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Sample records for hematopoietic myeloid precursors

  1. Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Gemelli, Claudia; Pirondi, Sara; Testa, Anna; Montanari, Monica; Parenti, Sandra; Tenedini, Elena; Grande, Alexis; Ferrari, Sergio . E-mail: sergio@unimo.it

    2006-12-10

    The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage.

  2. Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells Precedes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    E-print Network

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells Precedes Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Max myeloid leukemia (AML). Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations present in individual AML patients-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscriptNIH-PAAuthorManuscript #12;INTRODUCTION Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy of hematopoietic progenitor

  3. TREM2-Transduced Myeloid Precursors Mediate Nervous Tissue Debris Clearance and Facilitate Recovery in an Animal Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Prinz, Marco; Stagi, Massimiliano; Chechneva, Olga; Neumann, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Background In multiple sclerosis, inflammation can successfully be prevented, while promoting repair is still a major challenge. Microglial cells, the resident phagocytes of the central nervous system (CNS), are hematopoietic-derived myeloid cells and express the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), an innate immune receptor. Myeloid cells are an accessible source for ex vivo gene therapy. We investigated whether myeloid precursor cells genetically modified to express TREM2 affect the disease course of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. Methods and Findings EAE was induced in mice by immunization with a myelin autoantigen. Intravenous application of TREM2-transduced bone marrow–derived myeloid precursor cells at the EAE peak led to an amelioration of clinical symptoms, reduction in axonal damage, and prevention of further demyelination. TREM2-transduced myeloid cells applied intravenously migrated into the inflammatory spinal cord lesions of EAE-diseased mice, showed increased lysosomal and phagocytic activity, cleared degenerated myelin, and created an anti-inflammatory cytokine milieu within the CNS. Conclusions Intravenously applied bone marrow–derived and TREM2-tranduced myeloid precursor cells limit tissue destruction and facilitate repair within the murine CNS by clearance of cellular debris during EAE. TREM2 is a new attractive target for promotion of repair and resolution of inflammation in multiple sclerosis and other neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:17425404

  4. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  5. Systematic analysis of hematopoietic gene expression profiles for prognostic prediction in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Varn, Frederick S; Andrews, Erik H; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder initiated by the leukemogenic transformation of myeloid cells into leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Preexisting gene expression programs in LSCs can be used to assess their transcriptional similarity to hematopoietic cell types. While this relationship has previously been examined on a small scale, an analysis that systematically investigates this relationship throughout the hematopoietic hierarchy has yet to be implemented. We developed an integrative approach to assess the similarity between AML patient tumor profiles and a collection of 232 murine hematopoietic gene expression profiles compiled by the Immunological Genome Project. The resulting lineage similarity scores (LSS) were correlated with patient survival to assess the relationship between hematopoietic similarity and patient prognosis. This analysis demonstrated that patient tumor similarity to immature hematopoietic cell types correlated with poor survival. As a proof of concept, we highlighted one cell type identified by our analysis, the short-term reconstituting stem cell, whose LSSs were significantly correlated with patient prognosis across multiple datasets, and showed distinct patterns in patients stratified by traditional clinical variables. Finally, we validated our use of murine profiles by demonstrating similar results when applying our method to human profiles. PMID:26598031

  6. Systematic analysis of hematopoietic gene expression profiles for prognostic prediction in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder initiated by the leukemogenic transformation of myeloid cells into leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Preexisting gene expression programs in LSCs can be used to assess their transcriptional similarity to hematopoietic cell types. While this relationship has previously been examined on a small scale, an analysis that systematically investigates this relationship throughout the hematopoietic hierarchy has yet to be implemented. We developed an integrative approach to assess the similarity between AML patient tumor profiles and a collection of 232 murine hematopoietic gene expression profiles compiled by the Immunological Genome Project. The resulting lineage similarity scores (LSS) were correlated with patient survival to assess the relationship between hematopoietic similarity and patient prognosis. This analysis demonstrated that patient tumor similarity to immature hematopoietic cell types correlated with poor survival. As a proof of concept, we highlighted one cell type identified by our analysis, the short-term reconstituting stem cell, whose LSSs were significantly correlated with patient prognosis across multiple datasets, and showed distinct patterns in patients stratified by traditional clinical variables. Finally, we validated our use of murine profiles by demonstrating similar results when applying our method to human profiles. PMID:26598031

  7. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented. PMID:26455528

  8. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  9. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. VEGF signaling on hematopoietic precursors restricts B-lymphoid commitment in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Rita; Igreja, Cátia; Clode, Nuno; Henriques, Alexandra; Appleton, Cláudia; Zhu, Zhenping; Wu, Yan; Dias, Sérgio

    2008-10-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signals on vascular and hematopoietic cells via its receptors, VEGFR-2 (KDR) and VEGFR-1 (FLT-1). Elevated levels of VEGF, such as during tumor growth or inflammation, have been suggested to suppress hematopoiesis; most studies refer to KDR as the main receptor involved in this inhibitory effect. In the present study, having detected expression of FLT-1 in B-lymphoid precursors, we exploited the possibility that VEGF signaling via FLT-1 might affect early B-cell commitment. Using a well-established in vitro B-cell differentiation assay, we demonstrate that FLT-1 blockade promotes B-cell commitment and subsequent differentiation, while KDR blockade has no effect on B-cell commitment. In agreement, in vivo transplantation of human (CD34+) or murine (Sca1+l/Lin-) FLT-1-negative hematopoietic precursors into irradiated severe combined immune-deficient mice restored the bone marrow lymphoid compartment, while transplanting the FLT-1-positive counterpart failed to repopulate the lymphoid compartment, and unexpectedly resulted in early death of the irradiated recipients due to hematopoietic suppression. Taken together, we suggest that VEGF signaling via FLT-1 on hematopoietic precursors may restrict lymphopoiesis. PMID:18620797

  11. Therapy-related myeloid neoplasms after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in lymphoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Akhtari, Mojtaba; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Tandra, Pavan Kumar; Krishnamurthy, Jairam; Horstman, Heidi; Dreessen, Amy; Chen, Pei Xian; Armitage, James O

    2013-01-01

    Lymphoma patients treated with autologous transplantation (ASCT) live an increasingly long life with the recent advancement in therapeutic modalities. This has resulted in an increase in the incidence of therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN), which is one of the leading causes of non-relapse mortality. Several observational studies have linked the development of t-MN after ASCT with the intensity and frequency of chemotherapy, particularly alkylating agents, use of total body irradiation (TBI), and peripheral blood progenitor cells. In addition, role of genetic factors is increasingly being identified. It is postulated that the use of chemotherapy prior to ASCT results in DNA damage of progenitor cells, mitochondrial dysfunction, and altered gene expression related to DNA repair, metabolism as well as hematopoietic regulation. Cytogenetic studies have shown the presence of abnormalities in the peripheral blood progenitor cells prior to ASCT. It is, therefore, likely that the reinfusion of peripheral blood progenitor cells, proliferative stress on infused progenitor cells during hematopoietic regeneration and associated telomere shortening ultimately result in clonal hematopoiesis and blastic transformation. Cytopenias, myelodysplasia, or cytogenetic abnormalities are common and can be transient after ASCT; therefore, only when present together, they do confirm the diagnosis of t-MN. Attempts to reduce the occurrence of t-MN should be directed toward minimizing the exposure to the identified risk factors. Although the median survival is few months to less than a year, studies have shown the promising role of allogeneic transplantation in select young t-MN patients without high-risk cytogenetics. In this review we will explain the recent findings in the field of t-MN in lymphoma patients that have implications for identifying the molecular and genetic mechanisms of leukemogenesis and discuss potential strategies to reduce the risk of t-MN in this patient population. PMID:24025414

  12. PRIMITIVE ADULT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS CAN FUNCTION AS OSTEOBLAST PRECURSORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoblasts are continually recruited from stem cell pools to maintain bone. Although their immediate precursor is a plastic-adherent mesenchymal stem cell able to generate tissues other than bone, increasing evidence suggests the existence of a more primitive cell that can differentiate to both hem...

  13. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  14. The human embryo, but not its yolk sac, generates lympho-myeloid stem cells: mapping multipotent hematopoietic cell fate in intraembryonic mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Tavian, M; Robin, C; Coulombel, L; Péault, B

    2001-09-01

    We have traced emerging hematopoietic cells along human early ontogeny by culturing embryonic tissue rudiments in the presence of stromal cells that promote myeloid and B cell differentiation, and by assaying T cell potential in the NOD-SCID mouse thymus. Hematogenous potential was present inside the embryo as early as day 19 of development in the absence of detectable CD34+ hematopoietic cells, and spanned both lymphoid and myeloid lineages from day 24 in the splanchnopleural mesoderm and derived aorta where CD34+ progenitors appear at day 27. By contrast, hematopoietic cells arising in the third week yolk sac, as well as their progeny at later stages, were restricted to myelopoiesis and therefore are unlikely to contribute to definitive hematopoiesis in man. PMID:11567638

  15. Decitabine maintains hematopoietic precursor self-renewal by preventing repression of stem cell genes by a differentiation inducing stimulus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenbo; Negrotto, Soledad; Gu, Xiaorong; Mahfouz, Reda; Ng, Kwok Peng; Ebrahem, Quteba; Copelan, Edward; Singh, Harinder; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2010-01-01

    The cytosine analogue decitabine alters hematopoietic differentiation. For example, decitabine treatment increases self-renewal of normal hematopoietic stem cells. The mechanisms underlying decitabine induced shifts in differentiation are poorly understood, but likely relate to the ability of decitabine to deplete the chromatin-modifying enzyme DNA methyl-transferase 1 (DNMT1) that plays a central role in transcription repression. HOXB4 is a transcription factor that promotes hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal. In hematopoietic precursors induced to differentiate by the lineage-specifying transcription factor Pu.1, or by the cytokine granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), there is rapid repression of HOXB4 and other stem cell genes. Depletion of DNMT1 using shRNA or decitabine prevents HOXB4 repression by Pu.1 or G-CSF, and maintains hematopoietic precursor self-renewal. In contrast, depletion of DNMT1 by decitabine six hours after the differentiation stimulus, that is, after repression of HOXB4 has occurred, augments differentiation. Therefore, DNMT1 is required for the early repression of stem cell genes that occurs in response to a differentiation stimulus, providing a mechanistic explanation for the observation that decitabine can maintain or increase hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal in the presence of a differentiation stimulus. Using decitabine to deplete DNMT1 after this early repression phase does not impair progressive differentiation. PMID:20501800

  16. Retrovirus-Mediated Expression of E2A-PBX1 Blocks Lymphoid Fate but Permits Retention of Myeloid Potential in Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Woodcroft, Mark W.; Nanan, Kyster; Thompson, Patrick; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Smith, Steven P.; Slany, Robert K.; LeBrun, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor E2A-PBX1 is expressed consequent to chromosomal translocation 1;19 and is an important oncogenic driver in cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Elucidating the mechanism by which E2A-PBX1 induces lymphoid leukemia would be expedited by the availability of a tractable experimental model in which enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces pre-B-cell ALL. However, hematopoietic reconstitution of irradiated mice with bone marrow infected with E2A-PBX1-expressing retroviruses consistently gives rise to myeloid, not lymphoid, leukemia. Here, we elucidate the hematopoietic consequences of forced E2A-PBX1 expression in primary murine hematopoietic progenitors. We show that introducing E2A-PBX1 into multipotent progenitors permits the retention of myeloid potential but imposes a dense barrier to lymphoid development prior to the common lymphoid progenitor stage, thus helping to explain the eventual development of myeloid, and not lymphoid, leukemia in transplanted mice. Our findings also indicate that E2A-PBX1 enforces the aberrant, persistent expression of some genes that would normally have been down-regulated in the subsequent course of hematopoietic maturation. We show that enforced expression of one such gene, Hoxa9, a proto-oncogene associated with myeloid leukemia, partially reproduces the phenotype produced by E2A-PBX1 itself. Existing evidence suggests that the 1;19 translocation event takes place in committed B-lymphoid progenitors. However, we find that retrovirus-enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in committed pro-B-cells results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that the neoplastic phenotype induced by E2A-PBX1 is determined by the developmental stage of the cell into which the oncoprotein is introduced. PMID:26098938

  17. Stem cell biology is population biology: differentiation of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors to common lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) system is a demand control system, with the demand coming from the organism, since the products of the common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor (CMP, CLP respectively) cells are essential for activity and defense against disease. We show how ideas from population biology (combining population dynamics and evolutionary considerations) can illuminate the feedback control of the HSC system by the fully differentiated products, which has recently been verified experimentally. We develop models for the penultimate differentiation of HSC Multipotent Progenitors (MPPs) into CLP and CMP and introduce two concepts from population biology into stem cell biology. The first concept is the Multipotent Progenitor Commitment Response (MPCR) which is the probability that a multipotent progenitor cell follows a CLP route rather than a CMP route. The second concept is the link between the MPCR and a measure of Darwinian fitness associated with organismal performance and the levels of differentiated lymphoid and myeloid cells. We show that many MPCRs are consistent with homeostasis, but that they will lead to different dynamics of cells and signals following a wound or injury and thus have different consequences for Darwinian fitness. We show how coupling considerations of life history to dynamics of the HSC system and its products allows one to compute the selective pressures on cellular processes. We discuss ways that this framework can be used and extended. PMID:23327512

  18. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis Arises from Progenitors FRANZISKA MICHOR

    E-print Network

    Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Blast Crisis Arises from Progenitors FRANZISKA MICHOR Society of Fellows, USA Key Words. Chronic myeloid leukemia · Hematopoietic stem cells · Hematopoietic progenitor cells · Differentiation ABSTRACT Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progresses through three distinct clinical stages: chronic

  19. Unresponsiveness of primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells to macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha, an inhibitor of primitive normal hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eaves, C J; Cashman, J D; Wolpe, S D; Eaves, A C

    1993-01-01

    Most primitive hematopoietic cells appear to be normally quiescent in vivo, whereas their leukemic counterparts in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) are maintained in a state of rapid turnover. This difference is also seen in the long-term culture system, where control of primitive hematopoietic progenitor proliferation is mediated by interactions of these cells with marrow-derived mesenchymal cells of the fibroblast lineage. We now show that exogenous addition of macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha) to normal long-term cultures can reversibly and specifically block the activation of "primitive" (high proliferative potential), but not "mature" (lower proliferative potential), progenitors in the adherent layer of these cultures. Moreover, addition of MIP-1 beta after primitive-progenitor activation can prevent the subsequent return of these cells to a quiescent state a few days later as shown previously in similar experiments using antibodies to transforming growth factor beta. This suggests that the level of MIP-1 alpha (or a related MIP-1 alpha agonist) produced in LTCs, like the level of transforming growth factor beta, may be necessary, but is not on its own sufficient, to mediate the inhibitory activity of the regulatory cells in the adherent layer. Addition of MIP-1 alpha to similar long-term cultures containing normal marrow adherent layers but supporting exclusively neoplastic (CML) hematopoiesis did not block the cycling of primitive neoplastic progenitors. A defect in the responsiveness of CML cells to MIP-1 alpha (or a similarly acting chemokine) would explain their deregulated proliferative behavior in this model and, by extrapolation to the in vivo setting, suggests a molecular mechanism whereby the leukemic clone may become amplified at the stem-cell level. In addition, these findings suggest approaches to the therapy of CML, using inhibitors such as MIP-1 alpha for the protection of primitive normal cells. PMID:8265663

  20. Molecular biological characteristics of the recruitment of hematopoietic stem cells from bone marrow niche in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Biao; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Jiao; Li, Chenglong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) can be contextualized as a disease of unregulated self-renewal of stem cells which exist in a quiescent state and are instructed to differentiate and mobilize to circulation under pathologic circumstances leading to tumor invasion and metastasis. Here we found that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), induced by TGF-?1, upregulated s-KitL and s-ICAM-1, permitting the transfer of c-kit+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from the quiescent to proliferative niche in CML. Further study showed that this MMP-9 production was raised by CML specific BCR/ABL+ oncogene mediated TGF-?1. Besides, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/nuclear factor (NF)-?B signaling pathway was evidenced to govern this stem cell recruitment in CML pathogenesis. Overall, our observations defined a novel critical role for TGF-?1 induced PI3K/Akt/NF-?B signaling pathway in the recruitment of the malignant cells in CML by releasing s-KitL and s-ICAM-1 and this was through a distinct PI3K/Akt/NF-?B signaling pathway. PMID:26722450

  1. Reduced-intensity conditioning for unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation as treatment for myeloid malignancies in patients older than 55 years.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond; Giralt, Sergio A; Martin, Thomas; Couriel, Daniel R; Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios; Hosing, Chitra; Andersson, Borje S; Cano, Pedro; Shahjahan, Munir; Ippoliti, Cindy; Estey, Elihu H; McMannis, John; Gajewski, James L; Champlin, Richard E; de Lima, Marcos

    2003-10-15

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from unrelated donors is an effective treatment for myeloid malignancies, but its use is usually restricted to young patients without comorbidities. The development of reduced-intensity preparative regimens has allowed the extension of this form of treatment to older and medically infirm patients. We assessed the outcomes of patients older than 54 years who received unrelated donor transplants for the treatment of myeloid malignancies in our institution. There were 29 patients (median age, 59 years) with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (n = 13), myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 7), and chronic myeloid leukemia (n = 9) included. With a median follow-up of 27 months, the probability of overall and event-free survival, and nonrelapse mortality at one year were 44%, 37%, and 55%, respectively. Grades II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurred in 41% of patients and chronic GVHD developed in 63% of patients surviving more than 100 days. Of the 11 survivors, 9 were interviewed and reported good quality of life after transplantation using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale (FACT-BMT) questionnaire, with high scores in all dimensions. Unrelated donor transplantation is a treatment option for older patients with myeloid malignancies. The results in this cohort of patients are comparable with those reported in younger patients with similarly advanced disease. PMID:12842990

  2. Research on the clinical effect and in vitro study of HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell infusion for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Juan

    2015-12-01

    Purpose The treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains an important clinical problem. Recently, hematopoietic stem cell therapy provides promising outcomes. In this study we examined the clinical effect of HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell infusion combined with chemotherapy as a postremission therapy to improve the survival and reduce the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Method Thirty patients who achieved complete remission were divided into two groups and received different therapeutic regimes. Patients in combined therapy group received stem cell infusion with the chemotherapy. The patients' clinical indexes were monitored in both groups to evaluate therapy responses. Furthermore, the collected cells used in the therapy were also tested for their tumoricidal activity toward U937 cell lines. Results The combined therapy exhibited an improved effect than conventional chemotherapy. There were no delays in hematopoietic recovery and GVHD after the intense treatment. This method prolonged the 2.5-year disease-free survival as well as overall survival, and increased the therapeutic effect for patients in good/intermediate prognosis. Moreover, the donor microchimerism was detected in four female patients who had male donors. The experimental study revealed that HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell could induce U937 cells death and the tumoricidal activity enhanced proportionally with the increase in effector-target ratio. Conclusion HLA-mismatched hematopoietic stem cell infusion combined with chemotherapy improved the clinical outcomes and prevented severe GVHD. This comprehensive treatment can be used as a potential postremission therapy for AML. PMID:26067370

  3. Response of newly established mouse myeloid leukemic cell lines to MC3T3-G2/PA6 preadipocytes and hematopoietic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, H.; Iizuka, M.; Tomiyama, T.; Yoshida, K.; Seki, M.; Suda, T.; Nishikawa, S. )

    1991-01-01

    Some mouse myeloid leukemias induced by X-irradiation and serially transplanted into syngenic mice do not proliferate in vitro even in the presence of hematopoietic factors. To examine whether such leukemic cells can proliferate in response to stromal cells, we cocultured them with MC3T3-G2/PA6 (PA6) preadipocytes, cells that can support the growth of hematopoietic stem cells. All leukemias developed into in vitro cell lines, showing a dependence on contact with the PA6 cells. Two cell lines responded to none of the known hematopoietic factors including interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, GM-CSF, G-CSF, M-CSF, and Epo. These results demonstrate that the mechanism of the action of PA6 cells is different from that of any of the known hematopoietic factors, and that, because these two leukemic cell lines retained the ability to grow in vivo, responsiveness to the known hematopoietic factors is not essential for the leukemic cell growth in vivo. Furthermore, all leukemic cell lines could respond also to the preadipocytes fixed with formalin, paraformaldehyde, or glutaraldehyde, suggesting that some molecule(s) associated with the surface of PA6 cells or with extracellular matrix secreted by the preadipocytes is responsible for the leukemic cell growth.

  4. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 regulates RANK gene expression in myeloid progenitors

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Oh Hyung; Lee, Chong-Kil; Lee, Young Ik; Paik, Sang-Gi; Lee, Hyun-Jun . E-mail: hjlee7@kribb.re.kr

    2005-09-23

    Osteoclasts are bone resorbing cells of hematopoietic origin. The hematopoietic transcription factor PU.1 is critical for osteoclastogenesis; however, the molecular mechanisms of PU.1-regulated osteoclastogenesis have not been explored. Here, we present evidence that the receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B (RANK) gene that has been shown to be crucial for osteoclastogenesis is a transcriptional target of PU.1. The PU.1 {sup -/-} progenitor cells failed to express the RANK gene and reconstitution of PU.1 in these cells induced RANK expression. Treatment of the PU.1 reconstituted cells with M-CSF and RANKL further augmented the RANK gene expression. To explore the regulatory mechanism of the RANK gene expression by PU.1, we have cloned the human RANK promoter. Transient transfection assays have revealed that the 2.2-kb RANK promoter was functional in a monocyte line RAW264.7, whereas co-transfection of PU.1 transactivated the RANK promoter in HeLa cells. Taken together, these results suggest that PU.1 regulates the RANK gene transcription and this may represent one of the key roles of PU.1 in osteoclast differentiation.

  5. Mixed T Lymphocyte Chimerism after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Transplantation Is Predictive for Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hans C; Saliba, Rima M; Rondon, Gabriela; Chen, Julianne; Charafeddine, Yasmeen; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Alatrash, Gheath; Andersson, Borje S; Popat, Uday; Kebriaei, Partow; Ciurea, Stefan; Oran, Betul; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Chimerism testing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represents a promising tool for predicting disease relapse, although its precise role in this setting remains unclear. We investigated the predictive value of T lymphocyte chimerism analysis at 90 to 120 days after allo-HSCT in 378 patients with AML/MDS who underwent busulfan/fludarabine-based myeloablative preparative regimens. Of 265 (70%) patients with available T lymphocyte chimerism data, 43% of patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2) at the time of transplantation had complete (100%) donor T lymphocytes at day +90 to +120 compared with 60% of patients in the non-CR1/CR2 cohort (P = .005). In CR1/CR2 patients, donor T lymphocyte chimerism ? 85% at day +90 to +120 was associated with a higher frequency of 3-year disease progression (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 18% to 46% versus 15%; 95% CI, 9% to 23%; hazard ratio [HR], 2.1; P = .04). However, in the more advanced, non-CR1/CR2 cohort, mixed T lymphocyte chimerism was not associated with relapse (37%; 95% CI, 20% to 66% versus 34%; 95% CI, 25% to 47%; HR, 1.3; P = .60). These findings demonstrate that early T lymphocyte chimerism testing at day +90 to +120 is a useful approach for predicting AML/MDS disease recurrence in patients in CR1/CR2 at the time of transplantation. PMID:26183077

  6. Assessment of PET/CT in multifocal myeloid sarcomas with loss of TET2: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yu; Tao, Yongguang; Fu, Chunyan; Jia, Jiantao; Liu, Shuang; Xiao, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare solid tumor consisting of leukemic myeloblasts and/or myeloid precursors occurring outside the blood or bone marrow. The unique site with myeloid sarcoma has been reported, the multiple sites of myeloid sarcoma have rarely been cited in the medical literature. Here we report that the unusual clinical presentation and management of myeloid sarcoma in multiple sites with PET-CT, highlighting the utility of PET-CT was useful in detecting and monitoring myeloid sarcoma. We also found that loss of TET2 and gain of 5 hmC in the case of myeloid sarcoma, indicating the mechanism for myeloid sarcoma is totally different with other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:26722587

  7. Transforming growth factor beta 1 selectively regulates early murine hematopoietic progenitors and inhibits the growth of IL-3-dependent myeloid leukemia cell lines

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) has been shown to be associated with active centers of hematopoiesis and lymphopoiesis in the developing fetus. Therefore, the effects of TGF-beta 1 on mouse hematopoiesis were studied. TGF-beta 1 is a potent inhibitor of IL-3- induced bone marrow proliferation, but it does not inhibit the proliferation induced by granulocyte/macrophage, colony-stimulating factor (CSF), granulocyte CSF, and erythropoietin (Epo). TGF-beta 1 also inhibits IL-3-induced multipotential colony formation of bone marrow cells in soft agar, which includes early erythroid differentiation, while Epo-induced terminal differentiation is unaffected. In addition, IL-3-induced granulocyte/macrophage colonies were inhibited; however, small clusters of differentiated myeloid cells were consistently seen in cultures containing IL-3 and TGF-beta 1. Thus, TGF-beta 1 selectively inhibits early hematopoietic progenitor growth and differentiation but not more mature progenitors. TGF-beta 1 is also a potent inhibitor of IL-3-dependent and -independent myelomonocytic leukemic cell growth, while the more mature erythroid and macrophage leukemias are insensitive. Therefore, TGF-beta 1 functions as a selective regulator of differentiating normal hematopoietic cells, and suppresses myeloid leukemic cell growth. PMID:3261777

  8. Consequences of irradiation on bone and marrow phenotypes, and its relation to disruption of hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Green, Danielle E.; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2014-01-01

    The rising levels of radiation exposure, specifically for medical treatments and accidental exposures, have added great concern for the long term risks of bone fractures. Both the bone marrow and bone architecture are devastated following radiation exposure. Even sub-lethal doses cause a deficit to the bone marrow microenvironment, including a decline in hematopoietic cells, and this deficit occurs in a dose dependent fashion. Certain cell phenotypes though are more susceptible to radiation damage, with mesenchymal stem cells being more resilient than the hematopoietic stem cells. The decline in total bone marrow hematopoietic cells is accompanied with elevated adipocytes into the marrow cavity, thereby inhibiting hematopoiesis and recovery of the bone marrow microenvironment. Poor bone marrow is also associated with a decline in bone architectural quality. Therefore, the ability to maintain the bone marrow microenvironment would hinder much of the trabecular bone loss caused by radiation exposure, ultimately decreasing some comorbidities in patients exposed to radiation. PMID:24607941

  9. Stress hematopoiesis reveals abnormal control of self-renewal, lineage bias, and myeloid differentiation in Mll partial tandem duplication (Mll-PTD) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Yan, Xiaomei; Sashida, Goro; Zhao, Xinghui; Rao, Yalan; Goyama, Susumu; Whitman, Susan P.; Zorko, Nicholas; Bernot, Kelsie; Conway, Rajeana M.; Witte, David; Wang, Qian-fei; Tenen, Daniel G.; Xiao, Zhijian; Marcucci, Guido; Mulloy, James C.; Grimes, H. Leighton; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    One mechanism for disrupting the MLL gene in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is through partial tandem duplication (MLL-PTD); however, the mechanism by which MLL-PTD contributes to MDS and AML development and maintenance is currently unknown. Herein, we investigated hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) phenotypes of Mll-PTD knock-in mice. Although HSPCs (Lin?Sca1+Kit+ (LSK)/SLAM+ and LSK) in MllPTD/WT mice are reduced in absolute number in steady state because of increased apoptosis, they have a proliferative advantage in colony replating assays, CFU-spleen assays, and competitive transplantation assays over wild-type HSPCs. The MllPTD/WT-derived phenotypic short-term (ST)–HSCs/multipotent progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors have self-renewal capability, rescuing hematopoiesis by giving rise to long-term repopulating cells in recipient mice with an unexpected myeloid differentiation blockade and lymphoid-lineage bias. However, MllPTD/WT HSPCs never develop leukemia in primary or recipient mice, suggesting that additional genetic and/or epigenetic defects are necessary for full leukemogenic transformation. Thus, the Mll-PTD aberrantly alters HSPCs, enhances self-renewal, causes lineage bias, and blocks myeloid differentiation. These findings provide a framework by which we can ascertain the underlying pathogenic role of MLL-PTD in the clonal evolution of human leukemia, which should facilitate improved therapies and patient outcomes. PMID:22740449

  10. Myeloid Zinc Finger 1 (MZF-1) Regulates Expression of the CCN2/CTGF and CCN3/NOV Genes in the Hematopoietic Compartment.

    PubMed

    Piszczatowski, Richard T; Rafferty, Brian J; Rozado, Andre; Parziale, James V; Lents, Nathan H

    2015-11-01

    Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2/CTGF) and Nephroblastoma Overexpressed (CCN3/NOV) execute key functions within the hematopoietic compartment. Both are abundant in the bone marrow stroma, which is a niche for hematopoiesis and supports marrow function. Roles for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) and all-trans retinoic acid in the bone marrow have also been elucidated. Interestingly, some of the annotated roles of these vitamins overlap with established functions of CCN2 and CCN3. Yet, no factor has been identified that unifies these observations. In this study, we report the regulation of the CTGF and NOV genes by Myeloid Zinc Finger-1 (MZF-1), a hematopoietic transcription factor. We show the interaction of MZF-1 with the CTGF and NOV promoters in several cell types. Up-regulation of MZF-1 via calcitriol and vitamin A induces expression of CTGF and NOV, implicating a role for these vitamins in the functions of these two genes. Lastly, knockdown of MZF1 reduces levels of CTGF and NOV. Collectively, our results argue that MZF-1 regulates the CTGF and NOV genes in the hematopoietic compartment, and may be involved in their respective functions in the stroma. PMID:25899830

  11. Characteristics of Myeloid Differentiation and Maturation Pathway Derived from Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells Exposed to Different Linear Energy Transfer Radiation Types

    PubMed Central

    Monzen, Satoru; Yoshino, Hironori; Kasai-Eguchi, Kiyomi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Exposure of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to ionizing radiation causes a marked suppression of mature functional blood cell production in a linear energy transfer (LET)- and/or dose-dependent manner. However, little information about LET effects on the proliferation and differentiation of HSPCs has been reported. With the aim of characterizing the effects of different types of LET radiations on human myeloid hematopoiesis, in vitro hematopoiesis in Human CD34+ cells exposed to carbon-ion beams or X-rays was compared. Highly purified CD34+ cells exposed to each form of radiation were plated onto semi-solid culture for a myeloid progenitor assay. The surviving fractions of total myeloid progenitors, colony-forming cells (CFC), exposed to carbon-ion beams were significantly lower than of those exposed to X-rays, indicating that CFCs are more sensitive to carbon-ion beams (D0?=?0.65) than to X-rays (D0?=?1.07). Similar sensitivities were observed in granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid progenitors, respectively. However, the sensitivities of mixed-type progenitors to both radiation types were similar. In liquid culture for 14 days, no significant difference in total numbers of mononuclear cells was observed between non-irradiated control culture and cells exposed to 0.5 Gy X-rays, whereas 0.5 Gy carbon-ion beams suppressed cell proliferation to 4.9% of the control, a level similar to that for cells exposed to 1.5 Gy X-rays. Cell surface antigens associated with terminal maturation, such as CD13, CD14, and CD15, on harvest from the culture of X-ray-exposed cells were almost the same as those from the non-irradiated control culture. X-rays increased the CD235a+ erythroid-related fraction, whereas carbon-ion beams increased the CD34+CD38? primitive cell fraction and the CD13+CD14+/?CD15? fraction. These results suggest that carbon-ion beams inflict severe damage on the clonal growth of myeloid HSPCs, although the intensity of cell surface antigen expression by mature myeloid cells derived from HSPCs exposed to each type of radiation was similar to that by controls. PMID:23555027

  12. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adult acute myeloid leukemia in complete remission - a review from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the EBMT

    PubMed Central

    Sengsayadeth, Salyka; Savani, Bipin N.; Blaise, Didier; Malard, Florent; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia is the most common indication for an allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. The introduction of reduced intensity conditioning has expanded the recipient pool for transplantation, which has importantly made transplant an option for the more commonly affected older age groups. Reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplantation is currently the standard of care for patients with intermediate or high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and is now most often employed in older patients and those with medical comorbidities. Despite being curative for a significant proportion of patients, post-transplant relapse remains a challenge in the reduced intensity conditioning setting. Herein we discuss the studies that demonstrate the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic transplants, compare the outcomes of reduced intensity conditioning versus chemotherapy and conventional myeloablative conditioning regimens, describe the optimal donor and stem cell source, and consider the impact of post-remission consolidation, comorbidities, center experience, and more intensive (reduced toxicity conditioning) regimens on outcomes. Additionally, we discuss the need for further prospective studies to optimize transplant outcomes. PMID:26130513

  13. Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female. PMID:25653783

  14. Minimal Residual Disease as a Predictive Factor for Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in Adult Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First and Second Complete Remission

    PubMed Central

    Grubovikj, Rada M.; Alavi, Asif; Koppel, Ahrin; Territo, Mary; Schiller, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is potentially curative for patients with high-risk leukemia, but disease recurrence remains the leading cause of treatment failure. Our objective was to determine the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) by any technique in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in morphologic first and second complete remission undergoing allo-SCT. Fifty nine patients were eligible for the study of 160 patients transplanted over ten years. For the MRD assessment we used multiparametric flow cytometry, cytogenetics and fluorescent in situ hybridization; 19 patients (32.2%) were identified as MRD positive. Patients with MRD had a consistently worse outcome over those without MRD, with 3-years leukemia-free survival (LFS) of 15.8% vs. 62.4% and overall survival (OS) of 17.5% vs. 62.3%. Relapse rate was significantly higher in MRD-positive patients; 3 years relapse rate in MRD-positive patients was 57.9% vs. 15.1% in MRD-negative patients. Detection of MRD in complete remission was associated with increased overall mortality (HR = 3.3; 95% CI: 1.45–7.57; p = 0.0044) and relapse (HR = 5.26; 95% CI: 2.0–14.0; p = 0.001), even after controlling for other risk factors. Our study showed that for patients in morphologic complete remission the presence of MRD predicts for significantly increased risk of relapse and reduced LFS and OS. PMID:24213327

  15. Hematopoietic cell transplantation specific comorbidity index as an outcome predictor for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: combined FHCRC and MDACC experiences.

    PubMed

    Sorror, Mohamed L; Giralt, Sergio; Sandmaier, Brenda M; De Lima, Marcos; Shahjahan, Munir; Maloney, David G; Deeg, H Joachim; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Storer, Barry; Storb, Rainer

    2007-12-15

    A new hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was effective in predicting outcomes among patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC). Here, we compared the performance of the HCT-CI to 2 other indices and then tested its capacity to predict outcomes among 2 cohorts of patients diagnosed with a single disease entity, acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission, who underwent transplantation at either FHCRC or M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). FHCRC patients less frequently had unfavorable cytogenetics (15% versus 36%) and HCT-CI scores of 3 or more (21% versus 58%) compared with MDACC patients. We found that the HCT-CI had higher sensitivity and outcome predictability compared with the other indices among both cohorts. HCT-CI scores of 0, 1 to 2, and 3 or more predicted comparable nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among FHCRC and MDACC patients. In multivariate models, HCT-CI scores were associated with the highest hazard ratios (HRS) for NRM and survival among each cohort. The 2-year survival rates among FHCRC and MDACC patients were 71% versus 56%, respectively. After adjustment for risk factors, including HCT-CI scores, no difference in survival was detected (HR: 0.98, P = .94). The HCT-CI is a sensitive and informative tool for comparing trial results at different institutions. Inclusion of comorbidity data in HCT trials provides valuable, independent information. PMID:17873123

  16. Hematopoietic cell transplantation–specific comorbidity index as an outcome predictor for patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first remission: combined FHCRC and MDACC experiences

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Sergio; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; De Lima, Marcos; Shahjahan, Munir; Maloney, David G.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storer, Barry; Storb, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    A new hematopoietic cell transplantation–specific comorbidity index (HCT-CI) was effective in predicting outcomes among patients with hematologic malignancies who underwent HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC). Here, we compared the performance of the HCT-CI to 2 other indices and then tested its capacity to predict outcomes among 2 cohorts of patients diagnosed with a single disease entity, acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission, who underwent transplantation at either FHCRC or M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC). FHCRC patients less frequently had unfavorable cytogenetics (15% versus 36%) and HCT-CI scores of 3 or more (21% versus 58%) compared with MDACC patients. We found that the HCT-CI had higher sensitivity and outcome predictability compared with the other indices among both cohorts. HCT-CI scores of 0, 1 to 2, and 3 or more predicted comparable nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among FHCRC and MDACC patients. In multivariate models, HCT-CI scores were associated with the highest hazard ratios (HRS) for NRM and survival among each cohort. The 2-year survival rates among FHCRC and MDACC patients were 71% versus 56%, respectively. After adjustment for risk factors, including HCT-CI scores, no difference in survival was detected (HR: 0.98, P = .94). The HCT-CI is a sensitive and informative tool for comparing trial results at different institutions. Inclusion of comorbidity data in HCT trials provides valuable, independent information. PMID:17873123

  17. Acute myeloid leukemia arising from a donor derived premalignant hematopoietic clone: A possible mechanism for the origin of leukemia in donor cells.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Mark A; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B; Hedvat, Cyrus V; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Brentjens, Renier J

    2014-01-01

    During recent years, it has become increasingly evident that donor leukemia following allogeneic transplant may be more common then realized in the past. We identified five cases of potential donor leukemia cases during past five years. The precise mechanism of the origin of such leukemias, however, remains poorly defined. In this short communication, we report a well documented case of donor-derived de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) that developed fourteen years after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for treatment induced AML for his primary malignancy Immunoblastic lymphoma. This case allows us to postulate a possible mechanism of the origin of donor leukemia. The de novo AML clone contained a distinct cytogenetic abnormality, trisomy 11, which was simultaneously detected in preserved peripheral blood obtained at the time of transplantation as well as in the current bone marrow from an otherwise clinically and phenotypically normal donor. The findings from this unique case, provides insight into the process of leukemogenesis, and suggests that the sequence of events leading to leukemogenesis in this patient involved the senescence/apoptosis of normal donor hematopoietic cells due to telomere shortening resulting in the selective proliferation and transformation of this clone with MLL (mixed-lineage leukemia) gene amplification. PMID:24918066

  18. Reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Wen; Huang, Lifang; Meng, Fankai; Liu, Zeming; Zhou, Jianfeng; Sun, Hanying

    2014-01-01

    Background: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the clinical outcomes and toxicity of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) and myeloablative conditioning (MAC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Evidence acquisition: A comprehensive PubMed and Embase search was performed using the following keywords: “reduced-intensity”, “myeloablative”, “AML”, and “MDS”. The primary endpoints were overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS), and the secondary endpoints were relapse incidence (RI), non-relapse mortality (NRM), grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), and chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Results: Eight studies (2 prospective and 6 retrospective) involving 6464 patients who received RIC (n = 1571) or MAC (n = 4893) alloHSCT were included in the analysis. Median age and the number of patients with low hematopoietic cell transplantation-specific comorbidity index scores and who received ex vivo or in vivo T cell depletion were higher in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm. Significant heterogeneity was not found among the studies for any of the endpoints except for grade II-IV aGVHD. OS (odds ratio [OR], 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.84-1.08; p = 0.47) and EFS (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.77-1.00; p = 0.05) were similar in the RIC and MAC arms, whereas RI (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.24-1.59; p < 0.00001) was higher in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm. The incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD (OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.96; p = 0.03) was lower in the RIC arm than in the MAC arm; however, NRM (OR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.87-1.13; p = 0.85), total cGVHD (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.88-1.38; p = 0.38), and extensive cGVHD (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.75-1.37; p = 0.95) were not significantly different between the two arms. Conclusion: RIC alloHSCT may be an effective treatment strategy for AML/MDS patients who are not suitable candidates for MAC alloHSCT. However, heterogeneity in baseline patient characteristics and treatment protocols may have influenced the outcomes of RIC alloHSCT in our analysis. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:25550955

  19. Treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2-Gy total body irradiation followed by allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Gutman, Jonathan; Nemecek, Eneida R; Bar, Merav; Milano, Filippo; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Scott, Bart; Fang, Min; Wood, Brent; Pagel, John M; Baumgart, Joachim; Delaney, Colleen; Maziarz, Richard T; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Estey, Elihu H; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Storer, Barry E; Deeg, Hans Joachim

    2014-04-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers curative therapy for many patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics. In this prospective phase II trial, we assessed the efficacy and toxicity of treosulfan, fludarabine, and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML. Ninety-six patients with MDS (n = 36: 15 refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 1, 10 refractory anemia with excess blasts type 2, 1 chronic myelomonocytic leukemia type 1) or AML (n = 60: 35 first complete remission [CR], 18 second CR, 3 advanced CR, 4 refractory relapse) were enrolled; median age was 51 (range, 1 to 60) years. Twelve patients had undergone a prior HCT with high-intensity conditioning. Patients received 14 g/m(2)/day treosulfan i.v. on days -6 to -4, 30 mg/m(2)/day fludarabine i.v. on days -6 to -2, and 2 Gy TBI on day 0, followed by infusion of hematopoietic cells from related (n = 27) or unrelated (n = 69) donors. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus and methotrexate. With a median follow-up of 30 months, the 2-year overall survival (OS), relapse incidence, and nonrelapse mortality were 73%, 27%, and 8%, respectively. The incidences of grades II to IV (III to IV) acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease were 59% (10%) and 47%, respectively. Two-year OS was not significantly different between MDS patients with poor-risk and good/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (69% and 85%, respectively) or between AML patients with unfavorable and favorable/intermediate-risk cytogenetics (64% and 76%, respectively). In AML patients, minimal residual disease (MRD; n = 10) at the time of HCT predicted higher relapse incidence (70% versus 18%) and lower OS (41% versus 79%) at 2 years, when compared with patients without MRD. In conclusion, treosulfan, fludarabine, and low-dose TBI provided effective conditioning for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS or AML and resulted in low relapse incidence, regardless of cytogenetic risk. In patients with AML, MRD at the time of HCT remained a risk factor for post-HCT relapse. PMID:24440648

  20. Comparable outcomes post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for patients with de novo or secondary acute myeloid leukemia in first remission.

    PubMed

    Michelis, F V; Atenafu, E G; Gupta, V; Kim, D D; Kuruvilla, J; Lipton, J H; Loach, D; Seftel, M D; Uhm, J; Alam, N; Lambie, A; McGillis, L; Messner, H A

    2015-07-01

    Secondary AML (sAML) has a poor prognosis with conventional chemotherapy alone. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is beneficial for high-risk AML. Data comparing outcomes of transplants for patients with de novo and sAML are limited. We compared outcomes of patients transplanted for de novo and sAML in first complete remission and investigated the effect of age, HCT comorbidity index (HCT-CI) and karyotype in both groups. A total of 264 patients with de novo (n=180) and sAML (n=84) underwent allogeneic HCT between 1999 and 2013. Median age at transplant was 51 years (range 18-71), median follow-up of survivors was 77 months. Evaluation of all patients demonstrated no significant difference between de novo and sAML for overall survival (P=0.18), leukemia-free survival (P=0.17), cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.51) and non-relapse mortality (P=0.42). Multivariable and propensity score analyses confirmed the comparable outcomes between de novo and sAML post transplant. Although sAML demonstrates outcomes inferior to de novo AML treated with chemotherapy alone, outcomes following allogeneic HCT are comparable between the two groups. PMID:25822226

  1. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  2. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is an Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Advanced Disease or Failing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anish P; Barnett, Michael J; Broady, Raewyn C; Hogge, Donna E; Song, Kevin W; Toze, Cynthia L; Nantel, Stephen H; Power, Maryse M; Sutherland, Heather J; Nevill, Thomas J; Abou Mourad, Yasser; Narayanan, Sujaatha; Gerrie, Alina S; Forrest, Donna L

    2015-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only known curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, it is rarely utilized given the excellent long-term results with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine HSCT outcomes for patients with CML who failed TKI therapy or presented in advanced phase and to identify predictors of survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Fifty-one patients with CML underwent HSCT for advanced disease at diagnosis (n = 15), TKI resistance as defined by the European LeukemiaNet guidelines (n = 30), TKI intolerance (n = 2), or physician preference (n = 4). At a median follow-up of 71.9 months, the 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), relapse, and NRM were 68%, 46%, 41%, and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, predictors of OS included first chronic phase (CP1) disease status at HSCT (P = .0005), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score 1 to 4 (P = .04), and complete molecular response (CMR) to HSCT (P < .0001). Donor (female) to patient (male) gender combination (P = .02) and CMR to HSCT (P < .0001) predicted lower relapse. In multivariate analysis, CMR to HSCT remained an independent predictor of OS (odds ratio [OR], 43), EFS (OR, 56) and relapse (OR, 29). This report indicates that the outlook is excellent for those patients who remain in CP1 at the time of HSCT and achieve a CMR after HSCT. However, only approximately 50% of those in advanced phase at HSCT are long-term survivors. This highlights the ongoing need to try to identify patients earlier, before disease progression, who are destined to fail this treatment to optimize transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865648

  3. NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Sheryl M.; Slape, Christopher I.

    2011-01-01

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically encode a fusion protein that retains the amino terminus of NUP98; in this context, it is important to note that several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal portion of NUP98 exhibits transcription activation potential. Approximately half of the NUP98 fusion partners encode homeodomain proteins, and at least 5 NUP98 fusions involve known histone-modifying genes. Several of the NUP98 fusions, including NUP98-homeobox (HOX)A9, NUP98-HOXD13, and NUP98-JARID1A, have been used to generate animal models of both lymphoid and myeloid malignancy; these models typically up-regulate HOXA cluster genes, including HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA9, and HOXA10. In addition, several of the NUP98 fusion proteins have been shown to inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic precursors and to increase self-renewal of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, providing a potential mechanism for malignant transformation. PMID:21948299

  4. Karyotyping, immunophenotyping, and apoptosis analyses on human hematopoietic precursor cells derived from umbilical cord blood following long-term ex vivo expansion.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong; Huang, Shiang; Gong, Feili; Tian, Lei; Chen, Zhong

    2005-02-01

    By means of flow cytometry, CD34+/CD38- hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) were collected from umbilical cord blood (UCB) of 10 healthy women at the time of delivery and cultivated in stem-cell culture media supplemented with cell growth stimulating factors (IL-3, IL-6, GM-CSF, EPO, IGF-1, and SCF) for long periods. Apoptotic status, cell surface marker expression, and karyotypes of the cultured UCB-derived CD34+/CD38- stem-cells were investigated by flow cytometry and GTG-banding methods. The UCB-derived CD34+/CD38- stem-cells were able to divide and proliferate in vitro for at least 6 months. They did not show significantly increased apoptosis following ex vivo expansion for 20 and 32 days, respectively, in 2 cases and retained the same cell surface marker expression pattern (i.e., CD34+ and CD38-) in the majority of the cells of 2 cases following 20 and 37 days of incubation, respectively. In another 2 cases, chromosome analysis showed no evidence of numerical and structural abnormalities in the CD34+/CD38- stem-cells obtained after 20 and 43 days in culture, respectively. Our findings indicated that UCB-derived CD34+/CD38- stemcells are able to maintain their basic biologic and genetic characteristics after dividing and proliferating in vitro for a long period of time. UCB-derived HSC following ex vivo expansion can serve as a reliable resource for hematopoietic precursor cells transplantation. PMID:15676144

  5. The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a

    E-print Network

    Traulsen, Arne

    The allometry of chronic myeloid leukemia Jorge M. Pacheco a , Arne Traulsen b , David Dingli c Available online 10 April 2009 Keywords: Chronic myeloid leukemia Hematopoiesis Modeling Allometry a b s t r a c t Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is an acquired neoplastic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder

  6. Gradual Rarefaction of Hematopoietic Precursors and Atrophy in a Depleted microRNA 29a, b and c Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Lauren; Balatti, Veronica; Cascione, Luciano; Fadda, Paolo; Racke, Frederick; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Costinean, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background The self-renewing ability of HSCs is fundamental for the maintenance of a pool of bone marrow precursors throughout the life of an individual. The genetic mechanisms underlying such a complex process are still poorly understood. Results and Significance Here, we show that constitutive in vivo deletion of miR29ab1 leads to reduced number of HSCs and that miR29ab1 deficient bone marrow cannot repopulate the bone marrow of irradiated mice. An Affymetrix analysis of the miR29ab1 knockout mice identifies key proteins that could be responsible for this phenotype, as DNMT3a and b. Moreover, our findings reveal that whereas miR29b2c knockout mice do not exhibit any spontaneous abnormality, the double knock out – miR29ab1b2c – has marked generalized atrophy, raising the possibility that the two bi-cistrons might cooperate in order to maintain the stem cell number in general, not only limited to the bone marrow. PMID:26147501

  7. Assessing the efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (allo-HSCT) by analyzing survival end points in defined groups of acute myeloid leukemia patients: A retrospective, multicenter Polish Adult Leukemia Group study.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Sebastian; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Hellmann, Andrzej; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Dmoszynska, Anna; Su?ek, Kazimierz; Kloczko, Janusz; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Zdziarska, Barbara; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Pluta, Agnieszka; Komarnicki, Mieczyslaw; Giebel, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The importance of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for survival outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) currently remains unclear. The study aimed to compare measures of clinical treatment for patients with AML in CR1 (the first complete remission) with or without being subjected to allo-HSCT. These consisted of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and non-relapse mortality disease (NRM). Subjects were 622 patients, median age of 44, forming part of the prospective, randomized, and multicenter clinical Polish Adult Leukemia Group trials during 1999-2008. The Mantel-Byar approach was used to assess allo-HSCT on survival endpoints, accounting for a changing transplant status. Undergoing allo-HSCT significantly improved the LFS and OS for the entire group of patients with AML in CR1, along with the DAC induction subgroup and for the group with unfavorable cytogenetics aged 41-60. The CIR demonstrated that allo-HSCT reduced the risk of relapse for patients with AML in CR1 and those with an unfavorable cytogenetic risk. In addition, the NRM analysis showed that allo-HSCT significantly reduced the risk of death unrelated to relapse for the entire group of AML patients in CR1 and aged 41-60. The allo-HSCT treatment particularly benefitted survival for the AML in CR1 group having an unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis. Am. J. Hematol. 90:904-909, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26149802

  8. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  9. Identification of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells: strength and drawbacks of functional assays.

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2004-09-20

    A major challenge in hematopoiesis is to conceive assays that could bring useful insights into experimental and clinical hematology. This means identifying separately the various classes of hematopoietic progenitors that are produced sequentially during the progression from stem cells to differentiated functional cells. Standardized short-term colony assays easily quantify lineage-committed myeloid precursors, but identification of primitive cells, which have both the ability to repopulate durably myeloid and lymphoid lineages and perhaps to self-renew, still depends on in vivo assays. Whatever the assay, two important requisites have to be solved: one is the definition of appropriate read-outs that will depend solely on the function of these cells, and the second is to evaluate precisely their numbers and proliferative potential in quantitative assays. When evaluating hematopoiesis, three parameters have to be taken into account: (1) the lack of reliable correlation between the phenotype of a given cell and its function. This is especially problematic in post-transplantation situations where cells from transplanted animals are analysed; (2) functionally heterogeneous cells are identified in a single assay; and (3) ontogeny-related changes in hematopoietic cell proliferation and self-renewal that, in human beings, hampers the exploration of adult stem cells. Nevertheless, years of progress in the manipulation of hematopoietic stem cells have recently resulted in the purification of a cell subset that repopulates irradiated recipients with absolute efficiency. PMID:15378081

  10. Loss of Snail2 favors skin tumor progression by promoting the recruitment of myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Villarejo, Ana; Molina-Ortiz, Patricia; Montenegro, Yenny; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Morales, Saleta; Santos, Vanesa; Gridley, Tom; Pérez-Moreno, Mirna A; Peinado, Héctor; Portillo, Francisco; Calés, Carmela; Cano, Amparo

    2015-05-01

    Snail2 is a zinc finger transcription factor involved in driving epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. Snail2 null mice are viable, but display defects in melanogenesis, gametogenesis and hematopoiesis, and are markedly radiosensitive. Here, using mouse genetics, we have studied the contributions of Snail2 to epidermal homeostasis and skin carcinogenesis. Snail2 (-/-) mice presented a defective epidermal terminal differentiation and, unexpectedly, an increase in number, size and malignancy of tumor lesions when subjected to the two-stage mouse skin chemical carcinogenesis protocol, compared with controls. Additionally, tumor lesions from Snail2 (-/-) mice presented a high inflammatory component with an elevated percentage of myeloid precursors in tumor lesions that was further increased in the presence of the anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone. In vitro studies in Snail2 null keratinocytes showed that loss of Snail2 leads to a decrease in proliferation indicating a non-cell autonomous role for Snail2 in the skin carcinogenic response observed in vivo. Bone marrow (BM) cross-reconstitution assays between Snail2 wild-type and null mice showed that Snail2 absence in the hematopoietic system fully reproduces the tumor behavior of the Snail2 null mice and triggers the accumulation of myeloid precursors in the BM, blood and tumor lesions. These results indicate a new role for Snail2 in preventing myeloid precursors recruitment impairing skin chemical carcinogenesis progression. PMID:25784375

  11. Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation is Associated with a Reduced Risk of Relapse in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Survived to Day 100 after Transplantation: The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Transplantation-related Complication Working Group.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Katsuto; Nishida, Tetsuya; Asano-Mori, Yuki; Oshima, Kumi; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Mori, Takehiko; Kanamori, Heiwa; Miyamura, Koichi; Kato, Chiaki; Kobayashi, Naoki; Uchida, Naoyuki; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Morishima, Yasuo; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuda, Takahiro

    2015-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major infectious complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). Recently, it was reported that CMV reactivation is associated with a decreased risk of relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of early CMV reactivation on the incidence of disease relapse after allo-HSCT in a large cohort of patients. The Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation's Transplantation-Related Complication Working Group retrospectively surveyed the database of the Transplant Registry Unified Management Program at the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation. Patients with AML (n = 1836), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n = 911), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, n = 223), and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, n = 569) who underwent their first allo-HSCT from HLA-matched related or unrelated donors between 2000 and 2009 and who survived without disease relapse until day 100 after transplantation were analyzed. Patients who received umbilical cord blood transplantation were not included. Patients underwent surveillance by pp65 antigenemia from the time of engraftment, and the beginning of preemptive therapy was defined as CMV reactivation. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate the risk factors of relapse, nonrelapse, and overall mortality. CMV reactivation and acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were evaluated as time-dependent covariates. CMV reactivation was associated with a decreased incidence of relapse in patients with AML (20.3% versus 26.4%, P = .027), but not in patients with ALL, CML, or MDS. Among 1836 patients with AML, CMV reactivation occurred in 795 patients (43.3%) at a median of 42 days, and 436 patients (23.7%) relapsed at a median of 221 days after allo-HSCT. Acute GVHD grades II to IV developed in 630 patients (34.3%). By multivariate analysis considering competing risk factors, 3 factors were significantly associated with a decreased risk of AML relapse and 1 factor with an increased risk of AML relapse: CMV reactivation (hazard ratio [HR], .77; 95% confidence interval [CI], .59 to .99), unrelated donor compared with related donor (HR, .59; 95% CI, .42 to .84), development of chronic GVHD (HR, .77; 95% CI, .60 to .99), and pretransplantation advanced disease status compared with standard disease status (HR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.56 to 2.52). However, CMV reactivation was associated with increased nonrelapse mortality (HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.17) and overall mortality (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.69). A beneficial effect of CMV reactivation on subsequent risk of relapse was observed in patients with AML but not in those with other hematological malignancies. However, this benefit was nullified by the increased nonrelapse mortality. The underlying mechanism is unclear; however, immunological activation against CMV reactivation plays an essential role in this association. Thus, immune augmentation treatment options, including vaccination and adoptive T cell transfer, may be useful to take advantage of the efficacy of CMV reactivation with minimal increase in nonrelapse mortality. PMID:26211985

  12. Targeting interleukin-2 to the bone marrow stroma for therapy of acute myeloid leukemia relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gutbrodt, Katrin L; Kerkhoff, Andrea; Pohlen, Michele; Wiebe, Stefanie; Silling, Gerda; Angenendt, Linus; Kessler, Torsten; Mesters, Rolf M; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Schäfers, Michael; Altvater, Bianca; Rossig, Claudia; Grünewald, Inga; Wardelmann, Eva; Köhler, Gabriele; Neri, Dario; Stelljes, Matthias; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2015-05-01

    The antibody-based delivery of IL2 to extracellular targets expressed in the easily accessible tumor-associated vasculature has shown potent antileukemic activity in xenograft and immunocompetent murine models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), especially in combination with cytarabine. Here, we report our experience with 4 patients with relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), who were treated with the immunocytokine F16-IL2, in combination with low-dose cytarabine. One patient with disseminated extramedullary AML lesions achieved a complete metabolic response identified by PET/CT, which lasted 3 months. Two of 3 patients with bone marrow relapse achieved a blast reduction with transient molecular negativity. One of the 2 patients enjoyed a short complete remission before AML relapse occurred 2 months after the first infusion of F16-IL2. In line with a site-directed delivery of the cytokine, F16-IL2 led to an extensive infiltration of immune effector cells in the bone marrow. Grade 2 fevers were the only nonhematologic side effects in 2 patients. Grade 3 cytokine-release syndrome developed in the other 2 patients but was manageable in both cases with glucocorticoids. The concept of specifically targeting IL2 to the leukemia-associated stroma deserves further evaluation in clinical trials, especially in patients who relapse after allo-HSCT. PMID:25672398

  13. Highly Elevated Serum Hepcidin in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia prior to and after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Does This Protect from Excessive Parenchymal Iron Loading?

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Westerman, Mark; Krahl, Rainer; Leiblein, Sabine; Liebert, Uwe Gerd; Hehme, Marianne; Teupser, Daniel; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2011-01-01

    Hepcidin is upregulated by inflammation and iron. Inherited (HFE genotype) and treatment-related factors (blood units (BU), Iron overload) affecting hepcidin (measured by C-ELISA) were studied in 42 consecutive patients with AML prior to and after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Results. Elevated serum ferritin pre- and post-HCT was present in all patients. Median hepcidin pre- and post-HCT of 358 and 398?ng/mL, respectively, were elevated compared to controls (median 52?ng/mL) (P < .0001). Liver and renal function, prior chemotherapies, and conditioning had no impact on hepcidin. Despite higher total BU after HCT compared to pretransplantation (P < .0005), pre- and posttransplant ferritin and hepcidin were similar. BU influenced ferritin (P = .001) and hepcidin (P = .001). No correlation of pre- or posttransplant hepcidin with pretransplant ferritin was found. HFE genotype did not influence hepcidin. Conclusions. Hepcidin is elevated in AML patients pre- and post-HCT due to transfusional iron-loading suggesting that hepcidin synthesis remains intact despite chemotherapy and HCT. PMID:21687645

  14. A retrospective comparison of autologous and unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation in myelodysplastic syndrome and secondary acute myeloid leukemia: a report on behalf of the Chronic Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT).

