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1

Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors  

SciTech Connect

The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage.

Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Vignudelli, Tatiana [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Gemelli, Claudia [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Pirondi, Sara [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Testa, Anna [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Montanari, Monica [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Parenti, Sandra [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Tenedini, Elena [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Grande, Alexis [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy); Ferrari, Sergio [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche, Sezione di Chimica Biologica, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41100, Modena (Italy)]. E-mail: sergio@unimo.it

2006-12-10

2

Loss of mismatched HLA in myeloid/NK cell precursor acute leukemia relapse after T cell-replete haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia (MNKL) is an aggressive disease with a high relapse rate even after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We report a patient with MNKL who had a donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) for relapse after T cell-replete human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haploidentical SCT, but relapsed again 20 months later with loss of mismatched HLA. This case suggests that a strong graft-versus-leukemia effect of haploidentical SCT can be expected in MNKL patients. In the haploidentical setting, DLI should be considered for patients with relapsed leukemia whose leukemic cells have not lost HLA cell surface expression. PMID:24464971

Kobayashi, Shogo; Kikuta, Atsushi; Ito, Masaki; Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Akaihata, Mitsuko; Waragai, Tomoko; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Chitose; Ono, Satoshi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Hosoya, Mitsuaki

2014-10-01

3

Flk2/Flt3 promotes both myeloid and lymphoid development by expanding non–self-renewing multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells  

PubMed Central

Defining differentiation pathways is central to understanding the pathogenesis of hematopoietic disorders, including leukemia. The function of the receptor tyrosine kinase Flk2 (Flt3) in promoting myeloid development remains poorly defined, despite being commonly mutated in acute myeloid leukemia. We investigated the effect of Flk2 deficiency on myelopoiesis, focusing on specification of progenitors between HSC and mature cells. We provide evidence that Flk2 is critical for proliferative expansion of multipotent progenitors that are common precursors for all lymphoid and myeloid lineages, including megakaryocyte/erythroid (MegE) cells. Flk2 deficiency impaired the generation of both lymphoid and myeloid progenitors by abrogating propagation of their common upstream precursor. At steady state, downstream compensatory mechanisms masked the effect of Flk2 deficiency on mature myeloid output, whereas transplantation of purified progenitors revealed impaired generation of all mature lineages. Flk2 deficiency did not affect lineage choice, thus dissociating the role of Flk2 in promoting cell expansion and regulating cell fate. Surprisingly, despite impairing myeloid development, Flk2 deficiency afforded protection against myeloablative insult. This survival advantage was attributed to reduced cell cycling and proliferation of progenitors in Flk2-deficient mice. Our data support the existence of a common Flk2+ intermediate for all hematopoietic lineages and provide insight into how activating Flk2 mutations promote hematopoietic malignancy by non–Flk2-expressing myeloid cells. PMID:24333663

Beaudin, Anna E.; Boyer, Scott W.; Forsberg, E. Camilla

2014-01-01

4

Flk2/Flt3 promotes both myeloid and lymphoid development by expanding non-self-renewing multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells.  

PubMed

Defining differentiation pathways is central to understanding the pathogenesis of hematopoietic disorders, including leukemia. The function of the receptor tyrosine kinase Flk2 (Flt3) in promoting myeloid development remains poorly defined, despite being commonly mutated in acute myeloid leukemia. We investigated the effect of Flk2 deficiency on myelopoiesis, focusing on specification of progenitors between HSC and mature cells. We provide evidence that Flk2 is critical for proliferative expansion of multipotent progenitors that are common precursors for all lymphoid and myeloid lineages, including megakaryocyte/erythroid (MegE) cells. Flk2 deficiency impaired the generation of both lymphoid and myeloid progenitors by abrogating propagation of their common upstream precursor. At steady state, downstream compensatory mechanisms masked the effect of Flk2 deficiency on mature myeloid output, whereas transplantation of purified progenitors revealed impaired generation of all mature lineages. Flk2 deficiency did not affect lineage choice, thus dissociating the role of Flk2 in promoting cell expansion and regulating cell fate. Surprisingly, despite impairing myeloid development, Flk2 deficiency afforded protection against myeloablative insult. This survival advantage was attributed to reduced cell cycling and proliferation of progenitors in Flk2-deficient mice. Our data support the existence of a common Flk2(+) intermediate for all hematopoietic lineages and provide insight into how activating Flk2 mutations promote hematopoietic malignancy by non-Flk2-expressing myeloid cells. PMID:24333663

Beaudin, Anna E; Boyer, Scott W; Forsberg, E Camilla

2014-03-01

5

Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells Precedes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

E-print Network

Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells Precedes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Max myeloid leukemia (AML). Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations present in individual AML patients-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscript #12;INTRODUCTION Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy of hematopoietic progenitor

Quake, Stephen R.

6

HEMATOPOIETIC GROWTH FACTORS AND ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA  

Microsoft Academic Search

affinity. When the ligands are added to cultures of AML cells, induction of metabolic and cell cycle activation appears. In some cases AML cells may mature towards terminally differentiated cells in response to cytokine stimulation. When AML cells stimulated with hematopoietic growth factors are subjected to chemotherapy in vitro, cell killing may be considerably enhanced.(1) These observations have been a

B. Löwenberg

7

Proteomic Cornerstones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation: Distinct Signatures of Multipotent Progenitors and Myeloid Committed Cells*  

PubMed Central

Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, LinnegSca-1+c-Kit+) or myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSca-1?c-Kit+). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference in the expression of metabolic enzymes, including a clear shift of specific protein isoforms of the glycolytic pathway. Proteins involved in translation showed a collective higher expression in myeloid progenitors, indicating an increased translational activity. Strikingly, the data uncover a unique signature related to immune defense mechanisms, centering on the RIG-I and type-1 interferon response systems, which are installed in multipotent progenitors but not evident in myeloid committed cells. This suggests that specific, and so far unrecognized, mechanisms protect these immature cells before they mature. In conclusion, this study indicates that the transition of hematopoietic stem/progenitors toward myeloid commitment is accompanied by a profound change in processing of cellular resources, adding novel insights into the molecular mechanisms at the interface between multipotency and lineage commitment. PMID:22454540

Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Trumpp, Andreas; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

2012-01-01

8

The Hematopoietic Differentiation and Production of Mature Myeloid Cells from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Here we describe a protocol for hematopoietic differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and generation of mature myeloid cells from hPSCs through expansion and differentiation of hPSC-derived lin-CD34+CD43+CD45+ multipotent progenitors. The protocol is comprised of three major steps: (i) induction of hematopoietic differentiation by coculture of hPSCs with OP9 bone marrow stromal cells, (ii) short-term expansion of multipotent myeloid progenitors with a high dose of GM-CSF, and (iii) directed differentiation of myeloid progenitors into neutrophils, eosinophils, dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), macrophages, and osteoclasts. The generation of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors from hPSCs requires 9 days of culture, and an additional 2 days are needed to expand myeloid progenitors. Differentiation of myeloid progenitors into mature myeloid cells requires an additional 5–19 days of culture with cytokines, depending on the cell type. PMID:21372811

Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim; Slukvin, Igor I.

2011-01-01

9

Human bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells are increased in frequency and myeloid-biased with age.  

PubMed

In the human hematopoietic system, aging is associated with decreased bone marrow cellularity, decreased adaptive immune system function, and increased incidence of anemia and other hematological disorders and malignancies. Recent studies in mice suggest that changes within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population during aging contribute significantly to the manifestation of these age-associated hematopoietic pathologies. Though the mouse HSC population has been shown to change both quantitatively and functionally with age, changes in the human HSC and progenitor cell populations during aging have been incompletely characterized. To elucidate the properties of an aged human hematopoietic system that may predispose to age-associated hematopoietic dysfunction, we evaluated immunophenotypic HSC and other hematopoietic progenitor populations from healthy, hematologically normal young and elderly human bone marrow samples. We found that aged immunophenotypic human HSC increase in frequency, are less quiescent, and exhibit myeloid-biased differentiation potential compared with young HSC. Gene expression profiling revealed that aged immunophenotypic human HSC transcriptionally up-regulate genes associated with cell cycle, myeloid lineage specification, and myeloid malignancies. These age-associated alterations in the frequency, developmental potential, and gene expression profile of human HSC are similar to those changes observed in mouse HSC, suggesting that hematopoietic aging is an evolutionarily conserved process. PMID:22123971

Pang, Wendy W; Price, Elizabeth A; Sahoo, Debashis; Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J; Rossi, Derrick J; Schrier, Stanley L; Weissman, Irving L

2011-12-13

10

Human bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells are increased in frequency and myeloid-biased with age  

PubMed Central

In the human hematopoietic system, aging is associated with decreased bone marrow cellularity, decreased adaptive immune system function, and increased incidence of anemia and other hematological disorders and malignancies. Recent studies in mice suggest that changes within the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) population during aging contribute significantly to the manifestation of these age-associated hematopoietic pathologies. Though the mouse HSC population has been shown to change both quantitatively and functionally with age, changes in the human HSC and progenitor cell populations during aging have been incompletely characterized. To elucidate the properties of an aged human hematopoietic system that may predispose to age-associated hematopoietic dysfunction, we evaluated immunophenotypic HSC and other hematopoietic progenitor populations from healthy, hematologically normal young and elderly human bone marrow samples. We found that aged immunophenotypic human HSC increase in frequency, are less quiescent, and exhibit myeloid-biased differentiation potential compared with young HSC. Gene expression profiling revealed that aged immunophenotypic human HSC transcriptionally up-regulate genes associated with cell cycle, myeloid lineage specification, and myeloid malignancies. These age-associated alterations in the frequency, developmental potential, and gene expression profile of human HSC are similar to those changes observed in mouse HSC, suggesting that hematopoietic aging is an evolutionarily conserved process. PMID:22123971

Pang, Wendy W.; Price, Elizabeth A.; Sahoo, Debashis; Beerman, Isabel; Maloney, William J.; Rossi, Derrick J.; Schrier, Stanley L.; Weissman, Irving L.

2011-01-01

11

Genetic manipulation of AML1-ETO–induced expansion of hematopoietic precursors in a Drosophila model  

PubMed Central

Among mutations in human Runx1/AML1 transcription factors, the t(8;21)(q22;q22) genomic translocation that creates an AML1-ETO fusion protein is implicated in etiology of the acute myeloid leukemia. To identify genes and components associated with this oncogene we used Drosophila as a genetic model. Expression of AML1-ETO caused an expansion of hematopoietic precursors in Drosophila, which expressed high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mutations in functional domains of the fusion protein suppress the proliferative phenotype. In a genetic screen, we found that inactivation of EcRB1 or activation of Foxo and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2) suppress the AML1-ETO–induced phenotype by reducing ROS expression in the precursor cells. Our studies indicate that ROS is a signaling factor promoting maintenance of normal as well as the aberrant myeloid precursors and suggests the importance of antioxidant enzymes and their regulators as targets for further study in the context of leukemia. PMID:20688956

Sinenko, Sergey A.; Hung, Tony; Moroz, Tatiana; Tran, Quynh-Minh; Sidhu, Sohrab; Cheney, Matthew D.; Speck, Nancy A.

2010-01-01

12

Transcriptome-wide Profiling and Posttranscriptional Analysis of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Differentiation toward Myeloid Commitment  

PubMed Central

Summary Hematopoietic stem cells possess lifelong self-renewal activity and generate multipotent progenitors that differentiate into lineage-committed and subsequently mature cells. We present a comparative transcriptome analysis of ex vivo isolated mouse multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (LinnegSCA-1+c-KIT+) and myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSCA-1negc-KIT+). Our data display dynamic transcriptional networks and identify a stem/progenitor gene expression pattern that is characterized by cell adhesion and immune response components including kallikrein-related proteases. We identify 498 expressed lncRNAs, which are potential regulators of multipotency or lineage commitment. By integrating these transcriptome with our recently reported proteome data, we found evidence for posttranscriptional regulation of processes including metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Finally, our study identifies a high number of genes with transcript isoform regulation upon lineage commitment. This in-depth molecular analysis outlines the enormous complexity of expressed coding and noncoding RNAs and posttranscriptional regulation during the early differentiation steps of hematopoietic stem cells toward the myeloid lineage. PMID:25418729

Klimmeck, Daniel; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Reyes, Alejandro; von Paleske, Lisa; Renders, Simon; Hansson, Jenny; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Huber, Wolfgang; Trumpp, Andreas

2014-01-01

13

Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors  

SciTech Connect

Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

Bertagnolo, Valeria [Signal Transduction Unit-Laboratory of Cell Biology, Section of Human Anatomy, Department of Morphology and Embryology, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara, 66, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Brugnoli, Federica [Signal Transduction Unit-Laboratory of Cell Biology, Section of Human Anatomy, Department of Morphology and Embryology, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara, 66, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Mischiati, Carlo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ferrara (Italy); Sereni, Alessia [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Ferrara (Italy); Bavelloni, Alberto [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Electron Microscopy, IOR, Bologna (Italy); Carini, Cinzia [Signal Transduction Unit-Laboratory of Cell Biology, Section of Human Anatomy, Department of Morphology and Embryology, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara, 66, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Capitani, Silvano [Signal Transduction Unit-Laboratory of Cell Biology, Section of Human Anatomy, Department of Morphology and Embryology, University of Ferrara, Via Fossato di Mortara, 66, 44100 Ferrara (Italy) and MIUR ICSI, Interdisciplinary Center for the Study of Inflammation, University of Ferrara (Italy)]. E-mail: cps@unife.it

2005-05-15

14

Characterization of the Murine Myeloid Precursor Cell Line MuMac-E8  

PubMed Central

Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies. PMID:25546418

Fricke, Stephan; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

2014-01-01

15

Pbx1 restrains myeloid maturation while preserving lymphoid potential in hematopoietic progenitors  

PubMed Central

Summary The capacity of the hematopoietic system to promptly respond to peripheral demands relies on adequate pools of progenitors able to transiently proliferate and differentiate in a regulated manner. However, little is known about factors that may restrain progenitor maturation to maintain their reservoirs. Conditional knockout mice for the Pbx1 proto-oncogene have a significant reduction in lineage-restricted progenitors in addition to a profound defect in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal. Through analysis of purified progenitor proliferation, differentiation capacity and transcriptional profiling, we demonstrate that Pbx1 regulates the lineage-specific output of multipotent and oligopotent progenitors. In the absence of Pbx1 multipotent progenitor (MPP) and common myeloid progenitor (CMP) pools are reduced due to aberrantly rapid myeloid maturation. This is associated with premature expression of myeloid differentiation genes and decreased maintenance of proto-oncogene transcriptional pathways, including reduced expression of Meis1, a Pbx1 dimerization partner, and its subordinate transcriptional program. Conversely, Pbx1 maintains the lymphoid differentiation potential of lymphoid-primed MPPs (LMPPs) and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs), whose reduction in the absence of Pbx1 is associated with a defect in lymphoid priming that is also present in CMPs, which persistently express lymphoid and HSC genes underlying a previously unappreciated lineage promiscuity that is maintained by Pbx1. These results demonstrate a role for Pbx1 in restraining myeloid maturation while maintaining lymphoid potential to appropriately regulate progenitor reservoirs. PMID:23660001

Ficara, Francesca; Crisafulli, Laura; Lin, Chenwei; Iwasaki, Masayuki; Smith, Kevin S.; Zammataro, Luca; Cleary, Michael L.

2013-01-01

16

Type II interferon promotes differentiation of myeloid-biased hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Interferon gamma (IFN?) promotes cell division of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) without affecting the total HSC number. We postulated that IFN? stimulates differentiation of HSCs as part of the innate immune response. Here, we report that type II interferon signaling is required, both at baseline and during an animal model of LCMV infection, to maintain normal myeloid development. By separately evaluating myeloid-biased and lymphoid-biased HSC subtypes, we found that myeloid-biased HSCs express higher levels of IFN? receptor and are specifically activated to divide after recombinant IFN? exposure in vivo. While both HSC subtypes show increased expression of the transcription factor C/EBP? after infection, only the myeloid-biased HSCs are transiently depleted from the marrow during the type II interferon-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium avium infection, as measured both functionally and phenotypically. These findings indicate that IFN? selectively permits differentiation of myeloid-biased HSCs during an innate immune response to infection. This represents the first report of a context and a mechanism for discriminate utilization of the alternate HSC subtypes. Terminal differentiation, at the expense of self-renewal, may compromise HSC populations during states of chronic inflammation. PMID:25078851

Matatall, Katie A; Shen, Ching-Chieh; Challen, Grant A; King, Katherine Y

2014-11-01

17

OP9 stroma augments survival of hematopoietic precursors and progenitors during hematopoietic differentiation from human embryonic stem cells.  

PubMed

The cellular mechanism and target cell affected by stromal microenvironments in augmenting hematopoietic specification from pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has yet to be evaluated. Here, in contrast to aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived S62 stromal cells, OP9 cells inhibit apoptosis and also augment the proliferation of hemogenic precursors prospectively isolated from human embryoid bodies. In addition, OP9 stroma supported cells within the primitive hematopoietic compartment by inhibiting apoptosis of CD45(+)CD34(+) cells committed to the hematopoietic lineage, but have no effect on more mature blood (CD45(+)CD34(-)) cells. Inability of hESC-derived hematopoietic cells cocultured with OP9 stromal cells to engraft in both the adult and newborn NOD/SCID mice after intrafemoral and intrahepatic injection illustrated that although OP9 stromal cells augment hESC-derived hematopoiesis and progenitor output, this optimized environment does not confer or augment repopulating function of specified hematopoietic cells derived from hESCs. OP9 coculture also increases hematopoietic progenitors output from hemogenic precursors overexpressing HOXB4. Our study demonstrates that OP9 cells support both hemogenic precursors and their primitive hematopoietic progeny, thereby providing the first evidence toward understanding the cellular targets and mechanisms underlying the capacity of OP9 stromal cells to support hematopoiesis from ESCs and define the future steps required to achieve the global goal of generating bona fide human hematopoietic stem cells from ESC lines. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article. PMID:18669904

Ji, Junfeng; Vijayaragavan, Kausalia; Bosse, Marc; Menendez, Pablo; Weisel, Katja; Bhatia, Mickie

2008-10-01

18

The AML1/ETO target gene LAT2 interferes with differentiation of normal hematopoietic precursor cells  

PubMed Central

The adaptor protein linker activator of T-cells 2 (LAT2) is a known AML1/ETO target gene whose function during normal hematopoiesis is unknown. We addressed the role of LAT2 during erythroid and myeloid differentiation of normal human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. LAT2 is expressed at low levels in CD34+ cells and upregulated during cytokine-induced myeloid and erythroid differentiation. Forced LAT2 expression leads to a delay of erythroid and myeloid differentiation keeping CD34+ cells in a more immature state, whereas LAT2 knockdown accelerates differentiation. It is tempting to speculate that by affecting the differentiation capacity of normal hematopoietic progenitors, LAT2 may contribute to the pathogenesis of AML. PMID:24456692

Essig, Aitomi; Duque-Afonso, Jesus; Schwemmers, Sven; Pahl, Heike L.; Lübbert, Michael

2014-01-01

19

B-myb is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell and myeloid progenitor cell development  

PubMed Central

The B-myb (MYBL2) gene is a member of the MYB family of transcription factors and is involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and maintenance of genomic integrity. However, its function during adult development and hematopoiesis is unknown. We show here that conditional inactivation of B-myb in vivo results in depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, leading to profound reductions in mature lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cells. This defect is autonomous to the bone marrow and is first evident in stem cells, which accumulate in the S and G2/M phases. B-myb inactivation also causes defects in the myeloid progenitor compartment, consisting of depletion of common myeloid progenitors but relative sparing of granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. Microarray studies indicate that B-myb–null LSK+ cells differentially express genes that direct myeloid lineage development and commitment, suggesting that B-myb is a key player in controlling cell fate. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that B-myb is essential for HSC and progenitor maintenance and survival during hematopoiesis. PMID:24516162

Baker, Stacey J.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Lieu, Yen K.; John, Premila; Reddy, M. V. Ramana; Chen, Edward Y.; Duan, Qiaonan; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Reddy, E. Premkumar

2014-01-01

20

Twist-1, a novel regulator of hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and myeloid lineage development.  

PubMed

Transcription factor Twist-1 plays essential roles in specification and differentiation of mesoderm-derived tissues. Growing evidences now link Twist-1 to the acquisition of stem-cell-like properties. However, the role of Twist-1 in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) remains largely uncharacterized. We report that Twist-1 is more highly expressed in murine HSC and its expression declines with differentiation. To investigate Twist-1 gene function, retroviral-mediated overexpression or removal experiments are performed. Competitive repopulation studies demonstrate that enforced expression of Twist-1 in HSC-enriched Lin(-) c-Kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS) cells results in an increase in the size of the G(0) population, and in their reconstitution ability after the first and a second transplantation. Conversely, removal of Twist-1 in LKS cells impairs their ability to repopulate. In addition, increased Twist-1 expression causes a shift toward production of myeloid cells. Twist-1 transduction in LKS cells activates myeloid lineage-determining factors PU.1 and GATA-1 and downregulates lymphoid factor GATA-3 in vitro, suggesting that Twist-1-mediated myeloid skewing occurs in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). These findings indicate that Twist-1 is not only involved in the maintenance of HSC dormancy and self-renewal capacity but also implicated in the myeloid lineage fate choice of HSPCs. Exploration of the underlying mechanisms reveals that Runx1/c-Mpl/Tie2 regulatory pathway could possibly account for the observed effects caused by Twist-1 overexpression. Our study provides the first evidence supporting a role for Twist-1 in hematopoiesis. PMID:25100001

Dong, Cheng-Ya; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Nan; Wang, Li-Na; Yang, Bin-Xia; Ren, Qian; Liang, Hao-Yue; Ma, Xiao-Tong

2014-12-01

21

Induction of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells via re-specification of lineage-restricted precursors  

PubMed Central

Summary Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a promising source of patient-specific cells for disease modeling, drug screens, and cellular therapies. However, the inability to derive engraftable human hematopoietic stem and progenitor (HSPCs) has limited their characterization to in vitro assays. We report a strategy to re-specify lineage-restricted CD34+CD45+ myeloid precursors derived from hPSCs into multilineage progenitors that can be expanded in vitro and engraft in vivo. HOXA9, ERG, and RORA conferred self-renewal and multilineage potential in vitro and maintained primitive CD34+CD38? cells. Screening cells via transplantation revealed that two additional factors, SOX4 and MYB, were required for engraftment. Progenitors specified with all five factors gave rise to reproducible short-term engraftment with myeloid and erythroid lineages. Erythroid precursors underwent hemoglobin switching in vivo, silencing embryonic and activating adult globin expression. Our combinatorial screening approach establishes a strategy for obtaining transcription factor-mediated engraftment of blood progenitors from human pluripotent cells. PMID:24094326

Doulatov, Sergei; Vo, Linda T.; Chou, Stephanie S.; Kim, Peter G.; Arora, Natasha; Li, Hu; Hadland, Brandon K.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Collins, James J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Daley, George Q.

2013-01-01

22

Secondary Philadelphia chromosome and erythrophagocytosis in a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.  

PubMed

The acquisition of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) as a secondary change during the course of hematopoietic malignancies is rare and is associated with poor prognosis. Few cases of secondary Ph have been reported after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A secondary Ph at relapse is of clinical importance because it provides a therapeutic target for tyrosine kinase inhibitors along with or in replacement of chemotherapy. We describe a case of relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after HCT that developed a BCR-ABL1 translocation along with erythrophagocytosis by blasts as a secondary change at the time of relapse. The progression of this patient's myeloid neoplasm from myelodysplastic syndrome to AML to relapsed AML after HCT was accompanied by a stepwise cytogenetic evolution: A deletion 20q abnormality subsequently acquired a deletion 7q and, finally, at relapse after HCT, a secondary Ph was gained. The relationship between the secondary Ph and the erythrophagocytosis by blasts is not clear. We review the possible pathogenesis and cytogenetic associations of erythrophagocytosis by blasts, a rare feature in acute leukemias. PMID:25074248

Kelemen, Katalin; Galani, Komal; Conley, Christopher R; Greipp, Patricia T

2014-06-01

23

Generation of hematopoietic progenitor cell lines with myeloid and lymphoid potential  

PubMed Central

Investigation of immune cell differentiation and function is limited by shortcomings of suitable and scalable experimental systems. Here we show that an estrogen–regulated form of HOXB8 that is retrovirally delivered into mouse bone marrow cells can be used along with FLT3 ligand to conditionally immortalize early hematopoietic progenitor cells (Hoxb8–FL). Hoxb8–FL cells have lost self–renewal capacity and megakaryocyte/ erythroid lineage potential, but sustain myeloid and lymphoid potential. Hoxb8–FL cells differentiate in vitro and in vivo into different myeloid and lymphoid cell types, including macrophages, granulocytes, dendritic cells and B– and T–lymphocytes, which are phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from their primary counterparts. Quantitative in vitro cell lineage potential assays implicate that myeloid and B–cell potential of Hoxb8–FL cells is comparable to primary lymphoid–primed multipotent progenitors, while T–cell potential is comparatively reduced. Given the simplicity and unlimited proliferative capacity of Hoxb8–FL cells, this system provides unique opportunities to investigate cell differentiation and immune cell functions. PMID:23749299

Redecke, Vanessa; Wu, Ruiqiong; Zhou, Jingran; Finkelstein, David; Chaturvedi, Vandana; High, Anthony A.; Häcker, Hans

2013-01-01

24

(Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

2014-01-01

25

(Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

2014-01-01

26

The role of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is currently recommended as 2nd or 3rd line therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in first chronic phase or as salvage for patients with very advanced disease. As a consequence, numbers of HSCT in chronic phase have dropped significantly since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), numbers of transplants in advanced disease to a lesser extent. These current recommendations consider primarily disease risk, defined as failure of TKI therapy; they might need to be adapted. We propose a more balanced appraisal of HSCT for individual patients which should include disease risk, transplant risk, and macroeconomic aspects. HSCT should be integrated into the treatment algorithms from diagnosis and be considered very early at first TKI failure for patients with high disease but low transplant risk. For patients with very advanced disease and high transplant risk in contrast, HSCT might only be recommended in a restricted research setting. PMID:25814084

Gratwohl, Alois; Baldomero, Helen; Passweg, Jakob

2015-04-01

27

CITED2-mediated human hematopoietic stem cell maintenance is critical for acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

As the transcriptional coactivator CITED2 (CBP/p300-interacting-transactivator-with-an ED-rich-tail 2) can be overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, we analyzed the consequences of high CITED2 expression in normal and AML cells. CITED2 overexpression in normal CD34(+) cells resulted in enhanced hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) output in vitro, as well as in better hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftability in NSG (NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ) mice. This was because of an enhanced quiescence and maintenance of CD34(+)CD38(-) HSCs, due in part to an increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A. We demonstrated that PU.1 is a critical regulator of CITED2, as PU.1 repressed CITED2 expression in a DNA methyltransferase 3A/B (DNMT3A/B)-dependent manner in normal CD34(+) cells. CD34(+) cells from a subset of AML patients displayed higher expression levels of CITED2 as compared with normal CD34(+) HSPCs, and knockdown of CITED2 in AML CD34(+) cells led to a loss of long-term expansion, both in vitro and in vivo. The higher CITED2 expression resulted from reduced PU.1 activity and/or dysfunction of mutated DNMT3A/B. Collectively, our data demonstrate that increased CITED2 expression results in better HSC maintenance. In concert with low PU.1 levels, this could result in a perturbed myeloid differentiation program that contributes to leukemia maintenance. PMID:25184385

Korthuis, P M; Berger, G; Bakker, B; Rozenveld-Geugien, M; Jaques, J; de Haan, G; Schuringa, J J; Vellenga, E; Schepers, H

2015-03-01

28

Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure  

SciTech Connect

Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

Seed, T.M.

1990-01-01

29

Clonal precursor of bone, cartilage, and hematopoietic niche stromal cells  

PubMed Central

Organs are composites of tissue types with diverse developmental origins, and they rely on distinct stem and progenitor cells to meet physiological demands for cellular production and homeostasis. How diverse stem cell activity is coordinated within organs is not well understood. Here we describe a lineage-restricted, self-renewing common skeletal progenitor (bone, cartilage, stromal progenitor; BCSP) isolated from limb bones and bone marrow tissue of fetal, neonatal, and adult mice. The BCSP clonally produces chondrocytes (cartilage-forming) and osteogenic (bone-forming) cells and at least three subsets of stromal cells that exhibit differential expression of cell surface markers, including CD105 (or endoglin), Thy1 [or CD90 (cluster of differentiation 90)], and 6C3 [ENPEP glutamyl aminopeptidase (aminopeptidase A)]. These three stromal subsets exhibit differential capacities to support hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem and progenitor cells. Although the 6C3-expressing subset demonstrates functional stem cell niche activity by maintaining primitive hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) renewal in vitro, the other stromal populations promote HSC differentiation to more committed lines of hematopoiesis, such as the B-cell lineage. Gene expression analysis and microscopic studies further reveal a microenvironment in which CD105-, Thy1-, and 6C3-expressing marrow stroma collaborate to provide cytokine signaling to HSCs and more committed hematopoietic progenitors. As a result, within the context of bone as a blood-forming organ, the BCSP plays a critical role in supporting hematopoiesis through its generation of diverse osteogenic and hematopoietic-promoting stroma, including HSC supportive 6C3(+) niche cells. PMID:23858471

Chan, Charles K. F.; Lindau, Paul; Jiang, Wen; Chen, James Y.; Zhang, Lillian F.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Seita, Jun; Sahoo, Debashis; Kim, Jae-Beom; Lee, Andrew; Park, Sujin; Nag, Divya; Gong, Yongquan; Kulkarni, Subhash; Luppen, Cynthia A.; Theologis, Alexander A.; Wan, Derrick C.; DeBoer, Anthony; Seo, Eun Young; Vincent-Tompkins, Justin D.; Loh, Kyle; Walmsley, Graham G.; Kraft, Daniel L.; Wu, Joseph C.; Longaker, Michael T.; Weissman, Irving L.

2013-01-01

30

HoxB4 Confers Definitive Lymphoid-Myeloid Engraftment Potential on Embryonic Stem Cell and Yolk Sac Hematopoietic Progenitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

The extent to which primitive embryonic blood progenitors contribute to definitive lymphoid-myeloid hematopoiesis in the adult remains uncertain. In an effort to characterize factors that distinguish the definitive adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and primitive progenitors derived from yolk sac or embryonic stem (ES) cells, we examined the effect of ectopic expression of HoxB4, a homeotic selector gene implicated in

Michael Kyba; Rita C. R. Perlingeiro; George Q. Daley

2002-01-01

31

Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2013-01-01

32

Monosomal karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Monosomal karyotype (MK) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with an extremely poor outcome. The clinical significance of MK and the role of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were evaluated in 749 Korean patients with newly diagnosed AML. MK was found in 9.3 % of patients and was more frequent in patients with advanced age or secondary AML. Patients with MK had significantly lower blood leukocyte counts and bone marrow blast percentages, and they had lower complete remission (CR) rate (43 %) and shorter median overall survival (OS) (6.5 months) and relapse-free survival (RFS) (10.0 months) than any other prognostic group. MK+ patients who received allogeneic HCT at the first CR had higher OS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.344, P?=?0.018], RFS (HR 0.257, P?=?0.006), and lower relapse probability (HR 0.264, P?=?0.008) than those not receiving. This study's results confirmed poor outcomes for AML patients with MK and suggest that allogeneic HCT at the first CR may improve outcome. PMID:25563594

Choi, Yunsuk; Lee, Je-Hwan; Seo, Eul-Ju; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Dae-Young; Park, Chan-Jung; Jang, Seongsoo; Cho, Young-Uk; Seol, Miee; Lee, Young-Shin; Kang, Young-Ah; Jeon, Mijin; Lee, Kyoo-Hyung

2015-05-01

33

Optimizing patient selection for myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase.  

PubMed

Outstanding results have been obtained in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) with first-line imatinib therapy. However, approximately 35% of patients will not obtain long-term benefit with this approach. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is a valuable second- and third-line therapy for appropriately selected patients. To identify useful prognostic indicators of transplantation outcome in postimatinib therapeutic interventions, we investigated the role of the HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI) together with levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) before HCT in 271 patients who underwent myeloablative HCT for CML in first chronic phase. Multivariate analysis showed both an HCT-CI score higher than 0 and CRP levels higher than 9 mg/L independently predict inferior survival and increased nonrelapse mortality at 100 days after HCT. CML patients without comorbidities (HCT-CI score 0) with normal CRP levels (0-9 mg/L) may therefore be candidates for early allogeneic HCT after failing imatinib. PMID:20304808

Pavl?, Jirí; Kew, Andrea K; Taylor-Roberts, Beatrice; Auner, Holger W; Marin, David; Olavarria, Eduardo; Kanfer, Edward J; MacDonald, Donald H; Milojkovic, Dragana; Rahemtulla, Amin; Rezvani, Katayoun; Goldman, John M; Apperley, Jane F; Szydlo, Richard M

2010-05-20

34

Outcome of patients with abnl(17p) acute myeloid leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and abnormalities of chromosome 17p (abnl(17p)) are at high-risk of treatment failure. Poor outcomes have been reported with conventional chemotherapy. To accurately define the outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in patients with abnl(17p) AML, we analyzed the results of patients with this abnormality who received an allogeneic HSCT between January 2000 and December 2010 in 1 of 4 well-defined cohorts (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Haemato Oncology Foundation for Adults in the Netherlands, Study Alliance Leukemia, German Cooperative Transplant Study Group). Data of 201 patients with a median age of 54 years were evaluable. At the time of analysis, 30 patients were alive with a median follow-up of 30 months. The 3-year probability of overall survival (OS) was 15% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10-20). The cumulative incidence of relapse at 3 years was 49% (95% CI, 42-56). Notably, almost 70% of all relapses occurred within the first 6 months after HSCT. Patients who were transplanted in first complete remission (CR1) had superior OS compared with those with advanced disease (22% vs 9%, P < .001). Our findings confirm the high-risk of treatment failure in abnl(17p) AML even after allogeneic HSCT in CR1. Although allogeneic HSCT remains a valid option in CR1, alternative treatment strategies are needed for the remaining patients. PMID:24652988

Middeke, Jan M; Fang, Min; Cornelissen, Jan J; Mohr, Brigitte; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Stadler, Michael; Sanz, Jaime; Baurmann, Herrad; Bug, Gesine; Schäfer-Eckart, Kerstin; Hegenbart, Ute; Bochtler, Tilmann; Röllig, Christoph; Stölzel, Friedrich; Walter, Roland B; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Löwenberg, Bob; Schetelig, Johannes

2014-05-01

35

Growth after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Previous studies have shown that hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) may result in growth impairment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the growth during 5 yr after HSCT and to determine factors that influence final adult height (FAH). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who received HSCT. Among a total of 37 eligible patients, we selected 24 patients who began puberty at 5 yr after HSCT (Group 1) and 19 patients who reached FAH without relapse (Group 2). In Group 1, with younger age at HSCT, sex, steroid treatment, hypogonadism and hypothyroidism were not significantly associated with growth impairment 5 yr after HSCT. History of radiotherapy (RT) significantly impaired the 5 yr growth after HSCT. Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) only temporarily impaired growth after HSCT. In Group 2, with younger age at HSCT, steroid treatment and hypogonadism did not significantly reduce FAH. History of RT significantly reduced FAH. Growth impairment after HSCT may occur in AML patients, but in patients without a history of RT, growth impairment seemed to be temporary and was mitigated by catch-up growth. PMID:23341720

Chung, Seung Joon; Park, Seung Wan; Kim, Min Kyoung; Kang, Min Jae; Lee, Young Ah; Lee, Seong Yong; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won; Kang, Hyoung Jin; Park, Kyung Duk; Shin, Hee Young; Ahn, Hyo Seop

2013-01-01

36

Central nervous system involvement in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Knowledge regarding the rate of central nervous system (CNS) involvement and risk factors for its development in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) are limited. In this study we retrospectively evaluated CNS involvement in 327 patients who underwent myeloablative HCT at our institute in which all patients have cerebrospinal fluid examined by morphology or flow cytometry before HCT. Twenty-two patients (7%) had CNS AML involvement at pre-HCT evaluation. Covariates associated with such involvement were higher WBC at diagnosis, prior CNS or other extramedullary disease, and evidence of systemic disease at pre-HCT evaluation. History of prior CNS disease and disease status at pre-HCT evaluation allowed stratification of patients into 3 risk groups: 35% (20 patients), 16% (51 patients), and 3% (256 patients) rates of pre-HCT CNS involvement. Treatment of pre-HCT CNS disease was uniformly successful regardless of whether cranial irradiation therapy was used. Perhaps as a result, presence of CNS pre-HCT had no independent influence on post-HCT outcome, which was primarily influenced by status of systemic disease at time of HCT. PMID:25545726

Bar, Merav; Tong, Weigang; Othus, Megan; Loeb, Keith R; Estey, Elihu H

2015-03-01

37

Outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia patients with central nervous system involvement.  

PubMed

Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rare and associated with poor outcomes. Therefore, CNS involvement in AML is an indicator for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). However, the impact of CNS involvement in AML on the outcome of allo-HSCT remains unclear. We performed a large-scale nationwide retrospective analysis to elucidate the outcomes of allo-HSCT on AML with CNS involvement (CNS+AML). Clinical data were collected from a registry database of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. CNS involvement was defined as the infiltration of leukemia cells into the CNS or myeloid sarcoma in the CNS identified at any time from diagnosis to transplantation. One hundred fifty-seven patients with CNS+AML underwent allo-HSCT between 2006 and 2011. The estimated overall survival, cumulative incidence of relapse and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years for CNS+AML (51.2%, 30.2%, and 14.5%, respectively) were comparable with those for AML without CNS involvement (48.6%, 27.4%, and 22.0%, respectively). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that the development of chronic graft-versus-host disease, disease status, and cytogenetic risk category were independent prognostic factors for overall survival for CNS+AML. These results suggest that allo-HSCT may improve outcomes in patients with CNS+AML. PMID:25196856

Aoki, Jun; Ishiyama, Ken; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Kanamori, Heiwa; Eto, Tetsuya; Iwato, Koji; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Morishima, Yasuo; Nagamura, Tokiko; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi

2014-12-01

38

Extramedullary relapse of acute myeloid leukemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: incidence, risk factors and outcomes  

PubMed Central

Extramedullary relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia is a contributor to post-transplant mortality but risk factors for, and outcomes of, this condition are not well characterized. We analyzed 257 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia at our institution to characterize extramedullary relapse, identify predictive variables and assess outcomes. The 5-year cumulative incidence of isolated extramedullary or bone marrow relapse was 9% and 29%, respectively. Extramedullary relapse occurred later than marrow relapse and most frequently involved skin and soft tissue. Factors predictive of extramedullary relapse after transplantation included previous extramedullary disease, French-American-British classification M4/M5 leukemia, high risk cytogenetics, and advanced disease status at the time of transplantation. Children were more likely than adults to develop extramedullary relapse, a finding probably explained by an overrepresentation of extramedullary disease prior to transplantation and M4/M5 leukemia in children. Acute graft-versus-host disease was not protective against relapse. Unlike medullary relapse, chronic graft-versus-host disease was not protective against extramedullary relapse. The survival rate after extramedullary relapse was 30% at 1 year and 12% at 2 years. Extramedullary relapse is a significant contributor to mortality after allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and appears to be resistant to the immunotherapeutic effect of allogeneic grafting. Effective strategies for patients with extramedullary relapse are needed to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:23065502

Harris, Andrew C.; Kitko, Carrie L.; Couriel, Daniel R.; Braun, Thomas M.; Choi, Sung W.; Magenau, John; Mineishi, Shin; Pawarode, Attaphol; Yanik, Gregory; Levine, John E.

2013-01-01

39

Mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia have altered capacity to expand differentiated hematopoietic progenitors.  

PubMed

The bone marrow microenvironment may be permissive to the emergence and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Studying interactions between the microenvironment and leukemia cells should provide new insight for therapeutic advances. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are central to the maintenance of the hematopoietic niche. Here we compared the functions and gene expression patterns of MSCs derived from bone marrow aspirates of healthy donors and patients with AML. MSCs expanded from AML patients had heterogeneous morphology and displayed a wide range of proliferation capacity compared to MSCs from healthy controls. The ability of AML-MSCs to support the expansion of committed hematopoietic progenitors from umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) cells may be impaired while the expression of genes associated with maintaining hematopoietic quiescence appeared to be increased in AML-MSCs compared to healthy donors. These results highlight important potential differences in the biologic profile of MSCs from AML patients compared to healthy donors that may contribute to the emergence or progression of leukemia. PMID:25703353

Chandran, Priya; Le, Yevgeniya; Li, Yuhua; Sabloff, Mitchell; Mehic, Jelica; Rosu-Myles, Michael; Allan, David S

2015-04-01

40

Density of the Notch ligand Delta1 determines generation of B and T cell precursors from hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Notch signaling regulates multiple cell fate decisions by hematopoietic precursors. To address whether different amounts of Notch ligand influence lineage choices, we cultured murine bone marrow lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit+ cells with increasing densities of immobilized Delta1(ext-IgG) consisting of the extracellular domain of Delta1 fused to the Fc domain of human IgG1. We found that relatively lower densities of Delta1(ext-IgG) enhanced the generation of Sca-1(+)c-kit+ cells, Thy1(+)CD25+ early T cell precursors, and B220(+)CD43(-/lo) cells that, when cocultured with OP9 stroma cells, differentiated into CD19+ early B cell precursors. Higher densities of Delta1(ext-IgG) also enhanced the generation of Sca-1(+)c-kit+ precursor cells and promoted the development of Thy1(+)CD25+ cells, but inhibited the development of B220(+)CD43(-/lo) cells. Analyses of further isolated precursor populations suggested that the enhanced generation of T and B cell precursors resulted from the effects on multipotent rather than lymphoid-committed precursors. The results demonstrate the density-dependent effects of Delta1 on fate decisions of hematopoietic precursors at multiple maturational stages and substantiate the previously unrecognized ability of Delta1 to enhance the development of both early B and T precursor cells. PMID:15851488

Dallas, Mari H; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Delaney, Colleen; Kato, Keizo; Bernstein, Irwin D

2005-05-01

41

Hematopoietic stem cell expansion and distinct myeloid developmental abnormalities in a murine model of the AML1-ETO translocation.  

PubMed

The t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation, which fuses the ETO gene on human chromosome 8 with the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 (AML1-ETO), is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). It is seen in approximately 12 to 15% of AML cases and is present in about 40% of AML cases with a French-American-British classified M2 phenotype. We have generated a murine model of the t(8;21) translocation by retroviral expression of AML1-ETO in purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Animals reconstituted with AML1-ETO-expressing cells recapitulate the hematopoietic developmental abnormalities seen in the bone marrow of human patients with the t(8;21) translocation. Primitive myeloblasts were increased to approximately 10% of bone marrow by 10 months posttransplant. Consistent with this observation was a 50-fold increase in myeloid colony-forming cells in vitro. Accumulation of late-stage metamyelocytes was also observed in bone marrow along with an increase in immature eosinophilic myelocytes that showed abnormal basophilic granulation. HSC numbers in the bone marrow of 10-month-posttransplant animals were 29-fold greater than in transplant-matched control mice, suggesting that AML1-ETO expression overrides the normal genetic control of HSC pool size. In summary, AMLI-ETO-expressing animals recapitulate many (and perhaps all) of the developmental abnormalities seen in human patients with the t(8;21) translocation, although the animals do not develop leukemia or disseminated disease in peripheral tissues like the liver or spleen. This suggests that the principal contribution of AML1-ETO to acute myeloid leukemia is the inhibition of multiple developmental pathways. PMID:12101243

de Guzman, Cristina G; Warren, Alan J; Zhang, Zheng; Gartland, Larry; Erickson, Paul; Drabkin, Harry; Hiebert, Scott W; Klug, Christopher A

2002-08-01

42

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Distinct Myeloid Developmental Abnormalities in a Murine Model of the AML1-ETO Translocation  

PubMed Central

The t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation, which fuses the ETO gene on human chromosome 8 with the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 (AML1-ETO), is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). It is seen in approximately 12 to 15% of AML cases and is present in about 40% of AML cases with a French-American-British classified M2 phenotype. We have generated a murine model of the t(8;21) translocation by retroviral expression of AML1-ETO in purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Animals reconstituted with AML1-ETO-expressing cells recapitulate the hematopoietic developmental abnormalities seen in the bone marrow of human patients with the t(8;21) translocation. Primitive myeloblasts were increased to approximately 10% of bone marrow by 10 months posttransplant. Consistent with this observation was a 50-fold increase in myeloid colony-forming cells in vitro. Accumulation of late-stage metamyelocytes was also observed in bone marrow along with an increase in immature eosinophilic myelocytes that showed abnormal basophilic granulation. HSC numbers in the bone marrow of 10-month-posttransplant animals were 29-fold greater than in transplant-matched control mice, suggesting that AML1-ETO expression overrides the normal genetic control of HSC pool size. In summary, AMLI-ETO-expressing animals recapitulate many (and perhaps all) of the developmental abnormalities seen in human patients with the t(8;21) translocation, although the animals do not develop leukemia or disseminated disease in peripheral tissues like the liver or spleen. This suggests that the principal contribution of AML1-ETO to acute myeloid leukemia is the inhibition of multiple developmental pathways. PMID:12101243

de Guzman, Cristina G.; Warren, Alan J.; Zhang, Zheng; Gartland, Larry; Erickson, Paul; Drabkin, Harry; Hiebert, Scott W.; Klug, Christopher A.

2002-01-01

43

Adoptive precursor cell therapy to enhance immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mouse and man  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. T cell deficiency following\\u000a transplantation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss adoptive transfer of committed precursor\\u000a cells to enhance T cell reconstitution and improve overall prognosis after transplantation.

Amanda M. Holland; Johannes L. Zakrzewski; Gabrielle L. Goldberg; Arnab Ghosh

2008-01-01

44

Analysis of non-HLA genomic risk factors in HLA-matched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation is the main curative therapy for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who do not respond to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It has been proposed that non-human leukocyte antigen gene polymorphisms influence outcome after hematopoietic cell transplantation and could be used alongside traditional patient-donor and transplant characteristics to create a recipient risk profile associated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Design and Methods A previous study from the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation showed that the absence of recipient tumor necrosis factor receptor II, absence of donor interleukin 10 ATA/ACC and presence of donor interleukin 1 receptor antagonist allele 2 genotypes were associated with decreased survival and increased non-relapse mortality in adult patients with chronic myeloid leukemia undergoing myeloablative human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling transplantation. To explore these associations in unrelated donor transplantation, these polymorphisms were genotyped in 383 adult patients with chronic myeloid leukemia who underwent hematopoietic cell transplantation from unrelated donors matched for 10/10 human leukocyte antigens. Results The polymorphisms were not associated with overall survival, non-relapse mortality, relapse or acute graft-versus-host disease in the unrelated donor cohort. Comparison of the unrelated donor and human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling cohorts showed differences in survival and clinical characteristics. Conclusions We did not confirm that non-human leukocyte antigen polymorphisms were associated with outcomes in myeloablative unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia, possibly because of the strong association between clinical variables and outcome which masked more subtle genetic effects. PMID:22271889

Pearce, Kim F.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Haagenson, Michael; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Norden, Jean; Collin, Matthew P.; Klein, John P.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Lowerson, Shelagh A.; Davies, Stella; Dickinson, Anne M.

