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Sample records for hematopoietic myeloid precursors

  1. Tfe3 expression is closely associated to macrophage terminal differentiation of human hematopoietic myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Zanocco-Marani, Tommaso; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Gemelli, Claudia; Pirondi, Sara; Testa, Anna; Montanari, Monica; Parenti, Sandra; Tenedini, Elena; Grande, Alexis; Ferrari, Sergio . E-mail: sergio@unimo.it

    2006-12-10

    The MItf-Tfe family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors encodes four family members: MItf, Tfe3, TfeB and TfeC. In vitro, each protein of the family binds DNA in a homo- or heterodimeric form with other family members. Tfe3 is involved in chromosomal translocations recurrent in different tumors and it has been demonstrated, by in vivo studies, that it plays, redundantly with MItf, an important role in the process of osteoclast formation, in particular during the transition from mono-nucleated to multi-nucleated osteoclasts. Since mono-nucleated osteoclasts derive from macrophages we investigated whether Tfe3 might play a role upstream during hematopoietic differentiation. Here we show that Tfe3 is able to induce mono-macrophagic differentiation of U937 cells, in association with a decrease of cell proliferation and an increase of apoptosis. We also show that Tfe3 does not act physiologically during commitment of CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), since it is not able to direct HSCs toward a specific lineage as observed by clonogenic assay, but is a strong actor of terminal differentiation since it allows human primary myeloblasts' maturation toward the macrophage lineage.

  2. CD34(+) Liver Cancer Stem Cells Were Formed by Fusion of Hepatobiliary Stem/Progenitor Cells with Hematopoietic Precursor-Derived Myeloid Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Changjun; Zhang, Yanling; Park, Su Cheol; Eun, Jong Ryeol; Nguyen, Ngoc Tue; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Jung, Yong Jin; Theise, Neil D; Zern, Mark A; Duan, Yuyou

    2015-11-01

    A large number of cancer stem cells (CSCs) were identified and characterized; however, the origins and formation of CSCs remain elusive. In this study, we examined the origination of the newly identified CD34(+) liver CSC (LCSC). We found that CD34(+) LCSC coexpressed liver stem cell and myelomonocytic cell markers, showing a mixed phenotype, a combination of hepatobiliary stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and myelomonocytic cells. Moreover, human xenografts produced by CD34(+) LCSCs and the parental cells, which CD34(+) LCSC was isolated from, coexpressed liver cancer and myelomonocytic markers, also demonstrating mixed phenotypes. The xenografts and the parental cells secreted albumin demonstrating their hepatocyte origin and also expressed cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1b, IL-6, IL-12A, IL-18, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and CSF1] and chemokines (IL-8, CCL2, and CCL5). Expression of these cytokines and chemokines responded to the stimuli [interferon-γ (INF-γ), IL-4, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)]. Furthermore, human xenografts and the parental cells phagocytized Escherichia coli. CD34(+) LCSC coexpressed CD45, demonstrating that its origin appears to be from a hematopoietic precursor. The percentage of cells positive for OV6, CD34, and CD31, presenting the markers of HSPC, hematopoietic, and myelomonocytic cells, increased under treatment of CD34(+) LCSC with a drug. Cytogenetic analysis showed that CD34(+) LCSC contained a greater number of chromosomes. HBV DNA integrations and mutations in CD34(+) LCSC and the parental cells were identical to those in the literature or the database. Thus, these results demonstrated that CD34(+) LCSCs were formed by fusion of HSPC with CD34(+) hematopoietic precursor-derived myeloid intermediates; it appears that this is the first report that human CSCs have been formed by the fusion. Therefore, it represents a significant step toward better understanding of the formation of human CSC and the diverse origins of liver cancers. PMID:26192559

  3. Circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells are myeloid-biased in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Chao; Sun, Hong-Wei; Chen, Hai-Tian; Liang, Jing; Yu, Xing-Juan; Wu, Chong; Wang, Zilian; Zheng, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is associated with a profound perturbation in myelopoiesis that results in the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) to promote disease progression. Recent studies in mice suggest that tumor-derived factors could regulate the differentiation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow and subsequently contribute to dysregulation of hematopoiesis. However, the nature and role of HPSCs in patients with cancer remain unknown. Here we show, in detailed studies of the peripheral blood from 133 untreated patients with seven different types of tumors, that the composition of circulating HSPCs was significantly altered in patients with solid tumors. The frequencies of circulating granulocytemonocyte progenitors (GMPs) were increased four to seven fold in all types of tumors examined, and the circulating hematopoietic precursors exhibited myeloid bias with a skew toward granulocytic differentiation in patients with solid tumors. These myeloid precursors are selectively enriched in tumor tissues, and the high levels of circulating GMPs were positively correlated with disease progression. By using cord blood-derived CD34+ cells, we developed an in vitro short-term culture model to effectively induce the rapid generation of MDSCs. We found that, among the factors produced by various tumors, GM-CSF, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and IL-6 could not only promote the myeloid-biased differentiation, but also induce the differentiation of myeloid precursors into functional MDSCs. These findings suggest that the altered circulating HSPCs may serve as an important link between dysregulated bone marrow hematopoiesis and accumulated MDSCs in patients with cancer. PMID:24591638

  4. Proteomic Cornerstones of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation: Distinct Signatures of Multipotent Progenitors and Myeloid Committed Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Hansson, Jenny; Raffel, Simon; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Trumpp, Andreas; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative tissues such as the skin epidermis, the intestinal mucosa or the hematopoietic system are organized in a hierarchical manner with stem cells building the top of this hierarchy. Somatic stem cells harbor the highest self-renewal activity and generate a series of multipotent progenitors which differentiate into lineage committed progenitors and subsequently mature cells. In this report, we applied an in-depth quantitative proteomic approach to analyze and compare the full proteomes of ex vivo isolated and FACS-sorted populations highly enriched for either multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, LinnegSca-1+c-Kit+) or myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSca-1−c-Kit+). By employing stable isotope dimethyl labeling and high-resolution mass spectrometry, more than 5000 proteins were quantified. From biological triplicate experiments subjected to rigorous statistical evaluation, 893 proteins were found differentially expressed between multipotent and myeloid committed cells. The differential protein content in these cell populations points to a distinct structural organization of the cytoskeleton including remodeling activity. In addition, we found a marked difference in the expression of metabolic enzymes, including a clear shift of specific protein isoforms of the glycolytic pathway. Proteins involved in translation showed a collective higher expression in myeloid progenitors, indicating an increased translational activity. Strikingly, the data uncover a unique signature related to immune defense mechanisms, centering on the RIG-I and type-1 interferon response systems, which are installed in multipotent progenitors but not evident in myeloid committed cells. This suggests that specific, and so far unrecognized, mechanisms protect these immature cells before they mature. In conclusion, this study indicates that the transition of hematopoietic stem/progenitors toward myeloid commitment is accompanied by a profound change in processing of cellular resources, adding novel insights into the molecular mechanisms at the interface between multipotency and lineage commitment. PMID:22454540

  5. Hematopoietic Differentiation Is Required for Initiation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Min; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Henry; Koche, Richard; Staber, Philipp B; Cusan, Monica; Levantini, Elena; Welner, Robert S; Bach, Christian S; Zhang, Junyan; Krivtsov, Andrei V; Armstrong, Scott A; Tenen, Daniel G

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-associated oncogenes often arise in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and promote acquisition of leukemia stem cell (LSC) phenotypes. However, as LSCs often share features of lineage-restricted progenitors, the relative contribution of differentiation status to LSC transformation is unclear. Using murine MLL-AF9 and MOZ-TIF2 AML models, we show that myeloid differentiation to granulocyte macrophage progenitors (GMPs) is critical for LSC generation. Disrupting GMP formation by deleting the lineage-restricted transcription factor C/EBPa blocked normal granulocyte formation and prevented initiation of AML. However, restoring myeloid differentiation in C/EBPa mutants with inflammatory cytokines reestablished AML transformation capacity. Genomic analyses of GMPs, including gene expression and H3K79me2 profiling in conjunction with ATAC-seq, revealed a permissive genomic environment for activation of a minimal transcription program shared by GMPs and LSCs. Together, these findings show that myeloid differentiation is a prerequisite for LSC formation and AML development, providing insights for therapeutic development. PMID:26412561

  6. Alternative Donor Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kanakry, Christopher G; de Lima, Marcos J; Luznik, Leo

    2015-07-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) provides a potentially curative therapy for patients with high-risk or chemorefractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Historically, the applicability of alloHCT has been limited as only 30%-35% of patients have human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched siblings and outcomes using other donor types have been markedly inferior due to excess toxicity, graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and consequently non-relapse mortality. Advances in HLA typing, GVHD prophylactic approaches, and other transplantation techniques have successfully addressed these historical challenges. Herein, we review recent alloHCT studies using volunteer unrelated donors, umbilical cord blood units, or HLA-haploidentical donors, specifically focusing on studies that compared outcomes between donor sources. Although none are randomized and most are retrospective, these analyses suggest that current outcomes for AML patients using most alternative donor types are comparable to those seen using HLA-matched siblings. PMID:26111471

  7. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  8. Myeloid/natural killer cell precursor acute leukemia with tetraploidy.