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, H K; Brand, R; van Biezen, A; Finke, J; Boogaerts, M; Fauser, A A; Egeler, M; Cahn, J-Y; Arnold, R; Biersack, H; Niederwieser, D; de Witte, T

    2007-09-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an effective treatment for myelodysplasia (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). In this study, outcome of 593 patients with MDS/sAML after autologous and allogeneic HCT from a matched unrelated donor (MUD) were compared. A total of 167 (28%) patients received HCT from MUD without prior chemotherapy (MUD-U). The rest received HCT in first complete remission (CR1) (Autologous (Auto-CR1), n=290 (49%), HCT from MUD (MUD-CR1), n=136 (23%)). Survival at 3 years was best in MUD-CR1 (50%) compared to Auto-CR1 (41%) and MUD-U (40%) (P=0.01). Similarly, disease-free survival was 44% for MUD-CR1 compared to Auto-CR1 (28%) and MUD-U (34%) (P=0.03). Treatment-related mortality was 17% in Auto-CR1 compared to MUD-CR1 (38%) and MUD-U (49%) (P<0.001). Relapse for Auto-CR1 was 62% compared to 24 and 30% for MUD-CR1 and MUD-U, respectively (P<0.001). Outcome was best for patients with low tumor burden transplanted 6-12 months after diagnosis. Factors influencing outcome at 3 years were mainly significant in the first 6 months. Only, relapse after autologous HCT remained constant over time. Outcomes after allogeneic HCT in patients of 20-40 and >40 years were similar. Autologous and Allogeneic HCT from MUD offer the possibility of long-term survival to patients with MDS/sAML. PMID:17611571

  15. Comparison of Outcomes for Pediatric Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission and Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Based on Either Intravenous Busulfan or Total Body Irradiation: A Report From the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Motohiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Miyamura, Takako; Goto, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Jiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Terui, Kiminori; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Masami; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Takuya; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly receive myeloablative conditioning regimens based on busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT); however, the optimal conditioning regimen remains unclear. To identify which of these regimens is better for pediatric patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of nationwide registration data collected in Japan between 2006 and 2011 to assess the outcomes of patients receiving these regimens before a first allo-HCT. Myeloablative conditioning regimens based on i.v. BU (i.v. BU-MAC) (n = 69) or TBI (TBI-MAC) (n = 151) were compared in pediatric AML patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2). The incidences of sinusoid obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and early nonrelapse mortality (NRM) before day 100 were similar for both conditioning groups; however, the incidence of bacterial infection during the acute period was higher in the TBI-MAC group (P = .008). Both groups showed a similar incidence of NRM, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of relapse between the groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in the 2-year relapse-free survival rates for the i.v. BU-MAC and TBI-MAC groups in the CR1/CR2 setting (71% versus 67%, P = .36; hazard ratio, .73; 95% CI, .43 to 1.24, respectively). TBI-MAC was no better than i.v. BU-MAC for pediatric AML patients in remission. Although this retrospective registry-based analysis has several limitations, i.v. BU-MAC warrants further evaluation in a prospective trial. PMID:26271192

  16. NUP98/11p15 translocations affect CD34+ cells in myeloid and T lymphoid leukemias.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, Barbara; Nofrini, Valeria; Barba, Gianluca; Matteucci, Caterina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gorello, Paolo; Beverloo, Berna; Vitale, Antonella; Wlodarska, Iwona; Vandenberghe, Peter; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina

    2015-07-01

    We assessed lineage involvement by NUP98 translocations in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Single cell analysis by FICTION (Fluorescence Immunophenotype and Interphase Cytogenetics as a Tool for Investigation of Neoplasms) showed that, despite diverse partners, i.e. NSD1, DDX10, RAP1GDS1, and LNP1, NUP98 translocations always affected a CD34+/CD133+ hematopoietic precursor. Interestingly the abnormal clone included myelomonocytes, erythroid cells, B- and T- lymphocytes in MDS/AML and only CD7+/CD3+ cells in T-ALL. The NUP98-RAP1GDS1 affected different hematopoietic lineages in AML and T-ALL. Additional specific genomic events, were identified, namely FLT3 and CEBPA mutations in MDS/AML, and NOTCH1 mutations and MYB duplication in T-ALL. PMID:26004809

  17. Putative prethymic T cell precursors within the early human embryonic liver: a molecular and functional analysis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Hematopoietic cells present in the liver in early human fetal life were characterized by phenotypic analysis using a broad panel of monoclonal antibodies. Expression of very late antigen 4 and leukocyte function- associated antigen 3 cell adhesion receptors and 4F2 cell activation molecules was found in all fetal liver hematopoietic cells before acquisition of T cell-, B cell-, or myeloid-specific surface markers, and before the time of intrathymic colonization. Molecular studies showed that expression of the interleukin 2 receptor beta (IL-2R beta) also occurred in the embryonic liver at this early ontogenic stage. In contrast, no expression of IL-2R alpha or IL-2 transcripts was found in fetal liver cells, whereas transcription of the IL-4 gene was detected in a small fetal liver cell subset. Putative T cell precursors were identified among the hematopoietic fetal liver cells by the expression of genes encoding the gamma, delta, epsilon, and zeta invariant chains of the CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex. However, no transcription of the polymorphic alpha and beta TCR genes was detected. Functional in vitro assays further demonstrated that fetal liver hematopoietic cells from those early embryos were capable of proliferating in response to T cell growth factors, including IL-4 and IL-2. However, whereas IL-4- induced proliferation paralleled the appearance in vitro of CD45+CD7- CD4dull cells expressing the CD14 myeloid antigen, as well as of CD34+ primitive hematopoietic progenitors, differentiation into CD45+CD7+CD8+CD3- immature T cells was observed when using IL-2. Moreover, coculture with thymic epithelial cell monolayers provided additional evidence that early fetal liver hematopoietic cells may include very primitive T cell precursors, which were able to differentiate in vitro into TCR alpha/beta+ mature T cells. Therefore, our results indicate that, after triggering of the T cell-specific maturation program in primitive fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors, specific signals provided intrathymically by epithelial cells may fulfill the requirements to drive terminal differentiation of prethymically committed T cell precursors. PMID:8418199

  18. Parvovirus infection suppresses long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Segovia, José C; Guenechea, Guillermo; Gallego, Jesús M; Almendral, José M; Bueren, Juan A

    2003-08-01

    The functional disturbance of self-renewing and multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in viral diseases is poorly understood. In this report, we have assessed the susceptibility of mouse HSCs to strain i of the autonomous parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) in vitro and during persistent infection of an immunodeficient host. Purified 5FU(r) Lin(-) Sca-1(+) primitive hematopoietic precursors were permissive for MVMi genome replication and the expression of viral gene products. The lymphoid and myeloid repopulating capacity of bone marrow (BM) cells was significantly impaired after in vitro infection, although the degree of functional effect proportionally decreased with the posttransplantation time. This indicated that MVMi targets the heterogeneous compartment of repopulating cells with differential affinity and suggests that the virus may persist in some primitive HSCs in the quiescent stage, killing those eventually recruited for proliferative activity. Immunodeficient SCID mice oronasally infected with MVMi were cured of the characteristic virus-induced lethal leukopenia by transplantation of immunocompetent BM grafts. However, two double-stranded viral DNA species, probably uncommon replicative intermediates, remained in the marrow of every transplanted mouse months after infectious virus clearance. Genetic analysis of the rescued mice showed that the infection ensured a stable engraftment of donor hematopoiesis by markedly depleting the pool of endogenous HSCs. The MVMi-induced suppression of HSC functions illustrates the accessibility of this compartment to infection during a natural viral hematological disease. These results may provide clues to understanding delayed hematopoietic syndromes associated with persistent viral infections and to prospective gene delivery to HSCs in vivo. PMID:12857918

  19. C-Myb(+) erythro-myeloid progenitor-derived fetal monocytes give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Chen, Jinmiao; Lavin, Yonit; Low, Donovan; Almeida, Francisca F; See, Peter; Beaudin, Anna E; Lum, Josephine; Low, Ivy; Forsberg, E Camilla; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan; Chan, Jerry K Y; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-04-21

    Although classified as hematopoietic cells, tissue-resident macrophages (MFs) arise from embryonic precursors that seed the tissues prior to birth to generate a self-renewing population, which is maintained independently of adult hematopoiesis. Here we reveal the identity of these embryonic precursors using an in utero MF-depletion strategy and fate-mapping of yolk sac (YS) and fetal liver (FL) hematopoiesis. We show that YS MFs are the main precursors of microglia, while most other MFs derive from fetal monocytes (MOs). Both YS MFs and fetal MOs arise from erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) generated in the YS. In the YS, EMPs gave rise to MFs without monocytic intermediates, while EMP seeding the FL upon the establishment of blood circulation acquired c-Myb expression and gave rise to fetal MOs that then seeded embryonic tissues and differentiated into MFs. Thus, adult tissue-resident MFs established from hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors arise from two distinct developmental programs. PMID:25902481

  20. MicroRNA-223 dose levels fine tune proliferation and differentiation in human cord blood progenitors and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Bernhard; Pochert, Nicole; Rouhi, Arefeh; Boccalatte, Francesco; Plati, Tiziana; Berg, Tobias; Sun, Su Ming; Mah, Sarah M; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Ruschmann, Jens; Muranyi, Andrew; Leierseder, Simon; Argiropoulos, Bob; Starczynowski, Daniel T; Karsan, Aly; Heuser, Michael; Hogge, Donna; Camargo, Fernando D; Engelhardt, Stefan; Döhner, Hartmut; Buske, Christian; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Naldini, Luigi; Humphries, R Keith; Kuchenbauer, Florian

    2015-10-01

    A precise understanding of the role of miR-223 in human hematopoiesis and in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still lacking. By measuring miR-223 expression in blasts from 115 AML patients, we found significantly higher miR-223 levels in patients with favorable prognosis, whereas patients with low miR-223 expression levels were associated with worse outcome. Furthermore, miR-223 was hierarchically expressed in AML subpopulations, with lower expression in leukemic stem cell-containing fractions. Genetic depletion of miR-223 decreased the leukemia initiating cell (LIC) frequency in a myelomonocytic AML mouse model, but it was not mandatory for rapid-onset AML. To relate these observations to physiologic myeloid differentiation, we knocked down or ectopically expressed miR-223 in cord-blood CD34(+) cells using lentiviral vectors. Although miR-223 knockdown delayed myeloerythroid precursor differentiation in vitro, it increased myeloid progenitors in vivo following serial xenotransplantation. Ectopic miR-223 expression increased erythropoiesis, T lymphopoiesis, and early B lymphopoiesis in vivo. These findings broaden the role of miR-223 as a regulator of the expansion/differentiation equilibrium in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells where its impact is dose- and differentiation-stage-dependent. This also explains the complex yet minor role of miR-223 in AML, a heterogeneous disease with variable degree of myeloid differentiation. PMID:26163797

  1. Mice lacking c-fos have normal hematopoietic stem cells but exhibit altered B-cell differentiation due to an impaired bone marrow environment.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, S; Wang, Z Q; Grigoriadis, A E; Wagner, E F; von Rüden, T

    1994-01-01

    Mice lacking c-fos develop severe osteopetrosis with deficiencies in bone remodeling and exhibit extramedullary hematopoiesis, thymic atrophy, and altered B-cell development. In this study, we have used these mice to characterize in detail the developmental potential of hematopoietic stem cells lacking c-fos and to analyze how the lymphoid differentiation is altered. In c-fos -/- mice, B-cell numbers are reduced in the spleen, lymph nodes, and the peripheral blood as a result of a marked reduction (> 90%) in the number of clonogenic B-cell precursors. In contrast, the number and lineage distribution of myeloid progenitor cells are not affected. The thymic defects observed in a large number of these mice correlate with their health status, suggesting that this may be an indirect effect of the c-fos mutation. In vitro differentiation and bone marrow reconstitution experiments demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells lacking c-fos can give rise to all mature myeloid as well as lymphoid cells, suggesting that the observed B lymphopenia in the mutant mice is due to an altered environment. Transplantation of wild-type bone marrow cells into newborn mutant mice resulted in the establishment of a bone marrow space and subsequent correction of the B-cell defect. These results demonstrate that hematopoietic stem cells lacking Fos have full developmental potential and that the observed defect in B-cell development is most likely due to the impaired bone marrow environment as a consequence of osteopetrosis. Images PMID:8264605

  2. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  3. The age incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia can be explained by a one-mutation model

    E-print Network

    The age incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia can be explained by a one-mutation model Franziska for review June 10, 2006) Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is associated with the Philadelphia chromosome leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disorder of the hematopoietic system that leads to increased numbers

  4. Early ontogenic origin of the hematopoietic stem cell lineage

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Misato; Kubota, Yasushi; Nagai, Hiroki; Sheng, Guojun; Nishikawa, Shin-Ichi; Samokhvalov, Igor M.

    2012-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the adult hematopoietic system has multiple developmental origins, but the ontogenic relationship between nascent hematopoietic populations under this scheme is poorly understood. In an alternative theory, the earliest definitive blood precursors arise from a single anatomical location, which constitutes the cellular source for subsequent hematopoietic populations. To deconvolute hematopoietic ontogeny, we designed an embryo-rescue system in which the key hematopoietic factor Runx1 is reactivated in Runx1-null conceptuses at specific developmental stages. Using complementary in vivo and ex vivo approaches, we provide evidence that definitive hematopoiesis and adult-type hematopoietic stem cells originate predominantly in the nascent extraembryonic mesoderm. Our data also suggest that other anatomical sites that have been proposed to be sources of the definitive hematopoietic hierarchy are unlikely to play a substantial role in de novo blood generation. PMID:22392989

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Lysine-specific demethylase 1 restricts hematopoietic progenitor

    E-print Network

    Just, Armin

    Lysine (K)-specific demethylase 1A (LSD1/KDM1A) has been identified as a potential therapeutic target in solid cancers and more recently in acute myeloid leukemia. However, the potential side effects of a LSD1 model, that LSD1 represents a central regulator of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. LSD1

  6. [Hematopoietic stem cells].

    PubMed

    Coulombel, L; Pondarre, C; Bennaceur, A

    2000-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells, which share with other stem cells of adult tissues the ability to maintain constant the number and diversity of differentiated mature cells throughout adult life offer a fabulous system to analyze mechanisms controlling cell proliferation and differentiation. Cytokines controlling the differentiation of intermediate progenitors into mature cells of the various lineages have been characterized and have been widely used, in vitro as in vivo, to increase the output of differentiated cells. In contrast, despite significant technological advances, molecular events associated with the stem cell decisions first to either self-renew or differentiate, and then to irreversibly commit to one of the lymphoid or of the myeloid pathways are still very badly understood. This is partly explained by the lack of reliable assays, particularly in humans, to assess stem cell activity, and by the difficulty to dissect the composition of molecular complexes regulating gene expression in these very rare cells. Despite these limitations, recent evidence suggests that there is some flexibility in the initial decisions of stem cells, and that extracellular factors may influence stem cell fate. If this is confirmed, it may then become possible to propose new therapeutic strategies based on the manipulation of stem cell properties. PMID:11268669

  7. Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-03

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  8. Cell Stem Cell Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic

    E-print Network

    Collins, James J.

    patients with hematologic diseases, including Fanconi anemia (Mu¨ ller et al., 2012), sickle cell anemiaCell Stem Cell Article Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic Progenitors from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells via Respecification of Lineage-Restricted Precursors Sergei Doulatov,1,2 Linda T. Vo,1

  9. Inhibition of B Lymphopoiesis by Adipocytes and IL-1-Producing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Domenick E; Knight, Katherine L

    2015-09-15

    B lymphopoiesis declines with age, and this decline correlates with increased adipose tissue in the bone marrow (BM). Also, adipocyte-derived factors are known to inhibit B lymphopoiesis. Using cocultures of mouse BM cells with OP9 stromal cells, we found that adipocyte-conditioned medium induces the generation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells, which inhibit B cell development in vitro. Adipocyte-conditioned medium-induced CD11b(+)Gr1(+) cells express Arg1 (arginase) and Nos2 (inducible NO synthase) and suppress CD4(+) T cell proliferation, indicating that these cells are myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Blocking arginase and inducible NO synthase did not restore B lymphopoiesis, indicating that inhibition is not mediated by these molecules. Transwell and conditioned-medium experiments showed that MDSCs inhibit B lymphopoiesis via soluble factors, and by cytokine array we identified IL-1 as an important factor. Addition of anti-IL-1 Abs restored B lymphopoiesis in BM cultures containing MDSCs, showing that MDSC inhibition of B lymphopoiesis is mediated by IL-1. By treating hematopoietic precursors with IL-1, we found that multipotent progenitors are targets of IL-1. This study uncovers a novel function for MDSCs to inhibit B lymphopoiesis through IL-1. We suggest that inflammaging contributes to a decline of B lymphopoiesis in aged individuals, and furthermore, that MDSCs and IL-1 provide therapeutic targets for restoration of B lymphopoiesis in aged and obese individuals. PMID:26268654

  10. Microglia Versus Myeloid Cell Nomenclature during Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Greter, Melanie; Lelios, Iva; Croxford, Andrew Lewis

    2015-01-01

    As immune sentinels of the central nervous system (CNS), microglia not only respond rapidly to pathological conditions but also contribute to homeostasis in the healthy brain. In contrast to other populations of the myeloid lineage, adult microglia derive from primitive myeloid precursors that arise in the yolk sac early during embryonic development, after which they self-maintain locally and independently of blood-borne myeloid precursors. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, circulating monocytes invade the CNS parenchyma where they further differentiate into macrophages or inflammatory dendritic cells. Often it is difficult to delineate resident microglia from infiltrating myeloid cells using currently known markers. Here, we will discuss the current means to reliably distinguish between these populations, and which recent advances have helped to make clear definitions between phenotypically similar, yet functionally diverse myeloid cell types. PMID:26074918

  11. Hematopoietic mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Mattoscio, Miriam; Nicholas, Richard; Sormani, Maria P.; Malik, Omar; Lee, Jean S.; Waldman, Adam D.; Dazzi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the mobilization from the bone marrow and the functional relevance of the increased number of circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) induced by the anti-?-4 integrin antibody natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We evaluated CD45lowCD34+ HSPC frequency by flow cytometry in blood from 45 natalizumab-treated patients (12 of whom were prospectively followed during the first year of treatment as part of a pilot cohort and 16 prospectively followed for validation), 10 untreated patients with MS, and 24 healthy donors. In the natalizumab-treated group, we also assessed sorted HSPC cell cycle status, T- and B-lymphocyte subpopulation frequencies (n = 29), and HSPC differentiation potential (n = 10). Results: Natalizumab-induced circulating HSPC were predominantly quiescent, suggesting recent mobilization from the bone marrow, and were capable of differentiating ex vivo. Circulating HSPC numbers were significantly increased during natalizumab, but heterogeneously, allowing the stratification of mobilizer and nonmobilizer subgroups. Nonmobilizer status was associated with persistence of disease activity during treatment. The frequency of B cells and CD103+CD8+ regulatory T cells persistently increased, more significantly in mobilizer patients, who also showed a specific naive/memory B-cell profile. Conclusions: The data suggest that natalizumab-induced circulating HSPC increase is the result of true mobilization from the bone marrow and has clinical and immunologic relevance. HSPC mobilization, associated with clinical remission and increased proportion of circulating B and regulatory T cells, may contribute to the treatment's mode of action; thus, HSPC blood counts could represent an early biomarker of responsiveness to natalizumab. PMID:25762712

  12. Myeloid lineage progenitors give rise to vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Alexis S; Willenbring, Holger; Jiang, Shuguang; Anderson, Daniel A; Schroeder, David A; Wong, Melissa H; Grompe, Markus; Fleming, William H

    2006-08-29

    Despite an important role in vascular development and repair, the origin of endothelial progenitors remains unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that cells derived from the hematopoietic system participate in angiogenesis. However, the identity and functional role of these cells remain controversial. Here we show that vascular endothelial cells can differentiate from common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors. Endothelial cells derived from transplanted bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage progenitors expressed CD31, von Willebrand factor, and Tie2 but did not express the hematopoietic markers CD45 and F4/80 or the pericyte markers desmin and smooth muscle actin. Lineage tracing analysis in combination with a Tie2-driven Cre/lox reporter system revealed that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived hepatocytes, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells are not the products of cell fusion. The establishment of both hematopoietic and endothelial cell chimerism after parabiosis demonstrates that circulating cells can give rise to vascular endothelium in the absence of acute radiation injury. Our findings indicate that endothelial cells are an intrinsic component of myeloid lineage differentiation and underscore the close functional relationship between the hematopoietic and vascular systems. PMID:16920790

  13. Myeloid lineage progenitors give rise to vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Alexis S.; Willenbring, Holger; Jiang, Shuguang; Anderson, Daniel A.; Schroeder, David A.; Wong, Melissa H.; Grompe, Markus; Fleming, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Despite an important role in vascular development and repair, the origin of endothelial progenitors remains unknown. Accumulating evidence indicates that cells derived from the hematopoietic system participate in angiogenesis. However, the identity and functional role of these cells remain controversial. Here we show that vascular endothelial cells can differentiate from common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors. Endothelial cells derived from transplanted bone marrow-derived myeloid lineage progenitors expressed CD31, von Willebrand factor, and Tie2 but did not express the hematopoietic markers CD45 and F4/80 or the pericyte markers desmin and smooth muscle actin. Lineage tracing analysis in combination with a Tie2-driven Cre/lox reporter system revealed that, in contrast to bone marrow-derived hepatocytes, bone marrow-derived endothelial cells are not the products of cell fusion. The establishment of both hematopoietic and endothelial cell chimerism after parabiosis demonstrates that circulating cells can give rise to vascular endothelium in the absence of acute radiation injury. Our findings indicate that endothelial cells are an intrinsic component of myeloid lineage differentiation and underscore the close functional relationship between the hematopoietic and vascular systems. PMID:16920790

  14. Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Combined with (188)Rhenium Radioimmunotherapy before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of In Vivo T Cell Depletion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Strumpf, Annette; Schetelig, Johannes; Wunderlich, Gerd; Ehninger, Gerhard; Kotzerke, Jörg; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The combination of reduced-intensity conditioning, (188)rhenium anti-CD66 radioimmunotherapy, and in vivo T cell depletion was successfully applied in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Within a prospective phase II protocol, we investigated whether a dose reduction of alemtuzumab (from 75 mg to 50 mg MabCampath) would improve leukemia-free survival by reducing the incidence of relapse. Fifty-eight patients (median age, 67 years; range, 54 to 76) received radioimmunotherapy followed by fludarabine 150 mg/m(2) and busulfan 8 mg/kg combined with either 75 mg (n = 26) or 50 mg (n = 32) alemtuzumab. Although we observed a trend towards a shorter duration of neutropenia in the 50 mg group (median, 19 versus 21 days; P = .07), the time from transplantation to neutrophil and platelet engraftment as well as the overall incidence of engraftment did not differ. The incidence of severe acute graft-versus-host disease tended to be higher after the lower alemtuzumab dose (17% versus 4%; P = .15). No significant differences in the cumulative incidences of relapse (38% versus 35%; P = .81) or nonrelapse mortality (46% versus 27%; P = .31) were observed. Accordingly, disease-free and overall survival were not significantly different between groups. Although the feasibility of radioimmunotherapy plus reduced-intensity conditioning could be demonstrated in elderly patients, the dose reduction of alemtuzumab had no positive impact on overall outcome. PMID:26001695

  15. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS), transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1), epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX), tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53), and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2). Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach. PMID:22823977

  16. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic responses within the major subgroups are under study and should provide useful insights into the nature of hematopoietic accommodation (or its failure) under greatly extended periods of chronic, low-daily-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

  17. Hematopoietic growth factors: current knowledge, future prospects.

    PubMed

    Demetri, G D

    1992-01-01

    The introduction of hematopoietic growth factors into clinical medicine represents one of the more exciting developments in oncology in the past several years. The identification, gene cloning, and large-scale production of hematopoietic growth factors represent important examples of the practical benefits that may accrue from application of the sophisticated technology derived from recombinant DNA research. Research, both at the bench and by the bedside, has proceeded at an extraordinarily rapid pace in this field over the past five years, leading to an abundance of new information, novel promising agents, and important clinical controversies related to the biology and appropriate clinical applications of hematopoietic growth factors. With these agents, for the first time in history, the production of human blood cells can be systematically manipulated in vivo in an effort to optimize physiology beyond the endogenous host response. Additionally, investigators utilizing purified hematopoietic growth factors as reagents may provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of blood cell production in health and in various disease states. This review aims to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the control of blood cell production by specific factors and to put these data in the context of clinical medicine. The emphasis will be on factors that primarily influence myeloid (rather than lymphoid) cell growth, differentiation, and activation, and the clinical focus will be on applications in oncologic therapeutics and in the treatment of primary hematologic disorders. By reviewing what we know and what has already been done, we may be better able to define the important questions that remain and to formulate the means to answer our current uncertainties about the activities and clinical uses of hematopoietic growth factors. PMID:1382921

  18. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence

    PubMed Central

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L.; Campbell, Clyde A.; García-Moreno, Diana; Cid, Natasha Del; Kim, Albert D.; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNF? activates the Notch and NF-?B signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNF?, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  19. Proinflammatory signaling regulates hematopoietic stem cell emergence.

    PubMed

    Espín-Palazón, Raquel; Stachura, David L; Campbell, Clyde A; García-Moreno, Diana; Del Cid, Natasha; Kim, Albert D; Candel, Sergio; Meseguer, José; Mulero, Victoriano; Traver, David

    2014-11-20

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) underlie the production of blood and immune cells for the lifetime of an organism. In vertebrate embryos, HSCs arise from the unique transdifferentiation of hemogenic endothelium comprising the floor of the dorsal aorta during a brief developmental window. To date, this process has not been replicated in vitro from pluripotent precursors, partly because the full complement of required signaling inputs remains to be determined. Here, we show that TNFR2 via TNF? activates the Notch and NF-?B signaling pathways to establish HSC fate, indicating a requirement for inflammatory signaling in HSC generation. We determine that primitive neutrophils are the major source of TNF?, assigning a role for transient innate immune cells in establishing the HSC program. These results demonstrate that proinflammatory signaling, in the absence of infection, is utilized by the developing embryo to generate the lineal precursors of the adult hematopoietic system. PMID:25416946

  20. ?-Hemoglobin-stabilizing Protein: An Effective Marker for Erythroid Precursors in Bone Marrow Biopsy Specimens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Pinkus, Jack L; Pinkus, Geraldine S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate analysis of the erythroid lineage is essential in evaluating bone marrow biopsies and can be particularly challenging in settings of dyserythropoiesis. ?-Hemoglobin-stabilizing protein (AHSP) is an erythroid-specific chaperone protein and represents a potential specific marker for erythroid elements. This study defines the immunohistochemical profile of AHSP, as compared with an established erythroid marker CD71, in 101 bone marrow biopsies including normal marrows and cases of acute pure erythroid leukemia, acute erythroid/myeloid leukemia, other types of acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myelogenous leukemia, other types of myeloproliferative neoplasm, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, plasma cell neoplasm, and metastatic carcinoma. In acute pure erythroid leukemia, blasts in 7 of 11 cases showed similar reactivity for CD71 and AHSP, whereas less extensive reactivity was observed for AHSP as compared with CD71 in the remaining 4 cases. In normal marrows and other various disorders, reactivity for AHSP was similar to CD71 and was restricted to the erythroid lineage. Mature erythrocytes were negative for AHSP as were myeloblasts, lymphoblasts, nonerythroid hematopoietic marrow elements, plasma cells, and carcinoma cells. AHSP is an effective marker for detection of normal or abnormal erythroid precursors in bone marrow biopsies and is a useful addition to an immunohistochemical panel for assessment of neoplastic cells of possible erythroid derivation. PMID:25611244

  1. [Early ontogeny of the human hematopoietic system].

    PubMed

    Charbord, P; Tavian, M; Coulombel, L; Luton, D; San Clemente, H; Humeau, L; Dieterlen-Lièvre, F; Péault, B

    1995-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry was used to detect markers of the vascular, stromal and hematopoietic cell compartments in the human embryo and early fetus, from 3 to 15 weeks of gestation. CD34 expression was consistently observed at the surface of vascular endothelial cells from off earliest stages tested, at the single exception of embryonic liver blood vessels. Yolk sac hematopoiesis was very transient and limited to primitive erythropoiesis. Clusters of erythroblasts, monocytes and granulocytes appeared from 4 to 5 weeks of gestation in the liver rudiment. The early development of the bone marrow was marked by the rapid invasion, at 8 weeks, of long bone cartilaginous rudiments by CD68+ osteoclast precursors, CD34+ endothelial cells and by preosteoblasts, leading to the development of large vascular sinuses between ossifying trabeculae. Endogenous erythro- and granulopoiesis developed from week 11 in primary logettes always organized around an arteriole, in a loose stromal mesenchymal network established between the media of these arterioles and the sinusal endothelium. Round, hematopoietic CD34+ cells were seen occasionally in yolk sac blood vessels. In the liver they were rare and intermingled as single cells in the hepatocyte cords; strikingly, CD34+ hematopoietic cells could seldom be detected in the developing bone marrow. In contrast, compact clusters of non-endothelial, round CD34+ CD45+ hematopoietic cells were detected, during the 5th week of development, in close association with the ventral wall of the dorsal aorta. These cells exhibit phenotypic and functional characteristics of very primitive hematopoietic progenitors. This observation is in striking correlation with the evidence accumulated in animal models that stem cells for the late embryonic and adult hematopoietic systems develop inside the embryo per se, in the vicinity of the dorsal aorta. We thus suggest that these aorta-associated CD34+ cells, that exhibit an anatomic localization similar to that of the intraembryonic stem cells identified in the avian and murine embryo, are the real stem of human hematopoiesis. PMID:8564574

  2. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... about chronic myeloid leukemia? What is chronic myeloid leukemia? Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), also known as chronic ... is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts in the ...

  3. Cutaneous Infection Caused by Macrophomina phaseolina in a Child with Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Ashok; Wickes, Brian L.; Romanelli, Anna M.; Debelenko, Larisa; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Sutton, Deanna A.; Thompson, Elizabeth H.; Fothergill, Annette W.; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Hayden, Randall T.; Shenep, Jerry L.

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of Macrophomina phaseolina skin infection in an immunocompromised child with acute myeloid leukemia, which was treated successfully with posaconazole without recurrence after a hematopoietic stem cell transplant. The fungus was identified by DNA sequencing using both the internal transcribed spacer and D1/D2 region of the 28S ribosomal DNA gene. PMID:19386841

  4. A progenitor cell origin of myeloid malignancies Hiroshi Haenoa,b

    E-print Network

    's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Cancer Stem Cell Institute of hematopoietic stem and pro- genitor cells to study the evolutionary dynamics of cancer initia- tion. We consider cells, cancer stem cells. This concept was first developed in human myeloid leukemias (1, 2

  5. IGK with conserved IG?V/IG?J repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong; Xia, Miaoran; Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Yin, C Cameron

    2015-11-17

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig ? light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy. PMID:26429876

  6. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  7. Myeloid lineage skewing due to exacerbated NF-?B signaling facilitates osteopenia in Scurfy mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T H-P; Swarnkar, G; Mbalaviele, G; Abu-Amer, Y

    2015-01-01

    Immune surveillance through Foxp3+ regulatory T cells plays a crucial role in bone homeostasis. Scurfy, the mouse model of autoimmune IPEX syndrome, bears a loss-of-function mutation in Foxp3 that leads to multi-organ inflammation. Herein, we report that scurfy mice exhibit severe bone loss mediated by accelerated osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, Foxp3 deficiency results in the upregulation of NF-?B in T helper cells through the loss of repressive Foxp3/NEMO interaction, thereby unleashing NF-?B-mediated over-production of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines. Flow cytometry analysis shows marked increase in lin-Sca-1+c-kit+ hematopoietic stem cells (LSK HSCs) and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in bone marrow of scurfy mice with corresponding exacerbated osteoclastogenic potential, implying that osteoclast progenitors are affected at a very primitive stage in this disorder. Scurfy LSK HSCs exhibit greater sensitivity to M-CSF and contain abundant PU.1+ Sf LSK HSCs compared with WT. Accordingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of M-CSF or mTOR signaling, but not IL-17 signaling, attenuates osteoclastogenesis and osteopenia in scurfy. Thus, our study suggests that Foxp3 deficiency leads to osteopenia owing to dysregulated NF-?B activity and subsequent cytokine-mediated hyper-proliferation of myeloid precursors, and positions the NF-?B pathway as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for this disorder. PMID:25880090

  8. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  9. Hematopoietic Stem Cells Contribute to Lymphatic Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuguang; Bailey, Alexis S.; Goldman, Devorah C.; Swain, John R.; Wong, Melissa H.; Streeter, Philip R.; Fleming, William H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Although the lymphatic system arises as an extension of venous vessels in the embryo, little is known about the role of circulating progenitors in the maintenance or development of lymphatic endothelium. Here, we investigated whether hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the potential to give rise to lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC). Methodology/Principal Findings Following the transfer of marked HSCs into irradiated recipients, donor-derived LEC that co-express the lymphatic endothelial markers Lyve-1 and VEGFR-3 were identified in several tissues. HSC-derived LEC persisted for more than 12 months and contributed to ?3–4% of lymphatic vessels. Donor-derived LECs were not detected in mice transplanted with common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors, suggesting that myeloid lineage commitment is not a requisite step in HSC contribution to lymphatic endothelium. Analysis of parabiotic mice revealed direct evidence for the existence of functional, circulating lymphatic progenitors in the absence of acute injury. Furthermore, the transplantation of HSCs into ApcMin/+ mice resulted in the incorporation of donor-derived LEC into the lymphatic vessels of spontaneously arising intestinal tumors. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that HSCs can contribute to normal and tumor associated lymphatic endothelium. These findings suggest that the modification of HSCs may be a novel approach for targeting tumor metastasis and attenuating diseases of the lymphatic system. PMID:19043576

  10. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  11. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-11-30

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  12. Pathogenic microRNA’s in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khalaj, Mona; Tavakkoli, Montreh; Stranahan, Alec W.; Park, Christopher Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of the role microRNAs (miRNAs) play in regulating normal hematopoiesis. miRNAs are critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cell function and the development of mature progeny. Thus, perhaps it is not surprising that miRNAs serve as oncogenes and tumor suppressors in hematologic malignancies arising from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, such as the myeloid disorders. A number of studies have extensively documented the widespread dysregulation of miRNA expression in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), inspiring numerous explorations of the functional role of miRNAs in myeloid leukemogenesis. While these investigations have confirmed that a large number of miRNAs exhibit altered expression in AML, only a small fraction has been confirmed as functional mediators of AML development or maintenance. Herein, we summarize the miRNAs for which strong experimental evidence supports their functional roles in AML pathogenesis. We also discuss the implications of these studies on the development of miRNA-directed therapies in AML. PMID:25477897

  13. CDC42 ACTIVITY REGULATES HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL AGING AND REJUVENATION

    PubMed Central

    Florian, Maria Carolina; Dörr, Karin; Niebel, Anja; Daria, Deidre; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Hasenberg, Anja; Gunzer, Matthias; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Zheng, Yi; Geiger, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The functional decline in hematopoietic function seen during aging involves a progressive reduction in the immune response and an increased incidence of myeloid malignancy, and has been linked to aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The molecular mechanisms underlying HSC aging remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that elevated activity of the small RhoGTPase Cdc42 in aged HSCs is causally linked to HSC aging and correlates with a loss of polarity in aged HSCs. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity functionally rejuvenates aged HSCs, increases the percentage of polarized cells in an aged HSC population, and restores the level and spatial distribution of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation to a similar status as seen in young HSCs. Our data therefore suggest a mechanistic role for Cdc42 activity in HSC biology and epigenetic regulation, and identify Cdc42 activity as a pharmacological target for ameliorating stem cell aging. PMID:22560076

  14. Cdc42 activity regulates hematopoietic stem cell aging and rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Florian, Maria Carolina; Dörr, Karin; Niebel, Anja; Daria, Deidre; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Rojewski, Markus; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Hasenberg, Anja; Gunzer, Matthias; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Zheng, Yi; Geiger, Hartmut

    2012-05-01

    The decline in hematopoietic function seen during aging involves a progressive reduction in the immune response and an increased incidence of myeloid malignancy, and has been linked to aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The molecular mechanisms underlying HSC aging remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that elevated activity of the small RhoGTPase Cdc42 in aged HSCs is causally linked to HSC aging and correlates with a loss of polarity in aged HSCs. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity functionally rejuvenates aged HSCs, increases the percentage of polarized cells in an aged HSC population, and restores the level and spatial distribution of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation to a status similar to that seen in young HSCs. Our data therefore suggest a mechanistic role for Cdc42 activity in HSC biology and epigenetic regulation, and identify Cdc42 activity as a pharmacological target for ameliorating stem cell aging. PMID:22560076

  15. Canonical Wnt Signaling Promotes Early Hematopoietic Progenitor Formation and Erythroid Specification during Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tarafdar, Anuradha; Dobbin, Edwina; Corrigan, Pamela; Freeburn, Robin; Wheadon, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The generation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during development is a complex process linked to morphogenic signals. Understanding this process is important for regenerative medicine applications that require in vitro production of HSC. In this study we investigated the effects of canonical Wnt/?-catenin signaling during early embryonic differentiation and hematopoietic specification using an embryonic stem cell system. Our data clearly demonstrates that following early differentiation induction, canonical Wnt signaling induces a strong mesodermal program whilst maintaining a degree of stemness potential. This involved a complex interplay between ?-catenin/TCF/LEF/Brachyury/Nanog. ?-catenin mediated up-regulation of TCF/LEF resulted in enhanced brachyury levels, which in-turn lead to Nanog up-regulation. During differentiation, active canonical Wnt signaling also up-regulated key transcription factors and cell specific markers essential for hematopoietic specification, in particular genes involved in establishing primitive erythropoiesis. This led to a significant increase in primitive erythroid colony formation. ?-catenin signaling also augmented early hematopoietic and multipotent progenitor (MPP) formation. Following culture in a MPP specific cytokine cocktail, activation of ?-catenin suppressed differentiation of the early hematopoietic progenitor population, with cells displaying a higher replating capacity and a propensity to form megakaryocytic erythroid progenitors. This bias towards erythroid lineage commitment was also observed when hematopoietic progenitors were directed to undergo myeloid colony formation. Overall this study underscores the importance of canonical Wnt/?-catenin signaling in mesodermal specification, primitive erythropoiesis and early hematopietic progenitor formation during hematopoietic induction. PMID:24324557

  16. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development

    PubMed Central

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  17. Cellular complexity of the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Laura M; Link, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    The skeleton serves as the principal site for hematopoiesis in adult terrestrial vertebrates. The function of the hematopoietic system is to maintain homeostatic levels of all circulating blood cells, including myeloid cells, lymphoid cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This action requires the daily production of more than 500 billion blood cells. The vast majority of these cells are synthesized in the bone marrow, where they arise from a limited number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are multipotent and capable of extensive self-renewal. These attributes of HSCs are best demonstrated by marrow transplantation, where even a single HSC can repopulate the entire hematopoietic system. HSCs are therefore adult stem cells capable of multilineage repopulation, poised between cell fate choices which include quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, and apoptosis. While HSC fate choices are in part determined by multiple stochastic fluctuations of cell autonomous processes, according to the niche hypothesis, signals from the microenvironment are also likely to determine stem cell fate. While it had long been postulated that signals within the bone marrow could provide regulation of hematopoietic cells, it is only in the past decade that advances in flow cytometry and genetic models have allowed for a deeper understanding of the microenvironmental regulation of HSCs. In this review, we will highlight the cellular regulatory components of the HSC niche. PMID:24101231

  18. Cellular complexity of the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Calvi, Laura M.; Link, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    The skeleton serves as the principal site for hematopoiesis in adult terrestrial vertebrates. The function of the hematopoietic system is to maintain homeostatic levels of all circulating blood cells, including myeloid cells, lymphoid cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This action requires the daily production of more than 500 billion blood cells every day. The vast majority of these cells are synthesized in the bone marrow, where they arise from a limited number of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that are multipotent and capable of extensive self-renewal. These attributes of HSCs are best demonstrated by marrow transplantation, where even a single HSC can repopulate the entire hematopoietic system. HSCs are therefore adult stem cells capable of multilineage repopulation, poised between cell fate choices, which include quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation and apoptosis. While HSC fate choices are in part determined by multiple stochastic fluctuations of cell autonomous processes, according to the niche hypothesis, signals from the microenvironment are also likely to determine stem cell fate. While it had long been postulated that signals within the bone marrow could provide regulation of hematopoietic cells, it is only in the past decade that advances in flow cytometry and genetic models have allowed for a deeper understanding of microenvironmental regulation of HSCs. In this review, we will highlight the cellular regulatory components of the HSC niche. PMID:24101231

  19. Loss of Dnmt3a and endogenous KrasG12D/+ cooperate to regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell functions in leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuan-I; You, Xiaona; Kong, Guangyao; Ranheim, Erik A.; Wang, Jinyong; Du, Juan; Liu, Yangang; Zhou, Yun; Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS and KRAS mutations are prevalent in human juvenile and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML/CMML). However, additional genetic mutations cooperating with oncogenic RAS in JMML/CMML progression and/or their transformation to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain largely unknown. Here, we tested the potential genetic interaction of DNMT3A mutations and oncogenic RAS mutations in leukemogenesis. We found that Dnmt3a?/? induces multiple hematopoietic phenotypes after a prolonged latency, including T cell expansion in peripheral blood, stress erythropoiesis in spleen, and myeloid malignancies in liver. Dnmt3a?/? significantly promoted JMML/CMML progression and shortened the survival of KrasG12D/+ mice in a cell-autonomous manner. Similarly, downregulating Dnmt3a also promoted myeloid malignancies in NrasG12D/+ mice. Further studies show that Dnmt3a deficiency rescues KrasG12D/+-mediated depletion of hematopoietic stem cells and increases self-renewal of KrasG12D/+ myeloid progenitors. Moreover, ~33% of animals developed an AML-like disease, which is driven by KrasG12D/+; Dnmt3a?/? myeloid progenitors. Consistent with our result, COSMIC database mining demonstrates that the combination of oncogenic RAS and DNMT3A mutations exclusively occurred in patients with JMML, CMML, or AML. Our results suggest that DNMT3A mutations and oncogenic RAS cooperate to regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and promote myeloid malignancies. PMID:25801914

  20. Myeloid regulatory cells in tumor spreading and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Development of metastasis is determined by both the accretion of essential changes in cancerous cells and by their communications with different stromal elements in the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, inflammatory response and emergence of immune regulatory cells, such and myeloid regulatory cells (macrophages, dendritic cells, neutrophils, myeloid-derived suppressor cells) and lymphoid regulatory cells (regulatory T, B and NK cells) to the tumor site have been reported to support tumor growth in addition to spreading and metastasis. Every phase of tumor progression, from its initiation through metastatic expansion, is endorsed by interaction between malignant and immune cells mediated by a number of growth factors, cytokines, proteases and other molecules that modify the tumor microenvironment. Invasion and metastasis depend on intratumoral vascularization, alterations of the basement membrane and degradation of the extracellular matrix for tumor cell spreading, invasion and extravasation into the blood and lymphatic vessels. The consequent dissemination of cancerous cells to distant tissues and organs necessitates a trafficking through the vasculature, which is promoted by further interactions with cells of the immune system, including myeloid regulatory cells. Moreover, the formation of the pre-metastatic niche and specific metastasis organ tropism is also regulated and controlled by bone marrow-derived hematopoietic immune progenitor cells, immature myeloid cells and certain cytokines, chemokines and growth factors derived from tumor and immune cells, which amend the local microenvironment of the organ or tissue to promote adhesion and survival of circulating cancerous cells. Although the potential role for myeloid regulatory cells in tumor spreading and development of pre-metastatic niche has been suggested, the concept still requires further supportive experimental and clinical data, as well as data related to specific factors and mechanisms responsible for myeloid regulatory cell functioning at malignant sites. PMID:25178934

  1. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  2. Bone marrow and peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: focus on autografting.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R D; Hamm, C; Dansey, R; Klein, J; Cassells, L; Karanes, C; Abella, E; Peters, W P

    2000-08-01

    This review focuses on certain of the principles involved in high-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy along with autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of certain malignancies. In addition, the evidence, wherever possible based on randomized data, for the application of this approach in certain malignancies is reviewed. The malignancies highlighted include acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin disease, and breast cancer. PMID:10926918

  3. Human herpesvirus 7 infection of lymphoid and myeloid cell lines transduced with an adenovirus vector containing the CD4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, M; Inoue, Y; Ohminami, H; Sada, E; Miyake, K; Tohyama, T; Shimada, T; Fujita, S

    1997-01-01

    It has been reported recently that CD4 is a major component of the receptor for human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7), which has been newly identified as a T-lymphotropic virus. To investigate further the role of CD4 in HHV-7 infection, we examined the susceptibility to HHV-7 infection of various CD4-negative or weakly positive cell lines into which the cDNA for CD4 was transferred using an adenovirus vector (Adex1CACD4). Of 13 cell lines transduced with Adex1CACD4, including T-lymphoid, B-lymphoid, monocytoid, and myeloid cell lines, one T-lymphoid cell line, one monocytoid cell line, and two cell lines established from the blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia showed high susceptibility to HHV-7 infection. Taken together with the results of previous studies, these data suggest strongly that CD4 is a major component of the binding receptor for HHV-7. This study also shows that HHV-7 may be able to infect CD4-positive hematopoietic precursor cells as well as T lymphocytes. PMID:8995705

  4. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies. PMID:25644149

  5. Eosinophilic myeloid disorders.

    PubMed

    Noel, Pierre

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of therapeutically relevant mutations involving platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRA and PDGFRB) changed the way we evaluate and treat patients with clonal eosinophilia. Despite our improved understanding of the pathobiology of clonal eosinophilia, more than 50% of patients are diagnosed with idiopathic disease, 10% to 20% with a clonal myeloid disorder, and the remainder with a lymphocytic variant. The World Health Organization classification of tumors recognized the importance of a semi-molecular classification of eosinophilic myeloid disorders and divided them into two major subgroups: (1) myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1); and (2) chronic eosinophilic leukemia, not otherwise specified. A key challenge remains the identification of tyrosine kinase responsive molecular lesions in patients in whom the pathogenesis of clonal eosinophilia remains unclear. PMID:22449622

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  7. Low-level GATA2 overexpression promotes myeloid progenitor self-renewal and blocks lymphoid differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Satish K; Johnson, Kyle; Throm, Stacy L; Pestina, Tamara I; Neale, Geoffrey; Persons, Derek A

    2015-07-01

    The transcription factor GATA2 is highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and is downregulated during lineage maturation. Gain of function mutations, loss of function mutations, and overexpression of GATA2 have been reported in acute myeloid leukemia. In previous studies, we and others showed that GATA2 overexpression at high levels, similar to that seen in hematopoietic stem cells, blocked differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. To better understand the effects of GATA2, we designed a Tamoxifen-inducible GATA2-estrogen receptor (ERT) vector. In the absence of Tamoxifen, small amounts of GATA2-ERT were still able to enter the nucleus in mouse bone marrow (BM) cells, providing us with a tool to test the effects of low-level GATA2 overexpression. We observed that this low-level GATA2 overexpression enhanced self-renewal of myeloid progenitors in vitro and resulted in immortalization of BM cells to myeloid cell lines. Continuous GATA2-ERT expression was required for the proliferation of these immortalized lines. Myeloid expansion and a block in T and B lineage differentiation were observed in mice transplanted with GATA2-ERT-expressing BM cells. Myeloid expansion occurred after the granulocyte monocyte progenitor stage, and lymphoid block was distal to the common lymphoid progenitor in transgenic mice. GATA2 appeared to induce growth via downstream activation of Nmyc and Hoxa9. Our results demonstrate that GATA2 overexpression at low level confers self-renewal capacity to myeloid progenitors and is relevant to myeloid leukemia development. PMID:25907033

  8. NrasG12D/+ promotes leukemogenesis by aberrantly regulating hematopoietic stem cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Liu, Yangang; Du, Juan; Chang, Yuan-I; Tey, Sin Ruow; Zhang, Xinmin; Ranheim, Erik A.; Saba-El-Leil, Marc K.; Meloche, Sylvain; Damnernsawad, Alisa; Zhang, Jingfang; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic NRAS mutations are frequently identified in human myeloid leukemias. In mice, expression of endogenous oncogenic Nras (NrasG12D/+) in hematopoietic cells leads to expansion of myeloid progenitors, increased long-term reconstitution of bone marrow cells, and a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). However, acute expression of NrasG12D/+ in a pure C57BL/6 background does not induce hyperactivated granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor signaling or increased proliferation in myeloid progenitors. It is thus unclear how NrasG12D/+ signaling promotes leukemogenesis. Here, we show that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) expressing NrasG12D/+ serve as MPN-initiating cells. They undergo moderate hyperproliferation with increased self-renewal. The aberrant NrasG12D/+ HSC function is associated with hyperactivation of ERK1/2 in HSCs. Conversely, downregulation of MEK/ERK by pharmacologic and genetic approaches attenuates the cycling of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and prevents the expansion of NrasG12D/+ HSCs and myeloid progenitors. Our data delineate critical mechanisms of oncogenic Nras signaling in HSC function and leukemogenesis. PMID:23687087

  9. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML.

  10. Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

  11. IFN regulatory factor 8 represses GM-CSF expression in T cells to affect myeloid cell lineage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Paschall, Amy V; Zhang, Ruihua; Qi, Chen-Feng; Bardhan, Kankana; Peng, Liang; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Merad, Miriam; McGaha, Tracy; Zhou, Gang; Mellor, Andrew; Abrams, Scott I; Morse, Herbert C; Ozato, Keiko; Xiong, Huabao; Liu, Kebin

    2015-03-01

    During hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cells constantly differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages via a distinct differentiation program that is tightly controlled by myeloid lineage-specific transcription factors. Mice with a null mutation of IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) accumulate CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid cells that phenotypically and functionally resemble tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), indicating an essential role of IRF8 in myeloid cell lineage differentiation. However, IRF8 is expressed in various types of immune cells, and whether IRF8 functions intrinsically or extrinsically in regulation of myeloid cell lineage differentiation is not fully understood. In this study, we report an intriguing finding that, although IRF8-deficient mice exhibit deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and resultant accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr1(+) MDSCs, surprisingly, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in myeloid cells exhibit no abnormal myeloid cell lineage differentiation. Instead, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in T cells exhibited deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and MDSC accumulation. We further demonstrated that IRF8-deficient T cells exhibit elevated GM-CSF expression and secretion. Treatment of mice with GM-CSF increased MDSC accumulation, and adoptive transfer of IRF8-deficient T cells, but not GM-CSF-deficient T cells, increased MDSC accumulation in the recipient chimeric mice. Moreover, overexpression of IRF8 decreased GM-CSF expression in T cells. Our data determine that, in addition to its intrinsic function as an apoptosis regulator in myeloid cells, IRF8 also acts extrinsically to repress GM-CSF expression in T cells to control myeloid cell lineage differentiation, revealing a novel mechanism that the adaptive immune component of the immune system regulates the innate immune cell myelopoiesis in vivo. PMID:25646302

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow. An acute leukemia can become worse quickly if it is not treated and can result in death within months. AML is the most common type of acute leukemia in American adults and the average age of a patient with AML is 67.

  13. Regular Article MYELOID NEOPLASIA

    E-print Network

    Grossman, Robert

    of Pathology, 3Department of Human Genetics, 4Center for Research Informatics, 5Committee on Genetics, Genomics, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN; and Sections of 8Hematology/Oncology and 9Genetic Medicine, University. Similarly, haploinsufficiency of CUX1 gave human hematopoietic cells a significant engraftment advantage

  14. Functional Integration of Acute Myeloid Leukemia into the Vascular Niche

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Ronald P.; Masri, Azzah Al; Clark, Hilary A.; Asbaghi, Steven A.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Dunlap, Jennifer; Fan, Guang; Kovacsovics, Tibor; Liu, Qiuying; Meacham, Amy; Hamlin, Kimberly L.; Hromas, Robert A.; Scott, Edward W.; Fleming, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here, we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the up-regulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost 4-fold reduction in proliferative activity compared to non-vascular associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to down regulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally-defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. Taken together, these novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:24637335

  15. Survival for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betul; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia is the second most common leukemia among United States adults with a median age of 69 years. We investigated recent clinical practices related to treatments and disease outcomes in older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in the United States. Design and Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program data from 2000 through 2007 linked to Medicare enrollment and utilization data in the United States. Results Among 5,480 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (median age 78 years, range 65-93), 38.6% received leukemia therapy within three months of diagnosis (treated group). Practice changed with 16.3% of treated patients receiving hypomethylating agents after 2004 when those agents became available. Median survival was two months in the untreated group versus six months in the treated group (P<0.01) with the biggest improvements seen in those aged 65-69 years (10 months vs. 4 months; P<0.01) and 70-74 years (8 months vs. 3 months; P<0.01). In 46 patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (0.8%), the median survival from diagnosis was 22 months. Conclusions Therapy for leukemia improves overall survival in older acute myeloid leukemia patients. Based on their comorbidities, most patients up to 80 years of age should be considered for treatment. New therapies including hypomethylating agents and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation are promising and must be compared with other chemotherapy regimens. PMID:22773600

  16. IL12B expression is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reeme, Allison E.; Miller, Halli E.; Robinson, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary IL12B is required for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, promoting the initiation and maintenance of Mtb-specific effector responses. While this makes the IL12-pathway an attractive target for experimental tuberculosis (TB) therapies, data regarding what lineages express IL12B after infection is established are limited. This is not obvious in the lung, an organ in which both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages produce IL12p40 upon pathogen encounter. Here, we use radiation bone marrow chimeras and Yet40 reporter mice to determine what lineages produce IL12p40 during experimental TB. We observed that hematopoietic IL12p40-production was sufficient to control Mtb, with no contribution by non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, rather than being produced by a single subset, IL12p40 was produced by cells that were heterogenous in their size, granularity, autofluorescence and expression of CD11c, CD11b and CD8?. While depending on the timepoint and tissue examined, the surface phenotype of IL12p40-producers most closely resembled macrophages based on previous surveys of lung myeloid lineages. Importantly, depletion of CDllchi cells during infection had no affect on lung IL12p40-concentrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL12p40 production is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during experimental TB, and that redundant mechanisms of IL12p40-production exist when CD11chi lineages are absent. PMID:23491716

  17. Hematopoietic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Bociek, R G; Armitage, J O

    1996-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the availability of pharmacologic quantities of hematopoietic growth factors has opened many avenues of study in basic science and clinical investigation. Numerous studies performed to date have demonstrated significant benefits from the use of these cytokines. The side effect profiles, particularly for "later acting" growth factors, indicate that they are generally well tolerated by most patients. The table summarizes the potential indications for hematopoietic growth factor use as discussed in this article, as justified by current evidence of benefit, harm, and cost effectiveness resulting from their use in various clinical settings. It has been clearly demonstrated in standard-dose chemotherapy regimens that these agents shorten the duration of myelosuppression, reduce the incidence of significant infection, can shorten hospital stay, and reduce antibiotic use for most patients, although the cost/benefit ratio for growth factors such as G-CSF makes this a cost-effective approach only for regimens with a high (40 percent or more) incidence of febrile neutropenia. Limited indirect evidence supports the use of growth factors in patients with a prior episode of fever and neutropenia. The suppressive approach to growth factor use could potentially benefit patients with documented infection or clinical deterioration, but it has not otherwise been shown to be a particularly effective or cost-effective approach. Administration of hematopoietic growth factors has been instrumental in facilitating both autologous and allogeneic peripheral progenitor cell mobilization and techniques such as ex vivo expansion. There is an increasing body of data supporting the use of high-dose chemotherapy regimens with progenitor cell rescue for a number of malignancies and limited data supporting the benefits of maintaining dose-intensity for certain malignancies in standard-dose settings. Although of continuing concern, clinically significant evidence of disease stimulation and recurrence has not been unequivocally demonstrated in studies to date. A comprehensive set of evidence-based guidelines has recently been published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. As often is the case, current studies have perhaps generated more questions than answers. Future investigation will undoubtedly focus on use of hematopoietic growth factors in conjunction with other techniques, such as outpatient-based treatment of febrile neutropenia, CD34-positive stem cell selection in autologous transplantation, selective manipulation of T-cell subsets (to decrease the incidence of severe graft-versus-host disease) in allogeneic transplantation, and high-dose therapy with stem cell transplantation. PMID:8646546

  18. Common marmoset CD117+ hematopoietic cells possess multipotency.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shin; Nunomura, Satoshi; Mori, Shuya; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Takabayashi, Shuji; Okada, Yoshinori; Yahata, Takashi; Shiina, Takashi; Katoh, Hideki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tani, Kenzaburo; Ando, Kiyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Sasaki, Erika; Kametani, Yoshie

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the hematopoiesis of non-human primates is important to clarify the evolution of primate-specific hematopoiesis and immune regulation. However, the engraftment and development of the primate hematopoietic system are well-documented only in humans and are not clear in non-human primates. Callithrix jacchus (common marmoset, CM) is a New World monkey with a high rate of pregnancy and small size that lives in closed colonies. As stem cell factor (SCF) is an essential molecule for hematopoietic stem cell development in mice and humans, we focused on CD117, the SCF receptor, and examined whether CD117-expressing cells possess the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell characteristics of newborn marmoset-derived hematopoietic cells that can develop into T cells and B cells. When CD117(+) cell fractions of the bone marrow were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD (non-obese diabetic)/Shi-scid, common ?c-null (NOG) mice, these cells engrafted efficiently in the bone marrow and spleens of the NOG mice. The CD117(+) cells developed into myeloid lineage cells, CD20(+) B cells and CD3(+) T cells, which could express CM cytokines in vivo. The development of B cells did not precede that of T cells. The development of CD8(+) T cells was dominant in NOG mice. The engraftment was comparable for both CD117(+)CD34(+) cells and CD117(+)CD34(-) cells. These results suggest that the CD117(+) cell fraction can differentiate into all three cell lineages, and the development of marmoset immunity in the xenogeneic environment follows diverse developmental pathways compared with human immunity. PMID:25977306

  19. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Fischer, Kari R.; Choi, Hyejin; El Rayes, Tina; Ryu, Seongho; Nasar, Abu; Spinelli, Cathy F.; Andrews, Weston; Elemento, Olivier; Nolan, Daniel; Stiles, Brendon; Rafii, Shahin; Narula, Navneet; Davuluri, Ramana; Altorki, Nasser K.; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor “activated/reprogrammed” stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils) identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value. PMID:26046767

  20. Primary Myeloid Sarcoma Masquerading as an Obstructing Duodenal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Preeti; Murthy, Vijayashree; Su, Mu; Woel, Rosemonde; Grossman, I. Robert; Chamberlain, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid Sarcoma (MS), a rare extra hematopoietic carcinoma composed of blast cells, is located primarily in extramedullary sites such as skin, soft tissue, lymph nodes, and bone. MS usually presents in the setting of coexisting acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloproliferative disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement (GI) is extremely rare from nonspecific abdominal symptoms to obstruction. Eight cases of myeloid sarcoma involving the duodenum including the current case have been reported, overall mean age being 40 years (range 17–71) and M?:?F ratio 7?:?1. The prognosis of patients with de novo MS cases has been reported to be better than those who have a coexisting leukemia. MS is a rare extramedullary tumor, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a soft tissue mass involving the duodenum, especially if there is a coexisting hematological disorder. De novo cases often progress to AML, and current therapy involves Daunorubicin- and Cytarabine-based chemotherapy. The wide cytogenetic and molecular heterogeneity of MS implies a potential role for more targeted MS therapies, which may offer a curative strategy. PMID:23243527

  1. Autophagy limits proliferation and glycolytic metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Alexander S; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Stranks, Amanda; Williams, Owen; De Boer, Jasper; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion; McGouran, Joanna; Kessler, Benedikt; Khandwala, Shivani; Chowdhury, Onima; Puleston, Daniel; Phadwal, Kanchan; Mortensen, Monika; Ferguson, David; Soilleux, Elizabeth; Woll, Petter; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Decreased autophagy contributes to malignancies, however it is unclear how autophagy impacts on tumour growth. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an ideal model to address this as (i) patient samples are easily accessible, (ii) the hematopoietic stem and progenitor population (HSPC) where transformation occurs is well characterized, and (iii) loss of the key autophagy gene Atg7 in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) leads to a lethal pre-leukemic phenotype in mice. Here we demonstrate that loss of Atg5 results in an identical HSPC phenotype as loss of Atg7, confirming a general role for autophagy in HSPC regulation. Compared to more committed/mature hematopoietic cells, healthy human and mouse HSCs displayed enhanced basal autophagic flux, limiting mitochondrial damage and reactive oxygen species in this long-lived population. Taken together, with our previous findings these data are compatible with autophagy limiting leukemic transformation. In line with this, autophagy gene losses are found within chromosomal regions that are commonly deleted in human AML. Moreover, human AML blasts showed reduced expression of autophagy genes, and displayed decreased autophagic flux with accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria indicating that deficient autophagy may be beneficial to human AML. Crucially, heterozygous loss of autophagy in an MLL-ENL model of AML led to increased proliferation in vitro, a glycolytic shift, and more aggressive leukemias in vivo. With autophagy gene losses also identified in multiple other malignancies, these findings point to low autophagy providing a general advantage for tumour growth. PMID:26568842

  2. Myeloid cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shanshan; Kuo, Ning; Kryczek, Ilona; Zou, Weiping; Welling, Theodore H

    2015-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly associated with inflammation. Myeloid cells, including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, are abundant in the HCC microenvironment and are often associated with poor prognosis. Myeloid cells in HCC play a vital role in supporting tumor initiation, progression, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapeutic resistance. Here, we summarize our current knowledge about myeloid cells in HCC and focus on their immune-suppressive activities and tumor-promoting functions, as well as the relevance to potential new therapies in HCC. (Hepatology 2015;62:1304-1312). PMID:25914264

  3. Dual mechanisms by which miR-125b represses IRF4 to induce myeloid and B-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Yick-Lun; Sookram, Reeshelle; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Minisandram, Aarathi; Cheng, David; Xie, Catherine; Lim, Ee Lyn; Flores, Yvette Garcia; Jiang, Shuai; Kim, Jocelyn Tammy; Keown, Christopher; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Baltimore, David

    2014-08-28

    The oncomir microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is upregulated in a variety of human neoplastic blood disorders and constitutive upregulation of miR-125b in mice can promote myeloid and B-cell leukemia. We found that miR-125b promotes myeloid and B-cell neoplasm by inducing tumorigenesis in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Our study demonstrates that miR-125b induces myeloid leukemia by enhancing myeloid progenitor output from stem cells as well as inducing immortality, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis in myeloid progenitors. Through functional and genetic analyses, we demonstrated that miR-125b induces myeloid and B-cell leukemia by inhibiting interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) but through distinct mechanisms; it induces myeloid leukemia through repressing IRF4 at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level without altering the genomic DNA and induces B-cell leukemia via genetic deletion of the gene encoding IRF4. PMID:25006123

  4. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that originates in the bone marrow from immature white blood cells known as myeloblasts. About 25% of all children with leukemia have AML. Although survival rates have increased since the 1970s, approximately half of all childhood AML cases relapse despite intensive treatment. Additional therapies following relapse are often unsuccessful and can be especially difficult and damaging for children. These patients would clearly benefit from targeted therapeutic approaches.