2012-01-01

45

Impact of genomic risk factors on outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Non-HLA gene polymorphisms have been shown to influence outcome after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Results were derived from heterogeneous, small populations and their value remains a matter of debate. Design and Methods In this study, we assessed the effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes for interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL1RN), interleukin 4 (IL4), interleukin 6 (IL6), interleukin 10 (IL10), interferon (IFNG), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and the cell surface receptors tumor necrosis factor receptor II (TNFRSFIB), vitamin D receptor (VDR) and estrogen receptor alpha (ESR1) in a homogeneous cohort of 228 HLA identical sibling transplants for chronic myeloid leukemia. Three good predictors of overall survival, identified via statistical methods including Cox regression analysis, were investigated for their effects on transplant-related mortality and relapse. Predictive power was assessed after integration into the established European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) risk score. Results Absence of patient TNFRSFIB 196R, absence of donor IL10 ATA/ACC and presence of donor IL1RN allele 2 genotypes were associated with increased transplantation-related mortality and decreased survival. Application of prediction error and concordance index statistics gave evidence that integration improved the EBMT risk score. Conclusions Non-HLA genotypes were associated with survival after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. When three genetic polymorphisms were added into the EBMT risk model they improved the goodness of fit. Non-HLA genotyping could, therefore, be used to improve donor selection algorithms and risk assessment prior to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:20305143

Dickinson, Anne M.; Pearce, Kim F.; Norden, Jean; O’Brien, Stephen G.; Holler, Ernst; Bickeböller, Heike; Balavarca, Yesilda; Rocha, Vanderson; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Hromadnikova, Ilona; Sedlacek, Petr; Niederwieser, Dietger; Brand, Ronald; Ruutu, Tapani; Apperley, Jane; Szydlo, Richard; Goulmy, Els; Siegert, Wolfgang; de Witte, Theo; Gratwohl, Alois

2010-01-01

46

Daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion for extramedullary relapse of acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Myeloid sarcoma is a rare tumor consisting of myeloid blasts that involve anatomic sites outside the bone marrow. Fatal prognosis is inevitable in patients with extramedullary relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and no standard treatments are available yet. We report the first case of extramedullary relapse after HSCT treated with a combination of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine (DAC) regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). This treatment induced a new and durable remission in our patient. The favorable toxicity profile and the reduced cost make this combination worthy of further investigations. PMID:24066245

Sanna, Marco; Caocci, Giovanni; Vacca, Adriana; Piras, Eugenia; Orrù, Federica; La Nasa, Giorgio

2013-01-01

47

Computational Modeling of the Hematopoietic Erythroid-Myeloid Switch Reveals Insights into  

E-print Network

Radcliffe Hospital, Headington, Oxford, United Kingdom, 3 Lund Strategic Research Center for Stem Cell Biology and Cell Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden, 4 Computational Biology and Biological Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden Abstract Hematopoietic stem cell lineage

Peterson, Carsten

48

Molecular analysis of hematopoietic colonies derived from chronic myeloid leukemia patients: interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization compared with RT-PCR  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study we compared interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the molecular analysis of hematopoietic colonies derived from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Molecular analysis of individual colonies is often performed to monitor purging efficacy in CML. We harvested individual colony-forming unit granulocyte–macrophage (CFU-GM) colonies. One half was analyzed with

SFT Thijsen; GJ Schuurhuis; JW van Oostveen; AP Theijsmeijer; MMAC Langenhuijsen; GJ Ossenkoppele

1997-01-01

49

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in second chronic phase attained by imatinib after onset of blast crisis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prognosis for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in blast crisis (BC) remains dismal even with the availability\\u000a of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib, since it only offers short-term benefit in most cases. Allogeneic hematopoietic\\u000a stem cell transplantation (HSCT) seems to be a viable option for BC-CML patients who attained remission. We treated ten patients\\u000a with ablative allogeneic

Ying Wang; Depei Wu; Aining Sun; Zhengming Jin; Huiying Qiu; Miao Miao; Xiaowen Tang; Zhengzheng Fu

2008-01-01

50

Toll-Like Receptor 4/Stem Cell Antigen 1 Signaling Promotes Hematopoietic Precursor Cell Commitment to Granulocyte Development during the Granulopoietic Response to Escherichia coli Bacteremia  

PubMed Central

In response to severe bacterial infection, bone marrow hematopoietic activity shifts toward promoting granulopoiesis. The underlying cell signaling mechanisms remain obscure. To study the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) signaling in this process, bacteremia was induced in mice by intravenous injection of Escherichia coli. A subgroup of animals also received intravenous 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU). In a separate set of experiments, bone marrow lineage-negative (lin?) stem cell growth factor receptor-positive (c-kit+) Sca-1? cells containing primarily common myeloid progenitors were cultured in vitro without or with E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In genotypic background control mice, bacteremia significantly upregulated Sca-1 expression by lin? c-kit+ cells, as reflected by a marked increase in BrdU-negative lin? c-kit+ Sca-1+ cells in the bone marrow. In mice with the TLR4 gene deletion, this bacteremia-evoked Sca-1 response was blocked. In vitro, LPS induced a dose-dependent increase in Sca-1 expression by cultured marrow lin? c-kit+ Sca-1? cells. LPS-induced upregulation of Sca-1 expression was regulated at the transcriptional level. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK) activity with the specific inhibitor SP600125 suppressed LPS-induced upregulation of Sca-1 expression by marrow lin? c-kit+ Sca-1? cells. Engagement of Sca-1 with anti-Sca-1 antibodies enhanced the expression of Sfpi1 spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) proviral integration 1 (PU.1) in marrow lin? c-kit+ Sca-1? cells cultured with LPS. Sca-1 null mice failed to maintain the marrow pool of granulopoietic cells following bacteremia. These results demonstrate that TLR4/Sca-1 signaling plays an important role in the regulation of hematopoietic precursor cell programming and their enhancement of granulocyte lineage commitment in response to E. coli bacteremia. PMID:23545304

Shi, Xin; Siggins, Robert W.; Stanford, William L.; Melvan, John N.; Basson, Marc D.

2013-01-01

51

Genotypic and functional diversity of phenotypically defined primitive hematopoietic cells in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Much progress has been made in the management of chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML), but there is a continuing imperative to develop curative treatments, predict patient responses to specific modalities, and anticipate disease relapse or progression. These needs underlie continuing interest in methods to detect and quantify the relevant leukemic cells in clinical samples with improved reliability and specificity. We report the results of comparing three methods to enumerate primitive CP-CML cells in the same samples: genotyping CD34(+)38(-) cells directly by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and measuring BCR-ABL1 transcript-genotyped colony-forming cell outputs in either 5-week long-term cultures (LTCs) containing non-engineered mouse fibroblasts or in 6-week LTCs containing mouse fibroblasts engineered to produce human Steel factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and IL-3. The results demonstrate that the first two methods significantly overestimate the prevalence of primitive CP-CML cells by comparison to the third. In additional studies, we found that CML-CD34(+) cells can repopulate the marrow and spleen of serially transplanted adult NOD/SCID-IL-2R? chain-null mice for more than 1 year with an almost exclusive myeloid differentiation in primary and secondary recipients and without evidence of disease progression. These findings underscore the importance of long-term functional in vitro and in vivo endpoints to identify and characterize CP-CML stem cells. PMID:23851302

Sloma, Ivan; Beer, Philip A; Saw, Kyi Min; Chan, Matthew; Leung, Donna; Raghuram, Kamini; Brimacombe, Cedric; Johnston, Bobby; Lambie, Karen; Forrest, Donna; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Eaves, Connie J

2013-10-01

52

The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 regulates RANK gene expression in myeloid progenitors  

SciTech Connect

Osteoclasts are bone resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 is critical for osteoclastogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of PU.1-regulated osteoclastogenesis have not been explored. Here, we present evidence that the receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B (RANK) gene that has been shown to be crucial for osteoclastogenesis is a transcriptional target of PU.1. The PU.1 {sup -/-} progenitor cells failed to express the RANK gene and reconstitution of PU.1 in these cells induced RANK expression. Treatment of the PU.1 reconstituted cells with M-CSF and RANKL further augmented the RANK gene expression. To explore the regulatory mechanism of the RANK gene expression by PU.1, we have cloned the human RANK promoter. Transient transfection assays have revealed that the 2.2-kb RANK promoter was functional in a monocyte line RAW264.7, whereas co-transfection of PU.1 transactivated the RANK promoter in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PU.1 regulates the RANK gene transcription and this may represent one of the key roles of PU.1 in osteoclast differentiation.

Kwon, Oh Hyung [Systemic Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Oun-dong, Yusong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chong-Kil [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ik [Liver Cell Signal Transduction Laboratory, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Oun-dong, Yusong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Sang-Gi [Department of Biology, School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Chungnam National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyun-Jun [Systemic Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, 52 Oun-dong, Yusong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: hjlee7@kribb.re.kr

2005-09-23

53

A B220+ CD117+ CD19- hematopoietic progenitor with potent lymphoid and myeloid developmental potential.  

PubMed

In this report, we identify in the bone marrow (BM) of normal mice a subpopulation of B220+ CD117+ CD19- NK1.1- cells with potent lymphoid and myeloid developmental potential. These cells represent 0.1-0.2% of nucleated BM cells. By limiting dilution analysis in the presence of the appropriate combination of stromal cells and cytokines, 1 in 5-10 sorted cells formed B cells, 1 in 10-15 formed T cells and 1 in 5-10 generated macrophages. When cultured on a mixture of OP9 stroma and OP9 stromal cells expressing the Notch ligand Delta-like-1, single cells generated both T and B cells. Following intravenous infusion, freshly sorted cells transiently reconstituted both the T and B cell progenitor compartments, generating cohorts of mature T and B lymphocytes. The relationship between B220+ CD117+ CD19- NK1.1- cells of wild-type mice and other multi-lineage BM progenitors is discussed. PMID:15971276

Balciunaite, Gina; Ceredig, Rod; Massa, Steffen; Rolink, Antonius G

2005-07-01

54

Development and Function of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Generated From Mouse Embryonic and Hematopoietic Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Emerging evidence suggests that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have great potential as a novel immune intervention modality in the fields of transplantation and autoimmune diseases. Thus far, efforts to develop MDSC-based therapeutic strategies have been hampered by the lack of a reliable source of MDSCs. Here we show that functional MDSCs can be efficiently generated from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and bone marrow hematopoietic stem (HS) cells. In vitro-derived MDSCs encompass two homogenous subpopulations: CD115+Ly-6C+ and CD115+Ly-6C? cells. The CD115+Ly-6C+ subset is equivalent to the monocytic Gr-1+CD115+F4/80+ MDSCs found in tumor-bearing mice. In contrast, the CD115+Ly-6C? cells, a previously unreported population of MDSCs, resemble the granulocyte/macrophage progenitors developmentally. In vitro, ES- and HS-MDSCs exhibit robust suppression against T-cell proliferation induced by polyclonal stimuli or alloantigens via multiple mechanisms involving nitric oxide synthase-mediated NO production and interleukin (IL)-10. Impressively, they display even stronger suppressive activity and significantly enhance ability to induce CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T-cell development compared with tumor-derived MDSCs. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of ES-MDSCs can effectively prevent alloreactive T-cell-mediated lethal graft-versus-host disease, leading to nearly 82% long-term survival among treated mice. The successful in vitro generation of MDSCs may represent a critical step toward potential clinical application of MDSCs. PMID:20073041

Zhou, Zuping; French, Deborah L.; Ma, Ge; Eisenstein, Samuel; Chen, Ying; Divino, Celia M.; Keller, Gordon; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Pan, Ping-Ying

2015-01-01

55

Induced pluripotent stem cells from GMP-grade hematopoietic progenitor cells and mononuclear myeloid cells  

PubMed Central

Introduction The induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology allows generation of patient-specific pluripotent stem cells, thereby providing a novel cell-therapy platform for severe degenerative diseases. One of the key issues for clinical-grade iPSC derivation is the accessibility of donor cells used for reprogramming. Methods We examined the feasibility of reprogramming mobilized GMP-grade hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and tested the pluripotency of derived iPS clones. Results Ectopic expression of OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC in HPCs and PBMCs resulted in rapid iPSC derivation. Long-term time-lapse imaging revealed efficient iPSC growth under serum- and feeder-free conditions with frequent mitotic events. HPC- and PBMC-derived iPS cells expressed pluripotency-associated markers, including SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, and NANOG. The global gene-expression profiles demonstrated the induction of endogenous pluripotent genes, such as LIN28, TERT, DPPA4, and PODXL, in derived iPSCs. iPSC clones from blood and other cell sources showed similar ultrastructural morphologies and genome-wide gene-expression profiles. On spontaneous and guided differentiation, HPC- and PBMC-derived iPSCs were differentiated into cells of three germ layers, including insulin-producing cells through endodermal lineage, verifying the pluripotency of the blood-derived iPSC clones. Conclusions Because the use of blood cells allows minimally invasive tissue procurement under GMP conditions and rapid cellular reprogramming, mobilized HPCs and unmobilized PBMCs would be ideal somatic cell sources for clinical-grade iPSC derivation, especially from diabetes patients complicated by slow-healing wounds. PMID:22088171

2011-01-01

56

Transforming growth factor beta 1 selectively regulates early murine hematopoietic progenitors and inhibits the growth of IL-3-dependent myeloid leukemia cell lines  

PubMed Central

Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) has been shown to be associated with active centers of hematopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in the developing fetus. Therefore, the effects of TGF-beta 1 on mouse hematopoiesis were studied. TGF-beta 1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-3- induced bone marrow proliferation, but it does not inhibit the proliferation induced by granulocyte/macrophage, colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte CSF, and erythropoietin (Epo). TGF-beta 1 also inhibits IL-3-induced multipotential colony formation of bone marrow cells in soft agar, which includes early erythroid differentiation, while Epo-induced terminal differentiation is unaffected. In addition, IL-3-induced granulocyte/macrophage colonies were inhibited; however, small clusters of differentiated myeloid cells were consistently seen in cultures containing IL-3 and TGF-beta 1. Thus, TGF-beta 1 selectively inhibits early hematopoietic progenitor growth and differentiation but not more mature progenitors. TGF-beta 1 is also a potent inhibitor of IL-3-dependent and -independent myelomonocytic leukemic cell growth, while the more mature erythroid and macrophage leukemias are insensitive. Therefore, TGF-beta 1 functions as a selective regulator of differentiating normal hematopoietic cells, and suppresses myeloid leukemic cell growth. PMID:3261777

1988-01-01

57

Stress hematopoiesis reveals abnormal control of self-renewal, lineage bias, and myeloid differentiation in Mll partial tandem duplication (Mll-PTD) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells  

PubMed Central

One mechanism for disrupting the MLL gene in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is through partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD); however, the mechanism by which MLL-PTD contributes to MDS and AML development and maintenance is currently unknown. Herein, we investigated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) phenotypes of Mll-PTD knock-in mice. Although HSPCs (Lin?Sca1+Kit+ (LSK)/SLAM+ and LSK) in MllPTD/WT mice are reduced in absolute number in steady state because of increased apoptosis, they have a proliferative advantage in colony replating assays, CFU-spleen assays, and competitive transplantation assays over wild-type HSPCs. The MllPTD/WT-derived phenotypic short-term (ST)–HSCs/multipotent progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors have self-renewal capability, rescuing hematopoiesis by giving rise to long-term repopulating cells in recipient mice with an unexpected myeloid differentiation blockade and lymphoid-lineage bias. However, MllPTD/WT HSPCs never develop leukemia in primary or recipient mice, suggesting that additional genetic and/or epigenetic defects are necessary for full leukemogenic transformation. Thus, the Mll-PTD aberrantly alters HSPCs, enhances self-renewal, causes lineage bias, and blocks myeloid differentiation. These findings provide a framework by which we can ascertain the underlying pathogenic role of MLL-PTD in the clonal evolution of human leukemia, which should facilitate improved therapies and patient outcomes. PMID:22740449

Zhang, Yue; Yan, Xiaomei; Sashida, Goro; Zhao, Xinghui; Rao, Yalan; Goyama, Susumu; Whitman, Susan P.; Zorko, Nicholas; Bernot, Kelsie; Conway, Rajeana M.; Witte, David; Wang, Qian-fei; Tenen, Daniel G.; Xiao, Zhijian; Marcucci, Guido; Mulloy, James C.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Caligiuri, Michael A.

2012-01-01

58

A novel role of hematopoietic CCL5 in promoting triple-negative mammary tumor progression by regulating generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells  

PubMed Central

CCL5 is a member of the CC chemokine family expressed in a wide array of immune and non-immune cells in response to stress signals. CCL5 expression correlates with advanced human breast cancer. However, its functional significance and mode of action have not been established. Here, we show that CCL5-deficient mice are resistant to highly aggressive, triple-negative mammary tumor growth. Hematopoietic CCL5 is dominant in this phenotype. The absence of hematopoietic CCL5 causes aberrant generation of CD11b+/Gr-1+, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the bone marrow in response to tumor growth by accumulating Ly6Chi and Ly6G+ MDSCs with impaired capacity to suppress cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells. These properties of CCL5 are observed in both orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors. Antibody-mediated systemic blockade of CCL5 inhibits tumor progression and enhances the efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against non-immunogenic tumors. CCL5 also helps maintain the immunosuppressive capacity of human MDSCs. Our study uncovers a novel, chemokine-independent activity of the hematopoietically derived CCL5 that promotes mammary tumor progression via generating MDSCs in the bone marrow in cooperation with tumor-derived colony-stimulating factors. The study sheds considerable light on the interplay between the hematopoietic compartment and tumor niche. Because of the apparent dispensable nature of this molecule in normal physiology, CCL5 may represent an excellent therapeutic target in immunotherapy for breast cancer as well as a broad range of solid tumors that have significant amounts of MDSC infiltration. PMID:23266888

Zhang, Yan; Lv, Dandan; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Kurt, Robert A; Bu, Wen; Li, Yi; Ma, Xiaojing

2013-01-01

59

Expression Levels of Histone Deacetylases Determine the Cell Fate of Hematopoietic Progenitors*  

PubMed Central

Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are globally implicated in the growth and differentiation of mammalian cells; however, relatively little is known about their specific roles in hematopoiesis. In this study, we investigated the expression of HDACs in human hematopoietic cells and their functions during hematopoiesis. The expression of HDACs was very low in hematopoietic progenitor cells, which was accompanied by histone hyperacetylation. HDACs were detectable in more differentiated progenitors and erythroid precursors but down-regulated in mature myeloid cells especially granulocytes. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemias showed HDAC overexpression and histone hypoacetylation. Transcription of the HDAC1 gene was repressed by CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins during myeloid differentiation, and activated by GATA-1 during erythro-megakaryocytic differentiation. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of HDAC1 enhanced myeloid differentiation in immature hematopoietic cell lines and perturbed erythroid differentiation in progenitor cells. Myeloid but not erythro-megakaryocytic differentiation was blocked in mice transplanted with HDAC1-overexpressing hematopoietic progenitor cells. These findings suggest that HDAC is not merely an auxiliary factor of genetic elements but plays a direct role in the cell fate decision of hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:19736310

Wada, Taeko; Kikuchi, Jiro; Nishimura, Noriko; Shimizu, Rumi; Kitamura, Toshio; Furukawa, Yusuke

2009-01-01

60

MicroRNA-150 Expression Induces Myeloid Differentiation of Human Acute Leukemia Cells and Normal Hematopoietic Progenitors  

PubMed Central

In acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and blast crisis (BC) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) normal differentiation is impaired. Differentiation of immature stem/progenitor cells is critical for normal blood cell function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that interfere with gene expression by degrading messenger RNAs (mRNAs) or blocking protein translation. Aberrant miRNA expression is a feature of leukemia and miRNAs also play a significant role in normal hematopoiesis and differentiation. We have identified miRNAs differentially expressed in AML and BC CML and identified a new role for miR-150 in myeloid differentiation. Expression of miR-150 is low or absent in BC CML and AML patient samples and cell lines. We have found that expression of miR-150 in AML cell lines, CD34+ progenitor cells from healthy individuals, and primary BC CML and AML patient samples at levels similar to miR-150 expression in normal bone marrow promotes myeloid differentiation of these cells. MYB is a direct target of miR-150, and we have identified that the observed phenotype is partially mediated by MYB. In AML cell lines, differentiation of miR-150 expressing cells occurs independently of retinoic acid receptor ? (RARA) signaling. High-throughput gene expression profiling (GEP) studies of the AML cell lines HL60, PL21, and THP-1 suggest that activation of CEPBA, CEBPE, and cytokines associated with myeloid differentiation in miR-150 expressing cells as compared to control cells contributes to myeloid differentiation. These data suggest that miR-150 promotes myeloid differentiation, a previously uncharacterized role for this miRNA, and that absent or low miR-150 expression contributes to blocked myeloid differentiation in acute leukemia cells. PMID:24086639

Morris, Valerie A.; Zhang, Ailin; Yang, Taimei; Stirewalt, Derek L.; Ramamurthy, Ranjani; Meshinchi, Soheil; Oehler, Vivian G.

2013-01-01

61

Characteristics of Myeloid Differentiation and Maturation Pathway Derived from Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Exposed to Different Linear Energy Transfer Radiation Types  

PubMed Central

Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET)- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34+ cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34+ cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D0?=?0.65) than to X-rays (D0?=?1.07). Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a+ erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34+CD38? primitive cell fraction and the CD13+CD14+/?CD15? fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell surface antigen expression by mature myeloid cells derived from HSPCs exposed to each type of radiation was similar to that by controls. PMID:23555027

Monzen, Satoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

2013-01-01

62

Distinct regulation of c-myb gene expression by HoxA9, Meis1 and Pbx proteins in normal hematopoietic progenitors and transformed myeloid cells  

PubMed Central

The proto-oncogenic protein c-Myb is an essential regulator of hematopoiesis and is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant expression of c-Myb in myeloid leukemia, we analyzed and compared c-myb gene transcriptional regulation using two cell lines modeling normal hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and transformed myelomonocytic blasts. We report that the transcription factors HoxA9, Meis1, Pbx1 and Pbx2 bind in vivo to the c-myb locus and maintain its expression through different mechanisms in HPCs and leukemic cells. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Pbx2 in deregulating c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells cotransformed by the cooperative activity of HoxA9 and Meis1. This effect is associated with an intronic positioning of epigenetic marks and RNA polymerase II binding in the orthologous region of a previously described alternative promoter for c-myb. Taken together, our results could provide a first hint to explain the abnormal expression of c-myb in leukemic cells. PMID:22829978

Dassé, E; Volpe, G; Walton, D S; Wilson, N; Del Pozzo, W; O'Neill, L P; Slany, R K; Frampton, J; Dumon, S

2012-01-01

63

Estrogen signaling selectively induces apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitors and myeloid neoplasms without harming steady-state hematopoiesis.  

PubMed

Estrogens are potent regulators of mature hematopoietic cells; however, their effects on primitive and malignant hematopoietic cells remain unclear. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we observed differential expression and function of estrogen receptors (ERs) in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and progenitor subsets. ER? activation with the selective ER modulator (SERM) tamoxifen induced apoptosis in short-term HSCs and multipotent progenitors. In contrast, tamoxifen induced proliferation of quiescent long-term HSCs, altered the expression of self-renewal genes, and compromised hematopoietic reconstitution after myelotoxic stress, which was reversible. In mice, tamoxifen treatment blocked development of JAK2(V617F)-induced myeloproliferative neoplasm in vivo, induced apoptosis of human JAK2(V617F+) HSPCs in a xenograft model, and sensitized MLL-AF9(+) leukemias to chemotherapy. Apoptosis was selectively observed in mutant cells, and tamoxifen treatment only had a minor impact on steady-state hematopoiesis in disease-free animals. Together, these results uncover specific regulation of hematopoietic progenitors by estrogens and potential antileukemic properties of SERMs. PMID:25479752

Sánchez-Aguilera, Abel; Arranz, Lorena; Martín-Pérez, Daniel; García-García, Andrés; Stavropoulou, Vaia; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Isern, Joan; Martín-Salamanca, Sandra; Langa, Xavier; Skoda, Radek C; Schwaller, Jürg; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

2014-12-01

64

Errata 2 - Hematopoietic Diseases Coding Guide  

Cancer.gov

Page Diagnosis Change ICD-9-CM code to 23 Acute panmyelosis with myelofibrosis 238.79 Other lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues 30 Chronic myeloproliferative disease 238.79 Other lymphatic and hematopoietic tissues 31 Myelosclerosis with myeloid metaplasia

65

Natural killer–cell differentiation by myeloid progenitors  

PubMed Central

Because lymphoid progenitors can give rise to natural killer (NK) cells, NK ontogeny has been considered to be exclusively lymphoid. Here, we show that rare human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors develop into NK cells in vitro in the presence of cytokines (interleukin-7, interleukin-15, stem cell factor, and fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand). Adding hydrocortisone and stromal cells greatly increases the frequency of progenitor cells that give rise to NK cells through the recruitment of myeloid precursors, including common myeloid progenitors and granulocytic-monocytic precursors to the NK-cell lineage. WNT signaling was involved in this effect. Cells at more advanced stages of myeloid differentiation (with increasing expression of CD13 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor [M-CSFR]) could also differentiate into NK cells in the presence of cytokines, stroma, and hydrocortisone. NK cells derived from myeloid precursors (CD56?CD117+M-CSFR+) showed more expression of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors, a fraction of killer immunoglobulin–like receptor-positive–expressing cells that lacked NKG2A, a higher cytotoxicity compared with CD56?CD117+M-CSFR? precursor-derived NK cells and thus resemble the CD56dim subset of NK cells. Collectively, these studies show that NK cells can be derived from the myeloid lineage. PMID:21173117

Grzywacz, Bartosz; Kataria, Nandini; Kataria, Niketa; Blazar, Bruce R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.

2011-01-01

66

miR-363-5p regulates endothelial cell properties and their communication with hematopoietic precursor cells.  

PubMed

Recent findings have shown that the blood vessels of different organs exert an active role in regulating organ function. In detail, the endothelium that aligns the vasculature of most organs is fundamental in maintaining organ homeostasis and in promoting organ recovery following injury. Mechanistically, endothelial cells (EC) of tissues such as the liver, lungs or the bone marrow (BM) have been shown to produce "angiocrine" factors that promote organ recovery and restore normal organ function. Controlled production of angiocrine factors following organ injury is therefore essential to promote organ regeneration and to restore organ function. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordinated production and function of such "angiocrine" factors are largely undisclosed and were the subject of the present study. In detail, we identified for the first time a microRNA (miRNA) expressed by BM EC that regulates the expression of angiocrine genes involved in BM recovery following irradiation. Using a microarray-based approach, we identified several miRNA expressed by irradiated BMEC. After validating the variations in miRNA expression by semi-quantitative PCR, we chose to study further the ones showing consistent variations between experiments, and those predicted to regulate (directly or indirectly) angiogenic and angiocrine factors. Of the mi-RNA that were chosen, miR-363-5p (previously termed miR-363*) was subsequently shown to modulate the expression of numerous EC-specific genes including some angiocrine factors. By luciferase reporter assays, miR-363-5p is shown to regulate the expression of angiocrine factors tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (Timp-1) and thrombospondin 3 (THBS3) at post-transcriptional level. Moreover, miR-363-5p reduction using anti-miR is shown to affect EC angiogenic properties (such as the response to angiogenic factors stimulation) and the interaction between EC and hematopoietic precursors (particularly relevant in a BM setting). miR-363-5p reduction resulted in a significant decrease in EC tube formation on matrigel, but increased hematopoietic precursor cells adhesion onto EC, a mechanism that is shown to involve kit ligand-mediated cell adhesion. Taken together, we have identified a miRNA induced by irradiation that regulates angiocrine factors expression on EC and as such modulates EC properties. Further studies on the importance of miR-363-5p on normal BM function and in disease are warranted. PMID:24257019

Costa, Ana; Afonso, Joana; Osório, Catarina; Gomes, Ana L; Caiado, Francisco; Valente, Joana; Aguiar, Sandra I; Pinto, Francisco; Ramirez, Mário; Dias, Sérgio

2013-01-01

67

Development of chemotactic responsiveness in myeloid precursor cells: studies with a human leukemia cell line.  

PubMed Central

We have studied the events that occur during the development of chemotaxis in HL60, a promyelocytic leukemia cell line that acquires the features of mature neutrophils when exposed to dimethylformamide (DMF). Chemotactic function first appears between 48 and 96 hr of DMF induction and is associated not only with the coincidental development of deformability, spontaneous motility, greatly increased binding of fMet-Leu-Phe, and orientation but also with decreasing cell size and pleomorphism of nuclei. Surface adhesiveness develops earlier (36-48 hr) and is coincident with a 10-fold increase in protein synthesis not seen in other DMF-inducible cell lines. This burst of protein synthesis precedes the expression of chemotactic function. These studies show that the HL60 cell line can provide a useful model for delineating control mechanisms responsible for the development of complex cellular functions present in differentiated myeloid cells in humans. Images PMID:6932042

Fontana, J A; Wright, D G; Schiffman, E; Corcoran, B A; Deisseroth, A B

1980-01-01

68

Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus)  

PubMed Central

In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female. PMID:25653783

Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

2013-01-01

69

Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).  

PubMed

In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female. PMID:25653783

Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

2013-01-01

70

Histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment downregulates VLA-4 adhesion in hematopoietic stem cells and acute myeloid leukemia blast cells.  

PubMed

The alpha4beta1 integrin very late activation antigen-4 (VLA-4) is an alpha4 (CD49d)/beta1 (CD29) heterodimer. It plays a key role in the adhesion of both hematopoietic progenitor cells and leukemic blast cells to bone marrow stromal cells which express the vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) or produce fibronectin. VLA-4 expression has been associated with bone-marrow minimal residual disease, which causes relapse after chemotherapy in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. Conversely, the absence of VLA-4 reduces bone marrow retention of both hematopoietic progenitor and leukemic blast cells. We report on the downregulation of VLA-4/CD49d for various acute myelogenous leukemia cells lines, on primary cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukemia, and on hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors on treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitors suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid and valproic acid, which is associated with decreased adhesion to mesenchymal stromal cells. These findings suggest that HDAC-inhibitor treatment may on the one hand impair stem cell homing, while on the other it may improve peripheral blood stem cell mobilization and significantly help to reduce minimal residual disease from acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:18268283

Mahlknecht, Ulrich; Schönbein, Christiane

2008-03-01

71

Impact of cytogenetics on outcome of matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first or second complete remission  

PubMed Central

We compared the treatment-related mortality, relapse rate, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) by cytogenetic risk group of 261 patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission (CR1) and 299 patients in CR2 in undergoing matched unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). For patients in first CR, the DFS and OS at 5 years were similar for the favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk groups at 29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-56%) and 30% (22%-38%); 27% (19%-39%) and 29% (8%-56%); and 30% (95% CI, 22%-38%) and 30% (95% CI, 20%-41%), respectively. For patients in second CR, the DFS and OS at 5 years were 42% (95% CI, 33%-52%) and 35% (95% CI, 28%-43%); 38% (95% CI, 23%-54%) and 45% (95% CI, 35%-55%); and 37% (95% CI, 30%-45%) and 36% (95% CI, 21%-53%), respectively. Cytogenetics had little influence on the overall outcome for patients in first CR. In second CR, outcome was modestly, but not significantly, better for patients with favorable cytogenetics. The graft-versus-leukemia effect appeared effective, even in patients with unfavorable cytogenetics. However, treatment-related mortality was high. Matched unrelated donor HSCT should be considered for all patients with unfavorable cytogenetics who lack a suitable HLA-matched sibling donor. PMID:17374741

Dewald, Gordon W.; Gandham, Sharavi; Logan, Brent R.; Keating, Armand; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Litzow, Mark R.; Mehta, Jayesh; Pedersen, Tanya; Pérez, Waleska S.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Wetzler, Meir; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

2007-01-01

72

Acute myeloid leukemia arising from a donor derived premalignant hematopoietic clone: A possible mechanism for the origin of leukemia in donor cells  

PubMed Central

During recent years, it has become increasingly evident that donor leukemia following allogeneic transplant may be more common then realized in the past. We identified five cases of potential donor leukemia cases during past five years. The precise mechanism of the origin of such leukemias, however, remains poorly defined. In this short communication, we report a well documented case of donor-derived de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that developed fourteen years after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for treatment induced AML for his primary malignancy Immunoblastic lymphoma. This case allows us to postulate a possible mechanism of the origin of donor leukemia. The de novo AML clone contained a distinct cytogenetic abnormality, trisomy 11, which was simultaneously detected in preserved peripheral blood obtained at the time of transplantation as well as in the current bone marrow from an otherwise clinically and phenotypically normal donor. The findings from this unique case, provides insight into the process of leukemogenesis, and suggests that the sequence of events leading to leukemogenesis in this patient involved the senescence/apoptosis of normal donor hematopoietic cells due to telomere shortening resulting in the selective proliferation and transformation of this clone with MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) gene amplification. PMID:24918066

Dickson, Mark A.; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Hedvat, Cyrus V.; Jhanwar, Suresh C.; Brentjens, Renier J.

2014-01-01

73

Minimal Residual Disease as a Predictive Factor for Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First and Second Complete Remission  

PubMed Central

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is potentially curative for patients with high-risk leukemia, but disease recurrence remains the leading cause of treatment failure. Our objective was to determine the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) by any technique in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in morphologic first and second complete remission undergoing allo-SCT. Fifty nine patients were eligible for the study of 160 patients transplanted over ten years. For the MRD assessment we used multiparametric flow cytometry, cytogenetics and fluorescent in situ hybridization; 19 patients (32.2%) were identified as MRD positive. Patients with MRD had a consistently worse outcome over those without MRD, with 3-years leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 15.8% vs. 62.4% and overall survival (OS) of 17.5% vs. 62.3%. Relapse rate was significantly higher in MRD-positive patients; 3 years relapse rate in MRD-positive patients was 57.9% vs. 15.1% in MRD-negative patients. Detection of MRD in complete remission was associated with increased overall mortality (HR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.45–7.57; p = 0.0044) and relapse (HR = 5.26; 95% CI: 2.0–14.0; p = 0.001), even after controlling for other risk factors. Our study showed that for patients in morphologic complete remission the presence of MRD predicts for significantly increased risk of relapse and reduced LFS and OS. PMID:24213327

Grubovikj, Rada M.; Alavi, Asif; Koppel, Ahrin; Territo, Mary; Schiller, Gary J.

2012-01-01

74

In vitro differentiation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells toward the myeloid lineage occurs in response to Staphylococcus aureus and yeast species.  

PubMed

We have studied the effect of inactivated microbial stimuli (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Saccharomyces boulardii, and Staphylococcus aureus) on the in vitro differentiation of lineage negative (Lin(-)) hematopoietic progenitor mouse cells. Purified Lin(-) progenitors were co-cultured for 7 days with the stimuli, and cell differentiation was determined by flow cytometry analysis. All the stimuli assayed caused differentiation toward the myeloid lineage. S. boulardii and particularly C. glabrata were the stimuli that induced in a minor extent differentiation of Lin(-) cells, as the major population of differentiated cells corresponded to monocytes, whereas C. albicans and S. aureus induced differentiation beyond monocytes: to monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, respectively. Interestingly, signaling through TLR2 by its pure ligand Pam3CSK4 directed differentiation of Lin(-) cells almost exclusively to macrophages. These data support the notion that hematopoiesis can be modulated in response to microbial stimuli in a pathogen-dependent manner, being determined by the pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the pattern-recognition receptors involved, in order to generate the populations of mature cells required to deal with the pathogen. PMID:24650426

Maneu, Victoria; Estévez, Miguel Ángel; de Dios, Sara; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María Luisa; Megías, Javier

2014-01-01

75

Can a female donor for a male recipient decrease the relapse rate for patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation?  

PubMed

The mismatched minor histocompatibility antigens present on Y chromosome (H-Y) in male recipients receiving stem cells from female donors may contribute to the graft-versus-leukemia effect and results in a reduced relapse rate, especially in patients with high-risk disease. We retrospectively compared the outcomes of male patients with acute myeloid leukemia who received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from female donors (F-M) (174 patients) versus other gender combinations (667 patients). Median age was 50 years (range, 18 to 74 years). For the whole group, the 1-year cumulative incidence of relapse was significantly lower in F-M group (34.1% versus 41.3%, P = .044), whereas nonrelapse mortality (NRM) was higher (23.2% versus 15.7%, P = .004). For patients younger than 50 years beyond first complete remission, the F-M group was associated with lower relapse rate (42.5% versus 55.2%, P = .045) whereas NRM was not significantly different (35.8% versus 25.5%, P = .141). Although survival was not significantly improved, transplantation from a female donor for male recipient was associated with a lower relapse rate. When relapse is the most common concern for treatment failure, especially for younger patients, a female donor for a male recipient might be beneficial to decrease relapse rate after transplantation. Future studies are needed to explore how the H-Y mismatch may improve survival after transplantation. PMID:25540936

Kongtim, Piyanuch; Di Stasi, Antonio; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Adekola, Kehinde; Popat, Uday; Oran, Betul; Kebriaei, Partow; Andersson, Borje S; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

2015-04-01

76

Brain conditioning is instrumental for successful microglia reconstitution following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation  

PubMed Central

The recent hypothesis that postnatal microglia are maintained independently of circulating monocytes by local precursors that colonize the brain before birth has relevant implications for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), for which hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is applied to repopulate the recipient myeloid compartment, including microglia, with cells expressing the defective functional hydrolase. By studying wild-type and LSD mice at diverse time-points after HCT, we showed the occurrence of a short-term wave of brain infiltration by a fraction of the transplanted hematopoietic progenitors, independently from the administration of a preparatory regimen and from the presence of a disease state in the brain. However, only the use of a conditioning regimen capable of ablating functionally defined brain-resident myeloid precursors allowed turnover of microglia with the donor, mediated by local proliferation of early immigrants rather than entrance of mature cells from the circulation. PMID:22923692

Capotondo, Alessia; Milazzo, Rita; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Quattrini, Angelo; Palini, Alessio; Plati, Tiziana; Merella, Stefania; Nonis, Alessandro; di Serio, Clelia; Montini, Eugenio; Naldini, Luigi; Biffi, Alessandra

2012-01-01

77

Treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2-Gy total body irradiation followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative therapy for many patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. In this prospective phase II trial, we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML. Ninety-six patients with MDS (n = 36: 15 refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 1, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 2, 1 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 1) or AML (n = 60: 35 first complete remission [CR], 18 second CR, 3 advanced CR, 4 refractory relapse) were enrolled; median age was 51 (range, 1 to 60) years. Twelve patients had undergone a prior HCT with high-intensity conditioning. Patients received 14 g/m(2)/day treosulfan i.v. on days -6 to -4, 30 mg/m(2)/day fludarabine i.v. on days -6 to -2, and 2 Gy TBI on day 0, followed by infusion of hematopoietic cells from related (n = 27) or unrelated (n = 69) donors. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS), relapse incidence, and nonrelapse mortality were 73%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. The incidences of grades II to IV (III to IV) acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 59% (10%) and 47%, respectively. Two-year OS was not significantly different between MDS patients with poor-risk and good/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (69% and 85%, respectively) or between AML patients with unfavorable and favorable/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (64% and 76%, respectively). In AML patients, minimal residual disease (MRD; n = 10) at the time of HCT predicted higher relapse incidence (70% versus 18%) and lower OS (41% versus 79%) at 2 years, when compared with patients without MRD. In conclusion, treosulfan, fludarabine, and low-dose TBI provided effective conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML and resulted in low relapse incidence, regardless of cytogenetic risk. In patients with AML, MRD at the time of HCT remained a risk factor for post-HCT relapse. PMID:24440648

Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Gutman, Jonathan; Nemecek, Eneida R; Bar, Merav; Milano, Filippo; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Scott, Bart; Fang, Min; Wood, Brent; Pagel, John M; Baumgart, Joachim; Delaney, Colleen; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Estey, Elihu H; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Storer, Barry E; Deeg, Hans Joachim

2014-04-01

78

Reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a meta-analysis and systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning (MAC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Evidence acquisition: A comprehensive PubMed and Embase search was performed using the following keywords: “reduced-intensity”, “myeloablative”, “AML”, and “MDS”. The primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS), and the secondary endpoints were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Results: Eight studies (2 prospective and 6 retrospective) involving 6464 patients who received RIC (n = 1571) or MAC (n = 4893) alloHSCT were included in the analysis. Median age and the number of patients with low hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index scores and who received ex vivo or in vivo T cell depletion were higher in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm. Significant heterogeneity was not found among the studies for any of the endpoints except for grade II-IV aGVHD. OS (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.08; p = 0.47) and EFS (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.77-1.00; p = 0.05) were similar in the RIC and MAC arms, whereas RI (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.24-1.59; p < 0.00001) was higher in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm. The incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.96; p = 0.03) was lower in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm; however, NRM (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87-1.13; p = 0.85), total cGVHD (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.88-1.38; p = 0.38), and extensive cGVHD (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37; p = 0.95) were not significantly different between the two arms. Conclusion: RIC alloHSCT may be an effective treatment strategy for AML/MDS patients who are not suitable candidates for MAC alloHSCT. However, heterogeneity in baseline patient characteristics and treatment protocols may have influenced the outcomes of RIC alloHSCT in our analysis. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25550955

Zeng, Wen; Huang, Lifang; Meng, Fankai; Liu, Zeming; Zhou, Jianfeng; Sun, Hanying

2014-01-01

79

Cost analysis of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.  

PubMed

The purpose of the study was to analyze the first-year cost ofhematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) program for the treatment of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital (KCMH). The present retrospective study was carried out on 67 AML patients treated with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) at KCMH during the period of 1994 to 2005. The actual total one-year cost from the provider perspective were determined by the reviewing medical records for medical care costs (MCCs) and by adjusting data from the reports of annual cost analysis of KCMH for routine services costs (RSCs). All costs were converted to 2006 values using the Thai consumer price indices. It was found that the full cost of allogeneic HSCT (allo-HSCT) and autologous HSCT (auto-HSCT) in the first year of the program was $22,592.85 and $24,171.25 per case respectively. Cost-effective appraisal, comparing with chemotherapy, need to be studied further. PMID:18386705

Ngamkiatphaisan, Sureerat; Sriratanaban, Jiruth; Kamolratanakul, Pirom; Intragumtornchai, Tanin; Noppakun, Nopadon; Jongudomsuk, Pongpisut

2007-12-01

80

Impact of Pretransplantation Minimal Residual Disease, As Detected by Multiparametric Flow Cytometry, on Outcome of Myeloablative Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) benefits many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first remission. Hitherto, little attention has been given to the prognostic impact of pretransplantation minimal residual disease (MRD). Patients and Methods We retrospectively studied 99 consecutive patients receiving myeloablative HCT for AML in first morphologic remission. Ten-color multiparametric flow cytometry (MFC) was performed on bone marrow aspirates before HCT. MRD was identified as a cell population showing deviation from normal antigen expression patterns compared with normal or regenerating marrow. Any level of residual disease was considered MRD positive. Results Before HCT, 88 patients met morphologic criteria for complete remission (CR), whereas 11 had CR with incomplete blood count recovery (CRi). Twenty-four had MRD before HCT as determined by MFC. Two-year estimates of overall survival were 30.2% (range, 13.1% to 49.3%) and 76.6% (range, 64.4% to 85.1%) for MRD-positive and MRD-negative patients; 2-year estimates of relapse were 64.9% (range, 42.0% to 80.6%) and 17.6% (range, 9.5% to 27.9%). After adjustment for all or a subset of cytogenetic risk, secondary disease, incomplete blood count recovery, and abnormal karyotype pre-HCT, MRD-positive HCT was associated with increased overall mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 4.05; 95% CI, 1.90 to 8.62; P < .001) and relapse (HR, 8.49; 95% CI, 3.67 to 19.65; P < .001) relative to MRD-negative HCT. Conclusion These data suggest that pre-HCT MRD is associated with increased risk of relapse and death after myeloablative HCT for AML in first morphologic CR, even after controlling for other risk factors. PMID:21282535

Walter, Roland B.; Gooley, Ted A.; Wood, Brent L.; Milano, Filippo; Fang, Min; Sorror, Mohamed L.; Estey, Elihu H.; Salter, Alexander I.; Lansverk, Emily; Chien, Jason W.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Pagel, John M.

2011-01-01

81

Evidence for a positive role of SHIP in the BCR-ABL-mediated transformation of primitive murine hematopoietic cells and in human chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Previous studies suggested that the SH2-containing inositol-5-phosphatase (SHIP) may play a tumor suppressor-like function in BCR-ABL-mediated leukemogenesis. To investigate this possibility, we first developed a new assay for quantitating transplantable multilineage leukemia-initiating cells (L-ICs) in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-enriched mouse bone marrow (BM) cells transduced with a BCR-ABL-GFP (green fluorescent protein) retrovirus. The frequency of L-ICs (1 of 430 Sca-1+lin- cells) was 7-fold lower than the frequency of HSCs in the Sca-1+lin- subset transduced with a control virus (1 of 65 cells). Forced BCRABL expression was also accompanied by a loss of regular HSC activity consistent with the acquisition of an increased probability of differentiation. Interestingly, the frequency and in vivo behavior of wild-type (+/+) and SHIP-/- L-ICs were indistinguishable, and in vitro, Sca-1+lin- BCR-ABL-transduced SHIP-/- cells showed a modestly reduced factor independence. Comparison of different populations of cells from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase and normal human BM showed that the reduced expression of full-length SHIP proteins seen in the more mature (CD34-lin+) leukemic cells is not mirrored in the more primitive (CD34+lin-) leukemic cells. Thus, SHIP expression appears to be differently altered in the early and late stages of differentiation of BCR-ABL-transformed cells, underscoring the importance of the cellular context in which its mechanistic effects are analyzed. PMID:12829595

Jiang, Xiaoyan; Stuible, Matthew; Chalandon, Yves; Li, Andra; Chan, Wing Yiu; Eisterer, Wolfgang; Krystal, Gerald; Eaves, Allen; Eaves, Connie

2003-10-15

82

Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

Mayadev, Jyoti S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology University of California-Davis Medical Center, Davis, CA (United States); Douglas, James G., E-mail: drjay@u.washington.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Storer, Barry E. [University of Washington School of Public Health, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer [Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

2011-05-01

83

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor antagonist StemRegenin 1 promotes human plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cell development from CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.  

PubMed

The superiority of dendritic cells (DCs) as antigen-presenting cells has been exploited in numerous clinical trials, where generally monocyte-derived DCs (Mo-DCs) are injected to induce immunity in patients with cancer or infectious diseases. Despite promising expansion of antigen-specific T cells, the clinical responses following vaccination have been limited, indicating that further improvements of DC vaccine potency are necessary. Pre-clinical studies suggest that vaccination with combination of primary DC subsets, such as myeloid and plasmacytoid blood DCs (mDCs and pDCs, respectively), may result in stronger clinical responses. However, it is a challenge to obtain high enough numbers of primary DCs for immunotherapy, since their frequency in blood is very low. We therefore explored the possibility to generate them from hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Here, we show that by inhibiting the aryl hydrocarbon receptor with its antagonist StemRegenin 1 (SR1), clinical-scale numbers of functional BDCA2(+)BDCA4(+) pDCs, BDCA1(+) mDCs, and BDCA3(+)DNGR1(+) mDCs can be efficiently generated from human CD34(+) HPCs. The ex vivo-generated DCs were phenotypically and functionally comparable to peripheral blood DCs. They secreted high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-?, interleukin (IL)-12, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-? and upregulated co-stimulatory molecules and maturation markers following stimulation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Further, they induced potent allogeneic T-cell responses and activated antigen-experienced T cells. These findings demonstrate that SR1 can be exploited to generate high numbers of functional pDCs and mDCs from CD34(+) HPCs, providing an alternative option to Mo-DCs for immunotherapy of patients with cancer or infections. PMID:24325394

Thordardottir, Soley; Hangalapura, Basav N; Hutten, Tim; Cossu, Marta; Spanholtz, Jan; Schaap, Nicolaas; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van der Voort, Robbert; Dolstra, Harry

2014-05-01

84

Monocytic and promyelocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells may contribute to G-CSF-induced immune tolerance in haplo-identical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

We investigated the effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) on monocytic (M), promyelocytic (P), and granulocytic (G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) both in bone marrow and peripheral blood of 20 healthy donors and the association of MDSCs subgroups with acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD/cGvHD) in 62 patients who underwent haplo-identical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Patients who received a higher absolute counts of M-MDSCs or P-MDSCs exhibited lower incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD (P = 0.001; P = 0.031) and extensive cGvHD (P = 0.011; P = 0.021). In the multivariate analysis, absolute counts of MDSCs in allografts emerged as independent factors that reduced the occurrence of grade II-IV aGvHD (M-MDSCs: HR = 0.087, 95% CI = 0.020-0.381, P = 0.001; P-MDSCs: HR = 0.357, 95% CI = 0.139-0.922, P = 0.033) and extensive cGvHD (M-MDSCs: HR = 0.196, 95% CI = 0.043-0.894, P = 0.035; P-MDSCs: HR = 0.257, 95% CI = 0.070-0.942, P = 0.04). Delayed M-MDSC reconstitution was associated with aGvHD onset. The 3-year cumulative incidence of transplant related mortality and relapse, 3-year probability of disease-free survival, and overall survival did not differ significantly between these subgroups. Our results suggested that G-CSF-induced immune tolerance may be mediated by M/P-MDSCs in allo-HSCT. PMID:25303038

Lv, Meng; Zhao, Xiao-Su; Hu, Yue; Chang, Ying-Jun; Zhao, Xiang-Yu; Kong, Yuan; Zhang, Xiao-Hui; Xu, Lan-Ping; Liu, Kai-Yan; Huang, Xiao-Jun

2015-01-01

85

Relapse and Late Mortality in 5-Year Survivors of Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in First Chronic Phase  

PubMed Central

Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but its long-term outcomes are not well described. We studied the long-term outcomes of CML patients in first chronic phase who receive an allogeneic HCT. Patients and Methods Our study included 2,444 patients who received myeloablative HCT for CML in first chronic phase between 1978 and 1998 and survived in continuous complete remission for at least 5 years (median follow-up, 11 years; range, 5 to 25 years). Donor sources were human leukocyte antigen–matched siblings in 1,692 patients, unrelated donors in 639 patients, and other related donors in 113 patients. Results Overall survival rates at 15 years were 88% (95% CI, 86% to 90%) for sibling HCT and 87% (95% CI, 83% to 90%) for unrelated donor HCT. Corresponding cumulative incidences of relapse were 8% (95% CI, 7% to 10%) and 2% (95% CI, 1% to 4%), respectively. The latest relapse was reported 18 years post-HCT. In multivariable analyses, history of chronic graft-versus-host disease increased risks of late overall mortality and nonrelapse mortality but reduced risks of relapse. In comparison with age-, race-, and sex-adjusted normal populations, the mortality of HCT recipients was significantly higher until 14 years post-HCT; thereafter, mortality rates were similar to those of the general population (relative mortality ratio at 15 years, 2.3; 95% CI, 0 to 4.9). Conclusion Recipients of allogeneic HCT for CML in first chronic phase who remain in remission for at least 5 years have favorable subsequent long-term survival, and their mortality rates eventually approach those of the general population. PMID:20212247

Goldman, John M.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Klein, John P.; Wang, Zhiwei; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Arora, Mukta; Horowitz, Mary M.; Rizzo, J. Douglas

2010-01-01

86

ADAM17 limits the expression of CSF1R on murine hematopoietic progenitors.  

