemble definitive HSC, yet lack a Notch-signaling signature, likely accounting for their defective lymphopoiesis. Our analysis and web resource (http://hsc.hms.harvard.edu) will enhance efforts to identify regulators of HSC ontogeny and facilitate the engineering of hematopoietic specification. PMID:23122293

  11. Development of model for analysing respective collections of intended hematopoietic stem cells and harvests of unintended mature cells in apheresis for autologous hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    PubMed

    Hequet, O; Le, Q H; Rodriguez, J; Dubost, P; Revesz, D; Clerc, A; Rigal, D; Salles, G; Coiffier, B

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) required to perform peripheral hematopoietic autologous stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) can be collected by processing several blood volumes (BVs) in leukapheresis sessions. However, this may cause granulocyte harvest in graft and decrease in patient's platelet blood level. Both consequences may induce disturbances in patient. One apheresis team's current purpose is to improve HSC collection by increasing HSC collection and prevent increase in granulocyte and platelet harvests. Before improving HSC collection it seemed important to know more about the way to harvest these types of cells. The purpose of our study was to develop a simple model for analysing respective collections of intended CD34+ cells among HSC (designated here as HSC) and harvests of unintended platelets or granulocytes among mature cells (designated here as mature cells) considering the number of BVs processed and factors likely to influence cell collection or harvest. For this, we processed 1, 2 and 3 BVs in 59 leukapheresis sessions and analysed corresponding collections and harvests with a referent device (COBE Spectra). First we analysed the amounts of HSC collected and mature cells harvested and second the evolution of the respective shares of HSC and mature cells collected or harvested throughout the BV processes. HSC collections and mature cell harvests increased globally (p<0.0001) and their respective shares remained stable throughout the BV processes (p non-significant). We analysed the role of intrinsic (patient's features) and extrinsic (features before starting leukapheresis sessions) factors in collections and harvests, which showed that only pre-leukapheresis blood levels (CD34+cells and platelets) influenced both cell collections and harvests (CD34+cells and platelets) (p<0.001) and shares of HSC collections and mature unintended cells harvests (p<0.001) throughout the BV processes. Altogether, our results suggested that the main factors likely

  12. Effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab) on lens epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jong Hwa; Sohn, Wern-Joo; Lee, Youngkyun; Kim, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    The molecular and cellular effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab) on lens epithelial cells (LECs) were examined using both an immortalized human lens epithelial cell line and a porcine capsular bag model. After treatment with various concentrations of bevacizumab, cell viability and proliferation patterns were evaluated using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The scratch assay and Western blot analysis were employed to validate the cell migration pattern and altered expression levels of signaling molecules related to the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Application of bevacizumab induced a range of altered cellular events in a concentration-dependent manner. A 0.1–2 mg/mL concentration demonstrated dose-dependent increase in proliferation and viability of LECs. However, 4 mg/mL decreased cell proliferation and viability. Cell migrations displayed dose-dependent retardation from 0.1 mg/mL bevacizumab treatment. Transforming growth factor-β2 expression was markedly increased in a dose-dependent manner, and α-smooth muscle actin, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and vimentin expression levels showed dose-dependent changes in a B3 cell line. Microscopic observation of porcine capsular bag revealed changes in cellular morphology and a decline in cell density compared to the control after 2 mg/mL treatment. The central aspect of posterior capsule showed delayed confluence, and the factors related to EMT revealed similar expression patterns to those identified in the cell line. Based on these results, bevacizumab modulates the proliferation and viability of LECs and induces morphological alterations through the modulation of expression patterns of specific factors related to the EMT. PMID:27418802

  13. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26862318

  14. Intracellular processing of epidermal growth factor by early wound healing cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seyfer, A.E.; Nassaux, P.; Emory, R.; Wray, H.L.; Schaudies, R.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a potent 53-amino-acid residue polypeptide that has been implicated in normal wound healing. Although past studies have shown that locally applied EGF accelerates wound healing, these studies have not examined intracellular events related to the processing of the growth factor. The objective of this study was to characterize both initial and later postbinding intracellular processing of EGF by a responsive cell line (osteoblasts) that is important in the healing of wounds. Cloned mouse calvarial osteoblasts (MC-3TC-E1) were incubated with radiolabeled EGF, with and without preincubation with nonlabeled EGF, for specific time intervals. Cell-associated radioactivity was characterized by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results showed that EGF is processed as three distinct species and that the relative proportions of these species are altered at later time periods when compared with initial processing. The patterns, similar to those reported for human fibroblasts, indicate a possible common pathway for the mitogenic signal in cells associated with the early events of wound healing. In addition, these data represent the first direct evidence that preexposure of cells to nonlabeled EGF alters the processing of radiolabeled EGF. This is significant, because cells must be exposed to EGF for 5 to 8 hours to elicit a growth response. Such data may help to explain the lag phase of wound healing.