  5. Deregulated expression of HOXB4 enhances the primitive growth activity of human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Buske, Christian; Feuring-Buske, Michaela; Abramovich, Carolina; Spiekermann, Karsten; Eaves, Connie J; Coulombel, Laure; Sauvageau, Guy; Hogge, Donna E; Humphries, R Keith

    2002-08-01

    Identification of the molecular mechanisms that can promote human hematopoietic stem cell amplification is a major goal in experimental and clinical hematology. Recent data indicate that a variety of regulatory molecules active in early development may also play a role in the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells with repopulating activity. One important class of early developmental genes determining hematopoietic development are homeobox transcription factors. Here, we report that retrovirally mediated expression of the homeobox gene HOXB4 rapidly triggers an increase in the number of human hematopoietic cord blood cells with stem cell and progenitor cell properties detected both by in vitro and in vivo assays. This growth enhancement extended across primitive myeloid-erythroid and B-lymphoid progenitors but did not lead to alterations in the balance of lymphomyeloid reconstitution in vivo, suggesting that HOXB4 does not affect control of end-cell output. These findings reveal HOXB4 as a novel, positive regulator of the primitive growth activity of human hematopoietic progenitor cells and underline the relevance of early developmental factors for stem cell fate decisions. PMID:12130496

  6. LAPTM5: A novel lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adra, C.N.; Zhu, Shaochun; Ko, Jone-Long

    1996-07-15

    While a large body of knowledge about cell membrane proteins exists, much less is known about the repertoire and function of integral membrane proteins of intracellular organelles. In looking for novel classes of genes that are functionally important to hematopoietic cells, we have cloned the cDNA for a gene preferentially expressed in adult hematopoietic tissues. During embryonic development the gene is expressed in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues. In cell lines the gene is expressed specifically in hematopoietic lineages, whereas in normal adult tissues the mRNA is preferentially detected at high levels in lymphoid and myeloid tissues. The predicted protein is a pentaspanner with no homology to known genes and conserved across evolution. Immunocytological and cell fractionation studies with a specific antibody revealed a protein localizing in lysosomes. The gene, provisionally named LAPTM5, maps to chromosome 1p34. The expression pattern of the gene together with preliminary evidence that the protein interacts with ubiquitin indicates that the protein may have a special functional role during embryogenesis and in adult hematopoietic cells. 53 refs., 9 figs.

  7. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Togarrati, P. Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W.; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L.

    2014-01-01

    Although in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation is a promising strategy to treat congenital hematopoietic disorders, levels of engraftment have not been therapeutic for diseases in which donor cells have no survival advantage. We used an antibody against the murine c-Kit receptor (ACK2) to deplete fetal host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and increase space within the hematopoietic niche for donor cell engraftment. Fetal mice were injected with ACK2 on embryonic days 13.5 to 14.5 and surviving pups were transplanted with congenic hematopoietic cells on day of life 1. Low-dose ACK2 treatment effectively depleted HSCs within the bone marrow with minimal toxicity and the antibody was cleared from the serum before the neonatal transplantation. Chimerism levels were significantly higher in treated pups than in controls; both myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism increased because of higher engraftment of HSCs in the bone marrow. To test the strategy of repeated HSC depletion and transplantation, some mice were treated with ACK2 postnatally, but the increase in engraftment was lower than that seen with prenatal treatment. We demonstrate a successful fetal conditioning strategy associated with minimal toxicity. Such strategies could be used to achieve clinically relevant levels of engraftment to treat congenital stem cell disorders. PMID:24879814

  8. Non-Hematopoietic and Hematopoietic SIRP? Signaling Differently Regulates Murine B Cell Maturation in Bone Marrow and Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Kolan, Shrikant Shantilal; Lejon, Kristina; Koskinen Holm, Cecilia; Sulniute, Rima; Lundberg, Pernilla; Matozaki, Takashi; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2015-01-01

    B lymphocyte development occurs in the bone marrow, while final differentiation and maturation can occur in both the bone marrow and the spleen. Here we provide evidence that signal regulatory protein ? (SIRP?), an Ig-superfamily ITIM-receptor expressed by myeloid but not by lymphoid cells, is involved in regulating B cell maturation. Lack of SIRP? signaling in adult SIRP?-mutant mice resulted in a reduced maturation of B cells in the bone marrow, evident by reduced numbers of semi-mature IgD+IgMhi follicular type-II (F-II) and mature IgD+IgMlo follicular type-I (F-I) B cells, as well as reduced blood B cell numbers. In addition, lack of SIRP? signaling also impaired follicular B cell maturation in the spleen. Maturing BM or splenic B cells of SIRP?-mutant mice were found to express higher levels of the pro-apoptotic protein BIM and apoptosis was increased among these B cells. Bone marrow reconstitution experiments revealed that the B cell maturation defect in bone marrow and blood was due to lack of SIRP? signaling in non-hematopoietic cells, while hematopoietic SIRP? signaling was important for follicular B cell maturation in the spleen. Adding on to our previous findings of a stromal cell defect in SIRP?-mutant mice was the finding that gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-?B ligand (RANKL) was significantly lower in cultured bone marrow stromal cells of SIRP? mutant mice. These data suggest a novel and opposite contribution of SIRP? signaling within non-hematopoietic and hematopoietic cells, respectively, to maintain B cell maturation and to prevent apoptosis in the bone marrow and spleen of adult mice. PMID:26222253

  9. Early postradition recovery of hematopoietic stromal precursor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todriya, T.V.

    1985-04-01

    The aim of this investigation was an immunohistochemical study of alpha-endorphin-producing cells and also a study of rat mast cells (MC in the antral mucosa of the human stomach. Men aged 18 to 30 years undergoing in-patient treatment wre studied. According to the results of radioimmunoassay, antibodies against alpha-endorphin did not react with enkephalins, beta-endorphin, or the C-terminal fragment of beta-endorphin, but had cross reactivity of about 10% with gammaendorphin. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's test at a 85% level of significance and they are shown. The facts presented here suggest that MC of human gastric mucosa include argyrophilic cells which contain alpha-endorphin.

  10. Misfolded N-CoR is Linked to the Ectopic Reactivation of CD34/Flt3-Based Stem-Cell Phenotype in Promyelocytic and Monocytic Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Dawn Sijin; Li, Feng; Visvanathan, Sridevi; Khan, Matiullah

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) is the key component of generic co-repressor complex essential for the transcriptional control of genes involved in cellular hemostasis. We have recently reported that N-CoR actively represses Flt3, a key factor of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and growth, and that de-repression of Flt3 by the misfolded N-CoR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The leukemic cells derived from the promyelocytic and monocytic AML are distinctly characterized by the ectopic reactivation of stem cell phenotypes in relatively committed myeloid compartment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not known. Here, we report that N-CoR function is essential for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to the cells of myeloid lineage and that loss of N-CoR function due to misfolding is linked to the ectopic reactivation of generic stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Analysis of N-CoR and Flt3 transcripts in mouse hematopoietic cells revealed a positive correlation between N-CoR level and the commitment of myeloid cells and an inverse correlation between N-CoR and Flt3 levels in primitive as well as committed myeloid cells. Enforced N-CoR expression in mouse HSCs inhibited their growth and self-renewal potentials and promoted maturation toward cells of myeloid lineage, suggesting a role of N-CoR in the commitment of cells of myeloid lineage. In contrast to AML cells with natively folded N-CoR, primary and secondary promyelocytic and monocytic AML cells harboring the misfolded N-CoR were highly positive for Flt3 and myeloid antigen-based HSC marker CD34. Genetic and therapeutic restoration of N-CoR conformation significantly down-regulated the CD34 levels in monocytic AML cells, suggesting an important role of N-CoR in the suppression of CD34-based HSC phenotypes. These findings collectively suggest that N-CoR is crucial for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to cells of myeloid lineage and that misfolded N-CoR may contribute to transformation of committed myeloid cells through the ectopic reactivation of Flt3/CD34-based stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Moreover, these findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the formation of leukemic stem cells in subsets of AML and identify the misfolded N-CoR as a subtype-specific biomarker of AML. PMID:26500885

  11. Childhood and adolescent lymphoid and myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Schrappe, Martin; Ribeiro, Raul C; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2004-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the past decade in the treatment and in the understanding of the biology of childhood lymphoid and myeloid leukemias. With contemporary improved risk assessment, chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and supportive care, approximately 80% of children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 50% of those with myeloid neoplasm can be cured to date. Current emphasis is placed not only on increased cure rate but also on improved quality of life. In Section I, Dr. Ching-Hon Pui describes certain clinical and biologic features that still have prognostic and therapeutic relevance in the context of contemporary treatment programs. He emphasizes that treatment failure in some patients is not due to intrinsic drug resistance of leukemic cells but is rather caused by suboptimal drug dosing due to host compliance, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacogenetics. Hence, measurement of minimal residual disease, which accounts for both the genetic (primary and secondary) features of leukemic lymphoblasts and pharmacogenomic variables of the host, is the most reliable prognostic indicator. Finally, he contends that with optimal risk-directed systemic and intrathecal therapy, cranial irradiation may be omitted in all patients, regardless of the presenting features. In Section II, Dr. Martin Schrappe performs detailed analyses of the prognostic impact of presenting age, leukocyte count, sex, immunophenotype, genetic abnormality, early treatment response, and in vitro drug sensitivity/resistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, based on the large database of the Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster consortium. He also succinctly summarizes the important treatment components resulting in the improved outcome of children and young adolescents with this disease. He describes the treatment approach that led to the improved outcome of adolescent patients, a finding that may be applied to young adults in the second and third decade of life. Finally, he believes that treatment reduction under well-controlled clinical trials is feasible in a subgroup of patients with excellent early treatment response as evidenced by minimal residual disease measurement during induction and consolidation therapy. In Section III, Dr. Raul Ribeiro describes distinct morphologic and genetic subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia. The finding of essentially identical gene expression profiling by DNA microarray in certain specific genetic subtypes of childhood and adult acute myeloid leukemia suggests a shared leukemogenesis. He then describes the principles of treatment as well as the efficacy and toxicity of various forms of postremission therapy, emphasizing the need of tailoring therapy to both the disease and the age of the patient. Early results suggest that minimal residual disease measurement can also improve the risk assessment in acute myeloid leukemia, and that cranial irradiation can be omitted even in those with central-nervous-system leukemia at diagnosis. In Section IV, Dr. Charlotte Niemeyer describes a new classification of myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative diseases in childhood, which has greatly facilitated the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndromes and juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. The recent discovery of somatic mutations in PTPN11 has improved the understanding of the pathobiology and the diagnosis of juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Together with the findings of mutations in RAS and NF1 in the other patients, she suggests that pathological activation of RAS-dependent pathways plays a central role in the leukemogenesis of this disease. She then describes the various treatment approaches for both juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes in the US and Europe, emphasizing the differences between childhood and adult cases for the latter group of diseases. She also raises some controversial issues regarding treatment that will require well-controlled international clinical trials to address. PMID:15561680

  12. Reticular dysgenesis-associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-07-27

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  13. Major remodelling of the murine stem cell kinome following differentiation in the hematopoietic compartment

    PubMed Central

    Hazen, Amy L.; Diks, Sander H.; Wahle, Joseph A.; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Kerr, William G.

    2011-01-01

    The changes in signal transduction associated with the acquisition of specific cell fates remain poorly understood. We performed massive parallel assessment of kinase signatures of the radiations of the hematopoietic system, including long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSC), short-term repopulating HSC (ST-HSC), immature natural killer (iNK) cells, NK cells, B cells, T cells and myeloid cells. The LT-HSC kinome is characterised by non-canonical Wnt, Ca2+ and classical protein kinase C (PKC)-driven signalling, which is lost upon the transition to ST-HSC, whose kinome signature prominently features receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation of the Ras/MAPK signalling cassette. Further differentiation to iNK maintains signalling through this cassette but simultaneously leads to activation of a PI3K/PKB/Rac signalling, which becomes the dominant trait in the kinase signature following full differentiation towards NK cells. Differentiation along the myeloid and B cell lineages is accompanied by hyperactivation of both the Ras/MAPK and PI3K/PKB/Rac signalling cassette. T cells, however, deactivate signalling and only display residual G protein-coupled pathways. Thus, differentiation along the hematopoietic lineage is associated with major remodelling of cellular kinase signature. PMID:21648952

  14. Alternative Donor Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Haddad, Housam; Brunstein, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is a potentially curative therapy for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its use for consolidation therapy after first remission with induction chemotherapy used to be limited to younger patients and those with suitable donors. The median age of AML diagnosis is in the late 60s. With the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), many older adults are now eligible to receive allo-HCT, including those who are medically less fit to receive myeloablative conditioning. Furthermore, AML patients commonly have no human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical or medically suitable sibling donor available to proceed with allo-HCT. Technical advances in donor matching, suppression of alloreactivity, and supportive care have made it possible to use alternative donors, such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) and partially HLA-matched related (haploidentical) donors. Outcomes after alternative donor allo-HCT are now approaching the outcomes observed for conventional allo-HCT with matched related and unrelated donors. Thus, with both UCB and haploidentical donors available, lack of donor should rarely be a limiting factor in offering an allo-HCT to adults with AML. PMID:26239557

  15. Cellular Reprogramming Allows Generation of Autologous Hematopoietic Progenitors From AML Patients That Are Devoid of Patient-Specific Genomic Aberrations

    PubMed Central

    Salci, Kyle R; Lee, Jong-Hee; Laronde, Sarah; Dingwall, Steve; Kushwah, Rahul; Fiebig-Comyn, Aline; Leber, Brian; Foley, Ronan; Dal Cin, Arianna; Bhatia, Mickie

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments that use hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients substantially reduce the risk of relapse, but are limited by the availability of immune compatible healthy HPCs. Although cellular reprogramming has the potential to provide a novel autologous source of HPCs for transplantation, the applicability of this technology toward the derivation of healthy autologous hematopoietic cells devoid of patient-specific leukemic aberrations from AML patients must first be evaluated. Here, we report the generation of human AML patient-specific hematopoietic progenitors that are capable of normal in vitro differentiation to myeloid lineages and are devoid of leukemia-associated aberration found in matched patient bone marrow. Skin fibroblasts were obtained from AML patients whose leukemic cells possessed a distinct, leukemia-associated aberration, and used to create AML patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Through hematopoietic differentiation of AML patient iPSCs, coupled with cytogenetic interrogation, we reveal that AML patient-specific HPCs possess normal progenitor capacity and are devoid of leukemia-associated mutations. Importantly, in rare patient skin samples that give rise to mosaic fibroblast cultures that continue to carry leukemia-associated mutations; healthy hematopoietic progenitors can also be generated via reprogramming selection. Our findings provide the proof of principle that cellular reprogramming can be applied on a personalized basis to generate healthy HPCs from AML patients, and should further motivate advances toward creating transplantable hematopoietic stem cells for autologous AML therapy. Stem Cells 2013;33:1839–1849 PMID:25764124

  16. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  17. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petz, Lawrence D; Burnett, John C; Li, Haitang; Li, Shirley; Tonai, Richard; Bakalinskaya, Milena; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Armitage, Sue; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Regan, Donna M; Clark, Pamela; Querol, Sergio; Gutman, Jonathan A; Spellman, Stephen R; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-?32/?32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV/AIDS using HCT in patients with HIV-1 and malignancy have yielded mixed results, as encouraging evidence for virus eradication in a few cases has been offset by poor clinical outcomes due to the underlying cancer or other complications. Such clinical strategies have relied on HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that harbor the natural CCR5-?32/?32 mutation or that have been genetically modified for HIV-resistance. Nevertheless, HCT with HIV-resistant cord blood remains a promising option, particularly with inventories of CCR5-?32/?32 units or with genetically modified, human leukocyte antigen-matched cord blood. PMID:26251620

  18. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Petz, Lawrence D; Burnett, John C; Li, Haitang; Li, Shirley; Tonai, Richard; Bakalinskaya, Milena; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Armitage, Sue; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Regan, Donna M; Clark, Pamela; Querol, Sergio; Gutman, Jonathan A; Spellman, Stephen R; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-?32/?32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV/AIDS using HCT in patients with HIV-1 and malignancy have yielded mixed results, as encouraging evidence for virus eradication in a few cases has been offset by poor clinical outcomes due to the underlying cancer or other complications. Such clinical strategies have relied on HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that harbor the natural CCR5-?32/?32 mutation or that have been genetically modified for HIV-resistance. Nevertheless, HCT with HIV-resistant cord blood remains a promising option, particularly with inventories of CCR5-?32/?32 units or with genetically modified, human leukocyte antigen-matched cord blood. PMID:26251620

  19. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  20. Inflammatory signaling regulates embryonic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Esain, Virginie; Teng, Li; Xu, Jian; Kwan, Wanda; Frost, Isaura M.; Yzaguirre, Amanda D.; Cai, Xiongwei; Cortes, Mauricio; Maijenburg, Marijke W.; Tober, Joanna; Dzierzak, Elaine; Orkin, Stuart H.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying signaling pathways that regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) formation in the embryo will guide efforts to produce and expand HSPCs ex vivo. Here we show that sterile tonic inflammatory signaling regulates embryonic HSPC formation. Expression profiling of progenitors with lymphoid potential and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from aorta/gonad/mesonephros (AGM) regions of midgestation mouse embryos revealed a robust innate immune/inflammatory signature. Mouse embryos lacking interferon ? (IFN-?) or IFN-? signaling and zebrafish morphants lacking IFN-? and IFN-? activity had significantly fewer AGM HSPCs. Conversely, knockdown of IFN regulatory factor 2 (IRF2), a negative regulator of IFN signaling, increased expression of IFN target genes and HSPC production in zebrafish. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) and expression analyses demonstrated that IRF2-occupied genes identified in human fetal liver CD34+ HSPCs are actively transcribed in human and mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the primitive myeloid population contributes to the local inflammatory response to impact the scale of HSPC production in the AGM region. Thus, sterile inflammatory signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway regulating the production of HSPCs during embryonic development. PMID:25395663

  1. Increased mitochondrial apoptotic priming of human regulatory T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Kazuyuki; Kim, Haesook T.; Bascug, O.R. Gregory; Kawano, Yutaka; Ryan, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Ken-ichi; Davids, Matthew S.; Koreth, John; Ho, Vincent T.; Cutler, Corey; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Letai, Anthony; Ritz, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    CD4 regulatory T cells play a critical role in establishment of immune tolerance and prevention of graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The recovery and maintenance of regulatory T cells is dependent on homeostatic factors including the generation of naïve regulatory T cells from hematopoietic precursor cells, the proliferation and expansion of mature regulatory T cells, and the survival of regulatory T cells in vivo. In this study, quantitation of mitochondrial apoptotic priming was used to compare susceptibility of regulatory T cells, conventional CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells to intrinsic pathway apoptosis in 57 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and 25 healthy donors. In healthy donors, regulatory T cells are more susceptible to mitochondrial priming than conventional T cells. Mitochondrial priming is increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in all T-cell subsets and particularly in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease. Regulatory T cells express high levels of CD95 and are also more susceptible than conventional T cells to apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway. However, CD95 expression and extrinsic pathway apoptosis is not increased after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Decreased expression of BCL2 and increased expression of BIM, a mitochondrial cell death activator protein, in regulatory T cells contributes to increased mitochondrial priming in this T-cell subset but additional factors likely contribute to increased mitochondrial priming following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24859877

  2. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Kenigsberg, Ephraim; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Winter, Deborah; Lara-Astiaso, David; Gury, Meital; Weiner, Assaf; David, Eyal; Cohen, Nadav; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt; Haas, Simon; Schlitzer, Andreas; Mildner, Alexander; Ginhoux, Florent; Jung, Steffen; Trumpp, Andreas; Porse, Bo Torben; Tanay, Amos; Amit, Ido

    2015-12-17

    Within the bone marrow, stem cells differentiate and give rise to diverse blood cell types and functions. Currently, hematopoietic progenitors are defined using surface markers combined with functional assays that are not directly linked with in vivo differentiation potential or gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we comprehensively map myeloid progenitor subpopulations by transcriptional sorting of single cells from the bone marrow. We describe multiple progenitor subgroups, showing unexpected transcriptional priming toward seven differentiation fates but no progenitors with a mixed state. Transcriptional differentiation is correlated with combinations of known and previously undefined transcription factors, suggesting that the process is tightly regulated. Histone maps and knockout assays are consistent with early transcriptional priming, while traditional transplantation experiments suggest that in vivo priming may still allow for plasticity given strong perturbations. These data establish a reference model and general framework for studying hematopoiesis at single-cell resolution. PMID:26627738

  3. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Flotillins Are Involved in the Polarization of Primitive and Mature Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Beckmann, Julia; Magenau, Astrid; Boneberg, Eva-Maria; Gaus, Katharina; Viola, Antonella; Giebel, Bernd; Illges, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Background Migration of mature and immature leukocytes in response to chemokines is not only essential during inflammation and host defense, but also during development of the hematopoietic system. Many molecules implicated in migratory polarity show uniform cellular distribution under non-activated conditions, but acquire a polarized localization upon exposure to migratory cues. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present evidence that raft-associated endocytic proteins (flotillins) are pre-assembled in lymphoid, myeloid and primitive hematopoietic cells and accumulate in the uropod during migration. Furthermore, flotillins display a polarized distribution during immunological synapse formation. Employing the membrane lipid-order sensitive probe Laurdan, we show that flotillin accumulation in the immunological synapse is concomittant with membrane ordering in these regions. Conclusions Together with the observation that flotillin polarization does not occur in other polarized cell types such as polarized epithelial cells, our results suggest a specific role for flotillins in hematopoietic cell polarization. Based on our results, we propose that in hematopoietic cells, flotillins provide intrinsic cues that govern segregation of certain microdomain-associated molecules during immune cell polarization. PMID:20027317

  6. Telomeres in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Roth, Alexander; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2003-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells have an impressive regenerative potential, strikingly illustrated in transplantation experiments using limited number of cells. In mice, serial transplantation experiments suggest that individual hematopoietic cells are capable of extensive self-renewal and that any possible limitations in the replicative potential of individual hematopoietic stem cells are not affecting normal blood cell formation. The situation with human hematopoietic stem cells is less clear. Unlike the situation in the mouse, the telomere length in nucleated human blood cells shows a remarkable decline with age. Furthermore, even partial telomerase deficiency in humans typically results in marrow failure, whereas complete lack of telomerase is tolerated up to several generations in the mouse. The decline in telomere length in human leukocytes with age follows a cubic function and is much higher in lymphocytes than in granulocytes. This finding suggests that, under normal circumstances, telomere loss is more likely to compromise the function of lymphocytes than the function of hematopoietic stem cells. To reconcile differences in telomere biology between man and mice, it has been proposed that telomere shortening evolved as a tumor suppressor mechanism in long-lived species that may not exist in shorter-lived mammals. According to this model, telomeres in human cells are intimately involved in signaling cell cycle progression and cell division. Most likely, a minimum number of telomere repeats is required at each telomere to prevent activation of a "telomere checkpoint" and allow cell cycle progression. Telomere length measurements appear useful to distinguish between depletion and exhaustion of hematopoietic stem cells as a cause of marrow failure. PMID:12799281

  7. Effects of Stem Cell Factor on Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Alpha Accumulation in Human Acute Myeloid Leukaemia and LAD2 Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oniku, Abraham E.; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) is a hematopoietic growth factor that exerts its activity by signalling through the tyrosine kinase receptor known as Kit or CD117. SCF-Kit signalling is crucial for the survival, proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage. Furthermore, since myeloid leukaemia cells express the Kit receptor, SCF may play an important role in myeloid leukaemia progression too. However, the mechanisms of this pathophysiological effect remain unclear. Recent evidence shows that SCF triggers accumulation of the inducible alpha subunit of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hematopoietic cells—a transcription complex that plays a pivotal role in cellular adaptation to low oxygen availability. However, it is unknown how SCF impacts on HIF-1? accumulation in human myeloid leukaemia and mast cells. Here we show that SCF induces HIF-1? accumulation in THP-1 human myeloid leukaemia cells but not in LAD2 mast cells. We demonstrated that LAD2 cells have a more robust glutathione (GSH)-dependent antioxidative system compared to THP-1 cells and are therefore protected against the actions of ROS generated in an SCF-dependent manner. BSO-induced GSH depletion led to a significant decrease in HIF-1? prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) activity in THP-1 cells and to near attenuation of it in LAD2 cells. In THP-1 cells, SCF-induced HIF-1? accumulation is controlled via ERK, PI3 kinase/PKC-?/mTOR-dependent and to a certain extent by redox-dependent mechanisms. These results demonstrate for the first time an important cross-talk of signalling pathways associated with HIF-1 activation—an important stage of the myeloid leukaemia cell life cycle. PMID:21799876

  8. Functional integration of acute myeloid leukemia into the vascular niche.

    PubMed

    Cogle, C R; Goldman, D C; Madlambayan, G J; Leon, R P; Al Masri, A; Clark, H A; Asbaghi, S A; Tyner, J W; Dunlap, J; Fan, G; Kovacsovics, T; Liu, Q; Meacham, A; Hamlin, K L; Hromas, R A; Scott, E W; Fleming, W H

    2014-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are a critical component of the hematopoietic microenvironment that regulates blood cell production. Recent studies suggest the existence of functional cross-talk between hematologic malignancies and vascular endothelium. Here we show that human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) localizes to the vasculature in both patients and in a xenograft model. A significant number of vascular tissue-associated AML cells (V-AML) integrate into vasculature in vivo and can fuse with endothelial cells. V-AML cells acquire several endothelial cell-like characteristics, including the upregulation of CD105, a receptor associated with activated endothelium. Remarkably, endothelial-integrated V-AML shows an almost fourfold reduction in proliferative activity compared with non-vascular-associated AML. Primary AML cells can be induced to downregulate the expression of their hematopoietic markers in vitro and differentiate into phenotypically and functionally defined endothelial-like cells. After transplantation, these leukemia-derived endothelial cells are capable of giving rise to AML. These novel functional interactions between AML cells and normal endothelium along with the reversible endothelial cell potential of AML suggest that vascular endothelium may serve as a previously unrecognized reservoir for AML. PMID:24637335

  9. MYELOID NEOPLASIA The derivation of diagnostic markers of chronic myeloid leukemia progression

    E-print Network

    Raftery, Adrian

    MYELOID NEOPLASIA The derivation of diagnostic markers of chronic myeloid leukemia progression from, limited molecular markers ex- ist that can determine where in the spec- trum of chronic myeloid leukemia-based treat- ment strategy at diagnosis. (Blood. 2009; 114:3292-3298) Introduction Chronic myeloid leukemia

  10. Germline duplication of ATG2B and GSKIP predisposes to familial myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Joseph; Saint-Martin, Cécile; Di Stefano, Antonio; Lenglet, Gaëlle; Marty, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Pasquier, Florence; Valle, Véronique Della; Secardin, Lise; Leroy, Gwendoline; Mahfoudhi, Emna; Grosjean, Sarah; Droin, Nathalie; Diop, M'boyba; Dessen, Philippe; Charrier, Sabine; Palazzo, Alberta; Merlevede, Jane; Meniane, Jean-Côme; Delaunay-Darivon, Christine; Fuseau, Pascal; Isnard, Françoise; Casadevall, Nicole; Solary, Eric; Debili, Najet; Bernard, Olivier A; Raslova, Hana; Najman, Albert; Vainchenker, William; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Plo, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    No major predisposition gene for familial myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has been identified. Here we demonstrate that the autosomal dominant transmission of a 700-kb duplication in four genetically related families predisposes to myeloid malignancies, including MPN, frequently progressing to leukemia. Using induced pluripotent stem cells and primary cells, we demonstrate that overexpression of ATG2B and GSKIP enhances hematopoietic progenitor differentiation, including of megakaryocytes, by increasing progenitor sensitivity to thrombopoietin (TPO). ATG2B and GSKIP cooperate with acquired JAK2, MPL and CALR mutations during MPN development. Thus, the germline duplication may change the fitness of cells harboring signaling pathway mutations and increases the probability of disease development. PMID:26280900

  11. Targeting Myeloid Cells to the Brain Using Non-Myeloablative Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Chotima; Fernández-Klett, Francisco; Gladow, Nadine; Rolfes, Simone; Priller, Josef

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) are able to colonize the central nervous system (CNS) at sites of damage. This ability makes BMDCs an ideal cellular vehicle for transferring therapeutic genes/molecules to the CNS. However, conditioning is required for bone marrow-derived myeloid cells to engraft in the brain, which so far has been achieved by total body irradiation (TBI) and by chemotherapy (e.g. busulfan treatment). Unfortunately, both regimens massively disturb the host’s hematopoietic compartment. Here, we established a conditioning protocol to target myeloid cells to sites of brain damage in mice using non-myeloablative focal head irradiation (HI). This treatment was associated with comparatively low inflammatory responses in the CNS despite cranial radiation doses which are identical to TBI, as revealed by gene expression analysis of cytokines/chemokines such as CCL2, CXCL10, TNF-? and CCL5. HI prior to bone marrow transplantation resulted in much lower levels of blood chimerism defined as the percentage of donor-derived cells in peripheral blood (< 5%) compared with TBI (> 95%) or busulfan treatment (>50%). Nevertheless, HI effectively recruited myeloid cells to the area of motoneuron degeneration in the brainstem within 7 days after facial nerve axotomy. In contrast, no donor-derived cells were detected in the lesioned facial nucleus of busulfan-treated animals up to 2 weeks after transplantation. Our findings suggest that myeloid cells can be targeted to sites of brain damage even in the presence of very low levels of peripheral blood chimerism. We established a novel non-myeloablative conditioning protocol with minimal disturbance of the host’s hematopoietic system for targeting BMDCs specifically to areas of pathology in the brain. PMID:24244666

  12. Dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a review.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Dolly G; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2009-04-01

    Deregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) activity is the molecular marker for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which provides an identifiable target for developing therapeutic agents. Imatinib mesylate, a BCR-ABL TK inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for CML. Despite the stunning efficacy of this agent, a small number of patients develop a suboptimal response or resistance to imatinib. In newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML, the rate of resistance to imatinib at 4 years was up to 20%, increasing to 70% to 90% for patients in the accelerated/blastic phase. Resistance to imatinib led to the development of novel TK inhibitors such as dasatinib. Several clinical trials have reported more durable complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses with this agent in patients who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib is well tolerated and has broad efficacy, resulting in durable responses in patients with any BCR-ABL mutation except for T3151 and mutations in codon 317 - most commonly F317L - including mutations that were highly resistant to imatinib, such as L248, Y253, E255, F359, and H396. Dasatinib is recommended for CML in chronic, blastic or accelerated phase that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib was approved by the FDA at 100 mg once daily as the starting dose in patients with chronic phase CML and at 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated or blastic phase CML. Various clinical trial results provided evidence that resistance to one TK inhibitor can be reversed with the use of a different TK inhibitor (TKI). Other second-generation TKIs with activity in CML include nilotinib, bosutinib and INNO 406. New molecules, such as the inhibitor of Aurora family serine-threonine kinases, MK0457, which has antileukemic activity in CML associated with a T315I mutation, are being investigated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains an option for selected patients. PMID:19536317

  13. Dasatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Dolly G; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M

    2009-01-01

    Deregulated BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase (TK) activity is the molecular marker for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which provides an identifiable target for developing therapeutic agents. Imatinib mesylate, a BCR-ABL TK inhibitor, is the frontline therapy for CML. Despite the stunning efficacy of this agent, a small number of patients develop a suboptimal response or resistance to imatinib. In newly diagnosed patients with chronic phase CML, the rate of resistance to imatinib at 4 years was up to 20%, increasing to 70% to 90% for patients in the accelerated/blastic phase. Resistance to imatinib led to the development of novel TK inhibitors such as dasatinib. Several clinical trials have reported more durable complete hematologic and cytogenetic responses with this agent in patients who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib is well tolerated and has broad efficacy, resulting in durable responses in patients with any BCR-ABL mutation except for T3151 and mutations in codon 317 – most commonly F317L – including mutations that were highly resistant to imatinib, such as L248, Y253, E255, F359, and H396. Dasatinib is recommended for CML in chronic, blastic or accelerated phase that is resistant or intolerant to imatinib. Dasatinib was approved by the FDA at 100 mg once daily as the starting dose in patients with chronic phase CML and at 70 mg twice daily in patients with accelerated or blastic phase CML. Various clinical trial results provided evidence that resistance to one TK inhibitor can be reversed with the use of a different TK inhibitor (TKI). Other second-generation TKIs with activity in CML include nilotinib, bosutinib and INNO 406. New molecules, such as the inhibitor of Aurora family serine-threonine kinases, MK0457, which has antileukemic activity in CML associated with a T315I mutation, are being investigated. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains an option for selected patients. PMID:19536317

  14. Adult neurogenesis in the decapod crustacean brain: A hematopoietic connection?

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Barbara S.; Zhang, Yi; Benton, Jeanne L.; Sandeman, David C.

    2011-01-01

    New neurons are produced and integrated into circuits in the adult brains of many organisms, including crustaceans. In some crustacean species, the 1st- generation neuronal precursors reside in a niche exhibiting characteristics analogous to mammalian neurogenic niches. However, unlike mammalian niches where several generations of neuronal precursors coexist, the lineage of precursor cells in crayfish is spatially separated allowing the influence of environmental and endogenous regulators on specific generations in the neuronal precursor lineage to be defined. Experiments also demonstrate that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish Procambarus clarkii are not self-renewing. A source external to the neurogenic niche must therefore provide cells that replenish the 1st-generation precursor pool, because although these cells divide and produce a continuous efflux of 2nd-generation cells from the niche, the population of 1st-generation niche precursors is not diminished with growth and aging. In vitro studies show that cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to involve serotonergic mechanisms. We propose that in crayfish, the hematopoietic system may be a source of cells that replenish the niche cell pool. These and other studies reviewed here establish decapod crustaceans as model systems in which the processes underlying adult neurogenesis, such as stem cell origins and transformation, can be readily explored. Studies in diverse species where adult neurogenesis occurs will result in a broader understanding of fundamental mechanisms and how evolutionary processes may have shaped the vertebrate/mammalian condition. PMID:21929622

  15. Genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on genetically different acute myeloid leukemia cell lines by inhibiting protein synthesis and cell proliferation while inducing apoptosis – molecular insights from an iTRAQ™ quantitative proteomics study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Teck Kwang; Port, Sarah Alexandra; Han, Jin-Hua; Chen, Chien-Shing; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a form of cancer that affects the hematopoietic precursor cells with lethal effects. We investigated the prospect of using genistein as an effective alternate therapy for AML. A two-cell line model, one possessing the FLT3 gene with the ITD mutation (MV4?11) and the other with the wildtype FLT3 gene (HL?60) has been employed. Our 8?plexed iTRAQ™?based quantitative proteomics analysis together with various functional studies demonstrated that genistein exerts anti-leukemic effects on both the AML cell lines. Genistein treatment on the AML cells showed that the drug arrested the mTOR pathway leading to down?regulation of protein synthesis. Additionally, genistein treatment is found to induce cell death via apoptosis. Contrasting regulatory effects of genistein on the cell cycle of the two cell lines were also identified, with the induction of G2/M phase arrest in HL-60 cells but not in MV4?11 cells. Hence, our study highlights the potent anti-leukemic effect of genistein on AML cells irrespective of their genetic status. This suggests the potential use of genistein as an effective general drug therapy for AML patients. PMID:25859554

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. CUX1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 7 frequently inactivated in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Christopher D.; Wang, Xiaoyue; Bartom, Elizabeth T.; Karmakar, Subhradip; Bandlamudi, Chaitanya; Yu, Shan; Ko, Jinkyung; Sandall, Barry P.; Stricker, Thomas; Anastasi, John; Grossman, Robert L.; Cunningham, John M.; Le Beau, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of chromosome 7 and del(7q) [?7/del(7q)] are recurring cytogenetic abnormalities in hematologic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms, and associated with an adverse prognosis. Despite intensive effort by many laboratories, the putative myeloid tumor suppressor(s) on chromosome 7 has not yet been identified. We performed transcriptome sequencing and SNP array analysis on de novo and therapy-related myeloid neoplasms, half with ?7/del(7q). We identified a 2.17-Mb commonly deleted segment on chromosome band 7q22.1 containing CUX1, a gene encoding a homeodomain-containing transcription factor. In 1 case, CUX1 was disrupted by a translocation, resulting in a loss-of-function RNA fusion transcript. CUX1 was the most significantly differentially expressed gene within the commonly deleted segment and was expressed at haploinsufficient levels in ?7/del(7q) leukemias. Haploinsufficiency of the highly conserved ortholog, cut, led to hemocyte overgrowth and tumor formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Similarly, haploinsufficiency of CUX1 gave human hematopoietic cells a significant engraftment advantage on transplantation into immunodeficient mice. Within the RNA-sequencing data, we identified a CUX1-associated cell cycle transcriptional gene signature, suggesting that CUX1 exerts tumor suppressor activity by regulating proliferative genes. These data identify CUX1 as a conserved, haploinsufficient tumor suppressor frequently deleted in myeloid neoplasms. PMID:23212519

  18. Functional Analysis of Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Expression Using Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Although several reports have characterized the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transcriptome, the roles of HSC-specific genes in hematopoiesis remain elusive. To identify candidate regulators of HSC fate decisions, we compared the transcriptome of human umbilical cord blood and bone marrow CD34+CD33?CD38?Rholoc-kit+ cells, enriched for hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells with CD34+CD33?CD38?Rhohi cells, enriched in committed progenitors. We identified 277 differentially expressed transcripts conserved in these ontogenically distinct cell sources. We next performed a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (MO)-based functional screen in zebrafish to determine the hematopoietic function of 61 genes that had no previously known function in HSC biology and for which a likely zebrafish ortholog could be identified. MO knock down of 14/61 (23%) of the differentially expressed transcripts resulted in hematopoietic defects in developing zebrafish embryos, as demonstrated by altered levels of circulating blood cells at 30 and 48 h postfertilization and subsequently confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR for erythroid-specific hbae1 and myeloid-specific lcp1 transcripts. Recapitulating the knockdown phenotype using a second MO of independent sequence, absence of the phenotype using a mismatched MO sequence, and rescue of the phenotype by cDNA-based overexpression of the targeted transcript for zebrafish spry4 confirmed the specificity of MO targeting in this system. Further characterization of the spry4-deficient zebrafish embryos demonstrated that hematopoietic defects were not due to more widespread defects in the mesodermal development, and therefore represented primary defects in HSC specification, proliferation, and/or differentiation. Overall, this high-throughput screen for the functional validation of differentially expressed genes using a zebrafish model of hematopoiesis represents a major step toward obtaining meaningful information from global gene profiling of HSCs. PMID:16089502

  19. Phosphatase of regenerating liver in hematopoietic stem cells and hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Chen, Sisi; Gao, Rui; Bai, Yunpeng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), consisting PRL1, PRL2 and PRL3, are dual-specificity protein phosphatases that have been implicated as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in several solid tumors. However, their roles in hematological malignancies are largely unknown. Recent findings demonstrate that PRL2 is important for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. In addition, both PRL2 and PRL3 are highly expressed in some hematological malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), multiple myeloma (MM) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Moreover, PRL deficiency impairs the proliferation and survival of leukemia cells through regulating oncogenic signaling pathways. While PRLs are potential novel therapeutic targets in hematological malignancies, their exact biological function and cellular substrates remain unclear. This review will discuss how PRLs regulate hematopoietic stem cell behavior, what signaling pathways are regulated by PRLs, and how to target PRLs in hematological malignancies. An improved understanding of how PRLs function and how they are regulated may facilitate the development of PRL inhibitors that are effective in cancer treatment. PMID:25486470

  20. Elevated Mcl-1 perturbs lymphopoiesis, promotes transformation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, and enhances drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kirsteen J.; Bath, Mary L.; Turner, Marian L.; Vandenberg, Cassandra J.; Bouillet, Philippe; Metcalf, Donald; Scott, Clare L.

    2010-01-01

    Diverse human cancers with poor prognosis, including many lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, exhibit high levels of Mcl-1. To explore the impact of Mcl-1 overexpression on the hematopoietic compartment, we have generated vavP-Mcl-1 transgenic mice. Their lymphoid and myeloid cells displayed increased resistance to a variety of cytotoxic agents. Myelopoiesis was relatively normal, but lymphopoiesis was clearly perturbed, with excess mature B and T cells accumulating. Rather than the follicular lymphomas typical of vavP-BCL-2 mice, aging vavP-Mcl-1 mice were primarily susceptible to lymphomas having the phenotype of a stem/progenitor cell (11 of 30 tumors) or pre-B cell (12 of 30 tumors). Mcl-1 overexpression dramatically accelerated Myc-driven lymphomagenesis. Most vavP-Mcl-1/ E?-Myc mice died around birth, and transplantation of blood from bitransgenic E18 embryos into unirradiated mice resulted in stem/progenitor cell tumors. Furthermore, lethally irradiated mice transplanted with E13 fetal liver cells from Mcl-1/Myc bitransgenic mice uniformly died of stem/progenitor cell tumors. When treated in vivo with cyclophosphamide, tumors coexpressing Mcl-1 and Myc transgenes were significantly more resistant than conventional E?-Myc lymphomas. Collectively, these results demonstrate that Mcl-1 overexpression renders hematopoietic cells refractory to many cytotoxic insults, perturbs lymphopoiesis and promotes malignant transformation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:20631380

  1. Distinct Sources of Hematopoietic Progenitors Emerge before HSCs and Provide Functional Blood Cells in the Mammalian Embryo.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Fegan, Katherine H; Bowen, James R; Conway, Simon J; Catherman, Seana C; Kingsley, Paul D; Koniski, Anne D; Palis, James

    2015-06-30

    Hematopoietic potential arises in mammalian embryos before adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). At embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5), we show the first murine definitive erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) have an immunophenotype distinct from primitive hematopoietic progenitors, maturing megakaryocytes and macrophages, and rare B cell potential. EMPs emerge in the yolk sac with erythroid and broad myeloid, but not lymphoid, potential. EMPs migrate to the fetal liver and rapidly differentiate, including production of circulating neutrophils by E11.5. Although the surface markers, transcription factors, and lineage potential associated with EMPs overlap with those found in adult definitive hematopoiesis, they are present in unique combinations or proportions that result in a specialized definitive embryonic progenitor. Furthermore, we find that embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived hematopoiesis recapitulates early yolk sac hematopoiesis, including primitive, EMP, and rare B cell potential. EMPs do not have long-term potential when transplanted in immunocompromised adults, but they can provide transient adult-like RBC reconstitution. PMID:26095363

  2. Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays CONNIEEAVES,CINDYMILLER,JOHANNE CASHMAN Columbia, Canada Key Words.Hematopoietic stem cells Transplantation Cord blood. Expansion Growthfactors murine hematopoietic stem cells to be quantitated. Measurements of murine CRU have shown

  3. The Role of PTEN in Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Torti, Davide; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    PTEN deletion in the mouse and in the zebrafish highlights the essential role of this tumor suppressor in the development of myeloid malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia and myeloproliferative disorders. In humans, extensive genetic sequences of myeloid malignancies did not reveal recurrent PTEN mutations and deletions. However, PTEN was shown to be functionally inactivated in several acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia samples, through both post-trasductional modifications, changes in protein levels and cellular compartmentalization. Notably, non genomic inactivation of PTEN in myeloid malignancies could represent a challenging therapeutic opportunity for these diseases. Targeting those mechanisms that affect PTEN function could indeed promote PTEN reactivation with consequent cancer selective apoptosis induction. In this review we will describe the role of PTEN in the development of myeloid malignancies.

  4. Molecular Pathways: Myeloid Complicity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic phenotype. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifesta continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. PMID:25047706

  5. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes.

    PubMed

    Zambetti, Noemi A; Bindels, Eric M J; Van Strien, Paulina M H; Valkhof, Marijke G; Adisty, Maria N; Hoogenboezem, Remco M; Sanders, Mathijs A; Rommens, Johanna M; Touw, Ivo P; Raaijmakers, Marc H G P

    2015-10-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ? (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  6. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zambetti, Noemi A.; Bindels, Eric M. J.; Van Strien, Paulina M. H.; Valkhof, Marijke G.; Adisty, Maria N.; Hoogenboezem, Remco M.; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Touw, Ivo P.; Raaijmakers, Marc H. G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein ? (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  7. Characterization of hematopoietic progenitors from human yolk sacs and embryos.

    PubMed

    Huyhn, A; Dommergues, M; Izac, B; Croisille, L; Katz, A; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1995-12-15

    Hematopoiesis first arises in the extraembryonic yolk sac, and it is generally believed that yolk sac-derived stem cells migrate and seed the fetal liver at approximately week 6 of development in humans. Recently, the identification at day 8.5 to 9 of multipotential stem cells in intraembryonic sites different from the liver suggests that the establishment of hematopoiesis might be more complex than initially believed. In an attempt to understand initial steps of hematopoiesis during human ontogeny, we characterized clonogenic myeloid progenitor cells in human yolk sacs and corresponding embryos at 25 to 50 days of development. Most erythroid colonies derived from the yolk sacs differed from adult marrow-derived progenitors in that they also contained cells of the granulomacrophagic lineage, suggesting that they were pluripotent and exhibited a different response to cytokines. Furthermore, a subclass of nonerythroid progenitors generated very large granulomacrophagic colonies, some of which generated secondary erythroid colonies on replating. Analysis of the distribution of progenitors revealed that in contrast to erythroid progenitors, whose numbers were equally distributed between the yolk sac and the embryo, 80% of the nonerythroid progenitors were found in the embryo at stages II and III. Interestingly, a high proportion of nonerythroid progenitors (including high proliferative potential cells) was present in colony assays initiated with cells remaining after the liver has been removed. These findings were validated in colony assays established with CD34+ cells purified from extraembryonic yolk sacs and intraembryonic tissues. Increased knowledge about the biology of hematopoietic stem cells early in life may help to further understanding of the mechanisms associated with the restriction in proliferative and differentiative potential observed in the adult hematopoietic stem cell compartment. PMID:8541536

  8. Transduction of human NOD/SCID-repopulating cells with both lymphoid and myeloid potential by foamy virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Josephson, Neil C.; Vassilopoulos, George; Trobridge, Grant D.; Priestley, Greg V.; Wood, Brent L.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Russell, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells by oncoretroviral vectors is too low for effective gene therapy of most hematologic diseases. Retroviral vectors based on the nonpathogenic foamy viruses (FV) are an alternative gene-transfer system. In this study, human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with FV vectors by a single 10-h exposure to vector stocks and then injected into sublethally irradiated nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. At 5–7 weeks after transplantation, high transgene expression rates were observed in engrafted human hematopoietic cells, including over 60% of clonogenic progenitors. Significant transgene silencing did not occur. We developed an approach for expanding human cell populations derived from transplanted mice to show that multiple SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) had been transduced, including some that were capable of both lymphoid and myeloid differentiation. These findings demonstrate for the first time that human pluripotent (lympho-myeloid) hematopoietic stem cells repopulate NOD/SCID mice and can be efficiently transduced by FV vectors. PMID:12060773

  9. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, L D; Rao, T N; Rowe, R G; Nguyen, P T; Sullivan, J L; Pearson, D S; Doulatov, S; Wu, L; Lindsley, R C; Zhu, H; DeAngelo, D J; Daley, G Q; Wagers, A J

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration and tumor progression. Dysregulated MC development leads to systemic mastocytosis (SM), a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused MC accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-MC progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced MC specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced MCs appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of MC terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human MC leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal MCs from patients with SM. This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in MC disease. PMID:25655194

  10. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the developing world: experience from a center in Western India.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag A; Karanwal, Arun; Desai, Maharshi; Pandya, Munjal; Shah, Ravish; Shah, Rutvij

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience of first 50 consecutive hematopoietic stem-cell transplants (HSCT) done between 2007 and 2012 at the Apollo Hospital, Gandhinagar, 35 autologous HSCT and 15 allogeneic HSCT. Indications for autologous transplant were multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and acute myeloid leukemia, and indications for allogeneic transplants were thalassemia major, aplastic anaemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukaemia. The median age of autologous and allogeneic patient's cohort was 50 years and 21 years, respectively. Median follow-up period for all patients was 39 months. Major early complications were infections, mucositis, acute graft versus host disease, and venoocclusive disease. All of our allogeneic and autologous transplant patients survived during the first month of transplant. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 20% (N = 3) in our allogeneic and 3% (N = 1) in autologous patients. Causes of these deaths were disease relapse, sepsis, hemorrhagic complications, and GVHD. 46% of our autologous and 47% of our allogeneic patients are in complete remission phase after a median follow-up of 39 months. 34% of our autologous patients and 13% of our allogeneic patients had disease relapse. Overall survival rate in our autologous and allogeneic patients is 65.7% and 57.1%, respectively. Our results are comparable to many national and international published reports. PMID:25722722

  11. Hematopoietic lineage skewing and intestinal epithelia degeneration in aged mice with telomerase RNA component deletion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichun; Bryant, Mark A; Dent, James J; Sun, Yu; Desierto, Marie J; Young, Neal S

    2015-12-01

    A deletion of a telomerase RNA component (Terc(-/-)) in C57BL/6 (B6) mice resulted in hematopoietic lineage skewing with increased neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and decreased red blood cells and CD45R(+) B lymphocytes when animals reach ages older than 12months. There was no decline in bone marrow (BM) c-Kit(+)Sca-1(+)Lin(-) (KSL) cells in old Terc(-/-) mice, and the lineage skewing phenomenon was not transferred when BM cells from old Terc(-/-) donors were transplanted into young B6 recipients. Necropsy and histological examinations found minimal to no change in the lung, spleen and liver but detected severe epithelia degeneration, ulceration and infection in small and large intestines, leading to enteritis, typhlitis and colitis in old Terc(-/-) mice. In a mouse model of dextran-sulfate-sodium-induced typhlitis and colitis, development of intestinal pathology was associated with increases in neutrophils and CD11b(+) myeloid cells and a decrease in CD45R(+) B cells, similar to those observed in old Terc(-/-) mice. Treatment of 11-13month old Terc(-/-) mice with antibiotic trimethoprim-sulfa water reduced neutrophils and myeloid cells and increased B lymphocytes in the blood, indicating that mitigation of intestinal infection and inflammation could alleviate hematological abnormalities in old Terc(-/-) animals. PMID:26523501

  12. Relapse risk in patients with malignant diseases given allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after nonmyeloablative conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kahl, Christoph; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Mielcarek, Marco; Maris, Michael B.; Blume, Karl G.; Niederwieser, Dietger; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Forman, Stephen J.; Agura, Edward; Leis, Jose F.; Bruno, Benedetto; Langston, Amelia; Pulsipher, Michael A.; McSweeney, Peter A.; Wade, James C.; Epner, Elliot; Bo Petersen, Finn; Bethge, Wolfgang A.; Maloney, David G.