PubMed

All-lymphoid progenitors (ALPs) yield few myeloid cells in vivo, but readily generate such cells in vitro. The basis for this difference remains unknown. We hypothesized that ALPs limit responsiveness to in vivo concentrations of myeloid-promoting cytokines by reducing expression of the corresponding receptors, potentially through posttranscriptional mechanisms. Consistent with such a mechanism, ALPs express higher levels of CSF1R transcripts than their upstream precursors, yet show limited cell-surface protein expression of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). All-lymphoid progenitors and other hematopoietic progenitors deficient in A disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 17 (ADAM17), display elevated cell surface CSF1R expression. ADAM17(-/-) ALPs, however, fail to yield myeloid cells upon transplantation into irradiated recipients. Moreover, ADAM17(-/-) ALPs yield fewer macrophages in vitro than control ALPs at high concentrations of macrophage colony stimulating factor. Mice with hematopoietic-specific deletion of ADAM17 have normal numbers of myeloid and lymphoid progenitors and mature cells in vivo. These data demonstrate that ADAM17 limits CSF1R protein expression on hematopoietic progenitors, but that compensatory mechanisms prevent elevated CSF1R levels from altering lymphoid progenitor potential. PMID:25308957

Becker, Amy M; Walcheck, Bruce; Bhattacharya, Deepta

2015-01-01

87

Conditional requirement for the Flk-1 receptor in the in vitro generation of early hematopoietic cells.  

PubMed

Genetic studies in mice have previously demonstrated an intrinsic requirement for the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor Flk-1 in the early development of both the hematopoietic and endothelial cell lineages. In this study, embryonic stem (ES) cells homozygous for a targeted null mutation in flk-1 (flk-1 (-/-)) were examined for their hematopoietic potential in vitro during embryoid body (EB) formation or when cultured on the stromal cell line OP9. Surprisingly, in EB cultures flk-1 (-/-) ES cells were able to differentiate into all myeloid-erythroid lineages, albeit at half the frequency of heterozygous lines. In contrast, although flk-1 (-/-) ES cells formed mesodermal-like colonies on OP9 monolayers, they failed to generate hematopoietic clusters even in the presence of exogenous cytokines. However, flk-1 (-/-) OP9 cultures did contain myeloid precursors, albeit at greatly reduced percentages. This defect was rescued by first allowing flk-1 (-/-) ES cells to differentiate into EBs and then passaging these cells onto OP9 stroma. Thus, the requirement for Flk-1 in early hematopoietic development can be abrogated by alterations in the microenvironment. This finding is consistent with a role for Flk-1 in regulating the migration of early mesodermally derived precursors into a microenvironment that is permissive for hematopoiesis. PMID:10377421

Hidaka, M; Stanford, W L; Bernstein, A

1999-06-22

88

The TLR1\\/2 agonist PAM3CSK4 instructs commitment of human hematopoietic stem cells to a myeloid cell fate  

Microsoft Academic Search

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute a family of nonpolymorphic receptors that are devoted to pathogen recognition. In this work, we have explored the impact of TLR ligands (TLR-L) on human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). We show that HSCs and HPCs have a comparable pattern of expression of TLR transcripts characterized by the predominance of TLR1, -2,

K De Luca; V Frances-Duvert; M-J Asensio; R Ihsani; E Debien; M Taillardet; E Verhoeyen; C Bella; S Lantheaume; L Genestier; T Defrance

2009-01-01

89

CBFB-MYH11/RUNX1 together with a compendium of hematopoietic regulators, chromatin modifiers and basal transcription factors occupies self-renewal genes in inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Different mechanisms for CBF?-MYH11 function in acute myeloid leukemia with inv(16) have been proposed such as tethering of RUNX1 outside the nucleus, interference with transcription factor complex assembly and recruitment of histone deacetylases, all resulting in transcriptional repression of RUNX1 target genes. Here, through genome-wide CBF?-MYH11-binding site analysis and quantitative interaction proteomics, we found that CBF?-MYH11 localizes to RUNX1 occupied promoters, where it interacts with TAL1, FLI1 and TBP-associated factors (TAFs) in the context of the hematopoietic transcription factors ERG, GATA2 and PU.1/SPI1 and the coregulators EP300 and HDAC1. Transcriptional analysis revealed that upon fusion protein knockdown, a small subset of the CBF?-MYH11 target genes show increased expression, confirming a role in transcriptional repression. However, the majority of CBF?-MYH11 target genes, including genes implicated in hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal such as ID1, LMO1 and JAG1, are actively transcribed and repressed upon fusion protein knockdown. Together these results suggest an essential role for CBF?-MYH11 in regulating the expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell phenotype. PMID:24002588

Mandoli, A; Singh, A A; Jansen, P W T C; Wierenga, A T J; Riahi, H; Franci, G; Prange, K; Saeed, S; Vellenga, E; Vermeulen, M; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

2014-04-01

90

Cell cycle control in acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the result of a multistep transforming process of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs) which enables them to proceed through limitless numbers of cell cycles and to become resistant to cell death. Increased proliferation renders these cells vulnerable to acquiring mutations and may favor leukemic transformation. Here, we review how deregulated cell cycle control contributes to increased proliferation in AML and favors genomic instability, a prerequisite to confer selective advantages to particular clones in order to adapt and independently proliferate in the presence of a changing microenvironment. We discuss the connection between differentiation and proliferation with regard to leukemogenesis and outline the impact of specific alterations on response to therapy. Finally, we present examples, how a better understanding of cell cycle regulation and deregulation has already led to new promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:22957304

Schnerch, Dominik; Yalcintepe, Jasmin; Schmidts, Andrea; Becker, Heiko; Follo, Marie; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

2012-01-01

91

Density of the Notch ligand Delta1 determines generation of B and T cell precursors from hematopoietic stem cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

murine bone marrow linSca-1 ? c-kitcells with increasing densities of immobilized Delta1 ext-IgG consisting of the extracellular domain of Delta1 fused to the Fc domain of human IgG 1 . We found that relatively lower densities of Delta1 ext-IgG enhanced the generation of Sca-1 ? c-kitcells, Thy1 ? CD25 ? early T cell precursors, and B220 ? CD43 ? \\/lo

Mari H. Dallas; Barbara Varnum-Finney; Colleen Delaney; Keizo Kato; Irwin D. Bernstein

92

The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a  

E-print Network

The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a , Arne Traulsen b , David Dingli c Available online 10 April 2009 Keywords: Chronic myeloid leukemia Hematopoiesis Modeling Allometry a b s t r a c t Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder

Traulsen, Arne

93

Ectopic TAL-1/SCL expression in phenotypically normal or leukemic myeloid precursors: proliferative and antiapoptotic effects coupled with a differentiation blockade.  

PubMed Central

The TAL-1 gene specifies a basic helix-loop-helix domain (bHLH) transcription factor, which heterodimerizes with E2A gene family proteins. tal-1 protein is abnormally expressed in the majority of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). tal-1 is expressed and plays a significant role in normal erythropoietic differentiation and maturation, while its expression in early myeloid differentiation is abruptly shut off at the level of late progenitors/early differentiated precursors (G. L. Condorelli, L. Vitelli, M. Valtieri, I. Marta, E. Montesoro, V. Lulli, R. Baer, and C. Peschle, Blood 86:164-175, 1995). We show that in late myeloid progenitors (the phenotypically normal murine 32D cell line) and early leukemic precursors (the human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cell line) ectopic tal-1 expression induces (i) a proliferative effect under suboptimal culture conditions (i.e., low growth factor and serum concentrations respectively), via an antiapoptotic effect in 32D cells or increased DNA synthesis in HL-60 cells, and (ii) a total or marked inhibitory effect on differentiation, respectively, on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced granulopoiesis in 32D cells or retinoic acid- and vitamin D3-induced granulo- and monocytopoiesis in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, experiments with 32D temperature-sensitive p53 cells indicate that aberrant tal-1 expression at the permissive temperature does not exert a proliferative effect but causes p53-mediated apoptosis, i.e., the tal-1 proliferative effect depends on the integrity of the cell cycle checkpoints of the host cell, as observed for c-myc and other oncogenes. tal-1 mutant experiments indicate that ectopic tal-1 effects are mediated by both the DNA-binding and the heterodimerization domains, while the N-terminally truncated tal-1 variant (M3) expressed in T-ALL malignant cells mimics the effects of the wild-type protein. Altogether, our results (i) indicate proliferative and antidifferentiative effects of ectopic tal-1 expression, (ii) shed light on the underlying mechanisms (i.e., requirement for the integrity of the tal-1 bHLH domain and cell cycle checkpoints in the host cell, particularly p53), and (iii) provide new experimental models to further investigate these mechanisms. PMID:9111367

Condorelli, G L; Tocci, A; Botta, R; Facchiano, F; Testa, U; Vitelli, L; Valtieri, M; Croce, C M; Peschle, C

1997-01-01

94

Characteristics of novel myeloid precursor cell line, PC-MDS, established from a bone marrow of the patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome.  

PubMed

We report on characteristics of the first human cell line, PC-MDS, derived from a bone marrow of a patient with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) who had no overt post-MDS leukemia. Classic cytology analyses, immunophenotyping, cytogenetic and molecular genetic procedures were used for characterization of the cell line. PC-MDS cells are positive for the expression of CD13, CD15, CD30, CD33, and CD45 antigen. Positive cytochemical staining and immunophenotype analyses indicated that PC-MDS cells have some characteristics of the early myeloid precursor cell. The karyotype analysis of PC-MDS cell line revealed various numerical and structural changes including those typically associated with t-MDS: del(5)(q13)[7], der(5)t(5;11)(p11;q11)[13], -7[6], del(7)(q31)[2], +20[3], -20[4]. Evaluation of methylation status in a promoter region of p15, p16 and MGMT genes showed biallelic hypermethylation pattern of 5' promoter region only in MGMT gene. PC-MDS is the first t-MDS derived cell line, and based on its immunological, cytogenetic and molecular characterization could be a new tool in evaluation of complex biology of MDS and a model for methylation studies. PMID:17350682

Bogdanovi?, Gordana; Jurisi?, Vladimir; Kraguljac, Nada; Mrdjanovi?, Jasminka; Jakimov, Dimitar; Krtolica, Koviljka; Krajnovi?, Milena; Magi?, Zvonko; Stojiljkovi?, Bratislav; Andrijevi?, Ljiljana; Srdi?, Tatjana; Balti?, Mirjana; Popovi?, Stevan

2007-08-01

95

Early administration of donor lymphocyte infusions upon molecular relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia: a study by the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the EBMT.  

PubMed

Patients with chronic myeloid leukemia relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be treated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors and/or by donor lymphocyte infusions. The best strategies and timing of administration of lymphocytes are unclear. We analyzed 155 patients who relapsed after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with disease detectable only by molecular methods and who subsequently received lymphocytes. Transplants were performed in first chronic phase (n=125) or in advanced disease (n=29) from identical siblings (n=84) or unrelated donors (n=71) between 1986 and 2003. They received lymphocytes either during molecular relapse (n=85) or upon progression to more advanced disease (1993 to 2004). The median interval from relapse to lymphocyte infusion was 210 (0-1673) days. The median follow up after it was 46 (3-135) months. Overall survival was 76±4% at five years after lymphocyte infusions (89±8% with sibling donors and 63±13% with unrelated donors (P=0.003)). Survival was 69±14% when lymphocytes were given within six months of the detection of molecular relapse and 81±10% (P=0.061) when given later; 81±11% if given at molecular relapse versus 71±12% (P=0.26) with more advanced disease. In multivariate analysis survival was worse if the donor was unrelated (HR 2.54 (95% CI: 1.15-5.53), P=0.021) and better with lymphocyte infusions beyond six months from molecular relapse (HR 0.4 (95%CI: 0.19-0.84), P=0.018). These data confirm the remarkable efficacy of lymphocyte infusions for this disease. There appears to be no advantage from administering it early upon detection of molecular relapse in patients who received allogeneic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24997146

Chalandon, Yves; Passweg, Jakob R; Guglielmi, Cesare; Iacobelli, Simona; Apperley, Jane; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Finke, Jürgen; Robin, Marie; Fedele, Roberta; Bron, Dominique; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; van Biezen, Anja; de Witte, Theo; Kröger, Nicolaus; Olavarria, Eduardo

2014-09-01

96

Myeloid growth factors.  

PubMed

Febrile neutropenia, a common side effect of myelosuppressive chemotherapy in patients with cancer, can result in prolonged hospitalization and broad-spectrum antibiotic use, often prompting treatment delays or dose reductions of drug regimens. Prophylactic use of myeloid growth factors (mainly the colony-stimulating factors filgrastim and pegfilgrastim) in patients of heightened risk can reduce the severity and duration of febrile neutropenia. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Myeloid Growth Factors provide recommendations on the use of these agents mainly in the oncology setting based on clinical evidence and expert consensus. This version includes revisions surrounding the issue of timing of pegfilgrastim administration. It also includes new sections on tbo-filgrastim, a recently approved agent that is biologically similar to filgrastim, and the role of myeloid growth factors in the hematopoietic cell transplant setting. PMID:24142827

Crawford, Jeffrey; Armitage, James; Balducci, Lodovico; Becker, Pamela Sue; Blayney, Douglas W; Cataland, Spero R; Heaney, Mark L; Hudock, Susan; Kloth, Dwight D; Kuter, David J; Lyman, Gary H; McMahon, Brandon; Rugo, Hope S; Saad, Ayman A; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Shayani, Sepideh; Steensma, David P; Talbott, Mahsa; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Westervelt, Peter; Westmoreland, Michael; Dwyer, Mary; Ho, Maria

2013-10-01

97

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.  

SciTech Connect

We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

2009-12-24

98

Outcomes of patients with myeloid malignancies treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from matched unrelated donors compared with one human leukocyte antigen mismatched related donors using HLA typing at 10 loci.  

PubMed

Most candidates for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) lack a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor. Some patients may have a related donor with whom they are mismatched at 1 antigen/allele. It is not known whether such a match is preferable to a matched unrelated donor (MUD). We evaluated the outcomes (survival, relapse, nonrelapse mortality [NRM]) of all 28 patients with a single HLA antigen/allele mismatch identified through high-resolution HLA typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1, and all 318 patients with myeloid malignancies who received transplants from a 10/10 MUD treated during the same period of time at a single institution. Overall, outcomes for patients treated from a 1-antigen/allele mismatch related donor were significantly worse than from a MUD, primarily because of increased NRM. Overall survival (OS) rates at 3 years for 1-antigen/allele mismatched related donor and MUD transplant recipients were 19% and 45% (P = .007), and NRM rates were 40% and 26% (P = .05), respectively. Patients with class I mismatches appeared to have poorer OS than did patients with class II mismatches. A higher incidence of graft rejection was identified in the mismatched related donor group (P = .02). These results indicate that transplant outcomes are better with a MUD than with a 1 antigen/allele-mismatched related donor. PMID:20969970

Ciurea, Stefan O; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Patah, Poliana A; Aung, Fleur; Cano, Pedro; Andersson, Borje S; Kebriaei, Partow; Popat, Uday; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Champlin, Richard E; de Lima, Marcos

2011-06-01

99

Age-associated changes in the differentiation potentials of human circulating hematopoietic progenitors to T- or NK-lineage cells.  

PubMed

Age-associated changes of T and NK cell (T/NK) potential of human hematopoietic stem cells are unknown. In this study, we enumerate and characterize T/NK precursors among CD34(+)Lin(-) cell populations circulating in normal human adult peripheral blood (PB) by a limiting-dilution assay using coculture with OP9-DL1 stroma cells expressing Notch 1 ligand, Delta-like 1. The frequency of T cell precursors in CD34(+)Lin(-) cells was found to decrease with donor age, whereas the ratio of NK to T cell precursor frequency (NK/T ratio) increased with age, suggesting that lymphoid differentiation potential of PB progenitors shifts from T to NK cell lineage with aging. Clonal analyses of CD34(+)Lin(-) cells showed that differences in the NK/T ratio were attributable to different distributions of single- and dual-lineage T/NK precursor clones. Because nearly all of the clones retained monocyte and/or granulocyte differentiation potentials in coculture with OP9-DL1 cells, T/NK precursors in PB are considered to be contained in the pool of T/NK/myeloid multipotent progenitors. The age-associated increase in NK over T cell commitment might occur in precursor cells with T/NK/myeloid potential. PMID:23670190

Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Imai, Kazue; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

2013-06-15

100

Age-associated changes in the differentiation potentials of human circulating hematopoietic progenitors to T- or NK-lineage cells  

PubMed Central

Age-associated changes of T- and NK-cell (T/NK) potential of human hematopoietic stem cells are unknown. Here, we enumerate and characterize T/NK precursors among CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34+Lin?) cell populations circulating in normal human adult peripheral blood (PB) by a limiting-dilution assay using co-culture with OP9-DL1 stroma cells expressing Notch 1 ligand, Delta-like 1. The frequency of T-cell precursors in CD34+Lin? cells was found to decrease with donor age, while the ratio of NK- to T-cell precursor frequency (NK/T ratio) increased with age, suggesting that lymphoid differentiation potential of PB progenitors shifts from T- to NK-cell lineage with aging. Clonal analyses of CD34+Lin? cells showed that differences in the NK/T ratio were attributable to different distributions of single- and dual-lineage T/NK precursor clones. Since nearly all of the clones retained monocyte and/or granulocyte differentiation potentials in co-culture with OP9-DL1 cells, T/NK precursors in PB are considered to be contained in the pool of T/NK/myeloid multi-potent progenitors. The age-associated increase in NK- over T-cell commitment might occur in precursor cells with T/NK/myeloid potential. PMID:23670190

Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Imai, Kazue; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F.; Moore, Malcolm A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

2013-01-01

101

Expression profile of CREB knockdown in myeloid leukemia cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, CREB, is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in several model systems, including neuronal and hematopoietic cells. We demonstrated that CREB is overexpressed in acute myeloid and leukemia cells compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. CREB knockdown inhibits leukemic cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, but does not

Matteo Pellegrini; Jerry C Cheng; Jon Voutila; Dejah Judelson; Julie Taylor; Stanley F Nelson; Kathleen M Sakamoto

2008-01-01

102

Defining incidence, risk factors, and impact on survival of central line-associated blood stream infections following hematopoietic cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.  

PubMed

Central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI) commonly complicate the care of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HCT). We developed a modified CLABSI (MCLABSI) definition that attempts to exclude pathogens usually acquired because of disruption of mucosal barriers during the vulnerable neutropenic period following HCT that are generally included under the original definition (OCLABSI). We conducted a retrospective study of all AML and MDS patients undergoing HCT between August 2009 and December 2011 at the Cleveland Clinic (N = 73), identifying both OCLABSI and MCLABSI incidence. The median age at transplantation was 52 years (range, 16 to 70); 34 had a high (?3) HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI); 34 received bone marrow (BM), 24 received peripheral stem cells (PSC), and 15 received umbilical cord blood cells (UCB). Among these 73 patients, 23 (31.5%) developed OCLABSI, of whom 16 (69.6%) died, and 8 (11%) developed MCLABSI, of whom 7 (87.5%) died. OCLABSI was diagnosed a median of 9 days from HCT: 5 days (range, 2 to 12) for UCB and 78 days (range, 7 to 211) for BM/PSC (P < .001). MCLABSI occurred a median of 12 days from HCT, with similar earlier UCB and later BM/PSC diagnosis (P = .030). Risk factors for OCLABSI in univariate analysis included CBC (P < .001), human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatch (P = .005), low CD34(+) count (P = .007), low total nucleated cell dose (P = .016), and non-Caucasian race (P = .017). Risk factors for OCLABSI in multivariable analysis were UCB (P < .001) and high HCT-CI (P = .002). There was a significant increase in mortality for both OCLABSI (hazard ratio, 7.14; CI, 3.31 to 15.37; P < .001) and MCLABSI (hazard ratio, 6.44; CI, 2.28 to 18.18; P < .001). CLABSI is common and associated with high mortality in AML and MDS patients undergoing HCT, especially in UCB recipients and those with high HCT-CI. We propose the MCLABSI definition to replace the OCLABSI definition, given its greater precision for identifying preventable infection in HCT patients. PMID:23380342

Lukenbill, Joshua; Rybicki, Lisa; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Zaman, Muhammad Omer; Copelan, Alexander; Haddad, Housam; Fraser, Thomas; DiGiorgio, Megan J; Hanna, Rabi; Duong, Hien; Hill, Brian; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Bolwell, Brian; Copelan, Edward

2013-05-01

103

Control of hematopoietic cell growth regulators during mouse fetal development.  

PubMed Central

Gene expression for the four different growth-regulatory proteins for cells of the myeloid hematopoietic cell lineages was analyzed in mouse fetal and extraembryonic tissues at various stages of development. The macrophage growth inducer MGI-1M (colony-stimulating factor 1) was the only myeloid hematopoietic growth regulator detected as both mRNA and bioactive protein during fetal development. This regulator was produced predominantly in extraembryonic tissues, and the production of hematopoietic growth regulators in embryogenesis was regulated by transcriptional and posttranscriptional controls. Images PMID:3499568

Azoulay, M; Webb, C G; Sachs, L

1987-01-01

104

Vascular endothelial cell growth factor is an autocrine promoter of abnormal localized immature myeloid precursors and leukemia progenitor formation in myelodysplastic syndromes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic peptide with bio- logic effects that include regulation of hematopoietic stem cell development, ex- tracellular matrix remodeling, and inflam- matory cytokine generation. To delineate the potential role of VEGF in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), VEGF protein and receptor expression and its functional significance in MDS bone mar- row (BM) were

William T. Bellamy; Lynne Richter; Davuud Sirjani; Concepcion Roxas; Betty Glinsmann-Gibson; Yvette Frutiger; Thomas M. Grogan; Alan F. List

2001-01-01

105

Knockdown of Hspa9, a del(5q31.2) gene, results in a decrease in hematopoietic progenitors in mice  

PubMed Central

Heterozygous deletions spanning chromosome 5q31.2 occur frequently in the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and are highly associated with progression to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) when p53 is mutated. Mutagenesis screens in zebrafish and mice identified Hspa9 as a del(5q31.2) candidate gene that may contribute to MDS and AML pathogenesis, respectively. To test whether HSPA9 haploinsufficiency recapitulates the features of ineffective hematopoiesis observed in MDS, we knocked down the expression of HSPA9 in primary human hematopoietic cells and in a murine bone marrow–transplantation model using lentivirally mediated gene silencing. Knockdown of HSPA9 in human cells significantly delayed the maturation of erythroid precursors, but not myeloid or megakaryocytic precursors, and suppressed cell growth by 6-fold secondary to an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in the cycling of cells compared with control cells. Erythroid precursors, B lymphocytes, and the bone marrow progenitors c-kit+/lineage?/Sca-1+ (KLS) and megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitor (MEP) were significantly reduced in a murine Hspa9-knockdown model. These abnormalities suggest that cooperating gene mutations are necessary for del(5q31.2) MDS cells to gain clonal dominance in the bone marrow. Our results demonstrate that Hspa9 haploinsufficiency alters the hematopoietic progenitor pool in mice and contributes to abnormal hematopoiesis. PMID:21123823

Chen, Tim H.-P.; Kambal, Amal; Krysiak, Kilannin; Walshauser, Mark A.; Raju, Gagan; Tibbitts, Justin F.

2011-01-01

106

Vav1 is a crucial molecule in monocytic/macrophagic differentiation of myeloid leukemia-derived cells.  

PubMed

Vav1 is a critical signal transducer for both the development and function of normal hematopoietic cells, in which it regulates the acquisition of maturation-related properties, including adhesion, motility, and phagocytosis. Vav1 is also important for the agonist-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)-derived promyelocytes, in which it promotes the acquisition of a mature phenotype by playing multiple functions at both cytoplasmic and nuclear levels. We investigated the possible role of Vav1 in the differentiation of leukemic precursors to monocytes/macrophages. Tumoral promyelocytes in which Vav1 was negatively modulated were induced to differentiate into monocytes/macrophages with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and monitored for their maturation-related properties. We found that Vav1 was crucial for the phenotypical differentiation of tumoral myeloid precursors to monocytes/macrophages, in terms of CD11b expression, adhesion capability and cell morphology. Confocal analysis revealed that Vav1 may synergize with actin in modulating nuclear morphology of PMA-treated adherent cells. Our data indicate that, in tumoral promyelocytes, Vav1 is a component of lineage-specific transduction machineries that can be recruited by various differentiating agents. Since Vav1 plays a central role in the completion of the differentiation program of leukemic promyelocytes along diverse hematopoietic lineages, it can be considered a common target for developing new therapeutic strategies for the various subtypes of myeloid leukemias. PMID:21647562

Bertagnolo, Valeria; Nika, Ervin; Brugnoli, Federica; Bonora, Massimo; Grassilli, Silvia; Pinton, Paolo; Capitani, Silvano

2011-07-01

107

Type I Interferon Limits the Capacity of Bluetongue Virus To Infect Hematopoietic Precursors and Dendritic Cells In Vitro and In Vivo  

PubMed Central

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to progenitors with potential to produce multiple cell types, including dendritic cells (DCs). DCs are the principal antigen-presenting cells and represent the crucial link between innate and adaptive immune responses. Bluetongue virus (BTV), an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family, causes a hemorrhagic disease mainly in sheep and occasionally in other species of ruminants. BTV is transmitted between its mammalian hosts by certain species of biting midges (Culicoides spp.) and is a potent alpha interferon (IFN-?) inducer. In the present report, we show that BTV infects cells of hematopoietic origin but not HSCs in immunocompetent sheep. However, BTV infects HSCs in the absence of type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling in vitro and in vivo. Infection of HSCs in vitro results in cellular death by apoptosis. Furthermore, BTV infects bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs), interfering with their development to mature DCs in the absence of type I IFN signaling. Costimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 and costimulatory molecules CD40 and major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) are affected by BTV infection, suggesting that BTV interferes with DC antigen-presenting capacity. In vivo, different DC populations are also affected during the course of infection, probably as a result of a direct effect of BTV replication in DCs and the production of infectious virus. These new findings suggest that BTV infection of HSCs and DCs can impair the immune response, leading to persistence or animal death, and that this relies on IFN-I. PMID:24173228

Rodríguez-Calvo, Teresa; Rojas, José-Manuel; Martín, Verónica

2014-01-01

108

Mobilisation of Hematopoietic CD34+ Precursor Cells in Patients with Acute Stroke Is Safe - Results of an Open-Labeled Non Randomized Phase I/II Trial  

PubMed Central

Background Regenerative strategies in the treatment of acute stroke may have great potential. Hematopoietic growth factors mobilize hematopoietic stem cells and may convey neuroprotective effects. We examined the safety, potential functional and structural changes, and CD34+ cell–mobilization characteristics of G-CSF treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Three cohorts of patients (8, 6, and 6 patients per cohort) were treated subcutaneously with 2.5, 5, or 10 µg/kg body weight rhG-CSF for 5 consecutive days within 12 hrs of onset of acute stroke. Standard treatment included IV thrombolysis. Safety monitoring consisted of obtaining standardized clinical assessment scores, monitoring of CD34+ stem cells, blood chemistry, serial neuroradiology, and neuropsychology. Voxel-guided morphometry (VGM) enabled an assessment of changes in the patients' structural parenchyma. 20 patients (mean age 55 yrs) were enrolled in this study, 5 of whom received routine thrombolytic therapy with r-tPA. G-CSF treatment was discontinued in 4 patients because of unrelated adverse events. Mobilization of CD34+ cells was observed with no concomitant changes in blood chemistry, except for an increase in the leukocyte count up to 75,500/µl. Neuroradiological and neuropsychological follow-up studies did not disclose any specific G-CSF toxicity. VGM findings indicated substantial atrophy of related hemispheres, a substantial increase in the CSF space, and a localized increase in parenchyma within the ischemic area in 2 patients. Conclusions We demonstrate a good safety profile for daily administration of G-CSF when begun within 12 hours after onset of ischemic stroke and, in part in combination with routine IV thrombolysis. Additional analyses using VGM and a battery of neuropsychological tests indicated a positive functional and potentially structural effect of G-CSF treatment in some of our patients. Trial Registration German Clinical Trial Register DRKS 00000723 PMID:21887230

Kraemer, Mathias; Schormann, Thorsten; Schlachetzki, Felix; Schuierer, Gerhard; Luerding, Ralph; Hennemann, Burkhard; Orso, Evelyn; Dabringhaus, Andreas; Winkler, Jürgen; Bogdahn, Ulrich

2011-01-01

109

Ontogeny of Myeloid Cells  

PubMed Central

Granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) represent a subgroup of leukocytes, collectively called myeloid cells. During the embryonic development of mammalians, myelopoiesis occurs in a stepwise fashion that begins in the yolk sac and ends up in the bone marrow (BM). During this process, these early monocyte progenitors colonize various organs such as the brain, liver, skin, and lungs and differentiate into resident macrophages that will self-maintain throughout life. DCs are constantly replenished from BM precursors but can also arise from monocytes in inflammatory conditions. In this review, we summarize the different types of myeloid cells and discuss new insights into their early origin and development in mice and humans from fetal to adult life. We specifically focus on the function of monocytes, macrophages, and DCs at these different developmental stages and on the intrinsic and environmental influences that may drive these adaptations. PMID:25232355

De Kleer, Ismé; Willems, Fabienne; Lambrecht, Bart; Goriely, Stanislas

2014-01-01

110

Osteoblasts support B-lymphocyte commitment and differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Early B lymphopoiesis in mammals is induced within the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, but which cells consti- tute this niche is not known. Previous studies had shown that osteoblasts (OBs) support hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) proliferation and myeloid differentiation. We now find that purified primary mu- rine OBs also support the differentiation of primitive hematopoietic stem cells through lymphoid commitment

Jiang Zhu; Russell Garrett; Younghun Jung; Yi Zhang; Nacksung Kim; Jingcheng Wang; Gerard J. Joe; Elizabeth Hexner; Yongwon Choi; Russell S. Taichman; Stephen G. Emerson

2007-01-01

111

Hematopoietic cytokine-induced transcriptional regulation and Notch signaling as modulators of MDSC expansion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) differentiate into mature lineage restricted blood cells under the influence of a complex network of hematopoietic cytokines, cytokine-mediated transcriptional regulators, and manifold intercellular signaling pathways. The classical model of hematopoiesis proposes that progenitor cells undergo a dichotomous branching into myelo–erythroid and lymphoid lineages. Nonetheless, erythroid and lymphoid restricted progenitors retain their myeloid potential, supporting the existence

Sheinei J. Saleem; Daniel H. Conrad

2011-01-01

112

Hematopoietic cytokines  

PubMed Central

The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses—survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years. PMID:18182579

2008-01-01

113

Hierarchical differentiation of myeloid progenitors is encoded in the transcription factor network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematopoiesis is an ideal model system for stem cell biology with advanced experimental access. A systems view on the interactions of core transcription factors is important for understanding differentiation mechanisms and dynamics. In this manuscript, we construct a Boolean network to model myeloid differentiation, specifically from common myeloid progenitors to megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, granulocytes and monocytes. By interpreting the hematopoietic literature

Jan Krumsiek; Carsten Marr; Timm Schroeder; Fabian J. Theis

2011-01-01

114

Hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloproliferative disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

.  Myeloproliferative disorders, including chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis (CIMF), polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia\\u000a (ET), and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), are clonal diseases of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells. They often\\u000a show a protracted or chronic course; however, all have the potential of progressing to severe marrow failure, associated with\\u000a myelofibrosis, or of transforming into acute leukemia. At that point, hematopoietic cell

William Tse; H. Joachim Deeg

2006-01-01

115

Retinoic Acid Regulates Hematopoietic Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Summary The functions of retinoic acid (RA), a potent morphogen with crucial roles in embryogenesis including developmental hematopoiesis, have not been thoroughly investigated in the human setting. Using an in vitro model of human hematopoietic development, we evaluated the effects of RA signaling on the development of blood and on generated hematopoietic progenitors. Decreased RA signaling increases the generation of cells with a hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like phenotype, capable of differentiation into myeloid and lymphoid lineages, through two separate mechanisms: by increasing the commitment of pluripotent stem cells toward the hematopoietic lineage during the developmental process and by decreasing the differentiation of generated blood progenitors. Our results demonstrate that controlled low-level RA signaling is a requirement in human blood development, and we propose a new interpretation of RA as a regulatory factor, where appropriate control of RA signaling enables increased generation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from pluripotent stem cells in vitro. PMID:25680478

Rönn, Roger E.; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Chaves, Patricia; Saxena, Shobhit; Garcia, Bradley; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

2015-01-01

116

Addition of plerixafor to mobilization regimens in autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplants does not affect the correlation of preharvest hematopoietic precursor cell enumeration with first-harvest CD34+ stem cell yield.  

PubMed

The CXCR4 antagonist plerixafor is increasingly used in the mobilization regimens for autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation. This agent may mobilize a different subset of the stem cell population than traditional regimens, such as growth factors (with and without chemotherapy). Thus, it is important to determine whether plerixafor has an effect on the utility of measurements used to predict the yield of CD34(+) cells, usually either preharvest peripheral blood CD34(+) enumeration by flow cytometry or hematopoietic precursor cell (HPC) enumeration by automated hematology analysis. Although HPC enumeration has a weaker correlation with first-harvest CD34(+) cell yield, this parameter still plays an important role in the timing of apheresis procedures for autologous PBSC transplantation because of its technical simplicity and low cost. In the present study, we retrospectively examined the correlation of HPC measurements with CD34(+) cell yields in patients with multiple myeloma and lymphoma undergoing autologous PBSC transplantation, and investigated how the mobilization regimen affected these results. We found that the correlation coefficients ranged from 0.5877 to 0.7668 and were not significantly impacted by differences in diagnosis or inclusion of plerixafor in the mobilization regimen. The predictive ability of HPC enumeration for various target yields was also examined, and receiver-operating characteristic curves were generated. An HPC cutoff of 20 should result in adequate initial CD34(+) cell yields (>2.5 × 10(6) cell/kg) in >80% of autologous donors with or without plerixafor. This study confirms the utility of HPC enumeration in prediction of adequate initial cell yields, and demonstrates that this utility is maintained regardless of whether or not plerixafor is included in the mobilization regimen. PMID:22796644

Villa, Carlos H; Shore, Tsiporah; Van Besien, Koen; Cushing, Melissa

2012-12-01

117

ERK1 Regulates the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niches  

PubMed Central

The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1 and ERK2 are among the major signal transduction molecules but little is known about their specific functions in vivo. ERK activity is provided by two isoforms, ERK1 and ERK2, which are ubiquitously expressed and share activators and substrates. However, there are not in vivo studies which have reported a role for ERK1 or ERK2 in HSCs and the bone marrow microenvironment. The present study shows that the ERK1-deficient mice present a mild osteopetrosis phenotype. The lodging and the homing abilities of the ERK1?/? HSC are impaired, suggesting that the ERK1?/?-defective environment may affect the engrafment of HSCs. Serial transplantations demonstrate that ERK1 is involved in the maintenance of an appropriate medullar microenvironment, but that the intrinsic properties of HSCs are not altered by the ERK1?/? defective microenvironment. Deletion of ERK1 impaired in vitro and in vivo osteoclastogenesis while osteoblasts were unaffected. As osteoclasts derive from precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, investigation of the monocytic compartment was performed. In vivo analysis of the myeloid lineage progenitors revealed that the frequency of CMPs increased by approximately 1.3-fold, while the frequency of GMPs significantly decreased by almost 2-fold, compared with the respective WT compartments. The overall mononuclear-phagocyte lineage development was compromised in these mice due to a reduced expression of the M-CSF receptor on myeloid progenitors. These results show that the cellular targets of ERK1 are M-CSFR-responsive cells, upstream to osteoclasts. While ERK1 is well known to be activated by M-CSF, the present results are the first to point out an ERK1-dependent M-CSFR regulation on hematopoietic progenitors. This study reinforces the hypothesis of an active cross-talk between HSCs, their progeny and bone cells in the maintenance of the homeostasis of these compartments. PMID:22303456

Saulnier, Nathalie; Guihard, Soizic; Holy, Xavier; Decembre, Elodie; Jurdic, Pierre; Clay, Denis; Feuillet, Vincent; Pagès, Gilles; Pouysségur, Jacques; Porteu, Françoise; Gaudry, Murielle

2012-01-01

118

Subsets, expansion and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tumor cells and microorganisms manipulate the immune system to minimize any counter response in order to survive. Myeloid-derived\\u000a suppressor cells (MDSC) in the mouse represent activated Gr-1+ CD11b+ myeloid precursor cells. Activation may occur through endogenous or exogenous factors leading to the suppression of immune\\u000a responses. Under steady state conditions the same precursors differentiate into dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils.

Eliana Ribechini; Verena Greifenberg; Sarah Sandwick; Manfred B. Lutz

2010-01-01

119

Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

2014-11-10

120

Chronic myeloid leukemia: pathophysiology, diagnostic parameters, and current treatment concepts.  

PubMed

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell disease characterized by excessive accumulation of clonal myeloid (precursor) cells in hematopoietic tissues. CML cells display the translocation t(9; 22) that creates the bcr/abl oncogene. The respective oncoprotein (= BCR/ABL) exhibits constitutive tyrosine kinase activity and promotes growth and survival in CML cells. Clinically, CML can be divided into three phases: the chronic phase (CP), the accelerated phase (AP), and the blast phase (BP) that resembles acute leukemia. Progression to AP and BP is associated with occurrence of additional genetic defects that cooperate with bcr/abl in leukemogenesis and lead to resistance against antileukemic drugs. The prognosis in CML is variable depending on the phase of disease, age, and response to therapy. The only curative approach available to date is stem cell transplantation. For those who cannot be transplanted, the BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor STI571 (Glivec, Imatinib), interferon-alpha (with or without ARAC), or other cytoreductive drugs are prescribed. Currently available data show that STI571 is a superior compound compared to other drugs in producing complete cytogenetic and molecular responses. However, despite superior initial data and high expectations for an effect on survival, long term results are not available so far, and resistance against STI571 has been reported. Forthcoming strategies are therefore attempting to prevent or counteract STI571 resistance by co-administration of other antileukemic drugs. Whether these strategies will lead to curative drug therapy in CML in the future remains at present unknown. PMID:13677268

Sillaber, Christian; Mayerhofer, Matthias; Agis, Hermine; Sagaster, Verena; Mannhalter, Christine; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Geissler, Klaus; Valent, Peter

2003-08-14

121

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor mutations in myeloid malignancy.  

PubMed

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is a cytokine able to stimulate both myelopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, which has seen it used extensively in the clinic to aid hematopoietic recovery. It acts specifically via the homodimeric granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR), which is principally expressed on the surface of myeloid and hematopoietic progenitor cells. A number of pathogenic mutations have now been identified in CSF3R, the gene encoding G-CSFR. These fall into distinct classes, each of which is associated with a particular spectrum of myeloid disorders, including malignancy. This review details the various CSF3R mutations, their mechanisms of action, and contribution to disease, as well as discussing the clinical implications of such mutations. PMID:24822171

Liongue, Clifford; Ward, Alister Curtis

2014-01-01

122

Cell Stem Cell Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic  

E-print Network

patients with hematologic diseases, including Fanconi anemia (Mu¨ ller et al., 2012), sickle cell anemiaCell Stem Cell Article Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells via Respecification of Lineage-Restricted Precursors Sergei Doulatov,1,2 Linda T. Vo,1

Collins, James J.

123

[Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].  

PubMed

Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative option in different hematologic malignancies. This benefit is traditionally based on the immune anti-tumour effect mediated by the allogeneic immune effectors derived from the graft, usually called "graft versus leukemia". Several categories of donors and sources of stem cells are currently used. In addition, different types of preparative regimens are available, and can be distinguished based on their myeloablative and immunosuppressive properties. Despite significant progress in terms of short term toxicity and morbidity, and despite effective prophylactic strategies, graft versus host disease remains a major complication, with its corollary of prolonged immunosuppression and opportunistic infections. However, allogeneic stem cell transplantation is rapidly expanding because the immunological anti-tumour effect has been demonstrated both in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies with a relatively acceptable risk of toxicity. PMID:19213539

Mohty, Mohamad

2008-12-15

124

Stages of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment (PDQ®) Stages of Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies Key Points for This ...

125

Putative Prethymic T Cell Precursors within the Early Human Embryonic Liver: A Molecular and Functional Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Hematopoietic cells present in the liver in early human fetal life were characterized by phenotypic analysis using a broad panel of monoclonal antibodies. Expression of very late antigen 4 and leukocyte function-associated antigen 3 cell adhesion receptors and 4F2 cell activation molecules was found in all fetal liver hematopoietic cells before acquisition of T cell-, B cell-, or myeloid-

C. Guti; Edgar Fern; Esther Leonardo; Juanjo Lozano; Marfa L. Toribio

126

What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... get acute myeloid leukemia? What is acute myeloid leukemia? Leukemia is a type of cancer that starts ... person to bleed or bruise easily. Acute myeloid leukemia Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) goes by many names, ...

127

Differential gene expression in human hematopoietic stem cells specified toward erythroid, megakaryocytic, and granulocytic lineage  

Microsoft Academic Search

To better understand the transcrip- tional program that accompanies orderly lineage- specific hematopoietic differentiation, we analyzed expression changes during the lineage-specific dif- ferentiation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC; CD34\\/CD38-\\/CD33-); HSC and multipo- tent myeloid progenitors (MMP; CD34\\/CD38-\\/ CD33) were isolated from the bone marrow of healthy individuals by MACS. CD34 cells in semi- solid culture were stimulated with the

Xiao-Ling Liu; Jin-Yun Yuan; Jun-Wu Zhang; Xin-Hua Zhang; Rong-Xin Wang

2007-01-01

128

Enhanced T-cell reconstitution by hematopoietic progenitors expanded ex vivo using the Notch ligand Delta1  

PubMed Central

A physiologic role for Notch signaling in hematopoiesis has been clearly defined in lymphoid differentiation, with evidence suggesting a critical role in T-cell versus B-cell fate decisions. Previously, we demonstrated that activation of endogenous Notch receptors by culture of murine lin?Sca-1+c-kit+ (LSK) hematopoietic progenitors with exogenously presented Notch ligand, Delta1ext-IgG, consisting of the extracellular domain of Delta1 fused to the Fc domain of human IgG1, promoted early T-cell differentiation and increased the number of progenitors capable of short-term lymphoid and myeloid reconstitution. Here we show that culture of LSK precursors with Delta1ext-IgG increases the number of progenitors that are able to rapidly repopulate the thymus and accelerate early T-cell reconstitution with a diversified T-cell receptor repertoire. Most of the early T-cell reconstitution originated from cells that expressed lymphoid-associated antigens: B220, Thy1, CD25, and/or IL7R?, whereas the most efficient thymic repopulation on a per cell basis originated from the smaller number of cultured cells that did not express lymphoid-associated antigens. These findings demonstrate the potential of Delta1ext-IgG-cultured cells for accelerating early immune reconstitution after hematopoietic cell transplantation. PMID:17213287

Dallas, Mari H.; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Martin, Paul J.

2007-01-01

129

Granulocytic sarcoma presenting with malignant anasarca in a patient with secondary acute myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Granulocytic sarcomas (GS) are rare extramedullary tumor masses composed of immature cells derived from the hematopoietic\\u000a myeloid series. GS occur in 3% to 7% of cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and can present before, during, or even after\\u000a the diagnosis of AML. GS can involve different organs, individually or simultaneously, including the skin, lymph nodes, bone,\\u000a breast, central nervous

Mohammad Y. Khan; Khader K. Hussein; Max G. Walter; Muhammad K. Hasan; William Kern; Mohamed A. Kharfan-Dabajaa

2004-01-01

130

Notch Signaling Specifies Megakaryocyte Development from Hematopoietic Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY In the hematopoietic system, Notch signaling specifies T cell lineage fate, in part through negative regulation of B cell and myeloid lineage development. However, we unexpectedly observed the development of megakaryocytes when using heterotypic cocultures of hematopoietic stem cells with OP9 cells expressing Delta-like1, but not with parental OP9 cells. This effect was abrogated by inhibition of Notch signaling either with ?-secretase inhibitors or by expression of the dominant-negative Master-mind-like1. The importance of Notch signaling for megakaryopoietic development in vivo was confirmed by using mutant alleles that either activate or inhibit Notch signaling. These findings indicate that Notch is a positive regulator of megakaryopoiesis and plays a more complex role in cell-fate decisions among myeloid progenitors than previously appreciated. PMID:18786418

Mercher, Thomas; Cornejo, Melanie G.; Sears, Christopher; Kindler, Thomas; Moore, Sandra A.; Maillard, Ivan; Pear, Warren S.; Aster, Jon C.; Gilliland, D. Gary

2014-01-01

131

Notch signaling specifies megakaryocyte development from hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

In the hematopoietic system, Notch signaling specifies T cell lineage fate, in part through negative regulation of B cell and myeloid lineage development. However, we unexpectedly observed the development of megakaryocytes when using heterotypic cocultures of hematopoietic stem cells with OP9 cells expressing Delta-like1, but not with parental OP9 cells. This effect was abrogated by inhibition of Notch signaling either with gamma-secretase inhibitors or by expression of the dominant-negative Mastermind-like1. The importance of Notch signaling for megakaryopoietic development in vivo was confirmed by using mutant alleles that either activate or inhibit Notch signaling. These findings indicate that Notch is a positive regulator of megakaryopoiesis and plays a more complex role in cell-fate decisions among myeloid progenitors than previously appreciated. PMID:18786418

Mercher, Thomas; Cornejo, Melanie G; Sears, Christopher; Kindler, Thomas; Moore, Sandra A; Maillard, Ivan; Pear, Warren S; Aster, Jon C; Gilliland, D Gary

2008-09-11

132

MicroRNA-486-5p is an erythroid oncomiR of the myeloid leukemias of Down syndrome.  

PubMed

Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk for acute myeloid leukemias (ML-DS) characterized by mixed megakaryocytic and erythroid phenotype and by acquired mutations in the GATA1 gene resulting in a short GATA1s isoform. The chromosome 21 microRNA (miR)-125b cluster has been previously shown to cooperate with GATA1s in transformation of fetal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we report that the expression of miR-486-5p is increased in ML-DS compared with non-DS acute megakaryocytic leukemias (AMKLs). miR-486-5p is regulated by GATA1 and GATA1s that bind to the promoter of its host gene ANK1. miR-486-5p is highly expressed in mouse erythroid precursors and knockdown (KD) in ML-DS cells reduced their erythroid phenotype. Ectopic expression and KD of miR-486-5p in primary fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors demonstrated that miR-486-5p cooperates with Gata1s to enhance their self renewal. Consistent with its activation of AKT, overexpression and KD experiments showed its importance for growth and survival of human leukemic cells. Thus, miR-486-5p cooperates with GATA1s in supporting the growth and survival, and the aberrant erythroid phenotype of the megakaryocytic leukemias of DS. PMID:25533034

Shaham, Lital; Vendramini, Elena; Ge, Yubin; Goren, Yaron; Birger, Yehudit; Tijssen, Marloes R; McNulty, Maureen; Geron, Ifat; Schwartzman, Omer; Goldberg, Liat; Chou, Stella T; Pitman, Holly; Weiss, Mitchell J; Michaeli, Shulamit; Sredni, Benjamin; Göttgens, Berthold; Crispino, John D; Taub, Jeffrey W; Izraeli, Shai

2015-02-19

133

Osteolineage cells and regulation of the hematopoietic stem cell.  

PubMed

Over the last 10 years, progress has been made in understanding the relationship between hematopoietic stem cells and their microenvironment, or niche. Increased knowledge of the microenvironment and its effects on hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis based on murine models may lead to the identification of relevant new therapeutic targets for leukemia. In particular, the chemokine CCL3 has potential as a mediator of leukemia-induced microenvironmental changes, as it has been found to be increased in human acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24309526

Calvi, Laura M

2013-09-01

134

FHL2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell functions under stress conditions.  