  15. Lnk is an important modulator of insulin-like growth factor-1/Akt/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma axis during adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Hyang Seon; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Jae Ho; Bae, Sun Sik; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2016-09-01

    Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for metabolic homeostasis and nutrient signaling during development. However, limited information is available on the pivotal modulators of adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Adaptor protein Lnk (Src homology 2B3 [SH2B3]), which belongs to a family of SH2-containing proteins, modulates the bioactivities of different stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells. In this study, we investigated whether an interaction between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Lnk regulated IGF-1-induced adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. We found that wild-type MSCs showed greater adipogenic differentiation potential than Lnk (-/-) MSCs. An ex vivo adipogenic differentiation assay showed that Lnk (-/-) MSCs had decreased adipogenic differentiation potential compared with wild-type MSCs. Interestingly, we found that Lnk formed a complex with IGF-1R and that IGF-1 induced the dissociation of this complex. In addition, we observed that IGF-1-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin was triggered by the dissociation of the IGF-1R-Lnk complex. Expression levels of a pivotal transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and its adipogenic target genes (LPL and FABP4) significantly decreased in Lnk (-/-) MSCs. These results suggested that Lnk adaptor protein regulated the adipogenesis of MSCs through the IGF-1/Akt/PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27610032

  16. Lnk is an important modulator of insulin-like growth factor-1/Akt/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma axis during adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun; Lee, Hyang Seon; Ji, Seung Taek; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Jae Ho; Bae, Sun Sik

    2016-01-01

    Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is critical for metabolic homeostasis and nutrient signaling during development. However, limited information is available on the pivotal modulators of adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. Adaptor protein Lnk (Src homology 2B3 [SH2B3]), which belongs to a family of SH2-containing proteins, modulates the bioactivities of different stem cells, including hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells. In this study, we investigated whether an interaction between insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Lnk regulated IGF-1-induced adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. We found that wild-type MSCs showed greater adipogenic differentiation potential than Lnk–/– MSCs. An ex vivo adipogenic differentiation assay showed that Lnk–/– MSCs had decreased adipogenic differentiation potential compared with wild-type MSCs. Interestingly, we found that Lnk formed a complex with IGF-1R and that IGF-1 induced the dissociation of this complex. In addition, we observed that IGF-1-induced increase in the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin was triggered by the dissociation of the IGF-1R–Lnk complex. Expression levels of a pivotal transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) and its adipogenic target genes (LPL and FABP4) significantly decreased in Lnk–/– MSCs. These results suggested that Lnk adaptor protein regulated the adipogenesis of MSCs through the IGF-1/Akt/PPAR-γ pathway. PMID:27610032

  17. A reappraisal of ICU and long-term outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients and reassessment of prognosis factors: results of a 5-year cohort study (2009-2013).

    PubMed

    Platon, L; Amigues, L; Ceballos, P; Fegueux, N; Daubin, D; Besnard, N; Larcher, R; Landreau, L; Agostini, C; Machado, S; Jonquet, O; Klouche, K

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiology and prognosis of complications related to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients requiring admission to intensive care unit (ICU) have not been reassessed precisely in the past few years. We performed a retrospective single-center study on 318 consecutive HSCT patients (2009-2013), analyzing outcome and factors prognostic of ICU admission. Among these patients, 73 were admitted to the ICU. In all, 32 patients (40.3%) died in ICU, 46 at hospital discharge (63%) and 61 (83.6%) 1 year later. Survivors had a significantly lower sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, serum lactate and bilirubin upon ICU admission. Catecholamine support, mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or renal replacement therapy during ICU stay, a delayed organ support and an active graft versus host disease (GvHD) significantly worsen the outcome. By multivariate analysis, the worsening of SOFA score from days 1 to 3, the need for MV and the occurrence of an active GvHD were predictive of mortality. In conclusion, the incidence of HSCT-related complications requiring an admission to an ICU was at 22%, with an ICU mortality rate of 44%, and 84% 1 year later. A degradation of SOFA score at day 3 of ICU, need of MV and occurrence of an active GvHD are main predictive factors of mortality. PMID:26569092

  18. Requirement for neurogenesis to proceed through the division of neuronal progenitors following differentiation of epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor-2-responsive human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ostenfeld, Thor; Svendsen, Clive N