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after nonmyeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies depends on graft-versus-tumor effects for eradication of cancer. Here, we estimated relapse risks according to disease characteristics. Between 1997 and 2006, 834 consecutive patients (median age, 55 years; range, 5-74 years) received related (n = 498) or unrelated (n = 336) HCT after 2 Gy total body irradiation alone (n = 171) or combined with fludarabine (90 mg/m2; n = 663). Relapse rates per patient year (PY) at risk, corrected for follow-up and competing nonrelapse mortality, were calculated for 29 different diseases and stages. The overall relapse rate per PY was 0.36. Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in remission (CR), low-grade or mantle cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (CR + partial remission [PR]), and high-grade NHL-CR had the lowest rates (0.00-0.24; low risk). In contrast, patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had rates of more than 0.52 (high risk). Patients with lymphoproliferative diseases not in CR (except Hodgkin lymphoma and high-grade NHL) and myeloid malignancies in CR had rates of 0.26-0.37 (standard risk). In conclusion, patients with low-grade lymphoproliferative disorders experienced the lowest relapse rates, whereas patients with advanced myeloid and lymphoid malignancies had high relapse rates after nonmyeloablative HCT. The latter might benefit from cytoreductive treatment before HCT. PMID:17595333

  13. PRL-2 increases Epo and IL-3 responses in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Shoko; Dhavan, Deepika; Yi, Taolin

    2010-04-15

    Dual specificity protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL-2 is overexpressed in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is located at human chromosome 1p35, a region often rearranged or amplified in malignant lymphoma and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Little is known of the significance of PRL-2 expression in hematopoietic malignancies. Herein we demonstrated that ectopic expression of PRL-2 in murine pre-B-cell line Baf3ER and mouse bone marrow cells induced key features associated with malignant progression and metastasis. PRL-2-transfected Baf3ER cells had augmented growth responses to hematopoietic growth factors Epo or IL-3 with shortened cell cycle, reduced requirement (5x) for Epo in cell survival, increased cell migration (3x), reduced cell adhesion (5x), and conversion to an immature cell morphology in association with increased expression (3x) of stem cell marker Bmi-1. When transduced into mouse bone marrow cells, PRL-2 increased Epo-induced colony formation (4x) and gave rise to larger colonies. These observations provide evidences implicating PRL-2 as a pathogenic molecule in hematopoietic malignancies and suggest its potential as a novel therapeutic target. PMID:20226699

  14. Transcriptional fine-tuning of microRNA-223 levels directs lineage choice of human hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Vian, L; Di Carlo, M; Pelosi, E; Fazi, F; Santoro, S; Cerio, A M; Boe, A; Rotilio, V; Billi, M; Racanicchi, S; Testa, U; Grignani, F; Nervi, C

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell proliferation, differentiation and death during development and postnatal life. The expression level of mature miRNAs results from complex molecular mechanisms, including the transcriptional regulation of their genes. MiR-223 is a hematopoietic-specific miRNA participating in regulatory signaling networks involving lineage-specific transcription factors (TFs). However, the transcriptional mechanisms governing its expression levels and its functional role in lineage fate decision of human hematopoietic progenitors (HPCs) have not yet been clarified. We found that in CD34+HPCs undergoing unilineage differentiation/maturation, miR-223 is upregulated more than 10-fold during granulopoiesis, 3-fold during monocytopoiesis and maintained at low levels during erythropoiesis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter luciferase assays showed that the lineage-specific expression level of mature miR-223 is controlled by the coordinated binding of TFs to their DNA-responsive elements located in ‘distal' and ‘proximal' regulatory regions of the miR-223 gene, differentially regulating the transcription of two primary transcripts (pri-miRs). All this drives myeloid progenitor maturation into specific lineages. Accordingly, modulation of miR-223 activity in CD34+HPCs and myeloid cell lines significantly affects their differentiation/maturation into erythroid, granulocytic and monocytic/macrophagic lineages. MiR-223 overexpression increases granulopoiesis and impairs erythroid and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Its knockdown, meanwhile, impairs granulopoiesis and facilitates erythropoiesis and monocytic/macrophagic differentiation. Overall, our data reveal that transcriptional pathways acting on the differential regulation of two pri-miR transcripts results in the fine-tuning of a single mature miRNA expression level, which dictates the lineage fate decision of hematopoietic myeloid progenitors. PMID:24141720

  15. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Images PMID:7914701

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Cultures and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Benjamin J.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The adult hematopoietic system is repopulated in its entirety from a rare cell type known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that reside in the marrow space throughout the skeletal system. Here we describe the isolation and identification of HSCs both phenotypically and functionally. PMID:24482184

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell cultures and assays.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Benjamin J; Calvi, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    The adult hematopoietic system is repopulated in its entirety from a rare cell type known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that reside in the marrow space throughout the skeletal system. Here we describe the isolation and identification of HSCs both phenotypically and functionally. PMID:24482184

  18. Rapid decline of chronic myeloid leukemic cells in long-term culture due to a defect at the leukemic stem cell level.

    PubMed Central

    Udomsakdi, C; Eaves, C J; Swolin, B; Reid, D S; Barnett, M J; Eaves, A C

    1992-01-01

    In this report we describe a quantitative in vitro assay for the most primitive type of leukemic precursors yet defined in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This assay is based on the recently described "long-term culture-initiating cell" (LTC-IC) assay for primitive normal human hematopoietic cells. Such cells, when cocultured with competent fibroblast feeder layers, give rise after a minimum of 5 weeks to multiple single and multilineage clonogenic progenitors detectable in secondary semisolid assay cultures. Similar cultures initiated by seeding a highly enriched source of leukemic cells from patients onto normal feeders showed the clonogenic cell output after 5 weeks to be linearly related to the input innoculum over a wide range down to limiting numbers of input cells, thus allowing absolute frequencies of leukemic LTC-ICs to be determined using standard limiting dilution analysis techniques. Leukemic LTC-IC concentrations in CML marrow were found to be decreased, on average to less than 10% of the normal LTC-IC concentration in normal marrow, but were greatly increased (up to greater than 10(5) times) in CML blood. Assessment of the number of clonogenic cells produced per leukemic LTC-IC by comparison to normal blood or marrow LTC-IC values showed this function to be unchanged in leukemic LTC-ICs [i.e., 3.1 +/- 0.4 clonogenic cells per CML LTC-IC (mean +/- SEM, n = 6) versus 3.7 +/- 1.2 (n = 3) and 4.3 +/- 0.4 (n = 5), respectively, for normal blood and marrow LTC-ICs]. In contrast, leukemic LTC-IC maintenance in LTC proved to be highly defective by comparison to normal LTC-IC of either blood or marrow origin. Thus, when cells from primary LTC were subcultured into secondary LTC-IC assays, leukemic LTC-IC rapidly declined (greater than 30-fold) within the first 10 days of culture, whereas normal LTC-IC numbers remained unchanged during this period. These findings illustrate how self-maintenance and differentiation events in primitive human hematopoietic cells can be differentially modulated by an oncogenic process and provide a framework for further studies of their manipulation, analysis, and therapeutic exploitation. PMID:1631107

  19. Olive leaf components apigenin 7-glucoside and luteolin 7-glucoside direct human hematopoietic stem cell differentiation towards erythroid lineage.

    PubMed

    Samet, Imen; Villareal, Myra O; Motojima, Hideko; Han, Junkyu; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko

    2015-06-01

    The generation of blood cellular components from hematopoietic stem cells is important for the therapy of a broad spectrum of hematological disorders. In recent years, several lines of evidence suggested that certain nutrients, vitamins and flavonoids may have important roles in controlling the stem cell fate decision by maintaining their self-renewal or stimulating the lineage-specific differentiation. In this study, main olive leaf phytochemicals oleuropein (Olp), apigenin 7-glucoside (Api7G) and luteolin 7-glucoside (Lut7G) were investigated for their potential effects on hematopoietic stem cell differentiation using both phenotypic and molecular analysis. Oleuropein and the combination of the three compounds enhanced the differentiation of CD34+ cells into myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes progenitors and inhibited the commitment to megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages. Treatment with Lut7G stimulated both the erythroid and the myeloid differentiation, while treatment with Api7G specifically induced the differentiation of CD34+ cells towards the erythroid lineage and inhibited the myeloid differentiation. Erythroid differentiation induced by Api7G and Lut7G treatments was confirmed by the increase in hemoglobin genes expressions (?-hemoglobin, ?-hemoglobin and ?-hemoglobin) and erythroid transcription factor GATA1 expression. As revealed by microarray analysis, the mechanisms underlying the erythroid differentiation-inducing effect of Api7G on hematopoietic stem cells involves the activation of JAK/STAT signaling pathway. These findings prove the differentiation-inducing effects of olive leaf compounds on hematopoietic stem cells and highlight their potential use in the ex vivo generation of blood cells. PMID:26299581

  20. Different expression of CD41 on human lymphoid and myeloid progenitors from adults and neonates.

    PubMed

    Debili, N; Robin, C; Schiavon, V; Letestu, R; Pflumio, F; Mitjavila-Garcia, M T; Coulombel, L; Vainchenker, W

    2001-04-01

    The glycoprotein (Gp) IIb/IIIa integrin, also called CD41, is the platelet receptor for fibrinogen and several other extracellular matrix molecules. Recent evidence suggests that its expression is much wider in the hematopoietic system than was previously thought. To investigate the precise expression of the CD41 antigen during megakaryocyte (MK) differentiation, CD34(+) cells from cord blood and mobilized blood cells from adults were grown for 6 days in the presence of stem cell factor and thrombopoietin. Two different pathways of differentiation were observed: one in the adult and one in the neonate cells. In the neonate samples, early MK differentiation proceeded from CD34(+)CD41(-) through a CD34(-)CD41(+)CD42(-) stage of differentiation to more mature cells. In contrast, in the adult samples, CD41 and CD42 were co-expressed on a CD34(+) cell. The rare CD34(+)CD41(+)CD42(-) cell subset in neonates was not committed to MK differentiation but contained cells with all myeloid and lymphoid potentialities along with long-term culture initiating cells (LTC-ICs) and nonobese diabetic/severe combined immune-deficient repopulating cells. In the adult samples, the CD34(+)CD41(+)CD42(-) subset was enriched in MK progenitors, but also contained erythroid progenitors, rare myeloid progenitors, and some LTC-ICs. All together, these results demonstrate that the CD41 antigen is expressed at a low level on primitive hematopoietic cells with a myeloid and lymphoid potential and that its expression is ontogenically regulated, leading to marked differences in the surface antigenic properties of differentiating megakaryocytic cells from neonates and adults. (Blood. 2001;97:2023-2030) PMID:11264167

  1. The tumor suppressor menin regulates hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation by influencing Hox gene expression.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Xiong; Yan, Jizhou; Keeshan, Karen; Tubbs, Anthony T; Wang, Haoren; Silva, Albert; Brown, Eric J; Hess, Jay L; Pear, Warren S; Hua, Xianxin

    2006-01-24

    Menin is the product of the tumor suppressor gene Men1 that is mutated in the inherited tumor syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). Menin has been shown to interact with SET-1 domain-containing histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferases including mixed lineage leukemia proteins to regulate homeobox (Hox) gene expression in vitro. Using conditional Men1 knockout mice, we have investigated the requirement for menin in hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation. Men1 excision causes reduction of Hoxa9 expression, colony formation by hematopoietic progenitors, and the peripheral white blood cell count. Menin directly activates Hoxa9 expression, at least in part, by binding to the Hoxa9 locus, facilitating methylation of H3K4, and recruiting the methylated H3K4 binding protein chd1 to the locus. Consistent with signaling downstream of menin, ectopic expression of both Hoxa9 and Meis1 rescues colony formation defects in Men1-excised bone marrow. Moreover, Men1 excision also suppresses proliferation of leukemogenic mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 fusion-protein-transformed myeloid cells and Hoxa9 expression. These studies uncover an important role for menin in both normal hematopoiesis and myeloid transformation and provide a mechanistic understanding of menin's function in these processes that may be used for therapy. PMID:16415155

  2. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Patients with MDS

    PubMed Central

    Shadman, Mazyar; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) increases with age. While several therapeutic modalities have been developed, for most of these patients the only treatment with curative potential is allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The development of reduced/low intensity transplant conditioning regimens allows to successfully transplant patients in their ‘60s and even ‘70s, although comorbidities may determine who does come to transplantation and who does not. Also, as many as half of the patients will develop graft versus host disease (GVHD), even with HLA matched donors, requiring therapy for extended periods of time, and GVHD and treatment with glucocorticoids is likely to impact the quality of life. Nevertheless, dependent upon disease stage at HCT, the presence of comorbidities and the regimen used, 30% to 50% of patients 60 years of age or older, may survive long-term cured of their disease. Future studies should focus on the incorporation of non-transplant modalities into the overall transplant approach, the prevention of GVHD, and the utilization of immunotherapy to reduce the incidence of relapse and GVHD and further improve overall transplant success. PMID:25237469

  3. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 ?Ci/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  4. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagaraj, Srinivas; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2007-01-01

    The development of tumor-specific T cell tolerance is largely responsible for tumor escape. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in animal tumor models as well as in cancer patients is involved in tumor-associated T cell tolerance. In recent years, it has become increasingly evident that MDSCs bring about antigen-specific T cell tolerance by various mechanisms, which is the focus of this chapter. PMID:17713008

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell origin of BRAFV600E mutations in hairy cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Stephen S; Kim, Eunhee; Park, Jae H; Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F; Melnick, Ari M; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S; Park, Christopher Y; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2014-05-28

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells-all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  7. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J.; Huang, Christene A.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model. PMID:26635868

  8. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes1, but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing2–4 to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), leading to clonal outgrowth and myeloid malignancy. We thereby generated models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with cooperating mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors, and mediators of cytokine signaling, recapitulating the combinations of mutations observed in the human disease. Our results suggest that lentivirus-delivered sgRNA:Cas9 genome editing should be useful to engineer a broad array of in vivo cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease. PMID:24952903

  9. Chemokine polyreactivity of IL7R?+CSF-1R+ lympho-myeloid progenitors in the developing fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Kajikhina, Katja; Melchers, Fritz; Tsuneto, Motokazu

    2015-01-01

    In murine ontogeny, fetal liver is the major hemato- and B-lymphopoietic site until birth. Hematopoiesis develops in largely non-hematopoietic niches, which provide contacts, chemokines and cytokines that induce migration, residence, proliferation and differentiation of progenitors. Within early multipotent progenitors an IL7R?+CSF-1R+ subset expressed a mixture of lymphoid- and myeloid-specific genes and differentiated to lymphoid and myeloid lineages in vitro. By contrast, IL7R?+ cells were lymphoid-committed, and CSF-1R+ cells were erythro-myeloid-restricted. To respond to a multitude of chemokines single biphenotypic cells expressed CXCR4 and as many as five other chemokine receptors. The monopotent IL7R?+ and CSF-1R+progenitors all expressed CXCR4, and mutually exclusive, more restricted sets of the analysed five chemokine receptors. This study proposes that chemokine polyreactive, cytokine-bipotent and monopotent progenitors transmigrate through LYVE-1high endothelium, attracted by selected chemokines, and reach the IL7- and CSF-1-producing ALCAMhigh mesenchymal niche, attracted by other sets of chemokines, to differentiate to B-lymphoid respectively myeloid cells. PMID:26235516

  10. Activin A in combination with OP9 cells facilitates development of Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(-) and Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(+) hematopoietic mesodermal cells from murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Saeka; Ogawa, Minetaro

    2015-11-20

    Lateral mesoderm-derived hemogenic endothelial cells are known to originate the definitive hematopoietic lineage in mouse embryogenesis. The developmental process of the definitive hematopoietic lineage can be recapitulated by inducing differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in a co-culture system with OP9 stromal cells. However, the signaling molecules that can modulate the development of the definitive hematopoietic lineage in the OP9 co-culture system have yet to be identified. Here we report that activin A enhanced the hematopoietic potential of endothelial cells derived from ES cells in the OP9 co-culture system. Activin A in combination with OP9 cells augmented development of Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(+) early mesodermal cells and Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(-) lateral mesodermal cells from ES cells. These Flk-1(+) mesodermal cells further differentiated into CD41(+) endothelial cells, which preferentially possessed high hematopoietic potential. Furthermore, Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(+) cells but not Flk-1(+) PDGFR?(-) cells produced hematopoietic progenitors with a bimodal pattern when cultured as an aggregate with OP9 cells. Our results suggest that activin A in combination with OP9 cells facilitates differentiation of ES cells to Flk-1(+) mesodermal cells, which encompass various precursors that separately contribute to the development of hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26417686

  11. Clostridium difficile infection in Chilean patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pilcante, Javier; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Bertin, Pablo; García, Maria; Rodriguez, Maria; Jara, Veronica; Ajenjo, Maria; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection and multiple risk factors have been identified. Published reports have indicated an incidence from 9% to 30% of transplant patients however to date there is no information about infection in these patients in Chile. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who developed C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations from 2000 to 2013. Statistical analysis used the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were studied (mean age: 39 years; range: 17–69), with 147 (59%) receiving allogeneic transplants and 103 (41%) receiving autologous transplants. One hundred and ninety-two (77%) patients had diarrhea, with 25 (10%) cases of C. difficile infection being confirmed. Twenty infected patients had undergone allogeneic transplants, of which ten had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, three had acute myeloid leukemia and seven had other diseases (myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia). In the autologous transplant group, five patients had C. difficile infection; two had multiple myeloma, one had amyloidosis, one had acute myeloid leukemia and one had germinal carcinoma. The overall incidence of C. difficile infection was 4% within the first week, 6.4% in the first month and 10% in one year, with no difference in overall survival between infected and non-infected groups (72.0% vs. 67.6%, respectively; p-value = 0.56). Patients infected after allogeneic transplants had a slower time to neutrophil engraftment compared to non-infected patients (17.5 vs. 14.9 days, respectively; p-value = 0.008). In the autologous transplant group there was no significant difference in the neutrophil engraftment time between infected and non-infected patients (12.5 days vs. 11.8 days, respectively; p-value = 0.71). In the allogeneic transplant group, the median time to acute graft-versus-host disease was similar between the two groups (p-value = 0.08), as was the incidence of grades 1–4 acute graft-versus-host disease (40% vs. 48%; p-value >0.05). Conclusion The incidence of C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was low, with a significant number of cases occurring shortly after transplantation. Allogeneic transplants had a three-time higher risk of infection compared to autologous transplants, but this was not associated with increased mortality, decreased overall survival or higher risk of acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:26670401

  12. Thrombomucin, a Novel Cell Surface Protein that Defines Thrombocytes and Multipotent Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McNagny, Kelly M.; Pettersson, Inger; Rossi, Fabio; Flamme, Ingo; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Graf, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    MEP21 is an avian antigen specifically expressed on the surface of Myb-Ets–transformed multipotent hematopoietic precursors (MEPs) and of normal thrombocytes. Using nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we have sequenced and subsequently cloned the MEP21 cDNA and named the gene thrombomucin as it encodes a 571–amino acid protein with an extracellular domain typical of the mucin family of proteoglycans. Thrombomucin is distantly related to CD34, the best characterized and most used human hematopoietic stem cell marker. It is also highly homologous in its transmembrane/intracellular domain to podocalyxinlike protein–1, a rabbit cell surface glycoprotein of kidney podocytes. Single cell analysis of yolk sac cells from 3-d-old chick embryos revealed that thrombomucin is expressed on the surface of both lineage-restricted and multipotent progenitors. In the bone marrow, thrombomucin is also expressed on mono- and multipotent progenitors, showing an overlapping but distinct expression pattern from that of the receptor-type stem cell marker c-kit. These observations strengthen the notion that the Myb-Ets oncoprotein can induce the proliferation of thrombomucin-positive hematopoietic progenitors that have retained the capacity to differentiate along multiple lineages. They also suggest that thrombomucin and CD34 form a family of stem cell–specific proteins with possibly overlapping functions in early hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:9298993

  13. Absence of a red blood cell phenotype in mice with hematopoietic deficiency of SEC23B.

    PubMed

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P; Jones, Morgan; Everett, Lesley; Chase, Jennifer; Tao, Jiayi; Siemieniak, David; Zhang, Bin; Maillard, Ivan; Ginsburg, David

    2014-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease of ineffective erythropoiesis characterized by increased bi/multinucleated erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. CDAII results from mutations in SEC23B. The SEC23 protein is a core component of coat protein complex II-coated vesicles, which transport secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Though the genetic defect underlying CDAII has been identified, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration, with this early mortality limiting evaluation of the adult hematopoietic compartment. We now report that mice with SEC23B deficiency restricted to the hematopoietic compartment survive normally and do not exhibit anemia or other CDAII characteristics. We also demonstrate that SEC23B-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) do not exhibit a disadvantage at reconstituting hematopoiesis when compared directly to wild-type HSC in a competitive repopulation assay. Secondary bone marrow transplants demonstrated continued equivalence of SEC23B-deficient and WT HSC in their hematopoietic reconstitution potential. The surprising discordance in phenotypes between SEC23B-deficient mice and humans may reflect an evolutionary shift in SEC23 paralog function and/or expression, or a change in a specific COPII cargo critical for erythropoiesis. PMID:25071156

  14. Absence of a Red Blood Cell Phenotype in Mice with Hematopoietic Deficiency of SEC23B

    PubMed Central

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Jones, Morgan; Everett, Lesley; Chase, Jennifer; Tao, Jiayi; Siemieniak, David; Zhang, Bin; Maillard, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease of ineffective erythropoiesis characterized by increased bi/multinucleated erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. CDAII results from mutations in SEC23B. The SEC23 protein is a core component of coat protein complex II-coated vesicles, which transport secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Though the genetic defect underlying CDAII has been identified, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration, with this early mortality limiting evaluation of the adult hematopoietic compartment. We now report that mice with SEC23B deficiency restricted to the hematopoietic compartment survive normally and do not exhibit anemia or other CDAII characteristics. We also demonstrate that SEC23B-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) do not exhibit a disadvantage at reconstituting hematopoiesis when compared directly to wild-type HSC in a competitive repopulation assay. Secondary bone marrow transplants demonstrated continued equivalence of SEC23B-deficient and WT HSC in their hematopoietic reconstitution potential. The surprising discordance in phenotypes between SEC23B-deficient mice and humans may reflect an evolutionary shift in SEC23 paralog function and/or expression, or a change in a specific COPII cargo critical for erythropoiesis. PMID:25071156

  15. Chimerism of bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Yasuo; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Yao, Hisayuki; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi; Maekawa, Taira; Ichinohe, Tatsuo

    2013-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been extensively used as a transplantable cell source for regenerative medicine and immunomodulatory therapy. Specifically in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), co-transplantation or post-transplant infusion of MSCs derived from bone marrow (BM) of non-self donors has been implicated in accelerating hematopoietic recovery, ameliorating graft-vs.-host disease, and promoting tissue regeneration. However, irrespective of the use of MSC co-administration, post-transplant chimerism of BM-derived MSCs after allogeneic HSCT has been reported to remain of host origin, suggesting that the infused donor MSCs are immunologically rejected or not capable of long-term engraftment in the host microenvironment. Also, hematopoietic cell allografts currently used for HSCT do not seem to contain sufficient amount of MSCs or their precursors to reconstitute host BM microenvironment. Since the toxic conditioning employed in allo-HSCT may impair the function of host MSCs to maintain hematopoietic/regenerative stem cell niches and to provide a local immunomodulatory milieu, we propose that new directions for enhancing immunohematopoietic reconstitution and tissue repair after allogeneic HSCT include the development of strategies to support functional replenishment of residual host MSCs or to support more efficient engraftment of infused donor MSCs. Future areas of research should include in vivo tracking of infused MSCs and detection of their microchimeric presence in extra-marrow sites as well as in BM. PMID:23880502

  16. Marked elliptocytosis and schistocytosis in hematopoietic dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Hartz, J W; Buss, D H; White, D R; Bond, M G; Scharyj, M

    1984-09-01

    A 78-year-old white male patient presented with anemia characterized by marked elliptocytosis and schistocytosis. Other morphologic findings in the peripheral blood and marrow were diagnostic of hematopoietic dysplasia (preleukemic syndrome). Five years previously elliptocytosis and schistocytosis were not present, and the only features suggesting hematopoietic dysplasia were significant numbers of micromegakaryocytes in the marrow and rare giant platelets with giant granules in the peripheral blood. The features of this case suggest that acquired marked elliptocytosis and schistocytosis may be an unusual manifestation of hematopoietic dysplasia. PMID:6465103

  17. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with ?-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. ?-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  18. Generation of axolotl hematopoietic chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David; Scott, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair is an extremely complex process that requires precise coordination between various cell types including immune cells. Unfortunately, in mammals this usually results in scar formation instead of restoration of the original fully functional tissue, otherwise known as regeneration. Various animal models like frogs and salamanders are currently being studied to determine the intracellular and intercellular pathways, controlled by gene expression, that elicit cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration of cells during regenerative healing. Now, the necessary genetic tools to map regenerative pathways are becoming available for the axolotl salamander, thus allowing comparative studies between scarring and regeneration. Here, we describe in detail three methods to produce axolotl hematopoietic cell-tagged chimeras for the study of hematopoiesis and regeneration. PMID:26366424

  19. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Age and stage dependency of estrogen receptor expression by lymphocyte precursors

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, Hideya; Kouro, Taku; Yokota, Takafumi; Comp, Phillip C.; Kincade, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Sex steroids negatively regulate B lymphopoiesis in adult mice. Paradoxically, lymphocytes arise during fetal life, when estrogen levels are high and maternal lymphopoiesis is suppressed. Here we demonstrate that embryonic B lymphopoiesis was unaffected by estrogen, but sensitive to glucocorticoids. Both fetal and adult precursors contained glucocorticoid receptor transcripts, but only adult precursors expressed estrogen receptor ? and ? together with the androgen receptor. Fetal hematopoietic cells did not efficiently acquire functional estrogen receptors after transplantation to irradiated adult mice. Sex steroid receptors were also expressed in a stage- and developmental age-dependent fashion in human precursors. A developmental switch in responsiveness of hematopoietic cells to sex steroids may be essential for formation of the immune system. PMID:11752459

  1. Myeloid Dendritic Cells are Potential Players in Human Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Ciaramella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) and Parkinson’s diseases (PD) are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances, wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance; we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers, and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Serum concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde as markers of oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Petrola, Maria Juracy; de Castro, Alana Joselina Montenegro; Pitombeira, Maria Helena da Silva; Barbosa, Maritza Cavalcante; Quixadá, Acy Telles de Souza; Duarte, Fernando Barroso; Gonçalves, Romelia Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic myeloid leukemia is a neoplasm characterized by clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells resulting from the (9:22)(q34,11) translocation. The tyrosine kinase abl fusion protein,the initial leukemogenic event in chronic myeloid leukemia, is constitutively activated thus inducing the production of reactive oxygen species. Of particular relevance is the fact that an increase in reactive oxygen species can facilitate genomic instability and may contribute to disease progression. Objetive: To evaluate oxidative stress by determining the levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite in chronic myeloid leukemia patients under treatment with 1st and 2nd generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors monitored at a referral hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed of 64 male and female adults. Patients were stratified according to treatment. The levels of malondialdehyde and nitrite were determined by spectrophotometry. Statistical differences between groups were observed using the Student t-test and Fisher's exact test. The results are expressed as mean ± standard error of mean. The significance level was set for a p-value < 0.05 in all analyses. Results: The results show significantly higher mean concentrations of nitrite and malondialdehyde in chronic myeloid leukemia patients using second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors compared to patients on imatinib. Conclusion: It follows that chronic myeloid leukemia patients present higher oxidative activity and that the increases in oxidative damage markers can indicate resistance to 1st generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors. PMID:23125543

  3. Engineering humanized mice for improved hematopoietic reconstitution

    E-print Network

    Drake, Adam

    Humanized mice are immunodeficient animals engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells that give rise to various lineages of human blood cells throughout the life of the mouse. This article reviews recent advances in the ...

  4. Insights into cell ontogeny, age, and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Shahzya S; Morison, Jessica K; Gibson, Brenda E S; Keeshan, Karen

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The pathogenesis of AML involves cytogenetic abnormalities, genetic mutations, and epigenetic anomalies. Although it is widely accepted that the cellular biology, gene expression, and epigenetic landscape of normal HSCs change with age, little is known about the interplay between the age at which the cell becomes leukemic and the resultant leukemia. Despite its rarity, childhood AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. Treatment is in general extrapolated from adult AML on the assumption that adult AML and pediatric AML are similar biological entities. However, distinct biological processes and epigenetic modifications in pediatric and adult AML may mean that response to novel therapies in children may differ from that in adults with AML. A better understanding of the key pathways involved in transformation and how these differ between childhood and adult AML is an important step in identifying effective treatment. This review highlights both the commonalities and differences between pediatric and adult AML disease biology with respect to age. PMID:26051919

  5. A human ESC model for MLL-AF4 leukemic fusion gene reveals an impaired early hematopoietic-endothelial specification

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Melen, Gustavo J; Ramos-Mejia, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Ayllón, Verónica; Sanchez, Laura; Ligero, Gertrudis; Gutierrez-Aranda, Iván; Fernández, Agustín F; Fraga, Mario F; Moreno-Gimeno, Inmaculada; Burks, Deborah; del Carmen Plaza-Calonge, María; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, Juan C; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    The MLL-AF4 fusion gene is a hallmark genomic aberration in high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia in infants. Although it is well established that MLL-AF4 arises prenatally during human development, its effects on hematopoietic development in utero remain unexplored. We have created a human-specific cellular system to study early hemato-endothelial development in MLL-AF4-expressing human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Functional studies, clonal analysis and gene expression profiling reveal that expression of MLL-AF4 in hESCs has a phenotypic, functional and gene expression impact. MLL-AF4 acts as a global transcriptional activator and a positive regulator of homeobox gene expression in hESCs. Functionally, MLL-AF4 enhances the specification of hemogenic precursors from hESCs but strongly impairs further hematopoietic commitment in favor of an endothelial cell fate. MLL-AF4 hESCs are transcriptionally primed to differentiate towards hemogenic precursors prone to endothelial maturation, as reflected by the marked upregulation of master genes associated to vascular-endothelial functions and early hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we report that MLL-AF4 expression is not sufficient to transform hESC-derived hematopoietic cells. This work illustrates how hESCs may provide unique insights into human development and further our understanding of how leukemic fusion genes, known to arise prenatally, regulate human embryonic hematopoietic specification. PMID:22212479

  6. An overview of chronic myeloid leukemia and its animal models.

    PubMed

    Ma, WeiXu; Ma, Ning; Chen, XiaoHui; Zhang, YiYue; Zhang, WenQing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a form of leukemia characterized by the presence of clonal bone marrow stem cells with the proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors. CML is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome or t (9;22) translocation (BCR-ABL). CML is now usually treated with targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The mechanism and natural history of CML is still unclear. Here, we summarize the present CML animal disease models and compare them with each other. Meanwhile, we propose that it is a very wise choice to establish zebrafish (Danio rerio) CML model mimics clinical CML. This model could be used to learn more about the mechanism of CML, and to aid in the development of new drugs to treat CML. PMID:26582013

  7. A retrospective cohort study of cause-specific mortality and incidence of hematopoietic malignancies in Chinese benzene-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Linet, Martha S; Yin, Song-Nian; Gilbert, Ethel S; Dores, Graça M; Hayes, Richard B; Vermeulen, Roel; Tian, Hao-Yuan; Lan, Qing; Portengen, Lutzen; Ji, Bu-Tian; Li, Gui-Lan; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2015-11-01

    Benzene exposure has been causally linked with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but inconsistently associated with other hematopoietic, lymphoproliferative and related disorders (HLD) or solid tumors in humans. Many neoplasms have been described in experimental animals exposed to benzene. We used Poisson regression to estimate adjusted relative risks (RR) and the likelihood ratio statistic to derive confidence intervals for cause-specific mortality and HLD incidence in 73,789 benzene-exposed compared with 34,504 unexposed workers in a retrospective cohort study in 12 cities in China. Follow-up and outcome assessment was based on factory, medical and other records. Benzene-exposed workers experienced increased risks for all-cause mortality (RR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.1, 1.2) due to excesses of all neoplasms (RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.4), respiratory diseases (RR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.3) and diseases of blood forming organs (RR = ?, 95% CI = 3.4, ?). Lung cancer mortality was significantly elevated (RR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2, 1.9) with similar RRs for males and females, based on three-fold more cases than in our previous follow-up. Significantly elevated incidence of all myeloid disorders reflected excesses of myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2, 6.6) and chronic myeloid leukemia (RR = 2.5, 95% CI = 0.8, 11), and increases of all lymphoid disorders included excesses of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (RR = 3.9, 95%CI = 1.5, 13) and all lymphoid leukemia (RR = 5.4, 95%CI = 1.0, 99). The 28-year follow-up of Chinese benzene-exposed workers demonstrated increased risks of a broad range of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms, lung cancer, and respiratory diseases and suggested possible associations with other malignant and non-malignant disorders. PMID:25944549

  8. A specific need for CRKL in p210BCR-ABL-induced transformation of mouse hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Heui; Wood, Lisa J.; Agarwal, Anupriya; O’Hare, Thomas; Elsea, Collin R.; Griswold, Ian J.; Deininger, Michael W.N.; Imamoto, Akira; Druker, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    CRKL (CRK-Like) is an adapter protein predominantly phosphorylated in cells that express the tyrosine kinase p210BCR-ABL, the fusion product of a (9;22) chromosomal translocation causative for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). It has been unclear, however, whether CRKL plays a functional role in p210BCR-ABL transformation. Here we show that CRKL is required for p210BCR-ABL to support IL-3-independent growth of myeloid progenitor cells and long-term outgrowth of B-lymphoid cells from fetal liver-derived hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, a synthetic phosphotyrosyl peptide that binds to the CRKL SH2 domain with high affinity blocks association of endogenous CRKL with the p210BCR-ABL complex and reduces c-MYC levels in K562 human leukemic cells as well as mouse hematopoietic cells transformed by p210BCR-ABL or the imatinib-resistant mutant T315I. These results indicate that the function of CRKL as an adapter protein is essential for p210BCR-ABL-induced transformation. PMID:20807813

  9. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  10. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; López-Contreras, Andrés J.; Martínez, Dolores; Cañamero, Marta; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Isern, Joan; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative stress during embryonic development influences ageing and predisposition to disease in adults. A protective mechanism against replicative stress is provided by the licensing of thousands of origins in G1 that are not necessarily activated in the subsequent S-phase. These ‘dormant' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our results indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are particularly sensitive to replication stress, and full origin licensing ensures their correct differentiation and functionality. PMID:26456157

  11. Azacitidine and Erismodegib in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Delineation of Natural Killer Cell Differentiation from Myeloid Progenitors in Human

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingfeng; Ye, Weijian; Jian Tan, Wei; Mei Yong, Kylie Su; Liu, Min; Qi Tan, Shu; Loh, Eva; TE Chang, Kenneth; Chye Tan, Thiam; Preiser, Peter R.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of natural killer (NK) cell development in human is incomplete partly because of limited access to appropriate human tissues. We have developed a cytokine-enhanced humanized mouse model with greatly improved reconstitution and function of human NK cells. Here we report the presence of a cell population in the bone marrow of the cytokine-treated humanized mice that express both NK cell marker CD56 and myeloid markers such as CD36 and CD33. The CD56+CD33+CD36+ cells are also found in human cord blood, fetal and adult bone marrow. Although the CD56+CD33+CD36+ cells do not express the common NK cell functional receptors and exhibit little cytotoxic and cytokine-producing activities, they readily differentiate into mature NK cells by acquiring expression of NK cell receptors and losing expression of the myeloid markers. Further studies show that CD33+CD36+ myeloid NK precursors are derived from granulo-myelomonocytic progenitors. These results delineate the pathway of human NK cell differentiation from myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and suggest the utility of humanized mice for studying human hematopoiesis. PMID:26456148

  13. TGF? restores hematopoietic homeostasis after myelosuppressive chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brenet, Fabienne; Kermani, Pouneh; Spektor, Roman; Rafii, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Myelosuppression is a life-threatening complication of antineoplastic therapy, but treatment is restricted to a few cytokines with unilineage hematopoietic activity. Although hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are predominantly quiescent during homeostasis, they are rapidly recruited into cell cycle by stresses, including myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Factors that induce HSCs to proliferate during stress have been characterized, but it is not known how HSC quiescence is then reestablished. In this study, we show that TGF? signaling is transiently activated in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during hematopoietic regeneration. Blockade of TGF? signaling after chemotherapy accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution and delays the return of cycling HSCs to quiescence. In contrast, TGF? blockade during homeostasis fails to induce cycling of HSPCs. We identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Cdkn1c (p57) as a key downstream mediator of TGF? during regeneration because the recovery of chimeric mice, incapable of expressing p57 in HSPCs, phenocopies blockade of TGF? signaling after chemotherapy. This study demonstrates that context-dependent activation of TGF? signaling is central to an unrecognized counterregulatory mechanism that promotes homeostasis once hematopoiesis has sufficiently recovered from myelosuppressive chemotherapy. These results open the door to new, potentially superior, approaches to promote multilineage hematopoietic recovery by blocking the TGF? signaling that dampens regeneration. PMID:23440043

  14. Immunoglobulin gene expression in umbilical cord blood-derived CD34(+) hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingfang; Xia, Miaoran; Wang, Pingzhang; Wang, Chong; Geng, Zihan; Cameron Yin, C; Zhang, Chi; Qiu, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunoglobulin (Ig) expression was reported in a variety of non-B lineage cells, including myeloid cells. We assessed whether hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPCs) can express Ig. With Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) microarray database analysis, we found that IGHM was expressed with the highest frequency and level in umbilical cord blood CD34(+) HSC/HPCs, followed by IGK@, IGHE, IGHD, IGHG1, and IGHA1, while IGL@ was nearly not expressed. Ig expression was further confirmed by molecular experiments and immunofluorescence. Moreover, HSC/HPCs-derived Ig displayed restricted/biased usages and VHDJH rearrangement patterns. These results suggest that Igs, especially IgM, may have a role in CD34(+) HSC/HPCs function. PMID:26364572

  15. Back to the future! The evolving role of maintenance therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hourigan, Christopher S; McCarthy, Philip; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-02-01

    Relapse is a devastating event for patients with hematologic cancers treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In most situations, relapse treatment options are limited. Maintenance therapy offers the possibility of delaying or avoiding disease recurrence, but its role remains unclear in most conditions that we treat with transplantation. Here, Dr. Hourigan presents an overview of minimal residual disease (MRD) measurement in hematologic malignancies and the applicability of MRD-based post-transplantation interventions. Dr. McCarthy reviews current knowledge of maintenance therapy in the autologous transplantation context, with emphasis on immunologic interventions and immune modulation strategies designed to prevent relapse. Dr. de Lima discusses current lines of investigation in disease recurrence prevention after allogeneic transplantation, focusing on acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:24291784

  16. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally found in the umbilical cord and bone marrow as hematopoietic cells, a subset of mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, endothelial cells of blood vessels, etc. [Beutler et al. 2000 ] Potential mechanisms responsible for radiation-acquired marrow cell failure include direct toxicity , direct damage of hematopoietic multipotential cells or cellular or humoral immune suppression of the marrow multipotential cells. [ Beutler et al. 2000] Methods: These studies were conducted at several different research institutions and laboratories listed as follows: Kazan All-Union Scientific Research Veterinary, Biotechnology Centre of Russian Academy of Science (North Osetia), Institute Belarussian Scientific and Research Institute for Radiobiology in Gomel, the St. Petersburg Veterinary Institute, the Advanced Medical Technology and Systems Inc., Ontario, Canada. The studies were approved by the Animal Care and Use Committee for ethical animal research equivalent, at each institution. A critically important volume of purified Radiation Toxins (RT) was isolated from larger mammalian irradiated animals. Subsequently the RT were characterized chemically and biologically. The experimental design of later studies compared relative toxicity, potential for development of acute radiation hematopoietic syndrome, and potential cloning disorder of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors and their derivative and lethality after intravenous or intramuscular injections of SRD containing Hematopoietic Radiation Toxins. These experiments have employed a wide variety of experimental animals. The animals were irradiated in RUM-17, Puma, and Panorama devices. The dose varied from 0.7Gy to 100Gy. The methods of immune depletion, immuno-lympho plasmasabsorption, as well as direct extraction, were used to refine and purify the specific Radiation Toxins from the central lymph of animals with Hematopoietic forms of Radiation Toxins. Experiments include administration of Hematopoietic Radiation Toxins (SRD-4) to radiation naive animals in doses 0.1 mg/kg; 0,5 mg/kg; 1 mg/kg; 2 mg/kg;

  17. Cell-specific regulation of PTX3 by glucocorticoid hormones in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Doni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Porta, Chiara; Tuckermann, Jan; Reichardt, Holger M; Kleiman, Anna; Sironi, Marina; Rubino, Luca; Pasqualini, Fabio; Nebuloni, Manuela; Signorini, Stefano; Peri, Giuseppe; Sica, Antonio; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2008-10-31

    PTX3 (prototypic long pentraxin 3) is a fluid phase pattern recognition receptor, which plays nonredundant roles in the resistance against diverse pathogens, in the assembly of a hyaluronic acid-rich extracellular matrix, and in female fertility. Inflammatory signals induce production of PTX3 in diverse cell types, including myeloid dendritic cells (DC), fibroblasts, and endothelial cells (EC). The present study was designed to explore the effect of glucocorticoid hormones (GC) on PTX3 production in different cellular contexts. In myeloid DC, GC inhibited the PTX3 production. In contrast, in fibroblasts and EC, GC alone induced and, under inflammatory conditions, enhanced and extended PTX3 production. In vivo administration of GC augmented the blood levels of PTX3 in mice and humans. Moreover, patients with Cushing syndrome had increased levels of circulating PTX3, whereas PTX3 levels were decreased in subjects affected by iatrogenic hypocortisolism. In nonhematopoietic cells, GC receptor (GR) functioned as a ligand-dependent transcription factor (dimerization-dependent) to induce PTX3 gene expression. In contrast, in hematopoietic cells, GR repressed PTX3 gene transcription by interfering (dimerization-independent) with the action of other signaling pathways, probably NFkappaB and AP-1. Thus, divergent effects of GC were found to be due to different GR mechanisms. The results presented here indicate that GC have divergent effects on PTX3 production in hematopoietic (DC and macrophages) and nonhematopoietic (fibroblasts and EC) cells. The divergent effects of GC on PTX3 production probably reflect the different functions of this multifunctional molecule in innate immunity and in the construction of the extracellular matrix. PMID:18703503

  18. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mouse thymic lobes. Kinetics and phenotype of progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Spangrude, G.J.; Scollay, R. )

    1990-12-01

    To define cell populations which participate in the very early stages of T cell development in the mouse thymus, we enriched hematopoietic stem cells from mouse bone marrow and injected them into thymic lobes of irradiated Ly-5 congenic recipients. The progeny of the stem cells were identified and their phenotypes were determined by two-color flow cytometry for the expression of various cell surface differentiation Ag during the course of their subsequent intrathymic development. The majority of the differentiation which occurred in the first 10 days after intrathymic cell transfer was myeloid in nature; hence, this study demonstrates that the irradiated thymus is not strictly selective for T cell development. Further, the maximum rate of T cell development was observed after intrathymic injection of 200 stem cells. Donor-derived cells which did not express Ag characteristic of the myeloid lineage could be detected and their phenotypes could be determined by flow cytometry as early as 7 days after intrathymic injection. At this time, the cells were still very similar phenotypically to the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Exceptions to this were the expression of stem cell Ag 2 and a decrease in the level of MHC class I Ag expression. After 9 days, the donor-derived cells expressed high levels of the Thy-1 Ag and proceeded to change in cell surface phenotype as differentiation continued. These cell phenotypes are described for the time frame ending 18 days after injection, when most donor-derived cells were phenotypically small CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) thymocytes.

  19. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25047706

  20. Human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche containing hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells throughout development

    PubMed Central

    Robin, Catherine; Bollerot, Karine; Mendes, Sandra; Haak, Esther; Crisan, Mihaela; Cerisoli, Francesco; Lauw, Ivoune; Kaimakis, Polynikis; Jorna, Ruud; Vermeulen, Mark; Kayser, Manfred; van der Linden, Reinier; Imanirad, Parisa; Verstegen, Monique; Nawaz-Yousaf, Humaira; Papazian, Natalie; Steegers, Eric; Cupedo, Tom; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are responsible for the life-long production of the blood system and are pivotal cells in hematologic transplantation therapies. During mouse and human development, the first HSCs are produced in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region. Subsequent to this emergence, HSCs are found in other anatomical sites of the mouse conceptus. While the mouse placenta contains abundant HSCs at midgestation, little is known concerning whether HSCs or hematopoietic progenitors are present and supported in the human placenta during development. In this study we show, over a range of developmental times including term, that the human placenta contains hematopoietic progenitors and HSCs. Moreover, stromal cell lines generated from human placenta at several developmental time points are pericyte-like cells and support human hematopoiesis. Immunostaining of placenta sections during development localizes hematopoietic cells in close contact with pericytes/perivascular cells. Thus, the human placenta is a potent hematopoietic niche throughout development. PMID:19796619

  1. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-O-gallate induces cell death by acid sphingomyelinase activation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUHUI; KUMAZOE, MOTOFUMI; BAE, JAEHOON; YAMADA, SHUHEI; TAKAI, MIKA; HIDAKA, SHIORI; YAMASHITA, SHUYA; KIM, YOONHEE; WON, YEONGSEON; MURATA, MOTOKI; TSUKAMOTO, SHUNTARO; TACHIBANA, HIROFUMI

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological study showed that green tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of hematopoietic malignancy. The major green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is reported to have anticancer effects. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a major hematopoietic malignancy characterized by expansion of myeloid cells. In the present study, we showed EGCG-induced acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activation and lipid raft clustering in CML cells. The ASM inhibitor desipramine significantly reduced EGCG-induced cell death. Protein kinase C? is a well-known kinase that plays an important role in ASM activation. We observed EGCG-induced phos-phorylation of protein kinase C? at Ser664. Importantly, EGCG-induced ASM activation was significantly reduced by pretreatment of CML cells with the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor NS2028, suggesting that EGCG induced ASM activation through the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway. Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of a cGMP-negative regulator enhanced the anti-CML effect of EGCG. These results indicate that EGCG-induced cell death via the cGMP/ASM pathway in CML cells. PMID:26135316

  2. Hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) as a therapeutic target in immune and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-06-30

    The hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) is a member of the SRC family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (SFKs), and is expressed in cells of the myeloid and B-lymphocyte cell lineages. Excessive HCK activation is associated with several types of leukemia and enhances cell proliferation and survival by physical association with oncogenic fusion proteins, and with functional interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. Elevated HCK activity is also observed in many solid malignancies, including breast and colon cancer, and correlates with decreased patient survival rates. HCK enhances the secretion of growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines from myeloid cells, and promotes macrophage polarization towards a wound healing and tumor-promoting alternatively activated phenotype. Within tumor associated macrophages, HCK stimulates the formation of podosomes that facilitate extracellular matrix degradation, which enhance immune and epithelial cell invasion. By virtue of functional cooperation between HCK and bona fide oncogenic tyrosine kinases, excessive HCK activation can also reduce drug efficacy and contribute to chemo-resistance, while genetic ablation of HCK results in minimal physiological consequences in healthy mice. Given its known crystal structure, HCK therefore provides an attractive therapeutic target to both, directly inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and indirectly curb the source of tumor-promoting changes in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26087188

  3. Hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) as a therapeutic target in immune and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R.; O'Donoghue, Robert J.J.; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) is a member of the SRC family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (SFKs), and is expressed in cells of the myeloid and B-lymphocyte cell lineages. Excessive HCK activation is associated with several types of leukemia and enhances cell proliferation and survival by physical association with oncogenic fusion proteins, and with functional interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. Elevated HCK activity is also observed in many solid malignancies, including breast and colon cancer, and correlates with decreased patient survival rates. HCK enhances the secretion of growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines from myeloid cells, and promotes macrophage polarization towards a wound healing and tumor-promoting alternatively activated phenotype. Within tumor associated macrophages, HCK stimulates the formation of podosomes that facilitate extracellular matrix degradation, which enhance immune and epithelial cell invasion. By virtue of functional cooperation between HCK and bona fide oncogenic tyrosine kinases, excessive HCK activation can also reduce drug efficacy and contribute to chemo-resistance, while genetic ablation of HCK results in minimal physiological consequences in healthy mice. Given its known crystal structure, HCK therefore provides an attractive therapeutic target to both, directly inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and indirectly curb the source of tumor-promoting changes in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26087188

  4. MN1–Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1–friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1–Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1–Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3?ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1–Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  5. Mitochondria defects are involved in lead-acetate-induced adult hematopoietic stem cell decline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Jia, Dao-Yong; Cai, Shi-Zhong; Li, Cheng-Peng; Zhang, Meng-Si; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-19

    Occupational high-grade lead exposure has been reduced in recent decades as a result of increased regulation. However, environmental lead exposure remains widespread, and is associated with severe toxicity implicated in human diseases. We performed oral intragastric administration of various dose lead acetate to adult Sprague Dawley rats to define the role of lead exposure in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) function, and to clarify its underlying mechanism. Lead acetate-exposed rats exhibited developmental abnormalities in myeloid and lymphoid lineages, and a significant decline in immune functions. It also showed HSCs functional decline associated with senescent phenotype with low grade lead acetate exposure or apoptotic phenotype with relative higher grade dose exposure. Mechanistic exploration showed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lead acetate-exposed CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment, which correlated with functional defects in cellular mitochondria. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C led to reversion of the CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment functional decline. These results indicate that lead acetate perturbs the hematopoietic balance of adult HSCs, associated with cellular mitochondria defects, increased intracellular ROS generation. PMID:25800560

  6. The network of hematopoietic cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Sachs, L.; Lotem, J.

    1994-12-31

    Cell viability, multiplication, and differentiation to the various hematopoietic cell lineages are induced by a multigene cytokine family, and hematopoiesis is controlled by a network of interactions between these cytokines. This network includes positive regulators such as colony-stimulating factors and interleukins, and negative regulators such as transforming growth factor-{beta} and tumor necrosis factor. The functioning of the network requires an appropriate balance between positive and negative regulators, and the selective regulation of programmed cell death (apoptosis) by interaction of cytokines with their receptors. The cytokine network, which has arisen during evolution, allows considerable flexibility, depending on which part of the network is activated, and the ready amplification of response to a particular stimulus. This amplification occurs by autoregulation and transregulation by these cytokines of cytokine receptors. In addition to the flexibility of this network, both for response to present day infections and to infections that may develop in the future, a network may also be necessary to stabilize the whole system. The existence of a network and the cytokine-receptor regulation of apoptosis has to be taken into account in the clinical use of cytokines for therapy. Cytokines that regulate hematopoiesis induce the expression of genes for transcription factors. Cytokine signaling through transcription factors can thus ensure the autoregulation and transregulation of cytokine and receptor genes that occur in the network. Interactions between the cytokine network and transcription factors can also ensure production of specific cell types and stability of the differentiated state. 65 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Placenta, Cord Blood, and Fetal Liver, Based on Their Immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, Maria D.; Kyryk, Vitaliy M.; Svitina, Hanna M.; Shablii, Yulia M.; Lukash, Lubov L.; Lobyntseva, Galina S.; Shablii, Volodymyr A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with the CD34+CD45lowSSClow phenotype from full-term placental tissue (FTPT) as compared to cord blood (CB) and fetal liver (FL) cells. We demonstrated the presence of cell subpopulations at various stages of the differentiation with such immunophenotypes as CD34+/lowCD45low/?, CD34++CD45low/?, CD34+++CD45low/?, CD34+/lowCD45hi, and CD34++CD45hi in both first trimester placental tissue (FiTPT) and FTPT which implies their higher phenotypic heterogeneity compared to CB. HPCs of the FTPT origin expressed the CD90 antigen at a higher level compared to its expression by the CB HPCs and the CD133 antigen expression being at the same level in both cases. The HPCs compartment of FTPT versus CB contained higher number of myeloid and erythroid committed cells but lower number of myeloid and lymphoid ones compared to FL HPCs. HPCs of the FTPT and CB origin possess similar potentials for the multilineage differentiation in vitro and similar ratios of myeloid and erythroid progenitors among the committed cells. This observation suggests that the active hematopoiesis occurs in the FTPT. We obtained viable HPCs from cryopreserved placental tissue fragments allowing us to develop procedures for banking and testing of placenta-derived HPCs for clinical use. PMID:26347038

  8. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  9. A diffusible signal derived from hematopoietic cells supports the survival and proliferation of regenerative cells during zebrafish fin fold regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoya; Nakajima, Teruhiro; Ishida, Takashi; Kudo, Akira; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    Multicellular organisms maintain body integrity by constantly regenerating tissues throughout their lives; however, the overall mechanism for regulating regeneration remains an open question. Studies of limb and fin regeneration in teleost fish and urodeles have shown the involvement of a number of locally activated signals at the wounded site during regeneration. Here, we demonstrate that a diffusible signal from a distance also play an essential role for regeneration. Among a number of zebrafish mutants, we found that the zebrafish cloche (clo) and tal1 mutants, which lack most hematopoietic tissues, displayed a unique regeneration defect accompanying apoptosis in primed regenerative tissue. Our analyses of the mutants showed that the cells in the primed regenerative tissue are susceptible to apoptosis, but their survival is normally supported by the presence of hematopoietic tissues, mainly the myeloid cells. We further showed that a diffusible factor in the wild-type body fluid mediates this signal. Thus, our study revealed a novel mechanism that the hematopoietic tissues regulate tissue regeneration through a diffusible signal. PMID:25533245

  10. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses. PMID:26391449

  11. The Interface between BCR-ABL-Dependent and -Independent Resistance Signaling Pathways in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nestal de Moraes, Gabriela; Souza, Paloma Silva; Costas, Fernanda Casal de Faria; Vasconcelos, Flavia Cunha; Reis, Flaviana Ruade Souza; Maia, Raquel Ciuvalschi

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematopoietic disorder characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome which resulted from the reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22. The pathogenesis of CML involves the constitutive activation of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase, which governs malignant disease by activating multiple signal transduction pathways. The BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib, is the front-line treatment for CML, but the emergence of imatinib resistance and other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has called attention for additional resistance mechanisms and has led to the search for alternative drug treatments. In this paper, we discuss our current understanding of mechanisms, related or unrelated to BCR-ABL, which have been shown to account for chemoresistance and treatment failure. We focus on the potential role of the influx and efflux transporters, the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, and transcription factor-mediated signals as feasible molecular targets to overcome the development of TKIs resistance in CML. PMID:23259070

  12. Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation in Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome with Malignant Myeloid Transformation. A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Park, So Young; Chae, Min Byoung; Kwack, Yee Gyung; Lee, Moon Hee; Kim, Inho; Kim, Young Soo; Kim, Chul Soo

    2002-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare genetic disorder of unknown pathogenesis involving exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and hematological and skeletal abnormalities. About 25% of patients develop hematopoietic malignancies. We report on a case of acute myeloid leukemia (M2) in a 21-year-old woman affected by SDS. She was treated with conventional chemotherapy (idarubicin plus cytarabine) and reached complete remission of leukemia. After induction chemotherapy, she underwent allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The BMT preparative regimen consisted of total body irradiation (TBI) followed by cyclophosphamide. Cyclosporin A and short term methotrexate were used for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. After a follow-up of 12 months, she is alive leukemia free off any immunosuppressive agent. Although experience in this field is scarce, we speculate that bone marrow failure in SDS is an indication for BMT which is the only curative treatment option. PMID:12298432

  13. Transplant to treatment-free remission: the evolving view of 'cure' in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Agnes Sm; Brissot, Eolia; Rubinstein, Sam; Savani, Bipin N; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-12-01

    Before the introduction of the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was the leading indication for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and allogeneic HSCT remains the only treatment recognized as curative for CML. The success of imatinib and other TKIs (e.g., nilotinib, dasatinib) has made allogeneic HSCT a later-line therapy that is reserved only for advanced-phase, high-risk, or TKI-resistant patients with CML. Accumulating evidence from clinical trials investigating treatment-free remission suggests that TKIs may also provide an operational cure for some patients with CML. Herein, we discuss the concept of cure in CML and the current roles of both HSCT and TKIs in the treatment of CML. PMID:26364871

  14. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Are hematopoietic stem cells involved in hepatocarcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Matteo; Del Prete, Valentina; Neve, Viviana; Scavo, Maria Principia; Barone, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The liver has three cell lineages able to proliferate after a hepatic injury: the mature hepatocyte, the ductular “bipolar” progenitor cell termed “oval cell” and the putative periductular stem cell. Hepatocytes can only produce other hepatocytes whereas ductular progenitor cells are considerate bipolar since they can give rise to biliary cells or hepatocytes. Periductular stem cells are rare in the liver, have a very long proliferation potential and may be multipotent, being this aspect still under investigation. They originate in the bone marrow since their progeny express genetic markers of donor hematopoietic cells after bone marrow transplantation. Since the liver is the hematopoietic organ of the fetus, it is possible that hematopoietic stem cells may reside in the liver of the adult. This assumption is proved by the finding that oval cells express hematopoietic markers like CD34, CD45, CD 109, Thy-1, c-kit, and others, which are also expressed by bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells (BMSCs). Few and discordant studies have evaluated the role of BMSC in hepatocarcinogenesis so far and further studies in vitro and in vivo are warranted in order to definitively clarify such an issue. PMID:25202697

  16. [Transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to malignant hematopoietic cells of different origins].

    PubMed

    Wabg, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qinag; Yuan, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to hematopoietic malignant cells lines of various origins and AD5/F35 cytotoxicity. The hematologic malignant cell lines of various origins were transfected by AD5/F35-EGFP at different multiple of infection (MOI) and AD5-EGFP was used as control; the proportion of fluorescence positive cells was detected by flow cytometry; the killing effect of virus on infective target cells was assayed by MTT and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector to cell line of myeloid origin was > 99% at MOI = 30, the transfective efficiency of AD5 vector was 26.4% at MOI = 1,000; the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector and AD5 vector to cell line of B cell origin were 11.7% and 5.7%, respectively, at MOI = 1,000. AD5/F35 and AD5 vectors could not effectively transfect cells of T cell origin, no fluorescence positive cells were detected at MOI = 1,000; no significant killing effect of AD5/F35 vector on infective target cells was observed at MOI = 1,000. It is concluded that AD5/F35 vector infection has definite selectivity to hematologic malignant cells of various origin, the infection ability of AD5/F35 vector to cells of myeloid origin is stronger than that to cells of B cell origin, the cytotoxicity of AD5/F35 vector to infective target cells is small. The AD5/F35 vector is preferable to AD5 vector in respect of infection ability and offers good prospects of application in gene therapy for myeloid leukemia cells as target cells. PMID:16800935

  17. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Slovak, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  18. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myeloid leukemia is working? ”) How often is treatment successful? Up to about 70% of people have a ... see Leukemia: Acute Lymphocytic . Allogeneic SCT is less successful for blast phase CML than for earlier phases, ...

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Robert Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > Parents > Diseases & Conditions > Cancer & Tumors > Acute ... Causes Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  20. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC–derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina–induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor ? chain–null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood–derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  1. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gori, Jennifer L; Butler, Jason M; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L; Adair, Jennifer E; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC-derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina-induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor ? chain-null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood-derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  2. Hypoxia and Metabolic Properties of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The effect of redox signaling on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is not clearly understood. Recent Advances: A growing body of evidence suggests that adult HSCs reside in the hypoxic bone marrow microenvironment or niche during homeostasis. It was recently shown that primitive HSCs in the bone marrow prefer to utilize anaerobic glycolysis to meet their energy demands and have lower rates of oxygen consumption and lower ATP levels. Hypoxia-inducible factor-? (Hif-1?) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism. With hundreds of downstream target genes and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, it regulates various aspects of metabolism from the oxidative stress response to glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Hif-1? is highly expressed in HSCs, where it regulates their function and metabolic phenotype. However, the regulation of Hif-1? in HSCs is not entirely understood. The homeobox transcription factor myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (Meis1) is expressed in the most primitive HSCs populations, and it is required for primitive hematopoiesis. Recent reports suggest that Meis1 is required for normal adult HSC function by regulating the metabolism and redox state of HSCs transcriptionally through Hif-1? and Hif-2?. Critical Issues: Given the profound effect of redox status on HSC function, it is critical to fully characterize the intrinsic, and microenvironment-related mechanisms of metabolic and redox regulation in HSCs. Future Directions: Future studies will be needed to elucidate the link between HSC metabolism and HSC fates, including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1891–1901. PMID:23621582

  3. Understanding human NK cell differentiation: clues for improving the haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Montaldo, Elisa; Vacca, Paola; Moretta, Lorenzo; Mingari, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The study of in vitro and in vivo NK cell differentiation from hematopoietic precursors revealed the existence of discrete stages of development. These stages are characterized by the progressive acquisition of markers and receptors that play a crucial role in NK cell function. The knowledge acquired has revealed particularly relevant for improving the HSCT to cure high-risk leukemias in the haplo-HSCT setting, in which NK cells play a central role in the clearance of leukemic cells and in the positive clinical outcome. PMID:24076313

  4. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Decitabine and Midostaurin in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Impaired hydroxylation of 5-methylcytosine in myeloid cancers with mutant TET2.