PubMed

FHL2, a member of the four and one half LIM domain protein family, is a critical transcriptional modulator. Here, we identify FHL2 as a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is essential for maintaining HSC self-renewal under regenerative stress. We find that Fhl2 loss has limited effects on hematopoiesis under homeostatic conditions. In contrast, Fhl2-null chimeric mice reconstituted with Fhl2-null bone marrow cells developed abnormal hematopoiesis with significantly reduced numbers of HSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), red blood cells and platelets as well as hemoglobin levels. In addition, HSCs displayed a significantly reduced self-renewal capacity and were skewed toward myeloid lineage differentiation. We find that Fhl2 loss reduces both HSC quiescence and survival in response to regenerative stress, probably as a consequence of Fhl2-loss-mediated downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitors, including p21(Cip) and p27(Kip1). Interestingly, FHL2 is regulated under the control of a tissue-specific promoter in hematopoietic cells and it is downregulated by DNA hypermethylation in the leukemia cell line and primary leukemia cells. Furthermore, we find that downregulation of FHL2 frequently occurs in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia patients, raising a possibility that FHL2 downregulation has a role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. PMID:25179730

Hou, Y; Wang, X; Li, L; Fan, R; Chen, J; Zhu, T; Li, W; Jiang, Y; Mittal, N; Wu, W; Peace, D; Qian, Z

2015-03-01

135

Cell intrinsic alterations underlie hematopoietic stem cell aging  

PubMed Central

Loss of immune function and an increased incidence of myeloid leukemia are two of the most clinically significant consequences of aging of the hematopoietic system. To better understand the mechanisms underlying hematopoietic aging, we evaluated the cell intrinsic functional and molecular properties of highly purified long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) from young and old mice. We found that LT-HSC aging was accompanied by cell autonomous changes, including increased stem cell self-renewal, differential capacity to generate committed myeloid and lymphoid progenitors, and diminished lymphoid potential. Expression profiling revealed that LT-HSC aging was accompanied by the systemic down-regulation of genes mediating lymphoid specification and function and up-regulation of genes involved in specifying myeloid fate and function. Moreover, LT-HSCs from old mice expressed elevated levels of many genes involved in leukemic transformation. These data support a model in which age-dependent alterations in gene expression at the stem cell level presage downstream developmental potential and thereby contribute to age-dependent immune decline, and perhaps also to the increased incidence of leukemia in the elderly. PMID:15967997

Rossi, Derrick J.; Bryder, David; Zahn, Jacob M.; Ahlenius, Henrik; Sonu, Rebecca; Wagers, Amy J.; Weissman, Irving L.

2005-01-01

136

Reprogramming Human Endothelial to Hematopoietic Cells Requires Vascular Induction  

PubMed Central

Summary Generating engraftable human hematopoietic cells from autologous tissues promises new therapies for blood diseases. Directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells yields hematopoietic cells that poorly engraft. Here, we devised a method to phenocopy the vascular-niche microenvironment of hemogenic cells, thereby enabling reprogramming of human endothelial cells (ECs) into engraftable hematopoietic cells without transition through a pluripotent intermediate. Highly purified non-hemogenic human umbilical vein-ECs (HUVECs) or adult dermal microvascular ECs (hDMECs) were transduced with transcription factors (TFs), FOSB, GFI1, RUNX1, and SPI1 (FGRS), and then propagated on serum-free instructive vascular niche monolayers to induce outgrowth of hematopoietic colonies containing cells with functional and immunophenotypic features of multipotent progenitor cells (MPP). These reprogrammed ECs- into human-MPPs (rEC-hMPPs) acquire colony-forming cell (CFC) potential and durably engraft in immune-deficient mice after primary and secondary transplantation, producing long-term rEC-hMPP-derived myeloid (granulocytic/monocytic, erythroid, megakaryocytic) and lymphoid (NK, B) progeny. Conditional expression of FGRS transgenes, combined with vascular-induction, activates endogenous FGRS genes endowing rEC-hMPPs with a transcriptional and functional profile similar to self-renewing MPPs. Our approach underscores the role of inductive cues from vascular-niche in orchestrating and sustaining hematopoietic specification and may prove useful for engineering autologous hematopoietic grafts to treat inherited and acquired blood disorders. PMID:25030167

Sandler, Vladislav M.; Lis, Raphael; Liu, Ying; Kedem, Alon; James, Daylon; Elemento, Olivier; Butler, Jason M.; Scandura, Joseph M.; Rafii, Shahin

2014-01-01

137

CCR1 Plays a Critical Role in Modulating Pain through Hematopoietic and Non-Hematopoietic Cells  

PubMed Central

Inflammation is associated with immune cells infiltrating into the inflammatory site and pain. CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) mediates trafficking of leukocytes to sites of inflammation. However, the contribution of CCR1 to pain is incompletely understood. Here we report an unexpected discovery that CCR1-mediated trafficking of neutrophils and CCR1 activity on non-hematopoietic cells both modulate pain. Using a genetic approach (CCR1?/? animals) and pharmacological inhibition of CCR1 with selective inhibitors, we show significant reductions in pain responses using the acetic acid-induced writhing and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced mechanical hyperalgesia models. Reductions in writhing correlated with reduced trafficking of myeloid cells into the peritoneal cavity. We show that CCR1 is highly expressed on circulating neutrophils and their depletion decreases acetic acid-induced writhing. However, administration of neutrophils into the peritoneal cavity did not enhance acetic acid-induced writhing in wild-type (WT) or CCR1?/? mice. Additionally, selective knockout of CCR1 in either the hematopoietic or non-hematopoietic compartments also reduced writhing. Together these data suggest that CCR1 functions to significantly modulate pain by controlling neutrophil trafficking to the inflammatory site and having an unexpected role on non-hematopoietic cells. As inflammatory diseases are often accompanied with infiltrating immune cells at the inflammatory site and pain, CCR1 antagonism may provide a dual benefit by restricting leukocyte trafficking and reducing pain. PMID:25170619

Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Muthukumarana, Akalushi; Fogal, Steven E.; Corradini, Laura; Stefanopoulos, Dimitria E.; Adusumalli, Prathima; Pelletier, Josephine; Panzenbeck, Mark; Berg, Karen; Canfield, Melissa; Cook, Brian N.; Razavi, Hossein; Kuzmich, Daniel; Anderson, Shawn; Allard, Devan; Harrison, Paul; Grimaldi, Christine; Souza, Donald; Harcken, Christian; Fryer, Ryan M.; Modis, Louise K.; Brown, Maryanne L.

2014-01-01

138

The molecular basis of myeloid malignancies  

PubMed Central

Myeloid malignancies consist of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). The latter two diseases have preleukemic features and frequently evolve to AML. As with solid tumors, multiple mutations are required for leukemogenesis. A decade ago, these gene alterations were subdivided into two categories: class I mutations stimulating cell growth or inhibiting apoptosis; and class II mutations that hamper differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In mouse models, class I mutations such as the Bcr-Abl fusion kinase induce MPN by themselves and some class II mutations such as Runx1 mutations induce MDS. Combinations of class I and class II mutations induce AML in a variety of mouse models. Thus, it was postulated that hematopoietic cells whose differentiation is blocked by class II mutations would autonomously proliferate with class I mutations leading to the development of leukemia. Recent progress in high-speed sequencing has enabled efficient identification of novel mutations in a variety of molecules including epigenetic factors, splicing factors, signaling molecules and proteins in the cohesin complex; most of these are not categorized as either class I or class II mutations. The functional consequences of these mutations are now being extensively investigated. In this article, we will review the molecular basis of hematological malignancies, focusing on mouse models and the interfaces between these models and clinical findings, and revisit the classical class I/II hypothesis. PMID:25504228

KITAMURA, Toshio; INOUE, Daichi; OKOCHI-WATANABE, Naoko; KATO, Naoko; KOMENO, Yukiko; LU, Yang; ENOMOTO, Yutaka; DOKI, Noriko; UCHIDA, Tomoyuki; KAGIYAMA, Yuki; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; KAWABATA, Kimihito C.; NAGASE, Reina; HORIKAWA, Sayuri; HAYASHI, Yasutaka; SAIKA, Makoto; FUKUYAMA, Tomofusa; IZAWA, Kumi; OKI, Toshihiko; NAKAHARA, Fumio; KITAURA, Jiro

2014-01-01

139

FAM20: an evolutionarily conserved family of secreted proteins expressed in hematopoietic cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process controlled by a large number of factors that regulate stem cell renewal, lineage commitment and differentiation. Secreted proteins, including the hematopoietic growth factors, play critical roles in these processes and have important biological and clinical significance. We have employed representational difference analysis to identify genes that are differentially expressed during experimentally induced myeloid

Demet Nalbant; Hyewon Youn; S Isil Nalbant; Savitha Sharma; Everardo Cobos; Elmus G Beale; Yang Du; Simon C Williams

2005-01-01

140

What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... about chronic myeloid leukemia? What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

141

Cutaneous infection caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a child with acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene. PMID:19386841

Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L; Romanelli, Anna M; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E; Sutton, Deanna A; Thompson, Elizabeth H; Fothergill, Annette W; Rinaldi, Michael G; Hayden, Randall T; Shenep, Jerry L

2009-06-01

142

Id1 immortalizes hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and promotes a myeloproliferative disease in vivo  

PubMed Central

Id1 is frequently overexpressed in many cancer cells, but the functional significance of these findings is not known. To determine if Id1 could contribute to the development of hematopoietic malignancy, we reconstituted mice with hematopoietic cells overexpressing Id1. We showed for the first time that deregulated expression of Id1 leads to a myeloproliferative disease in mice, and immortalizes myeloid progenitors in vitro. In human cells, we demonstrate that Id genes are expressed in human acute myelogenous leukemia cells, and that knock down of Id1 expression inhibits leukemic cell line growth, suggesting that Id1 is required for leukemic cell proliferation. These findings established a causal relationship between Id1 overexpression and hematologic malignancy. Thus, deregulated expression of Id1 may contribute to the initiation of myeloid malignancy, and Id1 may represent a potential therapeutic target for early stage intervention in the treatment of hematopoietic malignancy. PMID:18542061

Suh, HC; Leeanansaksiri, W; Ji, M; Klarmann, KD; Renn, K; Gooya, J; Smith, D; McNiece, I; Lugthart, S; Valk, PJM; Delwel, R; Keller, JR

2011-01-01

143

Ectopic expression ofHOXC6 blocks myeloid differentiation and predisposes to malignant transformation  

PubMed Central

Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors has led to the discovery of many oncogenes associated with leukemia. Here we investigated the role of HOXC6, identified by proximal retrovirus insertion a large animal stem cell gene therapy study, for a potential involvement in hematopoietic stem cell activity and hematopoietic fate decision. HOXC6 was overexpressed in the murine bone marrow transplantation model and tested in a competitive repopulation assay in comparison to the known hematopoietic stem cell expansion factor, HOXB4. We have identified HOXC6 as a factor that enhances competitive repopulation capacity in vivo and colony formation in vitro. Ectopic HOXC6 expression also induced strong myeloid differentiation and expansion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors/common myeloid progenitors (GMPs/CMPs) in vivo, resulting in myeloid malignancies with low penetrance (3 out of 17 mice), likely in collaboration with Meis1 due to a provirus integration mapped to the 3' region in the malignant clone. We characterized the molecular basis of HOXC6-induced myeloid differentiation and malignant cell transformation with complementary DNA microarray analysis. Overexpression of HOXC6 induced a gene expression signature similar to several acute myeloid leukemia subtypes when compared to normal GMPs/CMPs. These results demonstrate HOXC6 as a regulator in hematopoiesis and its involvement in malignant transformation. PMID:24513167

Heckl, Dirk; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Nelson, Veronica; Beard, Brian C.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

2014-01-01

144

Direct interaction of hematopoietic transcription factors PU.1 and GATA-1: functional antagonism in erythroid cells  

PubMed Central

Malignant transformation usually inhibits terminal cell differentiation but the precise mechanisms involved are not understood. PU.1 is a hematopoietic-specific Ets family transcription factor that is required for development of some lymphoid and myeloid lineages. PU.1 can also act as an oncoprotein as activation of its expression in erythroid precursors by proviral insertion or transgenesis causes erythroleukemias in mice. Restoration of terminal differentiation in the mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells requires a decline in the level of PU.1, indicating that PU.1 can block erythroid differentiation. Here we investigate the mechanism by which PU.1 interferes with erythroid differentiation. We find that PU.1 interacts directly with GATA-1, a zinc finger transcription factor required for erythroid differentiation. Interaction between PU.1 and GATA-1 requires intact DNA-binding domains in both proteins. PU.1 represses GATA-1-mediated transcriptional activation. Both the DNA binding and transactivation domains of PU.1 are required for repression and both domains are also needed to block terminal differentiation in MEL cells. We also show that ectopic expression of PU.1 in Xenopus embryos is sufficient to block erythropoiesis during normal development. Furthermore, introduction of exogenous GATA-1 in both MEL cells and Xenopus embryos and explants relieves the block to erythroid differentiation imposed by PU.1. Our results indicate that the stoichiometry of directly interacting but opposing transcription factors may be a crucial determinant governing processes of normal differentiation and malignant transformation. PMID:10364157

Rekhtman, Natasha; Radparvar, Farshid; Evans, Todd; Skoultchi, Arthur I.

1999-01-01

145

[Chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells: cross-talk with the niche].  

PubMed

The physiological hematopoietic niche located in bone marrow is a pluricellular structure whose components are now well identified. Within this microenvironment, hematopoietic stem cells are in direct contact with mesenchymal stromal cells, osteoblasts and sinusoidal endothelial cells. These close relationships drive specialized cellular functions (proliferation/quiescence, differentiation/self-renewal) ensuring an efficient hematopoiesis. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a major model of leukemic hematopoiesis. The BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase, constitutively activated in CML, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of the disease. An intensive cross-talk between CML progenitors and the components of the hematopoietic niche has recently been demonstrated. Consequently, the occurrence of the so-called leukemic niche promotes both the proliferation of myeloid cells and the maintenance of quiescent leukemic stem cells. This bone marrow niche could also protect CML stem cells from tyrosine kinase inhibitors and probably contribute to their resistance towards targeted therapies. PMID:24801043

Chomel, Jean-Claude; Aggoune, Djamel; Sorel, Nathalie; Turhan, Ali G

2014-04-01

146

Mutations in GATA2 cause primary lymphedema associated with a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia (Emberger syndrome).  

PubMed

We report an allelic series of eight mutations in GATA2 underlying Emberger syndrome, an autosomal dominant primary lymphedema associated with a predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. GATA2 is a transcription factor that plays an essential role in gene regulation during vascular development and hematopoietic differentiation. Our findings indicate that haploinsufficiency of GATA2 underlies primary lymphedema and predisposes to acute myeloid leukemia in this syndrome. PMID:21892158

Ostergaard, Pia; Simpson, Michael A; Connell, Fiona C; Steward, Colin G; Brice, Glen; Woollard, Wesley J; Dafou, Dimitra; Kilo, Tatjana; Smithson, Sarah; Lunt, Peter; Murday, Victoria A; Hodgson, Shirley; Keenan, Russell; Pilz, Daniela T; Martinez-Corral, Ines; Makinen, Taija; Mortimer, Peter S; Jeffery, Steve; Trembath, Richard C; Mansour, Sahar

2011-10-01

147

Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation  

SciTech Connect

The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

Seed, T.M.

1994-12-01

148

Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... Clinical Trials NCI Publications Español Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®) Treatment Options for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Standard treatment of ...

149

Interleukin-7 receptor mutants initiate early T cell precursor leukemia in murine thymocyte progenitors with multipotent potential  

PubMed Central

Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) exhibits lymphoid, myeloid, and stem cell features and is associated with a poor prognosis. Whole genome sequencing of human ETP-ALL cases has identified recurrent mutations in signaling, histone modification, and hematopoietic development genes but it remains to be determined which of these abnormalities are sufficient to initiate leukemia. We show that activating mutations in the interleukin-7 receptor identified in human pediatric ETP-ALL cases are sufficient to generate ETP-ALL in mice transplanted with primitive transduced thymocytes from p19Arf?/? mice. The cellular mechanism by which these mutant receptors induce ETP-ALL is the block of thymocyte differentiation at the double negative 2 stage at which myeloid lineage and T lymphocyte developmental potential coexist. Analyses of samples from pediatric ETP-ALL cases and our murine ETP-ALL model show uniformly high levels of LMO2 expression, very low to undetectable levels of BCL11B expression, and a relative lack of activating NOTCH1 mutations. We report that pharmacological blockade of Jak–Stat signaling with ruxolitinib has significant antileukemic activity in this ETP-ALL model. This new murine model recapitulates several important cellular and molecular features of ETP-ALL and should be useful to further define novel therapeutic approaches for this aggressive leukemia. PMID:24687960

Treanor, Louise M.; Zhou, Sheng; Janke, Laura; Churchman, Michelle L.; Ma, Zhijun; Lu, Taihe; Chen, Shann-Ching; Mullighan, Charles G.

2014-01-01

150

HOXA9 promotes hematopoietic commitment of human embryonic stem cells.  

PubMed

The molecular determinants regulating the specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into hematopoietic cells remain elusive. HOXA9 plays a relevant role in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. It is highly expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and is downregulated upon differentiation. Hoxa9-deficient mice display impaired hematopoietic development, and deregulation of HOXA9 expression is frequently associated with acute leukemia. Analysis of the genes differentially expressed in cord blood HSPCs vs hESC-derived HSPCs identified HOXA9 as the most downregulated gene in hESC-derived HSPCs, suggesting that expression levels of HOXA9 may be crucial for hematopoietic differentiation of hESC. Here we show that during hematopoietic differentiation of hESCs, HOXA9 expression parallels hematopoietic development, but is restricted to the hemogenic precursors (HEP) (CD31(+)CD34(+)CD45(-)), and diminishes as HEPs differentiate into blood cells (CD45(+)). Different gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies reveal that HOXA9 enhances hematopoietic differentiation of hESCs by specifically promoting the commitment of HEPs into primitive and total CD45(+) blood cells. Gene expression analysis suggests that nuclear factor-?B signaling could be collaborating with HOXA9 to increase hematopoietic commitment. However, HOXA9 on its own is not sufficient to confer in vivo long-term engraftment potential to hESC-hematopoietic derivatives, reinforcing the idea that additional molecular regulators are needed for the generation of definitive in vivo functional HSPCs from hESC. PMID:25185710

Ramos-Mejía, Veronica; Navarro-Montero, Oscar; Ayllón, Verónica; Bueno, Clara; Romero, Tamara; Real, Pedro J; Menendez, Pablo

2014-11-13

151

[Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: principles and practice].  

PubMed

This article describes the basic definitions, indications and complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The different modes of transplantation (autologous, allogeneic-related and allogeneic-unrelated transplantation) are explained with regard to the underlying immunological processes and consequences for duration of treatment, distribution of age, complications, lethality, and for the family of the patient. In our department, the duration of the hospital stay was (median) 44 days for autologous BMT, 45 days for allogeneic-related BMT and 66 days for allogeneic-unrelated BMT. Six to twelve years old children showed a peak for allogeneic related transplantations; these children were treated mainly for relapse of acute lymphoblastic or myeloid leukemias. Patients over 15 years old showed a peak for autologous transplantations; due to the research focus of our center, Ewing's sarcoma was the main underlying disease in this age group. Allogeneic-unrelated transplantations were uniformly distributed over the whole age range from nine months to 24 years. PMID:8693241

Burdach, S; Nürnberger, W; Göbel, U

1996-06-01

152

Chronic myeloid leukemia detected on FDG PET/CT imaging in a patient with renal cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

It is well known that hematopoietic cytokine stimulation can cause increased fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation in bone marrow on PET/CT imaging, which simulates that seen in patients with bone marrow metastases. However, increased bone marrow FDG uptake can be caused by other etiologies. We report a patient with operated renal cell carcinoma had no history of hematopoietic cytokine stimulation. The FDG PET/CT images showed increased bone marrow FDG uptake, and the patient was diagnosed as chronic myeloid leukemia. This case revealed that increased FDG uptake on bone marrow may be related to neoplastic disease of the hematopoietic tissues. PMID:23177344

Varoglu, E; Kaya, B; Sari, O

2013-01-01

153

Hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell mechanisms in myelodysplastic syndromes  

PubMed Central

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by variable cytopenias and ineffective hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors in MDS have not been extensively characterized. We transplanted purified human HSCs from MDS samples into immunodeficient mice and show that HSCs are the disease-initiating cells in MDS. We identify a recurrent loss of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in the bone marrow of low risk MDS patients that can distinguish low risk MDS from clinical mimics, thus providing a simple diagnostic tool. The loss of GMPs is likely due to increased apoptosis and increased phagocytosis, the latter due to the up-regulation of cell surface calreticulin, a prophagocytic marker. Blocking calreticulin on low risk MDS myeloid progenitors rescues them from phagocytosis in vitro. However, in the high-risk refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) stages of MDS, the GMP population is increased in frequency compared with normal, and myeloid progenitors evade phagocytosis due to up-regulation of CD47, an antiphagocytic marker. Blocking CD47 leads to the selective phagocytosis of this population. We propose that MDS HSCs compete with normal HSCs in the patients by increasing their frequency at the expense of normal hematopoiesis, that the loss of MDS myeloid progenitors by programmed cell death and programmed cell removal are, in part, responsible for the cytopenias, and that up-regulation of the “don’t eat me” signal CD47 on MDS myeloid progenitors is an important transition step leading from low risk MDS to high risk MDS and, possibly, to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23388639

Pang, Wendy W.; Pluvinage, John V.; Price, Elizabeth A.; Sridhar, Kunju; Arber, Daniel A.; Greenberg, Peter L.; Schrier, Stanley L.; Park, Christopher Y.; Weissman, Irving L.

2013-01-01

154

Hematopoietic stem cell and progenitor cell mechanisms in myelodysplastic syndromes.  

PubMed

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a group of disorders characterized by variable cytopenias and ineffective hematopoiesis. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors in MDS have not been extensively characterized. We transplanted purified human HSCs from MDS samples into immunodeficient mice and show that HSCs are the disease-initiating cells in MDS. We identify a recurrent loss of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in the bone marrow of low risk MDS patients that can distinguish low risk MDS from clinical mimics, thus providing a simple diagnostic tool. The loss of GMPs is likely due to increased apoptosis and increased phagocytosis, the latter due to the up-regulation of cell surface calreticulin, a prophagocytic marker. Blocking calreticulin on low risk MDS myeloid progenitors rescues them from phagocytosis in vitro. However, in the high-risk refractory anemia with excess blasts (RAEB) stages of MDS, the GMP population is increased in frequency compared with normal, and myeloid progenitors evade phagocytosis due to up-regulation of CD47, an antiphagocytic marker. Blocking CD47 leads to the selective phagocytosis of this population. We propose that MDS HSCs compete with normal HSCs in the patients by increasing their frequency at the expense of normal hematopoiesis, that the loss of MDS myeloid progenitors by programmed cell death and programmed cell removal are, in part, responsible for the cytopenias, and that up-regulation of the "don't eat me" signal CD47 on MDS myeloid progenitors is an important transition step leading from low risk MDS to high risk MDS and, possibly, to acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:23388639

Pang, Wendy W; Pluvinage, John V; Price, Elizabeth A; Sridhar, Kunju; Arber, Daniel A; Greenberg, Peter L; Schrier, Stanley L; Park, Christopher Y; Weissman, Irving L

2013-02-19

155

Tif1? regulates the TGF-?1 receptor and promotes physiological aging of hematopoietic stem cells  

PubMed Central

The hematopoietic system declines with age. Myeloid-biased differentiation and increased incidence of myeloid malignancies feature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but the mechanisms involved remain uncertain. Here, we report that 4-mo-old mice deleted for transcription intermediary factor 1? (Tif1?) in HSCs developed an accelerated aging phenotype. To reinforce this result, we also show that Tif1? is down-regulated in HSCs during aging in 20-mo-old wild-type mice. We established that Tif1? controls TGF-?1 receptor (Tgfbr1) turnover. Compared with young HSCs, Tif1??/? and old HSCs are more sensitive to TGF-? signaling. Importantly, we identified two populations of HSCs specifically discriminated by Tgfbr1 expression level and provided evidence of the capture of myeloid-biased (Tgfbr1hi) and myeloid-lymphoid-balanced (Tgfbr1lo) HSCs. In conclusion, our data provide a new paradigm for Tif1? in regulating the balance between lymphoid- and myeloid-derived HSCs through TGF-? signaling, leading to HSC aging. PMID:25002492

Quéré, Ronan; Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Carmignac, Virginie; Martin, Romain Z.; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Largeot, Anne; Hammann, Arlette; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent

2014-01-01

156

The SKI proto-oncogene enhances the in vivo repopulation of hematopoietic stem cells and causes myeloproliferative disease  

PubMed Central

The proto-oncogene SKI is highly expressed in human myeloid leukemia and also in murine hematopoietic stem cells. However, its operative relevance in these cells remains elusive. We have over-expressed SKI to define its intrinsic role in hematopoiesis and myeloid neoplasms, which resulted in a robust competitive advantage upon transplantation, a complete dominance of the stem and progenitor compartments, and a marked enhancement of myeloid differentiation at the expense of other lineages. Accordingly, enforced expression of SKI induced a gene signature associated with hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid differentiation, as well as hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Here we demonstrate that, in contrast to what has generally been assumed, the significant impact of SKI on hematopoiesis is independent of its ability to inhibit TGF-beta signaling. Instead, myeloid progenitors expressing SKI are partially dependent on functional hepatocyte growth factor signaling. Collectively our results demonstrate that SKI is an important regulator of hematopoietic stem cell activity and its overexpression leads to myeloproliferative disease. PMID:24415629

Singbrant, Sofie; Wall, Meaghan; Moody, Jennifer; Karlsson, Göran; Chalk, Alistair M.; Liddicoat, Brian; Russell, Megan R.; Walkley, Carl R.; Karlsson, Stefan

2014-01-01

157

What Are the Risk Factors for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... for chronic myeloid leukemia? Do we know what causes chronic myeloid leukemia? Can chronic myeloid leukemia be prevented? Previous Topic ... myeloid leukemia? Next Topic Do we know what causes chronic myeloid leukemia? What are the risk factors for chronic myeloid ...

158

A crosstalk between the Wnt and the adhesion-dependent signaling pathways governs the chemosensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Relapses following chemotherapy are a major hindrance to patients’ survival in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To investigate the role of the hematopoietic niche in the chemoresistance of leukemic cells, we examined two pathways: one mediated by adhesion molecules\\/integrins, and the other by soluble factors of the morphogen Wnt pathway. In our study, both the adhesion of leukemic blasts to fibronectin

F De Toni; C Racaud-Sultan; G Chicanne; V Mansat-De Mas; C Cariven; F Mesange; J-P Salles; C Demur; M Allouche; B Payrastre; S Manenti; L Ysebaert

2006-01-01

159

Acute myeloid leukemia originates from a hierarchy of leukemic stem cell classes that differ in self-renewal capacity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emerging evidence suggests cancer stem cells sustain neoplasms; however, little is understood of the normal cell initially targeted and the resultant cancer stem cells. We show here, by tracking individual human leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in nonobese diabetic–severe combined immunodeficiency mice serially transplanted with acute myeloid leukemia cells, that LSCs are not functionally homogeneous but, like the normal hematopoietic stem

Kristin J Hope; Liqing Jin; John E Dick

2004-01-01

160

A Large Gene Network in Immature Erythroid Cells Is Controlled by the Myeloid and B Cell Transcriptional Regulator PU.1  

Microsoft Academic Search

PU.1 is a hematopoietic transcription factor that is required for the development of myeloid and B cells. PU.1 is also expressed in erythroid progenitors, where it blocks erythroid differentiation by binding to and inhibiting the main erythroid promoting factor, GATA-1. However, other mechanisms by which PU.1 affects the fate of erythroid progenitors have not been thoroughly explored. Here, we used

Sandeep N. Wontakal; Xingyi Guo; Britta Will; Minyi Shi; Debasish Raha; Milind C. Mahajan; Sherman Weissman; Michael Snyder; Ulrich Steidl; Deyou Zheng; Arthur I. Skoultchi

2011-01-01

161

Ectopic bone formation in severely combat-injured orthopedic patients -- a hematopoietic niche.  

PubMed

Combat-related heterotopic ossification (HO) has emerged as a common and problematic complication of modern wartime extremity injuries, contributing to substantial patient morbidity and loss of function. We have previously reported that HO-forming patients exhibit a more pronounced systemic and local inflammatory response very early in the wound healing process. Moreover, traumatized muscle-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells from these patients have a skewed differentiation potential toward bone. Here, we demonstrate that HO lesions excised from this patient population contain highly vascularized, mature, cancellous bone containing adipogenic marrow. Histologic analysis showed immature hematopoietic cells located within distinct foci in perivascular regions. The adipogenic marrow often contained low numbers of functional erythroid (BFU-E), myeloid (CFU-GM, CFU-M) and multilineage (CFU-GEMM) colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Conversely, tissue from control muscle and non-HO traumatic wound granulation tissue showed no evidence of hematopoietic progenitor cell activity. In summary, our findings suggest that ectopic bone can provide an appropriate hematopoietic microenvironment for supporting the proliferation and differentiation of HPCs. This reactive and vibrant cell population may help maintain normal hematopoietic function, particularly in those with major extremity amputations who have sustained both massive blood loss, prompting systemic marrow stimulation, as well as loss of available native active marrow space. These findings begin to characterize the functional biology of ectopic bone and elucidate the interactions between HPC and non-hematopoietic cell types within the ectopic intramedullary hematopoietic microenvironmental niche identified. PMID:23727270

Davis, Thomas A; Lazdun, Yelena; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

2013-09-01

162

Myeloid regulatory cells in tumor spreading and metastasis.  

PubMed

Development of metastasis is determined by both the accretion of essential changes in cancerous cells and by their communications with different stromal elements in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, inflammatory response and emergence of immune regulatory cells, such and myeloid regulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, myeloid-derived suppressor cells) and lymphoid regulatory cells (regulatory T, B and NK cells) to the tumor site have been reported to support tumor growth in addition to spreading and metastasis. Every phase of tumor progression, from its initiation through metastatic expansion, is endorsed by interaction between malignant and immune cells mediated by a number of growth factors, cytokines, proteases and other molecules that modify the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis depend on intratumoral vascularization, alterations of the basement membrane and degradation of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell spreading, invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The consequent dissemination of cancerous cells to distant tissues and organs necessitates a trafficking through the vasculature, which is promoted by further interactions with cells of the immune system, including myeloid regulatory cells. Moreover, the formation of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is also regulated and controlled by bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells, immature myeloid cells and certain cytokines, chemokines and growth factors derived from tumor and immune cells, which amend the local microenvironment of the organ or tissue to promote adhesion and survival of circulating cancerous cells. Although the potential role for myeloid regulatory cells in tumor spreading and development of pre-metastatic niche has been suggested, the concept still requires further supportive experimental and clinical data, as well as data related to specific factors and mechanisms responsible for myeloid regulatory cell functioning at malignant sites. PMID:25178934

Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Michael R

2015-02-01

163

Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells  

SciTech Connect

Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

Eshel, Rinat [Hematology Institute, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Ben-Zaken, Olga [Department of Oncology, Hadassah-Hebrew University hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Vainas, Oded [The Hematology Institute, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Nadir, Yona [Department of Hematology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Minucci, Saverio [European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Polliack, Aaron [Department of Hematology, Hadassah-Hebrew University hospital, Jerusalem (Israel); Naparstek, Ella [Hematology Institute, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Vlodavsky, Israel [Cancer and Vascular Biology Research Center, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion, Haifa (Israel); Katz, Ben-Zion [Hematology Institute, Sourasky Medical Center, Tel-Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv (Israel); E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

2005-10-07

164

Temporal Bone Myeloid Sarcoma  

PubMed Central

Myeloid sarcoma is a rare condition that's caused by the aggregation of immature myeloid cells in leukemic patients. Myeloid sarcoma occurring in the temporal bone more frequently involves the mastoid bone than is the case for metastatic lesions arising from non-systemic malignancies. The disease is difficult to diagnose when it presents with symptoms that mimic otomastoiditis. However, an early diagnosis is important in order to achieve complete remission of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporal bone is useful for making the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma, and especially to evaluate the extent of disease. High-dose radio- or chemotherapies are the first-line approaches and possibly the only approaches to achieve complete remission and to cure the disease. With the aim of improving our understanding of myeloid sarcoma in the temporal bone, the present report describes our experience with 5 such cases and we compare the clinical features of these 5 patients with those clinical features of patients who have metastatic lesions. PMID:20072695

Kim, Dong-Kee; Jun, Beom-Cho; Park, Yong-Soo

2009-01-01

165

Development of mature and functional human myeloid subsets in HSC engrafted NOD/SCID/IL2r?KO mice  

PubMed Central

While physiological development of human lymphoid subsets has become well documented in humanized mice, in vivo development of human myeloid subsets in a xenotransplantation setting has remained unevaluated. Therefore, we investigated in vivo differentiation and function of human myeloid subsets in NOD/SCID/IL2r?null (NSG) mouse recipients transplanted with purified lineage?CD34+CD38? cord blood hematopoietic stem cells. At four to six months post-transplantation, we identified the development of human neutrophils, basophils, mast cells, monocytes, as well as conventional and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in the recipient hematopoietic organs. The tissue distribution and morphology of these human myeloid cells were similar to those identified in humans. Following cytokine stimulation in vitro, phosphorylation of STAT molecules was observed in neutrophils and monocytes. In vivo administration of human G-CSF resulted in the recruitment of human myeloid cells into the recipient circulation. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging demonstrated that human bone marrow monocytes and alveolar macrophages in the recipients displayed intact phagocytic function. Human BM-derived monocytes/macrophages were further confirmed to exhibit phagocytosis and killing of Salmonella Typhimurium upon the IFN-? stimulation. These findings demonstrate the development of mature and functionally intact human myeloid subsets in vivo in the NSG recipients. In vivo human myelopoiesis established in the NSG humanized mouse system may facilitate the investigation of human myeloid cell biology including in vivo analyses of infectious diseases and therapeutic interventions. PMID:22611244

Tanaka, Satoshi; Saito, Yoriko; Kunisawa, Jun; Kurashima, Yosuke; Wake, Taichi; Suzuki, Nahoko; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Fumihiko

2012-01-01

166

Roles of Bim in Apoptosis of Normal and Bcr-Abl-Expressing Hematopoietic Progenitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bcr-Abl kinase is known to reverse apoptosis of cytokine-dependent cells due to cytokine deprivation, although it has been controversial whether chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitors have the potential to survive under conditions in which there are limited amounts of cytokines. Here we demonstrate that early hematopoietic progenitors (Sca-1 c-Kit Lin) isolated from normal mice rapidly undergo apoptosis in the absence

Ryoko Kuribara; Hiroaki Honda; Hirotaka Matsui; Tetsuharu Shinjyo; Takeshi Inukai; Kanji Sugita; Shinpei Nakazawa; Hisamaru Hirai; Keiya Ozawa; Toshiya Inaba

2004-01-01

167

The Notch ligand delta-1 is a hematopoietic development cofactor for plasmacytoid dendritic cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) play an important role in innate and adaptive immunity, prompting interest in mecha- nisms controlling the production of this lineage of cells. Notch signaling via one of the Notch ligands, delta-like 1 (delta-1), influences the hematopoietic develop- ment of several lymphoid and myeloid lineages, but whether or not delta-1 af- fects the formation of pDCs is

Aurelie Olivier; Evelyne Lauret; Patrick Gonin; Anne Galy

2010-01-01

168

Engraftment of Immune-Deficient Mice with Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system in which immune-deficient mice are repopulated with cells from the human myeloid lineage, and that provides an in vivo stem cell assay for human hematopoietic cells is described. Generation of the chimeric human\\/immune-deficient (HID) mice was dependent on the use of immune-deficient bg\\/nu\\/xid mice. Infusion of these mice with human bone marrow gave rise to increases in human

Suzanne Kamel-Reid; John E. Dick

1988-01-01

169

In Vivo Repopulating Activity Emerges at the Onset of Hematopoietic Specification during Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.  

PubMed

The generation of in vivo repopulating hematopoietic cells from in vitro differentiating embryonic stem cells has remained a long-standing challenge. To date, hematopoietic engraftment has mostly been achieved through the enforced expression of ectopic transcription factors. Here, we describe serum-free culture conditions that allow the generation of in vivo repopulating hematopoietic cells in the absence of ectopically expressed factors. We show that repopulating activity arises immediately upon the commitment of mesodermal precursors to the blood program, within the first wave of hematopoietic specification. We establish that the formation of these progenitors is extremely transient and exquisitely sensitive to the cytokine milieu. Our findings define the precise differentiating stage at which hematopoietic repopulating activity first appears in vitro, and suggest that during embryonic stem cell differentiation, all hematopoietic programs are unraveled simultaneously from the mesoderm in the absence of cues that restrict the coordinated emergence of each lineage as is normally observed during embryogenesis. PMID:25660408

Pearson, Stella; Cuvertino, Sara; Fleury, Maud; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie

2015-03-10

170

Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors  

PubMed Central

Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

2014-01-01

171

Spleens of myelofibrosis patients contain malignant hematopoietic stem cells  

PubMed Central

Cancer stem cell behavior is thought to be largely determined by intrinsic properties and by regulatory signals provided by the microenvironment. Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by hematopoiesis occurring not only in the marrow but also in extramedullary sites such as the spleen. In order to study the effects of these different microenvironments on primitive malignant hematopoietic cells, we phenotypically and functionally characterized splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34+ cells from patients with MF. MF spleens contained greater numbers of malignant primitive HPCs than PB. Transplantation of PB MF CD34+ cells into immunodeficient (NOD/SCID/IL2R?null) mice resulted in a limited degree of donor cell chimerism and a differentiation program skewed toward myeloid lineages. By contrast, transplanted splenic MF CD34+ cells achieved a higher level of chimerism and generated both myeloid and lymphoid cells that contained molecular or cytogenetic abnormalities indicating their malignant nature. Only splenic MF CD34+ cells were able to sustain hematopoiesis for prolonged periods (9 months) and were able to engraft secondary recipients. These data document the existence of MF stem cells (MF-SCs) that reside in the spleens of MF patients and demonstrate that these MF-SCs retain a differentiation program identical to that of normal hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:23023702

Wang, Xiaoli; Prakash, Sonam; Lu, Min; Tripodi, Joseph; Ye, Fei; Najfeld, Vesna; Li, Yan; Schwartz, Myron; Weinberg, Rona; Roda, Paul; Orazi, Attilio; Hoffman, Ronald

2012-01-01

172

Pediatric secondary chronic myeloid leukemia following cardiac transplantation for anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy.  

PubMed

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disorder of the hematopoietic stem cell that is exceptionally rare in the first five years of life, particularly as a secondary malignancy. This report describes a case of secondary CML in a four-year-old female occurring after AML treatment. Interestingly, CML developed while on immunosuppression for a heart transplant due to anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:25175922

Menon, Neethu Mohan; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Khalpey, Zain; Whitlow, Puja

2015-01-01

173

Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

Cancer.gov

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. An acute leukemia can become worse quickly if it is not treated and can result in death within months. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in American adults and the average age of a patient with AML is 67.

174

¹?F MRI tracer preserves in vitro and in vivo properties of hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have numerous therapeutic applications including immune reconstitution, enzyme replacement, regenerative medicine, and immunomodulation. The trafficking and persistence of these cells after administration is a fundamental question for future therapeutic applications of HSCs. Here, we describe the safe and efficacious labeling of human CD34(+) HSCs with a novel, self-delivering perfluorocarbon ¹?F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracer, which has recently been authorized for use in a clinical trial to track therapeutic cells. While various imaging contrast agents have been used to track cellular therapeutics, the impact of this MRI tracer on HSC function has not previously been studied. Both human CD34(+) and murine bone marrow (BM) HSCs were effectively labeled with the MRI tracer, with only a slight reduction in viability, relative to mock-labeled cells. In a pilot study, ¹?F MRI enabled the rapid evaluation of HSC delivery/retention following administration into a rat thigh muscle, revealing the dispersal of HSCs after injection, but not after surgical implantation. To investigate effects on cell functionality, labeled and unlabeled human HSCs were tested in in vitro colony forming unit (CFU) assays, which resulted in equal numbers of total CFU as well as individual CFU types, indicating that labeling did not alter multipotency. Cobblestone assay forming cell precursor frequency was also unaffected, providing additional evidence that stem cell function was preserved after labeling. In vivo tests of multipotency and reconstitution studies in mice with murine BM containing labeled HSCs resulted in normal development of CFU in the spleen, compared to unlabeled cells, and reconstitution of both lymphoid and myeloid compartments. The lack of interference in these complex biological processes provides strong evidence that the function and therapeutic potential of the HSCs are likely maintained after labeling. These data support the safety and efficacy of the MRI tracer for clinical tracking of human stem cells. PMID:22862925

Helfer, Brooke M; Balducci, Anthony; Sadeghi, Zhina; O'Hanlon, Charles; Hijaz, Adonis; Flask, Chris A; Wesa, Amy

2013-01-01

175

Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias  

PubMed Central

Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20?years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias. PMID:24427158

Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

2013-01-01

176

Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias.  

PubMed

Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20?years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to "malignant" DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias. PMID:24427158

Schürch, Christian M; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

2013-01-01

177

The soluble interleukin-6 receptor is a mediator of hematopoietic and skeletal actions of parathyroid hormone.  

PubMed

Both PTH and IL-6 signaling play pivotal roles in hematopoiesis and skeletal biology, but their interdependence is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of IL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) on hematopoietic and skeletal actions of PTH. In the bone microenvironment, PTH stimulated sIL-6R protein levels in primary osteoblast cultures in vitro and bone marrow in vivo in both IL-6(+/+) and IL-6(-/-) mice. PTH-mediated hematopoietic cell expansion was attenuated in IL-6(-/-) compared with IL-6(+/+) bone marrow, whereas sIL-6R treatment amplified PTH actions in IL-6(-/-) earlier than IL-6(+/+) marrow cultures. Blocking sIL-6R signaling with sgp130 (soluble glycoprotein 130 receptor) inhibited PTH-dependent hematopoietic cell expansion in IL-6(-/-) marrow. In the skeletal system, although intermittent PTH administration to IL-6(+/+) and IL-6(-/-) mice resulted in similar anabolic actions, blocking sIL-6R significantly attenuated PTH anabolic actions. sIL-6R showed no direct effects on osteoblast proliferation or differentiation in vitro; however, it up-regulated myeloid cell expansion and production of the mesenchymal stem cell recruiting agent, TGF-?1 in the bone marrow microenvironment. Collectively, sIL-6R demonstrated orphan function and mediated PTH anabolic actions in bone in association with support of myeloid lineage cells in the hematopoietic system. PMID:23297399

Cho, Sun Wook; Pirih, Flavia Q; Koh, Amy J; Michalski, Megan; Eber, Matthew R; Ritchie, Kathryn; Sinder, Benjamin; Oh, Seojin; Al-Dujaili, Saja A; Lee, JoonHo; Kozloff, Ken; Danciu, Theodora; Wronski, Thomas J; McCauley, Laurie K

2013-03-01

178

Impaired maturation of myeloid progenitors in mice lacking novel Polycomb group protein MBT-1  

PubMed Central

Polycomb group (PcG) proteins participate in DNA-binding complexes with gene-repressing activity, many of which have been highlighted for their involvement in hematopoiesis. We have identified a putative PcG protein, termed MBT-1, that is associated with Rnf2, an in vivo interactor of PcG proteins. MBT-1 structurally resembles the H-L(3)MBT protein, whose deletion is predicted to be responsible for myeloid hematopoietic malignancies. The human MBT-1 gene is located on chromosome 6q23, a region frequently deleted in leukemia cells, and shows a transient expression spike in response to maturation-inducing stimuli in myeloid leukemia cells. MBT-1?/? myeloid progenitor cells exhibit a maturational deficiency but maintain normal proliferative activities. This results in the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitors and hence, a marked decrease of mature myeloid blood cells, causing the MBT-1?/? mice to die of anemia during a late embryonic stage. Together, we conclude that MBT-1 specifically regulates the maturational advancement of myeloid progenitor cells during transitions between two developmental stages. We also show that MBT-1 appears to influence myelopoiesis by transiently enhancing p57KIP2 expression levels. PMID:15889154

Arai, Satoko; Miyazaki, Toru

2005-01-01

179

Induction of myelodysplasia by myeloid-derived suppressor cells  

PubMed Central

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are age-dependent stem cell malignancies that share biological features of activated adaptive immune response and ineffective hematopoiesis. Here we report that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which are classically linked to immunosuppression, inflammation, and cancer, were markedly expanded in the bone marrow of MDS patients and played a pathogenetic role in the development of ineffective hematopoiesis. These clonally distinct MDSC overproduce hematopoietic suppressive cytokines and function as potent apoptotic effectors targeting autologous hematopoietic progenitors. Using multiple transfected cell models, we found that MDSC expansion is driven by the interaction of the proinflammatory molecule S100A9 with CD33. These 2 proteins formed a functional ligand/receptor pair that recruited components to CD33’s immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM), inducing secretion of the suppressive cytokines IL-10 and TGF-? by immature myeloid cells. S100A9 transgenic mice displayed bone marrow accumulation of MDSC accompanied by development of progressive multilineage cytopenias and cytological dysplasia. Importantly, early forced maturation of MDSC by either all-trans-retinoic acid treatment or active immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif–bearing (ITAM-bearing) adapter protein (DAP12) interruption of CD33 signaling rescued the hematologic phenotype. These findings indicate that primary bone marrow expansion of MDSC driven by the S100A9/CD33 pathway perturbs hematopoiesis and contributes to the development of MDS. PMID:24216507

Chen, Xianghong; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Zhou, Junmin; Zhang, Ling; Djeu, Julie; Fortenbery, Nicole; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie; Van Bijnen, Sandra; Dolstra, Harry; Cannon, John; Youn, Je-in; Donatelli, Sarah S.; Qin, Dahui; De Witte, Theo; Tao, Jianguo; Wang, Huaquan; Cheng, Pingyan; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; List, Alan; Wei, Sheng

2013-01-01

180

T cell development requires constraint of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa by the Notch target and transcriptional repressor Hes1  

PubMed Central

Notch signaling induces gene expression of the T cell lineage and discourages alternative fate outcomes. Hematopoietic deficiency in the Notch target Hes1 results in severe T cell lineage defects; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found here that Hes1 constrained myeloid gene-expression programs in T cell progenitor cells, as deletion of the myeloid regulator C/EBPa restored the development of T cells from Hes1-deficient progenitor cells. Repression of Cebpa by Hes1 required its DNA-binding and Groucho-recruitment domains. Hes1-deficient multipotent progenitor cells showed a developmental bias toward myeloid and dendritic cells after Notch signaling, whereas Hes1-deficient lymphoid progenitor cells required additional cytokine signaling for diversion into the myeloid lineage. Our findings establish the importance of constraining developmental programs of the myeloid lineage early in T cell development. PMID:24185616

De Obaldia, Maria Elena; Bell, J Jeremiah; Wang, Xinxin; Harly, Christelle; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; DeLong, Jonathan H; Zlotoff, Daniel A; Sultana, Dil Afroz; Pear, Warren S; Bhandoola, Avinash

2014-01-01

181

T cell development requires constraint of the myeloid regulator C/EBP-? by the Notch target and transcriptional repressor Hes1.  

PubMed

Notch signaling induces gene expression of the T cell lineage and discourages alternative fate outcomes. Hematopoietic deficiency in the Notch target Hes1 results in severe T cell lineage defects; however, the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found here that Hes1 constrained myeloid gene-expression programs in T cell progenitor cells, as deletion of the myeloid regulator C/EBP-? restored the development of T cells from Hes1-deficient progenitor cells. Repression of Cebpa by Hes1 required its DNA-binding and Groucho-recruitment domains. Hes1-deficient multipotent progenitor cells showed a developmental bias toward myeloid cells and dendritic cells after Notch signaling, whereas Hes1-deficient lymphoid progenitor cells required additional cytokine signaling for diversion into the myeloid lineage. Our findings establish the importance of constraining developmental programs of the myeloid lineage early in T cell development. PMID:24185616

De Obaldia, Maria Elena; Bell, J Jeremiah; Wang, Xinxin; Harly, Christelle; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; DeLong, Jonathan H; Zlotoff, Daniel A; Sultana, Dil Afroz; Pear, Warren S; Bhandoola, Avinash

2013-12-01

182

Lysophosphatidic Acid Mediates Myeloid Differentiation within the Human Bone Marrow Microenvironment  

PubMed Central

Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a pleiotropic phospholipid present in the blood and certain tissues at high concentrations; its diverse effects are mediated through differential, tissue specific expression of LPA receptors. Our goal was to determine if LPA exerts lineage-specific effects during normal human hematopoiesis. In vitro stimulation of CD34+ human hematopoietic progenitors by LPA induced myeloid differentiation but had no effect on lymphoid differentiation. LPA receptors were expressed at significantly higher levels on Common Myeloid Progenitors (CMP) than either multipotent Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells (HSPC) or Common Lymphoid Progenitors (CLP) suggesting that LPA acts on committed myeloid progenitors. Functional studies demonstrated that LPA enhanced migration, induced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis of isolated CMP, but had no effect on either HSPC or CLP. Analysis of adult and fetal human bone marrow sections showed that PPAP2A, (the enzyme which degrades LPA) was highly expressed in the osteoblastic niche but not in the perivascular regions, whereas Autotaxin (the enzyme that synthesizes LPA) was expressed in perivascular regions of the marrow. We propose that a gradient of LPA with the highest levels in peri-sinusoidal regions and lowest near the endosteal zone, regulates the localization, proliferation and differentiation of myeloid progenitors within the bone marrow marrow. PMID:23696850

Richardson, Wade; Corselli, Mirko; Sahaghian, Arineh; Cardinal, Sofie; Zhu, Yuhua; Chan, Rebecca; Dunn, Bruce; Crooks, Gay M.