    PubMed

    Dinol, Gna?; Palandz, Skr; Nalaci, Meliha; Uur, Ali; Bykaydin, Banu

    2005-12-01

    Myeloid/natural killer (NK) cell precursor acute leukemia is characterized by coexpression of myeloid and natural killer cell antigens and an aggressive clinical course. Here we report a case of myeloid/NK precursor acute leukemia in a 37-year-old woman. Clinical presentation was correlated with leukemic blast morphology, immunophenotype, and cytogenetic analysis. The patient had noted fever, weakness, purpura, peripheral lymphadenopathy, and moderate hepatosplenomegaly. Peripheral blood smears and bone marrow aspirate smears at presentation revealed blastic cells, which were generally L2 shaped, with variation in cell size, round to moderately irregular nuclei and prominent nucleoli, pale cytoplasm, and a lack of azurophilic granules. Immunophenotypic analysis of the blasts displayed coexpression of myeloid and natural killer cell antigens with relatively immature phenotype: CD7+, CD33+, CD34+, CD56+, CD57+, CD16-, MPO-. Cytogenetic analysis of marrow cells showed 62% of cells with a normal female karyotype; in the remaining 38%, tetraploid changes were detected, where the chromosome number was 92, with no preferential losses or gains of chromosomes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis revealed the same abnormality. The patient did not respond to chemotherapy (cytosine arabinoside and idarubicin) and died of a septic complication on the 34th day after admission. To our knowledge, this is the first description of tetraploidy in myeloid/NK cell precursor acute leukemia. PMID:16337859

  9. Inflammatory arthritis increases mouse osteoclast precursors with myeloid suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Charles, Julia F; Hsu, Lih-Yun; Niemi, Erene C; Weiss, Arthur; Aliprantis, Antonios O; Nakamura, Mary C

    2012-12-01

    Increased osteoclastic bone resorption leads to periarticular erosions and systemic osteoporosis in RA patients. Although a great deal is known about how osteoclasts differentiate from precursors and resorb bone, the identity of an osteoclast precursor (OCP) population in vivo and its regulatory role in RA remains elusive. Here, we report the identification of a CD11b(-/lo)Ly6C(hi) BM population with OCP activity in vitro and in vivo. These cells, which can be distinguished from previously characterized precursors in the myeloid lineage, display features of both M1 and M2 monocytes and expand in inflammatory arthritis models. Surprisingly, in one mouse model of RA (adoptive transfer of SKG arthritis), cotransfer of OCP with SKG CD4+ T cells diminished inflammatory arthritis. Similar to monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs), OCPs suppressed CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro through the production of NO. This study identifies a BM myeloid precursor population with osteoclastic and T cell-suppressive activity that is expanded in inflammatory arthritis. Therapeutic strategies that prevent the development of OCPs into mature bone-resorbing cells could simultaneously prevent bone resorption and generate an antiinflammatory milieu in the RA joint. PMID:23114597

  10. Transcriptome-wide Profiling and Posttranscriptional Analysis of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Differentiation toward Myeloid Commitment

    PubMed Central

    Klimmeck, Daniel; Cabezas-Wallscheid, Nina; Reyes, Alejandro; vonPaleske, Lisa; Renders, Simon; Hansson, Jenny; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Huber, Wolfgang; Trumpp, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cells possess lifelong self-renewal activity and generate multipotent progenitors that differentiate into lineage-committed and subsequently mature cells. We present a comparative transcriptome analysis of exvivo isolated mouse multipotent hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (LinnegSCA-1+c-KIT+) and myeloid committed precursors (LinnegSCA-1negc-KIT+). Our data display dynamic transcriptional networks and identify a stem/progenitor gene expression pattern that is characterized by cell adhesion and immune response components including kallikrein-related proteases. We identify 498 expressed lncRNAs, which are potential regulators of multipotency or lineage commitment. By integrating these transcriptome with our recently reported proteome data, we found evidence for posttranscriptional regulation of processes including metabolism and response to oxidative stress. Finally, our study identifies a high number of genes with transcript isoform regulation upon lineage commitment. This in-depth molecular analysis outlines the enormous complexity of expressed coding and noncoding RNAs and posttranscriptional regulation during the early differentiation steps of hematopoietic stem cells toward the myeloid lineage. PMID:25418729

  11. Vav promotes differentiation of human tumoral myeloid precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Brugnoli, Federica; Mischiati, Carlo; Sereni, Alessia; Bavelloni, Alberto; Carini, Cinzia; Capitani, Silvano . E-mail: cps@unife.it

    2005-05-15

    Vav is one of the genetic markers that correlate with the differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In T and B cells, it appears crucial for both development and functions, while, in non-lymphoid hematopoietic cells, Vav seems not involved in cell maturation, but rather in the response of mature cells to agonist-dependent proliferation and phagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that the amount and the tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav are up-regulated in both whole cells and nuclei of tumoral promyelocytes induced to granulocytic maturation by ATRA and that tyrosine-phosphorylated Vav does not display any ATRA-induced GEF activity but contributes to the regulation of PI 3-K activity. In this study, we report that Vav accumulates in nuclei of ATRA-treated APL-derived cells and that the down-modulation of Vav prevents differentiation of tumoral promyelocytes, indicating that it is a key molecule in ATRA-dependent myeloid maturation. On the other hand, the overexpression of Vav induces an increased expression of surface markers of granulocytic differentiation without affecting the maturation-related changes of the nuclear morphology. Consistent with an effect of Vav on the transcriptional machinery, array profiling shows that the inhibition of the Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of Vav reduces the number of ATRA-induced genes. Our data support the unprecedented notion that Vav plays crucial functions in the maturation process of myeloid cells, and suggest that Vav can be regarded as a potential target for the therapeutic treatment of myeloproliferative disorders.

  12. Tet2 loss leads to increased hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and myeloid transformation.

    PubMed

    Moran-Crusio, Kelly; Reavie, Linsey; Shih, Alan; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Ndiaye-Lobry, Delphine; Lobry, Camille; Figueroa, Maria E; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Patel, Jay; Zhao, Xinyang; Perna, Fabiana; Pandey, Suveg; Madzo, Jozef; Song, Chunxiao; Dai, Qing; He, Chuan; Ibrahim, Sherif; Beran, Miloslav; Zavadil, Jiri; Nimer, Stephen D; Melnick, Ari; Godley, Lucy A; Aifantis, Iannis; Levine, Ross L

    2011-07-12

    Somatic loss-of-function mutations in the ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) gene occur in a significant proportion of patients with myeloid malignancies. Although there are extensive genetic data implicating TET2 mutations in myeloid transformation, the consequences of Tet2 loss in hematopoietic development have not been delineated. We report here an animal model of conditional Tet2 loss in the hematopoietic compartment that leads to increased stem cell self-renewal in vivo as assessed by competitive transplant assays. Tet2 loss leads to a progressive enlargement of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment and eventual myeloproliferation in vivo, including splenomegaly, monocytosis, and extramedullary hematopoiesis. In addition, Tet2(+/-) mice also displayed increased stem cell self-renewal and extramedullary hematopoiesis, suggesting that Tet2 haploinsufficiency contributes to hematopoietic transformation in vivo. PMID:21723200

  13. Characterization of the Murine Myeloid Precursor Cell Line MuMac-E8

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Stephan; Riemschneider, Sina; Kohlschmidt, Janine; Hilger, Nadja; Fueldner, Christiane; Knauer, Jens; Sack, Ulrich; Emmrich, Frank; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Starting point for the present work was the assumption that the cell line MuMac-E8 represents a murine cell population with stem cell properties. Preliminary studies already pointed to the expression of stem-cell associated markers and a self-regenerative potential of the cells. The cell line MuMac-E8 should be examined for their differential stage within stem cell hierarchy. MuMac-E8 cells were derived from a chimeric mouse model of arthritis. It could be shown that MuMac-E8 cells express mRNA of some genes associated with pluripotent stem cells (Nanog, Nucleostemin), of genes for hematopoietic markers (EPCR, Sca-1, CD11b, CD45), for the mesenchymal marker CD105 and of genes for the neural markers Pax-6 and Ezrin. In methylcellulose and May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining, hematopoietic colonies were obtained but the hematopoietic system of lethally irradiated mice could not be rescued. Osteogenic differentiation was not detectable. Thus, it became evident that MuMac-E8 represents not a stem cell line. However, MuMac-E8 cells expressed several myeloid surface markers (i.e. CD11b, F4/80, CD14, CD64), showed phagocytosis and is capable of producing nitric oxide. Thus, this cell line seems to be arrested an advanced stage of myeloid differentiation. Adherence data measured by impedance-based real-time cell analysis together with cell morphology data suggested that MuMac-E8 represents a new macrophage precursor cell line exhibiting weak adherence. This cell line is suitable as an in-vitro model for testing of macrophage functions. Moreover, it might be also useful for differentiation or reprogramming studies. PMID:25546418