    PubMed

    Ko, Myunggon; Huang, Yun; Jankowska, Anna M; Pape, Utz J; Tahiliani, Mamta; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; An, Jungeun; Lamperti, Edward D; Koh, Kian Peng; Ganetzky, Rebecca; Liu, X Shirley; Aravind, L; Agarwal, Suneet; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Rao, Anjana

    2010-12-01

    TET2 is a close relative of TET1, an enzyme that converts 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) in DNA. The gene encoding TET2 resides at chromosome 4q24, in a region showing recurrent microdeletions and copy-neutral loss of heterozygosity (CN-LOH) in patients with diverse myeloid malignancies. Somatic TET2 mutations are frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), MDS/MPN overlap syndromes including chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML), acute myeloid leukaemias (AML) and secondary AML (sAML). We show here that TET2 mutations associated with myeloid malignancies compromise catalytic activity. Bone marrow samples from patients with TET2 mutations displayed uniformly low levels of 5hmC in genomic DNA compared to bone marrow samples from healthy controls. Moreover, small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated depletion of Tet2 in mouse haematopoietic precursors skewed their differentiation towards monocyte/macrophage lineages in culture. There was no significant difference in DNA methylation between bone marrow samples from patients with high 5hmC versus healthy controls, but samples from patients with low 5hmC showed hypomethylation relative to controls at the majority of differentially methylated CpG sites. Our results demonstrate that Tet2 is important for normal myelopoiesis, and suggest that disruption of TET2 enzymatic activity favours myeloid tumorigenesis. Measurement of 5hmC levels in myeloid malignancies may prove valuable as a diagnostic and prognostic tool, to tailor therapies and assess responses to anticancer drugs. PMID:21057493

  7. Early myeloid cell-specific expression of the human cathepsin G gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Grisolano, J L; Sclar, G M; Ley, T J

    1994-09-13

    The human cathepsin G (CG) gene is expressed only in promyelocytes and encodes a neutral serine protease that is packaged in the azurophil (primary) granules of myeloid cells. To define the cis-acting DNA elements that are responsible for promyelocyte-specific "targeting," we injected a 6-kb transgene containing the entire human CG gene, including coding sequences contained in a 2.7-kb region, approximately 2.5 kb of 5' flanking sequence, and approximately 0.8 kb of 3' flanking sequence. Seven of seven "transient transgenic" murine embryos revealed human CG expression in the fetal livers at embryonic day 15. Stable transgenic founder lines were created with the same 6-kb fragment; four of five founder lines expressed human CG in the bone marrow. The level of human CG expression was relatively low per gene copy when compared with the endogenous murine CG gene, and expression was integration-site dependent; however, the level of gene expression correlated roughly with gene copy number. The human CG transgene and the endogenous murine CG gene were coordinately expressed in the bone marrow and the spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic bone marrow revealed that the human CG protein was expressed exclusively in myeloid cells. Expression of human CG protein was highest in myeloid precursors and declined in mature myeloid cells. These data suggest that the human CG gene was appropriately targeted and developmentally regulated, demonstrating that the cis-acting DNA sequences required for the early myeloid cell-specific expression of human CG are present in this small genomic fragment. PMID:8090757

  8. Gene expression profiling for hematopoietic cell Clive Glover

    E-print Network

    Fournier, John J.F.

    research in mammalian cell culture is also being done for the purpose of expanding stem cell populations ex of optimizing cell culture conditions for hematopoietic stem cells. #12;2 1. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Culture-vivo for therapeutic use. Hematopoietic stem cells are an example of such a population. They are found primarily

  9. Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  12. Systems Mapping for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linghua; Shen, Yong; Jiang, Libo; Yin, Danni; Guo, Jingxin; Zheng, Hui; Sun, Hao; Wu, Rongling; Guo, Yunqian

    2015-01-01

    Cells with the same genotype growing under the same conditions can show different phenotypes, which is known as “population heterogeneity”. The heterogeneity of hematopoietic progenitor cells has an effect on their differentiation potential and lineage choices. However, the genetic mechanisms governing population heterogeneity remain unclear. Here, we present a statistical model for mapping the quantitative trait locus (QTL) that affects hematopoietic cell heterogeneity. This strategy, termed systems mapping, integrates a system of differential equations into the framework for systems mapping, allowing hypotheses regarding the interplay between genetic actions and cell heterogeneity to be tested. A simulation approach based on cell heterogeneity dynamics has been designed to test the statistical properties of the model. This model not only considers the traditional QTLs, but also indicates the methylated QTLs that can illustrate non-genetic individual differences. It has significant implications for probing the molecular, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hematopoietic progenitor cell heterogeneity. PMID:25970338

  13. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  14. Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    Canine hematopoietic tumors constitute a group of neoplasms that are frequently encountered in veterinary practice. Although common, they are also a diagnostically confusing group of tumors due to continued revision of their definition and classification. The confusion that arises from these changes presents the clinician with a perpetual challenge of diagnosis and therapy. Therapy of canine hematopoietic tumors has traditionally evolved from treatment of human patients with similar diseases, and in turn, these neoplasms have served as models for evaluating newer therapies for possible application in human patients. Methods of treatment have included chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hyperthermia. 9 tabs.

  15. Hepatic regeneration from hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Austin, Timothy W; Lagasse, Eric

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, numerous investigators have reported novel cellular fates of multipotent stem or progenitor cells. In this review, we discuss the unexpected observations that hematopoietic stem cells can contribute to the hepatocyte lineage in humans and in rodent models of liver disease and regeneration. A key unresolved issue regarding hepatic regeneration from hematopoietic stem cells is whether the mechanism occurs through transdetermination, cell fusion, or other processes. A better understanding of the various stem or progenitor cells of the hepatic lineage may facilitate cellular transplantation approaches for the correction of hepatic function in patients with end-stage liver disease. PMID:12490303

  16. Hmga2 is a direct target gene of RUNX1 and regulates expansion of myeloid progenitors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kentson; Muselman, Alexander; Du, Randal; Harada, Yuka; Scholl, Amanda G.; Yan, Ming; Matsuura, Shinobu; Weng, Stephanie; Harada, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    RUNX1 is a master transcription factor in hematopoiesis and mediates the specification and homeostasis of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Disruptions in RUNX1 are well known to lead to hematologic disease. In this study, we sought to identify and characterize RUNX1 target genes in HSPCs by performing RUNX1 chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) using a murine HSPC line and complementing this data with our previously described gene expression profiling of primary wild-type and RUNX1-deficient HSPCs (Lineage–/cKit+/Sca1+). From this analysis, we identified and confirmed that Hmga2, a known oncogene, as a direct target of RUNX1. Hmga2 was strongly upregulated in RUNX1-deficient HSPCs, and the promoter of Hmga2 was responsive in a cell-type dependent manner upon coexpression of RUNX1. Conditional Runx1 knockout mice exhibit expansion of their HSPCs and myeloid progenitors as hallmark phenotypes. To further validate and establish that Hmga2 plays a role in inducing HSPC expansion, we generated mouse models of HMGA2 and RUNX1 deficiency. Although mice lacking both factors continued to display higher frequencies of HSPCs, the expansion of myeloid progenitors was effectively rescued. The data presented here establish Hmga2 as a transcriptional target of RUNX1 and a critical regulator of myeloid progenitor expansion. PMID:25150295

  17. Requirement for CDK6 in MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Placke, Theresa; Faber, Katrin; Nonami, Atsushi; Putwain, Sarah L.; Salih, Helmut R.; Heidel, Florian H.; Krämer, Alwin; Root, David E.; Barbie, David A.; Krivtsov, Andrei V.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Hahn, William C.; Huntly, Brian J.; Sykes, Stephen M.; Milsom, Michael D.; Scholl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving the H3K4 methyltransferase mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) trigger aberrant gene expression in hematopoietic progenitors and give rise to an aggressive subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Insights into MLL fusion-mediated leukemogenesis have not yet translated into better therapies because MLL is difficult to target directly, and the identity of the genes downstream of MLL whose altered transcription mediates leukemic transformation are poorly annotated. We used a functional genetic approach to uncover that AML cells driven by MLL-AF9 are exceptionally reliant on the cell-cycle regulator CDK6, but not its functional homolog CDK4, and that the preferential growth inhibition induced by CDK6 depletion is mediated through enhanced myeloid differentiation. CDK6 essentiality is also evident in AML cells harboring alternate MLL fusions and a mouse model of MLL-AF9–driven leukemia and can be ascribed to transcriptional activation of CDK6 by mutant MLL. Importantly, the context-dependent effects of lowering CDK6 expression are closely phenocopied by a small-molecule CDK6 inhibitor currently in clinical development. These data identify CDK6 as critical effector of MLL fusions in leukemogenesis that might be targeted to overcome the differentiation block associated with MLL-rearranged AML, and underscore that cell-cycle regulators may have distinct, noncanonical, and nonredundant functions in different contexts. PMID:24764564

  18. Myeloid leukemia factor is a conserved regulator of RUNX transcription factor activity involved in hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Stéphanie; Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Gobert, Vanessa; Augé, Benoît; Breig, Osman; Sanial, Matthieu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu; Haenlin, Marc; Plessis, Anne; Waltzer, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Defining the function of the genes that, like RUNX1, are deregulated in blood cell malignancies represents an important challenge. Myeloid leukemia factors (MLFs) constitute a poorly characterized family of conserved proteins whose founding member, MLF1, has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia in humans. To gain insight into the functions of this family, we investigated the role of the Drosophila MLF homolog during blood cell development. Here we report that mlf controls the homeostasis of the Drosophila hematopoietic system. Notably, mlf participates in a positive feedback loop to fine tune the activity of the RUNX transcription factor Lozenge (LZ) during development of the crystal cells, one of the two main blood cell lineages in Drosophila. At the molecular level, our data in cell cultures and in vivo strongly suggest that MLF controls the number of crystal cells by protecting LZ from degradation. Remarkably, it appears that the human MLF1 protein can substitute for MLF in the crystal cell lineage. In addition, MLF stabilizes the human oncogenic fusion protein RUNX1-ETO and is required for RUNX1-ETO–induced blood cell disorders in a Drosophila model of leukemia. Finally, using the human leukemic blood cell line Kasumi-1, we show that MLF1 depletion impairs RUNX1-ETO accumulation and reduces RUNX1-ETO–dependent proliferation. Thus, we propose that the regulation of RUNX protein levels is a conserved feature of MLF family members that could be critical for normal and pathological blood cell development. PMID:22411814

  19. Co-activation of AMPK and mTORC1 Induces Cytotoxicity in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sujobert, Pierre; Poulain, Laury; Paubelle, Etienne; Zylbersztejn, Florence; Grenier, Adrien; Lambert, Mireille; Townsend, Elizabeth C; Brusq, Jean-Marie; Nicodeme, Edwige; Decrooqc, Justine; Nepstad, Ina; Green, Alexa S; Mondesir, Johanna; Hospital, Marie-Anne; Jacque, Nathalie; Christodoulou, Alexandra; Desouza, Tiffany A; Hermine, Olivier; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Weinstock, David M; Moura, Ivan C; Bouscary, Didier; Tamburini, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    AMPK is a master regulator of cellular metabolism that exerts either oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on context. Here, we report that the specific AMPK agonist GSK621 selectively kills acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but spares normal hematopoietic progenitors. This differential sensitivity results from a unique synthetic lethal interaction involving concurrent activation of AMPK and mTORC1. Strikingly, the lethality of GSK621 in primary AML cells and AML cell lines is abrogated by chemical or genetic ablation of mTORC1 signaling. The same synthetic lethality between AMPK and mTORC1 activation is established in CD34-positive hematopoietic progenitors by constitutive activation of AKT or enhanced in AML cells by deletion of TSC2. Finally, cytotoxicity in AML cells from GSK621 involves the eIF2?/ATF4 signaling pathway that specifically results from mTORC1 activation. AMPK activation may represent a therapeutic opportunity in mTORC1-overactivated cancers. PMID:26004183

  20. MYBL2 is a sub-haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Stefan; Conover, Lillian F; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Kilpivaara, Outi; Stevenson, Kristen; Neuberg, Donna; Loh, Mignon L; Wu, Wen-Shu; Rodig, Scott J; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Look, A Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A common deleted region (CDR) in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) affects the long arm of chromosome 20 and has been predicted to harbor a tumor suppressor gene. Here we show that MYBL2, a gene within the 20q CDR, is expressed at sharply reduced levels in CD34+ cells from most MDS cases (65%; n = 26), whether or not they harbor 20q abnormalities. In a murine competitive reconstitution model, Mybl2 knockdown by RNAi to 20–30% of normal levels in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors resulted in clonal dominance of these ‘sub-haploinsufficient’ cells, which was reflected in all blood cell lineages. By 6 months post-transplantation, the reconstituted mice had developed a clonal myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorder originating from the cells with aberrantly reduced Mybl2 expression. We conclude that downregulation of MYBL2 activity below levels predicted by classical haploinsufficiency underlies the clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in a large fraction of human myeloid malignancies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00825.001 PMID:23878725

  1. t(6;9)(p22;q34)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged pediatric myeloid leukemia: an international study of 62 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Coenen, Eva A.; Forestier, Erik; Harbott, Jochen; Johansson, Bertil; Kerndrup, Gitte; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Chilton, Lucy; Fornerod, Maarten; de Haas, Valérie; Harrison, Christine J.; Inaba, Hiroto; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Perot, Christine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Reinhardt, Katarina; Tomizawa, Daisuke; von Neuhoff, Nils; Zecca, Marco; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Hasle, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;9)(p22;q34) is listed as a distinct entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification, but little is known about the clinical implications of t(6;9)-positive myeloid leukemia in children. This international multicenter study presents the clinical and genetic characteristics of 62 pediatric patients with t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged myeloid leukemia; 54 diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia, representing <1% of all childhood acute myeloid leukemia, and eight as having myelodysplastic syndrome. The t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 was associated with relatively late onset (median age 10.4 years), male predominance (sex ratio 1.7), French-American-British M2 classification (54%), myelodysplasia (100%), and FLT3-ITD (42%). Outcome was substantially better than previously reported with a 5-year event-free survival of 32%, 5-year overall survival of 53%, and a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 57%. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission improved the 5-year event-free survival compared with chemotherapy alone (68% versus 18%; P<0.01) but not the overall survival (68% versus 54%; P=0.48). The presence of FLT3-ITD had a non-significant negative effect on 5-year overall survival compared with non-mutated cases (22% versus 62%; P=0.13). Gene expression profiling showed a unique signature characterized by significantly higher expression of EYA3, SESN1, PRDM2/RIZ, and HIST2H4 genes. In conclusion, t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 represents a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with a high risk of relapse, high frequency of FLT3-ITD, and a specific gene expression signature. PMID:24441146

  2. t(6;9)(p22;q34)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged pediatric myeloid leukemia: an international study of 62 patients.

    PubMed

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Coenen, Eva A; Forestier, Erik; Harbott, Jochen; Johansson, Bertil; Kerndrup, Gitte; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H Berna; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Chilton, Lucy; Fornerod, Maarten; de Haas, Valérie; Harrison, Christine J; Inaba, Hiroto; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Perot, Christine; Raimondi, Susana C; Reinhardt, Katarina; Tomizawa, Daisuke; von Neuhoff, Nils; Zecca, Marco; Zwaan, C Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Hasle, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;9)(p22;q34) is listed as a distinct entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification, but little is known about the clinical implications of t(6;9)-positive myeloid leukemia in children. This international multicenter study presents the clinical and genetic characteristics of 62 pediatric patients with t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged myeloid leukemia; 54 diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia, representing <1% of all childhood acute myeloid leukemia, and eight as having myelodysplastic syndrome. The t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 was associated with relatively late onset (median age 10.4 years), male predominance (sex ratio 1.7), French-American-British M2 classification (54%), myelodysplasia (100%), and FLT3-ITD (42%). Outcome was substantially better than previously reported with a 5-year event-free survival of 32%, 5-year overall survival of 53%, and a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 57%. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission improved the 5-year event-free survival compared with chemotherapy alone (68% versus 18%; P<0.01) but not the overall survival (68% versus 54%; P=0.48). The presence of FLT3-ITD had a non-significant negative effect on 5-year overall survival compared with non-mutated cases (22% versus 62%; P=0.13). Gene expression profiling showed a unique signature characterized by significantly higher expression of EYA3, SESN1, PRDM2/RIZ, and HIST2H4 genes. In conclusion, t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 represents a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with a high risk of relapse, high frequency of FLT3-ITD, and a specific gene expression signature. PMID:24441146

  3. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the key statistics about chronic myeloid leukemia? The American Cancer Society's estimates for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in the ... Health On The Net National Health Council © 2015 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  5. Chemotherapy Plus Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Refractory Myeloid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Thrombocytopenia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... myeloid leukemia cases in adults. What are the genetic changes related to core binding factor acute myeloid ... Center . Where can I find general information about genetic conditions? The Handbook provides basic information about genetics ...

  7. What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic myeloid leukemia What`s new in chronic myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Studies ... such as cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, with a TKI. New drugs for CML Because researchers now know the ...

  8. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  9. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Successful transduction of human multipotent, lymphoid (T, B, NK) and myeloid, and transplantable CD34+CD38low cord blood cells using a murine oncoretroviral vector.

    PubMed

    Ravet, E; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A; Robin, C; Titeux, M; Coulombel, L; Pflumio, F

    2002-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are subject to great interest because of their medical importance and their biological properties. Therefore, the possibility of genetically modifying human HSC is a major concern in several inherited pathologies. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate that a murine oncoretroviral vector can transduce multipotential cord blood (CB) stem cells. Sorted CB CD34(+)CD38(low) cells were transduced with a Moloney-based MFG retroviral vector containing the coding sequence of the murine CD2 (mCD2). CD34(+)mCD2(+) cells were sorted by flow cytometry and cultured either in bulk or at one cell per well in culture conditions that allow differentiation along lymphoid (T, B, and NK) and myeloid (M) lineages. Phenotypic analysis of cells generated in culture showed that CD34(+)mCD2(+) cells could give rise to all lymphoid and myeloid progeny, indicating that the MFG/mCD2 vector had transduced progenitors of all tested lineages. Moreover, clonal cultures of 660 CD34(+)mCD2(+) cells showed that approximately 5% of these cells were able to generate both myeloid and lymphoid (B + NK) progenies; for 25% of them, this included the production of lymphoid T cells. We also demonstrate that transduced CD34(+)CD38(low) CB cells with lymphoid and myeloid potentials were capable of engraftment into the bone marrow (BM) of nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD-SCID) mice during several months. These results show that MFG retroviral vectors can transduce multipotent (T, B, NK, M) human hematopoietic progenitors with in vivo repopulating activity. PMID:11983104

  11. Drosophila Rabex-5 restricts Notch activity in hematopoietic cells and maintains hematopoietic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Reimels, Theresa A; Pfleger, Cathie M

    2015-12-15

    Hematopoietic homeostasis requires the maintenance of a reservoir of undifferentiated blood cell progenitors and the ability to replace or expand differentiated blood cell lineages when necessary. Multiple signaling pathways function in these processes, but how their spatiotemporal control is established and their activity is coordinated in the context of the entire hematopoietic network are still poorly understood. We report here that loss of the gene Rabex-5 in Drosophila causes several hematopoietic abnormalities, including blood cell (hemocyte) overproliferation, increased size of the hematopoietic organ (the lymph gland), lamellocyte differentiation and melanotic mass formation. Hemocyte-specific Rabex-5 knockdown was sufficient to increase hemocyte populations, increase lymph gland size and induce melanotic masses. Rabex-5 negatively regulates Ras, and we show that Ras activity is responsible for specific Rabex-5 hematopoietic phenotypes. Surprisingly, Ras-independent Notch protein accumulation and transcriptional activity in the lymph gland underlie multiple distinct hematopoietic phenotypes of Rabex-5 loss. Thus, Rabex-5 plays an important role in Drosophila hematopoiesis and might serve as an axis coordinating Ras and Notch signaling in the lymph gland. PMID:26567216

  12. Drosophila Rabex-5 restricts Notch activity in hematopoietic cells and maintains hematopoietic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Reimels, Theresa A.; Pfleger, Cathie M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hematopoietic homeostasis requires the maintenance of a reservoir of undifferentiated blood cell progenitors and the ability to replace or expand differentiated blood cell lineages when necessary. Multiple signaling pathways function in these processes, but how their spatiotemporal control is established and their activity is coordinated in the context of the entire hematopoietic network are still poorly understood. We report here that loss of the gene Rabex-5 in Drosophila causes several hematopoietic abnormalities, including blood cell (hemocyte) overproliferation, increased size of the hematopoietic organ (the lymph gland), lamellocyte differentiation and melanotic mass formation. Hemocyte-specific Rabex-5 knockdown was sufficient to increase hemocyte populations, increase lymph gland size and induce melanotic masses. Rabex-5 negatively regulates Ras, and we show that Ras activity is responsible for specific Rabex-5 hematopoietic phenotypes. Surprisingly, Ras-independent Notch protein accumulation and transcriptional activity in the lymph gland underlie multiple distinct hematopoietic phenotypes of Rabex-5 loss. Thus, Rabex-5 plays an important role in Drosophila hematopoiesis and might serve as an axis coordinating Ras and Notch signaling in the lymph gland. PMID:26567216

  13. Chronic variable stress activates hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Heidt, Timo; Sager, Hendrik B; Courties, Gabriel; Dutta, Partha; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Zaltsman, Alex; von Zur Muhlen, Constantin; Bode, Christoph; Fricchione, Gregory L; Denninger, John; Lin, Charles P; Vinegoni, Claudio; Libby, Peter; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to psychosocial stress is a risk factor for many diseases, including atherosclerosis. Although incompletely understood, interaction between the psyche and the immune system provides one potential mechanism linking stress and disease inception and progression. Known cross-talk between the brain and immune system includes the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which centrally drives glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary axis, which controls stress-induced catecholamine release in support of the fight-or-flight reflex. It remains unknown, however, whether chronic stress changes hematopoietic stem cell activity. Here we show that stress increases proliferation of these most primitive hematopoietic progenitors, giving rise to higher levels of disease-promoting inflammatory leukocytes. We found that chronic stress induced monocytosis and neutrophilia in humans. While investigating the source of leukocytosis in mice, we discovered that stress activates upstream hematopoietic stem cells. Under conditions of chronic variable stress in mice, sympathetic nerve fibers released surplus noradrenaline, which signaled bone marrow niche cells to decrease CXCL12 levels through the ?3-adrenergic receptor. Consequently, hematopoietic stem cell proliferation was elevated, leading to an increased output of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. When atherosclerosis-prone Apoe(-/-) mice were subjected to chronic stress, accelerated hematopoiesis promoted plaque features associated with vulnerable lesions that cause myocardial infarction and stroke in humans. PMID:24952646

  14. Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Organs in Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Grigorian, Melina; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Hemocytes (blood cells) are motile cells moving throughout the extracellular space and exist in all clades of the animal kingdom. Hemocytes play an important role in shaping the extracellular environment and in the immune response. Developmentally, hemocytes are closely related to the epithelial cells lining the vascular system (endothelia) and body cavity (mesothelia). In vertebrates and insects, common progenitors, called hemangioblasts, give rise to the endothelia and blood cells. In the adult animal, many differentiated hemocytes seem to retain the ability to proliferate; however, in most cases investigated closely, the bulk of hemocyte proliferation takes place in specialized hematopoietic organs. Hematopoietic organs provide an environment where undifferentiated blood stem cells are able to self renew, and at the same time generate offspring that differentiate into different blood cell types. Hematopoiesis in vertebrates, taking place in the bone marrow, has been subject to intensive research by immunologists and stem cell biologists. Much less is known about blood cell formation in invertebrate animals. In this review we will survey structural and functional properties of invertebrate hematopoietic organs, with a main focus on insects and other arthropod taxa. We will then discuss similarities, at the molecular and structural level, that are apparent when comparing the development of blood cells in hematopoietic organs of vertebrates and arthropods. Our comparative review is intended to elucidate aspects of the biology of blood stem cells that are more easily missed when focusing on one or a few model species. PMID:23319182

  15. Immunosurveillance by Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Trafficking through

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Immunosurveillance by Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Trafficking through Blood, Lymph thoracic duct (TD) lymph contains HSPCs that possess short- and long-term multilineage reconstitution ca organs, where they reside for at least 36 hr before entering draining lymphatics to return to the blood

  16. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20–30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients. PMID:26137202

  17. Hematopoietic stem cells develop in the absence of endothelial cadherin 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Heidi; Patch, Taylor C; Reddy, Pavankumar N G; Hagedorn, Elliott J; Kim, Peter G; Soltis, Kathleen A; Chen, Michael J; Tamplin, Owen J; Frye, Maike; MacLean, Glenn A; Hübner, Kathleen; Bauer, Daniel E; Kanki, John P; Vogin, Guillaume; Huston, Nicholas C; Nguyen, Minh; Fujiwara, Yuko; Paw, Barry H; Vestweber, Dietmar; Zon, Leonard I; Orkin, Stuart H; Daley, George Q; Shah, Dhvanit I

    2015-12-24

    Rare endothelial cells in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) transition into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during embryonic development. Lineage tracing experiments indicate that HSCs emerge from cadherin 5 (Cdh5; vascular endothelial-cadherin)(+) endothelial precursors, and isolated populations of Cdh5(+) cells from mouse embryos and embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into hematopoietic cells. Cdh5 has also been widely implicated as a marker of AGM-derived hemogenic endothelial cells. Because Cdh5(-/-) mice embryos die before the first HSCs emerge, it is unknown whether Cdh5 has a direct role in HSC emergence. Our previous genetic screen yielded malbec (mlb(bw306)), a zebrafish mutant for cdh5, with normal embryonic and definitive blood. Using time-lapse confocal imaging, parabiotic surgical pairing of zebrafish embryos, and blastula transplantation assays, we show that HSCs emerge, migrate, engraft, and differentiate in the absence of cdh5 expression. By tracing Cdh5(-/-)green fluorescent protein (GFP)(+/+) cells in chimeric mice, we demonstrated that Cdh5(-/-)GFP(+/+) HSCs emerging from embryonic day 10.5 and 11.5 (E10.5 and E11.5) AGM or derived from E13.5 fetal liver not only differentiate into hematopoietic colonies but also engraft and reconstitute multilineage adult blood. We also developed a conditional mouse Cdh5 knockout (Cdh5(flox/flox):Scl-Cre-ER(T)) and demonstrated that multipotent hematopoietic colonies form despite the absence of Cdh5. These data establish that Cdh5, a marker of hemogenic endothelium in the AGM, is dispensable for the transition of hemogenic endothelium to HSCs. PMID:26385351

  18. Somatic SETBP1 mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nguyen, Nhu; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Sanada, Masashi; Okuno, Yusuke; Ng, Kwok Peng; Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn O; Vishwakarma, Bandana A; Jerez, Andres; Gomez-Segui, Ines; Takahashi, Mariko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Nagata, Yasunobu; Guinta, Kathryn; Mori, Hiraku; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Paquette, Ronald L; McDevitt, Michael A; Kojima, Seiji; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Miyano, Satoru; Shih, Lee-Yung; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2013-08-01

    Here we report whole-exome sequencing of individuals with various myeloid malignancies and identify recurrent somatic mutations in SETBP1, consistent with a recent report on atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML). Closely positioned somatic SETBP1 mutations encoding changes in Asp868, Ser869, Gly870, Ile871 and Asp880, which match germline mutations in Schinzel-Giedion syndrome (SGS), were detected in 17% of secondary acute myeloid leukemias (sAML) and 15% of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) cases. These results from deep sequencing demonstrate a higher mutational detection rate than reported with conventional sequencing methodology. Mutant cases were associated with advanced age and monosomy 7/deletion 7q (-7/del(7q)) constituting poor prognostic factors. Analysis of serially collected samples indicated that SETBP1 mutations were acquired during leukemic evolution. Transduction with mutant Setbp1 led to the immortalization of mouse myeloid progenitors that showed enhanced proliferative capacity compared to cells transduced with wild-type Setbp1. Somatic mutations of SETBP1 seem to cause gain of function, are associated with myeloid leukemic transformation and convey poor prognosis in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and CMML. PMID:23832012

  19. Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arpinati, Mario; Curti, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with current chemotherapy regimens is still disappointing, with overall survival rates of ? 40% at 5 years. It is now well established that AML cells can evade the immune system through multiple mechanisms, including the expression of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase. Immunotherapeutic strategies, including both active, such as vaccination with leukemia-associated antigens, and passive, such as adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer cells, may overcome leukemia escape and lead to improved cure. Allogeneic hemopoeitic stem cell transplantation, the most effective treatment of AML, is the best known model of immunotherapy. Following transplant, recipient AML cells are eradicated by donor immune cells through the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. However, GVL is clinically associated with graft-versus-host disease, the major cause of mortality after transplant. GVL is mediated by donor T cells recognizing either leukemia-associated antigens or minor as well as major histocompatibility antigens. Several innovative strategies have been devised to generate leukemia reactive T cells so as to increase GVL responses with no or little graft-versus-host disease. PMID:24341888

  20. The fucosylated histo-blood group antigens H type 2 (blood group O, CD173) and Lewis Y (CD174) are expressed on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors but absent on mature lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Y; Merling, A; Karsten, U; Schwartz-Albiez, R

    2001-08-01

    The expression of LeY, H2, H3, and H4 on a broad variety of human leukemia cell lines and native lymphocytes as well as on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells was examined by flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. CD34+ leukemia cell lines (KG1, KG1a, and TF1) and native CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells expressed H2 (CD173) and LeY (CD174). In contrast, CD34(-) cell lines (HL-60, U937, JOK-1, Raji, Molt-3, Jurkat, and CEM-C7) and mature lymphocytes from peripheral blood and tonsils lacked CD173 and CD174. All cell lines and native lymphocytes as well as CD34+ precursor cells were negative for H3 and H4. Immunoprecipitation and consecutive Western blotting revealed a 170-kDa glycoprotein as the carrier molecule for the CD173 and CD174 oligosaccharide sequences on CD34+ hematopoietic precursors. The key enzyme for generating CD173 is the beta-D-galactoside 2-alpha-L-fucosyltransferase (FUT1). As shown by RT-PCR, FUT1 was expressed in immature hematopoietic cells but absent in mature lymphocytes, which indicates that expression of CD173 within the hematopoietic system is regulated at the transcriptional level by FUT1. Due to their exclusive presence on CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells, CD173 and CD174 represent novel markers of early hematopoiesis. The expression of the fucosylated histo-blood group antigens CD173 and CD174 in CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells and down-regulation of FUT1 in mature lymphocytes may be important factors influencing the homing process of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow. PMID:11479278

  1. CTCF depletion alters chromatin structure and transcription of myeloid-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Ouboussad, Lylia; Kreuz, Sarah; Lefevre, Pascal F

    2013-10-01

    Differentiation is a multistep process tightly regulated and controlled by complex transcription factor networks. Here, we show that the rate of differentiation of common myeloid precursor cells increases after depletion of CTCF, a protein emerging as a potential key factor regulating higher-order chromatin structure. We identified CTCF binding in the vicinity of important transcription factors regulating myeloid differentiation and showed that CTCF depletion impacts on the expression of these genes in concordance with the observed acceleration of the myeloid commitment. Furthermore, we observed a loss of the histone variant H2A.Z within the selected promoter regions and an increase in non-coding RNA transcription upstream of these genes. Both abnormalities suggest a global chromatin structure destabilization and an associated increase of non-productive transcription in response to CTCF depletion but do not drive the CTCF-mediated transcription alterations of the neighbouring genes. Finally, we detected a transient eviction of CTCF at the Egr1 locus in correlation with Egr1 peak of expression in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment in macrophages. This eviction is also correlated with the expression of an antisense non-coding RNA transcribing through the CTCF-binding region indicating that non-coding RNA transcription could be the cause and the consequence of CTCF eviction. PMID:23933634

  2. What happened to anti-CD33 therapy for acute myeloid leukemia?

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2012-03-01

    CD33, a 67-kDa glycoprotein expressed on the majority of myeloid leukemia cells as well as on normal myeloid and monocytic precursors, has been an attractive target for monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Lintuzumab, an unconjugated, humanized anti-CD33 mAb, has modest single-agent activity against AML but failed to improve patient outcomes in two randomized trials when combined with conventional chemotherapy. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin, an anti-CD33 mAb conjugated to the antitumor antibiotic calicheamicin, improved survival in a subset of AML patients when combined with standard chemotherapy, but safety concerns led to US marketing withdrawal. The activity of these agents confirms that CD33 remains a viable therapeutic target for AML. Strategies to improve the results of mAb-based therapies for AML include antibody engineering to enhance effector function, use of alternative drugs and chemical linkers to develop safer and more effective drug conjugates, and radioimmunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:22109628

  3. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  4. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-31

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Histamine Promotes the Development of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells and Reduces Tumor Growth by Targeting the Myeloid NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Wiktorin, Hanna G.; Lenox, Brianna; Ewald Sander, Frida; Aydin, Ebru; Aurelius, Johan; Thorén, Fredrik B.; Ståhlberg, Anders; Hermodsson, Svante; Hellstrand, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of immune-mediated clearance of cancer cells is hampered by immunosuppressive mediators in the malignant microenvironment, including NADPH oxidase–derived reactive oxygen species. We aimed at defining the effects of histamine, an inhibitor of the myeloid NADPH oxidase/NOX2, on the development of Ag-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) from myeloid precursors and the impact of these mechanisms for tumor growth. Histamine was found to promote the maturation of human DCs from monocytes by increasing the expression of HLA-DR and costimulatory molecules, which resulted in improved induction of Th cells with Th0 polarity. Experiments using wild-type and NOX2-deficient myelomonoblastic cells showed that histamine facilitated myeloid cell maturation only in cells capable of generating reactive oxygen species. Treatment of mice with histamine reduced the growth of murine EL-4 lymphomas in parallel with an increment of tumor-infiltrating DCs in NOX2-sufficient mice but not in NOX2-deficient (gp91phox?/?) mice. We propose that strategies to target the myeloid NADPH oxidase may facilitate the development of endogenous DCs in cancer. PMID:25870245

  9. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Protein GRP94 Is Required for Maintaining Hematopoietic Stem Cell Interactions with the Adult Bone Marrow Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Biquan; Lam, Ben S.; Lee, Sung Hyung; Wey, Shiuan; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Miao; Chen, Si-Yi; Adams, Gregor B.; Lee, Amy S.

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis in the adult bone marrow (BM) is regulated by both intrinsic gene expression products and interactions with extrinsic factors in the HSC niche. GRP94, an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, has been reported to be essential for the expression of specific integrins and to selectively regulate early T and B lymphopoiesis. In GRP94 deficient BM chimeras, multipotent hematopoietic progenitors persisted and even increased, however, the mechanism is not well understood. Here we employed a conditional knockout (KO) strategy to acutely eliminate GRP94 in the hematopoietic system. We observed an increase in HSCs and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors in the Grp94 KO BM, correlating with an increased number of colony forming units. Cell cycle analysis revealed that a loss of quiescence and an increase in proliferation led to an increase in Grp94 KO HSCs. This expansion of the HSC pool can be attributed to the impaired interaction of HSCs with the niche, evidenced by enhanced HSC mobilization and severely compromised homing and lodging ability of primitive hematopoietic cells. Transplanting wild-type (WT) hematopoietic cells into a GRP94 null microenvironment yielded a normal hematology profile and comparable numbers of HSCs as compared to WT control, suggesting that GRP94 in HSCs, but not niche cells, is required for maintaining HSC homeostasis. Investigating this, we further determined that there was a near complete loss of integrin ?4 expression on the cell surface of Grp94 KO HSCs, which showed impaired binding with fibronectin, an extracellular matrix molecule known to play a role in mediating HSC-niche interactions. Furthermore, the Grp94 KO mice displayed altered myeloid and lymphoid differentiation. Collectively, our studies establish GRP94 as a novel cell intrinsic factor required to maintain the interaction of HSCs with their niche, and thus regulate their physiology. PMID:21647226

  10. Modification of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells with CD19-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptors as a Novel Approach for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Christine; Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Tremcinska, Irena; Katebian, Behrod; Wherley, Jennifer; Sahaghian, Arineh; Tu, Andy; Grogan, Tristan; Elashoff, David; Cooper, Laurence J.N.; Hollis, Roger P.; Kohn, Donald B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) against CD19 have been shown to direct T-cells to specifically target B-lineage malignant cells in animal models and clinical trials, with efficient tumor cell lysis. However, in some cases, there has been insufficient persistence of effector cells, limiting clinical efficacy. We propose gene transfer to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) as a novel approach to deliver the CD19-specific CAR, with potential for ensuring persistent production of effector cells of multiple lineages targeting B-lineage malignant cells. Assessments were performed using in vitro myeloid or natural killer (NK) cell differentiation of human HSPCs transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying first and second generations of CD19-specific CAR. Gene transfer did not impair hematopoietic differentiation and cell proliferation when transduced at 1–2 copies/cell. CAR-bearing myeloid and NK cells specifically lysed CD19-positive cells, with second-generation CAR including CD28 domains being more efficient in NK cells. Our results provide evidence for the feasibility and efficacy of the modification of HSPC with CAR as a strategy for generating multiple lineages of effector cells for immunotherapy against B-lineage malignancies to augment graft-versus-leukemia activity. PMID:23978226

  11. A remote GATA2 hematopoietic enhancer drives leukemogenesis in inv(3)(q21;q26) by activating EVI1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hiromi; Suzuki, Mikiko; Otsuki, Akihito; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Bresnick, Emery H.; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosomal inversion between 3q21 and 3q26 results in high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here, we identified a mechanism whereby a GATA2 distal hematopoietic enhancer (G2DHE or ?77-kb enhancer) is brought into close proximity to the EVI1 gene in inv(3)(q21;q26) inversions, leading to leukemogenesis. We examined the contribution of G2DHE to leukemogenesis by creating a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic model that recapitulates the inv(3)(q21;q26) allele. Transgenic mice harboring a linked BAC developed leukemia accompanied by EVI1 overexpression, neoplasia that was not detected in mice bearing the same transgene but missing the GATA2 enhancer. These results establish the mechanistic basis underlying the pathogenesis of a severe form of leukemia through aberrant expression of the EVI1 proto-oncogene. PMID:24703906

  12. Reprint of: Back to the future! The evolving role of maintenance therapy after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hourigan, Christopher S; McCarthy, Philip; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-02-01

    Relapse is a devastating event for patients with hematologic cancers treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In most situations, relapse treatment options are limited. Maintenance therapy offers the possibility of delaying or avoiding disease recurrence, but its role remains unclear in most conditions that we treat with transplantation. Here, Dr. Hourigan presents an overview of minimal residual disease (MRD) measurement in hematologic malignancies and the applicability of MRD-based post-transplantation interventions. Dr. McCarthy reviews current knowledge of maintenance therapy in the autologous transplantation context, with emphasis on immunologic interventions and immune modulation strategies designed to prevent relapse. Dr. de Lima discusses current lines of investigation in disease recurrence prevention after allogeneic transplantation, focusing on acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. PMID:24485019

  13. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Inhibition of protein kinase CK2 with the clinical-grade small ATP-competitive compound CX-4945 or by RNA interference unveils its role in acute myeloid leukemia cell survival, p53-dependent apoptosis and daunorubicin-induced cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The involvement of protein kinase CK2 in sustaining cancer cell survival could have implications also in the resistance to conventional and unconventional therapies. Moreover, CK2 role in blood tumors is rapidly emerging and this kinase has been recognized as a potential therapeutic target. Phase I clinical trials with the oral small ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitor CX-4945 are currently ongoing in solid tumors and multiple myeloma. Methods We have analyzed the expression of CK2 in acute myeloid leukemia and its function in cell growth and in the response to the chemotherapeutic agent daunorubicin We employed acute myeloid leukemia cell lines and primary blasts from patients grouped according to the European LeukemiaNet risk classification. Cell survival, apoptosis and sensitivity to daunorubicin were assessed by different means. p53-dependent CK2-inhibition-induced apoptosis was investigated in p53 wild-type and mutant cells. Results CK2? was found highly expressed in the majority of samples across the different acute myeloid leukemia prognostic subgroups as compared to normal CD34+ hematopoietic and bone marrow cells. Inhibition of CK2 with CX-4945, K27 or siRNAs caused a p53-dependent acute myeloid leukemia cell apoptosis. CK2 inhibition was associated with a synergistic increase of the cytotoxic effects of daunorubicin. Baseline and daunorubicin-induced STAT3 activation was hampered upon CK2 blockade. Conclusions These results suggest that CK2 is over expressed across the different acute myeloid leukemia subsets and acts as an important regulator of acute myeloid leukemia cell survival. CK2 negative regulation of the protein levels of tumor suppressor p53 and activation of the STAT3 anti-apoptotic pathway might antagonize apoptosis and could be involved in acute myeloid leukemia cell resistance to daunorubicin. PMID:24283803

  15. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Precursors to Pancreatic Cancer+

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Maitra, Anirban; Kern, Scott E.; Goggins, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas is believed to arise from morphologically distinct non-invasive precursor lesions. These precursors include the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, the mucinous cystic neoplasm, and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are grossly visible mucin-producing epithelial neoplasms that arise in the main pancreatic duct or one of its branches. The cysts of mucinous cystic neoplasms do not communicate with the major pancreatic ducts and these neoplasms are characterized by a distinct ovarian-type stroma. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia is a microscopic lesion. This review focuses on the clinical significance of these three remarkable precursor lesions with emphasis on their clinical manifestations, detection, and treatment. PMID:17996793

  17. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Cell-specific Regulation of PTX3 by Glucocorticoid Hormones in Hematopoietic and Nonhematopoietic Cells*S?

    PubMed Central

    Doni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Porta, Chiara; Tuckermann, Jan; Reichardt, Holger M.; Kleiman, Anna; Sironi, Marina; Rubino, Luca; Pasqualini, Fabio; Nebuloni, Manuela; Signorini, Stefano; Peri, Giuseppe; Sica, Antonio; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Bottazzi, Barbara; Mantovani, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    PTX3 (prototypic long pentraxin 3) is a fluid phase pattern recognition receptor, which plays nonredundant roles in the resistance against diverse pathogens, in the assembly of a hyaluronic acid-rich extracellular matrix, and in female fertility. Inflammatory signals induce production of PTX3 in diverse cell types, including myeloid dendritic cells (DC), fibroblasts, and endothelial cells (EC). The present study was designed to explore the effect of glucocorticoid hormones (GC) on PTX3 production in different cellular contexts. In myeloid DC, GC inhibited the PTX3 production. In contrast, in fibroblasts and EC, GC alone induced and, under inflammatory conditions, enhanced and extended PTX3 production. In vivo administration of GC augmented the blood levels of PTX3 in mice and humans. Moreover, patients with Cushing syndrome had increased levels of circulating PTX3, whereas PTX3 levels were decreased in subjects affected by iatrogenic hypocortisolism. In nonhematopoietic cells, GC receptor (GR) functioned as a ligand-dependent transcription factor (dimerization-dependent) to induce PTX3 gene expression. In contrast, in hematopoietic cells, GR repressed PTX3 gene transcription by interfering (dimerization-independent) with the action of other signaling pathways, probably NF?B and AP-1. Thus, divergent effects of GC were found to be due to different GR mechanisms. The results presented here indicate that GC have divergent effects on PTX3 production in hematopoietic (DC and macrophages) and nonhematopoietic (fibroblasts and EC) cells. The divergent effects of GC on PTX3 production probably reflect the different functions of this multifunctional molecule in innate immunity and in the construction of the extracellular matrix. PMID:18703503

  19. Sindbis viral vectors target hematopoietic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Suzme, R; Tseng, J-C; Levin, B; Ibrahim, S; Meruelo, D; Pellicer, A

    2012-11-01

    Sindbis viral vectors target and inhibit the growth of various solid tumors in mouse models. However, their efficacy against blood cancer has not been well established. Here, we show that Sindbis vectors infect and efficiently trigger apoptosis in mouse BW5147 malignant hematopoietic T-cells, but only at low levels in human lymphoma and leukemia cells (Jurkat, Karpas, CEM, DHL and JB). The Mr 37/67?kD laminin receptor (LAMR) has been suggested to be the receptor for Sindbis virus. However, JB cells, which are infected by Sindbis at low efficiency, express high levels of LAMR, revealing that additional factors are involved in Sindbis tropism. To test the infectivity and therapeutic efficacy of Sindbis vectors against malignant hematopoietic cells in vivo, we injected BW5147 cells intraperitoneally into (C3HXAKR) F1 hybrid mice. We found that Sindbis vectors targeted the tumors and significantly prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We also tested the Sindbis vectors in a transgenic CD4-Rgr model, which spontaneously develop thymic lymphomas. However, infectivity in this model was less efficient. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Sindbis vectors have the potential to target and kill hematopoietic malignancies in mice, but further research is needed to evaluate the mechanism underlining the susceptibility of human lymphoid malignancies to Sindbis therapy. PMID:22956041

  20. Calcineurin/NFAT signalling inhibits myeloid haematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Fric, Jan; Lim, Clarice X F; Koh, Esther G L; Hofmann, Benjamin; Chen, Jinmiao; Tay, Hock Soon; Isa, Siti Aminah Bte Mohammad; Mortellaro, Alessandra; Ruedl, Christiane; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) comprises a family of transcription factors that regulate T cell development, activation and differentiation. NFAT signalling can also mediate granulocyte and dendritic cell (DC) activation, but it is unknown whether NFAT influences their development from progenitors. Here, we report a novel role for calcineurin/NFAT signalling as a negative regulator of myeloid haematopoiesis. Reconstituting lethally irradiated mice with haematopoietic stem cells expressing an NFAT-inhibitory peptide resulted in enhanced development of the myeloid compartment. Culturing bone marrow cells in media supplemented with Flt3-L in the presence of the calcineurin/NFAT inhibitor Cyclosporin A increased numbers of differentiated DC. Global gene expression analysis of untreated DC and NFAT-inhibited DC revealed differential expression of transcripts that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence that calcineurin/NFAT signalling negatively regulates myeloid lineage development. The finding that inhibition of NFAT enhances myeloid development provides a novel insight into understanding how the treatment with drugs targeting calcineurin/NFAT signalling influence the homeostasis of the innate immune system. PMID:22311511

  1. In vitro inhibitory effects of imatinib mesylate on stromal cells and hematopoietic progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Soares, P.B.; Jeremias, T.S.; Alvarez-Silva, M.; Licínio, M.A.; Santos-Silva, M.C.; Vituri, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) because it selectively inhibits tyrosine kinase, which is a hallmark of CML oncogenesis. Recent studies have shown that IM inhibits the growth of several non-malignant hematopoietic and fibroblast cells from bone marrow (BM). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IM on stromal and hematopoietic progenitor cells, specifically in the colony-forming units of granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM), using BM cultures from 108 1.5- to 2-month-old healthy Swiss mice. The results showed that low concentrations of IM (1.25?µM) reduced the growth of CFU-GM in clonogenic assays. In culture assays with stromal cells, fibroblast proliferation and ?-SMA expression by immunocytochemistry analysis were also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner, with a survival rate of approximately 50% with a dose of 2.5?µM. Cell viability and morphology were analyzed using MTT and staining with acrydine orange/ethidium bromide. Most cells were found to be viable after treatment with 5?µM IM, although there was gradual growth inhibition of fibroblastic cells while the number of round cells (macrophage-like cells) increased. At higher concentrations (15?µM), the majority of cells were apoptotic and cell growth ceased completely. Oil red staining revealed the presence of adipocytes only in untreated cells (control). Cell cycle analysis of stromal cells by flow cytometry showed a blockade at the G0/G1 phases in groups treated with 5-15?µM. These results suggest that IM differentially inhibits the survival of different types of BM cells since toxic effects were achieved. PMID:23011404

  2. Pharmacodynamic modeling of thrombopoietin, platelet, and megakaryocyte dynamics in patients with acute myeloid leukemia undergoing dose intensive chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Steven H; Jusko, William J; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Nichol, Janet; Wetzler, Meir

    2002-05-01

    A proposed model of thrombopoietin (TPO) regulation is that of a constitutive production of TPO with circulating levels being predominately regulated by changes in platelet and megackaryocyte mass. Using a pharmacodynamic (PD) approach, the authors examined the validity of this model for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing dose-intensive postinduction chemotherapy (HDT). TPO and platelet values were assayed weekly in AML patients undergoing HDT. A parsimonious dynamic model was then applied to these experimental data. The results (1) support the proposed model of TPO regulation, (2) model and quantify the effects of HDT on the megakaryocyte compartment, (3) characterize variables not amenable to direct measurement, and (4) have clinical utility as this model predicted that TPO given after HDT would not have a significant effect on platelet recovery, a finding borne out in clinical trials. This model provides information relevant to the interpretation of clinical trials of hematopoietic growth factors. PMID:12017344

  3. Chronic myeloid leukemia transformation in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria: a rare case report with literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yue; Tao, Shandong; Deng, Yuan; Song, Lixiao; Yu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is an acquired hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) disorder arising from a somatic mutation of the X-linked phosphatidylinositol glycan complementation class A gene (PIG-A) which leads to partial or complete deficiency of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked membrane proteins and causes intravascular hemolysis. Its pathophysiological links with aplastic anemia (AA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have been described frequently, and few acute leukemia are proved to be derived from PNH. However, PNH with transformation to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has never been reported. Here, we report a patient initially diagnosed with PNH while 11 years later, Ph chromosome and BCR/ABL fusion gene were detected and the patient was eventually confirmed the diagnosis of CML. Here, the diagnosis and management of the interesting case, as well as questions regarding pathogenesis, are discussed. PMID:26221399

  4. ?? T-cell reconstitution after HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic transplantation depleted of TCR-??+/CD19+ lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bertaina, Alice; Prigione, Ignazia; Zorzoli, Alessia; Pagliara, Daria; Cocco, Claudia; Meazza, Raffaella; Loiacono, Fabrizio; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Barbarito, Giulia; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Alessandro; Pistoia, Vito; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-01-01

    We prospectively assessed functional and phenotypic characteristics of ?? T lymphocytes up to 7 months after HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) depleted of ??+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in 27 children with either malignant or nonmalignant disorders. We demonstrate that (1) ?? T cells are the predominant T-cell population in patients during the first weeks after transplantation, being mainly, albeit not only, derived from cells infused with the graft and expanding in vivo; (2) central-memory cells predominated very early posttransplantation for both V?1 and V?2 subsets; (3) V?1 cells are specifically expanded in patients experiencing cytomegalovirus reactivation and are more cytotoxic compared with those of children who did not experience reactivation; (4) these subsets display a cytotoxic phenotype and degranulate when challenged with primary acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia blasts; and (5) V?2 cells are expanded in vitro after exposure to zoledronic acid (ZOL) and efficiently lyse primary lymphoid and myeloid blasts. This is the first detailed characterization of ?? T cells emerging in peripheral blood of children after CD19+ B-cell and ??+ T-cell–depleted haplo-HSCT. Our results can be instrumental to the development of clinical trials using ZOL for improving ?? T-cell killing capacity against leukemia cells. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01810120. PMID:25612623

  5. Outcome of myeloablative allogeneic peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for refractory/relapsed AML patients in NR status.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Ning, Hong-Mei; Hu, Liang-Ding; Jiang, Min; Xu, Chen; Hu, Jiang-Wei; Wang, Jun; Li, Yu-Hang; Li, Bo-Tao; Lou, Xiao; Yang, Fan; Chen, Jian-Lin; Su, Yong-Feng; Li, Meng; Wang, Hong-Ye; Ren, Jing; Feng, Yue-Qian; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dan-Hong; Chen, Hu

    2015-12-01

    To further find effective method to improve the long term survival of refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, we retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for 133 consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) therapy related AML(t-AML) in not remission status. The overall 3-year OS and DFS were 40.9% and 35.6% respectively. The variables associated with improved long term DFS were a bone marrow blast cell count less than 20% and an intensified conditioning regimen. In addition, the t-AML group had higher rates of relapse and III-IV acute GVHD than the primary AML group. The unrelated donor group had similar OS and DFS with sibling groups. Our study suggested that decreasing bone marrow blast cell counts before HSCT and strengthening the conditioning regimen may improve long-term DFS for refractory/relapsed AML patients, and unrelated donor group can get similar effect when compared to the sibling group. PMID:26530539

  6. Loss of TET2 in hematopoietic cells leads to DNA hypermethylation of active enhancers and induction of leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kasper D.; Jia, Guangshuai; Johansen, Jens V.; Pedersen, Marianne T.; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik O.; Porse, Bo T.; Bernard, Olivier A.; Christensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is tightly regulated throughout mammalian development, and altered DNA methylation patterns are a general hallmark of cancer. The methylcytosine dioxygenase TET2 is frequently mutated in hematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and has been suggested to protect CG dinucleotide (CpG) islands and promoters from aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, we present a novel Tet2-dependent leukemia mouse model that closely recapitulates gene expression profiles and hallmarks of human AML1-ETO-induced AML. Using this model, we show that the primary effect of Tet2 loss in preleukemic hematopoietic cells is progressive and widespread DNA hypermethylation affecting up to 25% of active enhancer elements. In contrast, CpG island and promoter methylation does not change in a Tet2-dependent manner but increases relative to population doublings. We confirmed this specific enhancer hypermethylation phenotype in human AML patients with TET2 mutations. Analysis of immediate gene expression changes reveals rapid deregulation of a large number of genes implicated in tumorigenesis, including many down-regulated tumor suppressor genes. Hence, we propose that TET2 prevents leukemic transformation by protecting enhancers from aberrant DNA methylation and that it is the combined silencing of several tumor suppressor genes in TET2 mutated hematopoietic cells that contributes to increased stem cell proliferation and leukemogenesis. PMID:25886910

  7. Loss of TET2 in hematopoietic cells leads to DNA hypermethylation of active enhancers and induction of leukemogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Kasper D; Jia, Guangshuai; Johansen, Jens V; Pedersen, Marianne T; Rapin, Nicolas; Bagger, Frederik O; Porse, Bo T; Bernard, Olivier A; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation is tightly regulated throughout mammalian development, and altered DNA methylation patterns are a general hallmark of cancer. The methylcytosine dioxygenase TET2 is frequently mutated in hematological disorders, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and has been suggested to protect CG dinucleotide (CpG) islands and promoters from aberrant DNA methylation. In this study, we present a novel Tet2-dependent leukemia mouse model that closely recapitulates gene expression profiles and hallmarks of human AML1-ETO-induced AML. Using this model, we show that the primary effect of Tet2 loss in preleukemic hematopoietic cells is progressive and widespread DNA hypermethylation affecting up to 25% of active enhancer elements. In contrast, CpG island and promoter methylation does not change in a Tet2-dependent manner but increases relative to population doublings. We confirmed this specific enhancer hypermethylation phenotype in human AML patients with TET2 mutations. Analysis of immediate gene expression changes reveals rapid deregulation of a large number of genes implicated in tumorigenesis, including many down-regulated tumor suppressor genes. Hence, we propose that TET2 prevents leukemic transformation by protecting enhancers from aberrant DNA methylation and that it is the combined silencing of several tumor suppressor genes in TET2 mutated hematopoietic cells that contributes to increased stem cell proliferation and leukemogenesis. PMID:25886910

  8. CD133+ cell selection is an alternative to CD34+ cell selection for ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kobari, L; Giarratana, M C; Pflumio, F; Izac, B; Coulombel, L; Douay, L

    2001-04-01

    CD133 is a new stem cell antigen that may provide an alternative to CD34 for the selection and expansion of hematopoietic cells for transplantation. This study compared the expansion capacities of CD133(+) and CD34(+) cells isolated from the same cord blood (CB) samples. After 14 days culture in stroma-free, serum-free medium in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), Flt3-1, megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF), and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CD133(+) and CD34(+) fractions displayed comparable expansion of the myeloid compartment (CFC, LTC-IC, and E-LTC-IC). The expansion of CD133(+) CB cells was up to 1262-fold for total cells, 99-fold for CD34(+) cells, 109-fold for CD34(+) CD133(+) cells, 133-fold for CFU-GM, 14.5-fold for LTC-IC, and 7.5-fold for E-LTC-IC. Moreover, the expanded population was able to generate lymphoid B (CD19(+)), NK (CD56(+)), and T (CD4(+) CD8(+)) cells in liquid or fetal thymic organ cultures, while expression of the homing antigen CXCR4 was similar on expanded and nonexpanded CD133(+) or CD34(+) cells. Thus, the CD133(+) subset could be expanded in the same manner as the CD34(+) subset and conserved its multilineage capacity, which would support the relevance of CD133 for clinical hematopoietic selection. PMID:11359674

  9. Acquired Deficiency of A20 Results in Rapid Apoptosis, Systemic Inflammation, and Abnormal Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Ebihara, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Kohichiro; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Takubo, Keiyo; Suda, Toshio; Oda, Hideaki; Inaba, Toshiya; Honda, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    A20 is a negative regulator of NF-?B, and mutational loss of A20 expression is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases and B-cell lymphomas. To clarify the role of A20 in adult hematopoiesis, we generated conditional A20 knockout mice (A20flox/flox) and crossed them with Mx–1Cre (MxCre+) and ERT2Cre (ERT2Cre+) transgenic mice in which Cre is inducibly activated by endogenous interferon and exogenous tamoxifen, respectively. A20flox/flox MxCre+ (A20Mx) mice spontaneously exhibited myeloid proliferation, B cell apoptosis, and anemia with overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Bone marrow transplantation demonstrated that these changes were caused by hematopoietic cells. NF-?B was constitutively activated in A20Mx hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which caused enhanced cell cycle entry and impaired repopulating ability. Tamoxifen stimulation of A20flox/flox ERT2Cre+ (A20ERT2) mice induced fulminant apoptosis and subsequent myeloproliferation, lymphocytopenia, and progressive anemia with excessive production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, as observed in A20Mx mice. These results demonstrate that A20 plays essential roles in the homeostasis of adult hematopoiesis by preventing apoptosis and inflammation. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism underlying A20 dysfunction and human diseases in which A20 expression is impaired. PMID:24498102

  10. Fanconi Anemia Mesenchymal Stromal Cells-Derived Glycerophospholipids Skew Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Amarachintha, Surya; Sertorio, Mathieu; Wilson, Andrew; Li, Xiaoli; Pang, Qishen

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) patients develop bone marrow (BM) failure or leukemia. One standard care for these devastating complications is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified a group of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs)-derived metabolites, glycerophospholipids, and their endogenous inhibitor, 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA), as regulators of donor hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We provided two pieces of evidence that TOFA could improve hematopoiesis-supporting function of FA MSCs: (a) limiting-dilution cobblestone area-forming cell assay revealed that TOFA significantly increased cobblestone colonies in Fanca-/- or Fancd2-/- cocultures compared to untreated cocultures. (b) Competitive repopulating assay using output cells collected from cocultures showed that TOFA greatly alleviated the abnormal expansion of the donor myeloid (CD45.2+Gr1+Mac1+) compartment in both peripheral blood and BM of recipient mice transplanted with cells from Fanca-/- or Fancd2-/- cocultures. Furthermore, mechanistic studies identified Tlr4 signaling as the responsible pathway mediating the effect of glycerophospholipids. Thus, targeting glycerophospholipid biosynthesis in FA MSCs could be a therapeutic strategy to improve hematopoiesis and stem cell transplantation. Stem Cells 2015;33:3382-3396. PMID:26212365

  11. Parallel assessment of globin lentiviral transfer in induced pluripotent stem cells and adult hematopoietic stem cells derived from the same transplanted ?-thalassemia patient.