2013-01-01

183

Anti-K562 cell monoclonal antibodies recognize hematopoietic progenitors.  

PubMed Central

The K562 leukemia cell has properties of self-renewal and pluripotency similar to those of the hematopoietic stem cell. Monoclonal antibodies to K562 cells have been produced by using hybridoma technology. By radioimmunoassay, some anti-K562 cell antibodies also bind to erythrocyte antigens or peripheral blood mononuclear cells; others are more specific for K562 cells. Antibody binding to hematopoietic progenitors was assayed by using the ability of these cells to form colonies in vitro. After exposure of human bone marrow cells to anti-K562 antibodies and complement, myeloid or erythroid colony formation was inhibited. Some of the inhibitory antibodies showed little binding to mature blood cells by radioimmunoassay, immunofluorescence, and complement cytotoxicity, suggesting that they recognize antigens specific to undifferentiated cells. With the fluorescence-activated cell sorter, one inhibitory antibody was shown to stain only 3% of bone marrow cells. Inhibitory anti-K562 antibodies also bind to myelogenous leukemia cells and virus-transformed lymphocytes. Thus, these antibodies appear to recognize antigens shared by normal hematopoietic progenitors, leukemic cells, and transformed lymphocytes. Images PMID:7031668

Young, N S; Hwang-Chen, S P

1981-01-01

184

Differential requirements for hematopoietic commitment between human and rhesus embryonic stem cells.  

PubMed

Progress toward clinical application of ESC-derived hematopoietic cellular transplantation will require rigorous evaluation in a large animal allogeneic model. However, in contrast to human ESCs (hESCs), efforts to induce conclusive hematopoietic differentiation from rhesus macaque ESCs (rESCs) have been unsuccessful. Characterizing these poorly understood functional differences will facilitate progress in this area and likely clarify the critical steps involved in the hematopoietic differentiation of ESCs. To accomplish this goal, we compared the hematopoietic differentiation of hESCs with that of rESCs in both EB culture and stroma coculture. Initially, undifferentiated rESCs and hESCs were adapted to growth on Matrigel without a change in their phenotype or karyotype. Subsequent differentiation of rESCs in OP9 stroma led to the development of CD34(+)CD45(-) cells that gave rise to endothelial cell networks in methylcellulose culture. In the same conditions, hESCs exhibited convincing hematopoietic differentiation. In cytokine-supplemented EB culture, rESCs demonstrated improved hematopoietic differentiation with higher levels of CD34(+) and detectable levels of CD45(+) cells. However, these levels remained dramatically lower than those for hESCs in identical culture conditions. Subsequent plating of cytokine-supplemented rhesus EBs in methylcellulose culture led to the formation of mixed colonies of erythroid, myeloid, and endothelial cells, confirming the existence of bipotential hematoendothelial progenitors in the cytokine-supplemented EB cultures. Evaluation of four different rESC lines confirmed the validity of these disparities. Although rESCs have the potential for hematopoietic differentiation, they exhibit a pause at the hemangioblast stage of hematopoietic development in culture conditions developed for hESCs. PMID:17284653

Rajesh, Deepika; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Wolf, Don P; Slukvin, Igor; Thomson, James A; Shaaban, Aimen F

2007-02-01

185

Evolving concepts in the management of chronic myeloid leukemia: recommendations from an expert panel on behalf of the European LeukemiaNet  

Microsoft Academic Search

The introduction of imatinib mesylate (IM) has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Al- though experience is too limited to permit evidence-based evaluation of survival, the available data fully justify critical reas- sessment of CMLmanagement. The panel therefore reviewed treatment of CMLsince 1998. It confirmed the value of IM (400 mg\\/day) and of conventional allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell

Michele Baccarani; Giuseppe Saglio; John Goldman; Andreas Hochhaus; Bengt Simonsson; Frederick Appelbaum; Jane Apperley; Francisco Cervantes; Jorge Cortes; Michael Deininger; Alois Gratwohl; Francois Guilhot; Mary Horowitz; Timothy Hughes; Hagop Kantarjian; Richard Larson; Dietger Niederwieser; Richard Silver; Rudiger Hehlmann

2006-01-01

186

Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates cell fate decisions during myeloid differentiation  

PubMed Central

Background The clinical use of chromatin-modulating drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, for the treatment of bone marrow failure and hematopoietic malignancies has increased dramatically over the last few years. Nonetheless, little is currently known concerning their effects on myelopoiesis. Design and Methods We utilized an ex vivo differentiation system in which umbilical cord blood-derived CD34+ cells were treated with trichostatin A, sodium butyrate and valproic acid to evaluate the effect of histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment on myeloid lineage development, colony-forming potential, proliferation, and terminal neutrophil differentiation. Results Trichostatin A treatment modestly reduced progenitor proliferation, while sodium butyrate and valproic acid resulted in concentration-dependent effects on proliferation and apoptosis. Addition of valproic acid uniquely stimulated CD34+ proliferation. Sodium butyrate treatment inhibited terminal neutrophil differentiation both quantitatively and qualitatively. Addition of 100 ?M valproic acid resulted in increased numbers of mature neutrophils with a block in differentiation at increasing concentrations. Sodium butyrate and valproic acid treatment resulted in increased acetylation of histones 3 and 4 while trichostatin A, sodium butyrate and valproic acid had differential effects on the acetylation of non-histone proteins. Conclusions Individual histone deacetylase inihibitors had specific effects on cell fate decisions during myeloid development. These data provide novel insights into the effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on the regulation of normal hematopoiesis, which is of importance when considering utilizing these compounds for the treatment of myeloid malignancies and bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:20107159

Bartels, Marije; Geest, Christian R.; Bierings, Marc; Buitenhuis, Miranda; Coffer, Paul J.

2010-01-01

187

Post-remission therapy for acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

Induction followed by post-remission therapy including intensive chemotherapy with high-dose cytarabine, autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is recognized as the main road towards cure in acute myeloid leukemia. In recent years, also a renaissance of maintenance therapy after completion of intensive consolidation has been observed with the introduction of kinase inhibitors and demethylating agents in clinical trials. Greater insight into the genetic background of the disease fostered the extension of disease classification and pretreatment risk-categorization by gene mutations. In addition, the pre-treatment risk-defining parameters have been supplemented by markers evaluated at distinct time points during treatment and follow up. In this context, minimal residual disease assessment is increasingly used to dynamically fine tune treatment recommendations. Currently, the gold standard to counterbalance a higher risk of relapse by treatment strategies based on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with grafts from matched related or unrelated donors is still valuable, whereas autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation showed promising results especially in patients categorized as low-risk. Nonetheless, more targeted approaches including kinase inhibitors and demethylating agents in combination with or sequentially before or after intensive chemotherapy are currently in clinical evaluation and may lead to more genotype- instead of purely risk-adapted treatment strategies. PMID:25420282

Schlenk, Richard F.

2014-01-01

188

Omega 3 fatty acids reduce myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow of mice and promote progenitor cell differentiation  

PubMed Central

Background Omega 3 fatty acids have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, and promote differentiation in various cell types. The processes of cell survival, expansion, and differentiation are of key importance in the regulation of hematopoiesis. We investigated the role of omega 3 fatty acids in controlling the frequency of various myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Increased progenitor cell frequency and blocked differentiation are characteristics of hematopoietic disorders of the myeloid lineage, such as myeloproliferative diseases and myeloid leukemias. Results We found that increasing the proportion of omega 3 fatty acids relative to the proportion of omega 6 fatty acids in the diet caused increased differentiation and reduced the frequency of myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow of mice. Furthermore, this had no adverse effect on peripheral white blood cell counts. Conclusion Our results indicate that omega 3 fatty acids impact hematopoietic differentiation by reducing myeloid progenitor cell frequency in the bone marrow and promoting progenitor cell differentiation. Further exploration of this discovery could lead to the use of omega 3 fatty acids as a therapeutic option for patients that have various disorders of hematopoiesis. PMID:19296839

Varney, Melinda E; Hardman, W Elaine; Sollars, Vincent E

2009-01-01

189

Hes repressors are essential regulators of hematopoietic stem cell development downstream of Notch signaling  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have identified Notch as a key regulator of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) development, but the underlying downstream mechanisms remain unknown. The Notch target Hes1 is widely expressed in the aortic endothelium and hematopoietic clusters, though Hes1-deficient mice show no overt hematopoietic abnormalities. We now demonstrate that Hes is required for the development of HSC in the mouse embryo, a function previously undetected as the result of functional compensation by de novo expression of Hes5 in the aorta/gonad/mesonephros (AGM) region of Hes1 mutants. Analysis of embryos deficient for Hes1 and Hes5 reveals an intact arterial program with overproduction of nonfunctional hematopoietic precursors and total absence of HSC activity. These alterations were associated with increased expression of the hematopoietic regulators Runx1, c-myb, and the previously identified Notch target Gata2. By analyzing the Gata2 locus, we have identified functional RBPJ-binding sites, which mutation results in loss of Gata2 reporter expression in transgenic embryos, and functional Hes-binding sites, which mutation leads to specific Gata2 up-regulation in the hematopoietic precursors. Together, our findings show that Notch activation in the AGM triggers Gata2 and Hes1 transcription, and next HES-1 protein represses Gata2, creating an incoherent feed-forward loop required to restrict Gata2 expression in the emerging HSCs. PMID:23267012

Guiu, Jordi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; D’Altri, Teresa; Fraser, Stuart T.; Hatakeyama, Jun; Bresnick, Emery H.; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Dzierzak, Elaine; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Espinosa, Lluis

2013-01-01

190

IGF signaling contributes to malignant transformation of hematopoietic progenitors by the MLL-AF9 oncoprotein.  

PubMed

Malignant transformation of normal hematopoietic progenitors is a multistep process that likely requires interaction between collaborating oncogenic signals at critical junctures. For instance, the MLL-AF9 fusion oncogene is thought to contribute to myeloid leukemogenesis by driving a hematopoietic stem cell-like "self-renewal" gene expression signature in committed myeloid progenitors. In addition, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling has been implicated in self-renewal/pluripotency in hematopoietic and embryonic stem cell contexts and supports cell growth/survival by activation of downstream pathways, including phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/Raf/extracellular signal-regulated kinase. We hypothesized that IGF signaling could be an important contributor in the process of cellular transformation and/or clonal propagation. Utilizing an MLL-AF9 mouse bone marrow transplantation model of acute myelogenous leukemia, we discovered that committed myeloid progenitor cells with genetically reduced levels of IGF1R were less susceptible to leukemogenic transformation due, at least in part, to a cell-autonomous defect in clonogenic activity. Rather unexpectedly, genetic deletion of IGF1R by inducible Cre recombinase had no effect on growth/survival of established leukemia cells. These findings suggest that IGF1R signaling contributes to transformation of normal myeloid progenitor cells, but is not required for propagation of the leukemic clone once it has become established. We also show that treatment of mouse MLL-AF9 acute myelogenous leukemia cells with BMS-536924, an IGF1R/insulin receptor-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked cell growth, suggesting its efficacy in this model may be due to inhibition of insulin receptor and/or related tyrosine kinases, and raising the possibility that similar IGF1R inhibitors in clinical development may be acting through alternate/related pathways. PMID:22613471

Jenkins, Christopher R; Shevchuk, Olena O; Giambra, Vincenzo; Lam, Sonya H; Carboni, Joan M; Gottardis, Marco M; Holzenberger, Martin; Pollak, Michael; Humphries, R Keith; Weng, Andrew P

2012-09-01

191

Differentiation of B lymphocytes from hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Differentiation of B lymphocytes can be efficiently obtained when multipotent hematopoietic precursors are cocultured with stromal cell lines and soluble growth factors. Stromal cell lines provide yet-undefined signals required for the expansion of the precursor population and/or lineage commitment and soluble mediators. In consequence, the type of the exogenously added interleukins depends on the stromal support used in the assay. In contrast to S17 and OP9 stroma, the fibroblast line NIH3T3 does not support B-cell precursor expansion of CD19(+) fetal liver cells; neither does it induce B-lineage differentiation from embryonic multipotent progenitors, in the absence of added cytokines. Under these conditions c-kit ligand, interleukin-7 (IL-7), and Flt3 ligand (Flt3-L) are added to the cultures to ensure optimal B-cell differentiation. Another cytokine, stroma-derived lymphopoietin, can also be used instead of IL-7 in embryonic but not adult hematopoietic precursors. PMID:15146113

Vieira, Paulo; Cumano, Ana

2004-01-01

192

Hematopoietic Precursor Cells Transiently Reestablish Permissiveness for X Inactivation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Xist is the trigger for X inactivation in female mammals. The long noncoding Xist RNA localizes along one of the two female X chromosomes and initiates chromosome-wide silencing in the early embryo. In differen- tiated cells, Xist becomes dispensable for the maintenance of the inactive X, and its function for initiation of silencing is lost. How Xist mediates gene repression

Fabio Savarese; Katja Flahndorfer; Rudolf Jaenisch; Meinrad Busslinger; Anton Wutz

2006-01-01

193

Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?  

MedlinePLUS

... GO » SEE A LIST » What are the risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia? Do we know what causes acute myeloid leukemia? ... What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML) Talking With Your Doctor After ...

194

The hematopoietic stem cell niche  

PubMed Central

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess the ability to self-renew and to differentiate to mature progeny along multiple different hematopoietic lineages. The function of HSCs depends upon the signals from surrounding cells found within the highly specialized microenvironment termed the hematopoietic stem cell niche. Understanding and exploiting the HSC niche is a goal of basic scientists and clinicians alike. Recent studies have focused on defining the cellular components and molecular factors critical to this microenvironment. Here we review recent findings, discuss unresolved questions, and examine the clinical implications of our current knowledge of the HSC niche. PMID:22201730

Park, Dongsu; Sykes, David B.; Scadden, David T.

2014-01-01

195

Effects of notch signaling on regulation of myeloid cell differentiation in cancer.  

PubMed

Functionally altered myeloid cells play an important role in immune suppression in cancer, in angiogenesis, and in tumor cells' invasion and metastases. Here, we report that inhibition of Notch signaling in hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and dendritic cells is directly involved in abnormal myeloid cell differentiation in cancer. Inhibition of Notch signaling was caused by the disruption of the interaction between Notch receptor and transcriptional repressor CSL, which is normally required for efficient transcription of target genes. This disruption was the result of serine phosphorylation of Notch. We demonstrated that increased activity of casein kinase 2 (CK2) observed in HPC and in MDSC could be responsible for the phosphorylation of Notch and downregulation of Notch signaling. Inhibition of CK2 by siRNA or by pharmacological inhibitor restored Notch signaling in myeloid cells and substantially improved their differentiation, both in vitro and in vivo. This study demonstrates a novel mechanism regulation of Notch signaling in cancer. This may suggest a new perspective for pharmacological regulation of differentiation of myeloid cells in cancer. PMID:24220241

Cheng, Pingyan; Kumar, Vinit; Liu, Hao; Youn, Je-In; Fishman, Mayer; Sherman, Simon; Gabrilovich, Dmitry

2014-01-01

196

MiR-181 family: regulators of myeloid differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia as well as potential therapeutic targets.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs have been shown to play an important role in normal hematopoisis and leukemogenesis. Here, we report function and mechanisms of miR-181 family in myeloid differentiation and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aberrant overexpression of all the miR-181 family members (miR-181a/b/c/d) was detected in French-American-British M1, M2 and M3 subtypes of adult AML patients. By conducting gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that miR-181a inhibits granulocytic and macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) by directly targeting and downregulating the expression of PRKCD (which then affected the PRKCD-P38-C/EBP? pathway), CTDSPL (which then affected the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein) and CAMKK1. The three genes were also demonstrated to be the targets of miR-181b, miR-181c and miR-181d, respectively. Significantly decreases in the expression levels of the target proteins were detected in AML patients. Inhibition of the expression of miR-181 family members owing to Lenti-miRZip-181a infection in bone marrow blasts of AML patients increased target protein expression levels and partially reversed myeloid differentiation blockage. In the mice implanted with AML CD34+ HSPCs, expression inhibition of the miR-181 family by Lenti-miRZip-181a injection improved myeloid differentiation, inhibited engraftment and infiltration of the leukemic CD34+ cells into the bone marrow and spleen, and released leukemic symptoms. In conclusion, our findings revealed new mechanism of miR-181 family in normal hematopoiesis and AML development, and suggested that expression inhibition of the miR-181 family could provide a new strategy for AML therapy.Oncogene advance online publication, 1 September 2014; doi:10.1038/onc.2014.274. PMID:25174404

Su, R; Lin, H-S; Zhang, X-H; Yin, X-L; Ning, H-M; Liu, B; Zhai, P-F; Gong, J-N; Shen, C; Song, L; Chen, J; Wang, F; Zhao, H-L; Ma, Y-N; Yu, J; Zhang, J-W

2014-09-01

197

The role of tumor suppressor p15Ink4b in the regulation of hematopoietic progenitor cell fate  

PubMed Central

Epigenetic silencing of the tumor suppressor gene p15Ink4b (CDKN2B) is a frequent event in blood disorders like acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. The molecular function of p15Ink4b in hematopoietic differentiation still remains to be elucidated. Our previous study demonstrated that loss of p15Ink4b in mice results in skewing of the differentiation pattern of the common myeloid progenitor towards the myeloid lineage. Here, we investigated a function of p15Ink4b tumor suppressor gene in driving erythroid lineage commitment in hematopoietic progenitors. It was found that p15Ink4b is expressed more highly in committed megakaryocyte–erythroid progenitors than granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. More importantly, mice lacking p15Ink4b have lower numbers of primitive red cell progenitors and a severely impaired response to 5-fluorouracil- and phenylhydrazine-induced hematopoietic stress. Introduction of p15Ink4b into multipotential progenitors produced changes at the molecular level, including activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase\\extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK/ERK) signaling, increase GATA-1, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) and decrease Pu1, GATA-2 expression. These changes rendered cells more permissive to erythroid commitment and less permissive to myeloid commitment, as demonstrated by an increase in early burst-forming unit-erythroid formation with concomitant decrease in myeloid colonies. Our results indicate that p15Ink4b functions in hematopoiesis, by maintaining proper lineage commitment of progenitors and assisting in rapid red blood cells replenishment following stress. PMID:23359317

Humeniuk, R; Rosu-Myles, M; Fares, J; Koller, R; Bies, J; Wolff, L

2013-01-01

198

Detection of FLT3 Oncogene Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis  

PubMed Central

FLT3 (fms-related tyrosine kinase 3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase class III that is expressed on by early hematopoietic progenitor cells and plays an important role in hematopoietic stem cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. FLT3 is also expressed on leukemia blasts in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In order to determine the frequency of FLT3 oncogene mutations, we analyzed genomic DNA of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) were used for FLT3 exons 11, 14, and 15, followed by direct DNA sequencing. Two different types of functionally important FLT 3 mutations have been identified. Those mutations were unique to patients with inv(16), t(15:17) or t(8;21) and comprised fifteen cases with internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutation in the juxtamembrane domain and eleven cases with point mutation (exon 20, Asp835Tyr). The high frequency of the flt3 proto-oncogene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia AML suggests a key role for the receptor function. The association of FLT3 mutations with chromosomal abnormalities invites speculation as to the link between these two changes in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemiaAML. Furthermore, CSGE method has shown to be a rapid and sensitive screening method for detection of nucleotide alteration in FLT3 gene. Finally, this study reports, for the first time in Saudi Arabia, mutations in the human FLT3 gene in acute myeloid leukemia AML patients. PMID:19330068

Gari, Mamdooh; Abuzenadah, Adel; Chaudhary, Adeel; Al-Qahtani, Mohammed; Banni, Huda; Ahmad, Waseem; Al-Sayes, Fatin; Lary, Sahira; Damanhouri, Ghazi

2008-01-01

199

TC1(C8orf4) Regulates Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells and Hematopoiesis  

PubMed Central

Hematopoiesis is a complex process requiring multiple regulators for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) and differentiation to multi-lineage blood cells. TC1(C8orf4) is implicated in cancers, hematological malignancies and inflammatory activation. Here, we report that Tc1 regulates hematopoiesis in mice. Myeloid and lymphoid cells are increased markedly in peripheral blood of Tc1–deleted mice compared to wild type controls. Red blood cells are small-sized but increased in number. The bone marrow of Tc1?/? mice is normocellular histologically. However, Lin?Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells are expanded in Tc1?/? mice compared to wild type controls. The expanded population mostly consists of CD150?CD48+ cells, suggesting the expansion of lineage-restricted hematopoietic progenitor cells. Colony forming units (CFU) are increased in Tc1?/? mice bone marrow cells compared to controls. In wild type mice bone marrow, Tc1 is expressed in a limited population of HSPC but not in differentiated cells. Major myeloid transcriptional regulators such as Pu.1 and Cebp? are not up-regulated in Tc1?/? mice bone marrow. Our findings indicate that TC1 is a novel hematopoietic regulator. The mechanisms of TC1-dependent HSPC regulation and lineage determination are unknown. PMID:24937306

Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Jungtae; Park, Surim; Song, Kyuyoung; Lee, Inchul

2014-01-01

200

Activating mutation in the tyrosine kinase JAK2 in polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), and myeloid metaplasia with myelofibrosis (MMM) are clonal disorders arising from hematopoietic progenitors. An internet-based protocol was used to collect clinical information and biological specimens from patients with these diseases. High-throughput DNA resequencing identified a recurrent somatic missense mutation JAK2V617F in granulocyte DNA samples of 121 of 164 PV patients, of which 41

Ross L. Levine; Martha Wadleigh; Jan Cools; Benjamin L. Ebert; Gerlinde Wernig; Brian J. P. Huntly; Titus J. Boggon; Iwona Wlodarska; Jennifer J. Clark; Sandra Moore; Jennifer Adelsperger; Sumin Koo; Jeffrey C. Lee; Stacey Gabriel; Thomas Mercher; Alan D’Andrea; Stefan Fröhling; Konstanze Döhner; Peter Marynen; Peter Vandenberghe; Ruben A. Mesa; Ayalew Tefferi; James D. Griffin; Michael J. Eck; William R. Sellers; Matthew Meyerson; Todd R. Golub; Stephanie J. Lee; D. Gary Gilliland

2005-01-01

201

The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Summary Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia. PMID:25754204

Perna, Fabiana; Vu, Ly P.; Themeli, Maria; Kriks, Sonja; Hoya-Arias, Ruben; Khanin, Raya; Hricik, Todd; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Papapetrou, Eirini P.; Levine, Ross L.; Studer, Lorenz; Sadelain, Michel; Nimer, Stephen D.

2015-01-01

202

Erythroblastic sarcoma, an extremely rare variant of myeloid sarcoma.  

PubMed

A 79-year-old man was admitted to the hospital because of a 20-lb weight loss, low back pain, and leg weakness. He had a 1-year history of fibrotic myelodysplasia, possibly therapy related, with a highly complex chromosome karyotype. Radiologic evaluation showed extensive destructive bone lesions, retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy, and evidence for thoracic spinal cord compression. Core biopsies of a retroperitoneal lymph node showed groups of large, immature-appearing mononuclear cells which, on Wright-stained touch preparation, appeared similar to dysplastic erythroid precursors noted on recent marrow aspirate smears. Immunohistochemical staining showed negativity of neoplastic cells to an extensive panel of nonhematopoietic and myeloid markers, and positivity for CD117, glycophorin A, and CD71, consistent with a diagnosis of erythroblastic sarcoma. This lesion is a very unusual variant of myeloid sarcoma and has been described only rarely in the medical literature. PMID:22795354

Cornfield, Dennis B

2012-11-01

203

Shared and Distinct Functions of the Transcription Factors IRF4 and IRF8 in Myeloid Cell Development  

PubMed Central

Interferon regulatory factor (IRF) 8 and IRF4 are structurally-related, hematopoietic cell-specific transcription factors that cooperatively regulate the differentiation of dendritic cells and B cells. Whilst in myeloid cells IRF8 is known to modulate growth and differentiation, the role of IRF4 is poorly understood. In this study, we show that IRF4 has activities similar to IRF8 in regulating myeloid cell development. The ectopic expression of IRF4 in myeloid progenitor cells in vitro inhibits cell growth, promotes macrophages, but hinders granulocytic cell differentiation. We also show that IRF4 binds to and activates transcription through the IRF-Ets composite sequence (IECS). Furthermore, we demonstrate that Irf8-/-Irf4-/- mice exhibit a more severe chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-like disease than Irf8-/- mice, involving a disproportionate expansion of granulocytes at the expense of monocytes/macrophages. Irf4-/- mice, however, display no obvious abnormality in myeloid cell development, presumably because IRF4 is expressed at a much lower level than IRF8 in granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. Our results also suggest that IRF8 and IRF4 have not only common but also specific activities in myeloid cells. Since the expression of both the IRF8 and IRF4 genes is downregulated in CML patients, these results may add to our understanding of CML pathogenesis. PMID:22003407

Hotta, Chie; Nishiyama, Akira; Kurotaki, Daisuke; Yoshinari, Masahiro; Takami, Masamichi; Ichino, Motohide; Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Kamijo, Ryutaro; Kitagawa, Seiichi; Ozato, Keiko; Tamura, Tomohiko

2011-01-01

204

Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells  

PubMed Central

There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

2010-01-01

205

Epigenetic deregulation in myeloid malignancies.  

PubMed

Abnormal epigenetic patterning commonly is observed in cancer, including the myeloid malignancies acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. However, despite the universal nature of epigenetic deregulation, specific subtypes of myeloid disorders are associated with distinct epigenetic profiles, which accurately reflect the biologic heterogeneity of these disorders. In addition, mutations and genetic alterations of epigenetic-modifying enzymes frequently have been reported in these myeloid malignancies, emphasizing the importance of epigenetic deregulation in the initiation, progression, and outcome of these disorders. These aberrant epigenetic modifiers have become new targets for drug design, because their inhibition can potentially reverse the altered epigenetic landscapes that contribute to the development of the leukemia. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of epigenetic deregulation in leukemic transformation and their potential for therapeutic targeting. PMID:24813528

Meldi, Kristen M; Figueroa, Maria E

2015-01-01

206

The origin and evolution of mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Summary Most mutations in cancer genomes are thought to be acquired after the initiating event, which may cause genomic instability, driving clonal evolution. However, for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), normal karyotypes are common, and genomic instability is unusual. To better understand clonal evolution in AML, we sequenced the genomes of AML samples with a known initiating event (PML-RARA) vs. normal karyotype AML samples, and the exomes of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from healthy people. Collectively, the data suggest that most of the mutations found in AML genomes are actually random events that occurred in HSPCs before they acquired the initiating mutation; the mutational history of that cell is “captured” as the clone expands. In many cases, only one or two additional, cooperating mutations are needed to generate the malignant founding clone. Cells from the founding clone can acquire additional cooperating mutations, yielding subclones that can contribute to disease progression and/or relapse. PMID:22817890

Welch, John S.; Ley, Timothy J.; Link, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Larson, David E.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Wartman, Lukas D.; Lamprecht, Tamara L.; Liu, Fulu; Xia, Jun; Kandoth, Cyriac; Fulton, Robert S.; McLellan, Michael D.; Dooling, David J.; Wallis, John W.; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C.; Schmidt, Heather K.; Kalicki-Veizer, Joelle M.; Lu, Charles; Zhang, Qunyuan; Lin, Ling; O’Laughlin, Michelle D.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Delehaunty, Kim D.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Magrini, Vincent J.; McGrath, Sean D.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Vickery, Tammi L.; Hundal, Jasreet; Cook, Lisa L.; Swift, Gary W.; Reed, Jerry P.; Alldredge, Patricia A.; Wylie, Todd N.; Walker, Jason R.; Watson, Mark A.; Heath, Sharon E.; Shannon, William D.; Varghese, Nobish; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Baty, Jack D.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Klco, Jeffery M.; Tomasson, Michael H.; Westervelt, Peter; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.; DiPersio, John F.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.

2012-01-01

207

Insights into the stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has long served as a paradigm for generating new insights into the cellular origin, pathogenesis and improved approaches to treating many types of human cancer. Early studies of the cellular phenotypes and genotypes represented in leukemic populations obtained from CML patients established the concept of an evolving clonal disorder originating in and initially sustained by a rare, multipotent, self-maintaining hematopoietic stem cell (HSC). More recent investigations continue to support this model, while also revealing new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms that explain how knowledge of CML stem cells and their early differentiating progeny can predict the differing and variable features of chronic phase and blast crisis. In particular, these emphasize the need for new agents that effectively and specifically target CML stem cells to produce non-toxic, but curative therapies that do not require lifelong treatments. PMID:20861912

Sloma, I; Jiang, X; Eaves, A C; Eaves, C J

2010-11-01

208

Targeting self-renewal pathways in myeloid malignancies  

PubMed Central

A fundamental property of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is the ability to self-renew. This is a complex process involving multiple signal transduction cascades which control the fine balance between self-renewal and differentiation through transcriptional networks. Key activators/regulators of self-renewal include chemokines, cytokines and morphogens which are expressed in the bone marrow niche, either in a paracrine or autocrine fashion, and modulate stem cell behaviour. Increasing evidence suggests that the downstream signaling pathways induced by these ligands converge at multiple levels providing a degree of redundancy in steady state hematopoiesis. Here we will focus on how these pathways cross-talk to regulate HSC self-renewal highlighting potential therapeutic windows which could be targeted to prevent leukemic stem cell self-renewal in myeloid malignancies. PMID:23675967

2013-01-01

209

Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia  

PubMed Central

Chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), previously a fatal illness, is now readily manageable with oral medication. First described in the 1840s, there was no widely accepted cure until the advent of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the late 1970s. This treatment was of limited value because of donor availability and toxicity problems. Discovering the Philadelphia chromosome and demonstrating that the BCR-ABL chimaeric gene was responsible for the malignant phenotype opened new avenues. The development of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) changed the lives of patients with CML. The treatment has been so successful that compliance is now a problem. Currently under discussion is the possible use of more expensive second generation TKIs for newly diagnosed patients. In spite of the success with TKIs, treatment of common cancers has not been so successful. Is CML therefore a paradigm for malignancy or just a strange disease? PMID:23275837

McCann, Shaun R.

2012-01-01

210

PXD101 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-08

211

Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-02-25

212

Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-11-06

213

Hematopoietic bone marrow recovery after radiation therapy: MRI evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is able to detect the increase of adipocytes in the hematopoietic bone marrow that occurs as a consequence of radiotherapy and is indicative of the loss of myeloid tissue. By monitoring this process, it is also possible to determine the recovery of the bone marrow. The amount of viable hematopoietic tissue plays a fundamental role in determining whether the patient is able to undergo further antineoplastic therapy, particularly chemotherapy. We examined 35 patients who had been treated with radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (12), uterine cervix carcinoma (nine), ovarian dysgerminoma (six), testicular seminoma (four), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (four). We observed that radiation-induced modifications of the MRI pattern in the bone marrow are tightly linked to two parameters; the administered radiation dose and the length of time passed after the treatment. Bone marrow recovery was observed only when patients were treated with doses lower than 50 Gy. The earlier radiation-induced modifications of the bone marrow MRI pattern occurred 6 to 12 months after irradiation, and they were most evident 5 to 6 years after the treatment. From 2 to 9 years after radiotherapy, we observed partial recovery. Complete recovery, when it occurred, was observed only 10 to 23 years after the treatment. Our results indicate that MRI studies are likely to be useful in the assessment of radiation-induced injuries.

Casamassima, F.; Ruggiero, C.; Caramella, D.; Tinacci, E.; Villari, N.; Ruggiero, M. (Univ. of Firenze (Italy))

1989-05-01

214

Role of KIRs and KIR ligands in hematopoietic transplantation.  

PubMed

This review focuses on recent research demonstrating the role alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells play in adoptive immunotherapy of leukemia in allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation. For patients with hematologic malignancies and an indication to allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation who do not have a matched sibling donor, unrelated donor, or cord blood transplants are almost always available (as long as the patient's ethnicity is represented in the donor registries). However, up to one half of patients relapse and do not make it to transplant during the time required for the donor search, completion of donor HLA typing, bone marrow harvest, and shipment. Donor-versus-recipient NK cell alloreactivity is effected by a functional repertoire of NK cells which express inhibitory Killer-Cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor(s) (KIR) for self class I ligand(s), sense missing expression of donor KIR ligand(s) in the recipient and mediate alloreactions. It improves outcomes of HLA haplotype-mismatched ('haploidentical') transplants by controlling acute myeloid leukemia relapse without causing graft-versus-host disease. It is hoped the dramatic improvements afforded by the discovery of the role of NK cell alloreactivity will extend the use of haploidentical transplants, as the donors are, unlike the unrelated, immediately available family members. PMID:18675345

Velardi, Andrea

2008-10-01

215

Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders  

PubMed Central

Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

2010-01-01

216

Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency.  

PubMed

We treated 14 patients with GATA2 deficiency using a nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation regimen. Four patients received peripheral blood stem cells from matched related donors (MRD), 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cells from matched unrelated donors (URD), 4 patients received hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood donors (UCB), and 2 patients received bone marrow cells from haploidentical related donors. MRD and URD recipients received conditioning with 3 days of fludarabine and 200 cGy total body irradiation (TBI). Haploidentical related donor recipients and UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide and 2 additional days of fludarabine along with 200 cGY TBI. MRD, URD, and UCB recipients received tacrolimus and sirolimus for post-transplantation immunosuppression, whereas haploidentical recipients received high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Eight patients are alive with reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, B cell, and natural killer cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype at a median follow-up of 3.5 years. Two patients (1 URD recipient and 1 UCB recipient) rejected the donor graft and 1 MRD recipient relapsed with myelodysplastic syndrome after transplantation. We are currently using a high-dose conditioning regimen with busulfan and fludarabine in patients with GATA2 deficiency to achieve more consistent engraftment and eradication of the malignant myeloid clones. PMID:25111582

Grossman, Jennifer; Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Zerbe, Christa; Calvo, Katherine; Hughes, Thomas; Hakim, Fran; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Freeman, Alexandra; Holland, Steven M; Hickstein, Dennis D

2014-12-01

217

RHAMM/HMMR (CD168) is not an ideal target antigen for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

Background Criteria for good candidate antigens for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia are high expression on leukemic stem cells in the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low or no expression in vital tissues. It was shown in vaccination trials that Receptor for Hyaluronic Acid Mediated Motility (RHAMM/HMMR) generates cellular immune responses in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and that these responses correlate with clinical benefit. It is not clear however whether this response actually targets the leukemic stem cell, especially since it was reported that RHAMM is expressed maximally during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. In addition, tumor specificity of RHAMM expression remains relatively unexplored. Design and Methods Blood, leukapheresis and bone marrow samples were collected from both acute myeloid leukemia patients and healthy controls. RHAMM expression was assessed at protein and mRNA levels on various sorted populations, either fresh or after manipulation. Results High levels of RHAMM were expressed by CD34+CD38+ and CD34- acute myeloid leukemia blasts. However, only baseline expression of RHAMM was measured in CD34+CD38- leukemic stem cells, and was not different from that in CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells from healthy controls. RHAMM was significantly up-regulated in CD34+ cells from healthy donors during in vitro expansion and during in vivo engraftment. Finally, we demonstrated an explicit increase in the expression level of RHAMM after in vitro activation of T cells. Conclusions RHAMM does not fulfill the criteria of an ideal target antigen for immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia. RHAMM expression in leukemic stem cells does not differ significantly from the expression in hematopoietic stem cells from healthy controls. RHAMM expression in proliferating CD34+ cells of healthy donors and activated T cells further compromises RHAMM-specific T-cell-mediated immunotherapy. PMID:22532518

Snauwaert, Sylvia; Vanhee, Stijn; Goetgeluk, Glenn; Verstichel, Greet; Van Caeneghem, Yasmine; Velghe, Imke; Philippé, Jan; Berneman, Zwi N.; Plum, Jean; Taghon, Tom; Leclercq, Georges; Thielemans, Kris; Kerre, Tessa; Vandekerckhove, Bart

2012-01-01

218

Septic shock caused by Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacteremia in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

Sphingomonas paucimobilis is an aerobic gram-negative bacillus that causes a variety of infections in healthy as well as in immunocompromised individuals. The organism is usually susceptible to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and carbapenems. However, resistance to penicillins and the first-generation cephalosporins is commonly encountered. Reported here is a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who developed S. paucimobilis bacteremia complicated by septic shock just before receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre in Riyadh. The septic episode was successfully treated in the intensive care unit. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of septic shock caused by S. paucimobilis bacteremia in a hematopoietic SCT recipient. PMID:17605729

Al-Anazi, K A; Abu Jafar, S; Al-Jasser, A M; Al-Shangeeti, A; Chaudri, N A; Al Jurf, M D; Al-Mohareb, F I

2008-04-01

219

MYELOID NEOPLASIA The derivation of diagnostic markers of chronic myeloid leukemia progression  

E-print Network

MYELOID NEOPLASIA The derivation of diagnostic markers of chronic myeloid leukemia progression from, limited molecular markers ex- ist that can determine where in the spec- trum of chronic myeloid leukemia-based treat- ment strategy at diagnosis. (Blood. 2009; 114:3292-3298) Introduction Chronic myeloid leukemia

Raftery, Adrian

220

Effects of Stem Cell Factor on Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Accumulation in Human Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and LAD2 Mast Cells  

PubMed Central

Stem cell factor (SCF) is a hematopoietic growth factor that exerts its activity by signalling through the tyrosine kinase receptor known as Kit or CD117. SCF-Kit signalling is crucial for the survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage. Furthermore, since myeloid leukaemia cells express the Kit receptor, SCF may play an important role in myeloid leukaemia progression too. However, the mechanisms of this pathophysiological effect remain unclear. Recent evidence shows that SCF triggers accumulation of the inducible alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hematopoietic cells—a transcription complex that plays a pivotal role in cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. However, it is unknown how SCF impacts on HIF-1? accumulation in human myeloid leukaemia and mast cells. Here we show that SCF induces HIF-1? accumulation in THP-1 human myeloid leukaemia cells but not in LAD2 mast cells. We demonstrated that LAD2 cells have a more robust glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidative system compared to THP-1 cells and are therefore protected against the actions of ROS generated in an SCF-dependent manner. BSO-induced GSH depletion led to a significant decrease in HIF-1? prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) activity in THP-1 cells and to near attenuation of it in LAD2 cells. In THP-1 cells, SCF-induced HIF-1? accumulation is controlled via ERK, PI3 kinase/PKC-?/mTOR-dependent and to a certain extent by redox-dependent mechanisms. These results demonstrate for the first time an important cross-talk of signalling pathways associated with HIF-1 activation—an important stage of the myeloid leukaemia cell life cycle. PMID:21799876

Oniku, Abraham E.; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

2011-01-01

221

Functional integration of acute myeloid leukemia into the vascular niche.  

PubMed

Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the upregulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost fourfold reduction in proliferative activity compared with non-vascular-associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to downregulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. These novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for AML. PMID:24637335

Cogle, C R; Goldman, D C; Madlambayan, G J; Leon, R P; Al Masri, A; Clark, H A; Asbaghi, S A; Tyner, J W; Dunlap, J; Fan, G; Kovacsovics, T; Liu, Q; Meacham, A; Hamlin, K L; Hromas, R A; Scott, E W; Fleming, W H

2014-10-01

222

REVIEW Open Access Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models  

E-print Network

Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative. They comprise chronic stages such as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS]. MPNs comprise a variety of disorders such as chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and non-CML MPNs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

[Chronic myeloid leukemia in the 21st century: biology and treatment].  

PubMed

Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia (CML) is a clonal disease, originated at the level of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC) and characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome and its oncogenic product p210(BcrAbl). Such a protein has been shown to be essential for malignant transformation, since it is capable of altering cell adhesion, proliferation and apoptosis. Historically, CML has been treated by using different approaches: arsenic (in the early days), a variety of chemical agents (busulfan, hydroxyurea, cytarabine), cytokines (IFN-alpha, IFNalpha-PEG), hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), and more recently drugs generated by design (imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib). All these molecules exert specific effects on HSC and lead to a variety of clinical and biological responses. In this article, we present an overview about hematopoiesis in CML and its implications in the treatment of this disease. PMID:19736811

Chávez-González, María Antonieta; Ayala-Sánchez, Manuel; Mayani, Héctor

2009-01-01

224

Localization of hematopoietic cells in the bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus).  

PubMed

Amphibians represent the first phylogenetic group to possess hematopoietic bone marrow. However, adult amphibian hematopoiesis has only been described in a few species and with conflicting data. Bone marrow, kidney, spleen, liver, gut, stomach, lung, tegument, and heart were therefore collected from adult Lithobates catesbeianus and investigated by light microscopy and immunohistochemical methods under confocal laser microscopy. Our study demonstrated active hematopoiesis in the bone marrow of vertebrae, femur, and fingers and in the kidney, but no hematopoietic activity inside other organs including the spleen and liver. Blood cells were identified as a heterogeneous cell population constituted by heterophils, basophils, eosinophils, monocytes, erythrocytic cells, lymphocytes, and their precursors. Cellular islets of the thrombocytic lineage occurred near sinusoids of the bone marrow. Antibodies against CD34, CD117, stem cell antigen, erythropoietin receptor, and the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor identified some cell populations, and some circulating immature cells were seen in the bloodstream. Thus, on the basis of these phylogenetic features, we propose that L. catesbeianus can be used as an important model for hematopoietic studies, since this anuran exhibits hematopoiesis characteristics both of lower vertebrates (renal hematopoiesis) and of higher vertebrates (bone marrow hematopoiesis). PMID:19449034

de Abreu Manso, Pedro Paulo; de Brito-Gitirana, Lycia; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo

2009-08-01

225

Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins.  

PubMed Central

One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogenic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase II, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11q23 or 21q22. The MLL gene at 11q23 or the AML1 gene at 21q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 11q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11q23 or 21q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. PMID:9118910

Larson, R A; LeBeau, M M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D

1996-01-01

226

Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins  

SciTech Connect

One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-12-01

227

Targeting myeloid cells to the brain using non-myeloablative conditioning.  

PubMed

Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are able to colonize the central nervous system (CNS) at sites of damage. This ability makes BMDCs an ideal cellular vehicle for transferring therapeutic genes/molecules to the CNS. However, conditioning is required for bone marrow-derived myeloid cells to engraft in the brain, which so far has been achieved by total body irradiation (TBI) and by chemotherapy (e.g. busulfan treatment). Unfortunately, both regimens massively disturb the host's hematopoietic compartment. Here, we established a conditioning protocol to target myeloid cells to sites of brain damage in mice using non-myeloablative focal head irradiation (HI). This treatment was associated with comparatively low inflammatory responses in the CNS despite cranial radiation doses which are identical to TBI, as revealed by gene expression analysis of cytokines/chemokines such as CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-? and CCL5. HI prior to bone marrow transplantation resulted in much lower levels of blood chimerism defined as the percentage of donor-derived cells in peripheral blood (< 5%) compared with TBI (> 95%) or busulfan treatment (> 50%). Nevertheless, HI effectively recruited myeloid cells to the area of motoneuron degeneration in the brainstem within 7 days after facial nerve axotomy. In contrast, no donor-derived cells were detected in the lesioned facial nucleus of busulfan-treated animals up to 2 weeks after transplantation. Our findings suggest that myeloid cells can be targeted to sites of brain damage even in the presence of very low levels of peripheral blood chimerism. We established a novel non-myeloablative conditioning protocol with minimal disturbance of the host's hematopoietic system for targeting BMDCs specifically to areas of pathology in the brain. PMID:24244666

Böttcher, Chotima; Fernández-Klett, Francisco; Gladow, Nadine; Rolfes, Simone; Priller, Josef

2013-01-01

228

Genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on genetically different acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting protein synthesis and cell proliferation while inducing apoptosis – molecular insights from an iTRAQ™ quantitative proteomics study  

PubMed Central

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a form of cancer that affects the hematopoietic precursor cells with lethal effects. We investigated the prospect of using genistein as an effective alternate therapy for AML. A two-cell line model, one possessing the FLT3 gene with the ITD mutation (MV4?11) and the other with the wildtype FLT3 gene (HL?60) has been employed. Our 8?plexed iTRAQ™?based quantitative proteomics analysis together with various functional studies demonstrated that genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on both the AML cell lines. Genistein treatment on the AML cells showed that the drug arrested the mTOR pathway leading to down?regulation of protein synthesis. Additionally, genistein treatment is found to induce cell death via apoptosis. Contrasting regulatory effects of genistein on the cell cycle of the two cell lines were also identified, with the induction of G2/M phase arrest in HL-60 cells but not in MV4?11 cells. Hence, our study highlights the potent anti-leukemic effect of genistein on AML cells irrespective of their genetic status. This suggests the potential use of genistein as an effective general drug therapy for AML patients.

Lim, Teck Kwang; Port, Sarah Alexandra; Han, Jin-Hua; Chen, Chien-Shing; Lin, Qingsong

2015-01-01

229

Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-23

230

Adult neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain: A hematopoietic connection?  

PubMed Central

New neurons are produced and integrated into circuits in the adult brains of many organisms, including crustaceans. In some crustacean species, the 1st- generation neuronal precursors reside in a niche exhibiting characteristics analogous to mammalian neurogenic niches. However, unlike mammalian niches where several generations of neuronal precursors coexist, the lineage of precursor cells in crayfish is spatially separated allowing the influence of environmental and endogenous regulators on specific generations in the neuronal precursor lineage to be defined. Experiments also demonstrate that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii are not self-renewing. A source external to the neurogenic niche must therefore provide cells that replenish the 1st-generation precursor pool, because although these cells divide and produce a continuous efflux of 2nd-generation cells from the niche, the population of 1st-generation niche precursors is not diminished with growth and aging. In vitro studies show that cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to involve serotonergic mechanisms. We propose that in crayfish, the hematopoietic system may be a source of cells that replenish the niche cell pool. These and other studies reviewed here establish decapod crustaceans as model systems in which the processes underlying adult neurogenesis, such as stem cell origins and transformation, can be readily explored. Studies in diverse species where adult neurogenesis occurs will result in a broader understanding of fundamental mechanisms and how evolutionary processes may have shaped the vertebrate/mammalian condition. PMID:21929622

Beltz, Barbara S.; Zhang, Yi; Benton, Jeanne L.; Sandeman, David C.

2011-01-01

231

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and TNF  promote the NF B-dependent maturation of normal and leukemic myeloid cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and TNF- in- duced monocytic maturation of primary normal CD34-derived myeloid precursors and of the M2\\/ M3-type acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line, associated to increased nuclear factor (NF)-B ac- tivity and nuclear translocation of p75, p65, and p50 NF-B family members. Consistently, both cytokines also induced the degradation of the NF-B inhibitors,

Paola Secchiero; Daniela Milani; Arianna Gonelli; Elisabetta Melloni; Diana Campioni; Davide Gibellini; Silvano Capitani; Giorgio Zauli

2003-01-01

232

Reconstitution of the myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous and genetically modified CD34+ bone marrow cells, following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Prolonged, altered hematopoietic reconstitution is commonly observed in patients undergoing myeloablative conditioning and bone marrow and\\/or mobilized peripheral blood-derived stem cell transplantation. We studied the reconstitution of myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous CD34+ bone marrow cells following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques. RESULTS: The bone marrow cells were first transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral

Sonia Derdouch; Wilfried Gay; Didier Nègre; Stéphane Prost; Mikael Le Dantec; Benoît Delache; Gwenaelle Auregan; Thibault Andrieu; Jean-Jacques Leplat; François-Loïc Cosset; Roger Le Grand

2008-01-01

233

Regulatory Myeloid Cells in Transplantation  

PubMed Central

Regulatory myeloid cells (RMC) are emerging as novel targets for immunosuppressive (IS) agents and hold considerable promise as cellular therapeutic agents. Herein, we discuss the ability of regulatory macrophages (Mreg), regulatory dendritic cells (DCreg) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to regulate alloimmunity, their potential as cellular therapeutic agents and the IS agents that target their function. We consider protocols for the generation of RMC and the selection of donor- or recipient-derived cells for adoptive cell therapy. Additionally, the issues of cell trafficking and antigen (Ag) specificity following RMC transfer are discussed. Improved understanding of the immunobiology of these cells has increased the possibility of moving RMC into the clinic to reduce the burden of current IS agents and promote Ag-specific tolerance. In the second half of this review, we discuss the influence of established and experimental IS agents on myeloid cell populations. IS agents believed historically to act primarily on T cell activation and proliferation are emerging as important regulators of RMC function. Better insights into the influence of IS agents on RMC will enhance our ability to develop cell therapy protocols to promote the function of these cells. Moreover, novel IS agents may be designed to target RMC in situ to promote Ag-specific immune regulation in transplantation and usher in a new era of immune modulation exploiting cells of myeloid origin. PMID:24092382

Rosborough, Brian R.; Raïch-Regué, Dàlia; Turnquist, Heth R.; Thomson, Angus W.