  14. Systematic analysis of hematopoietic gene expression profiles for prognostic prediction in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Varn, Frederick S.; Andrews, Erik H.; Cheng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic disorder initiated by the leukemogenic transformation of myeloid cells into leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Preexisting gene expression programs in LSCs can be used to assess their transcriptional similarity to hematopoietic cell types. While this relationship has previously been examined on a small scale, an analysis that systematically investigates this relationship throughout the hematopoietic hierarchy has yet to be implemented. We developed an integrative approach to assess the similarity between AML patient tumor profiles and a collection of 232 murine hematopoietic gene expression profiles compiled by the Immunological Genome Project. The resulting lineage similarity scores (LSS) were correlated with patient survival to assess the relationship between hematopoietic similarity and patient prognosis. This analysis demonstrated that patient tumor similarity to immature hematopoietic cell types correlated with poor survival. As a proof of concept, we highlighted one cell type identified by our analysis, the short-term reconstituting stem cell, whose LSSs were significantly correlated with patient prognosis across multiple datasets, and showed distinct patterns in patients stratified by traditional clinical variables. Finally, we validated our use of murine profiles by demonstrating similar results when applying our method to human profiles. PMID:26598031

  15. Successful Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in a Patient With X-linked Agammaglobulinemia and Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F.; Chernin, Leah R.; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2016-01-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19+ B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient’s leukemia. PMID:25900577

  16. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia. PMID:25900577

  17. Overexpression of HOXA10 in murine hematopoietic cells perturbs both myeloid and lymphoid differentiation and leads to acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Thorsteinsdottir, U; Sauvageau, G; Hough, M R; Dragowska, W; Lansdorp, P M; Lawrence, H J; Largman, C; Humphries, R K

    1997-01-01

    Multiple members of the A, B, and C clusters of Hox genes are expressed in hematopoietic cells. Several of these Hox genes have been found to display distinctive expression patterns, with genes located at the 3' side of the clusters being expressed at their highest levels in the most primitive subpopulation of human CD34+ bone marrow cells and genes located at the 5' end having a broader range of expression, with downregulation at later stages of hematopoietic differentiation. To explore if these patterns reflect different functional activities, we have retrovirally engineered the overexpression of a 5'-located gene, HOXA10, in murine bone marrow cells and demonstrate effects strikingly different from those induced by overexpression of a 3'-located gene, HOXB4. In contrast to HOXB4, which causes selective expansion of primitive hematopoietic cells without altering their differentiation, overexpression of HOXA10 profoundly perturbed myeloid and B-lymphoid differentiation. The bone marrow of mice reconstituted with HOXA10-transduced bone marrow cells contained in high frequency a unique progenitor cell with megakaryocytic colony-forming ability and was virtually devoid of unilineage macrophage and pre-B-lymphoid progenitor cells derived from the transduced cells. Moreover, and again in contrast to HOXB4, a significant proportion of HOXA10 mice developed a transplantable acute myeloid leukemia with a latency of 19 to 50 weeks. These results thus add to recognition of Hox genes as important regulators of hematopoiesis and provide important new evidence of Hox gene-specific functions that may correlate with their normal expression pattern. PMID:8972230

  18. Type II Interferon Promotes Differentiation of Myeloid-Biased Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matatall, Katie A.; Shen, Ching-Chieh; Challen, Grant A.; King, Katherine Y.

    2014-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) promotes cell division of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) without affecting the total HSC number. We postulated that IFNγ stimulates differentiation of HSCs as part of the innate immune response. Here we report that type II interferon signaling is required, both at baseline and during an animal model of LCMV infection, to maintain normal myeloid development. By separately evaluating myeloid-biased and lymphoid-biased HSC subtypes, we found that myeloid-biased HSCs express higher levels of IFNγ receptor and are specifically activated to divide after recombinant IFNγ exposure in vivo. HSCs show increased expression of the transcription factor C/EBPβ after infection. Furthermore, myeloid-biased HSCs are transiently depleted from the marrow during the Type II interferon-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium avium infection, as measured both functionally and phenotypically. These findings indicate that IFNγ selectively promotes differentiation of myeloid-biased HSCs during an innate immune response to infection. This represents the first report of a context and a mechanism for discriminate utilization of the alternate HSC subtypes. Terminal differentiation, at the expense of self-renewal, may compromise HSC populations during states of chronic inflammation. PMID:25078851

  19. Type II interferon promotes differentiation of myeloid-biased hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Matatall, Katie A; Shen, Ching-Chieh; Challen, Grant A; King, Katherine Y

    2014-11-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) promotes cell division of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) without affecting the total HSC number. We postulated that IFNγ stimulates differentiation of HSCs as part of the innate immune response. Here, we report that type II interferon signaling is required, both at baseline and during an animal model of LCMV infection, to maintain normal myeloid development. By separately evaluating myeloid-biased and lymphoid-biased HSC subtypes, we found that myeloid-biased HSCs express higher levels of IFNγ receptor and are specifically activated to divide after recombinant IFNγ exposure in vivo. While both HSC subtypes show increased expression of the transcription factor C/EBPβ after infection, only the myeloid-biased HSCs are transiently depleted from the marrow during the type II interferon-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium avium infection, as measured both functionally and phenotypically. These findings indicate that IFNγ selectively permits differentiation of myeloid-biased HSCs during an innate immune response to infection. This represents the first report of a context and a mechanism for discriminate utilization of the alternate HSC subtypes. Terminal differentiation, at the expense of self-renewal, may compromise HSC populations during states of chronic inflammation. PMID:25078851

  20. Erythro-Myeloid Progenitors: definitive hematopoiesis in the conceptus prior to the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Frame, Jenna M.; McGrath, Kathleen E.; Palis, James

    2013-01-01

    Erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMP) serve as a major source of hematopoiesis in the developing conceptus prior to the formation of a permanent blood system. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the emergence, fate, and potential of this hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-independent wave of hematopoietic progenitors, focusing on the murine embryo as a model system. A better understanding of the temporal and spatial control of hematopoietic emergence in the embryo will ultimately improve our ability to derive hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to serve therapeutic purposes. PMID:24095199

  1. B-myb is an essential regulator of hematopoietic stem cell and myeloid progenitor cell development

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stacey J.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Lieu, Yen K.; John, Premila; Reddy, M. V. Ramana; Chen, Edward Y.; Duan, Qiaonan; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Reddy, E. Premkumar

    2014-01-01

    The B-myb (MYBL2) gene is a member of the MYB family of transcription factors and is involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and maintenance of genomic integrity. However, its function during adult development and hematopoiesis is unknown. We show here that conditional inactivation of B-myb in vivo results in depletion of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) pool, leading to profound reductions in mature lymphoid, erythroid, and myeloid cells. This defect is autonomous to the bone marrow and is first evident in stem cells, which accumulate in the S and G2/M phases. B-myb inactivation also causes defects in the myeloid progenitor compartment, consisting of depletion of common myeloid progenitors but relative sparing of granulocyte–macrophage progenitors. Microarray studies indicate that B-myb–null LSK+ cells differentially express genes that direct myeloid lineage development and commitment, suggesting that B-myb is a key player in controlling cell fate. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that B-myb is essential for HSC and progenitor maintenance and survival during hematopoiesis. PMID:24516162

  2. Strategies to Reduce Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mawad, Raya; Lionberger, Jack M.; Pagel, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is expected to increase in conjunction with our ageing population. Although it is proving to be a heterogeneous disease process, the only treatment with proven survival benefit for poor risk AML remains allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant. Although this is presumed to be a curative strategy, many patients relapse after transplant, prompting us to examine various ways that we can improve outcomes. These efforts involve every step of AML diagnostics and therapy, including the intricate processes of conditioning, graft manipulation and immunomodulation. The hope is that improvement in these steps will ultimately improve survival and decrease relapse rates for AML patients after transplant. PMID:23456518

  3. Hematopoietic Reprogramming In Vitro Informs In Vivo Identification of Hemogenic Precursors to Definitive Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Chang, Betty; Gomes, Andreia; Bernitz, Jeffrey; Papatsenko, Dmitri; Niu, Xiaohong; Swiers, Gemma; Azzoni, Emanuele; de Bruijn, Marella F T R; Schaniel, Christoph; Lemischka, Ihor R; Moore, Kateri A

    2016-03-01

    Definitive hematopoiesis emerges via an endothelial-to-hematopoietic transition in the embryo and placenta; however, the precursor cells to hemogenic endothelium are not defined phenotypically. We previously demonstrated that the induction of hematopoietic progenitors from fibroblasts progresses through hemogenic precursors that are Prom1(+)Sca1(+)CD34(+)CD45(-) (PS34CD45(-)). Guided by these studies, we analyzed mouse placentas and identified a population with this phenotype. These cells express endothelial markers, are heterogeneous for early hematopoietic markers, and localize to the vascular labyrinth. Remarkably, global gene expression profiles of PS34CD45(-) cells correlate with reprogrammed precursors and establish a hemogenic precursor cell molecular signature. PS34CD45(-) cells are also present in intra-embryonic hemogenic sites. After stromal co-culture, PS34CD45(-) cells give rise to all blood lineages and engraft primary and secondary immunodeficient mice. In summary, we show that reprogramming reveals a phenotype for in vivo precursors to hemogenic endothelium, establishing that direct in vitro conversion informs developmental processes in vivo. PMID:26954547