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-responsive human neural stem cells may provide insight into mechanisms of neural development and have applications in cell-based therapeutics for neurological disease. However, their biology after expansion in vitro is currently poorly understood. Cells grown in either EGF or FGF-2 or a combination of both mitogens displayed characteristically similar levels of transcriptional activation and comparable proliferative profiles with linear cell-cycle kinetics and possessed similar neuronal differentiation capabilities. These data support the view that human neurospheres at later stages of expansion (>10 weeks) are comprised overwhelmingly of a single type of stem cell responsive to both EGF and FGF-2. After mitogen withdrawal and neurosphere plating, bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase experiments revealed that the stem cells did not undergo differentiation directly into neurons. Instead, most immature neurons arose via the division of emerging progenitor cells in the absence of exogenous EGF or FGF-2. Neurogenesis was abolished by application of high concentrations of either EGF/FGF-2 or the mitotic inhibitor cytosine-b-arabinofuranoside, suggesting that there is an obligatory requirement for at least one round of cell division in the absence of mitogens as a prelude to terminal neuronal differentiation. The differentiation of human neurospheres provides a useful model of human neurogenesis, and the data presented indicate that it proceeds through the division of committed neuronal progenitor cells rather than directly from the neural stem cell. PMID:15342944

  19. Retinoic acid modulates rat Ito cell proliferation, collagen, and transforming growth factor beta production.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B H; Kramer, R T; Davidson, N O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that vitamin A plays an inhibitory role with respect to "activation" of the hepatic Ito cell, a likely effector of hepatic fibrogenesis. Ito cell "activation" during fibrogenesis is characterized by a decrease in intracellular vitamin A and an increase in cellular proliferation and collagen production. To explore the hypothesis that retinoids have the capacity to diminish Ito cell activation, cultured Ito cells were exposed to retinoic acid and its effects assessed on three key features: cell proliferation, collagen protein production and mRNA abundance, and transforming growth factor beta protein production. Retinoic acid was 100-1,000X more potent than retinol with respect to inhibition of Ito cell proliferation. Interstitial collagen and transforming growth factor beta production were also reduced by 10(-6) M retinoic acid. The relative abundance of type I collagen mRNA however, was not significantly altered. By contrast, retinoic acid administration to rats caused a marked reduction in the abundance of type I collagen mRNA in both total hepatic and purified Ito cell RNA. The relative abundance of rat hepatic fibronectin or apolipoprotein E mRNA was not significantly altered. These studies demonstrate that retinoic acid can differentially modulate several key features of hepatic fibrogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Images PMID:2254460

  20. Lewisy Promotes Migration of Oral Cancer Cells by Glycosylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Ling; Lin, Yi-Shiuan; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation changes normal cellular functions and represents a specific hallmark of cancer. Lewisy (Ley) carbohydrate upregulation has been reported in a variety of cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). A high level of Ley expression is related to poor prognosis of patients with oral cancer. However, it is unclear how Ley mediates oral cancer progression. In this study, the role of Ley in OSCC was explored. Our data showed that Ley was upregulated in HSC-3 and OC-2 OSCC cell lines. Particularly, glycosylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with Ley was found in OC-2 cells, and this modification was absent upon inhibition of Ley synthesis. The absence of Ley glycosylation of EGFR weakened phosphorylation of AKT and ERK in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). Additionally, EGF-triggered cell migration was reduced, but cell proliferation was not affected. Ley modification stabilized EGFR upon ligand activation. Conversely, absence of Ley glycosylation accelerated EGFR degradation. In summary, these results indicate that increased expression of Ley in OSCC cells is able to promote cell migration by modifying EGFR which in turn stabilizes EGFR expression and downstream signaling. Targeting Ley on EGFR could have a potential therapeutic effect on oral cancer. PMID:25799278

  1. Fetal hematopoietic stem cells express MFG-E8 during mouse embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehun; Choi, Byung-il; Park, Seo Young; An, Su Yeon; Han, Jiyou; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The milk fat globule-EGF-factor 8 protein (MFG-E8) has been identified in various tissues, where it has an important role in intercellular interactions, cellular migration, and neovascularization. Previous studies showed that MFG-E8 is expressed in different cell types under normal and pathophysiological conditions, but its expression in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during hematopoiesis has not been reported. In the present study, we investigated MFG-E8 expression in multiple hematopoietic tissues at different stages of mouse embryogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that MFG-E8 was specifically expressed in CD34(+) HSCs at all hematopoietic sites, including the yolk sac, aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, placenta and fetal liver, during embryogenesis. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction analyses demonstrated that CD34(+) cells, purified from the fetal liver, expressed additional HSC markers, c-Kit and Sca-1, and that these CD34(+) cells, but not CD34(-) cells, highly expressed MFG-E8. We also found that MFG-E8 was not expressed in HSCs in adult mouse bone marrow, and that its expression was confined to F4/80(+) macrophages. Together, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that MFG-8 is expressed in fetal HSC populations, and that MFG-E8 may have a role in embryonic hematopoiesis. PMID:26206421