2013-01-01

234

Primary vaginal myeloid sarcoma: a rare case report and review of the literature.  

PubMed

Myeloid sarcoma (chloroma, granulocytic sarcoma, or extramedullary myeloid tumour) is an extramedullary mass forming neoplasm composed of myeloid precursor cells. It is usually associated with myeloproliferative disorders but very rarely may precede the onset of leukemia. Here, we are presenting a rare case of primary vaginal myeloid sarcoma in a geriatric female patient without initial presentation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A 68-year-old female patient with ECOG Performance Score of 1 presented with pervaginal bleeding for 20 days. On colposcopic examination, she was found to have mass in the anterior fornix of vagina. A punch biopsy specimen revealed chloromatous infiltration of the vagina. LCA (leukocyte common antigen), MPO (myeloperoxidase), and c-kit were strongly positive on IHC (immunohistochemistry). The patient's routine blood investigations were normal including peripheral smear, lactose dehydrogenase, uric acid, 2D echocardiography, conventional cytogenetics, bone marrow aspiration, and biopsy. The patient was given 4 cycles of decitabine (Decitex, manufactured by Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Limited, India), 20?mg/m(2) for 5 days at an interval of 28 days. There was a partial response to decitabine according to RECIST criteria. As decitabine therapy was well tolerated, we are continuing in the same way until disease progression without any complications. The patient is undergoing regular follow-up at our centre. PMID:25685570

Modi, Gaurang; Madabhavi, Irappa; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Anand, Asha; Parikh, Sonia; Jain, Pritam; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Sarkar, Malay

2015-01-01

235

Primary Vaginal Myeloid Sarcoma: A Rare Case Report and Review of the Literature  

PubMed Central

Myeloid sarcoma (chloroma, granulocytic sarcoma, or extramedullary myeloid tumour) is an extramedullary mass forming neoplasm composed of myeloid precursor cells. It is usually associated with myeloproliferative disorders but very rarely may precede the onset of leukemia. Here, we are presenting a rare case of primary vaginal myeloid sarcoma in a geriatric female patient without initial presentation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A 68-year-old female patient with ECOG Performance Score of 1 presented with pervaginal bleeding for 20 days. On colposcopic examination, she was found to have mass in the anterior fornix of vagina. A punch biopsy specimen revealed chloromatous infiltration of the vagina. LCA (leukocyte common antigen), MPO (myeloperoxidase), and c-kit were strongly positive on IHC (immunohistochemistry). The patient's routine blood investigations were normal including peripheral smear, lactose dehydrogenase, uric acid, 2D echocardiography, conventional cytogenetics, bone marrow aspiration, and biopsy. The patient was given 4 cycles of decitabine (Decitex, manufactured by Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Limited, India), 20?mg/m2 for 5 days at an interval of 28 days. There was a partial response to decitabine according to RECIST criteria. As decitabine therapy was well tolerated, we are continuing in the same way until disease progression without any complications. The patient is undergoing regular follow-up at our centre. PMID:25685570

Modi, Gaurang; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Anand, Asha; Parikh, Sonia; Jain, Pritam; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop; Sarkar, Malay

2015-01-01

236

Prognostic factors and outcomes of adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia after first relapse  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with acute myeloid leukemia who are treated with conventional chemotherapy still have a substantial risk of relapse; the prognostic factors and optimal treatments after relapse have not been fully established. We, therefore, retrospectively analyzed data from patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had achieved first complete remission to assess their prognosis after first relapse. Design and Methods Clinical data were collected from 70 institutions across the country on adult patients who were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and who had achieved a first complete remission after one or two courses of induction chemotherapy. Results Among the 1,535 patients who were treated with chemotherapy alone, 1,015 relapsed. Half of them subsequently achieved a second complete remission. The overall survival was 30% at 3 years after relapse. Multivariate analysis showed that achievement of second complete remission, salvage allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, and a relapse-free interval of 1 year or longer were independent prognostic factors. The outcome after allogeneic transplantation in second complete remission was comparable to that after transplantation in first complete remission. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia and cytogenetic risk factors other than inv(16) or t(8;21) had a significantly worse outcome when they did not undergo salvage transplantation even when they achieved second complete remission. Conclusions We found that both the achievement of second complete remission and the application of salvage transplantation were crucial for improving the prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first relapse. Our results indicate that the optimal treatment strategy after first relapse may differ according to the cytogenetic risk. PMID:20634493

Kurosawa, Saiko; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Miyawaki, Shuichi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Sakura, Toru; Kanamori, Heiwa; Usuki, Kensuke; Yamashita, Takuya; Okoshi, Yasushi; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Mawatari, Momoko; Hatanaka, Kazuo; Sunami, Kazutaka; Shimoyama, Manabu; Fujishima, Naohito; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Miura, Ikuo; Takaue, Yoichi; Fukuda, Takahiro

2010-01-01

237

Genome-scale expression and transcription factor binding profiles reveal therapeutic targets in transgenic ERG myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

The ETS transcription factor ERG plays a central role in definitive hematopoiesis, and its overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a stem cell signature and poor prognosis. Yet how ERG causes leukemia is unclear. Here we show that pan-hematopoietic ERG expression induces an early progenitor myeloid leukemia in transgenic mice. Integrated genome-scale analysis of gene expression and ERG binding profiles revealed that ERG activates a transcriptional program similar to human AML stem/progenitor cells and to human AML with high ERG expression. This transcriptional program was associated with activation of RAS that was required for leukemia cells growth in vitro and in vivo. We further show that ERG induces expression of the Pim1 kinase oncogene through a novel hematopoietic enhancer validated in transgenic mice and human CD34+ normal and leukemic cells. Pim1 inhibition disrupts growth and induces apoptosis of ERG-expressing leukemic cells. The importance of the ERG/PIM1 axis is further underscored by the poorer prognosis of AML highly expressing ERG and PIM1. Thus, integrative genomic analysis demonstrates that ERG causes myeloid progenitor leukemia characterized by an induction of leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. Pim1 and the RAS pathway are potential therapeutic targets of these high-risk leukemias. PMID:23974202

Goldberg, Liat; Tijssen, Marloes R.; Birger, Yehudit; Hannah, Rebecca L.; Kinston, Sarah J.; Schütte, Judith; Beck, Dominik; Knezevic, Kathy; Schiby, Ginette; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Biran, Anat; Kloog, Yoel; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D.; Aplan, Peter D.; Pimanda, John E.

2013-01-01

238

Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays  

E-print Network

Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays CONNIEEAVES,CINDYMILLER,JOHANNE CASHMAN Columbia, Canada Key Words.Hematopoietic stem cells Transplantation Cord blood. Expansion Growthfactors murine hematopoietic stem cells to be quantitated. Measurements of murine CRU have shown

Zandstra, Peter W.

239

Hematopoietic niche and bone meet  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review To provide an overview of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow. In addition to highlighting recent advances in the field, we will also discuss components of the niche that may contribute to the development of cancer, or cancer metastases to the bone. Recent findings Much progress has been very recently made in the understanding of the cellular and molecular interactions in the HSC microenvironment. These recent findings point out the extraordinary complexity of the HSC microenvironment. Emerging data also suggest convergence of signals important for HSC and for leukemia or metastatic disease support. Summary The HSC niche comprises complex interactions between multiple cell types and molecules requiring cell-cell signaling as well as local secretion. These components can be thought of as therapeutic targets not only for HSC expansion, but also to modify behavior of hematopoietic malignancies and cancer metastases to the bone. PMID:18685423

Frisch, Benjamin J.; Porter, Rebecca L.; Calvi, Laura M.

2008-01-01

240

Drosophila as a model for the two myeloid blood cell systems in vertebrates.  

PubMed

Fish, mice, and humans rely on two coexisting myeloid blood cell systems. One is sustained by hematopoietic progenitor cells, which reside in specialized microenvironments (niches) in hematopoietic organs and give rise to cells of the monocyte lineage. The other system corresponds to the independent lineage of self-renewing tissue macrophages, which colonize organs during embryonic development and are maintained during later life by proliferation in local tissue microenvironments. However, little is known about the nature of these microenvironments and their regulation. Moreover, many vertebrate tissues contain a mix of both tissue-resident and monocyte-derived macrophages, posing a challenge to the study of lineage-specific regulatory mechanisms and function. This review highlights how research in the simple model organism Drosophila melanogaster can address many of these outstanding questions in the field. Drawing parallels between hematopoiesis in Drosophila and vertebrates, we illustrate the evolutionary conservation of the two myeloid systems across animal phyla. Much like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses a lineage of self-renewing tissue-resident macrophages, which we refer to as tissue hemocytes, as well as a "definitive" lineage of macrophages that derive from hematopoiesis in the progenitor-based lymph gland. We summarize key findings from Drosophila hematopoiesis that illustrate how local microenvironments, systemic signals, immune challenges, and nervous inputs regulate adaptive responses of tissue-resident macrophages and progenitor-based hematopoiesis to maximize fitness of the animal. PMID:24946019

Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

2014-08-01

241

c-MYC oncoprotein dictates transcriptional profiles of ATP-binding cassette transporter genes in chronic myelogenous leukemia CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells.  

PubMed

Resistance to chemotherapeutic agents remains one of the major impediments to a successful treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Misregulation of the activity of a specific group of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC) is responsible for reducing the intracellular concentration of drugs in leukemic cells. Moreover, a consistent body of evidence also suggests that ABC transporters play a role in cancer progression beyond the efflux of cytotoxic drugs. Despite a large number of studies that investigated the function of the ABC transporters, little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the ABC genes. Here, we present data showing that the oncoprotein c-MYC is a direct transcriptional regulator of a large set of ABC transporters in CML. Furthermore, molecular analysis carried out in CD34+ hematopoietic cell precursors of 21 CML patients reveals that the overexpression of ABC transporters driven by c-MYC is a peculiar characteristic of the CD34+ population in CML and was not found either in the population of mononuclear cells from which they had been purified nor in CD34+ cells isolated from healthy donors. Finally, we describe how the methylation state of CpG islands may regulate the access of c-MYC to ABCG2 gene promoter, a well-studied gene associated with multidrug resistance in CML, hence, affecting its expression. Taken together, our findings support a model in which c-MYC-driven transcriptional events, combined with epigenetic mechanisms, direct and regulate the expression of ABC genes with possible implications in tumor malignancy and drug efflux in CML. PMID:21693596

Porro, Antonio; Iraci, Nunzio; Soverini, Simona; Diolaiti, Daniel; Gherardi, Samuele; Terragna, Carolina; Durante, Sandra; Valli, Emanuele; Kalebic, Thea; Bernardoni, Roberto; Perrod, Chiara; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Baccarani, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni; Perini, Giovanni

2011-08-01

242

Hematopoietic Cell Fate and the Initiation of Leukemic Properties in Primitive Primary Human Cells Are Influenced by Ras Activity and Farnesyltransferase Inhibition  

PubMed Central

The Ras pathway transduces divergent signals determining normal cell fate and is frequently activated in hematopoietic malignancies, but the manner in which activation contributes to human leukemia is poorly understood. We report that a high level of activated H-Ras signaling in transduced primary human hematopoietic progenitors reduced their proliferation and enhanced monocyte/macrophage differentiation. However, the exposure of these cells to a farnesyltransferase inhibitor and establishment of a moderate level of Ras activity showed increased proliferation, an elevated frequency of primitive blast-like cells, and progenitors with enhanced self-renewal capacity. These results suggest that the amplitude of Ras pathway signaling is a determinant of myeloid cell fate and that moderate Ras activation in primitive hematopoietic cells can be an early event in leukemogenesis. PMID:15282300

Dorrell, Craig; Takenaka, Katsuto; Minden, Mark D.; Hawley, Robert G.; Dick, John E.

2004-01-01

243

The Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (TET2) gene in hematopoiesis and hematopoietic diseases.  

PubMed

Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (TET2) inactivation through loss-of-function mutation, deletion and IDH1/2 (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2) gene mutation is a common event in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 gene mutations similar to those observed in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies also accumulate with age in otherwise healthy subjects with clonal hematopoiesis. TET2 is one of the three proteins of the TET (Ten-Eleven Translocation) family, which are evolutionarily conserved dioxygenases that catalyze the conversion of 5-methyl-cytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) and promote DNA demethylation. TET dioxygenases require 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and Fe(II) for their activity, which is enhanced in the presence of ascorbic acid. TET2 is the most expressed TET gene in the hematopoietic tissue, especially in hematopoietic stem cells. In addition to their hydroxylase activity, TET proteins recruit the O-linked ?-D-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) enzyme to chromatin, which promotes post-transcriptional modifications of histones and facilitates gene expression. The TET2 level is regulated by interaction with IDAX, originating from TET2 gene fission during evolution, and by the microRNA miR-22. TET2 has pleiotropic roles during hematopoiesis, including stem-cell self-renewal, lineage commitment and terminal differentiation of monocytes. Analysis of Tet2 knockout mice, which are viable and fertile, demonstrated that Tet2 functions as a tumor suppressor whose haploinsufficiency initiates myeloid and lymphoid transformations. This review summarizes the recently identified TET2 physiological and pathological functions and discusses how this knowledge influences our therapeutic approaches in hematological malignancies and possibly other tumor types. PMID:24220273

Solary, E; Bernard, O A; Tefferi, A; Fuks, F; Vainchenker, W

2014-03-01

244

Ethanol exhibits specificity in its effects on differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors1  

PubMed Central

Ethanol is a known teratogen but the mechanisms by which this simple compound affects fetal development remain unresolved. The goal of the current study was to determine the mechanism by which ethanol affects lymphoid differentiation using an in vitro model of ethanol exposure. Primitive hematopoietic oligoclonal neonatal progenitor cells (ONP), with the phenotype Lin?HSAloCD43loSca-1?c-Kit+ that are present in neonatal but not adult bone marrow were sorted from the bone marrow of 2-week-old C57BL/6J mice and cultured under conditions that favor either B cell or myeloid cell differentiation with or without addition of ethanol. The overall growth of the ONP cells was not significantly affected by inclusion of up to 100mM ethanol in the culture medium. However, the differentiation of the progenitor cells along the B-cell pathway was significantly impaired by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. Exposure of ONP cells to 100mM ethanol resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of B cell differentiation. Conversely, ethanol concentrations up to and including 100mM had no significant effect on differentiation along the myeloid pathway. The effect of ethanol on transcription factor expression was consistent with the effects on differentiation. ONP cells grown in 100mM ethanol failed to up-regulate Pax5 and EBF, transcriptional regulators that are necessary for B cell development. However, ethanol had no significant effect on the up-regulation of PU.1, a transcription factor that, when expressed in high concentration, favors myeloid cell development. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol has specificity in its effects on differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:18834972

Wang, Hao; Zhou, Huijuan; Chervenak, Robert; Moscatello, Kim M.; Brunson, Lee Ellen; Chervenak, Deborah C.; Wolcott, R. Michael

2009-01-01

245

Genetics Home Reference: Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... disorder catalog Conditions > Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... 2013 What is core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia? Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) ...

246

Genetics Home Reference: Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... PubMed Recent literature Conditions > Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia On this page: Description Genetic changes Inheritance Diagnosis ... January 2014 What is cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia? Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is ...

247

Genetics Home Reference: Familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA  

MedlinePLUS

... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA On this page: Description Genetic ... Reviewed May 2012 What is familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA? Familial acute myeloid leukemia with ...

248

Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning  

PubMed Central

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m2; n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT. PMID:17595333

Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Maloney, David G.

2007-01-01

249

Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in the Developing World: Experience from a Center in Western India  

PubMed Central

We describe our experience of first 50 consecutive hematopoietic stem-cell transplants (HSCT) done between 2007 and 2012 at the Apollo Hospital, Gandhinagar, 35 autologous HSCT and 15 allogeneic HSCT. Indications for autologous transplant were multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and acute myeloid leukemia, and indications for allogeneic transplants were thalassemia major, aplastic anaemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukaemia. The median age of autologous and allogeneic patient's cohort was 50 years and 21 years, respectively. Median follow-up period for all patients was 39 months. Major early complications were infections, mucositis, acute graft versus host disease, and venoocclusive disease. All of our allogeneic and autologous transplant patients survived during the first month of transplant. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 20% (N = 3) in our allogeneic and 3% (N = 1) in autologous patients. Causes of these deaths were disease relapse, sepsis, hemorrhagic complications, and GVHD. 46% of our autologous and 47% of our allogeneic patients are in complete remission phase after a median follow-up of 39 months. 34% of our autologous patients and 13% of our allogeneic patients had disease relapse. Overall survival rate in our autologous and allogeneic patients is 65.7% and 57.1%, respectively. Our results are comparable to many national and international published reports. PMID:25722722

Shah, Chirag A.; Karanwal, Arun; Desai, Maharshi; Pandya, Munjal; Shah, Ravish; Shah, Rutvij

2015-01-01

250

Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the developing world: experience from a center in Western India.  

PubMed

We describe our experience of first 50 consecutive hematopoietic stem-cell transplants (HSCT) done between 2007 and 2012 at the Apollo Hospital, Gandhinagar, 35 autologous HSCT and 15 allogeneic HSCT. Indications for autologous transplant were multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and acute myeloid leukemia, and indications for allogeneic transplants were thalassemia major, aplastic anaemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukaemia. The median age of autologous and allogeneic patient's cohort was 50 years and 21 years, respectively. Median follow-up period for all patients was 39 months. Major early complications were infections, mucositis, acute graft versus host disease, and venoocclusive disease. All of our allogeneic and autologous transplant patients survived during the first month of transplant. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 20% (N = 3) in our allogeneic and 3% (N = 1) in autologous patients. Causes of these deaths were disease relapse, sepsis, hemorrhagic complications, and GVHD. 46% of our autologous and 47% of our allogeneic patients are in complete remission phase after a median follow-up of 39 months. 34% of our autologous patients and 13% of our allogeneic patients had disease relapse. Overall survival rate in our autologous and allogeneic patients is 65.7% and 57.1%, respectively. Our results are comparable to many national and international published reports. PMID:25722722

Shah, Chirag A; Karanwal, Arun; Desai, Maharshi; Pandya, Munjal; Shah, Ravish; Shah, Rutvij

2015-01-01

251

CDCP1 identifies a broad spectrum of normal and malignant stem/progenitor cell subsets of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic origin.  

PubMed

CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) is a novel transmembrane molecule that is expressed in metastatic colon and breast tumors as well as on the surface of hematopoietic stem cells. In this study, we used multiparameter flow cytometry and antibodies against CDCP1 to analyze the expression of CDCP1 on defined hematopoietic cell subsets of different sources. In addition, CDCP1 expression on leukemic blasts and on cells with nonhematopoietic stem/progenitor cell phenotypes was determined. Here we demonstrate that a subset of bone marrow (BM), cord blood (CB), and mobilized peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells expressed this marker and that CDCP1 was detected on CD34(+)CD38- BM stem/progenitor cells but not on mature PB cells. Analysis of leukemic blasts from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, and chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis revealed that CDCP1 is predominantly expressed on CD34(+)CD133+ myeloid leukemic blasts. However, CDCP1 was not strictly correlated with CD34 and/or CD133 expression, suggesting that CDCP1 is a novel marker for leukemia diagnosis. Stimulation of CD34+ BM cells with CDCP1-reactive monoclonal antibody CUB1 resulted in an increased (approximately twofold) formation of erythroid colony-forming units, indicating that CDCP1 plays an important role in early hematopoiesis. Finally, we show that CDCP1 is also expressed on cells phenotypically identical to mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) and neural progenitor cells (NPCs). In conclusion, CDCP1 is not only a novel marker for immature hematopoietic progenitor cell subsets but also unique in its property to recognize cells with phenotypes reminiscent of MSC and NPC. PMID:15153610

Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Kuçi, Selim; Conze, Tim; Rathke, Gisa; Bartolovi?, Kerol; Grünebach, Frank; Scherl-Mostageer, Marwa; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Schweifer, Norbert; Lammers, Reiner

2004-01-01

252

Transcriptional fine-tuning of microRNA-223 levels directs lineage choice of human hematopoietic progenitors.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and death during development and postnatal life. The expression level of mature miRNAs results from complex molecular mechanisms, including the transcriptional regulation of their genes. MiR-223 is a hematopoietic-specific miRNA participating in regulatory signaling networks involving lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, the transcriptional mechanisms governing its expression levels and its functional role in lineage fate decision of human hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) have not yet been clarified. We found that in CD34(+)HPCs undergoing unilineage differentiation/maturation, miR-223 is upregulated more than 10-fold during granulopoiesis, 3-fold during monocytopoiesis and maintained at low levels during erythropoiesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter luciferase assays showed that the lineage-specific expression level of mature miR-223 is controlled by the coordinated binding of TFs to their DNA-responsive elements located in 'distal' and 'proximal' regulatory regions of the miR-223 gene, differentially regulating the transcription of two primary transcripts (pri-miRs). All this drives myeloid progenitor maturation into specific lineages. Accordingly, modulation of miR-223 activity in CD34(+)HPCs and myeloid cell lines significantly affects their differentiation/maturation into erythroid, granulocytic and monocytic/macrophagic lineages. MiR-223 overexpression increases granulopoiesis and impairs erythroid and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Its knockdown, meanwhile, impairs granulopoiesis and facilitates erythropoiesis and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Overall, our data reveal that transcriptional pathways acting on the differential regulation of two pri-miR transcripts results in the fine-tuning of a single mature miRNA expression level, which dictates the lineage fate decision of hematopoietic myeloid progenitors. PMID:24141720

Vian, L; Di Carlo, M; Pelosi, E; Fazi, F; Santoro, S; Cerio, A M; Boe, A; Rotilio, V; Billi, M; Racanicchi, S; Testa, U; Grignani, F; Nervi, C

2014-02-01

253

Transcriptional fine-tuning of microRNA-223 levels directs lineage choice of human hematopoietic progenitors  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and death during development and postnatal life. The expression level of mature miRNAs results from complex molecular mechanisms, including the transcriptional regulation of their genes. MiR-223 is a hematopoietic-specific miRNA participating in regulatory signaling networks involving lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, the transcriptional mechanisms governing its expression levels and its functional role in lineage fate decision of human hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) have not yet been clarified. We found that in CD34+HPCs undergoing unilineage differentiation/maturation, miR-223 is upregulated more than 10-fold during granulopoiesis, 3-fold during monocytopoiesis and maintained at low levels during erythropoiesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter luciferase assays showed that the lineage-specific expression level of mature miR-223 is controlled by the coordinated binding of TFs to their DNA-responsive elements located in ‘distal' and ‘proximal' regulatory regions of the miR-223 gene, differentially regulating the transcription of two primary transcripts (pri-miRs). All this drives myeloid progenitor maturation into specific lineages. Accordingly, modulation of miR-223 activity in CD34+HPCs and myeloid cell lines significantly affects their differentiation/maturation into erythroid, granulocytic and monocytic/macrophagic lineages. MiR-223 overexpression increases granulopoiesis and impairs erythroid and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Its knockdown, meanwhile, impairs granulopoiesis and facilitates erythropoiesis and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Overall, our data reveal that transcriptional pathways acting on the differential regulation of two pri-miR transcripts results in the fine-tuning of a single mature miRNA expression level, which dictates the lineage fate decision of hematopoietic myeloid progenitors. PMID:24141720

Vian, L; Di Carlo, M; Pelosi, E; Fazi, F; Santoro, S; Cerio, A M; Boe, A; Rotilio, V; Billi, M; Racanicchi, S; Testa, U; Grignani, F; Nervi, C

2014-01-01

254

BCR-ABL1-associated reduction of beta catenin antagonist Chibby1 in chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2) on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11) lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions) of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons). In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells. PMID:24339928

Leo, Elisa; Mancini, Manuela; Aluigi, Michela; Luatti, Simona; Castagnetti, Fausto; Testoni, Nicoletta; Soverini, Simona; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

2013-01-01

255

BCR-ABL1-Associated Reduction of Beta Catenin Antagonist Chibby1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia  

PubMed Central

Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2) on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11) lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions) of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons). In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells. PMID:24339928

Aluigi, Michela; Luatti, Simona; Castagnetti, Fausto; Testoni, Nicoletta; Soverini, Simona; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

2013-01-01

256

Aging-like Phenotype and Defective Lineage Specification in SIRT1-Deleted Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells  

PubMed Central

Summary Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging. PMID:25068121

Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L.; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M.; Sinclair, David A.; Ghaffari, Saghi

2014-01-01

257

CD47 is up-regulated on circulating hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells to avoid phagocytosis  

PubMed Central

Summary Macrophages clear pathogens and damaged or aged cells from the blood stream via phagocytosis. Cell-surface CD47 interacts with its receptor on macrophages, SIRP?, to inhibit phagocytosis of normal, healthy cells. We find that mobilizing cytokines and inflammatory stimuli cause CD47 to be transiently up-regulated on mouse hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors just prior to and during their migratory phase, and that the level of CD47 on these cells determines the probability that they are engulfed in vivo. CD47 is also constitutively up-regulated on mouse and human myeloid leukemias and over-expression of CD47 on a myeloid leukemia line increases its pathogenicity by allowing it to evade phagocytosis. We conclude that CD47 up-regulation is an important mechanism that provides protection to normal HSCs during inflammation-mediated mobilization, and that leukemic progenitors co-opt this ability in order to evade macrophage killing. PMID:19632178

Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Pang, Wendy W.; Park, Chris Y.; Chao, Mark P.; Majeti, Ravindra; Traver, David; van Rooijen, Nico; Weissman, Irving L.

2009-01-01

258

Antiangiogenic Agents in Myeloid Malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of angiogenesis in the development and progression of solid tumors has been well established over the 1980s and 1990s.\\u000a Through more recent investigations, it has become increasingly clear that neovascularization within the bone marrow of patients\\u000a with hematologic malignancies is of primary importance in the development and progression of these disorders. Evidence of\\u000a malignant angiogenesis in myeloid malignancies

Magda Melchert; Alan F. List

259

Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The development of tumor-specific T cell tolerance is largely responsible for tumor escape. Accumulation of myeloid-derived\\u000a suppressor cells (MDSCs) in animal tumor models as well as in cancer patients is involved in tumor-associated T cell tolerance.\\u000a In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that MDSCs bring about antigen-specific T cell tolerance by various mechanisms,\\u000a which is the focus of

Srinivas Nagaraj; Dmitry I. Gabrilovich

260

Functions of flt3 in zebrafish hematopoiesis and its relevance to human acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is expressed in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) but its role during embryogenesis is unclear. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), internal tandem duplication (ITD) of FLT3 at the juxtamembrane (JMD) and tyrosine kinase (TKD) domains (FLT3-ITD+) occurs in 30% of patients and is associated with inferior clinical prognosis. TKD mutations (FLT3-TKD+) occur in 5% of cases. We made use of zebrafish to examine the role of flt3 in developmental hematopoiesis and model human FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML. Zebrafish flt3 JMD and TKD were remarkably similar to their mammalian orthologs. Morpholino knockdown significantly reduced the expression of l-plastin (pan-leukocyte), csf1r, and mpeg1 (macrophage) as well as that of c-myb (definitive HSPCs), lck, and rag1 (T-lymphocyte). Expressing human FLT3-ITD in zebrafish embryos resulted in expansion and clustering of myeloid cells (pu.1+, mpo+, and cebp?+) which were ameliorated by AC220 and associated with stat5, erk1/2, and akt phosphorylation. Human FLT3-TKD (D835Y) induced significant, albeit modest, myeloid expansion resistant to AC220. This study provides novel insight into the role of flt3 during hematopoiesis and establishes a zebrafish model of FLT3-ITD+ and FLT3-TKD+ AML that may facilitate high-throughput screening of novel and personalized agents. PMID:24591202

He, Bai-Liang; Shi, Xiangguo; Man, Cheuk Him; Ma, Alvin C. H.; Ekker, Stephen C.; Chow, Howard C. H.; So, Chi Wai Eric; Choi, William W. L.; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yiyue

2014-01-01

261

Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo  

PubMed Central

Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/?) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/? aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/? mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/? myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

2014-01-01

262

The tumor suppressor menin regulates hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation by influencing Hox gene expression.  

PubMed

Menin is the product of the tumor suppressor gene Men1 that is mutated in the inherited tumor syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Menin has been shown to interact with SET-1 domain-containing histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases including mixed lineage leukemia proteins to regulate homeobox (Hox) gene expression in vitro. Using conditional Men1 knockout mice, we have investigated the requirement for menin in hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation. Men1 excision causes reduction of Hoxa9 expression, colony formation by hematopoietic progenitors, and the peripheral white blood cell count. Menin directly activates Hoxa9 expression, at least in part, by binding to the Hoxa9 locus, facilitating methylation of H3K4, and recruiting the methylated H3K4 binding protein chd1 to the locus. Consistent with signaling downstream of menin, ectopic expression of both Hoxa9 and Meis1 rescues colony formation defects in Men1-excised bone marrow. Moreover, Men1 excision also suppresses proliferation of leukemogenic mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 fusion-protein-transformed myeloid cells and Hoxa9 expression. These studies uncover an important role for menin in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation and provide a mechanistic understanding of menin's function in these processes that may be used for therapy. PMID:16415155

Chen, Ya-Xiong; Yan, Jizhou; Keeshan, Karen; Tubbs, Anthony T; Wang, Haoren; Silva, Albert; Brown, Eric J; Hess, Jay L; Pear, Warren S; Hua, Xianxin

2006-01-24

263

The tumor suppressor menin regulates hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation by influencing Hox gene expression  

PubMed Central

Menin is the product of the tumor suppressor gene Men1 that is mutated in the inherited tumor syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Menin has been shown to interact with SET-1 domain-containing histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases including mixed lineage leukemia proteins to regulate homeobox (Hox) gene expression in vitro. Using conditional Men1 knockout mice, we have investigated the requirement for menin in hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation. Men1 excision causes reduction of Hoxa9 expression, colony formation by hematopoietic progenitors, and the peripheral white blood cell count. Menin directly activates Hoxa9 expression, at least in part, by binding to the Hoxa9 locus, facilitating methylation of H3K4, and recruiting the methylated H3K4 binding protein chd1 to the locus. Consistent with signaling downstream of menin, ectopic expression of both Hoxa9 and Meis1 rescues colony formation defects in Men1-excised bone marrow. Moreover, Men1 excision also suppresses proliferation of leukemogenic mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 fusion-protein-transformed myeloid cells and Hoxa9 expression. These studies uncover an important role for menin in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation and provide a mechanistic understanding of menin's function in these processes that may be used for therapy. PMID:16415155

Chen, Ya-Xiong; Yan, Jizhou; Keeshan, Karen; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Wang, Haoren; Silva, Albert; Brown, Eric J.; Hess, Jay L.; Pear, Warren S.; Hua, Xianxin

2006-01-01

264

HDAC1 and Klf4 interplay critically regulates human myeloid leukemia cell proliferation  

PubMed Central

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is recognized as a complex disease of hematopoietic stem cell disorders, but its pathogenesis mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment remain unclear. General histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been used in blood cancers including AML, but the lack of gene specificity greatly limits their anti-cancer effects and clinical applications. Here, we found that HDAC1 expression was negatively correlated with that of Krüppel-like factor 4 (Klf4) and that AML patients with lower HDAC1 level had better prognosis. Further, knockdown of HDAC1 in leukemia cells K562, HL-60, and U937 significantly increased Klf4 expression and inhibited cell cycle progression and cell proliferation, similar results were found for HDAC inhibitors (VPA and mocetinostat). Moreover, overexpression or knockdown of Klf4 could markedly block the effects of HDAC1 overexpression or knockdown on leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Mechanistic analyses demonstrated that HDAC1 and Klf4 competitively bound to the promoter region of Klf4 and oppositely regulated Klf4 expression in myeloid leukemia. We identified HDAC1 as a potential specific target for repressing cell proliferation and inducing cell cycle arrest through interplay and modulation of Klf4 expression, suggests that HDAC1 and Klf4 are potential new molecular markers and targets for clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of myeloid leukemia. PMID:25341045

Huang, Y; Chen, J; Lu, C; Han, J; Wang, G; Song, C; Zhu, S; Wang, C; Li, G; Kang, J; Wang, J

2014-01-01

265

Identification of hematopoietic-specific regulatory elements from the CD45 gene and use for lentiviral tracking of transplanted cells.  

PubMed

The development of a hematopoietic reporter is crucial for determining the fate of lineages derived from cell-based therapies. A marking system will enable safer embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cell-based derivation of blood lineages and facilitate the development of efficient cellular reprogramming strategies based on direct fibroblast conversion. Here we report that the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is an ideal candidate gene on which to base a hematopoietic reporter. CD45 regulatory elements were discovered by analyzing transcription factor chromatin occupancy (ChIP-seq) and promoter nuclease sensitivity (DNase-seq) to identify minimally sufficient sequences required for expression. After cloning the CD45 regulatory elements into an attenuated lentiviral backbone, we found that two transcriptional initiation regions were essential for high-level expression. Expressing CD45 promoters containing these regions and tethered to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a primary B-cell differentiation assay and a transplantation model resulted in high levels of GFP in lymphoid, myeloid, and nucleated erythroid cells in mouse and human blood cell lineages. Moreover, GFP levels remained high 5 months after secondary transplantation, indicating persistence of the reporter. No CD45-driven GFP expression is observed after fibroblast or embryonic stem cell transduction. The GFP reporter is seen only after embryonic stem cells differentiate into hematopoietic cell progenitors and lineages, suggesting that this hematopoietic reporter system could be useful in validating potential autologous blood cell therapies. PMID:24852660

Duong, Khanh L; Das, Satyabrata; Yu, Shuyang; Barr, Jennifer Y; Jena, Snehalata; Kim, Eunmi; Zavazava, Nicolas; Colgan, John D; Xue, Hai-Hui; Levasseur, Dana N

2014-09-01

266

MFR PAPER 1213 Gonadal and Hematopoietic  

E-print Network

arenaria, collected from oil spill site, Harpswell, Maine. Hematopoietic tumor. Neoplastic cells occupy con, Harpswell, Maine. Hematopoietic tumor. Note invasion of neoplastic cells between the muscle bundles, Maine, known as the Brunswick or Harpswell oil spill site, a seepage of jet fuel, JP-4, from the tank

267

Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing  

PubMed Central

Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes1, but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing2–4 to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), leading to clonal outgrowth and myeloid malignancy. We thereby generated models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with cooperating mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors, and mediators of cytokine signaling, recapitulating the combinations of mutations observed in the human disease. Our results suggest that lentivirus-delivered sgRNA:Cas9 genome editing should be useful to engineer a broad array of in vivo cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease. PMID:24952903

Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

2014-01-01

268

Histocompatibility and Hematopoietic Transplantation in the Zebrafish  

PubMed Central

The zebrafish has proven to be an excellent model for human disease, particularly hematopoietic diseases, since these fish make similar types of blood cells as humans and other mammals. The genetic program that regulates the development and differentiation of hematopoietic cells is highly conserved. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the source of all the blood cells needed by an organism during its lifetime. Identifying an HSC requires a functional assay, namely, a transplantation assay consisting of multilineage engraftment of a recipient and subsequent serial transplant recipients. In the past decade, several types of hematopoietic transplant assays have been developed in the zebrafish. An understanding of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in the zebrafish has lagged behind transplantation experiments, limiting the ability to perform unbiased competitive transplantation assays. This paper summarizes the different hematopoietic transplantation experiments performed in the zebrafish, both with and without immunologic matching, and discusses future directions for this powerful experimental model of human blood diseases. PMID:22778744

de Jong, Jill L. O.; Zon, Leonard I.

2012-01-01

269

Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

2014-12-01

270

Invertebrate hematopoiesis: an astakine-dependent novel hematopoietic factor.  

PubMed

A novel factor, named crustacean hematopoietic factor (CHF), was identified from a library of suppression subtractive hybridization with the aim to find downstream genes of an invertebrate cytokine, astakine 1, in the freshwater crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus. CHF is a small cysteine-rich protein (?9 kDa) with high similarity to the N-terminal region of vertebrate CRIM1 in containing an insulin growth factor binding protein variant motif with unknown function. CHF was found to be induced in primary cell cultures of crayfish hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells (precursors of crayfish blood cells) after treatment with astakine 1. Silencing of CHF did not affect the renewal of Hpt cells in vitro, but induced apoptosis of Hpt cells. CHF is exclusively expressed in the blood cell lineage of crayfish (Hpt cells and blood cells), and in vivo RNA interference experiments show that knockdown of this gene results in severe loss of blood cells and a higher apoptotic rate in Hpt. Our data further suggest that crayfish CHF is critical for the survival of hemocytes and Hpt cells by preventing their apoptosis, thus it plays an important role in hemocyte homeostasis in crayfish. Our study of CHF may also shed light on the function of this untypical insulin growth factor binding protein motif located in the N-terminal of vertebrate CRIM1. PMID:21220699

Lin, Xionghui; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

2011-02-15

271

Ion Channels in Hematopoietic and Mesenchymal Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow niches and give rise to hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs). These have more restricted lineage potential and eventually differentiate into specific blood cell types. Bone marrow also contains mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which present multilineage differentiation potential toward mesodermal cell types. In bone marrow niches, stem cell interaction with the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrin receptors. Ion channels regulate cell proliferation and differentiation by controlling intracellular Ca2+, cell volume, release of growth factors, and so forth. Although little evidence is available about the ion channel roles in true HSCs, increasing information is available about HPCs and MSCs, which present a complex pattern of K+ channel expression. K+ channels cooperate with Ca2+ and Cl? channels in regulating calcium entry and cell volume during mitosis. Other K+ channels modulate the integrin-dependent interaction between leukemic progenitor cells and the niche stroma. These channels can also regulate leukemia cell interaction with MSCs, which also involves integrin receptors and affects the MSC-mediated protection from chemotherapy. Ligand-gated channels are also implicated in these processes. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors regulate cell proliferation and migration in HSCs and MSCs and may be implicated in the harmful effects of smoking. PMID:22919401

Pillozzi, Serena; Becchetti, Andrea

2012-01-01

272

PLC-? activation is required for PDGF-?R-mediated mitogenesis and monocytic differentiation of myeloid progenitor cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate the molecular mechanisms mediating hematopoietic cell differentiation and mitogenesis by activation of the platelet-derived growth factor ? receptor (PDGF-?R), the wild type PDGF-?R (PDGF-?RWT) and tyrosine to phenylalanine mutants of the PDGF-?R, including F751, F966, F970, F1009, F1021 and F1009\\/F1021 were overexpressed in FDC-P2 myeloid progenitor cells by retroviral-mediated gene transfer. Stimulation of PDGF-?RWT and F966, F970 and

Maurizio Alimandi; Mohammad A Heidaran; J Silvio Gutkind; Jiachang Zhang; Nelson Ellmore; Mindaugas Valius; Andrius Kazlauskas; Jacalyn H Pierce; Weiqun Li; W Li

1997-01-01

273

Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Patients with MDS  

PubMed Central

The incidence of myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) increases with age. While several therapeutic modalities have been developed, for most of these patients the only treatment with curative potential is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The development of reduced/low intensity transplant conditioning regimens allows to successfully transplant patients in their ‘60s and even ‘70s, although comorbidities may determine who does come to transplantation and who does not. Also, as many as half of the patients will develop graft versus host disease (GVHD), even with HLA matched donors, requiring therapy for extended periods of time, and GVHD and treatment with glucocorticoids is likely to impact the quality of life. Nevertheless, dependent upon disease stage at HCT, the presence of comorbidities and the regimen used, 30% to 50% of patients 60 years of age or older, may survive long-term cured of their disease. Future studies should focus on the incorporation of non-transplant modalities into the overall transplant approach, the prevention of GVHD, and the utilization of immunotherapy to reduce the incidence of relapse and GVHD and further improve overall transplant success. PMID:25237469

Shadman, Mazyar; Deeg, H. Joachim

2014-01-01

274

[Anticipated grieving in patients requiring Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].  

PubMed

The scope of this study was to understand how the process of anticipated grieving is imbued in patients undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). A cross-sectional clinical-qualitative study was conducted on a sample of 17 patients, mostly women, married, aged between 20 and 42 years and diagnosed with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Data was collected by semi-structured interviews applied individually and subjected to thematic content analysis. The results indicate that the loss of health imposes a new challenge in a life history already permeated by great hardships and premature losses. It was found that the expected reactions faced with normal grieving were expressed by the participants and that the most prevalent coping strategy was holding steadfast to their faith. Future plans involved being healed, returning to normality and vocational rehabilitation. The results may help the multidisciplinary teams to understand the emotional implications of the illness/treatment for implementing both preventive and intervention strategies. The critical aspect is that staff must be attentive as to how to communicate the diagnosis and the possibility of outlining a therapeutic plan, in order to augment the fighting spirit of the patient and strengthen the bond of trust with health professionals. PMID:23989563

de Oliveira Cardoso, Érika Arantes; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio

2013-09-01

275

Productive persistent infection of hematopoietic cells by human foamy virus.  

PubMed Central

Human foamy virus can establish persistent infections in human hematopoietic cell lines, such as H92.1.7 (erythroblastoid cells), Jurkat (CD4+ T cells), and U937 (myeloid-monocytic cells). The infection is characterized by constant production of infectious viruses (for > 2 1/2 years) with no cytopathic effects on the host cells. Electron microscopy of the infected cells showed a viral morphology similar to that observed for particles produced after acute infection. We have detected, in addition to the full-length form of bel1, a previously described deletion in the bel1 gene of the proviral DNA in these cells. RNA containing this 301-bp deletion, which mapped to the splice donor and acceptor sites of the intron of the bet gene, was also found in encapsidated virion RNA. However, the presence of this defective provirus harboring the deletion in bel1 does not prevent productive persistence in these chronically infected cells, since the virus titer does not decrease during cultivation. PMID:8551590

Yu, S F; Stone, J; Linial, M L

1996-01-01

276

Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity  

PubMed Central

Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain–containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-?B activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient’s myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-?B–mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S.; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; ?lvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R.; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

2014-01-01

277

Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Patients with MDS.  

PubMed

The incidence of myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) increases with age. While several therapeutic modalities have been developed, for most of these patients the only treatment with curative potential is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The development of reduced/low intensity transplant conditioning regimens allows to successfully transplant patients in their '60s and even '70s, although comorbidities may determine who does come to transplantation and who does not. Also, as many as half of the patients will develop graft versus host disease (GVHD), even with HLA matched donors, requiring therapy for extended periods of time, and GVHD and treatment with glucocorticoids is likely to impact the quality of life. Nevertheless, dependent upon disease stage at HCT, the presence of comorbidities and the regimen used, 30% to 50% of patients 60 years of age or older, may survive long-term cured of their disease. Future studies should focus on the incorporation of non-transplant modalities into the overall transplant approach, the prevention of GVHD, and the utilization of immunotherapy to reduce the incidence of relapse and GVHD and further improve overall transplant success. PMID:25237469

Shadman, Mazyar; Deeg, H Joachim

2014-01-01

278

Hematopoietic effects of benzene inhalation assessed by long-term bone marrow culture  

SciTech Connect

The strong and long-lasting hematotoxic effect after benzene exposure in vivo (300 ppm, 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 2 weeks) was assessed in mice with bone marrow cells grown in long-term bone marrow culture (LTBMC). Bone marrow cultures initiated 1 day after the last benzene exposure did not produce adequate numbers of hematopoietic cells over 3 weeks and, in most cases, no erythroid or myeloid clonogenic cells could be recovered. The adherent cell layer of these cultures had a lower capacity for supporting in vitro hematopoiesis after the second seeding with normal bone marrow cells compared with control cultures. Two weeks after the last benzene exposure, body weight, hematocrit, bone marrow cellularity, and committed hematopoietic progenitor content (BFU-E and CFU-GM) were regenerated to normal or subnormal values, whereas hematopoiesis in LTB MC was very poor. Over 8 weeks, little or no significant committed progenitor production was observed. Treatment of mice exposed to benzene with hemin (three doses of 3 {mu}g/g bw iv over 2 weeks for a total dose of 9 {mu}g/g) partially overcame the toxic effect of benzene on the hematopoietic system as measured by the LTBMC method. Cultures from mice treated with hemin had a modest recovery of BFU-E and CFU-GM clonogenic potential after 5 to 6 weeks in LTBMC. In contrast, little or no recovery was obtained for the adherent cell layer clonogenic capacity, even after hemin treatment. These results clearly indicate a strong, long-lasting toxic effect on the bone marrow stroma and a limited recovery of hematopoietic potential by clonogenic cells of the nonadherent population after in vivo hemin treatment. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Abraham, N.G. [Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1996-12-01

279

Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours  

Microsoft Academic Search

Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells — macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes — are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour

Dmitry I. Gabrilovich; Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg; Vincenzo Bronte

2012-01-01

280

Hematopoietic stem cells: an overview.  

PubMed

Considerable efforts have been made in recent years in understanding the mechanisms that govern hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) origin, development, differentiation, self-renewal, aging, trafficking, plasticity and transdifferentiation. Hematopoiesis occurs in sequential waves in distinct anatomical locations during development and these shifts in location are accompanied by changes in the functional status of the stem cells and reflect the changing needs of the developing organism. HSCs make a choice of either self-renewal or committing to differentiation. The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is considered to be critical to the maintenance of stem cell numbers. It is still under debate if HSC can rejuvenate infinitely or if they do not possess ''true" self-renewal and undergo replicative senescence such as any other somatic cell. Gene therapy applications that target HSCs offer a great potential for the treatment of hematologic and immunologic diseases. However, the clinical success has been limited by many factors. This review is intended to summarize the recent advances made in the human HSC field, and will review the hematopoietic stem cell from definition through development to clinical applications. PMID:25457002

Mosaad, Youssef Mohamed

2014-12-01

281

Induced pluripotent stem cells expressing elevated levels of sox-2, oct-4, and klf-4 are severely reduced in their differentiation from mesodermal to hematopoietic progenitor cells.  

PubMed

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic progenitor cells by ectopic expression of Sox-2, Oct-4, and Klf-4 with the hope that they may differentiate more efficiently than embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro into hematopoietic cell lineages because of their epigenetic memory. An in vitro culture system has been standardized to allow a quantitative assessment of the capacities of different ES, BM-derived iPS, and fibroblast-derived iPS cell lines developing to erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cell lineages. Surprisingly, the efficiency to differentiate BM-derived iPS cells to hematopoietic cells in vitro is severely reduced compared with ES cells and fibroblast-derived iPS cells. Undifferentiated as well as differentiated stages of the BM-derived iPS lines express elevated mRNA levels of the transcription factors Sox-2, Oct-4, and Klf-4 with which the iPS cells have been transduced. Overexpression of the transcription factors inhibits development of Flk-1(+) mesodermal to CD45(+) hematopoietic progenitors. The overexpression of Sox-2 appears to be inversely related to hematogenic potency. These results suggest that iPS cell generation with the aim of developing hematopoietic cells should be controlled and selected for low levels of transduced Sox-2, Oct-4, and Kfl-4 expression. PMID:21348597

Seiler, Katharina; Soroush Noghabi, Monireh; Karjalainen, Klaus; Hummel, Michael; Melchers, Fritz; Tsuneto, Motokazu

2011-07-01

282

Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-15

283

Hematopoietic toxicity of regional radiation therapy. Correlations for combined modality therapy with systemic chemotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Using circulating granulocyte-monocyte precursor colony-forming units in culture (CFUc) numbers as a probe along with standard blood count (CBC), the authors have quantitatively examined the hematopoietic toxicity of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) when combined with concurrent systemic chemotherapy or when used alone. Among 20 patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer receiving systemic chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, CCNU, and methotrexate, the addition of involved field chest RT resulted in increased hematopoietic toxicity as judged by increased need for platelet transfusion (P less than 0.05) and decreased frequency of measurable CFUc (P less than 0.04). Among 22 patients receiving regional radiotherapy alone consistent hematopoietic toxicity was also observed. This toxicity, although generally of only mild to moderate clinical significance, was detected earlier and to a greater degree in patients who required radiation to larger treatment volumes, who had significant amounts of bone marrow in the port, and who had a high percentage of cardiac output flowing through the port. These data suggest that the hematopoietic toxicity of regional radiotherapy may be additive to that of concurrent systemic chemotherapy and may occur more promptly and to a greater degree when treatment volumes are larger or incorporate increased amounts of marrow volume or cardiac output.

Abrams, R.A.; Lichter, A.S.; Bromer, R.H.; Minna, J.D.; Cohen, M.H.; Deisseroth, A.B.