  4. Induction of multipotential hematopoietic progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells via re-specification of lineage-restricted precursors

    PubMed Central

    Doulatov, Sergei; Vo, Linda T.; Chou, Stephanie S.; Kim, Peter G.; Arora, Natasha; Li, Hu; Hadland, Brandon K.; Bernstein, Irwin D.; Collins, James J.; Zon, Leonard I.; Daley, George Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent a promising source of patient-specific cells for disease modeling, drug screens, and cellular therapies. However, the inability to derive engraftable human hematopoietic stem and progenitor (HSPCs) has limited their characterization to in vitro assays. We report a strategy to re-specify lineage-restricted CD34+CD45+ myeloid precursors derived from hPSCs into multilineage progenitors that can be expanded in vitro and engraft in vivo. HOXA9, ERG, and RORA conferred self-renewal and multilineage potential in vitro and maintained primitive CD34+CD38− cells. Screening cells via transplantation revealed that two additional factors, SOX4 and MYB, were required for engraftment. Progenitors specified with all five factors gave rise to reproducible short-term engraftment with myeloid and erythroid lineages. Erythroid precursors underwent hemoglobin switching in vivo, silencing embryonic and activating adult globin expression. Our combinatorial screening approach establishes a strategy for obtaining transcription factor-mediated engraftment of blood progenitors from human pluripotent cells. PMID:24094326

  5. Clonal evolution of preleukemic hematopoietic stem cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Stephen M; Kokkaliaris, Konstantinos D; Milsom, Michael D; Levine, Ross L; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive blood cancer that results from an abnormal expansion of uncontrollably proliferating myeloid progenitors that have lost the capacity to differentiate. AML encompasses many genetically distinct subtypes that predominantly develop de novo. However, AML can also arise from premalignant myeloid conditions, such as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), or develop as the result of exposure to genotoxic agents used to treat unrelated malignancies. Although numerous distinct cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities associated with AML were discovered prior to the turn of the millennium, recent advances in whole genome sequencing and global genomic approaches have resulted in an explosion of newly identified molecular abnormalities. However, even with these advances, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to the etiology, pathogenesis, and therapeutic responses of AML remains largely unknown. Recently the International Society for Experimental Hematology (ISEH) hosted a webinar entitled "Clonal Evolution of Pre-Leukemic Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in AML" in which two AML mavens, Ross Levine, MD, and Ravindra Majeti, MD, PhD, discussed some of their recent, groundbreaking studies that have shed light on how many of these newly identified mutations contribute to leukemogenesis and therapy resistance in AML. Here, we provide a brief overview of this webinar and discuss the basic scientific and clinical implications of the data presented. PMID:26455528

  6. Membrane-bound human SCF/KL promotes in vivo human hematopoietic engraftment and myeloid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Shinsuke; Saito, Yoriko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Watanabe, Takashi; Hasegawa, Takanori; Mochizuki, Shinobu; Kunisawa, Jun; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Ohara, Osamu; Saito, Takashi; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, advances in the humanized mouse system have led to significantly increased levels of human hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment. The remaining limitations in human HSC engraftment and function include lymphoid-skewed differentiation and inefficient myeloid development in the recipients. Limited human HSC function may partially be attributed to the inability of the host mouse microenvironment to provide sufficient support to human hematopoiesis. To address this problem, we created membrane-bound human stem cell factor (SCF)/KIT ligand (KL)–expressing NOD/SCID/IL2rgKO (hSCF Tg NSG) mice. hSCF Tg NSG recipients of human HSCs showed higher levels of both human CD45+ cell engraftment and human CD45+CD33+ myeloid development compared with NSG recipients. Expression of hSCF/hKL accelerated the differentiation of the human granulocyte lineage cells in the recipient bone marrow. Human mast cells were identified in bone marrow, spleen, and gastrointestinal tissues of the hSCF Tg NSG recipients. This novel in vivo humanized mouse model demonstrates the essential role of membrane-bound hSCF in human myeloid development. Moreover, the hSCF Tg NSG humanized recipients may facilitate investigation of in vivo differentiation, migration, function, and pathology of human mast cells. PMID:22279057

  7. (Lymph)angiogenic influences on hematopoietic cells in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Kim, Hee-Je

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the effect of (lymph)angiogenic cytokines on hematopoietic cells involved in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Like angiogenesis, lymphangiogenesis occurs in pathophysiological conditions but not in healthy adults. AML is closely associated with the vasculature system, and the interplay between lymphangiogenic cytokines maintains leukemic blast survival in the bone marrow (BM). Once AML is induced, proangiogenic cytokines function as angiogenic or lymphangiogenic factors and affect hematopoietic cells, including BM-derived immune cells. Simultaneously, the representative cytokines, VEGFs and their receptors are expressed on AML blasts in vascular and osteoblast niches in both the BM and the peripheral circulation. After exposure to (lymph)angiogenic cytokines in leukemogenesis and infiltration, immune cell phenotypes and functions are affected. These dynamic behaviors in the BM reflect the clinical features of AML. In this review, we note the importance of lymphangiogenic factors and their receptors in hematopoietic cells in AML. Understanding the functional characterization of (lymph)angiogenic factors in the BM niche in AML will also be helpful in interrupting the engraftment of leukemic stem cells and for enhancing immune cell function by modulating the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25412683

  8. Enhanced Generation of Myeloid Lineages in Hematopoietic Differentiation from Embryonic Stem Cells by Silencing Transcriptional Repressor Twist-2

    PubMed Central

    Sharabi, Andrew B.; Lee, Sung-Hyung; Goodell, Margaret A.; Huang, Xue F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The self-renewal and multilineage differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) is largely governed by transcription factors or repressors. Extensive efforts have focused on elucidating critical factors that control the differentiation of specific cell lineages, for instance, myeloid lineages in hematopoietic development. In this study, we found that Twist-2, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, plays a critical role in inhibiting the differentiation of ESC. Murine ES cells, in which Twist-2 expression is silenced by lentivirally delivered shRNA, exhibit an enhanced formation of primary embryoid bodies (EB) and enhanced differentiation into mesodermally derived hematopoietic colonies. Furthermore, Twist-2 silenced (LV-siTwist-2) ESC display significantly increased generation of myeloid lineages (Gr-1+ and F4/80+ cells) during in vitro hematopoietic differentiation. Treatment with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 ligand synergistically stimulates the generation of primary EB formation as well as of hematopoietic progenitors differentiated from LV-siTwist-2 ES cells. Thus, this study reveals the critical role of the transcriptional repressor Twist-2 in regulating the development of myeloid lineage in hematopoietic differentiation from ESC. This study also suggests a potential strategy for directional differentiation of ESC by inhibiting a transcriptional repressor. PMID:20025523

  9. Functional Niche Competition Between Normal Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells and Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Glait-Santar, Chen; Desmond, Ronan; Feng, Xingmin; Bat, Taha; Chen, Jichun; Heuston, Elisabeth; Mizukawa, Benjamin; Mulloy, James C; Bodine, David M; Larochelle, Andre; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) reside in a specialized niche that regulates their proliferative capacity and their fate. There is increasing evidence for similar roles of marrow niches on controlling the behavior of leukemic cells; however, whether normal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) and leukemic cells reside in or functionally compete for the same marrow niche is unclear. We used the mixed lineage leukemia-AF9 (MLL-AF9) murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a competitive repopulation model to investigate whether normal HSPC and leukemic cells functionally compete for the same marrow niches. Irradiated recipient mice were transplanted with fixed numbers of MLL-AF9 cells mixed with increasing doses of normal syngeneic whole bone marrow (WBM) or with purified HSPC (LSK). Survival was significantly increased and leukemic progression was delayed proportional to increasing doses of normal WBM or normal LSK cells in multiple independent experiments, with all doses of WBM or LSK cells studied above the threshold for rapid and complete hematopoietic reconstitution in the absence of leukemia. Confocal microscopy demonstrated nests of either leukemic cells or normal hematopoietic cells but not both in the marrow adjacent to endosteum. Early following transplantation, leukemic cells from animals receiving lower LSK doses were cycling more actively than in those receiving higher doses. These results suggest that normal HSPC and AML cells compete for the same functional niche. Manipulation of the niche could impact on response to antileukemic therapies, and the numbers of normal HSPC could impact on leukemia outcome, informing approaches to cell dose in the context of stem cell transplantation. Stem Cells 2015;33:3635-3642. PMID:26388434