    PubMed

    Tubsuwan, Alisa; Abed, Soumeya; Deichmann, Annette; Kardel, Melanie D; Bartholomä, Cynthia; Cheung, Alice; Negre, Olivier; Kadri, Zahra; Fucharoen, Suthat; von Kalle, Christof; Payen, Emmanuel; Chrétien, Stany; Schmidt, Manfred; Eaves, Connie J; Leboulch, Philippe; Maouche-Chrétien, Leïla

    2013-09-01

    A patient with ?(E)/?(0) -thalassemia major was converted to transfusion-independence 4.5 years ago by lentiviral gene transfer in hematopoietic stem cells while showing a myeloid-biased cell clone. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a potential alternative source of hematopoietic stem cells. If fetal to adult globin class, switching does not occur in vivo in iPSC-derived erythroid cells, ?-globin gene transfer would be unnecessary. To investigate both vector integration skewing and the potential use of iPSCs for the treatment of thalassemia, we derived iPSCs from the thalassemia gene therapy patient and compared iPSC-derived hematopoietic cells to their natural isogenic somatic counterparts. In NSG immunodeficient mice, embryonic to fetal and a partial fetal to adult globin class switching were observed, indicating that the gene transfer is likely necessary for iPSC-based therapy of the ?-hemoglobinopathies. Lentivector integration occurred in regions of low and high genotoxicity. Surprisingly, common integration sites (CIS) were identified across those iPSCs and cells retrieved from isogenic and nonisogenic gene therapy patients with ?-thalassemia and adrenoleukodystrophy, respectively. This suggests that CIS observed in the absence of overt tumorigenesis result from nonrandom lentiviral integration rather than oncogenic in vivo selection. These findings bring the use of iPSCs closer to practicality and further clarify our interpretation of genome-wide lentivector integration. PMID:23712774

  12. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-12

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. A Novel Function for P2Y2 in Myeloid Recipient-Derived Cells during Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Klämbt, Verena; Wohlfeil, Sebastian A; Schwab, Lukas; Hülsdünker, Jan; Ayata, Korcan; Apostolova, Petya; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Dierbach, Heide; Prinz, Gabriele; Follo, Marie; Prinz, Marco; Idzko, Marco; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. During the initiation phase of acute GvHD, endogenous danger signals such as ATP are released and inform the innate immune system via activation of the purinergic receptor P2X7 that a noninfectious damage has occurred. A second ATP-activated purinergic receptor involved in inflammatory diseases is P2Y2. In this study, we used P2y2(-/-) mice to test the role of this receptor in GvHD. P2y2(-/-) recipients experienced reduced GvHD-related mortality, IL-6 levels, enterocyte apoptosis, and histopathology scores. Chimeric mice with P2y2 deficiency restricted to hematopoietic tissues survived longer after GvHD induction than did wild-type mice. P2y2 deficiency of the recipient was connected to lower levels of myeloperoxidase in the intestinal tract of mice developing GvHD and a reduced myeloid cell signature. Selective deficiency of P2Y2 in inflammatory monocytes decreased GvHD severity. Mechanistically, P2y2(-/-) inflammatory monocytes displayed defective ERK activation and reactive oxygen species production. Compatible with a role of P2Y2 in human GvHD, the frequency of P2Y2(+) cells in inflamed GvHD lesions correlated with histopathological GvHD severity. Our findings indicate a novel function for P2Y2 in ATP-activated recipient myeloid cells during GvHD, which could be exploited when targeting danger signals to prevent GvHD. PMID:26538394

  14. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Tightly regulated 'all-in-one' lentiviral vectors for protection of human hematopoietic cells from anticancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, N; Brennig, S; Hillje, R; Schermeier, H; Phaltane, R; Dahlmann, J; Gruh, I; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Baum, C; Moritz, T

    2015-11-01

    Successful application of gene therapy strategies may require stringently regulated transgene expression. Along this line, we describe a doxycycline (Dox)-inducible 'all-in-one' lentiviral vector design using the pTET-T11 (TII) minimal-promoter and a reverse transactivator protein (rtTA2S-M2) driven by the phosphoglycerate kinase promoter allowing for tight regulation of transgene expression (Lv.TII vectors). Vector design was evaluated in human hematopoietic cells in the context of cytidine deaminase (hCDD)-based myeloprotective gene therapy. Upon Dox administration, a rapid (16-24?h) and dose-dependent (>0.04??g?ml(-1) Dox) onset of transgene expression was detected in Lv.TII.CDD gene-modified K562 cells as well as in primary human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells. Importantly, in both cell models low background transgene expression was observed in the absence of Dox. Functionality of Dox-inducible hCDD expression was demonstrated by >10-fold increase in cytosine arabinoside (1-?-d-arabinofuranosylcytosine, Ara-C) resistance of Lv.TII.CDD-transduced K562 cells. In addition, Lv.TII.CDD-transduced CD34(+)-derived myeloid cells were protected from up to 300?nm Ara-C (control affected from 50?nm onwards). These data clearly demonstrate the suitability of our self-inactivating lentiviral vector to induce robust, tightly regulated transgene expression in human hematopoietic cells with minimal background activity and highlight the potential of our construct in myeloprotective gene therapy strategies. PMID:26125609

  16. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-27

    Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Increased expression of PcG protein YY1 negatively regulates B cell development while allowing accumulation of myeloid cells and LT-HSC cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xuan; Jones, Morgan; Jiang, Jie; Zaprazna, Kristina; Yu, Duonan; Pear, Warren; Maillard, Ivan; Atchison, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Ying Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional Polycomb Group (PcG) transcription factor that binds to multiple enhancer binding sites in the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci and plays vital roles in early B cell development. PcG proteins have important functions in hematopoietic stem cell renewal and YY1 is the only mammalian PcG protein with DNA binding specificity. Conditional knock-out of YY1 in the mouse B cell lineage results in arrest at the pro-B cell stage, and dosage effects have been observed at various YY1 expression levels. To investigate the impact of elevated YY1 expression on hematopoetic development, we utilized a mouse in vivo bone marrow reconstitution system. We found that mouse bone marrow cells expressing elevated levels of YY1 exhibited a selective disadvantage as they progressed from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to pro-B, pre-B, immature B and re-circulating B cell stages, but no disadvantage of YY1 over-expression was observed in myeloid lineage cells. Furthermore, mouse bone marrow cells expressing elevated levels of YY1 displayed enrichment for cells with surface markers characteristic of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). YY1 expression induced apoptosis in mouse B cell lines in vitro, and resulted in down-regulated expression of anti-apoptotic genes Bcl-xl and NF?B2, while no impact was observed in a mouse myeloid line. B cell apoptosis and LT-HSC enrichment induced by YY1 suggest that novel strategies to induce YY1 expression could have beneficial effects in the treatment of B lineage malignancies while preserving normal HSCs. PMID:22292011

  19. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 specifies a distinct subpopulation of quiescent myeloid-biased long-term HSCs.

    PubMed

    Land, Ruben H; Rayne, Anna K; Vanderbeck, Ashley N; Barlowe, Trevor S; Manjunath, Shwetha; Gross, Matthew; Eiger, Sophie; Klein, Peter S; Cunningham, Nicole R; Huang, Jian; Emerson, Stephen G; Punt, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is maintained throughout life by self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that differentiate to produce both myeloid and lymphoid cells. The NR4A family of orphan nuclear receptors, which regulates cell fate in many tissues, appears to play a key role in HSC proliferation and differentiation. Using a NR4A1(GFP) BAC transgenic reporter mouse we have investigated NR4A1 expression and its regulation in early hematopoiesis. We show that NR4A1 is most highly expressed in a subset of Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) CD48(-) CD150(+) long-term (LT) HSCs, and its expression is tightly associated with HSC quiescence. We also show that NR4A1 expression in HSCs is induced by PGE2, a known enhancer of stem cell engraftment potential. Finally, we find that both NR4A1(GFP+) and NR4A1(GFP-) HSCs successfully engraft primary and secondary irradiated hosts; however, NR4A1(GFP+) HSCs are distinctly myeloid-biased. These results show that NR4A1 expression identifies a highly quiescent and distinct population of myeloid-biased LT-HSCs. PMID:25284014

  3. Hematopoietic growth factors in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rowe, J M; Liesveld, J L

    1997-03-01

    The hematopoietic growth factors are glycoproteins that can be produced by recombinant DNA technology. They have many potential clinical uses in acute leukemia; several areas have been explored extensively and much data are available from clinical trials. Other areas are of potential interest, but have a paucity of clinical information. The past decade has seen major strides in the development and clinical application of cytokines in acute leukemia and it is expected that this trend will continue over the next decade as further areas are explored and results of clinical trials mature to enable us to determine the precise role of cytokines in the clinical setting. PMID:9067570

  4. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. Muscle Nerve, 2015 Muscle Nerve 52: 480-487, 2015. PMID:26044357

  5. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  6. Precision medicine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  7. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia - Prognostic Value of Mutations.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Bushra; Shahab, Sadaf; Ahmed, Nuzhat; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a stem cell disorder characterized by unrestricted proliferation of the myeloid series that occurs due to the BCR-ABL fusion oncogene as a result of reciprocal translocation t(9;22) (q34;q11). This discovery has made this particular domain a target for future efforts to cure CML. Imatinib revolutionized the treatment options for CML and gave encouraging results both in case of safety as well as tolerability profile as compared to agents such as hydroxyurea or busulfan given before Imatinib. However, about 2-4% of patients show resistance and mutations have been found to be one of the reasons for its development. European Leukemianet gives recommendations for BCR-ABL mutational analysis along with other tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) that should be administered according to the mutations harbored in a patient. The following overview gives recommendations for monitoring patients on the basis of their mutational status. PMID:26625737

  8. Lymphoid and Myeloid Recovery in Rhesus Macaques Following Total Body X-Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Farese, Ann M; Hankey, Kim G; Cohen, Melanie Veirs; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Recovery from severe immunosuppression requires hematopoietic stem cell reconstitution and effective thymopoiesis to restore a functional immune cell repertoire. Herein, a model of immune cell reconstitution consequent to potentially lethal doses of irradiation is described, which may be valuable in evaluating potential medical countermeasures. Male rhesus macaques were total body irradiated by exposure to 6.00 Gy 250 kVp x-radiation (midline tissue dose, 0.13 Gy min), resulting in an approximate LD10/60 (n = 5/59). Animals received medical management, and hematopoietic and immune cell recovery was assessed (n ? 14) through 370 d post exposure. A subset of animals (n ? 8) was examined through 700 d. Myeloid recovery was assessed by neutrophil and platelet-related parameters. Lymphoid recovery was assessed by the absolute lymphocyte count and FACS-based phenotyping of B- and T-cell subsets. Recent thymic emigrants were identified by T cell receptor excision circle quantification. Severe neutropenia, lymphopenia, and thrombocytopenia resolved within 30 d. Total CD3+ cells ?L required 60 d to reach values 60% of normal, followed by subsequent slow recovery to approximately normal by 180 d post irradiation. Recovery of CD3+4+ and CD3+8+ cell memory and naïve subsets were markedly different. Memory populations were ? 100% of normal by day 60, whereas naïve populations were only 57% normal at 180 d and never fully recovered to baseline post irradiation. Total (CD20+) B cells ?L were within normal levels by 77 d post exposure. This animal model elucidates the variable T- and B-cell subset recovery kinetics after a potentially lethal dose of total-body irradiation that are dependent on marrow-derived stem and progenitor cell recovery, peripheral homeostatic expansion, and thymopoiesis. PMID:26425902

  9. Alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin? cell transplantation correlates with their differentiation into myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong Ryu, Su; Ju, Ji-Min; Kim, Woojin; Bum Kim, Min; Hee Oh, Kuen; Sup Lee, Dong; Lee, Hakmo; Eun Oh, Ju; Soo Park, Kyong; Young Choi, Eun

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cellular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects exerted by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the repair of tissue damage, we investigated the in vivo dynamics of bone marrow (BM) lineage-negative (Lin?) cells transplanted into mice with hyper sensitivity dermatitis. Longitudinal in vivo imaging and flow cytometry analyses revealed that Lin? cells home directly to inflamed skin within 6?h, where they undergo extensive expansion with the peak on day 14 post-transplantation, and preferential differentiation into CD11b+Ly6GintLy6C+ cells by day 7. Cells with phenotypic profiles of neutrophils, macrophages, and DCs appeared in inflamed skin on day 14. Progenies of transplanted Lin? cells showed similar kinetics of expansion and myeloid differentiation in BM. However, differentiation into CD11b+Ly6GintLy6C+ cells in the inflamed skin on day 7 was more skewed toward CD115+ cells (?60%) with immune suppressive function and higher expression levels of iNOS, arginase, and IL-10, compared with those in the BM. Transplantation of Lin? cells reduced the levels of Cd3 transcript and CD4+/CD8+ cells in inflamed skin. These results demonstrate differentiation of transplanted Lin? cells into myeloid-derived suppressor cells in inflamed skin to be the basis of the alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin? cell transplantation. PMID:26441031

  10. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation.

  11. Distinct gene expression profiles of acute myeloid/T-lymphoid leukemia with silenced CEBPA and mutations in NOTCH1

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Bas J.; Jordà, Meritxell Alberich; Keeshan, Karen; Louwers, Irene; Erpelinck-Verschueren, Claudia A. J.; Tielemans, Dennis; Langerak, Anton W.; He, Yiping; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Zhang, Pu; Hetherington, Christopher J.; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Valk, Peter J. M.; Löwenberg, Bob; Tenen, Daniel G.; Pear, Warren S.

    2007-01-01

    Gene expression profiling of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) allows the discovery of previously unrecognized molecular entities. Here, we identified a specific subgroup of AML, defined by an expression profile resembling that of AMLs with mutations in the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (C/EBP?), while lacking such mutations. We found that in these leukemias, the CEBPA gene was silenced, which was associated with frequent promoter hypermethylation. The leukemias phenotypically showed aberrant expression of T-cell genes, of which CD7 was most consistent. We identified 2 mechanisms that may contribute to this phenotype. First, absence of Cebpa led to up-regulation of specific T-cell transcripts (ie, Cd7 and Lck) in hematopoietic stem cells isolated from conditional Cebpa knockout mice. Second, the enhanced expression of TRIB2, which we identify here as a direct target of the T-cell commitment factor NOTCH1, suggested aberrantly activated Notch signaling. Putatively activating NOTCH1 mutations were found in several specimens of the newly identified subgroup, while a large set of control AMLs was mutation negative. A gene expression prediction signature allowed the detection of similar cases of leukemia in independent series of AML. PMID:17671232

  12. Cytogenetics in benzene-associated myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia: new insights into a disease continuum.

    PubMed

    Irons, Richard D; Kerzic, Patrick J

    2014-03-01

    Hematopoiesis in health and disease results from complex interactions between primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and the extrinsic influences of other cells in the bone marrow (BM) niche. Advances in stem cell biology, molecular genetics, and computational biology reveal that the immortality, self-renewal, and maintenance of blood homeostasis generally attributed to individual HSCs are functions of the cells' behavior in the normal BM environment. Here we discuss how these advances, together with results of outcomes-based clinical epidemiology studies, provide new insight into the importance of epigenetic events in leukemogenesis. For the chemical benzene (Bz), development of myeloid neoplasms depends predominantly on alterations within the microenvironments in which they arise. The primary persistent disease in Bz myelotoxicity is myelodysplastic syndrome, which precedes cytogenetic injury. Evidence indicates that acute myeloid leukemia arises as a secondary event, subsequent to evolution of the leukemia-initiating cell phenotype within the altered BM microenvironment. Further explorations into the nature of chemical versus de novo disease should consider this mechanism, which is biologically distinct from previous models of clonal cytogenetic injury. Understanding alterations of homeostatic regulation in the BM niche is important for validation of models of leukemogenesis, monitoring at-risk populations, and development of novel treatment and prevention strategies. PMID:24611724

  13. CD33-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells exhibit potent preclinical activity against human acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kenderian, S S; Ruella, M; Shestova, O; Klichinsky, M; Aikawa, V; Morrissette, J J D; Scholler, J; Song, D; Porter, D L; Carroll, M; June, C H; Gill, S

    2015-08-01

    Patients with chemo-refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have a dismal prognosis. Chimeric antigen receptor T (CART) cell therapy has produced exciting results in CD19+ malignancies and may overcome many of the limitations of conventional leukemia therapies. We developed CART cells to target CD33 (CART33) using the anti-CD33 single chain variable fragment used in gemtuzumab ozogamicin (clone My96) and tested the activity and toxicity of these cells. CART33 exhibited significant effector functions in vitro and resulted in eradication of leukemia and prolonged survival in AML xenografts. CART33 also resulted in human lineage cytopenias and reduction of myeloid progenitors in xenograft models of hematopoietic toxicity, suggesting that permanently expressed CD33-specific CART cells would have unacceptable toxicity. To enhance the viability of CART33 as an option for AML, we designed a transiently expressed mRNA anti-CD33 CAR. Gene transfer was carried out by electroporation into T cells and resulted in high-level expression with potent but self-limited activity against AML. Thus our preclinical studies show potent activity of CART33 and indicate that transient expression of anti-CD33 CAR by RNA modification could be used in patients to avoid long-term myelosuppression. CART33 therapy could be used alone or as part of a preparative regimen prior to allogeneic transplantation in refractory AML. PMID:25721896

  14. Alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin(-) cell transplantation correlates with their differentiation into myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong Ryu, Su; Ju, Ji-Min; Kim, Woojin; Bum Kim, Min; Hee Oh, Kuen; Sup Lee, Dong; Lee, Hakmo; Eun Oh, Ju; Soo Park, Kyong; Young Choi, Eun

    2015-01-01

    To understand the cellular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effects exerted by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in the repair of tissue damage, we investigated the in vivo dynamics of bone marrow (BM) lineage-negative (Lin(-)) cells transplanted into mice with hyper sensitivity dermatitis. Longitudinal in vivo imaging and flow cytometry analyses revealed that Lin(-) cells home directly to inflamed skin within 6?h, where they undergo extensive expansion with the peak on day 14 post-transplantation, and preferential differentiation into CD11b(+)Ly6G(int)Ly6C(+) cells by day 7. Cells with phenotypic profiles of neutrophils, macrophages, and DCs appeared in inflamed skin on day 14. Progenies of transplanted Lin(-) cells showed similar kinetics of expansion and myeloid differentiation in BM. However, differentiation into CD11b(+)Ly6G(int)Ly6C(+) cells in the inflamed skin on day 7 was more skewed toward CD115(+) cells (?60%) with immune suppressive function and higher expression levels of iNOS, arginase, and IL-10, compared with those in the BM. Transplantation of Lin(-) cells reduced the levels of Cd3 transcript and CD4(+)/CD8(+) cells in inflamed skin. These results demonstrate differentiation of transplanted Lin(-) cells into myeloid-derived suppressor cells in inflamed skin to be the basis of the alleviation of skin inflammation after Lin(-) cell transplantation. PMID:26441031

  15. Myeloid Dysregulation in a Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Model of PTPN11-Associated Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mulero-Navarro, Sonia; Sevilla, Ana; Roman, Angel C; Lee, Dung-Fang; D'Souza, Sunita L; Pardo, Sherly; Riess, Ilan; Su, Jie; Cohen, Ninette; Schaniel, Christoph; Rodriguez, Nelson A; Baccarini, Alessia; Brown, Brian D; Cavé, Hélène; Caye, Aurélie; Strullu, Marion; Yalcin, Safak; Park, Christopher Y; Dhandapany, Perundurai S; Yongchao, Ge; Edelmann, Lisa; Bahieg, Sawsan; Raynal, Patrick; Flex, Elisabetta; Tartaglia, Marco; Moore, Kateri A; Lemischka, Ihor R; Gelb, Bruce D

    2015-10-20

    Somatic PTPN11 mutations cause juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). Germline PTPN11 defects cause Noonan syndrome (NS), and specific inherited mutations cause NS/JMML. Here, we report that hematopoietic cells differentiated from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) harboring NS/JMML-causing PTPN11 mutations recapitulated JMML features. hiPSC-derived NS/JMML myeloid cells exhibited increased signaling through STAT5 and upregulation of miR-223 and miR-15a. Similarly, miR-223 and miR-15a were upregulated in 11/19 JMML bone marrow mononuclear cells harboring PTPN11 mutations, but not those without PTPN11 defects. Reducing miR-223's function in NS/JMML hiPSCs normalized myelogenesis. MicroRNA target gene expression levels were reduced in hiPSC-derived myeloid cells as well as in JMML cells with PTPN11 mutations. Thus, studying an inherited human cancer syndrome with hiPSCs illuminated early oncogenesis prior to the accumulation of secondary genomic alterations, enabling us to discover microRNA dysregulation, establishing a genotype-phenotype association for JMML and providing therapeutic targets. PMID:26456833

  16. Honokiol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via inhibiting class I histone deacetylases in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Ying; Ye, Hai-Ge; Chen, Chi-Qi; Yin, Li-Hui; Wu, Jian-Bo; He, Li-Cai; Gao, Shen-Meng

    2015-02-01

    Honokiol, a constituent of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to possess potent anti-cancer activity through targeting multiple signaling pathways in numerous malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be defined. Here, we report that honokiol effectively decreased enzyme activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and reduced the protein expression of class I HDACs in leukemic cells. Moreover, treatment with proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented honokiol-induced degradation of class I HDACs. Importantly, honokiol increased the levels of p21/waf1 and Bax via triggering acetylation of histone in the regions of p21/waf1 and Bax promoter. Honokiol induced apoptosis, decreased activity of HDACs, and significantly inhibited the clonogenic activity of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow mononuclear cells from patients with AML. However, honokiol did not decrease the activity of HDACs and induce apoptosis in normal hematopoietic progenitors from unbilicial cord blood. Finally, honokiol dramatically reduced tumorigenicity in a xenograft leukemia model. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that honokiol has anti-leukemia activity through inhibiting HDACs. Thus, being a relative non-toxic agent, honokiol may serve as a novel natural agent for cancer prevention and therapy in leukemia. PMID:25187418

  17. Molecularly targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Eytan M

    2015-12-01

    The past 15 years have seen major leaps in our understanding of the molecular genetic mutations that act as drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trials of agents against specific mutant proteins, such as FLT3-internal tandem duplications (ITDs) and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations (IDHs) are ongoing. This review discusses agents in clinical trials that target specific gene mutations and/or epigenetic targets. PMID:26637775

  18. Acute Myeloid Leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that originates in the bone marrow from immature white blood cells known as myeloblasts. About 25% of all children with leukemia have AML. Although survival rates have increased since the 1970s, approximately half of all childhood AML cases relapse despite intensive treatment. Additional therapies following relapse are often unsuccessful and can be especially difficult and damaging for children. These patients would clearly benefit from targeted therapeutic approaches.

  19. Bcr/Abl expression stimulates integrin function in hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoni, G; Carlesso, N; Griffin, J D; Hemler, M E

    1996-01-01

    Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is largely mediated by adhesion molecules of the integrin family and is often diminished upon oncogenic transformation. However, we show here that the chronic myelogenous leukemia oncogene Bcr/Abl has positive effects on VLA-4 and VLA-5 integrin function. The presence of Bcr/Abl in the GM-CSF- or IL-3-dependent hematopoietic cell lines MO7e, 32D, and BaF/3 enhanced cell binding to both soluble and immobilized fibronectin. The effect was due to enhanced function of the VLA-5 integrin fibronectin receptor and not to increased surface expression. In parallel, Bcr/Abl stimulated cell adhesion to the VLA-4 integrin ligand VCAM-1. Stimulation of VLA-5 function directly correlated with induction of Bcr/Abl tyrosine kinase activity in a temperature-sensitive kinase mutant. Thus, Bcr/Abl stimulates integrin-dependent cell adhesion, by a mechanism involving increased ligand binding, with the tyrosine kinase activity of Bcr/Abl likely playing a key role. Consistent with these results, hematopoietic precursor cells from chronic myelogenous leukemia patients also showed increased adhesion to fibronectin. PMID:8755665

  20. Aorta-associated CD34+ hematopoietic cells in the early human embryo.

    PubMed

    Tavian, M; Coulombel, L; Luton, D; Clemente, H S; Dieterlen-Lièvre, F; Péault, B

    1996-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is established from circulating blood stem cells that seed the embryonic rudiments of blood-forming tissues, a basic notion in developmental hematology. However, the assumption that these stem cells originate from the extraembryonic mesoderm, where primitive hematopoiesis is initiated by intrinsic precursors, has been reconsidered after analysis of blood cell development in avian embryo chimeras: yolk-sac-derived stem cells do not contribute significantly to the definitive blood system, whose first forerunners develop independently along the ventral aspect of the embryonic aorta. Recently, the homologous intraembryonic tissues of the mouse have been submitted to sensitive in vivo and in vitro assays, which showed that they also harbor multipotential hematopoietic stem cells. We have now identified a dense population of hematogenous cells, marked by the surface expression of the CD34 glycoprotein, associated with the ventral endothelium of the aorta in the 5-week human embryo. Therefore, we extend to the human species the growing evidence that intraembryonic hematopoietic cells developing independently of the yolk sac might be the real stem of the whole blood system. PMID:8547678

  1. Chronic GVHD complicated with polymyositis and cardiomyopathy after myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuki; Oka, Satoko; Tashima, Masaharu; Hamahata, Keigo; Nohgawa, Masaharu

    2015-05-01

    A 50-year-old woman presented with leukocytosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia in June 2013. She was diagnosed with de novo acute myeloid leukemia with the t(16;21)(q24;q22) translocation. She received an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant from an HLA-DRB1 locus-mismatched unrelated donor in June 2014. The myeloablative preparative regimen consisted of cyclophosphamide at 60 mg/kg for 2 days and total body irradiation at 12 Gy. On Day 55, she was treated with prednisolone at 20 mg/day for acute GVHD (Grade III; Skin Stage 2, Gut Stage 2, Liver Stage 0) and gradually improved. She had fever, myalgia in the upper limbs, and asymptomatic sinus tachycardia on Day 145. Laboratory tests showed elevated CK, CKMB, aldolase, and troponin I. Electromyographic examination revealed myopathic abnormalities compatible with the diagnosis of myositis. Electrocardiography showed tachycardia and anteroseptal ST elevation, and echocardiography showed hypokinesia of the left interventricular septal wall without evidence of infection or leukemia relapse. She was immediately treated with 40 mg/day prednisolone after the diagnosis of polymyositis and cardiomyopathy, associated with chronic GVHD. The polymyositis and cardiomyopathy improved promptly after the administration of prednisolone and the patient remains in remission with a current maintenance program of prednisolone at 5 mg/day. PMID:26062670

  2. Stat5a serine 725 and 779 phosphorylation is a prerequisite for hematopoietic transformation

    PubMed Central

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Kovacic, Boris; Li, Geqiang; Hoelbl, Andrea; Yahiaoui, Saliha; Sexl, Veronika; Müllner, Ernst W.; Fajmann, Sabine; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Bunting, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Stat5 transcription factors are essential gene regulators promoting proliferation, survival, and differentiation of all hematopoietic cell types. Mutations or fusions of oncogenic tyrosine kinases often result in constitutive Stat5 activation. We have modeled persistent Stat5 activity by using an oncogenic Stat5a variant (cS5). To analyze the hitherto unrecognized role of Stat5 serine phosphorylation in this context, we have generated cS5 constructs with mutated C-terminal serines 725 and 779, either alone or in combination. Genetic complementation assays in primary Stat5null/null mast cells and Stat5?N T cells demonstrated reconstitution of proliferation with these mutants. Similarly, an in vivo reconstitution experiment of transduced Stat5null/null fetal liver cells transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients revealed that these mutants exhibit biologic activity in lineage differentiation. By contrast, the leukemogenic potential of cS5 in bone marrow transplants decreased dramatically in cS5 single-serine mutants or was completely absent upon loss of both serine phosphorylation sites. Our data suggest that Stat5a serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for cS5-mediated leukemogenesis. Hence, interference with Stat5a serine phosphorylation might provide a new therapeutic option for leukemia and myeloid dysplasias without affecting major functions of Stat5 in normal hematopoiesis. PMID:20508164

  3. Stat5a serine 725 and 779 phosphorylation is a prerequisite for hematopoietic transformation.

    PubMed

    Friedbichler, Katrin; Kerenyi, Marc A; Kovacic, Boris; Li, Geqiang; Hoelbl, Andrea; Yahiaoui, Saliha; Sexl, Veronika; Müllner, Ernst W; Fajmann, Sabine; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Beug, Hartmut; Gouilleux, Fabrice; Bunting, Kevin D; Moriggl, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Stat5 transcription factors are essential gene regulators promoting proliferation, survival, and differentiation of all hematopoietic cell types. Mutations or fusions of oncogenic tyrosine kinases often result in constitutive Stat5 activation. We have modeled persistent Stat5 activity by using an oncogenic Stat5a variant (cS5). To analyze the hitherto unrecognized role of Stat5 serine phosphorylation in this context, we have generated cS5 constructs with mutated C-terminal serines 725 and 779, either alone or in combination. Genetic complementation assays in primary Stat5(null/null) mast cells and Stat5(DeltaN) T cells demonstrated reconstitution of proliferation with these mutants. Similarly, an in vivo reconstitution experiment of transduced Stat5(null/null) fetal liver cells transplanted into irradiated wild-type recipients revealed that these mutants exhibit biologic activity in lineage differentiation. By contrast, the leukemogenic potential of cS5 in bone marrow transplants decreased dramatically in cS5 single-serine mutants or was completely absent upon loss of both serine phosphorylation sites. Our data suggest that Stat5a serine phosphorylation is a prerequisite for cS5-mediated leukemogenesis. Hence, interference with Stat5a serine phosphorylation might provide a new therapeutic option for leukemia and myeloid dysplasias without affecting major functions of Stat5 in normal hematopoiesis. PMID:20508164

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Eltrombopag in Post-hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) Thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Raut, Shreeniwas S; Shah, Sandip A; Sharanangat, Vijay V; Shah, Kamlesh M; Patel, Kinnari A; Anand, Asha S; Talati, Shailesh S; Panchal, Harsha P; Patel, Apurva A; Parikh, Sonia K; Shukla, Shilin N

    2015-12-01

    Twelve adult patients (median age 29.5 years) were started on Eltrombopag 25-50 mg/day for post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) thrombocytopenia. All patients were having primary thrombocytopenia after HSCT. No patient had other secondary cause for thrombocytopenia. Two patients were allogenic subsets (1 acute myeloid leukemia i.e., AML and 1 aplastic anemia), and 10 were autologous transplants (3 multiple myeloma, 6 lymphoma and 1 AML). Nine patients were males, three were females. The median time of starting Eltrombopag was 21 days post-stem cell infusion (range day +17 to +60) at a median platelet count of 9,000/cmm (range 3,000-11,000/cmm). The median duration for treatment was 29 days. Median total dose of 812.5 mg was received by patients and they had a median platelet increment of 36,000/cmm. We observed that there were no adverse effects in these patients and there was a gradual increase in platelet count so that none of the patients had any complication due to thrombocytopenia. The cost of treatment was less than the cost of extended hospitalization and irradiated single donor platelet transfusion. PMID:26306064

  5. Microbiota from Obese Mice Regulate Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation by Altering the Bone Niche.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yubin; Chen, Guang-Liang; Hannemann, Nicole; Ipseiz, Natacha; Krönke, Gerhard; Bäuerle, Tobias; Munos, Luis; Wirtz, Stefan; Schett, Georg; Bozec, Aline

    2015-11-01

    The effect of metabolic stress on the bone marrow microenvironment is poorly defined. We show that high-fat diet (HFD) decreased long-term Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) stem cells and shifted lymphoid to myeloid cell differentiation. Bone marrow niche function was impaired after HFD as shown by poor reconstitution of hematopoietic stem cells. HFD led to robust activation of PPAR?2, which impaired osteoblastogenesis while enhancing bone marrow adipogenesis. At the same time, expression of genes such as Jag-1, SDF-1, and IL-7 forming the bone marrow niche was highly suppressed after HFD. Moreover, structural changes of microbiota were associated to HFD-induced bone marrow changes. Antibiotic treatment partially rescued HFD-mediated effects on the bone marrow niche, while transplantation of stools from HFD mice could transfer the effect to normal mice. These findings show that metabolic stress affects the bone marrow niche by alterations of gut microbiota and osteoblast-adipocyte homeostasis. PMID:26387866

  6. The role, mechanism and potentially therapeutic application of microRNA-29 family in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gong, J-N; Yu, J; Lin, H-S; Zhang, X-H; Yin, X-L; Xiao, Z; Wang, F; Wang, X-S; Su, R; Shen, C; Zhao, H-L; Ma, Y-N; Zhang, J-W

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal proliferation, apoptosis repression and differentiation blockage of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells have been characterized to be the main reasons leading to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previous studies showed that miR-29a and miR-29b could function as tumor suppressors in leukemogenesis. However, a comprehensive investigation of the function and mechanism of miR-29 family in AML development and their potentiality in AML therapy still need to be elucidated. Herein, we reported that the family members, miR-29a, -29b and -29c, were commonly downregulated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and bone marrow (BM) CD34+ cells derived from AML patients as compared with the healthy donors. Overexpression of each miR-29 member in THP1 and NB4 cells markedly inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. AKT2 and CCND2 mRNAs were demonstrated to be targets of the miR-29 members, and the role of miR-29 family was attributed to the decrease of Akt2 and CCND2, two key signaling molecules. Significantly increased Akt2, CCND2 and c-Myc levels in the AML cases were detected, which were correlated with the decreased miR-29 expression in AML blasts. Furthermore, a feed-back loop comprising of c-Myc, miR-29 family and Akt2 were found in myeloid leukemogenesis. Reintroduction of each miR-29 member partially corrected abnormal cell proliferation and apoptosis repression and myeloid differentiation arrest in AML BM blasts. An intravenous injection of miR-29a, -29b and -29c in the AML model mice relieved leukemic symptoms significantly. Taken together, our finding revealed a pivotal role of miR-29 family in AML development and rescue of miR-29 family expression in AML patients could provide a new therapeutic strategy. PMID:24076586

  7. The Src homology 2 protein Shb promotes cell cycle progression in murine hematopoietic stem cells by regulation of focal adhesion kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafsson, Karin; Heffner, Garrett; Wenzel, Pamela L.; Curran, Matthew; Grawé, Jan; McKinney-Freeman, Shannon L.; Daley, George Q.; Welsh, Michael

    2013-07-15

    The widely expressed adaptor protein Shb has previously been reported to contribute to T cell function due to its association with the T cell receptor and furthermore, several of Shb's known interaction partners are established regulators of blood cell development and function. In addition, Shb deficient embryonic stem cells displayed reduced blood cell colony formation upon differentiation in vitro. The aim of the current study was therefore to explore hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function in the Shb knockout mouse. Shb deficient bone marrow contained reduced relative numbers of long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs) that exhibited lower proliferation rates. Despite this, Shb knockout LT-HSCs responded promptly by entering the cell cycle in response to genotoxic stress by 5-fluorouracil treatment. In competitive LT-HSC transplantations, Shb null cells initially engrafted as well as the wild-type cells but provided less myeloid expansion over time. Moreover, Shb knockout bone marrow cells exhibited elevated basal activities of focal adhesion kinase/Rac1/p21-activated kinase signaling and reduced responsiveness to Stem Cell Factor stimulation. Consequently, treatment with a focal adhesion kinase inhibitor increased Shb knockout LT-HSC proliferation. The altered signaling characteristics thus provide a plausible mechanistic explanation for the changes in LT-HSC proliferation since these signaling intermediates have all been shown to participate in LT-HSC cell cycle control. In summary, the loss of Shb dependent signaling in bone marrow cells, resulting in elevated focal adhesion kinase activity and reduced proliferative responses in LT-HSCs under steady state hematopoiesis, confers a disadvantage to the maintenance of LT-HSCs over time. -- Highlights: • Shb is an adaptor protein operating downstream of tyrosine kinase receptors. • Shb deficiency reduces hematopoietic stem cell proliferation. • The proliferative effect of Shb occurs via increased focal adhesion kinase activity. • Shb is critical for the long-term maintenance of the hematopoietic stem cell pool.

  8. Glutathione peroxidase 4 prevents necroptosis in mouse erythroid precursors.

    PubMed

    Canli, Özge; Alanku?, Yasemin B; Grootjans, Sasker; Vegi, Naidu; Hültner, Lothar; Hoppe, Philipp S; Schroeder, Timm; Vandenabeele, Peter; Bornkamm, Georg W; Greten, Florian R

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining cellular redox balance is vital for cell survival and tissue homoeostasis because imbalanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may lead to oxidative stress and cell death. The antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 4 (Gpx4) is a key regulator of oxidative stress-induced cell death. We show that mice with deletion of Gpx4 in hematopoietic cells develop anemia and that Gpx4 is essential for preventing receptor-interacting protein 3 (RIP3)-dependent necroptosis in erythroid precursor cells. Absence of Gpx4 leads to functional inactivation of caspase 8 by glutathionylation, resulting in necroptosis, which occurs independently of tumor necrosis factor ? activation. Although genetic ablation of Rip3 normalizes reticulocyte maturation and prevents anemia, ROS accumulation and lipid peroxidation in Gpx4-deficient cells remain high. Our results demonstrate that ROS and lipid hydroperoxides function as not-yet-recognized unconventional upstream signaling activators of RIP3-dependent necroptosis. PMID:26463424

  9. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R; Namekawa, Satoshi H; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb(-/y)) mice and found that Fancb(-/y) mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb(-/y) mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb(-/y) mice. Furthermore, Fancb(-/y) BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb(-/y) HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb(-/y) mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  11. Epigenetic regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging

    SciTech Connect

    Beerman, Isabel

    2014-12-10

    Aging is invariably associated with alterations of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment, including loss of functional capacity, altered clonal composition, and changes in lineage contribution. Although accumulation of DNA damage occurs during HSC aging, it is unlikely such consistent aging phenotypes could be solely attributed to changes in DNA integrity. Another mechanism by which heritable traits could contribute to the changes in the functional potential of aged HSCs is through alterations in the epigenetic landscape of adult stem cells. Indeed, recent studies on hematopoietic stem cells have suggested that altered epigenetic profiles are associated with HSC aging and play a key role in modulating the functional potential of HSCs at different stages during ontogeny. Even small changes of the epigenetic landscape can lead to robustly altered expression patterns, either directly by loss of regulatory control or through indirect, additive effects, ultimately leading to transcriptional changes of the stem cells. Potential drivers of such changes in the epigenetic landscape of aged HSCs include proliferative history, DNA damage, and deregulation of key epigenetic enzymes and complexes. This review will focus largely on the two most characterized epigenetic marks – DNA methylation and histone modifications – but will also discuss the potential role of non-coding RNAs in regulating HSC function during aging.

  12. Fancb deficiency impairs hematopoietic stem cell function

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Amarachintha, Surya; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Andreassen, Paul R.; Namekawa, Satoshi H.; Pang, Qishen

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, variable congenital malformations and a predisposition to malignancies. FANCB (also known as FAAP95), is the only X-linked FA gene discovered thus far. In the present study, we investigated hematopoiesis in adult Fancb deficient (Fancb?/y) mice and found that Fancb?/y mice have decreased hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence accompanied by reduced progenitor activity in vitro and reduced repopulating capacity in vivo. Like other FA mouse models previously reported, the hematopoietic system of Fancb?/y mice is hypersensitive to DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C (MMC), which induces bone marrow failure in Fancb?/y mice. Furthermore, Fancb?/y BM exhibits slower recovery kinetics and less tolerance to myelotoxic stress induced by 5-fluorouracil than wild-type littermates. RNA-seq analysis reveals altered expression of genes involved in HSC function and cell cycle regulation in Fancb?/y HSC and progenitor cells. Thus, this Fancb?/y mouse model provides a novel approach for studying the critical role of the FA pathway not only in germ cell development but also in the maintenance of HSC function. PMID:26658157

  13. Pleiotrophin mediates hematopoietic regeneration via activation of RAS

    PubMed Central

    Himburg, Heather A.; Yan, Xiao; Doan, Phuong L.; Quarmyne, Mamle; Micewicz, Eva; McBride, William; Chao, Nelson J.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Chute, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are highly susceptible to ionizing radiation–mediated death via induction of ROS, DNA double-strand breaks, and apoptotic pathways. The development of therapeutics capable of mitigating ionizing radiation–induced hematopoietic toxicity could benefit both victims of acute radiation sickness and patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation. Unfortunately, therapies capable of accelerating hematopoietic reconstitution following lethal radiation exposure have remained elusive. Here, we found that systemic administration of pleiotrophin (PTN), a protein that is secreted by BM-derived endothelial cells, substantially increased the survival of mice following radiation exposure and after myeloablative BM transplantation. In both models, PTN increased survival by accelerating the recovery of BM hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in vivo. PTN treatment promoted HSC regeneration via activation of the RAS pathway in mice that expressed protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor-zeta (PTPRZ), whereas PTN treatment did not induce RAS signaling in PTPRZ-deficient mice, suggesting that PTN-mediated activation of RAS was dependent upon signaling through PTPRZ. PTN strongly inhibited HSC cycling following irradiation, whereas RAS inhibition abrogated PTN-mediated induction of HSC quiescence, blocked PTN-mediated recovery of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and abolished PTN-mediated survival of irradiated mice. These studies demonstrate the therapeutic potential of PTN to improve survival after myeloablation and suggest that PTN-mediated hematopoietic regeneration occurs in a RAS-dependent manner. PMID:25250571

  14. Expression and function of integrins on hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Coulombel, L; Auffray, I; Gaugler, M H; Rosemblatt, M

    1997-01-01

    The growth and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells are highly dependent on regulatory molecules produced by stromal cells of the marrow environment. Evidence has accumulated over the past years which shows that adhesive receptors on hematopoietic cells and their ligands on stromal cells and extracellular matrix play a crucial role in these interactions. Integrins of the beta 1 family, mostly VLA-4 and VLA-5, are the best characterized and have been identified on committed progenitor cells of the hematopoietic hierarchy as well as on more primitive stem cells defined by their long-term repopulating capacity assayed in vitro as well as in vivo. Functional assays demonstrate that most progenitor cells efficiently bind to ECM components through beta 1 integrins and lineage- and maturation stage-specific differences have been described. Evidence exists on the direct control of late erythroid differentiation by VLA-4, but whether or not the triggering of beta 1 integrins is critically required for hematopoietic stem cell functioning at more immature steps is unclear. Many other integrin and non-integrin receptors involved in adhesive interactions are expressed on hematopoietic progenitor cells and tightly regulated during differentiation but their function is still controversial. Our main purpose in this review is to describe recent advances in the knowledge of integrin expression on hematopoietic progenitor cells in both mouse and man. The emerging importance of the synergy between integrins and cytokine signalling pathways in the regulation of hematopoietic differentiation will also be discussed. PMID:8980606

  15. Evi1 defines leukemia-initiating capacity and tyrosine kinase inhibitor resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Goyama, S; Kataoka, K; Nasu, R; Tsuruta-Kishino, T; Kagoya, Y; Nukina, A; Kumagai, K; Kubota, N; Nakagawa, M; Arai, S; Yoshimi, A; Honda, H; Kadowaki, T; Kurokawa, M

    2014-10-16

    Relapse of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is triggered by stem cells with a reconstituting capacity similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and CML stem cells are a source of resistance in drug therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Ecotropic viral integration site 1 (EVI1), a key transcription factor in HSC regulation, is known to predict poor outcomes in myeloid malignancies, however, incapability of prospective isolation of EVI1-high leukemic cells precludes the functional evaluation of intraindividual EVI1-high cells. Introduction of CML into Evi1-internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice, a versatile HSC-reporter strain, enables us to separate Evi1-high CML cells from the individual. Evi1-IRES-GFP allele models of CML in chronic phase (CML-CP), by retroviral overexpression of BCR-ABL and by crossing BCR-ABL transgenic mice, revealed that Evi1 is predominantly enriched in the stem cell fraction and associated with an enhanced proliferative as well as a leukemia-initiating capacity and that Evi1-high CML-CP cells exhibit resistance to TKIs. Overexpressing BCR-ABL and NUP98-HOXA9 in Evi1-IRES-GFP knock-in mice to model CML in blast crisis (CML-BC), in which Evi1-high cells turned to be a major population as opposed to a minor population in CML-CP models, showed that Evi1-high CML-BC cells have a greater potential to recapitulate the disease and appear resistant to TKIs. Furthermore, given that Evi1 heterozygosity ameliorates CML-CP and CML-BC development and that the combination of Evi1 and BCR-ABL causes acute myeloid leukemia resembling CML-BC, Evi1 could regulate CML development as a potent driver. In addition, in human CML-CP cases, we show that EVI1 is highly expressed in stem cell-enriched CD34+CD38-CD90+ fraction at single-cell level. This is the first report to clarify directly that Evi1-high leukemic cells themselves possess the superior potential to Evi1-low cells in oncogenic self-renewal, which highlights the role of Evi1 as a valuable and a functional marker of CML stem cells. PMID:24747972

  16. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  17. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers

    E-print Network

    Tan, Weihong

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Molecular recognition of acute myeloid leukemia using aptamers K Sefah1,2 , ZW live acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells to select a group of DNA aptamers, which can recognize AML molecular analysis of leukemia and its subcategories. Leukemia (2009) 23, 235­244; doi:10.1038/leu.2008

  18. Ex vivo expansion of murine and human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Doan, Phuong L; Chute, John P

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells have the capacity to self-renew and give rise to the entirety of the mature blood and immune system throughout the lifespan of an organism. Here, we describe methods to isolate and culture murine bone marrow (BM) CD34(-)ckit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) (CD34(-)KSL) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We also describe a method to measure functional HSC content via the competitive repopulation assay. Furthermore, we summarize methods to isolate and culture human CD34(+)CD38(-)Lineage(-) cells which are enriched for human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:25062631

  19. Glycyrrhizic Acid-Mediated Subdual of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Induces Antileishmanial Immune Responses in a Susceptible Host.

    PubMed

    Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Bhattacharjee, Amrita; Banerjee, Sayantan; Halder, Kuntal; Das, Shibali; Paul Chowdhury, Bidisha; Majumdar, Subrata

    2015-12-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a heterogeneous population of precursor cells, modulate protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis by suppressing T cell functions. We observed that CD11b(+) Gr1(+) MDSCs, which initially expanded in soluble leishmanial antigen (SLA)-immunized mice and later diminished, suppressed proliferation of T cells isolated from SLA-immunized mice, but to a lesser extent than the case in naive mice. This lesser suppression of MDSCs accompanied the expression of F4/80 and the production of Cox-2, arginase I, nitric oxide, and PGE2. However, with SLA immunization, there was no difference in the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2) or gamma interferon (IFN-?) by T cells, in contrast to the case in nonimmunized mice, in which there is an influence. Glycyrrhizic acid (a triterpenoid compound)-mediated inhibition of Cox-2 in myeloid-derived suppressor cells influenced the capacity of T cells to proliferate and the expression of IL-2 and IFN-? in Leishmania donovani-infected BALB/c mice. Further characterization confirmed that administration of glycyrrhizic acid to L. donovani-infected BALB/c mice results in an impairment of the generation of MDSCs and a reciprocal organ-specific proliferation of IFN-?- and IL-10-expressing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Comprehensive knowledge on the Cox-2-mediated regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells might be involved in unlocking a new avenue for therapeutic interventions during visceral leishmaniasis. PMID:26351281

  20. JC Virus Multiplication in Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells Requires the NF-1 Class D Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Maria Chiara G.; Sabath, Bruce F.; Durham, Linda C.; Major, Eugene O.

    2001-01-01

    JCV, a small DNA virus of the polyomavirus family, has been shown to infect glial cells of the central nervous system, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and immune system lymphocytes. A family of DNA binding proteins called nuclear factor-1 (NF-1) has been linked with site-coding specific transcription of cellular and viral genes and replication of some viruses, including JC virus (JCV). It is unclear which NF-1 gene product must be expressed by cells to promote JCV multiplication. Previously, it was shown that elevated levels of NF-1 class D mRNA were expressed by human brain cells that are highly susceptible to JCV infection but not by JCV nonpermissive HeLa cells. Recently, we reported that CD34+ precursor cells of the KG-1 line, when treated with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), differentiated to cells with macrophage-like characteristics and lost susceptibility to JCV infection. These studies have now been extended by asking whether loss of JCV susceptibility by PMA-treated KG-1 cells is linked with alterations in levels of NF-1 class D expression. Using reverse transcription-PCR, we have found that PMA-treated KG-1 cells express mRNA that codes for all four classes of NF-1 proteins, although different levels of RNA expression were observed in the hematopoietic cells differentiated into macrophages. Northern hybridization confirms that the expression of NF-1 class D gene is lower in JCV nonpermissive PMA-treated KG-1 cells compared with non-PMA-treated cells. Further, using gel mobility shift assays, we were able to show the induction of specific NF-1–DNA complexes in KG-1 cells undergoing PMA treatment. The binding increases in direct relation to the duration of PMA treatment. These results suggest that the binding pattern of NF-1 class members may change in hematopoietic precursor cells, such as KG-1, as they undergo differentiation to macrophage-like cells. Transfection of PMA-treated KG-1 cells with an NF-1 class D expression vector restored the susceptibility of these cells to JCV infection, while the transfection of PMA-treated KG-1 cells with NF-1 class A, B, and C vectors was not able to restore JCV susceptibility. These data collectively suggest that selective expression of NF-1 class D has a regulatory role in JCV multiplication. PMID:11559801

  1. Transcriptional regulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Condamine, Thomas; Mastio, Jérôme; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I

    2015-12-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are a heterogeneous group of pathologically activated immature cells that play a major role in the negative regulation of the immune response in cancer, autoimmunity, many chronic infections, and inflammatory conditions, as well as in the regulation of tumor angiogenesis, tumor cell invasion, and metastases. Accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells is governed by a network of transcriptional regulators that could be combined into 2 partially overlapping groups: factors promoting myelopoiesis and preventing differentiation of mature myeloid cells and factors promoting pathologic activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In this review, we discuss the specific nature of these factors and their impact on myeloid-derived suppressor cell development. PMID:26337512

  2. Clonal Architecture of Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Defined by Single-Cell Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Andrew E. O.; Magrini, Vincent; Demeter, Ryan; Miller, Christopher A.; Fulton, Robert; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Eades, William C.; Elliott, Kevin; Heath, Sharon; Westervelt, Peter; Ding, Li; Conrad, Donald F.; White, Brian S.; Shao, Jin; Link, Daniel C.; DiPersio, John F.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.; Walter, Matthew J.; Graubert, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has been used to infer the clonality of heterogeneous tumor samples. These analyses yield specific predictions—the population frequency of individual clones, their genetic composition, and their evolutionary relationships—which we set out to test by sequencing individual cells from three subjects diagnosed with secondary acute myeloid leukemia, each of whom had been previously characterized by whole genome sequencing of unfractionated tumor samples. Single-cell mutation profiling strongly supported the clonal architecture implied by the analysis of bulk material. In addition, it resolved the clonal assignment of single nucleotide variants that had been initially ambiguous and identified areas of previously unappreciated complexity. Accordingly, we find that many of the key assumptions underlying the analysis of tumor clonality by deep sequencing of unfractionated material are valid. Furthermore, we illustrate a single-cell sequencing strategy for interrogating the clonal relationships among known variants that is cost-effective, scalable, and adaptable to the analysis of both hematopoietic and solid tumors, or any heterogeneous population of cells. PMID:25010716

  3. Folliculocentric cutaneous presentation of disseminated Candida krusei infection in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Jourabchi, Natanel; Balagula, Yevgeniy; Sheu, Mary; Fischer, Max K

    2015-01-01

    Candida krusei (C. krusei) is a multidrug-resistant opportunistic fungal pathogen that may cause disseminated infections in immunocompromised hosts. However, its clinical and histologic features are not well-characterized. We present a unique case to contribute to the growing knowledge base associated with this organism. During hospitalization for neutropenic fever, a 19-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia, who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, developed a generalized folliculocentric eruption following initiation of antifungal therapy for newly diagnosed C. krusei fungemia. Despite adequate antifungal coverage and negative blood cultures, the follicular-based erythematous papules persisted. Biopsies demonstrated yeast within ruptured follicles, without angiotropism or involvement of the interfollicular dermis, subcutaneous tissue, or stratum corneum. Concurrent skin tissue cultures confirmed C. krusei. The patient remained febrile despite aggressive antifungal therapy, with relapse of leukemia and subsequent death. Our case is unusual given the development of cutaneous lesions following clearance of fungemia, with yeast limited to ruptured follicular lumina, possibly indicating a primary cutaneous source or early transfollicular/transepidermal elimination. Given the limited available descriptions of cutaneous histopathology for C. krusei, we seek to add to the understanding of its pathophysiology and aid in the diagnosis and treatment of this often fatal infection. PMID:26632935

  4. Inhibition of autophagy augments the anticancer activity of ?-mangostin in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Jie; Long, Zi-Jie; Xu, Dong-Fan; Xiao, Ruo-Zhi; Liu, Ling-Ling; Xu, Zhi-Fang; Qiu, Samuel X; Lin, Dong-Jun; Liu, Quentin

    2014-03-01

    Natural products possessing anticancer activity have been extensively studied because of their low toxicity and potential effect. ?-Mangostin, a component of Garcinia mangostana Linn, is a xanthone derivative shown to have antioxidant and antitumor properties. This study was carried out to investigate how to improve the anticancer effects of ?-mangostin in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell lines bearing wild-type BCR-ABL or BCR-ABL-T315I mutation. We showed that ?-mangostin inhibited cell proliferation of K562, KBM5 and KBM5-T315I cells in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Significantly, ?-mangostin increased the number of apoptotic cells and induced DNA fragmentation compared to control cells. Moreover, ?-mangostin selectively inhibited proliferation in primary CML cells, while showing limited lethality in normal hematopoietic progenitors. Additionally, ?-mangostin induced not only apoptosis but also autophagy in CML cells. ?-Mangostin dramatically increased the expression levels of LC-3II, an autophagosome marker in mammals, and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs). Inhibition of autophagy by chloroquine enhanced ?-mangostin-mediated cytotoxicity through increasing apoptosis. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting the autophagy pathway is a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance ?-mangostin-induced apoptosis. Our study provides an approach for future studies to explore this combination for the treatment of CML. PMID:23734655

  5. p53 independent epigenetic-differentiation treatment in xenotransplant models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kwok Peng; Ebrahem, Quteba; Negrotto, Soledad; Mahfouz, Reda Z.; Link, Kevin A.; Hu, Zhenbo; Gu, Xiaorong; Advani, Anjali; Kalaycio, Matt; Sobecks, Ronald; Sekeres, Mikkael; Copelan, Edward; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Mulloy, James C.; Saunthararajah, Yogen

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of apoptosis by TP53 mutation contributes to resistance of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) to conventional cytotoxic treatment. Using differentiation to induce irreversible cell cycle exit in AML cells could be a p53-independent treatment alternative, however, this possibility requires evaluation. In vitro and in vivo regimens of the deoxycytidine analogue decitabine that deplete the chromatin modifying enzyme DNA methyl-transferase 1 (DNMT1) without phosphorylating p53 or inducing early apoptosis were determined. These decitabine regimens but not equimolar DNA-damaging cytarabine up regulated the key late differentiation factors CEBP? and p27/CDKN1B, induced cellular differentiation, and terminated AML cell-cycle, even in cytarabine-resistant p53- and p16/CDKN2A-null AML cells. Leukemia initiation by xeno-transplanted AML cells was abrogated but normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment was preserved. In vivo, the low toxicity allowed frequent drug administration to increase exposure, an important consideration for S-phase specific decitabine therapy. In xeno-transplant models of p53-null and relapsed/refractory AML, the non-cytotoxic regimen significantly extended survival compared to conventional cytotoxic cytarabine. Modifying in vivo dose and schedule to emphasize this pathway of decitabine action can bypass a mechanism of resistance to standard therapy. PMID:21701495

  6. Genetic Abnormalities and Challenges in the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, C. Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder in which there are too many immature blood-forming cells accumulating in the bone marrow and interfering with the production of normal blood cells. It has long been recognized that AML is a clinically heterogeneous disease characterized by a multitude of chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations, which translate to marked differences in responses and survival following chemotherapy. The cytogenetic and molecular genetic aberrations associated with AML are not mutually exclusive and often coexist in the leukemic cells. AML is a disease of the elderly, with a mean age of diagnosis of 70 years. Adverse cytogenetic abnormalities increase with age, and within each cytogenetic group, prognosis with standard treatment worsens with age. In the past 20 years, there has been little improvement in chemotherapeutic regimens and hence the overall survival for patients with AML. A huge unmet need exists for efficacious targeted therapies for elderly patients that are less toxic than available chemotherapy regimens. The multitude of chromosomal and genetic abnormalities makes the treatment of AML a challenging prospect. A detailed understanding of the molecular changes associated with the chromosomal and genetic abnormalities in AML is likely to provide a rationale for therapy design and biomarker development. This review summarizes the variety of cytogenetic and genetic changes observed in AML and gives an overview of the clinical status of new drugs in development. PMID:21779483

  7. Single monosomy as a relatively better survival factor in acute myeloid leukemia patients with monosomal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Jang, J E; Min, Y H; Yoon, J; Kim, I; Lee, J-H; Jung, C W; Shin, H-J; Lee, W S; Lee, J H; Hong, D-S; Kim, H-J; Kim, H-J; Park, S; Lee, K-H; Jang, J H; Chung, J S; Lee, S M; Park, J; Park, S K; Ahn, J-S; Min, W-S; Cheong, J-W

    2015-01-01

    Monosomal karyotype (MK) defined by either ?2 autosomal monosomies or single monosomy with at least one additional structural chromosomal abnormality is associated with a dismal prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). It was detected in 174 of 3041 AML patients in South Korean Registry. A total of 119 patients who had received induction therapy were finally analyzed to evaluate the predictive factors for a positive prognosis. On multivariate analysis, single monosomy, the absence of abn(17p), ?10% of cells with normal metaphase and the achievement of a complete remission (CR) after induction therapy were significant factors for more favorable outcomes. Especially, single monosomy remained as a significantly independent prognostic factor for superior survival in both patients who received allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) in CR and who did not. Allo-HSCT in CR improved overall survival significantly only in patients with a single monosomy. Our results suggest that MK-AML may be biologically different according to the karyotypic subtype and that allo-HSCT in CR should be strongly recommended to patients with a single monosomy. For other patients, more prudent treatment strategies should be examined. Furthermore, the biological mechanism by which a single monosomy influences survival should be investigated. PMID:26473530

  8. DNMT3A Mutations in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia in South Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pezzi, Annelise; Moraes, Lauro; Valim, Vanessa; Amorin, Bruna; Melchiades, Gabriela; Oliveira, Fernanda; da Silva, Maria Aparecida; Matte, Ursula; Pombo-de-Oliveira, Maria S.; Bittencourt, Rosane; Daudt, Liane; Silla, Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a complex and heterogeneous hematopoietic tissue neoplasm. Several molecular markers have been described that help to classify AML patients into risk groups. DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) gene mutations have been recently identified in about 22% of AML patients and associated with poor prognosis as an independent risk factor. Our aims were to determine the frequency of somatic mutations in the gene DNMT3A and major chromosomal translocations in a sample of patients with AML. We investigated in 82 samples of bone marrow from patients with AML for somatic mutations in DNMT3A gene by sequencing and sought major fusion transcripts by RT-PCR. We found mutations in the DNMT3A gene in 6 patients (8%); 3 were type R882H. We found fusion transcripts in 19 patients, namely, AML1/ETO (n = 5; 6.1%), PML/RAR? (n = 12; 14.6%), MLL/AF9 (0; 0%), and CBF?/MYH11 (n = 2; 2.4%). The identification of recurrent mutations in the DNMT3A gene and their possible prognostic implications can be a valuable tool for making treatment decisions. This is the first study on the presence of somatic mutations of the DNMT3A gene in patients with AML in Brazil. The frequency of these mutations suggests a possible ethnogeographic variation. PMID:23193409

  9. MUC1 IS A POTENTIAL TARGET FOR THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA STEM CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Stroopinsky, Dina; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn; Ito, Keisuke; Mills, Heidi; Yin, Li; Rajabi, Hasan; Vasir, Baldev; Kufe, Turner; Luptakova, Katarina; Arnason, Jon; Nardella, Caterina; Levine, James D.; Joyce, Robin; Galinsky, Ilene; Reiter, Yoram; Stone, Richard; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Kufe, Donald; Avigan, David

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a malignancy of stem cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal. MUC1 is a secreted, oncogenic mucin that is expressed aberrantly in AML blasts, but its potential uses to target AML stem cells have not been explored. Here we report that MUC1 is highly expressed on AML CD34+/lineage?/CD38? cells as compared to their normal stem cell counterparts. MUC1 expression was not restricted to AML CD34+ populations as similar results were obtained with leukemic cells from patients with CD34? disease. Engraftment of AML stem cell populations that highly express MUC1 (MUC1high) led to development of leukemia in NSG immunodeficient mice. In contrast, MUC1low cell populations established normal hematopoiesis in the NSG model. Functional blockade of the oncogenic MUC1-C subunit with the peptide inhibitor GO-203 depleted established AML in vivo, but did not affect engraftment of normal hematopoietic cells. Our results establish that MUC1 is highly expressed in AML stem cells and they define the MUC1-C subunit as a valid target for their therapeutic eradication. PMID:23867470

  10. A Case Report on the Progression of Myeloid Sarcoma to Form Multiple Metastatic Deposits without Developing Acute Myeloid Leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Sunita; Lee, Mark; Marshall, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Myeloid sarcomas (MS) are rare tumours occurring at extramedullary sites. They are usually associated with other haematology disorders such as acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. They frequently occur with a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or with relapse of preexisting disease. Patients with myeloid sarcomas without history or evidence of myeloid leukaemia typically progress to form AML. Case Presentation. A case report of a patient diagnosed with an isolated myeloid sarcoma that rarely did not transform to AML but instead spread to form multiple myeloid sarcomas throughout the body. Discussion. This case identifies the risk of metastatic spread of these tumours rather than the development of AML which is poorly documented in the literature, due to the rarity of cases, and may be significant in the investigation and management of isolated myeloid sarcomas. This case highlights the need for clinicians to consider repeat cross-sectional imaging to investigate unexplained clinical decline or symptoms, when there is no sign of AML progression and to consider radiotherapy treatment early. PMID:26491577

  11. A Case Report on the Progression of Myeloid Sarcoma to Form Multiple Metastatic Deposits without Developing Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Sunita; Lee, Mark; Marshall, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Myeloid sarcomas (MS) are rare tumours occurring at extramedullary sites. They are usually associated with other haematology disorders such as acute myeloid leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. They frequently occur with a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or with relapse of preexisting disease. Patients with myeloid sarcomas without history or evidence of myeloid leukaemia typically progress to form AML. Case Presentation. A case report of a patient diagnosed with an isolated myeloid sarcoma that rarely did not transform to AML but instead spread to form multiple myeloid sarcomas throughout the body. Discussion. This case identifies the risk of metastatic spread of these tumours rather than the development of AML which is poorly documented in the literature, due to the rarity of cases, and may be significant in the investigation and management of isolated myeloid sarcomas. This case highlights the need for clinicians to consider repeat cross-sectional imaging to investigate unexplained clinical decline or symptoms, when there is no sign of AML progression and to consider radiotherapy treatment early. PMID:26491577

  12. Delineating the hepatocyte's hematopoietic fusion partner.

    PubMed

    Willenbring, Holger; Grompe, Markus

    2004-12-01

    Cell fusion has evolved as an explanation of how transplanted bone marrow cells adopt the phenotype of hepatocytes, Purkinje neurons, skeletal and cardiac muscle cells. In vivo nuclear transfer associated with cell fusion has direct implications for regenerative medicine, but the spontaneous frequency of cell fusion is well below the thresholds of therapeutic significance. Increased efficiency could be achieved by utilizing cellular factors known to govern fusion but for this the identity of the hematopoietic cell that fuses with the host cell must be known. Using increasingly lineage-restricted donor bone marrow cell populations we have shown in mouse liver that fusion occurs between host hepatocytes and transplanted myelomonocytic cells such as macrophages. Now it should be feasible to increase the efficiency and assess the potential of cell fusion for the correction of a broad range of somatic cell types that can be targeted by fusion. PMID:15611666

  13. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-19

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. At the Southern California field sites, one loop antenna was positioned for omni-directional reception and also detected a strong First Schumann Resonance; however, additional Schumann Resonances were absent. At the Timpson, TX field sites, loop antennae were positioned for directional reception, due to earthquake-induced, hydraulic fracturing activity currently conducted by the oil and gas industry. Two strong signals, one moderately strong signal, and approximately 6-8 weaker signals were detected in the immediate vicinity. The three stronger signals were mapped by a biangulation technique, followed by a triangulation technique for confirmation. This was the first antenna mapping technique ever performed for determining possible earthquake epicenters. Six and a half months later, Timpson experienced two M4 (M4.1 and M4.3) earthquakes on September 2, 2013 followed by a M2.4 earthquake three days later, all occurring at a depth of five kilometers. The Timpson earthquake activity now has a cyclical rate and a forecast was given to the proper authorities. As a result, the Southern California and Timpson, TX field results led to an improved design and construction of a third prototype antenna. With a loop antenna array, a viable communication system, and continuous monitoring, a full fracture cycle can be established and observed in real-time. In addition, field data could be reviewed quickly for assessment and lead to a much more improved earthquake forecasting capability. The EM precursors determined by this method appear to surpass all prior precursor claims, and the general public will finally receive long overdue forecasting.