1985-04-01

284

Sex differences in the incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

The incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which is caused by BCR/ABL chimeric oncogene formation in a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), increases with age and exposure to ionizing radiation. CML is a comparatively well-characterized neoplasm, important for its own sake and useful for insights into other neoplasms. Here, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) CML data are analyzed after considering possible misclassification of chronic myelo-monocytic leukemia as CML. For people older than 25 years, plots of male and female CML log incidences versus age at diagnosis are approximately parallel straight lines with males either above or to the left of females. This is consistent with males having a higher risk of developing CML or a shorter latency from initiation to diagnosis of CML. These distinct mechanisms cannot be distinguished using SEER data alone. Therefore, CML risks among male and female Japanese A-bomb survivors are also analyzed. The present analyses suggest that sex differences in CML incidence more likely result from differences in risk than in latency. The simplest but not the sole interpretation of this is that males have more target cells at risk to develop CML. Comprehensive mathematical models of CML could lead to a better understanding of the role of HSCs in CML and other preleukemias that can progress to acute leukemia. PMID:24337217

Jankovic, Gradimir M.; Tiu, Ramon V.; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Jackson, Robert C.; Hlatky, Lynn R.; Gale, Robert Peter; Sachs, Rainer K.

2014-01-01

285

Sex differences in the incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

The incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which is caused by BCR/ABL chimeric oncogene formation in a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), increases with age and exposure to ionizing radiation. CML is a comparatively well-characterized neoplasm, important for its own sake and useful for insights into other neoplasms. Here, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) CML data are analyzed after considering possible misclassification of chronic myelo-monocytic leukemia as CML. For people older than 25 years, plots of male and female CML log incidences versus age at diagnosis are approximately parallel straight lines with males either above or to the left of females. This is consistent with males having a higher risk of developing CML or a shorter latency from initiation to diagnosis of CML. These distinct mechanisms cannot be distinguished using SEER data alone. Therefore, CML risks among male and female Japanese A-bomb survivors are also analyzed. The present analyses suggest that sex differences in CML incidence more likely result from differences in risk than in latency. The simplest but not the sole interpretation of this is that males have more target cells at risk to develop CML. Comprehensive mathematical models of CML could lead to a better understanding of the role of HSCs in CML and other preleukemias that can progress to acute leukemia. PMID:24337217

Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Jankovic, Gradimir M; Tiu, Ramon V; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Jackson, Robert C; Hlatky, Lynn R; Gale, Robert Peter; Sachs, Rainer K

2014-03-01

286

Differential regulation of myeloid leukemias by the bone marrow microenvironment.  

PubMed

Like their normal hematopoietic stem cell counterparts, leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are presumed to reside in specific niches in the bone marrow microenvironment (BMM) and may be the cause of relapse following chemotherapy. Targeting the niche is a new strategy to eliminate persistent and drug-resistant LSCs. CD44 (refs. 3,4) and interleukin-6 (ref. 5) have been implicated previously in the LSC niche. Transforming growth factor-?1 (TGF-?1) is released during bone remodeling and plays a part in maintenance of CML LSCs, but a role for TGF-?1 from the BMM has not been defined. Here, we show that alteration of the BMM by osteoblastic cell-specific activation of the parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor attenuates BCR-ABL1 oncogene-induced CML-like myeloproliferative neoplasia (MPN) but enhances MLL-AF9 oncogene-induced AML in mouse transplantation models, possibly through opposing effects of increased TGF-?1 on the respective LSCs. PTH treatment caused a 15-fold decrease in LSCs in wild-type mice with CML-like MPN and reduced engraftment of immune-deficient mice with primary human CML cells. These results demonstrate that LSC niches in CML and AML are distinct and suggest that modulation of the BMM by PTH may be a feasible strategy to reduce LSCs, a prerequisite for the cure of CML. PMID:24162813

Krause, Daniela S; Fulzele, Keertik; Catic, André; Sun, Chia Chi; Dombkowski, David; Hurley, Michael P; Lezeau, Sanon; Attar, Eyal; Wu, Joy Y; Lin, Herbert Y; Divieti-Pajevic, Paola; Hasserjian, Robert P; Schipani, Ernestina; Van Etten, Richard A; Scadden, David T

2013-11-01

287

Serum concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde as markers of oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting from the (9:22)(q34,11) translocation. The tyrosine kinase abl fusion protein,the initial leukemogenic event in chronic myeloid leukemia, is constitutively activated thus inducing the production of reactive oxygen species. Of particular relevance is the fact that an increase in reactive oxygen species can facilitate genomic instability and may contribute to disease progression. Objetive: To evaluate oxidative stress by determining the levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite in chronic myeloid leukemia patients under treatment with 1st and 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors monitored at a referral hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed of 64 male and female adults. Patients were stratified according to treatment. The levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite were determined by spectrophotometry. Statistical differences between groups were observed using the Student t-test and Fisher's exact test. The results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. The significance level was set for a p-value < 0.05 in all analyses. Results: The results show significantly higher mean concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde in chronic myeloid leukemia patients using second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors compared to patients on imatinib. Conclusion: It follows that chronic myeloid leukemia patients present higher oxidative activity and that the increases in oxidative damage markers can indicate resistance to 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23125543

Petrola, Maria Juracy; de Castro, Alana Joselina Montenegro; Pitombeira, Maria Helena da Silva; Barbosa, Maritza Cavalcante; Quixadá, Acy Telles de Souza; Duarte, Fernando Barroso; Gonçalves, Romelia Pinheiro

2012-01-01

288

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells  

PubMed Central

While conventional anticancer therapies, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and/or chemotherapy, are relatively efficient at eliminating primary tumors, these treatment modalities are largely ineffective against metastases. At least in part, this reflects the rather inefficient delivery of conventional anticancer agents to metastatic lesions. We have recently demonstrated that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) can be used as cellular missiles to selectively deliver a radioisotope-coupled attenuated variant of Listeria monocytogenes to both primary and metastatic neoplastic lesions in mice with pancreatic cancer. This novel immunotherapeutic intervention robustly inhibited tumor growth while promoting a dramatic decrease in the number of metastases. PMID:24427545

Chandra, Dinesh; Gravekamp, Claudia

2013-01-01

289

Chronic myeloid leukemia presenting with visual and auditory impairment in an adolescent: an insight to management strategies.  

PubMed

A 15-year-old girl presented with progressive deterioration in vision and hearing over 1 week. A huge spleen was palpated below the left costal margin laying down to inguinal region. Blood count showed hyperleukocytosis with a white blood cell count of 455 × 10(9)/l. Peripheral smear yielded myeloid precursor cells with basophilia. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a blast count of 5% morphologically and 4% by flow cytometry. Fundoscopic examination revealed bilateral retinal exudates, edema and hemorhages. Partial sensorioneural hearing loss was also detected on the right ear. The diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia was confirmed by positive t(9;22) by RT-PCR. After commencing on hydroxyurea and intrathecal methotrexate-prednisolone, progressive improvement in hearing and vision was obtained. In our brief report, we aimed to emphasize rare presentation with visual and hearing impairment of chronic myeloid leukemia during childhood, especially in "chronic phase". PMID:21886391

Gokce, Muge; Unal, Sule; Bayrakç?, Benan; Tuncer, Murat

2010-09-01

290

Azacitidine and Erismodegib in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-12

291

Notch signaling in mammalian hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Notch is a crucial cell signaling pathway in metazoan development. By means of cell-cell interactions, Notch signaling regulates cellular identity, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Within the last decade, numerous studies have shown an important role for this pathway in the development and homeostasis of mammalian stem cell populations. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) constitute a well-defined population that shows self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation potential, with the clinically relevant capacity to repopulate the hematopoietic system of an adult organism. Here, we review the emergence, development and maintenance of HSCs during mammalian embryogenesis and adulthood, with respect to the role of Notch signaling in hematopoietic biology. PMID:21647159

Pajcini, K V; Speck, N A; Pear, W S

2011-10-01

292

[Roles of osteoblasts in hematopoietic stem cell niche and relationship between osteoblasts and hematopoietic diseases].  

PubMed

Hemopoietic stem cells(HSCs) are regulated by two niches: osteoblastic niche and vascular niche. Osteoblasts are the critical constitutive regulators of the osteoblastic niche. The significance of osteoblasts for hematopoietic disease has not escaped attention. This review attempts to capture the discoveries of the last few years regarding the role of osteoblasts in hematopoietic stem cell niche and relationship between osteoblasts and hematopoietic diseases. PMID:25130843

Fei, Cheng-Ming; Chang, Chun-Kang

2014-08-01

293

Gastric myeloid sarcoma without acute myeloblastic leukemia.  

PubMed

Myeloid sarcomas (MS) involve extramedullary blast proliferation from one or more myeloid lineages that replace the original tissue architecture, and these neoplasias are called granulocytic sarcomas, chloromas or extramedullary myeloid tumors. Such tumors develop in lymphoid organs, bones (e.g., skulls and orbits), skin, soft tissue, various mucosae, organs, and the central nervous system. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is rare, while the occurrence of myeloid sarcomas in patients without leukemia is even rare. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with epigastric pain and progressive jaundice. An upper GI endoscopy had shown extensive multifocal hyperemic fold thickening and the spread of nodular lesions in the body of the stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesions indicated myeloid sarcoma of the stomach. However, concurrent peripheral blood and bone marrow examinations showed no evidence of acute myeloid leukemia. For diagnosis, the immunohistochemical markers must be checked when evaluating a suspected myeloid sarcoma case. Accurate MS diagnosis determines the appropriate therapy and prognosis. PMID:25717265

Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Jin; Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jian-Ning; Shao, Chun-Kui; Wu, Bin

2015-02-21

294

Gastric myeloid sarcoma without acute myeloblastic leukemia  

PubMed Central

Myeloid sarcomas (MS) involve extramedullary blast proliferation from one or more myeloid lineages that replace the original tissue architecture, and these neoplasias are called granulocytic sarcomas, chloromas or extramedullary myeloid tumors. Such tumors develop in lymphoid organs, bones (e.g., skulls and orbits), skin, soft tissue, various mucosae, organs, and the central nervous system. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is rare, while the occurrence of myeloid sarcomas in patients without leukemia is even rare. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with epigastric pain and progressive jaundice. An upper GI endoscopy had shown extensive multifocal hyperemic fold thickening and the spread of nodular lesions in the body of the stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesions indicated myeloid sarcoma of the stomach. However, concurrent peripheral blood and bone marrow examinations showed no evidence of acute myeloid leukemia. For diagnosis, the immunohistochemical markers must be checked when evaluating a suspected myeloid sarcoma case. Accurate MS diagnosis determines the appropriate therapy and prognosis. PMID:25717265

Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Jin; Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jian-Ning; Shao, Chun-Kui; Wu, Bin

2015-01-01

295

Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.  

PubMed

Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25047706

Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

2014-10-15

296

Engineering humanized mice for improved hematopoietic reconstitution  

E-print Network

Humanized mice are immunodeficient animals engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells that give rise to various lineages of human blood cells throughout the life of the mouse. This article reviews recent advances in the ...

Drake, Adam

297

A specific need for CRKL in p210BCR-ABL-induced transformation of mouse hematopoietic progenitors  

PubMed Central

CRKL (CRK-Like) is an adapter protein predominantly phosphorylated in cells that express the tyrosine kinase p210BCR-ABL, the fusion product of a (9;22) chromosomal translocation causative for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). It has been unclear, however, whether CRKL plays a functional role in p210BCR-ABL transformation. Here we show that CRKL is required for p210BCR-ABL to support IL-3-independent growth of myeloid progenitor cells and long-term outgrowth of B-lymphoid cells from fetal liver-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, a synthetic phosphotyrosyl peptide that binds to the CRKL SH2 domain with high affinity blocks association of endogenous CRKL with the p210BCR-ABL complex and reduces c-MYC levels in K562 human leukemic cells as well as mouse hematopoietic cells transformed by p210BCR-ABL or the imatinib-resistant mutant T315I. These results indicate that the function of CRKL as an adapter protein is essential for p210BCR-ABL-induced transformation. PMID:20807813

Seo, Ji-Heui; Wood, Lisa J.; Agarwal, Anupriya; O’Hare, Thomas; Elsea, Collin R.; Griswold, Ian J.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Imamoto, Akira; Druker, Brian J.

2010-01-01

298

Progressive maturation toward hematopoietic stem cells in the mouse embryo aorta  

PubMed Central

Clusters of cells attached to the endothelium of the main embryonic arteries were first observed a century ago. Present in most vertebrate species, such clusters, or intraaortic hematopoietic clusters (IAHCs), derive from specialized hemogenic endothelial cells and contain the first few hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generated during embryonic development. However, some discrepancies remained concerning the spatio-temporal appearance and the numbers of IAHCs and HSCs. Therefore, the exact cell composition and function of IAHCs remain unclear to date. We show here that IAHCs contain pre-HSCs (or HSC precursors) that can mature into HSCs in vivo (as shown by the successful long-term multilineage reconstitution of primary neonates and secondary adult recipients). Such IAHC pre-HSCs could contribute to the HSC pool increase observed at midgestation. The novel insights in pre-HSC to HSC transition represent an important step toward generating transplantable HSCs in vitro that are needed for autologous HSC transplantation therapies. PMID:25301706

Boisset, Jean-Charles; Clapes, Thomas; Klaus, Anna; Papazian, Natalie; Onderwater, Jos; Mommaas-Kienhuis, Mieke; Cupedo, Tom

2015-01-01

299

Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice  

SciTech Connect

Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

1988-04-01

300

Inflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell emergence in vertebrates.  

PubMed

Inflammatory signaling has been shown to be essential for stress hematopoiesis in adult bone marrow, either through increasing proliferation or by directing differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) toward myeloid or lymphoid lineages. However, its role in embryonic normal hematopoiesis has been unknown. Here, we demonstrate that in both zebrafish and mouse embryos, inflammatory signaling is necessary and sufficient for HSPC emergence, in the absence of infection or pathological inflammation. Mechanistically, inflammatory signaling regulates hemogenic endothelium-derived HSPC development through a conserved Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-nuclear factor ?-light-chain enhancer of activated B core (NF-?B) signaling, which then promotes Notch activity, a well-known signal required for HSPC specification in vertebrates. Our findings establish a previously unrecognized link between inflammatory signaling and HSPC emergence, and provide new insights into regenerative medicine and novel therapies to treat innate immune-related diseases. PMID:25540193

He, Qiuping; Zhang, Chunxia; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Panpan; Ma, Dongyuan; Lv, Junhua; Liu, Feng

2015-02-12

301

Two waves of distinct hematopoietic progenitor cells colonize the fetal thymus.  

PubMed

The generation of T cells depends on the migration of hematopoietic progenitor cells to the thymus throughout life. The identity of the thymus-settling progenitor cells has been a matter of considerable debate. Here we found that thymopoiesis was initiated by a first wave of T cell lineage-restricted progenitor cells with limited capacity for population expansion but accelerated differentiation into mature T cells. They gave rise to ?? and ?? T cells that constituted V?3(+) dendritic epithelial T cells. Thymopoiesis was subsequently maintained by less-differentiated progenitor cells that retained the potential to develop into B cells and myeloid cells. In that second wave, which started before birth, progenitor cells had high proliferative capacity but delayed differentiation capacity and no longer gave rise to embryonic ?? T cells. Our work reconciles conflicting hypotheses on the nature of thymus-settling progenitor cells. PMID:24317038

Ramond, Cyrille; Berthault, Claire; Burlen-Defranoux, Odile; de Sousa, Ana Pereira; Guy-Grand, Delphine; Vieira, Paulo; Pereira, Pablo; Cumano, Ana

2014-01-01

302

C/EBPa controls acquisition and maintenance of adult hematopoietic stem cell quiescence  

PubMed Central

Summary In blood, transcription factor C/EBPa is essential for myeloid differentiation and has been implicated in regulating self-renewal of fetal liver (FL) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, its function in adult HSCs has remained unknown. Here, using an inducible knockout model we found that C/EBPa deficient adult HSCs underwent a pronounced expansion with enhanced proliferation, characteristics resembling FL HSCs. Consistently, transcription profiling of C/EBPa deficient HSCs revealed a gene expression programme similar to FL HSCs. Moreover we observed that age-specific C/EBPa expression correlated with its inhibitory effect on HSC cell cycle. Mechanistically we identified N-Myc as C/EBPa downstream target, and loss of C/EBPa resulted in de-repression of N-Myc. Our data establish C/EBPa as a central determinant in the switch from fetal to adult HSCs. PMID:23502316

Ye, Min; Zhang, Hong; Amabile, Giovanni; Yang, Henry; Staber, Philipp B.; Zhang, Pu; Levantini, Elena; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Zhang, Junyan; Kawasaki, Akira; Tenen, Daniel G.

2013-01-01

303

Renal dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Renal dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.BackgroundAllogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), formerly called bone marrow transplantation, can potentially cure various malignant and non-malignant diseases, but it is associated with a high risk of toxicity. We have previously shown an overall 21% incidence of severe acute renal failure in patients undergoing autologous HCT. The present study evaluated renal dysfunction in patients

Chirag R Parikh; Peter A McSweeney; Didem Korular; Tevfik Ecder; Aicha Merouani; Jeremy Taylor; Vicki Slat-Vasquez; Elizabeth J Shpall; Roy B Jones; Scott I Bearman; Robert W Schrier

2002-01-01

304

Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally found in the umbilical cord and bone marrow as hematopoietic cells, a subset of mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, etc. [Beutler et al. 2000 ] Potential mechanisms responsible for radiation-acquired marrow cell failure include direct toxicity , direct damage of hematopoietic multipotential cells or cellular or humoral immune suppression of the marrow multipotential cells. [ Beutler et al. 2000] Methods: These studies were conducted at several different research institutions and laboratories listed as follows: Kazan All-Union Scientific Research Veterinary, Biotechnology Centre of Russian Academy of Science (North Osetia), Institute Belarussian Scientific and Research Institute for Radiobiology in Gomel, the St. Petersburg Veterinary Institute, the Advanced Medical Technology and Systems Inc., Ontario, Canada. The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. A critically important volume of purified Radiation Toxins (RT) was isolated from larger mammalian irradiated animals. Subsequently the RT were characterized chemically and biologically. The experimental design of later studies compared relative toxicity, potential for development of acute radiation hematopoietic syndrome, and potential cloning disorder of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors and their derivative and lethality after intravenous or intramuscular injections of SRD containing Hematopoietic Radiation Toxins. These experiments have employed a wide variety of experimental animals. The animals were irradiated in RUM-17, Puma, and Panorama devices. The dose varied from 0.7Gy to 100Gy. The methods of immune depletion, immuno-lympho plasmasabsorption, as well as direct extraction, were used to refine and purify the specific Radiation Toxins from the central lymph of animals with Hematopoietic forms of Radiation Toxins. Experiments include administration of Hematopoietic Radiation Toxins (SRD-4) to radiation naive animals in doses 0.1 mg/kg; 0,5 mg/kg; 1 mg/kg; 2 mg/kg;

Popov, Dmitri

305

cDNA cloning of a human mRNA preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells and with homology to a GDP-dissociation inhibitor for the rho GTP-binding proteins.  

PubMed Central

We have identified the mRNA for a human gene, denoted D4, which is expressed at very high levels in hematopoietic cell lines and in normal cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin. The 1.5-kb transcript is absent or detectable only at low levels in nonhematopoietic tissues. D4 encodes a 201-amino acid protein with homology to rhoGDI, an inhibitor of GDP dissociation for the ras-homologous protein rho. D4 might function also as a regulator of guanine nucleotide exchange for small GTP-binding proteins. A homologous transcript of similar size is also preferentially expressed in murine hematopoietic tissues. When totipotent murine embryonic stem cells develop in vitro into hematopoietic cells, the gene is activated with the onset of hematopoiesis. When hematopoietic cell lines are induced to differentiate, the expression of D4 is modulated. Thus, D4 appears to be a developmentally regulated gene. Its preferential expression in hematopoietic cells indicates that D4 likely plays some significant role in the growth and differentiation processes of hematopoietic cells. This significance is underscored by increasing evidence for the involvement of regulators of G proteins in clinical diseases. Images PMID:8434008

Lelias, J M; Adra, C N; Wulf, G M; Guillemot, J C; Khagad, M; Caput, D; Lim, B

1993-01-01

306

Enhanced ability of daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 to suppress apoptosis in human hematopoietic cells.  

PubMed

Modified and chimeric cytokines have been developed to aid in the recovery of hematopoietic precursor cells after myeloablative chemotherapy. The interleukin-3 (IL-3) receptor agonist, daniplestim, binds to the IL-3 receptor-alpha subunit with 60-fold greater affinity and induces cell proliferation and colony-forming unit formation 10- to 22-fold better than native IL-3. A chimeric cytokine, myelopoietin-1, composed of daniplestim and a G-CSF receptor agonist binds both the IL-3 and G-CSF receptors. While the in vivo effects of daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 are well described, the mechanisms by which they stimulate growth are not well understood. We have investigated the effects of daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 on the prevention of apoptosis in two human hematopoietic cell lines, OCI-AML.5 and AML 193. Daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 prevented apoptosis to a greater degree than native recombinant IL-3 or G-CSF as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide binding and TUNEL assays. Daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 promoted the maintenance of the mitochondrial membrane potential better than native IL-3 or G-CSF. These cytokines promoted a lower redox potential as higher levels of free radicals were detected after cytokine treatment than in cytokine-deprived cells implying increased respiration. These results indicate that daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 are able to prevent apoptosis in hematopoietic cells more effectively than native IL-3 and G-CSF. These effects of daniplestim and myelopoietin-1 may contribute to their effective ability to repopulate hematopoietic precursor cells after chemotherapy. PMID:11480562

McCubrey, J A; Blalock, W L; Saleh, O; Pearce, M; Burrows, C; Steelman, L S; Lee, J T; Franklin, R A; Oberhaus, S M; Moye, P W; Doshi, P D; McKearn, J P

2001-08-01

307

Reconstitution of the myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous and genetically modified CD34+ bone marrow cells, following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques  

PubMed Central

Background Prolonged, altered hematopoietic reconstitution is commonly observed in patients undergoing myeloablative conditioning and bone marrow and/or mobilized peripheral blood-derived stem cell transplantation. We studied the reconstitution of myeloid and lymphoid compartments after the transplantation of autologous CD34+ bone marrow cells following gamma irradiation in cynomolgus macaques. Results The bone marrow cells were first transduced ex vivo with a lentiviral vector encoding eGFP, with a mean efficiency of 72% ± 4%. The vector used was derived from the simian immunodeficiency lentivirus SIVmac251, VSV-g pseudotyped and encoded eGFP under the control of the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. After myeloid differentiation, GFP was detected in colony-forming cells (37% ± 10%). A previous study showed that transduction rates did not differ significantly between colony-forming cells and immature cells capable of initiating long-term cultures, indicating that progenitor cells and highly immature hematopoietic cells were transduced with similar efficiency. Blood cells producingeGFP were detected as early as three days after transplantation, and eGFP-producing granulocyte and mononuclear cells persisted for more than one year in the periphery. Conclusion The transplantation of CD34+ bone marrow cells had beneficial effects for the ex vivo proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors, favoring reconstitution of the T- and B-lymphocyte, thrombocyte and red blood cell compartments. PMID:18565229

Derdouch, Sonia; Gay, Wilfried; Nègre, Didier; Prost, Stéphane; Le Dantec, Mikael; Delache, Benoît; Auregan, Gwenaelle; Andrieu, Thibault; Leplat, Jean-Jacques; Cosset, François-Loïc; Le Grand, Roger

2008-01-01

308

Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

2001-01-01

309

Intracellular reactive oxygen species mark and influence the megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitor fate of common myeloid progenitors.  

PubMed

While most studies regarding reactive oxygen species (ROS) focus on their deleterious biological effects, a growing body of evidence indicates the importance of ROS as critical mediators of several signaling pathways, including those involved in hematopoiesis. In this study, we show the critical role of ROS in lineage decision of myeloid progenitors. In megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitor cells (MEP), intracellular ROS levels were found to be as low as those in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In contrast, remarkably high intracellular ROS levels were observed in granulocyte-monocyte progenitor cells. Intracellular ROS levels in common myeloid progenitors (CMP) were inversely correlated with their MEP differentiation potential. Moreover, gene set enrichment analysis revealed that ROS-low CMP showed gene expression patterns similar to those of MEP, indicating that intracellular ROS levels mark the fate of CMP. In in vitro assays, ROS significantly suppressed the generation of MEP and the formation of megakaryocyte-erythrocyte colonies from CMP. In ROS-high CMP, expression of colony-stimulating factor one receptor (CSF1R) was highly upregulated, and its surface expression correlated with their granulocyte-monocyte differentiation potential. Furthermore, ROS was found to induce the expression of CSF1R mRNA in a leukemia cell line. These data provide novel insights into the relationship between ROS and the hematopoietic differentiation system. PMID:24167091

Shinohara, Akihito; Imai, Yoichi; Nakagawa, Masahiro; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Kurokawa, Mineo

2014-02-01

310

Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-30

311

Developmental potential of the earliest precursor cells from the adult mouse thymus  

PubMed Central

A new, numerically minute population of cells representing the earliest T precursor cells in the adult mouse thymus has recently been isolated. This population has been shown to be similar to bone marrow hemopoietic stem cells in surface antigenic phenotype and to express moderate levels of CD4. We now show, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and intrathymic transfer to irradiated mice, that this apparently homogeneous population differs from multipotent stem cells in expressing the surface stem cell antigen 2 (Sca-2), that it differs from most early B lineage cells in lacking B220 and class II major histocompatibility complex expression, and that it binds rhodamine 123 like an activated rather than a quiescent cell. Irradiated recipient mice differing at the Ly 5 locus were used to compare the developmental potential of these early intrathymic precursors with bone marrow stem cells. Only T lineage product cells were detected when the intrathymic precursor population was transferred back into an irradiated thymus. However, when the intrathymic precursor population was transferred intravenously, it displayed the capacity to develop into both B and T lymphoid cells in recipient bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes, but no donor-derived myeloid cells were detected. The absence of myeloid and erythroid precursor activity was confirmed by showing that the intrathymic precursor population was unable to develop into myeloid or erythroid spleen colonies on intravenous transfer or to form colonies in an agar culture. These findings indicate that this earliest intrathymic precursor population has become restricted (or strongly biased) to lymphoid lineage development, but not exclusively to T lymphocytes. PMID:1683894

1991-01-01

312

General Information about Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

MedlinePLUS

... abnormal myeloblasts (a type of white blood cell), red blood cells, or platelets. Adult acute myeloid leukemia ( ... is made mostly of fat. Leukemia may affect red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Normally, ...

313

The roles of bioactive sphingolipids in resveratrol-induced apoptosis in HL60 acute myeloid leukemia cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Acute promyelocytic leukemia results from a translocation between 15 and 17 chromosomes that produce PML\\/RAR? fusion protein.\\u000a PML\\/RAR? inhibits differentiation of myeloid precursor cells at stem cell level. Resveratrol is a phytoalexin that exerts\\u000a cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. Ceramides have crucial roles in cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, drug resistance,\\u000a and apoptosis. In this study, we examined the possible cytotoxic

Zeynep Cakir; Guray Saydam; Fahri Sahin; Yusuf Baran

2011-01-01

314

An approach to the management of chronic myeloid leukemia in British Columbia  

PubMed Central

Chronic myeloid leukemia (cml) is a myeloproliferative disorder whose therapy has changed dramatically since the late 1990s. With the introduction of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (tki) imatinib mesylate, the treatment outcomes for patients with cml have improved markedly, and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation is no longer routinely offered as first-line therapy for most patients in chronic phase. However, resistance to tki therapy is increasingly being recognized, and alternative therapy is needed for this group of patients. In addition, the development of models predicting response to tki therapy is desired, so that appropriate treatment strategies can be used for individual patients. The present report serves to outline the approach to the treatment of cml in British Columbia and to highlight areas of ongoing research. PMID:18454182

Forrest, D.L.; Jiang, X.; Eaves, C.J.; Smith, C.L.

2008-01-01

315

Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-14

316

Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-01-14

317

Nitric oxide-induced murine hematopoietic stem cell fate involves multiple signaling proteins, gene expression, and redox modulation.  

PubMed

There are a growing number of reports showing the influence of redox modulation in cellular signaling. Although the regulation of hematopoiesis by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) has been described, their direct participation in the differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) remains unclear. In this work, the direct role of nitric oxide (NO(•)), a RNS, in the modulation of hematopoiesis was investigated using two sources of NO(•) , one produced by endothelial cells stimulated with carbachol in vitro and another using the NO(•)-donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) in vivo. Two main NO(•) effects were observed: proliferation of HSCs-especially of the short-term HSCs-and its commitment and terminal differentiation to the myeloid lineage. NO(•)-induced proliferation was characterized by the increase in the number of cycling HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells positive to BrdU and Ki-67, upregulation of Notch-1, Cx43, PECAM-1, CaR, ERK1/2, Akt, p38, PKC, and c-Myc. NO(•)-induced HSCs differentiation was characterized by the increase in granulocytic-macrophage progenitors, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units, mature myeloid cells, upregulation of PU.1, and C/EBP? genes concomitantly to the downregulation of GATA-3 and Ikz-3 genes, activation of Stat5 and downregulation of the other analyzed proteins mentioned above. Also, redox status modulation differed between proliferation and differentiation responses, which is likely associated with the transition of the proliferative to differentiation status. Our findings provide evidence of the role of NO(•) in inducing HSCs proliferation and myeloid differentiation involving multiple signaling. PMID:24964894

Nogueira-Pedro, Amanda; Dias, Carolina C; Regina, Helena; Segreto, C; Addios, Priscilla C; Lungato, Lisandro; D'Almeida, Vania; Barros, Carlos C; Higa, Elisa M S; Buri, Marcus V; Ferreira, Alice T; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian

2014-11-01

318

Common 4q24 deletion in four cases of hematopoietic malignancy: early stem cell involvement?  

PubMed

We determined bone marrow karyotype at diagnosis in four female acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplasia patients, aged between 52 and 56 years. In each case, we observed chromosome rearrangement involving the same 4q24 band. Three patients had a balanced reciprocal translocation as the sole abnormality - t(3;4)(q26;q24), t(4;5)(q24;p16) and t(4;7)(q24;q21) - and the fourth had del(4)(q23q24), +4. We used a set of 4q BAC probes for fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in these four cases. We found a 4q24 submicroscopic deletion in all three translocations, with a common deletion of approximately 0.5 Mb. In three cases, we concluded that rearrangement occurred in an early hematopoietic stem cell, as it was detected, in mosaic with a normal karyotype, in a fraction of remission bone marrow cells, peripheral T and B lymphocytes, malignant lymph node T-lymphoma cells in one case and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines established in two cases. Moreover, one of 10 additional AML patients tested by FISH had a normal karyotype and deletion of one of the commonly deleted probe sequences. A tumor suppressor gene may therefore be involved, especially as two patients developed malignant lymphoma at the same time as myeloid proliferation. PMID:15920487

Viguié, F; Aboura, A; Bouscary, D; Ramond, S; Delmer, A; Tachdjian, G; Marie, J P; Casadevall, N

2005-08-01

319

Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-21

320

Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-03-19

321

Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-06-03

322

[Expression of early hematopoietic markers in cord blood and mobilized blood].  

PubMed

G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood and cord blood are major sources of hematopoietic progenitor cells. These cells are characterized by the expression of "early" antigens. We have evaluated the coexpression of hematopoietic cell markers CD34, CD133, CD90, CDCP1, CD117 and activation antigen CD38 using multicolor flow cytometry. We show that (1) cells being positive for every single antigen form a separate population. (2) Percentage of cells expressing each "early" antigen are twice more in the cord blood than in the mobilized blood. The content of cells with complex progenitor phenotype (CD34+/CD38-/CD117, CD133+/CD34+/CD38-, CDCP1+/CD34+/CD38- etc.) is equal in mobilized and cord blood. (3) There are strong positive correlations between the expression of CD34, CD133, CD117 and CDCP1 in both groups. Positive correlation exists for CD90 with CD34, CD133, CDCP1 and CD117 only in cord blood and is not significant in mobilized blood. The analyses of early antigens coexpression with activation marker CD38 revealed that hypothesis on sequential activation and loss of expression of the aforementioned antigens is not confirmed. We assume that there is global regulation of the expression of CD34, CD133, CDCP1 and CD117. Yet expression of CD38 could be reversibly abolished during maturation of the hemapoetic cells and CD117 could be expressed not only on myeloid cells. PMID:23285731

Panteleev, A V; Vorob'ev, I A

2012-01-01

323

Mitochondria defects are involved in lead-acetate-induced adult hematopoietic stem cell decline.  

PubMed

Occupational high-grade lead exposure has been reduced in recent decades as a result of increased regulation. However, environmental lead exposure remains widespread, and is associated with severe toxicity implicated in human diseases. We performed oral intragastric administration of various dose lead acetate to adult Sprague Dawley rats to define the role of lead exposure in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) function, and to clarify its underlying mechanism. Lead acetate-exposed rats exhibited developmental abnormalities in myeloid and lymphoid lineages, and a significant decline in immune functions. It also showed HSCs functional decline associated with senescent phenotype with low grade lead acetate exposure or apoptotic phenotype with relative higher grade dose exposure. Mechanistic exploration showed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lead acetate-exposed CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment, which correlated with functional defects in cellular mitochondria. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C led to reversion of the CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment functional decline. These results indicate that lead acetate perturbs the hematopoietic balance of adult HSCs, associated with cellular mitochondria defects, increased intracellular ROS generation. PMID:25800560

Liu, Jun; Jia, Dao-Yong; Cai, Shi-Zhong; Li, Cheng-Peng; Zhang, Meng-Si; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wang, Ya-Ping

2015-05-19

324

The role of PML in hematopoietic and leukemic stem cell maintenance  

PubMed Central

The tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia (PML) was first identified as a component of PML–RAR? fusion protein, one of the initiating cytogenetic abnormalities in acute promyelocytic leukemia. PML is now known to have diverse functions regulating the DNA-damage response, apoptosis, senescence, and angiogenesis. Recent investigations have identified PML as a regulator of metabolic pathways in stem cell compartments, including the hematopoietic system, and have provided researchers with new strategies for controlling stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Studies of PML in leukemia-initiating cells demonstrate that PML is also an essential component of their maintenance, which has drawn tremendous attention to PML from scientists in various stem cell fields. Here, we review research into PML and its associated pathways, including recent studies of PML as it relates to stem cell biology, as well as our finding that PML regulates fatty acid oxidation, which is essential to the maintenance of normal hematopoietic stem cells. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of controlling PML-associated pathways. In particular, we describe promising evidence for the use of arsenic trioxide in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:24488785

Nakahara, Fumio; Weiss, Cary N.

2014-01-01

325

Concise review: hematopoietic stem cell aging and the prospects for rejuvenation.  

PubMed

Because of the continuous increases in lifetime expectancy, the incidence of age-related diseases will, unless counteracted, represent an increasing problem at both the individual and socioeconomic levels. Studies on the processes of blood cell formation have revealed several shortcomings as a consequence of chronological age. They include a reduced ability to mount adaptive immune responses and a blood cell composition skewed toward myeloid cells, with the latter coinciding with a dramatically increased incidence of myelogenous diseases, including cancer. Conversely, the dominant forms of acute leukemia affecting children associate with the lymphoid lineages. A growing body of evidence has suggested that aging of various organs and cellular systems, including the hematopoietic system, associates with a functional demise of tissue-resident stem cell populations. Mechanistically, DNA damage and/or altered transcriptional landscapes appear to be major drivers of the hematopoietic stem cell aging state, with recent data proposing that stem cell aging phenotypes are characterized by at least some degree of reversibility. These findings suggest the possibility of rejuvenating, or at least dampening, stem cell aging phenotypes in the elderly for therapeutic benefit. PMID:25548388

Wahlestedt, Martin; Pronk, Cornelis Jan; Bryder, David

2015-02-01

326

Deficiency of Src family kinases compromises the repopulating ability of hematopoietic stem cells  

PubMed Central

Objective Src family kinases (SFK) have been implicated in regulating growth factor and integrin-induced proliferation, migration, and gene expression in multiple cell types. However, little is known about the role of these kinases in the growth, homing, and engraftment potential of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Results Here we show that loss of hematopoietic-specific SFKs Hck, Fgr, and Lyn results in increased number of Sca-1+Lin? cells in the bone marrow, which respond differentially to cytokine-induced growth in vitro and manifest a significant defect in the long-term repopulating potential in vivo. Interestingly, a significant increase in expression of adhesion molecules, known to coincide with the homing potential of wild-type bone marrow cells is also observed on the surface of SFK?/? cells, although, this increase did not affect the homing potential of more primitive Lin?Sca-1+ SFK?/? cells. The stem cell–repopulating defect observed in mice transplanted with SFK?/? bone marrow cells is due to the loss of Lyn Src kinase, because deficiency of Lyn, but not Hck or Fgr, recapitulated the long-term stem cell defect observed in mice transplanted with SFK?/? bone marrow cells. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrate an essential role for Lyn kinase in positively regulating the long-term and multilineage engraftment of stem cells, which is distinct from its role in mature B cells and myeloid cells. PMID:18346837

Orschell, Christie M.; Borneo, Jovencio; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Ma, Peilin; Sims, Emily; Ramdas, Baskar; Yoder, Mervin C.; Kapur, Reuben

2015-01-01

327

Human monoclonal antibody detects a cell surface antigen expressed on hematopoietic malignant cells of lymphoid lineage.  

PubMed

An antigen with a molecular weight of 150 kilodaltons expressed on certain leukemia and lymphoma cells was recognized by a human monoclonal antibody (3H12), which had been established by the fusion of lymphocytes from a small cell lung cancer patient with a mouse myeloma cell line (P3U1). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 3 out of 4 cases with lymphoid crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) were positively stained by 3H12, while cells from 5 cases with myeloid crisis of CML did not react to this antibody. The antibody did not show any reactivity to cells from the chronic phase of CML, other types of leukemias or normal hematopoietic cells. We further examined 29 cell lines of hematopoietic origin and found that 2 undifferentiated cells (BV-173 and K-562) reacted to the 3H12 antibody. In addition, we found that 3 out of 6 Burkitt lymphoma cells (DAUDI, RAJI and HR1K) reacted to 3H12. Taken together, these results suggest that the antigen recognized by 3H12 is a differentiation-associated antigen expressed on immature lymphoid cells, and could potentially be a reliable cell lineage marker. PMID:1900825

Iizasa, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Tagawa, M; Fujisawa, T; Saito, H; Kondo, H; Matsuo, Y; Minowada, J; Taniguchi, M

1991-02-01

328

In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells  

PubMed Central

Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications. PMID:23212524

Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S.; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S.; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E.

2013-01-01

329

Ubiquitous Expression of MAKORIN-2 in Normal and Malignant Hematopoietic Cells and Its Growth Promoting Activity  

PubMed Central

Makorin-2 (MKRN2) is a highly conserved protein and yet its functions are largely unknown. We investigated the expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1 in normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, and leukemia cell lines. We also attempted to delineate the role of MKRN2 in umbilical cord blood CD34+ stem/progenitor cells and K562 cell line by over-expression and inhibition of MKRN2 through lentivirus transduction and shRNA nucleofection, respectively. Our results provided the first evidence on the ubiquitous expression of MKRN2 in normal hematopoietic cells, embryonic stem cell lines, primary leukemia and leukemic cell lines of myeloid, lymphoid, erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages. The expression levels of MKRN2 were generally higher in primary leukemia samples compared with those in age-matched normal BM cells. In all leukemia subtypes, there was no significant correlation between expression levels of MKRN2 and RAF1. sh-MKRN2-silenced CD34+ cells had a significantly lower proliferation capacity and decreased levels of the early stem/progenitor subpopulation (CFU-GEMM) compared with control cultures. Over-expression of MKRN2 in K562 cells increased cell proliferation. Our results indicated possible roles of MKRN2 in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:24675897

Lee, King Yiu; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Tsang, Kam Sze; Chen, Yang Chao; Kung, Hsiang-fu; Ng, Pak Cheung; Li, Chi Kong; Leung, Kam Tong; Li, Karen

2014-01-01

330

Selective Enhancement of Donor Hematopoietic Cell Engraftment by the CXCR4 Antagonist AMD3100 in a Mouse Transplantation Model  

PubMed Central

The interaction between stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) with CXCR4 chemokine receptors plays an important role in hematopoiesis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We examined the efficacy of post transplant administration of a specific CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100) in improving animal survival and in enhancing donor hematopoietic cell engraftment using a congeneic mouse transplantation model. AMD3100 was administered subcutaneously at 5 mg/kg body weight 3 times a week beginning at day +2 post-transplant. Post-transplant administration of AMD3100 significantly improves animal survival. AMD3100 reduces pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production. Furthermore, post transplant administration of AMD3100 selectively enhances donor cell engraftment and promotes recovery of all donor cell lineages (myeloid cells, T and B lymphocytes, erythrocytes and platelets). This enhancement results from a combined effect of increased marrow niche availability and greater cell division induced by AMD3100. Our studies shed new lights into the biological roles of SDF-1/CXCR4 interaction in hematopoietic stem cell engraftment following transplantation and in transplant-related mortality. Our results indicate that AMD3100 provides a novel approach for enhancing hematological recovery following transplantation, and will likely benefit patients undergoing transplantation. PMID:20596257

Kang, Yubin; Chen, Benny J.; DeOliveira, Divino; Mito, Jeffrey; Chao, Nelson J.

2010-01-01

331

Enhanced Angpt1/Tie2 signaling affects the differentiation and long-term repopulation ability of hematopoietic stem cells.  

PubMed

Angiopoietin-1 (Angpt1) signaling via the Tie2 receptor regulates vascular and hematopoietic systems. To investigate the role of Angpt1-Tie2 signaling in hematopoiesis, we prepared conditionally inducible transgenic (Tg) mice expressing a genetically engineered Angpt1, cartridge oligomeric matrix protein (COMP)-Angpt1. The effects of COMP-Angpt1 overexpression in osteoblasts on hematopoiesis were then investigated by crossing COMP-Angpt1 Tg mice with Col1a1-Cre Tg mice. Interestingly, peripheral blood analyses showed that 4 week (wk)-old (but not 8 wk-old) Col1a1-Cre+/COMP-Angpt1+ mice had a lower percentage of circulating B cells and a higher percentage of myeloid cells than Col1a1-Cre-/COMP-Angpt1+ (control) mice. Although there were no significant differences in the immunophenotypic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) populations between Col1a1-Cre+/COMP-Angpt1+ and control mice, lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells isolated from 8 wk-old Col1a1-Cre+/COMP-Angpt1+ mice showed better long-term bone marrow reconstitution ability. These data indicate that Angpt1-Tie2 signaling affects the differentiation capacity of hematopoietic lineages during development and increases the stem cell activity of HSCs. PMID:23149415

Ikushima, Yoshiko Matsumoto; Arai, Fumio; Nakamura, Yuka; Hosokawa, Kentaro; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Hirashima, Masanori; Toyama, Hirofumi; Suda, Toshio

2013-01-01

332

Isomeric Trisaryloxycyclotriphosphazene Polymer Precursors  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Substances useful for making heat-and fire-resistant polymers. Cyclotriphosphazene-based monomers and polymer precursors led to development of high-temperature materials. Cyclotriphosphazene-derived monomers, polymer precursors, and polymers becoming important from both industrial and scientific points of view. Presence of phosphazene moiety in cyclotriphosphazene-based monomers and polymer precursors expected to impact special properties in desired high-performance materials containing inorganic backbones for aerospace applications. Useful for obtaining heat-and fire-resistant polymers for composites, adhesives, molding powders, and coating laminates. Also used in structures (e.g. secondary structures in aircraft), in construction of spacecraft, and in electronics and computer industries.

St. Clair, Terry L.; Kumar, Devendra

1990-01-01

333

ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA stimulate human hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation into eosinophils: the role of nuclear factor-?B  

PubMed Central

Background ETV6-PDGFRB (also called TEL-PDGFRB) and FIP1L1-PDGFRA are receptor-tyrosine kinase fusion genes that cause chronic myeloid malignancies associated with hypereosinophilia. The aim of this work was to gain insight into the mechanisms whereby fusion genes affect human hematopoietic cells and in particular the eosinophil lineage. Design and Methods We introduced ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA into human CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells isolated from umbilical cord blood. Results Cells transduced with these oncogenes formed hematopoietic colonies even in the absence of cytokines. Both oncogenes also stimulated the proliferation of cells in liquid culture and their differentiation into eosinophils. This model thus recapitulated key features of the myeloid neoplasms induced by ETV6-PDGFRB and FIP1L1-PDGFRA. We next showed that both fusion genes activated the transcription factors STAT1, STAT3, STAT5 and nuclear factor-?B. Phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase inhibition blocked nuclear factor-?B activation in transduced progenitor cells and patients’ cells. Nuclear factor-?B was also activated in the human FIP1L1-PDGFRA-positive leukemia cell line EOL1, the proliferation of which was blocked by borte-zomib and the I?B kinase inhibitor BMS-345541. A mutant I?B that prevents nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-?B inhibited cell growth and the expression of eosinophil markers, such as the interleukin-5 receptor and eosinophil peroxidase, in progenitors transduced with ETV6-PDGFRB. In addition, several potential regulators of this process, including HES6, MYC and FOXO3 were identified using expression microarrays. Conclusions We show that human CD34+ cells expressing PDGFR fusion oncogenes proliferate autonomously and differentiate towards the eosinophil lineage in a process that requires nuclear factor-?B. These results suggest new treatment possibilities for imatinib-resistant myeloid neoplasms associated with PDGFR mutations. PMID:22271894

Montano-Almendras, Carmen P.; Essaghir, Ahmed; Schoemans, Hélène; Varis, Inci; Noël, Laura A.; Velghe, Amélie I.; Latinne, Dominique; Knoops, Laurent; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

2012-01-01

334

Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

Slovak, M.L. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

1994-09-01

335

Histone Lysine-specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1) Protein Is Involved in Sal-like Protein 4 (SALL4)-mediated Transcriptional Repression in Hematopoietic Stem Cells*  

PubMed Central

The stem cell protein SALL4 plays a critical role in hematopoiesis by regulating the cell fate. In primitive hematopoietic precursors, it activates or represses important genes via recruitment of various epigenetic factors such as DNA methyltransferases, and histone deacylases. Here, we demonstrate that LSD1, a histone lysine demethylase, also participates in the trans-repressive effects of SALL4. Based on luciferase assays, the amine oxidase domain of LSD1 is important in suppressing SALL4-mediated reporter transcription. In freshly isolated adult mouse bone marrows, both SALL4 and LSD1 proteins are preferentially expressed in undifferentiated progenitor cells and co-localize in the nuclei. Further sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that these two factors share the same binding sites at the promoter regions of important hematopoietic regulatory genes including EBF1, GATA1, and TNF. In addition, studies from both gain- and loss-of-function models revealed that SALL4 dynamically controls the binding levels of LSD1, which is accompanied by a reversely changed histone 3 dimethylated lysine 4 at the same promoter regions. Finally, shRNA-mediated knockdown of LSD1 in hematopoietic precursor cells resulted in altered SALL4 downstream gene expression and increased cellular activity. Thus, our data revealed that histone demethylase LSD1 may negatively regulate SALL4-mediated transcription, and the dynamic regulation of SALL4-associated epigenetic factors cooperatively modulates early hematopoietic precursor proliferation. PMID:24163373

Liu, Li; Souto, Joseph; Liao, Wenbin; Jiang, Yongping; Li, Yangqiu; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Huang, Suming; Rosengart, Todd; Yang, Vincent W.; Schuster, Michael; Ma, Yupo; Yang, Jianchang

2013-01-01

336

Understanding human NK cell differentiation: clues for improving the haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.  

PubMed

The study of in vitro and in vivo NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic precursors revealed the existence of discrete stages of development. These stages are characterized by the progressive acquisition of markers and receptors that play a crucial role in NK cell function. The knowledge acquired has revealed particularly relevant for improving the HSCT to cure high-risk leukemias in the haplo-HSCT setting, in which NK cells play a central role in the clearance of leukemic cells and in the positive clinical outcome. PMID:24076313

Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

2013-01-01

337

Comparative analysis of the efficiency and specificity of myeloid-Cre deleting strains using ROSA-EYFP reporter mice.  

PubMed

Since the first example of conditional gene targeting in mice in 1994, the use of Cre recombinase and loxP flanked sequences has become an invaluable technique to generate tissue and temporal specific gene knockouts. The number of mouse strains expressing floxed-gene sequences, and tissue-specific or temporal-specific Cre-recombinase that have been reported in the literature has grown exponentially. However, increased use of this technology has highlighted several problems that can impact the interpretation of any phenotype observed in these mouse models. In particular, accurate knowledge of the specificity of Cre expression in each strain is critical in order to make conclusions about the role of specific cell types in the phenotypes observed. Cre-mediated deletion specificity and efficiency have been described in many different ways in the literature, making direct comparisons between these Cre strains impossible. Here we report crossing thirteen different myeloid-Cre mouse strains to ROSA-EYFP reporter mice and assaying YFP expression in a variety of naïve unstimulated hematopoietic cells, in parallel. By focusing on myeloid subsets, we directly compare the relative efficiency and specificity of myeloid deletion in these strains under steady-state conditions. PMID:24857755

Abram, Clare L; Roberge, Gray L; Hu, Yongmei; Lowell, Clifford A

2014-06-01

338

Earthquakes: Hydrogeochemical precursors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

Ingebritsen, S. E.; Manga, M.