  10. Impact of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant in patients with myeloid neoplasms carrying spliceosomal mutations.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Betty Ky; Visconte, Valeria; Jia, Xuefei; Tabarroki, Ali; Makishima, Hideki; Hasrouni, Edy; Abounader, Donna; Kalaycio, Matt; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Sobecks, Ronald; Duong Liu, Hien; Bolwell, Brian; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Copelan, Edward; Tiu, Ramon V

    2016-06-01

    Molecular predictors of outcome are increasingly important in determining optimal therapy for myeloid neoplasms. Mutations in the spliceosomal genes (U2AF1 and SRSF2) predict for poor outcomes in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and related diseases. We investigated the effect of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) on the negative prognostic impact of U2AF1 and SRSF2 mutations. In total, 122 patients with MDS (30%), acute myeloid leukemia (51%), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) (11%), and MDS/MPN (8%) receiving a HCT from 2003 to 2012 were evaluated for mutations in U2AF1 and SRSF2 by direct sequencing. Median time of follow up was 24 months (range 0.46-110). SRSF2 mutations were detected in 11 (10%) patients and U2AF1 in 3 (3%) patients. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between mutated and wild-type (WT) patients. Patients carrying SRSF2 and U2AF1 mutations had similar overall survival (P = 0.84), relapse mortality (P = 0.50), and non-relapse mortality (P = 0.72) compared to WT patients. However, taking into account disease status and cytogenetics in a subset of AML patients, SRSF2 and U2AF1 mutations were associated with worse survival (HR 3.71, P = 0.035). Am. J. Hematol. 91:406-409, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26799334

  11. Hematopoietic cell crisis: An early stage of evolving myeloid leukemia following radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1990-01-01

    Under select radiological conditions, chronic radiation exposure elicits a high incidence of myeloproliferative disease, principally myeloid leukemia (ML), in beagles. Previously we demonstrated that for full ML expression, a four-stage preclinical sequence is required, namely (1) suppression, (2) recovery, (3) accommodation, and (4) preleukemic transition. Within this pathological sequence, a critical early event has been identified as the acquisition of radioresistance by hematopoietic progenitors that serves to mediate a newfound regenerative hematopoietic capacity. As such, this event sets the stage'' for preleukemic progression by initiating progression from preclinical phase 1 to 2. Due to the nature of target cell suppression, the induction of crisis, and the outgrowth of progenitors with altered phenotypes, this preleukemic event resembles the immortalization'' step of the in vitro transformation sequence following induction with either physical and chemical carcinogens. The radiological, temporal, and biological dictates governing this event have been extensively evaluated and will be discussed in light of their role in the induction and progression of chronic radiation leukemia. 35 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Acute myeloid leukemia is associated with retroviral gene transfer to hematopoietic progenitor cells in a rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Seggewiss, Ruth; Pittaluga, Stefania; Adler, Rima L.; Guenaga, F. Javier; Ferguson, Cole; Pilz, Ingo H.; Ryu, Byoung; Sorrentino, Brian P.; Young, W. Scott; Donahue, Robert E.; von Kalle, Christof; Nienhuis, Arthur W.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2006-01-01

    We report, for the first time, a replication-defective retroviral vectorassociated neoplasia in a nonhuman primate. Five years after transplantation with CD34+ cells transduced with a retroviral vector expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and a drug-resistant variant of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (L22Y), a rhesus macaque developed a fatal myeloid sarcoma, a type of acute myeloid leukemia. Tumor cells contained 2 clonal vector insertions. One insertion was found in BCL2-A1, an antiapoptotic gene. This event suggests that currently available retroviral vectors may have long-term side effects, particularly in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:16439674

  13. Acute myeloid leukemia is associated with retroviral gene transfer to hematopoietic progenitor cells in a rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Seggewiss, Ruth; Pittaluga, Stefania; Adler, Rima L; Guenaga, F Javier; Ferguson, Cole; Pilz, Ingo H; Ryu, Byoung; Sorrentino, Brian P; Young, W Scott; Donahue, Robert E; von Kalle, Christof; Nienhuis, Arthur W; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2006-05-15

    We report, for the first time, a replication-defective retroviral vector-associated neoplasia in a nonhuman primate. Five years after transplantation with CD34+ cells transduced with a retroviral vector expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and a drug-resistant variant of the dihydrofolate reductase gene (L22Y), a rhesus macaque developed a fatal myeloid sarcoma, a type of acute myeloid leukemia. Tumor cells contained 2 clonal vector insertions. One insertion was found in BCL2-A1, an antiapoptotic gene. This event suggests that currently available retroviral vectors may have long-term side effects, particularly in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:16439674

  14. JunB protects against myeloid malignancies by limiting hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and differentiation without affecting self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Marianne; Schepers, Koen; King, Bryan; Sabnis, Amit J.; Forsberg, E. Camilla; Attema, Joanne L.; Braun, Benjamin S.; Passegué, Emmanuelle

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Loss of the JunB/AP-1 transcription factor induces a myeloproliferative disease (MPD) arising from the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment. Now we show that JunB inactivation deregulates the cell cycle machinery and increases the proliferation of long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) without impairing their self-renewal or regenerative potential in vivo. We found that JunB loss destabilizes a complex network of genes and pathways that normally limit myeloid differentiation, leading to impaired responsiveness to both Notch and TGF-β signaling due, in part, to transcriptional deregulation of the Hes1 gene. These results demonstrate that LT-HSC proliferation and differentiation are uncoupled from self-renewal, and establish some of the mechanisms by which JunB normally limits the production of myeloid progenitors hence preventing initiation of myeloid malignancies. PMID:19345332

  15. PRIMITIVE ADULT HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS CAN FUNCTION AS OSTEOBLAST PRECURSORS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteoblasts are continually recruited from stem cell pools to maintain bone. Although their immediate precursor is a plastic-adherent mesenchymal stem cell able to generate tissues other than bone, increasing evidence suggests the existence of a more primitive cell that can differentiate to both hem...

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions.

    PubMed

    Kanate, Abraham S; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-04-26

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion. PMID:24772235

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for acute myeloid leukemia: Current state in 2013 and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kanate, Abraham S; Pasquini, Marcelo C; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents a heterogeneous group of high-grade myeloid neoplasms of the elderly with variable outcomes. Though remission-induction is an important first step in the management of AML, additional treatment strategies are essential to ensure long-term disease-free survival. Recent pivotal advances in understanding the genetics and molecular biology of AML have allowed for a risk-adapted approach in its management based on relapse-risk. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents an effective therapeutic strategy in AML providing the possibility of cure with potent graft-versus-leukemia reactions, with a demonstrable survival advantage in younger patients with intermediate- or poor-risk cytogenetics. Herein we review the published data regarding the role of allo-HCT in adults with AML. We searched MEDLINE/PubMed and EMBASE/Ovid. In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings and ongoing trial databases. We discuss the role of allo-HCT in AML patients stratified by cytogenetic- and molecular-risk in first complete remission, as well as allo-HCT as an option in relapsed/refractory AML. Besides the conventional sibling and unrelated donor allografts, we review the available data and recent advances for alternative donor sources such as haploidentical grafts and umbilical cord blood. We also discuss conditioning regimens, including reduced intensity conditioning which has broadened the applicability of allo-HCT. Finally we explore recent advances and future possibilities and directions of allo-HCT in AML. Practical therapeutic recommendations have been made where possible based on available data and expert opinion. PMID:24772235

  18. Hematopoietic cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia in the age of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Edward A; Grunwald, Michael R; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Plesca, Dragos; Trivedi, Jigar; Avalos, Belinda R

    2015-03-01

    The development and widespread use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has relegated the use of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), in most countries, to chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients who fail or are intolerant to TKIs. Its long-term cost effectiveness compared to TKIs, however, has maintained its use as front-line treatment in some areas. Advances in HCT, including the development of intravenous busulfan and plasma assays permitting dose adjustment, have improved results of HCT in CML. Improved supportive care has lowered the incidence of non-relapse mortality and improved survival. The availability of reduced-intensity preparative regimens, molecular typing of unrelated donors, and the use of cord blood and haploidentical donors has expanded the application of HCT to nearly any patient with an appropriate indication. From 2006 to 2010, approximately one thousand HCTs were performed annually in patients with CML. Better understanding of recent advances will improve the appropriate use and results of HCT in patients with CML. PMID:25828525

  19. Impact of prior imatinib mesylate on the outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Manisha; Wang, Tao; Giralt, Sergio A.; Szer, Jeffrey; Arora, Mukta; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Cervantes, Francisco; Champlin, Richard E.; Gale, Robert Peter; Halter, Joerg; Keating, Armand; Marks, David I.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Olavarria, Eduardo; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Abecasis, Manuel; Gupta, Vikas; Khoury, H. Jean; George, Biju; Hale, Gregory A.; Liesveld, Jane L.; Rizzieri, David A.; Antin, Joseph H.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Carabasi, Matthew H.; Copelan, Edward; Ilhan, Osman; Litzow, Mark R.; Schouten, Harold C.; Zander, Axel R.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Maziarz, Richard T.