  2. Combined plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for harvesting high-dose hematopoietic stem cells: Possible niche for plerixafor use in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Bitan, Menachem; Eshel, Rinat; Sadot, Efraim; Friedman, Shirley; Pinhasov, Aviva; Levin, Dror; Dvir, Rina; Manisterski, Michal; Berger-Achituv, Sivan; Rosenfeld-Keidar, Hila; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    PB is a source of HSC, especially for autologous HCT in solid tumors. However, there is a risk of failing to achieve the target number of SC after mobilization with growth factors alone in patients who were heavily pretreated with chemotherapy or those in need for tandem transplants. SC were harvested from seven pediatric patients with solid tumors who were in need of autologous HCT following combination GCSF and plerixafor. Six of them received plerixafor after failing to achieve enough SC with GCSF only, while the seventh patient received the combined protocol upfront. All seven patients achieved the target number of SC according to their treatment protocol. There were no adverse events. All patients underwent autologous HCT using the harvested HSC and achieved full engraftment. A protocol for harvesting autologous HCT using GCSF and plerixafor is feasible and safe in children with solid tumors who had been heavily pretreated with chemotherapy or needed tandem transplants. PMID:26991903

  3. Growth factor and small molecule influence on urological tissue regeneration utilizing cell seeded scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arun K; Cheng, Earl Y

    2015-03-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies combine various attributes from multiple disciplines including stem cell biology, chemistry, materials science and medicine. The junction at which these disciplines intersect provides a means to address unmet medical needs in an assortment of pathologies with the goal of creating sustainable, functional replacement tissues. Tissue damage caused by trauma for example, requires rapid responses in order to mitigate further tissue deterioration. Cell/scaffold composites have been utilized to initiate and stabilize regenerative responses in vivo with the hope that functional tissue can be attained. Along with the gross reconfiguration of regenerating tissues, small molecules and growth factors also play a pivotal role in tissue regeneration. Several regenerative studies targeting a variety of urological tissues demonstrate the utility of these small molecules or growth factors in an in vivo setting. PMID:25446138

  4. Biology of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors: implications for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Motonari; Wagers, Amy J; Manz, Markus G; Prohaska, Susan S; Scherer, David C; Beilhack, Georg F; Shizuru, Judith A; Weissman, Irving L

    2003-01-01

    Stem cell biology is scientifically, clinically, and politically a current topic. The hematopoietic stem cell, the common ancestor of all types of blood cells, is one of the best-characterized stem cells in the body and the only stem cell that is clinically applied in the treatment of diseases such as breast cancer, leukemias, and congenital immunodeficiencies. Multicolor cell sorting enables the purification not only of hematopoietic stem cells, but also of their downstream progenitors such as common lymphoid progenitors and common myeloid progenitors. Recent genetic approaches including gene chip technology have been used to elucidate the gene expression profile of hematopoietic stem cells and other progenitors. Although the mechanisms that control self-renewal and lineage commitment of hematopoietic stem cells are still ambiguous, recent rapid advances in understanding the biological nature of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells have broadened the potential application of these cells in the treatment of diseases. PMID:12615892

  5. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 inhibits growth and induces differentiation of mouse osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M R; Zhou, R; Hoeflich, A; Krebs, O; Schmidt, J; Mohan, S; Wolf, E; Lahm, H

    2001-10-26

    The precise role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) in regulating the growth of tumor cells, especially of bone-derived malignant cells, is not well understood. We have investigated the biological activity of IGFBP-5 by transfecting OS/50-K8 mouse osteosarcoma cells with an expression vector containing the osteocalcin promoter and the complete mouse IGFBP-5 cDNA (OC-IGFBP-5). Overexpression of IGFBP-5 mRNA and secretion of increased amounts of bioactive protein in conditioned media were demonstrated in different clones. For the analysis of cell proliferation, three clones exhibiting high levels of IGFBP-5 expression were selected and compared to a mock clone and to nontransfected parental cells. IGFBP-5-secreting clones displayed reduced proliferation under both anchorage-dependent and -independent conditions (P < 0.05). The increase in proliferation observed in IGFBP-5-secreting clones after addition of exogenous IGF was significantly lower than that observed in mock-transfected or parental cells. A similar result was obtained with long[R3]IGF-I which has a low affinity for all IGFBPs, suggesting that the inhibitory effect of IGFBP-5 is only partially IGF-dependent. OC-IGFBP-5-transfected clones expressed significantly higher amounts of osteocalcin mRNA (P < 0.05) and secreted more osteocalcin protein than a mock clone or parental OS-50/K8 cells. Thus, part of the growth-inhibiting effect of IGFBP-5 may be due to an induction of differentiation in these cells. PMID:11606061