  16. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R. G.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L.; Weissman, P.

    1977-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, with launch about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. Candidate science instruments are suggested. Individual spacecraft systems for the mission were considered, technology requirements and problem areas noted, and a number of recommendations made for technology study and advanced development. The most critical technology needs include attainment of 50-yr spacecraft lifetime and development of a long-life NEP system.

  17. Expansion of Human Cord Blood Hematopoietic Stem Cells for Transplantation

    E-print Network

    Chou, Song

    A recent Science paper reported a purine derivative that expands human cord blood hematopoietic stem cells in culture ( Boitano et al., 2010) by antagonizing the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Major problems need to be overcome ...

  18. The hematopoietic stem cell niche in homeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Laura M; Link, Daniel C

    2015-11-26

    The bone marrow microenvironment contains a heterogeneous population of stromal cells organized into niches that support hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and other lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors. The stem cell niche generates signals that regulate HSC self-renewal, quiescence, and differentiation. Here, we review recent studies that highlight the heterogeneity of the stromal cells that comprise stem cell niches and the complexity of the signals that they generate. We highlight emerging data that stem cell niches in the bone marrow are not static but instead are responsive to environmental stimuli. Finally, we review recent data showing that hematopoietic niches are altered in certain hematopoietic malignancies, and we discuss how these alterations might contribute to disease pathogenesis. PMID:26468230

  19. Epigenetic diversity in hematopoietic neoplasms Rita Shaknovich a,b

    E-print Network

    Review Epigenetic diversity in hematopoietic neoplasms Rita Shaknovich a,b , Subhajyoti De c September 2014 Accepted 11 September 2014 Available online 18 September 2014 Keywords: Epigenetics changing selection pressures during tumorigenesis. Here, we re- view recent findings on epigenetic

  20. Purified hematopoietic stem cells can differentiate into hepatocytes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lagasse, E; Connors, H; Al-Dhalimy, M; Reitsma, M; Dohse, M; Osborne, L; Wang, X; Finegold, M; Weissman, I L; Grompe, M

    2000-11-01

    The characterization of hepatic progenitor cells is of great scientific and clinical interest. Here we report that intravenous injection of adult bone marrow cells in the FAH(-/-) mouse, an animal model of tyrosinemia type I, rescued the mouse and restored the biochemical function of its liver. Moreover, within bone marrow, only rigorously purified hematopoietic stem cells gave rise to donor-derived hematopoietic and hepatic regeneration. This result seems to contradict the conventional assumptions of the germ layer origins of tissues such as the liver, and raises the question of whether the cells of the hematopoietic stem cell phenotype are pluripotent hematopoietic cells that retain the ability to transdifferentiate, or whether they are more primitive multipotent cells. PMID:11062533

  1. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Regulators of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    E-print Network

    Gazit, Roi

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain blood homeostasis and are the functional units of bone marrow transplantation. To improve the molecular understanding of HSCs and their proximal progenitors, we performed transcriptome ...

  2. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Calvanese, Vincenzo; Fernández, Agustín F.; Urdinguio, Rocío G.; Suárez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Mangas, Cristina; Pérez-García, Vicente; Bueno, Clara; Montes, Rosa; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Ferrero, Cecilia; Assenov, Yassen; Bock, Christoph; Menendez, Pablo; Carrera, Ana Clara; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Fraga, Mario F.

    2012-01-01

    Global mechanisms defining the gene expression programs specific for hematopoiesis are still not fully understood. Here, we show that promoter DNA demethylation is associated with the activation of hematopoietic-specific genes. Using genome-wide promoter methylation arrays, we identified 694 hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss of methylation in hematopoietic can be associated with gene expression. The association between promoter methylation and gene expression was studied for many hematopoietic-specific genes including CD45, CD34, CD28, CD19, the T cell receptor (TCR), the MHC class II gene HLA-DR, perforin 1 and the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and results indicated that DNA demethylation was not always sufficient for gene activation. Promoter demethylation occurred either early during embryonic development or later on during hematopoietic differentiation. Analysis of the genome-wide promoter methylation status of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34+ HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34+ HSPCs confirmed the role of DNA methylation in regulating the expression of genes of the hemato-immune system, and indicated that promoter methylation of these genes may be associated to stemness. Together, these data suggest that promoter DNA demethylation might play a role in the tissue/cell-specific genome-wide gene regulation within the hematopoietic compartment. PMID:21911366

  3. Oral squamous cell carcinoma arising in a patient after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Arduino, Paolo G; Scully, Crispian; Chiusa, Luigi; Broccoletti, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    A 55-year-old man with a history of acute myeloid leukaemia treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and with a 5-year history of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws, following 12 cycles of intravenous zoledronic acid therapy, presented in December 2009 with a history of increasingly severe unilateral lower jaw pain. Oral examination revealed, as previously, exposed bone in the left mandible, but also a new exophytic mass on the lower-left buccal mucosa. Biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of oral squamous cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an oral squamous cell carcinoma that appeared adjacent to an area of osteochemonecrosis. PMID:25973278

  4. Parameters detected by geriatric and quality of life assessment in 195 older patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia are highly predictive for outcome

    PubMed Central

    Deschler, Barbara; Ihorst, Gabriele; Platzbecker, Uwe; Germing, Ulrich; März, Eva; de Figuerido, Marcelo; Fritzsche, Kurt; Haas, Peter; Salih, Helmut R.; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Selleslag, Dominik; Labar, Boris; de Witte, Theo; Wijermans, Pierre; Lübbert, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia exemplify the complexity of treatment allocation in older patients as options range from best supportive care, non-intensive treatment (e.g. hypomethylating agents) to intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation. Novel metrics for non-disease variables are urgently needed to help define the best treatment for each older patient. We investigated the feasibility and prognostic value of geriatric/quality of life assessments aside from established disease-specific variables in 195 patients aged 60 years or over with myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia. These patients were grouped according to treatment intensity and assessed. Assessment consisted of eight instruments evaluating activities of daily living, depression, mental functioning, mobility, comorbidities, Karnofsky Index and quality of life. Patients with a median age of 71 years (range 60-87 years) with myelodysplastic syndromes (n=63) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=132) were treated either with best supportive care (n=47), hypomethylating agents (n=73) or intensive chemotherapy/hematopoietic cell transplantation (n=75). After selection of variables, pathological activities of daily living and quality of life/fatigue remained highly predictive for overall survival in the entire patient group beyond disease-related risk factors adverse cytogenetics and blast count of 20% or over. In 107 patients treated non-intensively activities of daily living of less than 100 (hazard ratio, HR 2.94), Karnofsky Index below 80 (HR 2.34) and quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over (HR 1.77) were significant prognosticators. Summation of adverse features revealed a high risk of death (HR 9.36). In-depth evaluation of older patients prior to individual treatment allocation is feasible and provides additional information to standard assessment. Patients aged 60 years or over with newly diagnosed myelodysplastic syndromes/acute myeloid leukemia and impairments in activities of daily living, Karnofsky Index below 80%, quality of life/’fatigue’ of 50 or over, are likely to have poor outcomes. PMID:22875615

  5. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-24

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Diabetes Inhibits Gr-1+ Myeloid Cell Maturation via Cebpa Deregulation.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Kate; Torbica, Tanja; Umehara, Takahiro; Amin, Shilu; Bobola, Nicoletta; Mace, Kimberly A

    2015-12-01

    Recruitment of innate immune cells from the bone marrow (BM) to an injury site is required for effective repair. In diabetes, this process is altered, leading to excessive recruitment and retention of dysfunctional myeloid cells that fail to promote angiogenesis, prolong inflammation, and block healing. The aberrant myeloid phenotype is partially mediated by stable intrinsic changes to developing cells in the BM that are induced by the diabetic (db) environment, but the exact mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the db-derived Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) immature myeloid population has widespread misexpression of chromatin-remodeling enzymes and myeloid differentiation factors. Crucially, diabetes represses transcription of the key myeloid transcription factor CEBPA via diminished H3 Lys 27 promoter acetylation, leading to a failure in monocyte and granulocyte maturation. Restoring Cebpa expression by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reverses the db phenotype and rescues myeloid maturation. Importantly, our data demonstrate a possible link between myeloid cell maturation and chronic inflammation. PMID:26324181

  7. PRECURSOR FLARES IN OJ 287

    SciTech Connect

    Pihajoki, P.; Berdyugin, A.; Lindfors, E.; Reinthal, R.; Sillanpaeae, A.; Takalo, L.; Valtonen, M.; Nilsson, K.; Zola, S.; Koziel-Wierzbowska, D.; Liakos, A.; Drozdz, M.; Winiarski, M.; Ogloza, W.; Provencal, J.; Santangelo, M. M. M.; Salo, H.; Chandra, S.; Ganesh, S.; Baliyan, K. S.; and others

    2013-02-10

    We have studied three most recent precursor flares in the light curve of the blazar OJ 287 while invoking the presence of a precessing binary black hole in the system to explain the nature of these flares. Precursor flare timings from the historical light curves are compared with theoretical predictions from our model that incorporate effects of an accretion disk and post-Newtonian description for the binary black hole orbit. We find that the precursor flares coincide with the secondary black hole descending toward the accretion disk of the primary black hole from the observed side, with a mean z-component of approximately z{sub c} = 4000 AU. We use this model of precursor flares to predict that precursor flare of similar nature should happen around 2020.96 before the next major outburst in 2022.

  8. Microbiota modulation of myeloid cells in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldszmid, Romina S; Dzutsev, Amiran; Viaud, Sophie; Zitvogel, Laurence; Restifo, Nicholas P; Trinchieri, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid cells represent a major component of the tumor microenvironment, where they play divergent dual roles. They can induce antitumor immune responses, but mostly they promote immune evasion, tumor progression, and metastasis formation. Thus, strategies aiming at reprogramming the tumor microenvironment represent a promising immunotherapy approach. Myeloid cells respond to environmental factors including signals derived from commensal microbes. In this Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads overview, we discuss recent advances on the effects of the commensal microbiota on myeloid-cell functions and how they affect the response to cancer therapy. PMID:25660553

  9. Identification of the hemogenic endothelial progenitor and its direct precursor in human pluripotent stem cell differentiation cultures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Dal; Vodyanik, Maxim A.; Togaratti, Padma Priya; Suknuntha, Kran; Kumar, Akhilesh; Samarjeet, Fnu; Probasco, Mitchell D.; Tian, Shulan; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hemogenic endothelium (HE) has been recognized as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in the embryo. Access to human HE progenitors (HEPs) is essential to enable the investigation of the molecular determinants of HSC specification. Here we show that HEPs capable of generating definitive hematopoietic cells can be obtained from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) and identified precisely by VE-cadherin+CD73?CD235a/CD43? phenotype. This phenotype discriminates true HEPs from VE-cadherin+CD73+ non-HEPs, and VE-cadherin+CD235a+CD41a? early hematopoietic cells with endothelial and FGF2-dependent hematopoietic colony-forming potential. We found that HEPs arise at the post primitive streak stage of differentiation directly from VE-cadherin-negative KDRbrightAPLNR+PDGFR?low/? hematovascular mesodermal precursors (HVMPs). In contrast, hemangioblasts, which are capable of forming endothelium and primitive blood cells, originate from more immature APLNR+PDGFR?+ mesoderm. The demarcation of HEPs and HVMPs provides a platform for modeling blood development from endothelium with a goal to facilitate generation of HSCs from hPSCs. PMID:22981233

  10. An interstellar precursor mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, L. D.; Ivie, C.; Lewis, J. C.; Lipes, R.; Norton, H. N.; Stearns, J. W.; Stimpson, L. D.; Weissman, P.

    1980-01-01

    A mission out of the planetary system, launched about the year 2000, could provide valuable scientific data as well as test some of the technology for a later mission to another star. Primary scientific objectives for the precursor mission concern characteristics of the heliopause, the interstellar medium, stellar distances (by parallax measurements), low-energy cosmic rays, interplanetary gas distribution, and the mass of the solar system. Secondary objectives include investigation of Pluto. The mission should extend to 400-1000 AU from the sun. A heliocentric hyperbolic escape velocity of 50-100 km/sec or more is needed to attain this distance within a reasonable mission duration (20-50 years). The trajectory should be toward the incoming interstellar gas. For a year 2000 launch, a Pluto encounter and orbiter can be included. A second mission targeted parallel to the solar axis would also be worthwhile. The mission duration is 20 years, with an extended mission to a total of 50 years. A system using one or two stages of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) was selected as a possible baseline. The most promising alternatives are ultralight solar sails or laser sailing, with the lasers in earth orbit, for example. The NEP baseline design allows the option of carrying a Pluto orbiter as a daughter spacecraft.

  11. A mesoderm-derived precursor for mesenchymal stem and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanik, Maxim A.; Yu, Junying; Zhang, Xin; Tian, Shulan; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.; Slukvin, Igor I.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Among the three embryonic germ layers, the mesoderm is a major source of the mesenchymal precursors giving rise to skeletal and connective tissues. These precursors, however, have not been previously identified and characterized. Using human embryonic stem cells directed to mesendodermal differentiation, here we show that mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) originate from a population of mesodermal cells identified by expression of the apelin receptor. In semisolid medium, these precursors form FGF2-dependent compact spheroid colonies containing mesenchymal cells with a transcriptional profile representative of mesoderm-derived embryonic mesenchyme. When transferred to the adherent cultures, individual colonies give rise to MSC lines with chondro-, osteo-, and adipogenenic differentiation potentials. Although the MSC lines lacked endothelial potential, endothelial cells could be derived from mesenchymal colonies, suggesting that, similar to hematopoietic cells, MSCs arise from precursors with angiogenic potential. Together, these studies identified a common precursor of mesenchymal and endothelial cells, mesenchymoangioblast, as the source of mesoderm-derived MSCs. PMID:21112566

  12. Establishment of lal-/- Myeloid Lineage Cell Line That Resembles Myeloid-Derived Suppressive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xinchun; Wu, Lingyan; Yan, Cong; Du, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in mouse are inflammatory cells that play critical roles in promoting cancer growth and metastasis by directly stimulating cancer cell proliferation and suppressing immune surveillance. In order to facilitate characterization of biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MDSCs, it is urgent to establish an “MDSC-like” cell line. By cross breeding of immortomouse (simian virus 40 large T antigen transgenic mice) with wild type and lysosomal acid lipase (LAL) knock-out (lal-/-) mice, we have established a wild type (HD1A) and a lal-/- (HD1B) myeloid cell lines. Compared with HD1A cells, HD1B cells demonstrated many characteristics similar to lal-/- MDSCs. HD1B cells exhibited increased lysosomes around perinuclear areas, dysfunction of mitochondria skewing toward fission structure, damaged membrane potential, and increased ROS production. HD1B cells showed increased glycolytic metabolism during blockage of fatty acid metabolism to fuel the energy need. Similar to lal-/- MDSCs, the mTOR signal pathway in HD1B cells is overly activated. Rapamycin treatment of HD1B cells reduced ROS production and restored the mitochondrial membrane potential. HD1B cells showed much stronger immunosuppression on CD4+ T cell proliferation and function in vitro, and enhanced cancer cells proliferation. Knockdown of mTOR with siRNA reduced the HD1B cell ability to immunosuppress T cells and stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Therefore, the HD1B myeloid cell line is an “MDSC-like” cell line that can be used as an alternative in vitro system to study how LAL controls various myeloid cell functions. PMID:25807535

  13. Lineage-related cytotoxicity and clonogenic profile of 1,4-benzoquinone-exposed hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Chow, Paik Wah; Abdul Hamid, Zariyantey; Chan, Kok Meng; Inayat-Hussain, Salmaan Hussain; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2015-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are sensitive targets for benzene-induced hematotoxicity and leukemogenesis. The impact of benzene exposure on the complex microenvironment of HSCs and HPCs remains elusive. This study aims to investigate the mechanism linking benzene exposure to targeting HSCs and HPCs using phenotypic and clonogenic analyses. Mouse bone marrow (BM) cells were exposed ex vivo to the benzene metabolite, 1,4-benzoquinone (1,4-BQ), for 24h. Expression of cellular surface antigens for HSC (Sca-1), myeloid (Gr-1, CD11b), and lymphoid (CD45, CD3e) populations were confirmed by flow cytometry. The clonogenicity of cells was studied using the colony-forming unit (CFU) assay for multilineage (CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM) and single-lineage (CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M) progenitors. 1,4-BQ demonstrated concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in mouse BM cells. The percentage of apoptotic cells increased (p < 0.05) following 1,4-BQ exposure. Exposure to 1,4-BQ showed no significant effect on CD3e(+) cells but reduced the total counts of Sca-1(+), CD11b(+), Gr-1(+), and CD45(+) cells at 7 and 12 ?M (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the CFU assay showed reduced (p < 0.05) clonogenicity in 1,4-BQ-treated cells. 1,4-BQ induced CFU-dependent cytotoxicity by significantly inhibiting colony growth for CFU-E, BFU-E, CFU-G, and CFU-M starting at a low concentration of exposure (5?M); whereas for the CFU-GM and CFU-GEMM, the inhibition of colony growth was remarkable only at 7 and 12?M of 1,4-BQ, respectively. Taken together, 1,4-BQ caused lineage-related cytotoxicity in mouse HPCs, demonstrating greater toxicity in single-lineage progenitors than in those of multi-lineage. PMID:25645895

  14. Signaling profiling at the single-cell level identifies a distinct signaling signature in murine hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Jinyong; Kong, Guangyao; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Jingfang; Liu, Yangang; Tong, Wei; Zhang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function is tightly regulated by cytokine signaling. Although phospho-flow cytometry allows us to study signaling in defined populations of cells, there has been tremendous hurdle to carry out this study in rare HSCs due to unrecoverable critical HSC markers, low HSC number, and poor cell recovery rate. Here, we overcame these difficulties and developed a “HSC phospho-flow” method to analyze cytokine signaling in murine HSCs at the single-cell level and compare HSC signaling profile to that of multipotent progenitors (MPPs), a cell type immediately downstream of HSCs, and commonly used Lin? cKit+ cells (LK cells, enriched for myeloid progenitors). We chose to study signaling evoked from three representative cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF) and thrombopoietin (TPO) that are essential for HSC function, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) that is dispensable for HSCs. HSCs display a distinct TPO and GM-CSF signaling signature from MPPs and LK cells, which highly correlates with receptor surface expression. In contrast, although majority of LK cells express lower levels of cKit than HSCs and MPPs, SCF-evoked ERK1/2 activation in LK cells shows a significantly increased magnitude for a prolonged period. These results suggest that specific cellular context plays a more important role than receptor surface expression in SCF signaling. Our study of HSC signaling at the homeostasis stage paves the way to investigate signaling changes in HSCs under conditions of stress, aging, and hematopoietic diseases. PMID:22628264

  15. [Knockdown of Larp4b in Lin(-) cells does not affect the colony forming ability of mouse hematopoietic cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Pang, Ya-Kun; Cheng, Hui; Dong, Fang; Liang, Hao-Yue; Zhang, Ying-Chi; Wang, Xiao-Min; Xu, Jing; Cheng, Tao; Yuan, Wei-Ping

    2013-06-01

    Larp4b is a member of the LARP family, which can interact with RNA and generally stimulate the translation of mRNA. Abnormal expression of Larp4b can be found in leukemia patients in our previous study. This study was purposed to detect the relative expression of Larp4b mRNA in different subpopulations of mouse hematopoietic cells, to construct lentivirus vector containing shLarp4b targeting mouse gene Larp4b and to explore its effects on mouse Lin(-) cells infected with shLarp4b by lentivirus. SF-LV-shLarP4b-EGFP and control vectors were constructed and two-plasmid lentivirus packing system was used to transfect 293T cells. After 48 h and 72 h, lentivirus SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was harvested and was used to infect Lin(-) cells. After 48 h, EGFP(+) cells was sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). Meanwhile, semi-quantitative real time-PCR, AnnexinV-PE/7-AAD staining, PI staining and colony forming cell assay (CFC) were performed to determine the expression of Larp4b and its effect on the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitor cells. The results showed that Larp4b was highly expressed in myeloid cells. SF-LV-shLarp4b-EGFP was successfully constructed according to the restriction endonuclease digestion assay. RT-PCR confirmed that Larp4b was efficiently knockdown in mouse Lin(-) cells. The low expression of Larp4b did not affect the colony forming number, the apoptosis and cell cycle of Lin(-) cells. It is concluded that knockdown of Larp4b in mouse Lin(-) cells do not contribute to the colony forming ability and the growth of Lin(-) cells in vitro. This useful knockdown system will be used to study in vivo Larp4b in future. PMID:23815932

  16. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBP?, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBP? binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBP?, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation. PMID:25938608

  17. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-22

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-24

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Leucine-rich Repeat-containing G-protein-coupled Receptor 5 Marks Short-term Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells during Mouse Embryonic Development*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Donghua; He, Xi C.; Qian, Pengxu; Barker, Nick; Trainor, Paul A.; Clevers, Hans; Liu, Huiwen; Li, Linheng

    2014-01-01

    Lgr5 is a marker for proliferating stem cells in adult intestine, stomach, and hair follicle. However, Lgr5 is not expressed in adult hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Whether Lgr5 is expressed in the embryonic and fetal HSPCs that undergo rapid proliferation is unknown. Here we report the detection of Lgr5 expression in HSPCs in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) and fetal liver. We also found that a portion of Lgr5+ cells expressed the Runx1 gene that is critical for the ontogeny of HSPCs. A small portion of Lgr5+ cells also expressed HSPC surface markers c-Kit and CD34 in AGM or CD41 in fetal liver. Furthermore, the majority of Lgr5+ cells expressed Ki67, indicating their proliferating state. Transplantation of fetal liver-derived Lgr5-GFP+ cells (E12.5) demonstrated that Lgr5-GFP+ cells were able to reconstitute myeloid and lymphoid lineages in adult recipients, but the engraftment was short-term (4–8 weeks) and 20-fold lower compared with the Lgr5-GFP? control. Our data show that Lgr5-expressing cells mark short-term hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, consistent with the role of Lgr5 in supporting HSPCs rapid proliferation during embryonic and fetal development. PMID:24966324

  8. Two-Dimensional Polymer-Based Cultures Expand Cord Blood-Derived Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Support Engraftment of NSG Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Rebekka Kramann; Wagner, Wolfgang; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi; Labude, Norina; Bovi, Manfred; Piroth, Daniela; Knüchel, Ruth; Hieronymus, Thomas; Müller, Albrecht M.; Zenke, Martin; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Currently, ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is still insufficient. Traditional approaches for HSC expansion include the use of stromal cultures, growth factors, and/or bioreactors. Biomaterial-based strategies provide new perspectives. We focus on identifying promising two-dimensional (2D) polymer candidates for HSC expansion. After a 7-day culture period with cytokine supplementation, 2D fibrin, poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid; Resomer® RG503), and Poly(?-caprolactone; PCL) substrates supported expansion of cord blood (CB)-derived CD34+ cells ex vivo. Fibrin cultures achieved the highest proliferation rates (>8700-fold increase of total nuclear cells, p<0.001), high total colony-forming units (3.6-fold increase, p<0.001), and highest engraftment in NSG mice (7.69-fold more donor cells compared with tissue culture polysterene, p<0.001). In addition, the presence of multiple human hematopoietic lineages such as myeloid (CD13+), erythroid (GypC+), and lymphoid (CD20+/CD56+) in murine transplant recipients confirmed the multilineage engraftment potential of fibrin-based cultures. Filopodia development in fibrin-expanded cells was a further indicator for superior cell adhesion capacities. We propose application of fibrin, Resomer® RG503, and PCL for future strategies of CB-CD34+ cell expansion. Suitable polymers for HSC expansion might also be appropriate for future drug discovery applications or for studies aimed to develop hematological therapies. PMID:22712684

  9. The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 central DNA flap is a crucial determinant for lentiviral vector nuclear import and gene transduction of human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sirven, A; Pflumio, F; Zennou, V; Titeux, M; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A; Charneau, P

    2000-12-15

    Gene transfer in human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) has great potential for both gene therapy and the understanding of hematopoiesis. As HSCs have extensive proliferative capacities, stable gene transfer should include genomic integration of the transgene. Lentiviral vectors are now preferred to oncoretroviral vectors especially because they integrate in nondividing cells such as HSCs, thereby avoiding the use of prolonged cytokine stimulation. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) has evolved a complex reverse transcription strategy including a central strand displacement event controlled in cis by the central polypurine tract (cPPT) and the central termination sequence (CTS). This creates, at the center of HIV-1 linear DNA molecules, a 99-nucleotide-long plus-strand overlap, the DNA flap, which acts as a cis-determinant of HIV-1 genome nuclear import. The reinsertion of the DNA flap sequence in an HIV-derived lentiviral vector promotes a striking increase of gene transduction efficiency in human CD34(+) hematopoietic cells, and the complementation of the nuclear import defect present in the parental vector accounts for this result. In a short ex vivo protocol, the flap-containing vector allows efficient transduction of the whole hierarchy of human HSCs including both slow-dividing or nondividing HSCs that have multiple lymphoid and myeloid potentials and primitive cells with long-term engraftment ability in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice (NOD/SCID). PMID:11110680

  10. Hematopoietic progenitor cell collection after autologous transplant for multiple myeloma: low platelet count predicts for poor collection and sole use of resulting graft enhances risk of myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, X; Rosenbaum, ER; Tyler, LN; Sawyer, J; Heuck, CJ; Barlogie, B; Cottler-Fox, M

    2014-01-01

    Collection of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) after previous autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant (aHCT) was studied in 221 patients with multiple myeloma (MM). With a total of 333 collections, the median number of CD34 cells collected was 4.7 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg, and 74% of the patients collected ?2.5 × 106 CD34 + cells/kg. Among 26 variables examined, the strongest predictor for poor collection was a platelet count <100 × 106/l before mobilization (P<0.001). A subsequent aHCT was performed in 154 of the 221 patients. Sole use of HPC procured after aHCT in 86 patients was associated with delayed platelet recovery (P<0.001) and linked to development of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-associated cytogenetic abnormalities (MDS-CA; P = 0.027, odds ratio (OR) 10.34) and a tendency towards clinical MDS/acute myeloid leukemia (AML; P = 0.091, OR 3.57). However, treatment-related mortality (P = 0.766) and time to absolute neutrophil count recovery ?0.5 × 109/l (P = 0.879) were similar to when a pre-aHCT graft was used. Indeed, adding HPC collected before any aHCT neutralized the risk of MDS-CA or MDS/AML. Therefore, we advise generous initial HPC collection to broaden the salvage armamentarium for patients with MM. PMID:23852547

  11. Inducible knockout of GRP78/BiP in the hematopoietic system suppresses Pten-null leukemogenesis and AKT oncogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Wey, Shiuan; Luo, Biquan; Tseng, Chun-Chih; Ni, Min; Zhou, Hui; Fu, Yong; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L; Lee, Amy S

    2012-01-19

    Traditionally, GRP78 is regarded as protective against hypoxia and nutrient starvation prevalent in the microenvironment of solid tumors; thus, its role in the development of hematologic malignancies remains to be determined. To directly elucidate the requirement of GRP78 in leukemogenesis, we created a biallelic conditional knockout mouse model of GRP78 and PTEN in the hematopoietic system. Strikingly, heterozygous knockdown of GRP78 in PTEN null mice is sufficient to restore the hematopoietic stem cell population back to the normal percentage and suppress leukemic blast cell expansion. AKT/mTOR activation in PTEN null BM cells is potently inhibited by Grp78 heterozygosity, corresponding with suppression of the PI3K/AKT pathway by GRP78 knockdown in leukemia cell lines. This is the first demonstration that GRP78 is a critical effector of leukemia progression, at least in part through regulation of oncogenic PI3K/AKT signaling. In agreement with PI3K/AKT as an effector for cytosine arabinoside resistance in acute myeloid leukemia, overexpression of GRP78 renders human leukemic cells more resistant to cytosine arabinoside-induced apoptosis, whereas knockdown of GRP78 sensitizes them. These, coupled with the emerging association of elevated GRP78 expression in leukemic blasts of adult patients and early relapse in childhood leukemia, suggest that GRP78 is a novel therapeutic target for leukemia. PMID:21937694

  12. Hematopoietic stem cell characterization and isolation.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Lara; Challen, Grant A; Sirin, Olga; Lin, Karen Kuan-Yin; Goodell, Margaret A

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by the capabilities of multi-lineage differentiation and long-term self-renewal. Both these characteristics contribute to maintain the homeostasis of the system and allow the restoration of hematopoiesis after insults, such as infections or therapeutic ablation. Reconstitution after lethal irradiation strictly depends on a third, fundamental property of HSCs: the capability to migrate under the influence of specific chemokines. Directed by a chemotactic compass, after transplant HSCs find their way to the bone marrow, where they eventually home and engraft. HSCs represent a rare population that primarily resides in the bone marrow with an estimated frequency of 0.01% of total nucleated cells. Separating HSCs from differentiated cells that reside in the bone marrow has been the focus of intense investigation for years. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the strategy routinely used by our laboratory to purify murine HSCs, by exploiting their antigenic phenotype (KSL), combined with the physiological capability to efficiently efflux the vital dye Hoechst 33342, generating the so-called Side Population, or SP. PMID:21618082

  13. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Graeff, Annette H.; Nitschke, Roland; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche) and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche) harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin+ MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients. PMID:26696752

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Oman.

    PubMed

    Dennison, D; Al Kindi, S; Pathare, A; Daar, S; Nusrat, N; Ur Rehman, J; Zia, F; Khan, H; Khan, M Irfan; Alghazaly, A; Al Zadjali, S; Tauro, M; Al Lawatia, At; Ganguly, Ss

    2008-08-01

    Hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) is an integral part of the management of patients with hematologic disorders. The Sultanate of Oman, with a population of 2.3 million, has an HSCT program based in the Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) hospital. Initiated in 1995, this two-bed unit continues to be the only program in the country. Between June 1995 and August 2006, a total of 128 patients underwent HSCT in this center, averaging about 10-12 transplants per year. The median age of these patients was 11 years (2 months to 45 years). Hematologic malignancies (49%) and inherited disorders (42%) constituted the major transplant indications, whereas BM failure accounted for the remaining. The majority of transplants carried out so far have been HLA-matched sibling-donor allogeneic HSCTs. Among the inherited disorders, homozygous beta-thalassemia and primary immunodeficiency are important transplant indications in this center. The approximate cost of an uncomplicated transplant in this center is US$50,000. The success of this program has now led to the initiation of a new and larger HSCT complex to provide the opportunity for more patients to benefit from this treatment modality within the country. PMID:18724280

  15. The Hematopoietic Niche in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Graeff, Annette H; Nitschke, Roland; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Specialized microanatomical areas of the bone marrow provide the signals that are mandatory for the maintenance and regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells. A complex microenvironment adjacent to the marrow vasculature (vascular niche) and close to the endosteum (endosteal niche) harbors multiple cell types including mesenchymal stromal cells and their derivatives such as CAR cells expressing high levels of chemokines C-X-C motif ligand 12 and early osteoblastic lineage cells, endothelial cells, and megakaryocytes. The characterization of the cellular and molecular networks operating in the HSC niche has opened new perspectives for the understanding of the bidirectional cross-talk between HSCs and stromal cell populations in normal and malignant conditions. A structural and functional remodeling of the niche may contribute to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Malignant HSCs may alter the function and survival of MSCs that do not belong to the neoplastic clone. For example, a regression of nestin(+) MSCs by apoptosis has been attributed to neuroglial damage in MPN. Nonneoplastic MSCs in turn can promote aggressiveness and drug resistance of malignant cells. In the future, strategies to counteract the pathological interaction between the niche and neoplastic HSCs may offer additional treatment strategies for MPN patients. PMID:26696752

  16. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers with the potential to i

  17. Researchers discover key mutation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have discovered mutations in a particular gene that affects the treatment prognosis for some patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), an aggressive blood cancer that kills 9,000 Americans annually.

  18. Enhanced transgene expression in cord blood CD34(+)-derived hematopoietic cells, including developing T cells and NOD/SCID mouse repopulating cells, following transduction with modified trip lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Sirven, A; Ravet, E; Charneau, P; Zennou, V; Coulombel, L; Guétard, D; Pflumio, F; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A

    2001-04-01

    The recent development of lentivirus-derived vectors is an important breakthrough in gene transfer technology because these vectors allow transduction of nondividing cells such as hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), due to an active nuclear import of reverse-transcribed vector DNA. We recently demonstrated that addition of the central DNA flap of HIV-1 to an HIV-derived lentiviral vector strikingly increases transduction of CD34(+) cells. We now describe improvements of the transduction protocol designed to preserve HSC properties and two modifications of the previously described TRIP-CMV vector. First, deletion of the enhancer/promoter of the 3' LTR in the TRIP-CMV vector resulted in a safer vector (TRIPDeltaU3-CMV) with conserved transduction efficiency and increased EGFP transgene expression. Second, the original internal CMV promoter was replaced with the promoter for the ubiquitously expressed elongation factor 1alpha (EF1alpha). This promoter substitution resulted in a significantly more homogeneous expression of the EGFP transgene in all hematopoietic cell types, including CD34(+)-derived T lymphocytes, in which the CMV promoter was inactive, and NOD/SCID mouse repopulating cells. We thus present here an HIV-derived lentiviral vector, TRIPDeltaU3-EF1alpha, which can very efficiently transduce human cord blood HSC and results in high long-term transgene expression in CD34(+)-derived T, B, NK, and myeloid hematopoietic cells. PMID:11319904

  19. Busulfan and Etoposide Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Low-Dose Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Method for purification of human hematopoietic stem cells by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Reitsma, Michael J; Lee, Brenda R; Uchida, Nobuko

    2002-01-01

    Human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors can be isolated by enriching for a rare cell population with a combination of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Such an isolation scheme involves multi-step procedures including ficoll-density fractionation and presort enrichment followed by cell sorting. Over the past decade, various cell-surface and metabolic markers have been identified and used to isolate human HSCs and progenitors as summarized in Table 1. Among them, CD34 has become the most critical cell-surface marker for positively selecting a rare cell population (1,2). Within the CD34(+) cell population, the differential expression of Thy-1, CD38, and AC133 have been used to fractionate HSCs and progenitors. In order to subfractionate CD34(+) cells by these markers, the cells can be further purified by flow cytometry. HSCs can be further enriched into a Thy-1(+) (3-7), CD38(-lo) (8-10), Thy-1+ CD38(-lo) (11), or AC133+ (12,13) fraction of CD34(+) cells. Table 1 Commercially Available Cell-Surface and Metabolic Markers for Isolation of Human HSC and Progenitor Cells Marker Expression/Remark Fluorochrome conjugate recommended Reference Positive marker CD34 Positive FITC, PE, APC, BIO 1,2,33 Thy-1 Positive PE, BIO 3,4 AC133 Positive PE 12,34 Negative/low marker CD38 Negative /low FITC, PE, APC 8,9 HLA-DR( a ) Negative to low FITC, PE 35,36 Mature lineage marker, Lin- CD2 T-cell lineage FITC, PE, BIO 3 CD3 T-cell lineage FITC, PE, APC, BIO 3 CD19 B-cell lineage FITC, PE, APC, BIO 3 CD16 NK-cell lineage FITC, PE, APC, BIO 3 CD14 Myeloid lineage FITC, PE 3 CD15 Myeloid lineage FITC, PE 3 Glycophorin A Erythroid lineage FITC, PE 3 2nd Step reagent Avidin/Streptavidin For BIO MAb FITC, PE, APC, TXRD, PharRed, Cy-chrome( d ) Metabolic marker( b ) Rhodamine 123( c ) Low Mitochondria-binding dye 37,38 Hoechst 33342( c ) Low DNA-binding dye 39,40 Pyronin Y Low RNA-binding dye 39,40 Propidium iodide Negative to low Dead-cell exclusion Abbreviations: FBM, fetal bone marrow; MPB, mobilized peripheral blood; ABM, adult bone marrow; HSC, hematopoietic stem cells; FITC, fluorescein; PE, phycoerythrin; APC, allophycocyanin; TXRD, Texas red; BIO, biotinylated. ( a ) FBM, MPB HSCs express HLA-DR (41,42). ( b ) To isolate quiescent HSC. ( c ) Substrates for p-glycoprotein, encoded by MDR-1. HSC possess high levels of p-glycoprotein efflux activity. ( d ) Recommended for single laser flow cytometry only, lineage marker positive and PI positive cells can be excluded simultaneously. PMID:21437800

  1. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-07

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Molecular Study of Interactions between Hematopoietic Stem Cells and Stromal Cells

    E-print Network

    Luo, Biao

    Multipotent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are progenitors of all types of hematopoietic cells, and the efficient isolation and propagation of HSCs will significantly enhance our ability to manage many human disorders ...

  3. Trafficking of Murine Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Health and Vascular Disease

    E-print Network

    von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    Trafficking of Murine Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Health and Vascular Disease disease, mouse model Stem cells (SCs) are undifferentiated cells capable of transforming into multiple Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA ABSTRACT Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) possess the unique

  4. Chronic myeloid leukemia: In pursuit of perfection

    PubMed Central

    Jayakar, Vishal

    2012-01-01

    The resounding success of imatinib (IM) as front line treatment in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has certainly made a paradigm shift in the therapeutic algorithm of this disorder. The precise targeting of the BCR-ABL oncogene in CML has entitled it to be the poster child of translational medicine with a well-deserved Oscar ovation from the oncology community. Clinicians are now empowered with first-, second- and third-generation tyrosine kinases, as well as advanced molecular tools to monitor disease and characterize resistance. We have come a long way in successfully managing these patients, but there are still a significant few unmet clinical needs which need addressing and targeting to optimize clinical outcomes. This review focuses on 4 such pertinent and relevant clinical issues, which still need ironing out to fulfill our ambition of achieving ‘perfection’ in this patient cohort. PMID:24455503

  5. Prostaglandin E2 increases hematopoietic stem cell survival and accelerates hematopoietic recovery after radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Rebecca L.; Georger, Mary; Bromberg, Olga; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Frisch, Benjamin J.; Becker, Michael W.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs), which continuously maintain all mature blood cells, are regulated within the marrow microenvironment. We previously reported that pharmacologic treatment of naïve mice with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) expands HSPCs. However, the cellular mechanisms mediating this expansion remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that PGE2 treatment in naïve mice inhibits apoptosis of HSPCs without changing their proliferation rate. In a murine model of sub-lethal total body irradiation (TBI), in which HSPCs are rapidly lost, treatment with a long-acting PGE2 analogue (dmPGE2) reversed the apoptotic program initiated by TBI. dmPGE2 treatment in vivo decreased the loss of functional HSPCs following radiation injury, as demonstrated both phenotypically and by their increased reconstitution capacity. The antiapoptotic effect of dmPGE2 on HSPCs did not impair their ability to differentiate in vivo, resulting instead in improved hematopoietic recovery after TBI. dmPGE2 also increased microenvironmental cyclooxygenase-2 expression and expanded the ?-SMA+ subset of marrow macrophages, thus enhancing the bone marrow microenvironmental response to TBI. Therefore, in vivo treatment with PGE2 analogues may be particularly beneficial to HSPCs in the setting of injury by targeting them both directly and also through their niche. The current data provide rationale for in vivo manipulation of the HSPC pool as a strategy to improve recovery after myelosuppression. PMID:23169593

  6. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  7. Brillouin precursors in Debye media

    E-print Network

    Macke, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the formation of Brillouin precursors in Debye media. We point out that the precursors are only visible at propagation distances such that the impulse response of the medium is essentially determined by the frequency-dependence of its absorption and is practically Gaussian. By simple convolution, we then obtain explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted waves generated by reference incident waves, distinguishing precursor and main signal by physical arguments. These expressions are in good agreement with the signals obtained in numerical or real experiments performed on water and explain some features of these signals that remained mysterious or unnoticed. In addition, we show quite generally that the shape of the Brillouin precursor appearing alone at large enough propagation distance and the law giving its amplitude as a function of this distance do not depend on the precise form of the incident wave but only on its integral properties. The incidence of a static conductivity o...

  8. 14–3-3 integrates prosurvival signals mediated by the AKT and MAPK pathways in ZNF198-FGFR1–transformed hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaozhong; Kang, Sumin; Gu, Ting-Lei; Kardar, Sean; Fu, Haian; Lonial, Sagar; Khoury, Hanna Jean; Khuri, Fadlo

    2007-01-01

    Human 8p11 stem cell leukemia/lymphoma syndrome usually presents as a myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) that evolves to acute myeloid leukemia and/or lymphoma. The syndrome associated with t(8;13)(p11;q12) results in expression of the ZNF198-FGFR1 fusion tyrosine kinase that plays a pathogenic role in hematopoietic transformation. We found that ZNF198-FGFR1 activated both the AKT and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) prosurvival signaling pathways, resulting in elevated phosphorylation of the AKT target FOXO3a at T32 and BAD at S112, respectively. These phosphorylated residues subsequently sequestered the proapoptotic FOXO3a and BAD to 14–3-3 to prevent apoptosis. We used a peptide-based 14–3-3 competitive antagonist, R18, to disrupt 14–3-3–ligand association. Expression of R18 effectively induced apoptosis in hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells transformed by ZNF198-FGFR1 compared with control cells. Moreover, purified recombinant transactivator of transcription (TAT)-conjugated R18 proteins effectively transduced into human leukemia cells and induced significant apoptosis in KG-1a cells expressing FGFR1OP2-FGFR1 fusion tyrosine kinase but not in control HL-60 and Jurkat T cells. Surprisingly, R18 was only able to dissociate FOXO3a, but not BAD as previously proposed, from 14–3-3 binding and induced apoptosis partially through liberation and reactivation of FOXO3a. Our findings suggest that 14–3-3 integrates prosurvival signals in FGFR1 fusion-transformed hematopoietic cells. Disrupting 14–3-3–ligand association may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to treat 8p11 stem cell MPD. PMID:17389761

  9. Knockdown of HPRT for selection of genetically modified human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Rashmi; Baturin, Dmitry; Fosmire, Susan; Freed, Brian; Porter, Christopher C

    2013-01-01

    The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using 6-thioguanine (6TG). Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45(+) cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection. PMID:23555045

  10. The consensus sequence of FAMLF alternative splice variants is overexpressed in undifferentiated hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, W L; Luo, D F; Gao, C; Ding, Y; Wang, S Y

    2015-07-01

    The familial acute myeloid leukemia related factor gene (FAMLF) was previously identified from a familial AML subtractive cDNA library and shown to undergo alternative splicing. This study used real-time quantitative PCR to investigate the expression of the FAMLF alternative-splicing transcript consensus sequence (FAMLF-CS) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 119 patients with de novo acute leukemia (AL) and 104 healthy controls, as well as in CD34+ cells from 12 AL patients and 10 healthy donors. A 429-bp fragment from a novel splicing variant of FAMLF was obtained, and a 363-bp consensus sequence was targeted to quantify total FAMLF expression. Kruskal-Wallis, Nemenyi, Spearman's correlation, and Mann-Whitney U-tests were used to analyze the data. FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from AL patients and CD34+ cells from AL patients and controls was significantly higher than in control PBMCs (P < 0.0001). Moreover, FAMLF-CS expression in PBMCs from the AML group was positively correlated with red blood cell count (rs =0.317, P=0.006), hemoglobin levels (rs = 0.210, P = 0.049), and percentage of peripheral blood blasts (rs = 0.256, P = 0.027), but inversely correlated with hemoglobin levels in the control group (rs = -0.391, P < 0.0001). AML patients with high CD34+ expression showed significantly higher FAMLF-CS expression than those with low CD34+ expression (P = 0.041). Our results showed that FAMLF is highly expressed in both normal and malignant immature hematopoietic cells, but that expression is lower in normal mature PBMCs. PMID:26083996

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell-derived adipocytes and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ying; McDonald, Lindsay T; Russell, Dayvia L; Kelly, Ryan R; Wilson, Katie R; Mehrotra, Meenal; Soloff, Adam C; LaRue, Amanda C

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment (TME) is complex and constantly evolving. This is due, in part, to the crosstalk between tumor cells and the multiple cell types that comprise the TME, which results in a heterogeneous population of tumor cells and TME cells. This review will focus on two stromal cell types, the cancer-associated adipocyte (CAA) and the cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF). In the clinic, the presence of CAAs and CAFs in the TME translates to poor prognosis in multiple tumor types. CAAs and CAFs have an activated phenotype and produce growth factors, inflammatory factors, cytokines, chemokines, extracellular matrix components, and proteases in an accelerated and aberrant fashion. Through this activated state, CAAs and CAFs remodel the TME, thereby driving all aspects of tumor progression, including tumor growth and survival, chemoresistance, tumor vascularization, tumor invasion, and tumor cell metastasis. Similarities in the tumor-promoting functions of CAAs and CAFs suggest that a multipronged therapeutic approach may be necessary to achieve maximal impact on disease. While CAAs and CAFs are thought to arise from tissues adjacent to the tumor, multiple alternative origins for CAAs and CAFs have recently been identified. Recent studies from our lab and others suggest that the hematopoietic stem cell, through the myeloid lineage, may serve as a progenitor for CAAs and CAFs. We hypothesize that the multiple origins of CAAs and CAFs may contribute to the heterogeneity seen in the TME. Thus, a better understanding of the origin of CAAs and CAFs, how this origin impacts their functions in the TME, and the temporal participation of uniquely originating TME cells may lead to novel or improved anti-tumor therapeutics. PMID:25815113

  12. Effects of long-term administration of Senna occidentalis seeds on the hematopoietic tissue of rats.

    PubMed

    Teles, A V F F; Fock, R A; Górniak, S L

    2015-12-15

    Senna occidentalis (S. occidentalis) is a toxic leguminous plant that contaminates crops and has been shown to be toxic to several animal species. All parts of the plant are toxic, but most of the plant's toxicity is due to its seeds. Despite its toxicity, S. occidentalis is widely used for therapeutic purposes in humans. The aim of the present work was to investigate, for the first time, the effects of the chronic administration of S. occidentalis seeds on hematopoietic organs, including the bone marrow and spleen. Fifty male Wistar rats were divided into five groups of 10 animals. Rats were treated with diets containing 0% (control), 0.5% (So0.5), 1% (So1), or 2% (So2) S. occidentalis seeds for a period of 90 days. Food and water were provided ad libitum, except to pair-fed (PF) group which received the same amount of ration to those of So2 group, however free of S. occidentalis seeds. It was verified that rats treated with 2% S. occidentalis seeds presented changes in hematological parameters. The blood evaluation also showed a significant decrease of the Myeloid/Erythroid (M/E) ratio. Chronic treatment with S. occidentalis promoted a reduction in the cellularity of both the bone marrow and spleen. Additionally, we observed changes in bone marrow smears, iron stores and spleen hemosiderin accumulation. Histological analyses of bone marrow revealed erythroid hyperplasia which was consistent with the increased reticulocyte count. These findings suggest that the long-term administration of S. occidentalis seeds can promote blood toxicity. PMID:26435339

  13. Donor Chimerism Early after Reduced-intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Predicts Relapse and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Milford, Edgar L.; Armand, Philippe; Cutler, Corey; Glotzbecker, Brett; Ho, Vincent T.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of early donor cell chimerism on outcomes of T-replete reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is ill-defined. We evaluated day 30 (D30) and 100 (D100) total donor cell chimerism after RIC HSCT undertaken between 2002 and 2010 at our institution, excluding patients who died or relapsed before D30. When available, donor T-cell chimerism was also assessed. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS), relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM). 688 patients with hematologic malignancies (48% myeloid; 52% lymphoid) and a median age of 57 years (range, 18-74) undergoing RIC HSCT with T-replete donor grafts (97% peripheral blood; 92% HLA-matched) and median follow-up of 58.2 months (range, 12.6-120.7) were evaluated. In multivariable analysis total donor cell and T-cell chimerism at D30 and D100 each predicted RIC HSCT outcomes, with D100 total donor cell chimerism most predictive. D100 total donor cell chimerism <90% was associated with increased relapse (HR 2.54, 95% CI 1.83-3.51, p<0.0001), impaired PFS (HR 2.01, 95% CI 1.53-2.65, p<0.0001) and worse OS (1.50, 95% CI 1.11-2.04, p=0.009), but not NRM (HR 0.76; 95% CI 0.44-2.27, p=0.33). There was no additional utility of incorporating sustained D30-D100 total donor cell chimerism, or T-cell chimerism. Low donor chimerism early after RIC HSCT is an independent risk factor for relapse and impaired survival. Donor chimerism assessment early after RIC HSCT can prognosticate for long-term outcomes and help identify high-risk patient cohorts that may benefit from additional therapeutic interventions. PMID:24907627

  14. Knockdown of HPRT for Selection of Genetically Modified Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Rashmi; Baturin, Dmitry; Fosmire, Susan; Freed, Brian; Porter, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The inability to obtain sufficient numbers of transduced cells remains a limitation in gene therapy. One strategy to address this limitation is in vivo pharmacologic selection of transduced cells. We have previously shown that knockdown of HPRT using lentiviral delivered shRNA facilitates efficient selection of transduced murine hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) using 6-thioguanine (6TG). Herein, we now extend these studies to human HPC. We tested multiple shRNA constructs in human derived cell lines and identified the optimal shRNA sequence for knockdown of HPRT and 6TG resistance. We then tested this vector in human umbilical cord blood derived HPC in vitro and in NOD/SCID recipients. Knockdown of HPRT effectively provided resistance to 6TG in vitro. 6TG treatment of mice resulted in increased percentages of transduced human CD45+ cells in the peripheral blood and in the spleen in particular, in both myeloid and lymphoid compartments. 6TG treatment of secondary recipients resulted in higher percentages of transduced human cells in the bone marrow, confirming selection from the progeny of long-term repopulating HPCs. However, the extent of selection of cells in the bone marrow at the doses of 6TG tested and the toxicity of higher doses, suggest that this strategy may be limited to selection of more committed progenitor cells. Together, these data suggest that human HPC can be programmed to be resistant to purine analogs, but that HPRT knockdown/6TG-based selection may not be robust enough for in vivo selection. PMID:23555045