    2008-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM, Gleevec) has largely supplanted allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as first line therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Nevertheless, many people with CML eventually undergo HCT, raising the question of whether prior IM therapy impacts HCT success. Data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research on 409 subjects treated with IM before HCT (IM+) and 900 subjects who did not receive IM before HCT (IM−) were analyzed. Among patients in first chronic phase, IM therapy before HCT was associated with better survival but no statistically significant differences in treatment-related mortality, relapse, and leukemia-free survival. Better HLA-matched donors, use of bone marrow, and transplantation within one year of diagnosis were also associated with better survival. A matched-pairs analysis was performed and confirmed a higher survival rate among first chronic phase patients receiving IM. Among patients transplanted with advanced CML, use of IM before HCT was not associated with treatment-related mortality, relapse, leukemia-free survival, or survival. Acute graft-versus-host disease rates were similar between IM+ and IM− groups regardless of leukemia phase. These results should be reassuring to patients receiving IM before HCT. PMID:18664621

  20. Risk Assessment before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Older Adults with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sorror, Mohamed L.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) most commonly affects patients older than 60 years. Outcomes of treatment of older AML patients have been poor. The advent of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens made allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) an available treatment option with curative intent for older AML patients. Because older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, little is known about the stratification of their risks before allogeneic HCT. While recent studies of RIC and allogeneic HCT have shown little impact of age on outcomes, other variables such as the recipient health status and the AML disease status and chromosomal aberrations have proven to be of prognostic significance. Here, we review recent studies of allogeneic HCT for older patients with AML with detailed evaluation of risk factors for relapse as well as non-relapse mortality. We have integrated the currently available information on transplant risks into a five-category risk-benefit system that could aid in the decision-making in this patient population. PMID:24083472

  1. Immune mediated autologous cytotoxicity against hematopoietic precursor cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; Westers, Theresia M.; van Dreunen, Linda; Groenland, Judith; Zevenbergen, Adri; Eeltink, Corien M.; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.

    2009-01-01

    Background An activated immune system has been observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome but its exact contribution to disease development and control is not fully clarified. On the one hand an activated and skewed T-cell repertoire has been reported, but on the other hand, decreased natural killer cell function has been found. Immune activation could reflect undesired autoimmune reactions against normal hematopoietic precursor cells as well as effective immune-surveillance against dysplastic clones. Design and Methods We have investigated immune effector cells (lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte activation markers, and natural killer cells) of 40 low and intermediate risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients and compared them to those of 10 age-matched healthy donors. Furthermore, we have analyzed the cytotoxic capacity of effector cells against autologous bone marrow hematopoietic precursor cells of 8 myelodysplastic syndrome patients and 2 healthy donors. Results In myelodysplastic syndrome patients, we have found an activated state of lymphocytes, determined by increased percentages of effector T cells with cytotoxic profile, more skewing of the T-cell receptor Vβ (TCR-Vβ) repertoire, and decreased frequencies of regulatory T cells, when compared to healthy donors. The percentage of natural killer cells did not differ between myelodysplastic syndrome patients and healthy donors, but natural killer cells of myelodysplastic syndrome patients expressed increased levels of granzyme B. Finally, we have demonstrated non-MHC restricted autologous cytotoxicity up to 90% against aberrant hematopoietic precursor cells, presumably mediated by natural killer cells. Conclusions Our data point to a role for active immune-surveillance in myelodysplastic syndrome, as demonstrated by activated T cells and TCR-Vß skewing. Autologous cytotoxicity against hematopoietic precursor cells was natural killer cell dependent, which points to an additional role for the innate immune system in immune-surveillance of myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:19229054

  2. Nonmyeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gyurkocza, Boglarka; Storb, Rainer; Storer, Barry E.; Chauncey, Thomas R.; Lange, Thoralf; Shizuru, Judith A.; Langston, Amelia A.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B.; Maris, Michael B.; Agura, Edward; Yeager, Andrew; Bethge, Wolfgang; Sahebi, Firoozeh; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Maloney, David G.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after high-dose conditioning regimens imposes prohibitively high risks of morbidity and mortality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are older or have comorbid conditions. Here, we examined outcomes after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT in such patients. Patients and Methods Two hundred seventy-four patients (median age, 60 years) with de novo or secondary AML underwent allogeneic HCT from related (n = 118) or unrelated donors (n = 156) after conditioning with 2 Gy of total-body irradiation (TBI) with or without fludarabine. A calcineurin inhibitor and mycophenolate mofetil were used for postgrafting immunosuppression. Results With a median follow-up of 38 months in surviving patients, the estimated overall survival at 5 years was 33%. The estimated 5-year relapse/progression and nonrelapse mortality rates were 42% and 26%, respectively. The cumulative incidences of grades 2, 3, and 4 acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were 38%, 9%, and 5%, respectively. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD at 5 years was 44%. Patients in first and second complete remission had better survival rates than patients with more advanced disease (37% and 34% v 18%, respectively). Patients with HLA-matched related or unrelated donors had similar survivals. Unfavorable cytogenetic risk status was associated with increased relapse and subsequent mortality. Chronic GVHD was associated with lower relapse risk. Conclusion Allogeneic HCT from related or unrelated donors after conditioning with low-dose TBI and fludarabine, relying almost exclusively on graft-versus-leukemia effects, can result in long-term remissions in older or medically infirm patients with AML. PMID:20439626

  3. Extracellular vesicle miR-7977 is involved in hematopoietic dysfunction of mesenchymal stromal cells via poly(rC) binding protein 1 reduction in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Hiroto; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Shohei; Yoshida, Masahiro; Murata, Masaki; Murase, Kazuyuki; Iyama, Satoshi; Takada, Kohichi; Sato, Tsutomu; Ono, Kaoru; Hashimoto, Akari; Tatekoshi, Ayumi; Kamihara, Yusuke; Kawano, Yutaka; Miyanishi, Koji; Sawada, Norimasa; Kato, Junji

    2016-04-01

    The failure of normal hematopoiesis is observed in myeloid neoplasms. However, the precise mechanisms governing the replacement of normal hematopoietic stem cells in their niche by myeloid neoplasm stem cells have not yet been clarified. Primary acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome cells induced aberrant expression of multiple hematopoietic factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 in mesenchymal stem cells even in non-contact conditions, and this abnormality was reverted by extracellular vesicle inhibition. Importantly, the transfer of myeloid neoplasm-derived extracellular vesicles reduced the hematopoietic supportive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells. Analysis of extracellular vesicle microRNA indicated that several species, including miR-7977 from acute myeloid leukemia cells, were higher than those from normal CD34(+)cells. Remarkably, the copy number of miR-7977 in bone marrow interstitial fluid was elevated not only in acute myeloid leukemia, but also in myelodysplastic syndrome, as compared with lymphoma without bone marrow localization. The transfection of the miR-7977 mimic reduced the expression of the posttranscriptional regulator, poly(rC) binding protein 1, in mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, the miR-7977 mimic induced aberrant reduction of hematopoietic growth factors in mesenchymal stem cells, resulting in decreased hematopoietic-supporting capacity of bone marrow CD34(+)cells. Furthermore, the reduction of hematopoietic growth factors including Jagged-1, stem cell factor and angiopoietin-1 were reverted by target protection of poly(rC) binding protein 1, suggesting that poly(rC) binding protein 1 could be involved in the stabilization of several growth factors. Thus, miR-7977 in extracellular vesicles may be a critical factor that induces failure of normal hematopoiesis via poly(rC) binding protein 1 suppression. PMID:26802051

  4. Human blood-mobilized hematopoietic precursors differentiate into osteoclasts in the absence of stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Matayoshi, A; Brown, C; DiPersio, J F; Haug, J; Abu-Amer, Y; Liapis, H; Kuestner, R; Pacifici, R

    1996-01-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is a complex process that is facilitated by bone marrow stromal cells (SCs). To determine if SCs are an absolute requirement for the differentiation of human hematopoietic precursors into fully mature, osteoclasts (OCs), CD34+ cells were mobilized into the peripheral circulation with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, harvested by leukapheresis, and purified by magnetic-activated cell sorting. This procedure yields a population of CD34+ cells that does not contain SC precursors, as assessed by the lack of expression of the SC antigen Stro-1, and that differentiates only into hematopoietic cells. We found that CD34+, Stro-1- cells cultured with a combination of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 3 generated cells that fulfill current criteria for the characterization of OCs, including multinucleation, presence of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, and expression of the calcitonin and vitronectin receptors and of pp60c-src tyrosine kinase. These OCs also expressed mRNA for the noninserted isoform of the calcitonin receptor and excavated characteristic resorption pits in devitalized bone slices. These data demonstrate that accessory SCs are not essential for human osteoclastogenesis and that granulocyte colony-stimulating factor treatment mobilizes OC precursors into the peripheral circulation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8855258

  5. Functional Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Subsets Recover Rapidly after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Qingdong; Blankstein, Anna R; Anjos, Karla; Synova, Oleksandra; Tulloch, Marie; Giftakis, Angeline; Yang, Bin; Lambert, Pascal; Peng, Zhikang; Cuvelier, Geoff D E; Wall, Donna A