2014-10-01

339

CMV reactivation after allogeneic HCT and relapse risk: evidence for early protection in acute myeloid leukemia  

PubMed Central

The association between cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and relapse was evaluated in a large cohort of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 761), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (n = 322), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (n = 646), lymphoma (n = 254), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 371) who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) between 1995 and 2005. In multivariable models, CMV pp65 antigenemia was associated with a decreased risk of relapse by day 100 among patients with AML (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3-0.9) but not in patients with ALL, lymphoma, CML, or MDS. The effect appeared to be independent of CMV viral load, acute graft-versus-host disease, or ganciclovir-associated neutropenia. At 1 year after HCT, early CMV reactivation was associated with reduced risk of relapse in all patients, but this did not reach significance for any disease subgroup. Furthermore, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR = 1.31; 95% CI, 1.1-1.6) and no difference in overall mortality (HR = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.9-1.3). This report demonstrates a modest reduction in early relapse risk after HCT associated with CMV reactivation in a large cohort of patients without a benefit in overall survival. PMID:23744585

Leisenring, Wendy M.; Xie, Hu; Walter, Roland B.; Mielcarek, Marco; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Riddell, Stanley R.; Boeckh, Michael

2013-01-01

340

Preclinical targeting of human acute myeloid leukemia and myeloablation using chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells  

PubMed Central

Many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are incurable with chemotherapy and may benefit from novel approaches. One such approach involves the transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for a specific cell-surface antigen. This strategy depends upon preferential expression of the target on tumor cells. To date, the lack of AML-specific surface markers has impeded development of such CAR-based approaches. CD123, the transmembrane ? chain of the interleukin-3 receptor, is expressed in the majority of AML cells but is also expressed in many normal hematopoietic cells. Here, we show that CD123 is a good target for AML-directed CAR therapy, because its expression increases over time in vivo even in initially CD123dim populations, and that human CD123-redirected T cells (CART123) eradicate primary AML in immunodeficient mice. CART123 also eradicated normal human myelopoiesis, a surprising finding because anti-CD123 antibody-based strategies have been reportedly well tolerated. Because AML is likely preceded by clonal evolution in “preleukemic” hematopoietic stem cells, our observations support CART123 as a viable AML therapy, suggest that CART123-based myeloablation may be used as a novel conditioning regimen for hematopoietic cell transplantation, and raise concerns for the use of CART123 without such a rescue strategy. PMID:24596416

Gill, Saar; Tasian, Sarah K.; Ruella, Marco; Shestova, Olga; Li, Yong; Porter, David L.; Carroll, Martin; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Scholler, John; Grupp, Stephan A.; June, Carl H.

2014-01-01

341

MYBL2 is a sub-haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in myeloid malignancy.  

PubMed

A common deleted region (CDR) in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) affects the long arm of chromosome 20 and has been predicted to harbor a tumor suppressor gene. Here we show that MYBL2, a gene within the 20q CDR, is expressed at sharply reduced levels in CD34+ cells from most MDS cases (65%; n = 26), whether or not they harbor 20q abnormalities. In a murine competitive reconstitution model, Mybl2 knockdown by RNAi to 20-30% of normal levels in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors resulted in clonal dominance of these 'sub-haploinsufficient' cells, which was reflected in all blood cell lineages. By 6 months post-transplantation, the reconstituted mice had developed a clonal myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorder originating from the cells with aberrantly reduced Mybl2 expression. We conclude that downregulation of MYBL2 activity below levels predicted by classical haploinsufficiency underlies the clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in a large fraction of human myeloid malignancies. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00825.001. PMID:23878725

Heinrichs, Stefan; Conover, Lillian F; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Kilpivaara, Outi; Stevenson, Kristen; Neuberg, Donna; Loh, Mignon L; Wu, Wen-Shu; Rodig, Scott J; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Look, A Thomas

2013-01-01

342

Differential Expression of Novel Potential Regulators in Hematopoietic Stem Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hematopoietic system is an invaluable model both for understanding basic developmental biology and for developing clinically relevant cell therapies. Using highly purified cells and rigorous microarray analysis we have compared the expression pattern of three of the most primitive hematopoietic subpopulations in adult mouse bone marrow: long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), short-term HSC, and multipotent progenitors. All three populations

E. Camilla Forsberg; Susan S Prohaska; Sol Katzman; Garrett C Heffner; Josh M Stuart; Irving L Weissman

2005-01-01

343

Analysis of Aurora kinase A expression in CD34(+) blast cells isolated from patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Aurora kinase A, also known as aurora A, is a serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in mitosis entry, chromosome alignment, segregation, and cytokinesis. Overexpression of aurora A has been observed in many solid tumors and some hematopoietic neoplasms, but little is known about its expression in myeloid diseases. Because cytogenetic abnormalities play an essential role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies, we hypothesized that aurora A deregulation may be involved in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia and contribute to the chromosomal instability observed in these diseases. We assessed aurora A mRNA levels in CD34(+) bone marrow blasts from nine patients with acute myeloid leukemia, 20 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes, and five normal patients serving as controls. CD34(+) blasts were isolated from bone marrow aspirate specimens using magnetic activated cell separation technology. RNA was extracted from purified CD34(+) cells, and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for aurora A was performed. Immunocytochemical analyses for total aurora A, phosphorylated aurora A, Ki-67, and activated caspase 3 were performed on cytospin slides made from purified CD34(+) cells in myelodysplastic syndrome patients using standard methods. Aurora A mRNA and protein levels were correlated, as was aurora A mRNA level, with blast counts, cytogenetic abnormalities, and International Prognostic Scoring System score. We found that CD34(+) cells in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia expressed aurora A at significantly higher levels (P = 0.01 and P = 0.01, respectively) than normal CD34(+) cells. Aurora A mRNA levels correlated with total and phosphorylated protein levels (P = 0.0002 and P = 0.02, respectively). No significant correlation was found between aurora A mRNA level and blast count, blast viability, cytogenetic abnormalities, or the International Prognostic Scoring System score in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. We conclude that aurora A is up-regulated in CD34(+) blasts from myeloid neoplasms. PMID:19669217

Ye, Dongjiu; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Xiao, Lianchun; Vadhan-Raj, Saroj; Fernandez, Michael H; Nguyen, Martin H; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E

2009-03-01

344

Chemotherapy Plus Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Refractory Myeloid Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Thrombocytopenia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-01-08

345

-Arrestin2 mediates the initiation and progression of myeloid leukemia  

E-print Network

-Arrestin2 mediates the initiation and progression of myeloid leukemia Mark Fereshteha leukemia (CML). These defects are linked to a re- duced frequency, as well as defective self maintenance. chronic myeloid leukemia | leukemia stem cell | hematopoiesis Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML

346

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... chronic myeloid leukemia? What should you ask your doctor about chronic myeloid leukemia? As you cope with ... need to have honest, open discussions with your doctor. You should feel free to ask any question ...

347

What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... Topic Additional resources for chronic myeloid leukemia What`s new in chronic myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Studies ... such as cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, with a TKI. New drugs for CML Because researchers now know the ...

348

What Are the Key Statistics about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?  

MedlinePLUS

... for chronic myeloid leukemia? What are the key statistics about chronic myeloid leukemia? The American Cancer Society's ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

349

Progenitor cell hyperplasia with rare development of myeloid leukemia in interleukin 11 bone marrow chimeras  

PubMed Central

Post 5-fluorouracil-treated murine bone marrow cells infected with a recombinant retrovirus (murine stem cell virus-interleukin 11 [MSCV-IL- 11]) bearing a human IL-11 gene were transplanted into lethally irradiated syngeneic mice. Analysis of proviral integration sites in DNA prepared from hematopoietic tissues and purified cell populations of long-term reconstituted primary and secondary recipients demonstrated polyclonal engraftment by multipotential stem cells. High levels (100-1,500 U/ml) of IL-11 were detected in the plasma of the MSCV-IL-11 mice. Systemic effects of chronic IL-11 exposure included loss of body fat, thymus atrophy, some alterations in plasma protein levels, frequent inflammation of the eyelids, and often a hyperactive state. A sustained rise in peripheral platelet levels (approximately 1.5-fold) was seen throughout the observation period (4-17 wk). No changes were observed in the total number of circulating leukocytes in the majority of the transplanted animals (including 10 primary and 18 secondary recipients) despite a > 20-fold elevation in myeloid progenitor cell content in the spleen. The exceptions were members of one transplant pedigree which presented with myeloid leukemia during the secondary transplant phase. A clonal origin of the disease was determined, with significant expansion of the MSCV-IL-11-marked clone having occurred in the spleen of the primary host. Culturing of leukemic spleen cells from a quaternary recipient led to the establishment of a permanent cell line (denoted PGMD1). IL-11-producing PGMD1 myeloid leukemic cells are dependent on IL-3 for continuous growth in vitro and they differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages in response to granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The inability of autogenously produced IL-11 to support autonomous growth of PGMD1 cells argues against a mechanism of transformation involving a classical autocrine loop. PMID:8104229

1993-01-01

350

Human thymus contains multipotent progenitors with T/B lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid lineage potential.  

PubMed

It is a longstanding question which bone marrow-derived cell seeds the thymus and to what level this cell is committed to the T-cell lineage. We sought to elucidate this issue by examining gene expression, lineage potential, and self-renewal capacity of the 2 most immature subsets in the human thymus, namely CD34+ CD1a- and CD34+ CD1a+ thymocytes. DNA microarrays revealed the presence of several myeloid and erythroid transcripts in CD34+ CD1a- thymocytes but not in CD34+ CD1a+ thymocytes. Lineage potential of both subpopulations was assessed using in vitro colony assays, bone marrow stroma cultures, and in vivo transplantation into nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. The CD34+ CD1a- subset contained progenitors with lymphoid (both T and B), myeloid, and erythroid lineage potential. Remarkably, development of CD34+ CD1a- thymocytes toward the T-cell lineage, as shown by T-cell receptor delta gene rearrangements, could be reversed into a myeloid-cell fate. In contrast, the CD34+ CD1a+ cells yielded only T-cell progenitors, demonstrating their irreversible commitment to the T-cell lineage. Both CD34+ CD1a- and CD34+ CD1a+ thymocytes failed to repopulate NOD/SCID mice. We conclude that the human thymus is seeded by multipotent progenitors with a much broader lineage potential than previously assumed. These cells resemble hematopoietic stem cells but, by analogy with murine thymocytes, apparently lack sufficient self-renewal capacity. PMID:16384926

Weerkamp, Floor; Baert, Miranda R M; Brugman, Martijn H; Dik, Willem A; de Haas, Edwin F E; Visser, Trudi P; de Groot, Christianne J M; Wagemaker, Gerard; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Staal, Frank J T

2006-04-15

351

Role of calcium-dependent protein kinases in chronic myeloid leukemia: combined effects of PKC and BCR-ABL signaling on cellular alterations during leukemia development  

PubMed Central

Calcium-dependent protein kinases (PKCs) function in a myriad of cellular processes, including cell-cycle regulation, proliferation, hematopoietic stem cell differentiation, apoptosis, and malignant transformation. PKC inhibitors, when targeted to these pathways, have demonstrated efficacy against several types of solid tumors as well as leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) represents 20% of all adult leukemia. The aberrant Philadelphia chromosome has been reported as the main cause of CML development in hematopoietic stem cells, due to the formation of the BCR-ABL oncogene. PKCs and BCR-ABL coordinate several signaling pathways that are crucial to cellular malignant transformation. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that pharmacological approaches using PKC inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of CML. This mini review summarizes articles from the National Center for Biotechnology Information website that have shown evidence of the involvement of PKC in CML. PMID:25045273

Mencalha, André L; Corrêa, Stephany; Abdelhay, Eliana

2014-01-01

352

AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-10

353

Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-10-14

354

Haploinsufficiency of del(5q) genes, Egr1 and Apc, cooperate with Tp53 loss to induce acute myeloid leukemia in mice  

PubMed Central

An interstitial deletion of chromosome 5, del(5q), is the most common structural abnormality in primary myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs) after cytotoxic therapy. Loss of TP53 activity, through mutation or deletion, is highly associated with t-MNs with a del(5q). We previously demonstrated that haploinsufficiency of Egr1 and Apc, 2 genes lost in the 5q deletion, are key players in the progression of MDS with a del(5q). Using genetically engineered mice, we now show that reduction or loss of Tp53 expression, in combination with Egr1 haploinsufficiency, increased the rate of development of hematologic neoplasms and influenced the disease spectrum, but did not lead to overt myeloid leukemia, suggesting that altered function of additional gene(s) on 5q are likely required for myeloid leukemia development. Next, we demonstrated that cell intrinsic loss of Tp53 in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells haploinsufficient for both Egr1 and Apc led to the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 17% of mice. The long latency (234-299 days) and clonal chromosomal abnormalities in the AMLs suggest that additional genetic changes may be required for full transformation. Thus, loss of Tp53 activity in cooperation with Egr1 and Apc haploinsufficiency creates an environment that is permissive for malignant transformation and the development of AML. PMID:24381225

Fernald, Anthony A.; Wang, Jianghong; Davis, Elizabeth M.; Karrison, Theodore; Anastasi, John; Le Beau, Michelle M.

2014-01-01

355

Newly Recruited CD11b+, GR-1+, Ly6Chigh Myeloid Cells Augment Tumor-Associated Immunosuppression Immediately following the Therapeutic Administration of Oncolytic Reovirus.  

PubMed

Tumor-associated immunosuppression aids cancer cells to escape immune-mediated attack and subsequent elimination. Recently, however, many oncolytic viruses, including reovirus, have been reported to overturn such immunosuppression and promote the development of a clinically desired antitumor immunity, which is known to promote favorable patient outcomes. Contrary to this existing paradigm, in this article we demonstrate that reovirus augments tumor-associated immunosuppression immediately following its therapeutic administration. Our data show that reovirus induces preferential differentiation of highly suppressive CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells from bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, reovirus administration in tumor-bearing hosts drives time-dependent recruitment of CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells in the tumor milieu, which is further supported by virus-induced increased expression of numerous immune factors involved in myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival and trafficking. Most importantly, CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), Ly6C(high) myeloid cells specifically potentiate the suppression of T cell proliferation and are associated with the absence of IFN-? response in the tumor microenvironment early during oncotherapy. Considering that the qualitative traits of a specific antitumor immunity are largely dictated by the immunological events that precede its development, our findings are of critical importance and must be considered while devising complementary interventions aimed at promoting the optimum efficacy of oncolytic virus-based anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:25825443

Clements, Derek R; Sterea, Andra M; Kim, Youra; Helson, Erin; Dean, Cheryl A; Nunokawa, Anna; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Sharif, Tanveer; Marcato, Paola; Gujar, Shashi A; Lee, Patrick W K

2015-05-01

356

Tet2 facilitates the de-repression of myeloid target genes during C/EBPa induced transdifferentiation of pre-B cells  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY The methylcytosine hydroxylase Tet2 has been implicated in hematopoietic differentiation and the formation of myeloid malignancies when mutated. An ideal system to study the role of Tet2 in myelopoeisis is C/EBPa induced transdifferentiation of pre-B cells into macrophages. Here we found that C/EBPa binds to upstream regions of Tet2 and that the gene becomes activated. Tet2 knockdowns impaired the upregulation of macrophage markers as well as phagocytic capacity, suggesting that the enzyme is required for both early and late stage myeloid differentiation. A slightly weaker effect was seen in primary cells with a Tet2 ablation. Expression arrays of transdifferentiating cells with Tet2 knockdowns permitted the identification of a small subset of myeloid genes whose upregulation was blunted. Activation of these target genes was accompanied by rapid increases of promoter hydroxy-methylation. Our observations indicate that Tet2 helps C/EBPa rapidly de-repress myeloid genes during the conversion of pre-B cells into macrophages. PMID:22981865

Kallin, Eric M.; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Christensen, J esper; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Helin, Kristian; Ballestar, Esteban; Graf, Thomas

2013-01-01

357

Arrested Development of Embryonic Red Cell Precursors in Mouse Embryos Lacking Transcription Factor GATA1  

Microsoft Academic Search

The X chromosome-linked transcription factor GATA-1 is expressed specifically in erythroid, mast, megakaryocyte, and eosinophil lineages, as well as in hematopoietic progenitors. Prior studies revealed that gene-disrupted GATA-1- embryonic stem cells give rise to adult (or definitive) erythroid precursors arrested at the proerythroblast stage in vitro and fail to contribute to adult red blood cells in chimeric mice but did

Yuko Fujiwara; Carol P. Browne; Kerrianne Cunniff; Sabra C. Goff; Stuart H. Orkin

1996-01-01

358

Combination of vaccine-strain measles and mumps virus synergistically kills a wide range of human hematological cancer cells: Special focus on acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

Through combining vaccine-derived measles and mumps viruses (MM), we efficiently targeted a wide range of hematopoietic cancer cell lines. MM synergistically killed many cell lines including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines. Further investigation suggested that enhanced oncolytic effect of MM was due to increased apoptosis induction. In an U937 xenograft AML mouse model, MM displayed greater tumor suppression and prolonged survival. Furthermore, MM efficiently killed blasts from 16 out of 20 AML patients and elicited more efficient killing effect on 11 patients when co-administered with Ara-C. Our results demonstrate that MM is a promising therapeutic candidate for hematological malignancies. PMID:25193462

Zhang, Li Feng; Tan, Darren Qian Cheng; Jeyasekharan, Anand D; Hsieh, Wen Son; Ho, Anh Son; Ichiyama, Koji; Ye, Min; Pang, Brendan; Ohba, Kenji; Liu, Xin; de Mel, Sanjay; Cuong, Bui Khac; Chng, Wee Joo; Ryo, Akihide; Suzuki, Youichi; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Toan, Nguyen Linh; Yamamoto, Naoki

2014-11-28

359

In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies  

PubMed Central

In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

2014-01-01

360

Signal, Transduction, and the Hematopoietic Stem Cell  

PubMed Central

The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) is a unique cell positioned highest in the hematopoietic hierarchical system. The HSC has the ability to stay in quiescence, to self-renew, or to differentiate and generate all lineages of blood cells. The path to be actualized is influenced by signals that derive from the cell’s microenvironment, which activate molecular pathways inside the cell. Signaling pathways are commonly organized through inducible protein–protein interactions, mediated by adaptor proteins that link activated receptors to cytoplasmic effectors. This review will focus on the signaling molecules and how they work in concert to determine the HSC’s fate. PMID:25386349

Louria-Hayon, Igal

2014-01-01

361

Myeloid sarcomas: a histologic, immunohistochemical, and cytogenetic study  

PubMed Central

Context. - Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a neoplasm of immature granulocytes, monocytes, or both involving any extramedullary site. The correct diagnosis of MS is important for adequate therapy, which is often delayed because of a high misdiagnosis rate. Objective. - To evaluate the lineage differentiation of neoplastic cells in MS by immunohistochemistry, and to correlate the results with clinicopathologic findings and cytogenetic studies. Design. - Histologic and immunohistochemical examinations were performed on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 13 cases of MS. They were classified according to the World Health Organization criteria. Chromosomal analysis data were available in 11 cases. Clinical, pathological, and cytogenetic findings were analyzed. Results. - The study included six male and seven female patients with an age range of 25 to 72 years (mean, 49.3 years) and a male to female ratio of 1:1.2. MS de novo occurred in 4/13 (31%) of cases examined. The most sensitive immunohistochemical markers were CD43 and lysozyme present in all cases with MS (13/13, 100%). All de novo MS showed a normal karyotype, monoblastic differentiation, and lack of CD34. The most common chromosomal abnormalities in MS associated with a hematopoietic disorder were trisomy 8 and inv(16) (2/11, 18%). Conclusion. - An immunohistochemical panel including CD43, lysozyme, myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD68 (or CD163), CD117, CD3 and CD20 can successfully identify the vast majority of MS variants in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections. The present report expands the spectrum of our knowledge showing that de novo MS has frequent monoblastic differentiation and frequently carries a normal karyotype. PMID:17974004

Alexiev, Borislav A; Wang, Wenle; Ning, Yi; Chumsri, Saranya; Gojo, Ivana; Rodgers, William H; Stass, Sanford A; Zhao, Xianfeng F

2007-01-01

362

Frozen Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells Differentiate into Higher Numbers of Functional Natural Killer Cells In Vitro than Mobilized Hematopoietic Stem Cells or Freshly Isolated Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Adoptive natural killer (NK) cell therapy relies on the acquisition of large numbers of NK cells that are cytotoxic but not exhausted. NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has become an alluring option for NK cell therapy, with umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (PBCD34+) being the most accessible HSC sources as collection procedures are less invasive. In this study we compared the capacity of frozen or freshly isolated UCB hematopoietic stem cells (CBCD34+) and frozen PBCD34+ to generate NK cells in vitro. By modifying a previously published protocol, we showed that frozen CBCD34+ cultures generated higher NK cell numbers without loss of function compared to fresh CBCD34+ cultures. NK cells generated from CBCD34+ and PBCD34+ expressed low levels of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors but high levels of activating receptors and of the myeloid marker CD33. However, blocking studies showed that CD33 expression did not impact on the functions of the generated cells. CBCD34+-NK cells exhibited increased capacity to secrete IFN-? and kill K562 in vitro and in vivo as compared to PBCD34+-NK cells. Moreover, K562 killing by the generated NK cells could be further enhanced by IL-12 stimulation. Our data indicate that the use of frozen CBCD34+ for the production of NK cells in vitro results in higher cell numbers than PBCD34+, without jeopardizing their functionality, rendering them suitable for NK cell immunotherapy. The results presented here provide an optimal strategy to generate NK cells in vitro for immunotherapy that exhibit enhanced effector function when compared to alternate sources of HSC. PMID:24489840

Luevano, Martha; Domogala, Anna; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Derniame, Sophie; Escobedo-Cousin, Michelle; Querol, Sergio; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

2014-01-01

363

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Myeloid cell HIF-1 regulates asthma airway resistance  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Myeloid cell HIF-1 regulates asthma airway resistance and eosinophil function and macrophages. These studies examine the role of myeloid cell HIF-1 in regulating asthma induction of eosinophils, the myeloid cells most associated with asthma. Wild-type (WT) and my- eloid cell-specific HIF-1

Nizet, Victor

364

A modified busulfan and cyclophosphamide preparative regimen for allogeneic transplantation in myeloid malignancies.  

PubMed

Background Busulfan/cyclophosphamide (Bu/Cy) is commonly used as a standard conditioning regimen without total body irradiation for patients with hematological myeloid malignancies undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Objective To develop a new myeloablative conditioning regimen incorporating fludarabine (Flu) and cytarabine (Ara-c). Setting A tertiary blood disease hospital in Tianjin, China. Methods A Bu/Cy preparative regimen was used, modified by Flu 90 mg/m(2) and Ara-c 6 g/m(2) in 57 unselected patients (median age 37 years) with hematological myeloid malignancies. The patients were to receive allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Thirteen patients had high-risk leukemia, fifty patients had HLA matched sibling donors while seven patients had HLA mismatched sibling donors. Cy was given 50 mg/kg/day for 2 days while Bu was given 3.2 mg/kg/day intravenously for 3 days. Main outcome measure Post-transplant donor chimerism, relapse tendency and minimal residual disease. Results Extramedullar toxicity was relatively limited; the incidence of treatment-related mortality (TRM) within 100 days was 3.5 %. The incidence of grade II-IV, grade III-IV acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD of the evaluable patients were 21.1, 8.8 and 36.4 %, respectively. With a median follow up of 59 (13-96.5) months, TRM and relapse rate (RR) at eight years were 24.1 ± 5.8 and 14.7 ± 4.8 %, respectively. Disease free survival at eight years was 67.9 ± 6.2 % for the entire group, 60.0 ± 8.9 % for patients with AML, 77.3 ± 8.9 % for patients with CML, 70.0 ± 6.5 and 42.9 ± 18.7 % or matched sibling and mismatched sibling HSCT respectively. Conclusion The new regimen was associated with a low relapse rate, low incidence and severity of graft versus host disease and satisfactory survival for patients with myeloid malignancies. PMID:25432692

Cai, Xiaojin; Wei, Jialing; He, Yi; Yang, Dongling; Jiang, Erlie; Huang, Yong; Han, Mingzhe; Feng, Sizhou

2015-02-01

365

Myelopoiesis and Myeloid Leukaemogenesis in the Zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Over the past ten years, studies using the zebrafish model have contributed to our understanding of vertebrate haematopoiesis, myelopoiesis, and myeloid leukaemogenesis. Novel insights into the conservation of haematopoietic lineages and improvements in our capacity to identify, isolate, and culture such haematopoietic cells continue to enhance our ability to use this simple organism to address disease biology. Coupled with the strengths of the zebrafish embryo to dissect developmental myelopoiesis and the continually expanding repertoire of models of myeloid malignancies, this versatile organism has established its niche as a valuable tool to address key questions in the field of myelopoiesis and myeloid leukaemogenesis. In this paper, we address the recent advances and future directions in the field of myelopoiesis and leukaemogenesis using the zebrafish system. PMID:22851971

Forrester, A. Michael; Berman, Jason N.; Payne, Elspeth M.

2012-01-01

366

Hematopoietic cell differentiation from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells  

PubMed Central

Pluripotent stem cells, both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, are undifferentiated cells that can self-renew and potentially differentiate into all hematopoietic lineages, such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hematopoietic progenitor cells and mature hematopoietic cells in the presence of a suitable culture system. Establishment of pluripotent stem cells provides a comprehensive model to study early hematopoietic development and has emerged as a powerful research tool to explore regenerative medicine. Nowadays, HSC transplantation and hematopoietic cell transfusion have successfully cured some patients, especially in malignant hematological diseases. Owing to a shortage of donors and a limited number of the cells, hematopoietic cell induction from pluripotent stem cells has been regarded as an alternative source of HSCs and mature hematopoietic cells for intended therapeutic purposes. Pluripotent stem cells are therefore extensively utilized to facilitate better understanding in hematopoietic development by recapitulating embryonic development in vivo, in which efficient strategies can be easily designed and deployed for the generation of hematopoietic lineages in vitro. We hereby review the current progress of hematopoietic cell induction from embryonic stem/induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23796405

2013-01-01

367

Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-04-11

368

Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-03-10

369

Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-05-07

370

Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

2014-10-14

371

Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-04-25

372

CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2015-02-24

373

Daunorubicin Hydrochloride, Cytarabine and Oblimersen Sodium in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-06-04

374

Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-05-05

375

Fusion between Hematopoietic and Epithelial Cells in Adult Human Intestine  

PubMed Central

Following transplantation of hematopoietic lineage cells, genetic markers unique to the transplanted cells have been detected in non-hematopoietic recipient cells of human liver, vascular endothelium, intestinal epithelium and brain. The underlying mechanisms by which this occurs are unclear. Evidence from mice suggests it is due in part to fusion between cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origins; however, direct evidence for this in humans is scant. Here, by quantitative and statistical analysis of X- and Y-chromosome numbers in epithelial and non-epithelial intestinal cells from gender-mismatched hematopoietic cell transplant patients, we provide evidence that transplanted cells of the hematopoietic lineage incorporate into human intestinal epithelium through cell fusion. This is the first definitive identification of cell fusion between hematopoietic cells and any epithelial cell type in humans, and provides the basis for further understanding the physiological and potential pathological consequences of cell fusion in humans. PMID:23383228

Silk, Alain D.; Gast, Charles E.; Davies, Paige S.; Fakhari, Farnaz D.; Vanderbeek, Gretchen E.; Mori, Motomi; Wong, Melissa H.

2013-01-01

376

Putative intermediate precursor between hematogenic endothelial cells and blood cells in the developing embryo.  

PubMed

During embryogenesis, endothelial cells are a source of hematopoietic cells. Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin modulates adherens junctions between endothelial cells. How endothelial cells, integrated into the vascular bed via adherens junctions, give rise to free-floating hematopoietic cells has been examined. Contrary to our previous reports, in this report a cell type simultaneously expressing VE-cadherin and the hematopoietic marker CD45 was identified, without rigorous enzymatic dissociation of embryonic tissues. In spite of expressing several other endothelial markers such as endothelial cell nitrous oxide synthase (ECNOS) and MECA-32, this newly defined population failed to produce endothelial colonies when cultured on OP9 stroma, in direct contrast to enzymatically dissociated VE-cadherin+ cells. When isolated from 9.5 days post coitus (d.p.c.) embryos, VE-cadherin+ CD45+ cells generated erythroid, myeloid, but not B lymphoid, cells, also in contrast to VE-cadherin+ cells obtained by enzymatic dissociation. Runx1 null mutant embryos lacked this novel population. Collectively, these results introduce a novel VE-cadherin+ population within the developing embryo, which may represent an intermediate cell type in the transition of hemogenic endothelial cells into blood. PMID:12630947

Fraser, Stuart T; Ogawa, Minetaro; Yokomizo, Tomomasa; Ito, Yoshiaki; Nishikawa, Satomi; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi

2003-02-01

377

Renal Complications of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers curative potential in the treatment of both malignant and nonmalignant disorders of lymphohematopoiesis. Over the last two decades, advances in graft matching, expanded donor registries, better post-graft immunosuppression, and improved management of infectious com- plications have fueled dramatic growth in these transplants. Despite this progress, renal complications of HSCT remain a very important cause

Reza Abdi; Jessamyn Bagley; Joseph V. Bonventre; Barry M. Brenner; Charles B. Carpenter; Anil K. Chandraker; David M. Charytan; Kenneth B. Christopher; Gary C. Curhan; Bradley M. Denker; John P. Forman; Markus H. Frank; M. D. Won; Kook Han; Dirk M. Hentschel; Li-Li Hsiao; Stephen Hsu; Benjamin D. Humphreys; John J. Iacomini; Takaharu Ichimura; Julie Lin; M. P. H. Colm; C. Magee; M. P. H. Edgar; L. Milford; David B. Mount; Nader Najafian; Shona Pendse; Martin R. Pollack; Stephen T. Reeders; Mohamed H. Sayegh; Julian L. Seifter; Jagesh V. Shah; Alice M. Sheridan; Ajay K. Singh; Theodore I. Steinman; Eric N. Taylor; Kathryn Tinckam; John K. Tucker; Wolfgang C. Winkelmayer; D. Xueli Yuan; D. Kambiz Zandi-Nejad; Jing Zhou

378

Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Organs in Arthropods  

PubMed Central

Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells moving throughout the extracellular space and exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species. PMID:23319182

Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

2013-01-01

379

Acute renal failure in hematopoietic cell transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hematopoietic cell transplantation is a common procedure for the treatment of malignancies and some non-malignant hematologic disorders. In addition to other transplant-related organ toxicities, acute renal failure is a common complication following transplantation. This review discusses the incidence, timing, etiologies, risk factors, and prognosis of renal failure associated with three commonly used transplantation procedures – myeloablative autologous, myeloablative allogeneic, and

C R Parikh; S G Coca

2006-01-01

380

Acute myeloblastic leukemia (ANLL-M2) with t(8;21)(q22;q22) variant expressing lymphoid but not myeloid surface antigens with a high number of G-CSF receptors.  

PubMed

Leukemic cells from an 8-year-old girl with ANLL-M2 expressed precursor B-cell antigen CD19, but none of the myeloid antigens CD11b, CD13, CD14 and CD33. After culture, the cells expressed CD11b and CD13. The cells carried a high number of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors. In chromosome analysis, metaphase cells were obtained only in the case of culture with G-CSF. The karyotype was a variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22). Southern blot analysis revealed rearrangement of the AMLI gene located on chromosome 21. These observations may suggest that even without myeloid surface antigens and with precursor B-cell antigen, ANLL-M2 with t(8;21)(q22;q22) has apparent myeloid characteristics. PMID:8487587

Tsuchiya, H; ElSonbaty, S S; Nagano, K; Watanabe, M; Migita, M; Mitsubuchi, H; Kaneko, Y; Matsuda, I

1993-04-01

381

Genetically Modified CD34+ Hematopoietic Stem Cells Contribute to Turnover of Brain Perivascular Macrophages in Long-Term Repopulated Primates  

PubMed Central

Studies in rodents have shown that brain perivascular macrophages are derived from bone marrow precursors. Less is known about the origin and turnover of perivascular cells in the human central nervous system. We took advantage of non-human primates reconstituted with autologous CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that had been transduced with a lentiviral vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to study the ontogeny of brain macrophages of rhesus macaques. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry/fluorescence microscopy showed long-term reconstitution of monocytes/macrophages in the blood, lymphoid, and brain tissues 4 years post-transplant. In the brain, EGFP+ cells were detected in the choroid plexus, cerebellum, and cerebrum, where the percent engraftment between animals reflected the percentage of EGFP+ monocytes in the blood. Morphology and location of brain EGFP+ cells exclusively in the vicinity of blood vessels were consistent with perivascular macrophages. Up to 85% of brain EGFP+ cells expressed CD163, a marker of perivascular macrophages, and greater than 70% were CD68+ macrophages. These findings clearly demonstrate that a subpopulation of CD163+/CD68+ brain perivascular macrophages in rhesus macaques are renewed by CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell-derived precursors and exhibit a continuous long-lasting turnover. Because perivascular macrophages are significant targets of productive HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus infection in the brain, these observations point to hematopoietic stem cells as targets of both HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus infection and potential gene therapy. PMID:19349370

Soulas, Caroline; Donahue, Robert E.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.; Persons, Derek A.; Alvarez, Xavier; Williams, Kenneth C.

2009-01-01

382

Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies)  

MedlinePLUS

... immature white blood cell called myeloblasts (or myeloid blasts ). The myeloblasts, or leukemia cells, in AML are ... become mature white blood cells. These are called blasts. Over time, the granulocytes and blasts crowd out ...

383

Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-07-25

384

Ancient cytokines, the role of astakines as hematopoietic growth factors.  

PubMed

Hematopoiesis is the process by which hemocytes mature and subsequently enter the circulation. Vertebrate prokineticins (PKs) are known to take part in this process, as are the invertebrate prokineticin domain proteins, astakines. In Pacifastacus leniusculus, astakine 1 is essential for the release of new hemocytes into the open circulatory system of these animals. In addition to astakine 1, we have now cloned a homologue of astakine 1 with an insert of 13 amino acids, named as astakine 2. Both crustacean astakines lack the N-terminal AVIT motif, which is present in vertebrate PKs, and hence receptor binding differs from that of vertebrate PKs. We have found astakine-like sequences in 19 different invertebrate species, and the sequences show that some motifs are conserved among invertebrate groups. Previously we showed that astakine 1 is directly involved in hematopoiesis, and now we show that astakine 1 and astakine 2 have different roles in hemocyte lineage differentiation. Astakine 1 can stimulate proliferation of hematopoietic tissue (Hpt) cells (precursor of hemocytes) as well as specifically induce differentiation of Hpt cells along the semigranular cell lineage, whereas astakine 2 plays a role in granular cell differentiation. Moreover, we discuss the impact of the putative structures of different astakines in comparison with the vertebrate prokineticins. PMID:20592028

Lin, Xionghui; Novotny, Marian; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene

2010-09-10

385

Enforced activation of STAT5A facilitates the generation of embryonic stem-derived hematopoietic stem cells that contribute to hematopoiesis in vivo.  

PubMed

Little is known about the molecular mechanisms that direct the transition from primitive to definitive hematopoiesis. In this study, we cocultured murine embryonic stem (ES) cells on OP9 stroma to induce hematopoietic differentiation as a model to study factors involved in the generation of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Overexpression of the constitutively activated mutant signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5A(1*6) in ES cells facilitated the generation of cells that expressed the endothelial-hemangioblast marker Flk-1 within 5 days of coculture on OP9. The first CD41+/ CD45+/c-Kit+/(Flk-1)- hematopoietic cells arose in our culture conditions between days 5 and 7. Persistent activation of STAT5A greatly enhanced the generation of hematopoietic progenitors compared with controls, as determined by colony assays in methylcellulose. Moreover, whereas controls generated only a short transient wave of hematopoiesis lasting less than 3 weeks, expression of STAT5A(1*6) resulted in the generation of hematopoietic cobblestone area-forming cells (CAFCs) on OP9 that could be serially passaged onto new OP9, giving rise to second and third CAFCs that generated hematopoietic progenitors for > or = 5 weeks, indicating a role for STAT5A in HSC self-renewal in vitro. Several definitive hematopoietic genes were upregulated by STAT5A (1*6), as well as Runx1/AML1, vascular endothelial growth factor, oncostatin M receptor, HoxB4, Wnt5A, Delta-like-1, and Bmi-1. Furthermore, ES-derived hematopoietic cells expressing STAT5A(1*6) contributed to myeloid-lymphoid hematopoiesis in primary and secondary nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency recipients, although no donor-derived cells could be detected after 7 weeks in the secondary recipients. These data indicate that a persistent activation of STAT5A allows the generation of ES-derived HSCs that can, at least for an intermediate period, contribute to hematopoiesis in vivo. PMID:15579639

Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Wu, Kaida; Morrone, Giovanni; Moore, Malcolm A S

2004-01-01

386

Avalanche precursors R. Delannay,  

E-print Network

Avalanche precursors R. Delannay, Institut de Physique de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, CNRS UMR at the top of the tray after some avalanches. · 4 or 5 large avalanches then observed during the slow of small "avalanches" which are recorded by a camera.2mm diameter beads #12;N. Nérone et al. Physica A 283

Gruner, Daniel S.

387

Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2014-12-19

388

Mutation of All Runx (AML1/Core) Sites in the Enhancer of T-Lymphomagenic SL3-3 Murine Leukemia Virus Unmasks a Significant Potential for Myeloid Leukemia Induction and Favors Enhancer Evolution toward Induction of Other Disease Patterns  

PubMed Central

SL3-3 murine leukemia virus is a potent inducer of T-lymphomas in mice. Using inbred NMRI mice, it was previously reported that a mutant of SL3-3 with all enhancer Runx (AML1/core) sites disrupted by 3-bp mutations (SL3-3dm) induces predominantly non-T-cell tumors with severely extended latency (S. Ethelberg, J. Lovmand, J. Schmidt, A. Luz, and F. S. Pedersen, J. Virol. 71:7273-7280, 1997). By use of three-color flow cytometry and molecular and histopathological analyses, we have now performed a detailed phenotypic characterization of SL3-3- and SL3-3dm-induced tumors in this mouse strain. All wild-type induced tumors had clonal T-cell receptor ? rearrangements, and the vast majority were CD3+ CD4+ CD8? T-lymphomas. Such a consistent phenotypic pattern is unusual for murine leukemia virus-induced T-lymphomas. The mutant virus induced malignancies of four distinct hematopoietic lineages: myeloid, T lymphoid, B lymphoid, and erythroid. The most common disease was myeloid leukemia with maturation. Thus, mutation of all Runx motifs in the enhancer of SL3-3 severely impedes viral T-lymphomagenicity and thereby discloses a considerable and formerly unappreciated potential of this virus for myeloid leukemia induction. Proviral enhancers with complex structural alterations (deletions, insertions, and/or duplications) were found in most SL3-3dm-induced T-lymphoid tumors and immature myeloid leukemias but not in any cases of myeloid leukemia with maturation, mature B-lymphoma, or erythroleukemia. Altogether, our results indicate that the SL3-3dm enhancer in itself promotes induction of myeloid leukemia with maturation but that structural changes may arise in vivo and redirect viral disease specificity to induction of T-lymphoid or immature myeloid leukemias, which typically develop with moderately shorter latencies. PMID:15542674

Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kunder, Sandra; Schmidt, Jörg; Pedersen, Finn Skou

2004-01-01

389

Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

2013-09-27

390

Activation of the unfolded protein response in human acute myeloid leukemia.  

PubMed

There is accumulating evidence for the involvement of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the pathogenesis of many tumor types in humans. This is particularly the case in rapidly growing solid tumors in which the demand for oxygen and nutrients can exceed the supply until new tumor-initiated blood vessels are formed. In contrast, the role of the UPR during leukemogenesis remains largely unknown. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by the accumulation of somatic mutations in hematopoietic progenitor cells that alter the physiological regulation of self-renewal, survival, proliferation, or differentiation. The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA) gene is a key myeloid transcription factor and a frequent target for disruption in AML. In particular, translation of CEBPA mRNA can be specifically blocked by binding of the chaperone calreticulin (CALR), a well-established effector of the UPR, to a stem loop structure within the 5' region of the CEBPA mRNA. The relevance of this mechanism was first elucidated in certain AML subtypes carrying the gene rearrangements t(3;21) or inv(16). In our recent work, we could demonstrate the induction of key effectors of the UPR in leukemic cells of AML patients comprising all subtypes (according to the French-American-British (FAB) classification for human AML). The formation of the spliced variant of the X-box binding protein (XBP1s) was detectable in 17.4% (17 of 105) of AML patients. Consistent with an activated UPR, this group had significantly increased expression of the UPR target genes CALR, the 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), and the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP). Consistently, in vitro studies confirmed that calreticulin expression was upregulated via activation of the ATF6 pathway in myeloid leukemic cells. As a consequence, CEBPA protein expression was inhibited in vitro as well as in leukemic cells from patients with activated UPR. We therefore propose a model of the UPR being involved in leukemogenesis through induction of calreticulin along the ATF6 pathway, thereby ultimately suppressing CEBPA translation and contributing to the block in myeloid differentiation and cell-cycle deregulation which represent key features of the leukemic phenotype. From a more clinical point of view, the presence of activated UPR in AML patient samples was found to be associated with a favorable disease course. PMID:21266233

Schardt, Julian A; Mueller, Beatrice U; Pabst, Thomas

2011-01-01

391

Distinct Roles for Hematopoietic and Extra-Hematopoietic Sphingosine Kinase-1 in Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

PubMed Central

Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1), one of two SK enzymes, is highly regulated and has been shown to act as a focal point for the action of many growth factors and cytokines. SK1 leads to generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and potentially the activation of S1P receptors to mediate biologic effects. Our previous studies implicated SK1/S1P in the regulation of inflammatory processes, specifically in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These studies were conducted using a total body knockout mouse for SK1 and were unable to determine the source of SK1/S1P (hematopoietic or extra-hematopoietic) involved in the inflammatory responses. Therefore, bone marrow transplants were performed with wild-type (WT) and SK1-/- mice and colitis induced with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Irrespective of the source of SK1/S1P, bone marrow or tissue, DSS induced colitis in all mice; however, mice lacking SK1 in both hematopoietic and extra-hematopoietic compartments exhibited decreased crypt damage. Systemic inflammation was assessed, and mice with WT bone marrow demonstrated significant neutrophilia in response to DSS. In the local inflammatory response, mice lacking SK1/S1P in either bone marrow or tissue exhibited decreased induction of cytokines and less activation of STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3). Interestingly, we determined that extra-hematopoietic SK1 is necessary for the induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in colon epithelium in response to DSS-induced colitis. Taken together our data suggest that hematopoietic-derived SK1/S1P regulates specific aspects of the systemic inflammatory response, while extra-hematopoietic SK1 in the colon epithelium is necessary for the autocrine induction of COX2 in DSS-induced colitis. PMID:25460165

Snider, Ashley J.; Ali, Wahida H.; Sticca, Jonathan A.; Coant, Nicolas; Ghaleb, Amr M.; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Yang, Vincent W.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Obeid, Lina M.

2014-01-01

392

Modification of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells with CD19-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptors as a Novel Approach for Cancer Immunotherapy  

PubMed Central

Abstract Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) against CD19 have been shown to direct T-cells to specifically target B-lineage malignant cells in animal models and clinical trials, with efficient tumor cell lysis. However, in some cases, there has been insufficient persistence of effector cells, limiting clinical efficacy. We propose gene transfer to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) as a novel approach to deliver the CD19-specific CAR, with potential for ensuring persistent production of effector cells of multiple lineages targeting B-lineage malignant cells. Assessments were performed using in vitro myeloid or natural killer (NK) cell differentiation of human HSPCs transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying first and second generations of CD19-specific CAR. Gene transfer did not impair hematopoietic differentiation and cell proliferation when transduced at 1–2 copies/cell. CAR-bearing myeloid and NK cells specifically lysed CD19-positive cells, with second-generation CAR including CD28 domains being more efficient in NK cells. Our results provide evidence for the feasibility and efficacy of the modification of HSPC with CAR as a strategy for generating multiple lineages of effector cells for immunotherapy against B-lineage malignancies to augment graft-versus-leukemia activity. PMID:23978226

Ryan, Christine; Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Tremcinska, Irena; Katebian, Behrod; Wherley, Jennifer; Sahaghian, Arineh; Tu, Andy; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Hollis, Roger P.; Kohn, Donald B.

2013-01-01

393

The transcription factor PlagL2 activates Mpl transcription and signaling in hematopoietic progenitor and leukemia cells.  

PubMed

Cytokine signaling pathways are frequent targets of oncogenic mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), promoting proliferation and survival. We have previously shown that the transcription factor PLAGL2 promotes proliferation and cooperates with the leukemia fusion protein Cbf?-SMMHC in AML development. Here, we show that PLAGL2 upregulates expression of the thrombopoietin receptor Mpl, using two consensus sites in its proximal promoter. We also show that Mpl overexpression efficiently cooperates with Cbf?-SMMHC in development of leukemia in mice. Finally, we demonstrate that PlagL2-expressing leukemic cells show hyper-activation of Jak2 and downstream STAT5, Akt and Erk1/2 pathways in response to Thpo ligand. These results show that PlagL2 expression activates expression of Mpl in hematopoietic progenitors, and that upregulation of wild-type Mpl provides an oncogenic signal in cooperation with CBF?-SMMHC in mice. PMID:21263445

Landrette, S F; Madera, D; He, F; Castilla, L H

2011-04-01

394

DNMT3A Arg882 mutation drives chronic myelomonocytic leukemia through disturbing gene expression/DNA methylation in hematopoietic cells  

PubMed Central

The gene encoding DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is mutated in ?20% of acute myeloid leukemia cases, with Arg882 (R882) as the hotspot. Here, we addressed the transformation ability of the DNMT3A-Arg882His (R882H) mutant by using a retroviral transduction and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) approach and found that the mutant gene can induce aberrant proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. At 12 mo post-BMT, all mice developed chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with thrombocytosis. RNA microarray analysis revealed abnormal expressions of some hematopoiesis-related genes, and the DNA methylation assay identified corresponding changes in methylation patterns in gene body regions. Moreover, DNMT3A-R882H increased the CDK1 protein level and enhanced cell-cycle activity, thereby contributing to leukemogenesis. PMID:24497509

Xu, Jie; Wang, Yue-Ying; Dai, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Wu; Zhang, Wei-Na; Xiong, Shu-Min; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Kan-Kan; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

2014-01-01

395

Disseminated Rhizopus microsporus infection cured by salvage allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, antifungal combination therapy, and surgical resection.  

PubMed

Invasive Zygomycetes infection complicating prolonged neutropenia is associated with high mortality in the absence of immune recovery. We report a patient who developed disseminated zygomycosis due to Rhizopus microsporus during induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Rescue allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) was performed as her only chance of cure of this infection and to treat refractory leukemia. Posaconazole combined with liposomal amphotericin B contained the zygomycosis during prolonged neutropenia due to allo-HSCT followed by intense immunosuppression for grade IV acute graft-versus-host disease. Surgical removal of all infected sites after immune recovery, with prolonged posaconazole treatment, ultimately cured the infection. New combination antifungal therapies might sufficiently control disseminated zygomycosis to allow allo-HSCT to be performed, assuring life-saving immune recovery. Surgery appears to be necessary for definite cure of these infections. PMID:20163567

Lebeau, O; Van Delden, C; Garbino, J; Robert, J; Lamoth, F; Passweg, J; Chalandon, Y

2010-06-01

396

Peripheral blood lymphocyte and monocyte recovery and survival in acute leukemia postmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.  

PubMed

Many previous studies of immune reconstitution (IR) postallogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have focused on lymphocyte recovery. Recognizing that IR involves complex interactions between innate and adaptive immune networks, we hypothesized that patterns of both monocyte and lymphocyte recovery could provide additional prognostic information. To test our hypothesis, we analyzed data from 135 consecutive patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic HSCT for acute myeloid (AML) and lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from 2001 to 2010. The absolute lymphocyte and monocyte counts (ALC and AMC, respectively) were determined longitudinally at days +15, +30, +60, and +100, and correlated with clinical outcomes. At the day +30 time point, both ALC and AMC >0.3 × 10(9) cells/L were strongly associated with improved survival (overall survival [OS] 29.6 months versus 5.4 months, P = .006 and 25.3 months versus 5.1 months, P = .01 respectively), a pattern that generally continued through the day +100 evaluation. Multivariate analysis revealed the following independent prognostic factors: early disease status at transplantation, the development of chronic GVHD, the day +30 AMC, day +100 AMC, and day +100 ALC.