  15. Impact of KIR and HLA Genotypes on Outcomes after Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sobecks, Ronald M; Wang, Tao; Askar, Medhat; Gallagher, Meighan M; Haagenson, Michael; Spellman, Stephen; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Müller, Carlheinz; Battiwalla, Minoo; Gajewski, James; Verneris, Michael R; Ringdén, Olle; Marino, Susana; Davies, Stella; Dehn, Jason; Bornhäuser, Martin; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Woolfrey, Ann; Shaw, Peter; Pollack, Marilyn; Weisdorf, Daniel; Milller, Jeffrey; Hurley, Carolyn; Lee, Stephanie J; Hsu, Katharine

    2015-09-01

    Natural killer cells are regulated by killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) interactions with HLA class I ligands. Several models of natural killer cell reactivity have been associated with improved outcomes after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but this issue has not been rigorously addressed in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) unrelated donor (URD) HCT. We studied 909 patients undergoing RIC-URD HCT. Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, n = 612) lacking ? 1 KIR ligands experienced higher grade III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (HR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.28; P = .005) compared to those with all ligands present. Absence of HLA-C2 for donor KIR2DL1 was associated with higher grade II to IV (HR, 1.4; P = .002) and III to IV acute GVHD (HR, 1.5; P = .01) compared with HLA-C2(+) patients. AML patients with KIR2DS1(+), HLA-C2 homozygous donors had greater treatment-related mortality compared with others (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.2; P = .002) but did not experience lower relapse. There were no significant associations with outcomes for AML when assessing donor-activating KIRs or centromeric KIR content or for any donor-recipient KIR-HLA assessments in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 297). KIR-HLA combinations in RIC-URD HCT recapitulate some but not all KIR-HLA effects observed in myeloablative HCT. PMID:25960307

  16. Twist-2 Controls Myeloid Lineage Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B; Aldrich, Melissa; Sosic, Drazen; Olson, Eric N; Friedman, Alan D; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Chen, Si-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in lymphoid and erythroid development; however, little is known about their role in myeloid lineage development. In this study, we identify the bHLH transcription factor Twist-2 as a key negative regulator of myeloid lineage development, as manifested by marked increases in mature myeloid populations of macrophages, neutrophils, and basophils in Twist-2–deficient mice. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that Twist-2 inhibits the proliferation as well as differentiation of granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMP) by interacting with and inhibiting the transcription factors Runx1 and C/EBP?. Moreover, Twist-2 was found to have a contrasting effect on cytokine production: inhibiting the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interferon-? (IFN?) while promoting the regulatory cytokine IL-10 by myeloid cells. The data from further analyses suggest that Twist-2 activates the transcription factor c-Maf, leading to IL-10 expression. In addition, Twist-2 was found to be essential for endotoxin tolerance. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineages, as well as the function and inflammatory responses of mature myeloid cells. PMID:19090621

  17. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E S; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-09-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1-0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1-4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7. PMID:26069293

  18. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. GTI-2040 and High-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  1. Asymptotic Behavior of a Discrete Maturity Structured System of Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    E-print Network

    Crauste, Fabien

    Asymptotic Behavior of a Discrete Maturity Structured System of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Dynamics Abstract. We propose and analyze a mathematical model of hematopoietic stem cell dy- namics. This model marrow by so-called hematopoietic stem cells. They are pluripotent stem cells, with self- renewal

  2. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  3. Co-administration of the mTORC1/TORC2 inhibitor INK128 and the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL antagonist ABT-737 kills human myeloid leukemia cells through Mcl-1 down-regulation and AKT inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Mohamed; Aust, Mandy Mayo; Hawkins, Elisa; Parker, Rebecca E.; Ross, Masey; Kmieciak, Maciej; Reshko, Leonid Borisovich; Rizzo, Kathryn A.; Dumur, Catherine I.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Grant, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Effects of concurrent inhibition of mTORC1/2 and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL in human acute myeloid leukemia cells were examined. Tetracycline-inducible Bcl-2/Bcl-xL dual knockdown markedly sensitized acute myeloid leukemia cells to the dual TORC1/2 inhibitor INK128 in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, INK128 co-administered with the Bcl-2/xL antagonist ABT-737 sharply induced cell death in multiple acute myeloid leukemia cell lines, including TKI-resistant FLT3-ITD mutants and primary acute myeloid leukemia blasts carrying various genetic aberrations e.g., FLT3, IDH2, NPM1, and Kras, while exerting minimal toxicity toward normal hematopoietic CD34+ cells. Combined treatment was particularly active against CD34+/CD38?/CD123+ primitive leukemic progenitor cells. The INK128/ABT-737 regimen was also effective in the presence of a protective stromal microenvironment. Notably, INK128 was more potent than the TORC1 inhibitor rapamycin in down-regulating Mcl-1, diminishing AKT and 4EBP1 phosphorylation, and potentiating ABT-737 activity. Mcl-1 ectopic expression dramatically attenuated INK128/ABT-737 lethality, indicating an important functional role for Mcl-1 down-regulation in INK128/ABT-737 actions. Immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that combined treatment markedly diminished Bax, Bak, and Bim binding to all major anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 members (Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Mcl-1), while Bax/Bak knockdown reduced cell death. Finally, INK128/ABT-737 co-administration sharply attenuated leukemia growth and significantly prolonged survival in a systemic acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model. Analysis of subcutaneous acute myeloid leukemia-derived tumors revealed significant decrease in 4EBP1 phosphorylation and Mcl-1 protein level, consistent with results obtained in vitro. These findings demonstrate that co-administration of dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and BH3-mimetics exhibits potent anti-leukemic activity in vitro and in vivo, arguing that this strategy warrants attention in acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:26452980

  4. SBR-Blood: systems biology repository for hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Jens; Heuston, Elisabeth F.; Mishra, Tejaswini; Keller, Cheryl A.; Hardison, Ross C.; Bodine, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Extensive research into hematopoiesis (the development of blood cells) over several decades has generated large sets of expression and epigenetic profiles in multiple human and mouse blood cell types. However, there is no single location to analyze how gene regulatory processes lead to different mature blood cells. We have developed a new database framework called hematopoietic Systems Biology Repository (SBR-Blood), available online at http://sbrblood.nhgri.nih.gov, which allows user-initiated analyses for cell type correlations or gene-specific behavior during differentiation using publicly available datasets for array- and sequencing-based platforms from mouse hematopoietic cells. SBR-Blood organizes information by both cell identity and by hematopoietic lineage. The validity and usability of SBR-Blood has been established through the reproduction of workflows relevant to expression data, DNA methylation, histone modifications and transcription factor occupancy profiles. PMID:26590403

  5. The Genetic Landscape of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Frequency in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Crow, Amanda L.; Hartiala, Jaana; Spindler, Tassja J.; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Barsky, Lora W.; Bennett, Brian J.; Parks, Brian W.; Eskin, Eleazar; Jain, Rajan; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Adams, Gregor B.; Allayee, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Summary Prior efforts to identify regulators of hematopoietic stem cell physiology have relied mainly on candidate gene approaches with genetically modified mice. Here we used a genome-wide association study (GWAS) strategy with the hybrid mouse diversity panel to identify the genetic determinants of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequency. Among 108 strains, we observed ?120- to 300-fold variation in three HSPC populations. A GWAS analysis identified several loci that were significantly associated with HSPC frequency, including a locus on chromosome 5 harboring the homeodomain-only protein gene (Hopx). Hopx previously had been implicated in cardiac development but was not known to influence HSPC biology. Analysis of the HSPC pool in Hopx?/? mice demonstrated significantly reduced cell frequencies and impaired engraftment in competitive repopulation assays, thus providing functional validation of this positional candidate gene. These results demonstrate the power of GWAS in mice to identify genetic determinants of the hematopoietic system. PMID:26050929

  6. Myeloid derived suppressor cell infiltration of murine and human gliomas is associated with reduction of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Baisakhi; Rayman, Patricia; Huang, Pengjing; Grabowski, Matthew; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Finke, James H; Vogelbaum, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are bone marrow derived cells with immunosuppressive properties. We have shown previously that MDSCs numbers are elevated in the circulation of GBM patients and that they produce reversible T cell dysfunction. Here, we evaluated whether MDSCs infiltrate human GBM tissues, and whether a commonly used mouse model of GBM reproduces the biology of MDSCs that is observed in patients. We evaluated tumor specimens from patients with newly diagnosed GBM. We harvested and evaluated normal brain, tumors and hematopoietic tissues from control, vehicle and sunitinib-treated mice. In human GBM tumors, MDSCs represented 5.4 ± 1.8 % of total cells. The majority of MDSCs (CD33+HLADR-) were lineage negative (CD14-CD15-), followed by granulocytic (CD15+CD14-) and monocytic (CD15-CD14+) subtypes. In murine GBM tumors, MDSCs were 8.06 ± 0.78 % of total cells, of which more were monocytic (M-MDSC, CD11b+ Gr1-low) than granulocytic (G-MDSC, CD11b+ Gr1-high). Treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib decreased the infiltration of both granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs in murine GBM tumors. In the hematopoietic tissues, circulating G-MDSC blood levels were reduced after sunitinib treatment. In tumors, both CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cell counts increased following sunitinib treatment (p ? 0.001). Total T cell proliferation (p < 0.001) and interferon gamma production (p = 0.004) were increased in the spleens of sunitinib treated mice. Sunitinib-treated mice survived longer than vehicle-treated mice (p = 0.002). MDSCs are present in both human and mouse GBM tumors. Sunitinib may have an immunostimulatory effect, as its use is associated with a reduction in G-MDSCs and improvement in anti-tumor immune function. PMID:25579983

  7. Transcriptome comparison of distinct osteolineage subsets in the hematopoietic stem cell niche using a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Scadden, David T.

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow niche is recognized as a central player in maintaining and regulating the behavior of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Specific gain-of and loss-of function experiments perturbing a range of osteolineage cells or their secreted proteins had been shown to affect stem cell maintenance (Calvi et al, 2003 [1]; Stier et al., 2005 [2]; Zhang et al., 2003 [3]; Nilsson et al., 2005 [4]; Greenbaum et al., 2013 [5]) and engraftment (Adam et al., 2006, 2009 [6,7]). We used specific in vivo cell deletion approaches to dissect the niche cell-parenchymal cell dependency in a complex bone marrow microenvironment. Endogenous deletion of osteocalcin-expressing (Ocn+) cells led to a loss of T immune cells (Yu et al., 2015 [8]. Ocn+ cells express the Notch ligand DLL4 to communicate with T-competent progenitors, and thereby ensuring T precursor production and expression of chemotactic molecules on their cell surface for subsequent thymic seeding. In contrast, depletion of osterix-expressing (Osx+) osteoprogenitors led to reduced B immune cells. These distinct hematopoietic phenotypes suggest specific pairing of mesenchymal niche cells and parenchymal hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow to create unique functional units to support hematopoiesis. Here, we present the global gene expression profiles of these osteolineage subtypes utilizing a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model (OsxCre+;Rosa-mCh+;Ocn:Topaz+) that labels Osx+ cells red, Ocn+ cells green, and Osx+ Ocn+ cells yellow. This system allows isolation of distinct osteolineage subsets within the same animal by flow cytometry. Array data that have been described in our study [8] are also publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession number GSE66042. Differences in gene expression may correlate with functional difference in supporting hematopoiesis. PMID:26484277

  8. Transcriptome comparison of distinct osteolineage subsets in the hematopoietic stem cell niche using a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Vionnie W C; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Scadden, David T

    2015-09-01

    The bone marrow niche is recognized as a central player in maintaining and regulating the behavior of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Specific gain-of and loss-of function experiments perturbing a range of osteolineage cells or their secreted proteins had been shown to affect stem cell maintenance (Calvi et al, 2003 [1]; Stier et al., 2005 [2]; Zhang et al., 2003 [3]; Nilsson et al., 2005 [4]; Greenbaum et al., 2013 [5]) and engraftment (Adam et al., 2006, 2009 [6,7]). We used specific in vivo cell deletion approaches to dissect the niche cell-parenchymal cell dependency in a complex bone marrow microenvironment. Endogenous deletion of osteocalcin-expressing (Ocn(+)) cells led to a loss of T immune cells (Yu et al., 2015 [8]. Ocn(+) cells express the Notch ligand DLL4 to communicate with T-competent progenitors, and thereby ensuring T precursor production and expression of chemotactic molecules on their cell surface for subsequent thymic seeding. In contrast, depletion of osterix-expressing (Osx(+)) osteoprogenitors led to reduced B immune cells. These distinct hematopoietic phenotypes suggest specific pairing of mesenchymal niche cells and parenchymal hematopoietic cells in the bone marrow to create unique functional units to support hematopoiesis. Here, we present the global gene expression profiles of these osteolineage subtypes utilizing a triple fluorescent transgenic mouse model (OsxCre(+);Rosa-mCh(+);Ocn:Topaz(+)) that labels Osx(+) cells red, Ocn(+) cells green, and Osx(+) Ocn(+) cells yellow. This system allows isolation of distinct osteolineage subsets within the same animal by flow cytometry. Array data that have been described in our study [8] are also publically available from NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) with the accession number GSE66042. Differences in gene expression may correlate with functional difference in supporting hematopoiesis. PMID:26484277

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  10. Filgrastim for the treatment of hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farese, A M; MacVittie, T J

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Neupogen® (filgrastim) for the treatment of patients with radiation-induced myelosuppression following a radiological/nuclear incident. It is the first medical countermeasure currently approved by the FDA for this indication under the criteria of the FDA "animal rule". This article summarizes the consequences of high-dose radiation exposure, a description of the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome (H-ARS), the use of hematopoietic growth factors in radiation accident victims and current available treatments for H-ARS with an emphasis on the use of Neupogen in this scenario. PMID:26488033

  11. Fbxl10 overexpression in murine hematopoietic stem cells induces leukemia involving metabolic activation and upregulation of Nsg2.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Takeshi; Nagamachi, Akiko; Takubo, Keiyo; Yamasaki, Norimasa; Matsui, Hirotaka; Kanai, Akinori; Nakata, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Kenichiro; Konuma, Takaaki; Oda, Hideaki; Wolff, Linda; Honda, Zen-ichiro; Wu, Xudong; Helin, Kristian; Iwama, Atsushi; Suda, Toshio; Inaba, Toshiya; Honda, Hiroaki

    2015-05-28

    We previously reported that deficiency for Samd9L, which was cloned as a candidate gene for -7/7q- syndrome, accelerated leukemia cooperatively with enhanced expression of a histone demethylase: F-box and leucine-rich repeat protein 10 (Fbxl10, also known as Jhdm1b, Kdm2b, and Ndy1). To further investigate the role of Fbxl10 in leukemogenesis, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice that overexpress Fbxl10 in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Interestingly, Fbxl10 Tg mice developed myeloid or B-lymphoid leukemia with complete penetrance. HSCs from the Tg mice exhibited an accelerated G0/G1-to-S transition with a normal G0 to G1 entry, resulting in pleiotropic progenitor cell expansion. Fbxl10 Tg HSCs displayed enhanced expression of neuron-specific gene family member 2 (Nsg2), and forced expression of Nsg2 in primary bone marrow cells resulted in expansion of immature cells. In addition, the genes involved in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation were markedly enriched in Fbxl10 Tg HSCs, coupled with increased cellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate levels. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing analysis demonstrated that Fbxl10 directly binds to the regulatory regions of Nsg2 and oxidative phosphorylation genes. These findings define Fbxl10 as a bona fide oncogene, whose deregulated expression contributes to the development of leukemia involving metabolic proliferative advantage and Nsg2-mediated impaired differentiation. PMID:25872778

  12. Outcomes of mismatched and unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Fanconi anemia conditioned with chemotherapy only.

    PubMed

    Chao, M M; Kuehl, J S; Strauss, G; Hanenberg, H; Schindler, D; Neitzel, H; Niemeyer, C; Baumann, I; von Bernuth, H; Rascon, J; Nagy, M; Zimmermann, M; Kratz, C P; Ebell, W

    2015-08-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genomic instability syndrome associated with bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and/or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to restore normal hematopoiesis. Although low-intensity fludarabine-based preparative regimens without radiation confer excellent outcomes in FA HSCTs with HLA-matched sibling donors, outcomes for FA patients with alternative donors are less encouraging, albeit improving. We present our experience with 17 FA patients who completed mismatched related or unrelated donor HSCT using a non-radiation fludarabine-based preparative regimen at Charité University Medicine Berlin. All patients engrafted; however, one patient had unstable chimerism in the setting of multi-viral infections that necessitated a stem cell boost to revert to full donor chimerism. Forty-seven percent of patients developed grade I acute graft-verus-host disease (aGVHD). No grade II-IV aGVHD or chronic graft-versus-host disease of any severity occurred. At a median follow-up of 30 months, 88 % of patients are alive with normal hematopoiesis. Two patients died of infections 4 months post-transplantation. These results demonstrate that short-term outcomes for FA patients with mismatched and unrelated donor HSCTs can be excellent using chemotherapy only conditioning. Viral reactivation, however, was a major treatment-related complication. PMID:25862235

  13. Enhanced genetic modification of adult growth factor mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Li, Lijing; Torres-Coronado, Mónica; Gu, Angel; Rao, Anitha; Gardner, Agnes M; Epps, Elizabeth W; Gonzalez, Nancy; Tran, Chy-Anh; Wu, Xiwei; Wang, Jin-Hui; DiGiusto, David L

    2014-10-01

    Genetic modification of adult human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) with lentiviral vectors leads to long-term gene expression in the progeny of the HSPCs and has been used to successfully treat several monogenic diseases. In some cases, the gene-modified cells have a selective growth advantage over nonmodified cells and eventually are the dominant engrafted population. However, in disease indications for which the gene-modified cells do not have a selective advantage, optimizing transduction of HSPC is paramount to successful stem cell-based gene therapy. We demonstrate here that transduction of adult CD34+ HSPCs with lentiviral vectors in the presence of rapamycin, a widely used mTORC1 inhibitor, results in an approximately threefold increase in stable gene marking with minimal effects on HSPC growth and differentiation. Using this approach, we have demonstrated that we can enhance the frequency of gene-modified HSPCs that give rise to clonogenic progeny in vitro without excessive increases in the number of vector copies per cell or changes in integration pattern. The genetic marking of HSPCs and expression of transgenes is durable, and transplantation of gene-modified HSPCs into immunodeficient mice results in high levels of gene marking of the lymphoid and myeloid progeny in vivo. The prior safe clinical history of rapamycin in other applications supports the use of this compound to generate gene-modified autologous HSPCs for our HIV gene therapy clinical trials. PMID:25107584

  14. Blood dendritic cells suppress NK cell function and increase the risk of leukemia relapse after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Martinez, Antonio; Iyengar, Rekha; Gan, Kwan; Chotsampancharoen, Thirachit; Rooney, Barbara; Holladay, Marti; Ramírez, Manuel; Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    NK cells play an important role in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) and in cross talk with dendritic cells (DCs) to induce primary T cell response against infection. Therefore, we hypothesized that blood DCs should augment NK cell function and reduce the risk of leukemia relapse after HCT. To test this hypothesis, we conducted laboratory and clinical studies in parallel. We found that although phenotypically NK cells could induce DC maturation and DCs could in turn increase activating marker expression on NK cells, paradoxically, both BDCA1+ myeloid DCs and BDCA4+ plasmacytoid DCs suppressed the function of NK cells. Patients who received an HLA-haploidentical graft containing larger number of BDCA1+ DCs or BDCA4+ DCs had a higher risk of leukemia relapse and poorer survival. Further experiments indicated that the potent inhibition on NK cell cytokine production and cytotoxicity was mediated in part through the secretion of IL-10 by BDCA1+ DCs and IL-6 by BDCA4+ DCs. These results have significant implications for future HCT strategies. PMID:20977942

  15. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in hematopoietic cell transplant patients affecting early recognition of, and response to, endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Guinan, Eva C; Palmer, Christine D; Mancuso, Christy J; Brennan, Lisa; Stoler-Barak, Liat; Kalish, Leslie A; Suter, Eugenie E; Gallington, Leighanne C; Huhtelin, David P; Mansilla, Maria; Schumann, Ralf R; Murray, Jeffrey C; Weiss, Jerrold; Levy, Ofer

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is a life-saving therapy for many malignant and non-malignant bone marrow diseases. Associated morbidities are often due to transplant-related toxicities and infections, exacerbated by regimen-induced immune suppression and systemic incursion of bacterial products. Patients undergoing myeloablative conditioning for HCT become endotoxemic and display blood/plasma changes consistent with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic innate immune activation. Herein, we addressed whether patients scheduled for HCT display differences in recognition/response to LPS ex vivo traceable to specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two SNPs of LPS binding protein (LBP) were associated with changes in plasma LBP levels, with one LBP SNP also associating with differences in efficiency of extraction and transfer of endotoxin to myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2), a step needed for activation of TLR4. None of the examined SNPs of CD14, bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), TLR4 or MD-2 were associated with corresponding protein plasma levels or endotoxin delivery to MD-2, but CD14 and BPI SNPs significantly associated with differences in LPS-induced TNF-? release ex vivo and infection frequency, respectively. These findings suggest that specific LBP, CD14 and BPI SNPs might be contributory assessments in studies where clinical outcome may be affected by host response to endotoxin and bacterial infection. PMID:24107515

  16. Lisofylline suppresses ex vivo release by murine spleen cells of hematopoietic inhibitors induced by cancer chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    de Vries, P; Singer, J W

    2000-08-01

    Many cytotoxic cancer therapeutic drugs activate stress response signaling pathways that transcriptionally activate a variety of genes. We decided to determine if cytotoxic therapies induce inflammatory cytokines with inhibitory effects on hematopoiesis and if lisofylline (LSF), a novel antiinflammatory compound, suppresses this induction. Mice were treated with cytosine beta-d-arabinofuranoside (AraC), cis-platinum(II)diammine-dichloride (CisP), etoposide (VP-16), or melphalan at clinically relevant doses, with or without LSF. Spleen cell conditioned media (CM) derived from mice treated with cytotoxic agents, but not from control or LSF treated mice, reduced colony formation by murine bone marrow progenitors belonging to the myeloid, erythroid, megakaryocytic, and B-lymphoid lineages. LSF (100 mg/kg), administered either simultaneously with or up to 48 hours before the cytotoxic agents, suppressed the release of this inhibitory activity. Treatment of inhibitory CM with neutralizing antibodies against known growth inhibitory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta, and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, resulted in enhanced colony growth. We conclude that treatment of mice with chemotherapeutic drugs induces the ex vivo production of multilineage hematopoietic inhibitors and that induction of these inhibitors could be abrogated by treatment with LSF. These findings suggest a mechanism whereby LSF can accelerate recovery of hematopoiesis following cytotoxic therapies. PMID:10989192

  17. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-05

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  20. Brillouin precursors in Debye media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    We theoretically study the formation of Brillouin precursors in Debye media. We point out that the precursors are visible only at propagation distances such that the impulse response of the medium is essentially determined by the frequency dependence of its absorption and is practically Gaussian. By simple convolution, we then obtain explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted waves generated by reference incident waves, distinguishing precursor and main signal by a simple examination of the long-time behavior of the overall signal. These expressions are in good agreement with the signals obtained in numerical or real experiments performed on water in the radio-frequency domain and explain in particular some observed shapes of the precursor. Results are obtained for other remarkable incident waves. In addition, we show quite generally that the shape of the Brillouin precursor appearing alone at sufficiently large propagation distance and the law giving its amplitude as a function of this distance do not depend on the precise form of the incident wave but only on its integral properties. The incidence of a static conductivity of the medium is also examined and explicit analytical results are again given in the limit of weak and strong conductivities.

  1. Distribution of mast-cell precursors in hematopoeitic and lymphopoietic tissues of mice

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Two experimental systems were used to investigate the origin of precursor cells which differentiate into tissue mast cells in vivo. (a) Increase of mast cell number was examined in the skin, stomach, cecum, and mesentery of genetically mast cell-depleted WBB6F1 (WB X C57BL/6)- W/WV mice after the injection of various hematolymphoid cells of congenic +/+ mice. (b) Appearance of mast cells with giant granules was studied in irradiated C57BL/6-+/+ mice after the injection of lymphoid cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice. Concentrations of mast cell precursors in the thymus, lymph node and Peyer's patch were less than 0.1% of the concentration in the bone marrow. Neither treatment of donor bone marrow cells with anti-Thy-1.2 serum and complement nor thymectomy of the recipient mice affects the development of mast cells in the skin, stomach, cecum, and mesentery. Moreover, the number of mast cells increased to normal level when the skin of WBB6F1-W/WV mice was grafted on the back of nude athymic (BALB/c-nu/nu) mice. These results indicate that mast cell precursors are derived from hematopoietic tissues rather than lymphopoetic ones and that the differentiation of the precursor cells does not depend on T lymphocytes or the thymus. PMID:383876

  2. Decitabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant and Cyclophosphamide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With High-Risk or Recurrent Myeloid Leukemia After Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-12

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Busulfan, Etoposide, and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Advanced Myeloid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts

  5. Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia is clinically distinct from unclassifiable myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hasserjian, Robert P.; Fox, Patricia S.; Rogers, Heesun J.; Geyer, Julia T.; Chabot-Richards, Devon; Weinzierl, Elizabeth; Hatem, Joseph; Jaso, Jesse; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Stingo, Francesco C.; Patel, Keyur P.; Mehrotra, Meenakshi; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Young, Ken H.; Dinardo, Courtney D.; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tiu, Ramon V.; Bagg, Adam; Hsi, Eric D.; Arber, Daniel A.; Foucar, Kathryn; Luthra, Raja; Orazi, Attilio

    2014-01-01

    Atypical chronic myeloid leukemia (aCML) is a rare subtype of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) largely defined morphologically. It is, unclear, however, whether aCML-associated features are distinctive enough to allow its separation from unclassifiable MDS/MPN (MDS/MPN-U). To study these 2 rare entities, 134 patient archives were collected from 7 large medical centers, of which 65 (49%) cases were further classified as aCML and the remaining 69 (51%) as MDS/MPN-U. Distinctively, aCML was associated with many adverse features and an inferior overall survival (12.4 vs 21.8 months, P = .004) and AML-free survival (11.2 vs 18.9 months, P = .003). The aCML defining features of leukocytosis and circulating myeloid precursors, but not dysgranulopoiesis, were independent negative predictors. Other factors, such as lactate dehydrogenase, circulating myeloblasts, platelets, and cytogenetics could further stratify MDS/MPN-U but not aCML patient risks. aCML appeared to have more mutated RAS (7/20 [35%] vs 4/29 [14%]) and less JAK2p.V617F (3/42 [7%] vs 10/52 [19%]), but was not statistically significant. Somatic CSF3R T618I (0/54) and CALR (0/30) mutations were not detected either in aCML or MDS/MPN-U. In conclusion, within MDS/MPN, the World Health Organization 2008 criteria for aCML identify a subgroup of patients with features clearly distinct from MDS/MPN-U. The MDS/MPN-U category is heterogeneous, and patient risk can be further stratified by a number of clinicopathological parameters. PMID:24627528

  6. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-16

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cells derived from acute myeloid leukemia bone marrow exhibit aberrant cytogenetics and cytokine elaboration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J C; Basu, S K; Zhao, X; Chien, S; Fang, M; Oehler, V G; Appelbaum, F R; Becker, P S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) play a fundamental role in the BM microenvironment (BME) and abnormalities of these cells may contribute to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis. The aim of the study was to characterize the cytokine and gene expression profile, immunophenotype and cytogenetics of BM-MSCs from AML patients compared to normal BM-MSCs from healthy donors. AML BM-MSCs showed decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 levels compared to normal BM-MSCs. AML BM-MSCs expressed similar ?1 integrin, CD44, CD73, CD90 and E-cadherin compared to normal BM-MSCs. Cytogenetic analysis revealed chromosomal aberrations in AML BM-MSCs, some overlapping with and others distinct from their corresponding AML blasts. No significant difference in gene expression was detected between AML BM-MSCs compared to normal BM-MSCs; however, comparing the differences between AML and MSCs from AML patients with the differences between normal hematopoietic cells and normal MSCs by Ingenuity pathway analysis showed key distinctions of the AML setting: (1) upstream gene regulation by transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor, tissue transglutaminase 2, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable related, matrix associated, actin dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily a, member 4; (2) integrin and interleukin 8 signaling as overrepresented canonical pathways; and (3) upregulation of transcription factors FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog and v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog. Thus, phenotypic abnormalities of AML BM-MSCs highlight a dysfunctional BME that may impact AML survival and proliferation. PMID:25860293

  8. microRNA expression profiling as supportive diagnostic and therapy prediction tool in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurkovicova, D; Lukackova, R; Magyerkova, M; Kulcsar, L; Krivjanska, M; Krivjansky, V; Chovanec, M

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder of hematopoietic stem cells carrying Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome and the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 fusion gene. microRNAs (miRNAs) belong to hematopoiesis transcription regulators and their deregulated expression associates with pathogenesis of CML. The current study assesses and validates expression profiles of selected oncogenic and tumor suppressing miRNAs that are associated with different imatinib mesylate (IM) response in CML patients carrying rare BCR-ABL variants. Microarray analysis has identified different expression of 70 miRNAs (46 up- and 24 down-regulated) when compared IM-resistant with IM-responsive patients carrying Ph chromosome. Significantly up-regulated expression of oncogenic miRNAs (miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-21, miR-27a and miR-155) and significantly down-regulated expression of tumor supressing mRNAs (let-7d, miR-205, miR-320, miR-451 and miR-574) in IM-resistant compared to IM-responsive patients was confirmed and validated by qRT-PCR. This study confirms the involvement of the selected oncogenic and tumor suppressing miRNAs in CML pathogenesis and IM response and suggests that these miRNAs could be suitable biomarkers for differential diagnosis of CML patients carrying rare BCR-ABL transcripts, as well as for prediction of their IM response and therapy outcome. PMID:26458312

  9. High-dimensional analysis of the murine myeloid cell system.

    PubMed

    Becher, Burkhard; Schlitzer, Andreas; Chen, Jinmiao; Mair, Florian; Sumatoh, Hermi R; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; Low, Donovan; Ruedl, Christiane; Riccardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Poidinger, Michael; Greter, Melanie; Ginhoux, Florent; Newell, Evan W

    2014-12-01

    Advances in cell-fate mapping have revealed the complexity in phenotype, ontogeny and tissue distribution of the mammalian myeloid system. To capture this phenotypic diversity, we developed a 38-antibody panel for mass cytometry and used dimensionality reduction with machine learning-aided cluster analysis to build a composite of murine (mouse) myeloid cells in the steady state across lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In addition to identifying all previously described myeloid populations, higher-order analysis allowed objective delineation of otherwise ambiguous subsets, including monocyte-macrophage intermediates and an array of granulocyte variants. Using mice that cannot sense granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor GM-CSF (Csf2rb(-/-)), which have discrete alterations in myeloid development, we confirmed differences in barrier tissue dendritic cells, lung macrophages and eosinophils. The methodology further identified variations in the monocyte and innate lymphoid cell compartment that were unexpected, which confirmed that this approach is a powerful tool for unambiguous and unbiased characterization of the myeloid system. PMID:25306126

  10. Spinal Myeloid Sarcoma "Chloroma" Presenting as Cervical Radiculopathy: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaobang; Shahab, Imran; Lieberman, Isador H

    2015-06-01

    Study Design?Case report. Objective?Myeloid sarcoma (also known as chloroma) is a rare, extramedullary tumor composed of immature granulocytic cells. It may occur early in the course of acute or chronic leukemia or myeloproliferative disorders. Spinal cord invasion by myeloid sarcoma is rare. The authors report a rare case of spinal myeloid sarcoma presenting as cervical radiculopathy. Methods?A previously healthy 43-year-old man presented with progressive neck, right shoulder, and arm pain. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a very large enhancing extradural soft tissue mass extending from C7 through T1, with severe narrowing of the thecal sac at the T1 level. The patient underwent posterior cervical open biopsy, laminectomy, and decompression. Histologic examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma. Postoperatively, a bone marrow biopsy was done, which showed myeloproliferative neoplasm with eosinophilia. The patient then received systemic chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Results?At the 10-month follow-up, the patient reported complete relief of arm pain and neck pain. X-rays showed that the overall cervical alignment was intact and there was no evidence of a recurrent lesion. MRI showed no evidence of compressive or remnant lesion. Conclusions?Spinal myeloid sarcoma presenting as cervical radiculopathy is rare, and it may be easily misdiagnosed. Knowledge of its clinical presentation, imaging, and histologic characterization can lead to early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:26131394

  11. haematologica | 2012; 97(10) 1553 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Articles and Brief Reports

    E-print Network

    haematologica | 2012; 97(10) 1553 Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Articles and Brief Reports *These The online version of this article has a SupplementaryAppendix. Background Chronic myeloid leukemia with a mathematical frame- work of chronic myeloid leukemia, based on a four-compartment model that can explain

  12. Dynamics of chronic myeloid leukemia response to dasatinib, nilotinib, and high-dose imatinib

    E-print Network

    Dynamics of chronic myeloid leukemia response to dasatinib, nilotinib, and high-dose imatinib, Hughes T, Branford S, Quintás-Cardama A, and Michor F. Dynamics of chronic myeloid leukemia response.2013.085977. #12;1 Dynamics of chronic myeloid leukemia response to dasatinib, nilotinib, andhigh

  13. Orbital myeloid sarcoma presenting as massive proptosis.

    PubMed

    Dinand, Veronique; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Grover, Ashok Kumar; Bhalla, Sunita; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2013-03-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with right proptosis for 8 months. The eyeball was grossly pushed down, with diffuse corneal haze and non-reactive pupil. Systemic examination was normal. Previous investigations in another centre included a computerized tomography scan, which showed a well-defined enhancing retro-bulbar mass, a non-contributory fine needle aspiration cytology and a biopsy showing fibrocollagenous tissue with moderate lympho-monocytic infiltrate suggestive of non-specific inflammation. PET-CT scan revealed the presence of enlarged fluoro-deoxyglucose-avid cervical and mesenteric lymph nodes. Biopsy of the retro-bulbar mass was repeated in our centre. It showed fibrocollagenous and skeletal muscle tissue infiltrated by lymphoid follicles, dispersely lying lymphocytes and plasma cells, and admixed large atypical cells with vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli and scanty cytoplasm, strongly positive for myeloperoxidase, CD43 and CD99 immunohistochemistry. Hemogram was normal. Bone marrow aspiration/biopsy and CSF showed no evidence of acute myeloid leukemia. The child received chemotherapy in another centre and is in complete remission 6 months after completion. PMID:23664602

  14. Acute myeloid leukemia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Yanada, Masamitsu; Naoe, Tomoki

    2012-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is predominantly a disease of older adults, with a median age at diagnosis of over 65 years. AML in older adults differs biologically and clinically from that in younger ones, and is characterized by stronger intrinsic resistance and lower tolerance to chemotherapy. The effects of age on both patient- and disease-related factors result in a higher incidence of early death during chemotherapy, a lower rate of complete remission, and a reduced chance of long-term survival. Treatment options for older adults with AML include intensive chemotherapy, less-intensive chemotherapy, best supportive care, or enrolment in clinical trials. Given the heterogeneous nature of AML in older adults, therapeutic decisions need to be individualized after systematic assessment of disease biology and patient characteristics. Regardless of treatment, however, outcomes for older AML patients remain in general unsatisfactory. In contrast with the progress made for younger adults, the treatment of AML in older adults has not improved significantly in recent decades. Development of less toxic and more targeted agents may well provide treatment alternatives for a majority of these patients. The overall dismal outcome with currently available treatment approaches has encouraged older AML patients to participate in prospective clinical trials. PMID:22791510

  15. An HSEF for murine myeloid leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Bullis, J.E.; Wuu, C.S.; Marino, S.A.; Zaider, M.

    1996-10-01

    In the past decade, a large amount of effort has gone into the development of hit size effectiveness functions (HSEFs), with the ultimate aim of replacing the present absorbed dose-RBE-Q system. However, the absorbed dose determined at the tissue level is incapable of providing information on single hits on (doses to) the single cell. As a result, it is necessary to resort to microdosimetry, which is capable of providing not only the number of hits on cells, but the distribution of hit sizes as well. From this information, an HSEF can be derived. However, to date there have been no sets of data available on animals exposed to radiations of several qualities, and for which microdosimetric data were available. The objective of the present set of experiments was to remedy this situation. Large numbers of mice were exposed to radiations of several different qualities, and were observed throughout their entire lifespan for the appearance of myeloid leukemia. The HSEF developed for this neoplasm is presented and discussed.

  16. Efciency of Embryoid Body Formation and Hematopoietic Development from

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    systems by measuring aspects of em- bryoid body (EB) formation ef®ciency and cell proliferation and essential role in the human body as they provide the starting material for every tissue and organ during emEf®ciency of Embryoid Body Formation and Hematopoietic Development from Embryonic Stem Cells

  17. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong; Zhou, Zhigang; Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli; Sun, Hanying

    2009-09-25

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  18. Zfx Controls the Self-Renewal of Embryonic and Hematopoietic

    E-print Network

    Mirny, Leonid

    Zfx Controls the Self-Renewal of Embryonic and Hematopoietic Stem Cells Jose M. Galan-Caridad,1 Reizis1, * 1 Department of Microbiology 2 Department of Pathology Columbia University Medical Center, New for self-renewal in an undifferentiated state. It is un- clear whether the self-renewal of pluripotent

  19. A promoter DNA demethylation landscape of human hematopoietic differentiation

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Uwe

    hematopoietic-specific genes repressed by promoter DNA methylation in human embryonic stem cells and whose loss stem cells (iPSCs) generated from somatic CD34+ HSPCs and differentiated derivatives from CD34+ HSPCs.e. stem cell (HSC), B progenitor (pro-B), B pre- cursor (pre-B), mature B cells, plasma cells, etc.]. *To

  20. Understanding cellular networks to improve hematopoietic stem cell expansion cultures

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Understanding cellular networks to improve hematopoietic stem cell expansion cultures Daniel C blood stem cell growth have met with limited success. Considering that adult stem cell cultures-output systems, adult stem cell cultures are better described as complex, non-linear, multiple-input multiple

  1. Does hematopoietic stem cell transplantation benefit infants with acute leukemia?

    PubMed Central

    Sison, Edward Allan R.; Brown, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). She has completed induction therapy and is currently in first complete remission (CR1). You are asked by your resident if hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) would benefit infants with acute leukemia. PMID:24319238

  2. PLASMA ANTIOXIDANTS IN SUBJECTS PRIOR TO HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chemo-irradiation induced oxidative damage to vascular endothelium may contribute to pulmonary complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We compared antioxidants, markers of oxidative stress and the ability of plasma to handle an oxidative stress in plasma or serum from 24 sub...

  3. Expression profiling of human glial precursors

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, James T; Sandrock, Robert W; Wheatley, Will; Xue, Haipeng; Zheng, Jianhua; Liang, Feng; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Zhan, Ming; Rao, Mahendra S; Liu, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Background We have generated gene expression databases for human glial precursors, neuronal precursors, astrocyte precursors and neural stem cells and focused on comparing the profile of glial precursors with that of other populations. Results A total of 14 samples were analyzed. Each population, previously distinguished from each other by immunocytochemical analysis of cell surface markers, expressed genes related to their key differentiation pathways. For the glial precursor cell population, we identified 458 genes that were uniquely expressed. Expression of a subset of these individual genes was validated by RT-PCR. We also report genes encoding cell surface markers that may be useful for identification and purification of human glial precursor populations. Conclusion We provide gene expression profile for human glial precursors. Our data suggest several signaling pathways that are important for proliferation and differentiation of human glial precursors. Such information may be utilized to further purify glial precursor populations, optimize media formulation, or study the effects of glial differentiation. PMID:18947415

  4. Effects of Corynebacterium parvum on murine myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsson, S.; Preisler, H.; Pavelic, Z.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of C. parvum on RFM/UN myeloid leukaemia were studied. Mice inoculated with 7.0 mg but not 0.7 mg C. parvum i.p. survived significantly longer than untreated leukaemic mice (P less than 0.001). Administration of silica abrogated the effects of C. parvum, whilst polyvinyl pyridine-N-oxide prevented the inhibitory effects of silica. These studies demonstrate that a single large dose of C. parvum, either before or after leukaemic-cell passage, can significantly prolong the survival of RFM mice bearing myeloid leukaemia. The effects of silica and PVNO on C. parvum suggest a critical role for macrophages in C. parvum effects on myeloid leukaemia. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:217398

  5. Novel and Emerging Drugs for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Stein, E.M.; Tallman, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a challenging disease to treat with the majority of patients dying from their illness. While overall survival has been markedly prolonged in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), survival in younger adults with other subtypes of AML has only modestly improved over the last twenty years. Physicians who treat AML eagerly await drugs like Imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, Cladribine for hairy cell leukemia, and Rituximab for non-Hodgkin Lymphoma which have had an important impact on improving outcome. Recent research efforts have focused on refining traditional chemotherapeutic agents to make them more active in AML, targeting specific genetic mutations in myeloid leukemia cells, and utilizing novel agents such as Lenalidomide that have shown activity in other hematologic malignancies. Here, we focus on reviewing the recent literature on agents that may assume a role in clinical practice for patients with AML over the next five years. PMID:22483153

  6. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, R.

    1998-08-04

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic and/or reduced particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of all metals in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products. 7 figs.

  7. Preparation of superconductor precursor powders

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghunath (Littleton, CO); Blaugher, Richard D. (Evergreen, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A process for the preparation of a precursor metallic powder composition for use in the subsequent formation of a superconductor. The process comprises the steps of providing an electrodeposition bath comprising an electrolyte medium and a cathode substrate electrode, and providing to the bath one or more soluble salts of one or more respective metals, such as nitrate salts of thallium, barium, calcium, and copper, which are capable of exhibiting superconductor properties upon subsequent appropriate treatment. The bath is continually energized to cause the metallic particles formed at the electrode to drop as a powder from the electrode into the bath, and this powder, which is a precursor powder for superconductor production, is recovered from the bath for subsequent treatment. The process permits direct inclusion of thallium in the preparation of the precursor powder, and yields an amorphous product mixed on an atomic scale to thereby impart inherent high reactivity. Superconductors which can be formed from the precursor powder include pellet and powder-in-tube products.

  8. Molecular characterisation of murine acute myeloid leukaemia induced by 56Fe ion and 137Cs gamma ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Bacher, Jeffery W.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to sparsely ionising gamma- or X-ray irradiation is known to increase the risk of leukaemia in humans. However, heavy ion radiotherapy and extended space exploration will expose humans to densely ionising high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for which there is currently no understanding of leukaemia risk. Murine models have implicated chromosomal deletion that includes the hematopoietic transcription factor gene, PU.1 (Sfpi1), and point mutation of the second PU.1 allele as the primary cause of low-LET radiation-induced murine acute myeloid leukaemia (rAML). Using array comparative genomic hybridisation, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and high resolution melt analysis, we have confirmed that biallelic PU.1 mutations are common in low-LET rAML, occurring in 88% of samples. Biallelic PU.1 mutations were also detected in the majority of high-LET rAML samples. Microsatellite instability was identified in 42% of all rAML samples, and 89% of samples carried increased microsatellite mutant frequencies at the single-cell level, indicative of ongoing instability. Instability was also observed cytogenetically as a 2-fold increase in chromatid-type aberrations. These data highlight the similarities in molecular characteristics of high-LET and low-LET rAML and confirm the presence of ongoing chromosomal and microsatellite instability in murine rAML. PMID:22987027

  9. Specific expression of the human cellular fps/fes-encoded protein NCP92 in normal and leukemic myeloid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, R A; Gabrilove, J L; Tam, J P; Moore, M A; Hanafusa, H

    1985-01-01

    We have found that both an antibody directed against a synthetic peptide representing an amino acid sequence of the conserved kinase domain of transforming protein P140 of Fujinami sarcoma virus and a regressing tumor antiserum recognized the products of the c-fps/fes genes of both avian and mammalian cells. The anti-peptide antibody also recognized a 94-kilodalton protein that was related to but distinct from the c-fps/fes product in structure and in tissue distribution. A 92-kilodalton protein, NCP92, was found to be the mammalian counterpart of the previously identified avian c-fps/fes protein NCP98 by its structural similarity to NCP98, its associated tyrosine kinase activity, and its similar tissue distribution. The highest levels of NCP92 were found in tissue macrophages and in bone marrow. In bone marrow NCP92 expression was restricted to cells of the monocyte/macrophage and granulocyte lineages. That the expression of NCP92 is limited to these cell types was confirmed by the analysis of murine and human hematopoietic tumors representing different cell lineages: NCP92 was positive in leukemic cells of granulocytic and monocytic origin but not in B-lymphocytic, T-lymphocytic, or erythroid tumor cells. The expression of NCP92 seems to be related to the capacity of myeloid cells to differentiate and to respond to certain colony-stimulating factors. Images PMID:2986115

  10. Chronic myeloid leukemia with e14a3 BCR-ABL transcript: analysis of characteristics and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Xiaomin, Gui; Yong, Zhang; Jinlan, Pan; Huiying, Qiu; Jiannong, Cen; Yongquan, Xue; Suning, Chen; Hongjie, Shen; Li, Yao; Jun, Zhang; Yafang, Wu; Yan, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) and BCR-ABL fusion genes. This study retrospectively analyzed 2381 CML patients with Ph chromosome confirmed by cytogenetics, Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Among them, five CML patients without e13a2, e14a2 or e1a2 transcripts detected by Q-PCR were identified. DNA sequencing confirmed the fusion of BCR exon 14 and ABL exon 3. Case 1 reponded poorly to imatinib and achieved complete cytogenetic response (CCyR) after converting from imatinib to dasatinib. BCR-ABL transcripts were undetectable in cases after 2, 3 and 4 treated with imatinib after 6, 6 and 3 months, respectively, and in one patient who had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after 4 months. Q-PCR may miss the detection of rare cases that are not covered by the primers used in Q-PCR, unless the proper primers are used. PMID:25962435

  11. DNA hydroxymethylation profiling reveals that WT1 mutations result in loss of TET2 function in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rampal, Raajit; Alkalin, Altuna; Madzo, Jozef; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Pronier, Elodie; Patel, Jay; Li, Yushan; Ahn, Jihae; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Shih, Alan; Lu, Chao; Ward, Patrick S.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Hricik, Todd; Tosello, Valeria; Tallman, Jacob E.; Zhao, Xinyang; Daniels, Danette; Dai, Qing; Ciminio, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; He, Chuan; Fuks, Francois; Tallman, Martin S.; Ferrando, Adolfo; Nimer, Stephen; Paietta, Elisabeth; Thompson, Craig B.; Licht, Jonathan D.; Mason, Chris; Godley, Lucy A.; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E.; Levine, Ross L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Somatic mutations in IDH1/2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2 mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC). The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anti-correlate with TET2/IDH1/2 mutations in AML led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients have reduced 5-hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/2-mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5-hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5-hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a novel role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/2, and WT1 mutations define a novel AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation. PMID:25482556

  12. JAK of all trades: JAK2-STAT5 as novel therapeutic targets in BCR-ABL1+ chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Warsch, Wolfgang; Walz, Christoph; Sexl, Veronika

    2013-09-26

    The transcription factor signal transducers and activators of transcription 5 (STAT5) has an important and unique role in Breakpoint Cluster Region - Abelson 1 (BCR-ABL1)-driven neoplasias. STAT5 is an essential component in the signaling network that maintains the survival and growth of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells. In contrast, the function of the prototypical upstream kinase of STAT5, the Janus kinase JAK2, in CML is still under debate. Although there is widespread agreement that JAK2 is part of the signaling network downstream of BCR-ABL1, it is unclear whether and under what circumstances JAK2 inhibitors may be beneficial for CML patients. Recent studies in murine models have cast doubt on the importance of JAK2 in CML maintenance. Nevertheless, JAK2 has been proposed to have a central role in the cytokine signaling machinery that allows the survival of CML stem cells in the presence of BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this review, we summarize the current debate and provide an overview of the arguments on both sides of the fence. We present recent evidence showing that CML stem cells do not depend on BCR-ABL1 kinase activity but require the continuous support of the hematopoietic niche and its distinct cytokine environment and suggest that it has the potential to resolve the dispute. PMID:23926299

  13. Antibodies targeting human IL1RAP (IL1R3) show therapeutic effects in xenograft models of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ågerstam, Helena; Karlsson, Christine; Hansen, Nils; Sandén, Carl; Askmyr, Maria; von Palffy, Sofia; Högberg, Carl; Rissler, Marianne; Wunderlich, Mark; Juliusson, Gunnar; Richter, Johan; Sjöström, Kjell; Bhatia, Ravi; Mulloy, James C.; Järås, Marcus; Fioretos, Thoas

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a poor survival rate, and there is an urgent need for novel and more efficient therapies, ideally targeting AML stem cells that are essential for maintaining the disease. The interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP; IL1R3) is expressed on candidate leukemic stem cells in the majority of AML patients, but not on normal hematopoietic stem cells. We show here that monoclonal antibodies targeting IL1RAP have strong antileukemic effects in xenograft models of human AML. We demonstrate that effector-cell–mediated killing is essential for the observed therapeutic effects and that natural killer cells constitute a critical human effector cell type. Because IL-1 signaling is important for the growth of AML cells, we generated an IL1RAP-targeting antibody capable of blocking IL-1 signaling and show that this antibody suppresses the proliferation of primary human AML cells. Hence, IL1RAP can be efficiently targeted with an anti-IL1RAP antibody capable of both achieving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and blocking of IL-1 signaling as modes of action. Collectively, these results provide important evidence in support of IL1RAP as a target for antibody-based treatment of AML. PMID:26261316

  14. Big data analysis of treatment patterns and outcomes among elderly acute myeloid leukemia patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Bruno C; Satram-Hoang, Sacha; Hurst, Deborah; Hoang, Khang Q; Momin, Faiyaz; Reyes, Carolina

    2015-07-01

    Over half of patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are 65 years or older. We examined patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and survival among elderly patients in routine clinical practice. We utilized a retrospective cohort analysis of first primary AML patients in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database. Patients were diagnosed between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2009, >66 years, and continuously enrolled in Medicare Part A and B in the year prior to diagnosis. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression assessed overall survival by treatment. There were 3327 (40 %) patients who received chemotherapy within 3 months of diagnosis. Treated patients were more likely younger, male, and married, and less likely to have secondary AML and poor performance indicators and comorbidity score compared to untreated patients. In multivariate survival analysis, treated patients exhibited a significant 33 % lower risk of death compared to untreated patients. Significant survival benefits were noted with receipt of intensive and hypomethylating agent (HMA) therapies compared to no therapy. A survival benefit with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was seen in younger Medicare patients. This real-world study showed that about 60 % of elderly AML patients remain untreated following diagnosis. Use of anti-leukemic therapy was associated with a significant survival benefit in this elderly cohort. PMID:25791241

  15. High affinity and covalent-binding microtubule stabilizing agents show activity in chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pera, Benet; Calvo-Vidal, M Nieves; Ambati, Srikanth; Jordi, Michel; Kahn, Alissa; Díaz, J Fernando; Fang, Weishuo; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Cerchietti, Leandro; Moore, Malcolm A S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is frequently due to the persistence of a cell population resistant to chemotherapy through different mechanisms, in which drug efflux via ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins, specifically P-glycoprotein, is one of the most recognized. However, disappointing results from clinical trials employing inhibitors for these transporters have demonstrated the need to adopt different strategies. We hypothesized that microtubule targeting compounds presenting high affinity or covalent binding could overcome the effect of ABC transporters. We therefore evaluated the activity of the high-affinity paclitaxel analog CTX-40 as well as the covalent binder zampanolide (ZMP) in AML cells. Both molecules were active in chemosensitive as well as in chemoresistant cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein. Moreover, ZMP or CTX-40 in combination with daunorubicin showed synergistic killing without increased in vitro hematopoietic toxicity. In a primary AML sample, we further demonstrated that ZMP and CTX-40 are active in progenitor and differentiated leukemia cell populations. In sum, our data indicate that high affinity and covalent-binding anti-microtubule agents are active in AML cells otherwise chemotherapy resistant. PMID:26277539

  16. DNA hydroxymethylation profiling reveals that WT1 mutations result in loss of TET2 function in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rampal, Raajit; Alkalin, Altuna; Madzo, Jozef; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Pronier, Elodie; Patel, Jay; Li, Yushan; Ahn, Jihae; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Shih, Alan; Lu, Chao; Ward, Patrick S; Tsai, Jennifer J; Hricik, Todd; Tosello, Valeria; Tallman, Jacob E; Zhao, Xinyang; Daniels, Danette; Dai, Qing; Ciminio, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; He, Chuan; Fuks, Francois; Tallman, Martin S; Ferrando, Adolfo; Nimer, Stephen; Paietta, Elisabeth; Thompson, Craig B; Licht, Jonathan D; Mason, Christopher E; Godley, Lucy A; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E; Levine, Ross L

    2014-12-11

    Somatic mutations in IDH1/IDH2 and TET2 result in impaired TET2-mediated conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The observation that WT1 inactivating mutations anticorrelate with TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) led us to hypothesize that WT1 mutations may impact TET2 function. WT1 mutant AML patients have reduced 5hmC levels similar to TET2/IDH1/IDH2 mutant AML. These mutations are characterized by convergent, site-specific alterations in DNA hydroxymethylation, which drive differential gene expression more than alterations in DNA promoter methylation. WT1 overexpression increases global levels of 5hmC, and WT1 silencing reduced 5hmC levels. WT1 physically interacts with TET2 and TET3, and WT1 loss of function results in a similar hematopoietic differentiation phenotype as observed with TET2 deficiency. These data provide a role for WT1 in regulating DNA hydroxymethylation and suggest that TET2 IDH1/IDH2 and WT1 mutations define an AML subtype defined by dysregulated DNA hydroxymethylation. PMID:25482556

  17. HDAC8 Inhibition Specifically Targets Inv(16) Acute Myeloid Leukemic Stem Cells by Restoring p53 Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jing; Singh, Sandeep; Hua, Wei-Kai; Cai, Qi; Chao, Shi-Wei; Li, Ling; Liu, Hongjun; Ho, Yinwei; McDonald, Tinisha; Lin, Allen; Marcucci, Guido; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Wei-Jan; Chang, Chung-I; Kuo, Ya-Huei

    2015-11-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is driven and sustained by leukemia stem cells (LSCs) with unlimited self-renewal capacity and resistance to chemotherapy. Mutation in the TP53 tumor suppressor is relatively rare in de novo AML; however, p53 can be regulated through post-translational mechanisms. Here, we show that p53 activity is inhibited in inv(16)(+) AML LSCs via interactions with the CBF?-SMMHC (CM) fusion protein and histone deacetylase 8 (HDAC8). HDAC8 aberrantly deacetylates p53 and promotes LSC transformation and maintenance. HDAC8 deficiency or inhibition using HDAC8-selective inhibitors (HDAC8i) effectively restores p53 acetylation and activity. Importantly, HDAC8 inhibition induces apoptosis in inv(16)(+) AML CD34(+) cells, while sparing the normal hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, in vivo HDAC8i administration profoundly diminishes AML propagation and abrogates leukemia-initiating capacity of both murine and patient-derived LSCs. This study elucidates an HDAC8-mediated p53-inactivating mechanism promoting LSC activity and highlights HDAC8 inhibition as a promising approach to selectively target inv(16)(+) LSCs. PMID:26387755

  18. Kindlin-3 interacts with the ribosome and regulates c-Myc expression required for proliferation of chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jing; Ero, Rya; Feng, Chen; Ong, Li-Teng; Tan, Hui-Foon; Lee, Hui-Shan; Ismail, Muhammad HB; Bu, Wen-Ting; Nama, Srikanth; Sampath, Prabha; Gao, Yong-Gui; Tan, Suet-Mien

    2015-01-01

    Kindlins are FERM-containing cytoplasmic proteins that regulate integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) attachments. Kindlin-3 is expressed in hematopoietic cells, platelets, and endothelial cells. Studies have shown that kindlin-3 stabilizes cell adhesion mediated by ß1, ß2, and ß3 integrins. Apart from integrin cytoplasmic tails, kindlins are known to interact with other cytoplasmic proteins. Here we demonstrate that kindlin-3 can associate with ribosome via the receptor for activated-C kinase 1 (RACK1) scaffold protein based on immunoprecipitation, ribosome binding, and proximity ligation assays. We show that kindlin-3 regulates c-Myc protein expression in the human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562. Cell proliferation was reduced following siRNA reduction of kindlin-3 expression and a significant reduction in tumor mass was observed in xenograft experiments. Mechanistically, kindlin-3 is involved in integrin ?5ß1-Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling; however, its regulation of c-Myc protein expression could be independent of this signaling axis. PMID:26677948

  19. Azacitidine improves the T-cell repertoire in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fozza, Claudio; Corda, Giovanna; Barraqueddu, Francesca; Virdis, Patrizia; Contini, Salvatore; Galleu, Antonio; Isoni, Antonella; Dore, Fausto; Angelucci, Emanuele; Longinotti, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    Patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with multilineage dysplasia show several immunological abnormalities. In this clinical setting, by combining flow cytometry and CDR3 spectratyping we monitored the kinetic of the T-cell repertoire during Azacitidine treatment, in order to explore its potential ability to reverse the immune derangement typical of these disorders. We firstly demonstrated by flow cytometry an increase in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell frequencies after starting treatment. Moreover, when monitored by spectratyping our patients showed significant changes in their T-cell receptor (TCR) CDR3 profiles, which were much more evident in helper T-cells. In fact, the frequency of BV (beta variable) subfamilies showing a skewed CDR3 profile significantly decreased from baseline to the following evaluations in CD4+ T-cells (81% vs. 70%). This pattern was even more pronounced in patients responding to Azacitidine (90% vs. 61%). Our data show that the overall derangement of the T-cell repertoire detectable in patients with MDS and AML with multilineage dysplasia gradually improves during Azacitidine treatment. These findings therefore suggest that Azacitidine could be potentially able, not only to restore the hematopoietic function, but also to reverse the immune derangement typical of these hematologic disorders. PMID:26209197

  20. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit natural killer cell activity toward Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Leisse, Johanna; Brueggemann, Sabrina; Bouzani, Maria; Schmitt, Anna-Lena; Einsele, Hermann; Loeffler, Juergen

    2015-08-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating infectious disease in immunocompromised patients. Besides neutrophils and macrophages, natural killer (NK) cells have recently emerged a