    2015-07-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are regulatory cell populations that have the ability to suppress effector T cell responses and promote the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). They are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid progenitors that include monocytic and granulocytic subsets. We postulated that given the rapid expansion of myeloid cells post-transplant, these members of the innate immune system may be important contributors to the early immune environment post-transplant. To evaluate the kinetics of recovery and function of MDSCs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), 26 patients undergoing allogeneic HSCT were studied at 6 time points in the first 3 months after HSCT. Both MDSC subsets recovered between 2 and 4 weeks, well before the recovery of T and B lymphocytes. MDSC subset recovery positively correlated with T, B, and/or double-negative T cell numbers after HSCT. MDSCs isolated from patients post-transplant were functional in that they suppressed third-party CD4(+) T cell proliferation and Th1 differentiation and promoted Treg development. In conclusion, functional MDSC are present early after HSCT and likely contribute to the regulatory cell population post-transplant. PMID:25963921

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukaemia of Donor Cell Origin Developing 17 Years after Allogenic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Promyelocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Pilar; Alvarez, J. Carlos; Garrido, Pilar; Lorente, J. Antonio; Palacios, Jorge; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Donor cell leukaemia (DCL) is a rare complication of allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We report the case of a female patient with acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), FAB type M3, who developed acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) type M5 of donor origin 17 years after allogenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) from her HLA-matched sister. Morphology and immunophenotyping showed differences with the initial leukaemia, and short tandem repeat (STR) analysis confirmed donor-type haematopoiesis. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) showed an 11q23 deletion. Given that the latency period between transplant and development of leukaemia was the longest reported to date, we discuss the mechanisms underlying delayed leukaemia onset. PMID:23675279

  7. Hematopoietic stem cell expansion and distinct myeloid developmental abnormalities in a murine model of the AML1-ETO translocation.

    PubMed

    de Guzman, Cristina G; Warren, Alan J; Zhang, Zheng; Gartland, Larry; Erickson, Paul; Drabkin, Harry; Hiebert, Scott W; Klug, Christopher A

    2002-08-01

    The t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation, which fuses the ETO gene on human chromosome 8 with the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 (AML1-ETO), is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). It is seen in approximately 12 to 15% of AML cases and is present in about 40% of AML cases with a French-American-British classified M2 phenotype. We have generated a murine model of the t(8;21) translocation by retroviral expression of AML1-ETO in purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Animals reconstituted with AML1-ETO-expressing cells recapitulate the hematopoietic developmental abnormalities seen in the bone marrow of human patients with the t(8;21) translocation. Primitive myeloblasts were increased to approximately 10% of bone marrow by 10 months posttransplant. Consistent with this observation was a 50-fold increase in myeloid colony-forming cells in vitro. Accumulation of late-stage metamyelocytes was also observed in bone marrow along with an increase in immature eosinophilic myelocytes that showed abnormal basophilic granulation. HSC numbers in the bone marrow of 10-month-posttransplant animals were 29-fold greater than in transplant-matched control mice, suggesting that AML1-ETO expression overrides the normal genetic control of HSC pool size. In summary, AMLI-ETO-expressing animals recapitulate many (and perhaps all) of the developmental abnormalities seen in human patients with the t(8;21) translocation, although the animals do not develop leukemia or disseminated disease in peripheral tissues like the liver or spleen. This suggests that the principal contribution of AML1-ETO to acute myeloid leukemia is the inhibition of multiple developmental pathways. PMID:12101243

  8. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Expansion and Distinct Myeloid Developmental Abnormalities in a Murine Model of the AML1-ETO Translocation

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman, Cristina G.; Warren, Alan J.; Zhang, Zheng; Gartland, Larry; Erickson, Paul; Drabkin, Harry; Hiebert, Scott W.; Klug, Christopher A.

    2002-01-01

    The t(8;21)(q22;q22) translocation, which fuses the ETO gene on human chromosome 8 with the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 (AML1-ETO), is one of the most frequent cytogenetic abnormalities associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). It is seen in approximately 12 to 15% of AML cases and is present in about 40% of AML cases with a French-American-British classified M2 phenotype. We have generated a murine model of the t(8;21) translocation by retroviral expression of AML1-ETO in purified hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Animals reconstituted with AML1-ETO-expressing cells recapitulate the hematopoietic developmental abnormalities seen in the bone marrow of human patients with the t(8;21) translocation. Primitive myeloblasts were increased to approximately 10% of bone marrow by 10 months posttransplant. Consistent with this observation was a 50-fold increase in myeloid colony-forming cells in vitro. Accumulation of late-stage metamyelocytes was also observed in bone marrow along with an increase in immature eosinophilic myelocytes that showed abnormal basophilic granulation. HSC numbers in the bone marrow of 10-month-posttransplant animals were 29-fold greater than in transplant-matched control mice, suggesting that AML1-ETO expression overrides the normal genetic control of HSC pool size. In summary, AMLI-ETO-expressing animals recapitulate many (and perhaps all) of the developmental abnormalities seen in human patients with the t(8;21) translocation, although the animals do not develop leukemia or disseminated disease in peripheral tissues like the liver or spleen. This suggests that the principal contribution of AML1-ETO to acute myeloid leukemia is the inhibition of multiple developmental pathways. PMID:12101243

  9. Adoptive precursor cell therapy to enhance immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Ghosh, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. T cell deficiency following transplantation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss adoptive transfer of committed precursor cells to enhance T cell reconstitution and improve overall prognosis after transplantation. PMID:19015856

  10. Retrovirus-Mediated Expression of E2A-PBX1 Blocks Lymphoid Fate but Permits Retention of Myeloid Potential in Early Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Woodcroft, Mark W.; Nanan, Kyster; Thompson, Patrick; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Smith, Steven P.; Slany, Robert K.; LeBrun, David P.

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor E2A-PBX1 is expressed consequent to chromosomal translocation 1;19 and is an important oncogenic driver in cases of pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Elucidating the mechanism by which E2A-PBX1 induces lymphoid leukemia would be expedited by the availability of a tractable experimental model in which enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces pre-B-cell ALL. However, hematopoietic reconstitution of irradiated mice with bone marrow infected with E2A-PBX1-expressing retroviruses consistently gives rise to myeloid, not lymphoid, leukemia. Here, we elucidate the hematopoietic consequences of forced E2A-PBX1 expression in primary murine hematopoietic progenitors. We show that introducing E2A-PBX1 into multipotent progenitors permits the retention of myeloid potential but imposes a dense barrier to lymphoid development prior to the common lymphoid progenitor stage, thus helping to explain the eventual development of myeloid, and not lymphoid, leukemia in transplanted mice. Our findings also indicate that E2A-PBX1 enforces the aberrant, persistent expression of some genes that would normally have been down-regulated in the subsequent course of hematopoietic maturation. We show that enforced expression of one such gene, Hoxa9, a proto-oncogene associated with myeloid leukemia, partially reproduces the phenotype produced by E2A-PBX1 itself. Existing evidence suggests that the 1;19 translocation event takes place in committed B-lymphoid progenitors. However, we find that retrovirus-enforced expression of E2A-PBX1 in committed pro-B-cells results in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our findings indicate that the neoplastic phenotype induced by E2A-PBX1 is determined by the developmental stage of the cell into which the oncoprotein is introduced. PMID:26098938

  11. Stem cell biology is population biology: differentiation of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors to common lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) system is a demand control system, with the demand coming from the organism, since the products of the common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor (CMP, CLP respectively) cells are essential for activity and defense against disease. We show how ideas from population biology (combining population dynamics and evolutionary considerations) can illuminate the feedback control of the HSC system by the fully differentiated products, which has recently been verified experimentally. We develop models for the penultimate differentiation of HSC Multipotent Progenitors (MPPs) into CLP and CMP and introduce two concepts from population biology into stem cell biology. The first concept is the Multipotent Progenitor Commitment Response (MPCR) which is the probability that a multipotent progenitor cell follows a CLP route rather than a CMP route. The second concept is the link between the MPCR and a measure of Darwinian fitness associated with organismal performance and the levels of differentiated lymphoid and myeloid cells. We show that many MPCRs are consistent with homeostasis, but that they will lead to different dynamics of cells and signals following a wound or injury and thus have different consequences for Darwinian fitness. We show how coupling considerations of life history to dynamics of the HSC system and its products allows one to compute the selective pressures on cellular processes. We discuss ways that this framework can be used and extended. PMID:23327512

  12. Daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion for extramedullary relapse of acute myeloid leukemia after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Marco; Caocci, Giovanni; Vacca, Adriana; Piras, Eugenia; Orrù, Federica; La Nasa, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare tumor consisting of myeloid blasts that involve anatomic sites outside the bone marrow. Fatal prognosis is inevitable in patients with extramedullary relapse after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and no standard treatments are available yet. We report the first case of extramedullary relapse after HSCT treated with a combination of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and cladribine (DAC) regimen plus radiotherapy and donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI). This treatment induced a new and durable remission in our patient. The favorable toxicity profile and the reduced cost make this combination worthy of further investigations. PMID:24066245