  7. Basic fibroblast growth factor: its role in the control of smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C. L.; Reidy, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    The formation of an intimal lesion in an injured artery is the consequence of the replication and migration of smooth muscle cells. Recent studies have implicated basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) as an important mediator of replication in the arterial media, and platelet-derived growth factor as an important mediator of migration. However, the degree of arterial trauma produced during injury has a significant influence on the time of onset of intimal thickening, suggesting that factors released from damaged smooth muscle cells may affect migration. We have investigated the role of one of these factors, bFGF, in smooth muscle cell migration in vivo. We found that 1) deendothelialization of the rat carotid artery results in significantly more migration when it is accompanied by traumatic injury to the underlying smooth muscle; 2) the rate of migration in arteries that have been gently deendothelialized is significantly stimulated by systemic injection of bFGF; and 3) inhibition of bFGF with a blocking antibody significantly reduces the amount of migration after traumatic deendothelializing injury with a balloon catheter. These findings suggest that bFGF plays an important role in the mediation of smooth muscle cell migration after arterial injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8213998

  8. Recurrent exposure to nicotine differentiates human bronchial epithelial cells via epidermal growth factor receptor activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Garcia, Eva; Irigoyen, Marta; Anso, Elena; Martinez-Irujo, Juan Jose; Rouzaut, Ana

    2008-05-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major preventable cause of lung cancer in developed countries. Nicotine (3-(1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)-pyridine) is one of the major alkaloids present in tobacco. Besides its addictive properties, its effects have been described in panoply of cell types. In fact, recent studies have shown that nicotine behaves as a tumor promoter in transformed epithelial cells. This research focuses on the effects of acute repetitive nicotine exposure on normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE cells). Here we show that treatment of NHBE cells with recurrent doses of nicotine up to 500 {mu}M triggered cell differentiation towards a neuronal-like phenotype: cells emitted filopodia and expressed neuronal markers such as neuronal cell adhesion molecule, neurofilament-M and the transcription factors neuronal N and Pax-3. We also demonstrate that nicotine treatment induced NF-kB translocation to the nucleus, phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and accumulation of heparin binding-EGF in the extracellular medium. Moreover, addition of AG1478, an inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, or cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody that precludes ligand binding to the same receptor, prevented cell differentiation by nicotine. Lastly, we show that differentiated cells increased their adhesion to the extracellular matrix and their protease activity. Given that several lung pathologies are strongly related to tobacco consumption, these results may help to better understand the damaging consequences of nicotine exposure.

  9. Platelet-Derived Growth Factor C Is Upregulated in Human Uterine Fibroids and Regulates Uterine Smooth Muscle Cell Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Guangli; Jiang, Yong; Cowan, Bryan; Wang, Jean Y.J.

    2009-01-01

    Leiomyomata uteri (i.e., uterine fibroids) are benign tumors arising from the abnormal growth of uterine smooth muscle cells (SMCs). We show here that the expression of platelet-derived growth factor C (PDGFC) is higher in approximately 80% of uterine fibroids than in adjacent myometrial tissues examined. Increased expression of PDGFC is also observed in fibroid-derived SMCs (fSMCs) relative to myometrial-derived SMCs (mSMCs). Recombinant bioactive PDGFCC homodimer stimulates the growth of fSMCs and mSMCs in ex vivo cultures and prolongs the survival of fSMCs in Matrigel plugs implemented subcutaneously in immunocompromised mice. The knockdown of PDGF receptor-alpha (PDGFRA) through lentiviral-mediated RNA interference reduces the growth of fSMCs and mSMCs in ex vivo cultures and in Matrigel implants. Furthermore, two small molecule inhibitors of the PDGFR tyrosine kinase (i.e., imatinib and dasatinib) exerted negative effects on fSMC and mSMC growth in ex vivo cultures, albeit at concentrations that cannot be achieved in vivo. These results suggest that the PDGFCC/PDGFRA signaling module plays an important role in fSMC and mSMC growth, and that the upregulation of PDGFC expression may contribute to the clonal expansion of fSMCs in the development of uterine fibroids. PMID:19553600

  10. Expression of endothelial cell-specific receptor tyrosine