  13. MCP1 Directs Trafficking of Hematopoietic Stem Cell-Derived Fibroblast Precursors in Solid Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Abangan, Romeo S.; Williams, Christopher R.; Mehrotra, Meenal; Duncan, James D.; LaRue, Amanda C.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are a novel source of carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. However, the mechanisms regulating recruitment and homing of HSC-derived carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or their precursors to the tumor microenvironment are unknown. Herein, we demonstrate using a single cell transplantation model that circulating fibroblast precursors (CFPs) are of HSC origin. This population increased with tumor burden in vivo and functional in vitro studies showed that CFPs preferentially migrated and differentiated into fibroblasts in response to tumor, suggesting that HSC-derived CFPs serve as an intermediate between the bone marrow and tumor. Based on this chemotactic ability and our demonstration of a monocyte lineage origin for CFPs, we investigated the role of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP1) in mediating CFP recruitment/homing. Blocking tumor-produced MCP1 inhibited in vitro migration of CFPs in response to multiple tumor types, indicating broad biological significance for this CFP/chemokine interaction. In vivo, CCR2-expressing CFPs increased in circulation during the period of active tumor growth and stromal development. Inhibition of MCP1 during tumor development resulted in decreased tumor volume in tumor-bearing mice. Together these findings confirm an HSC origin for CFPs, demonstrate a role for MCP1 in regulating their contribution to the tumor microenvironment, and suggest a potential therapeutic target for limiting tumor growth. PMID:20167869

  14. PSTPIP2 deficiency in mice causes osteopenia and increased differentiation of multipotent myeloid precursors into osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Nacu, Viorel; Charles, Julia F.; Henne, William M.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Nandi, Sayan; Ketchum, Halley; Harris, Renee; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    Missense mutations that reduce or abrogate myeloid cell expression of the F-BAR domain protein, proline serine threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), lead to autoinflammatory disease involving extramedullary hematopoiesis, skin and bone lesions. However, little is known about how PSTPIP2 regulates osteoclast development. Here we examined how PSTPIP2 deficiency causes osteopenia and bone lesions, using the mouse PSTPIP2 mutations, cmo, which fails to express PSTPIP2 and Lupo, in which PSTPIP2 is dysfunctional. In both models, serum levels of the pro-osteoclastogenic factor, MIP-1α, were elevated and CSF-1 receptor (CSF-1R)–dependent production of MIP-1α by macrophages was increased. Treatment of cmo mice with a dual specificity CSF-1R and c-Kit inhibitor, PLX3397, decreased circulating MIP-1α and ameliorated the extramedullary hematopoiesis, inflammation, and osteopenia, demonstrating that aberrant myelopoiesis drives disease. Purified osteoclast precursors from PSTPIP2-deficient mice exhibit increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro and were used to probe the structural requirements for PSTPIP2 suppression of osteoclast development. PSTPIP2 tyrosine phosphorylation and a functional F-BAR domain were essential for PSTPIP2 inhibition of TRAP expression and osteoclast precursor fusion, whereas interaction with PEST-type phosphatases was only required for suppression of TRAP expression. Thus, PSTPIP2 acts as a negative feedback regulator of CSF-1R signaling to suppress inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. PMID:22923495

  15. Changes of nucleolar organizer regions in granulopoietic precursors during the course of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gilberti, M F; Metze, K; Lorand-Metze, I

    1995-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the nucleolar organizer region (AgNOR) pattern of granulopoietic precursors in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at diagnosis and during the course of the disease. Clusters of AgNORs and isolated dots were counted separately in 24 cases of CML at diagnosis, in 19 cases during the relapse of the chronic phase after treatment, and in 16 cases of blast crisis. For comparison, 20 cases of normal bone marrow were studied. Each cell type had its own characteristic AgNOR pattern, as has been described for normal bone marrow. There was no significant difference in the number of AgNORs between cells in the peripheral blood and bone marrow. Compared with normal granulopoiesis, myeloblasts in CML at diagnosis had lower numbers of clusters, which decreased further during relapse of chronic phase and in blast crisis. Promyelocytes and myelocytes showed significantly fewer dots. The number of AgNOR clusters correlates inversely with the duration of the cell cycle. Therefore, these findings are consistent with the progressive loss in proliferative activity of immature precursors described during the course of CML. As the number of dots indicates cellular maturation, their lower number in promyelocytes and myelocytes in CML favors the concept of a discordant maturation process described in this disease. The separate counting of clusters and dots provides a useful, simple, and cheap method of describing cytokinetic changes during the course of this myeloproliferative disorder. PMID:8534758

  16. Purine metabolism in myeloid precursor cells during maturation. Studies with the HL-60 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, D L; Webster, H K; Wright, D G

    1983-01-01

    In studies with the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60, we defined changes in intermediary purine metabolism that appear to contribute to the regulation of terminal maturation in myeloid cells. When HL-60 cells were exposed to compounds that induce maturation, consistent alterations in purine metabolism were found to occur within 24 h of culture. Perturbation of guanosine nucleotide synthesis and decreases of up to 50% in intracellular guanylate pool sizes were associated with the induced maturation of these cells in response to diverse inducing agents. While immature HL-60 cells were observed to synthesize purine nucleotides by both de novo and salvage pathways, the activity of both pathways decreased in cells induced to mature, although the relative contribution of purine salvage increased. Moreover, incorporation of the salvage pathway precursor, [14C]hypoxanthine from the intermediate, inosine monophosphate (IMP), into guanylates was reduced by approximately 65% in induced HL-60 cells, reflecting decreased activity of both hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase and IMP dehydrogenase. When various inhibitors of IMP dehydrogenase (mycophenolic acid, 3-deazaguanosine, and 2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) were evaluated for their effects upon HL-60 cells, each agent was found to induce the cells to mature morphologically and functionally. Like other inducers, these agents decreased HL-60 cell proliferation and caused the cells to acquire an ability to phagocytose opsonized yeast and reduce nitroblue tetrazolium. Each agent reduced intracellular guanosine nucleotide pool sizes and induced HL-60 cell maturation at micromolar concentrations. These observations suggest that the size of intracellular guanosine nucleotide pools, the biosynthesis of guanosine nucleotides, and the activity of IMP dehydrogenase may be central to the regulation of terminal maturation in myeloid cells. PMID:6139386

  17. Busulfan and melphalan as conditioning regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Nadjanara Dorna; Dulley, Frederico Luiz; Saboya, Rosaura; Amigo Filho, Jos Ulysses; Coracin, Fabio Luiz; Chamone, Dalton de Alencar Fischer

    2011-01-01

    Background Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with HLA-identical donors has been established for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia patients for over 30 years with a cure rate of 50% to 60%. Objectives To analyze the overall survival of patients and identify factors that influence the outcomes of this type of transplant in patients in 1st complete remission who received a busulfan and melphalan combination as conditioning regimen. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with acute myeloid leukemia were enrolled between 2003 and 2008. The median age was 34 years old (Range: 16 - 57 years). All patients received cyclosporine and methotrexate for prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease. Median neutrophil engraftment time was 16 days (Range: 7 - 22 days) and 17 days (Range: 7 - 46 days) for platelets. Sinusoidal obstructive syndrome was observed in three patients, seven had grade II acute graft-versus-host disease and one extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Results The overall survival by the Kaplan-Meier method was 48% after 36 months with a plateau at 36 months after transplantation. Intensive consolidation with high-dose arabinoside resulted in an improved survival (p-value = 0.0001), as did grade II acute graft-versus-host disease (p-value = 0.0377) and mild chronic graft-versus-host disease (p-value < 0.0001). Thirteen patients died, five due to infection within 100 days of transplant, two due to hemorrhages, one to infection and graftversus-host disease and three relapses followed by renal failure (one) and infection (two). The cause of death could not be determined for two patients. Conclusion The busulfan and melphalan conditioning regimen is as good as other conditioning regimens providing an excellent survival rate. PMID:23049292

  18. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant overcomes poor prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Doki, Noriko; Kurosawa, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Tsukasa; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Harada, Kaito; Yamamoto, Keita; Hino, Yutaro; Shingai, Naoki; Senoo, Yasushi; Watanabe, Ken; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that acute myeloid leukemia with myelodysplasia-related changes (AML-MRC) exhibits a worse clinical outcome than AML not otherwise specified (AML-NOS). However, transplant outcomes of patients with AML-MRC have not been reported compared to patients with AML-NOS. We analyzed transplant outcomes among 147 patients with AML-MRC or AML-NOS who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) in a single institution. There were no significant differences in the 2-year overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and non-relapse mortality (NRM) between the two groups (2-year OS: 48% vs. 59%; 2-year CIR: 37% vs. 35%; 2-year NRM: 19% vs. 13%). Subgroup analysis adjusting for age and disease status demonstrated the same results between the two groups. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that AML-MRC was not an independent prognostic factor for poor prognosis in the setting of allo-HSCT (p = 0.7). These results suggest that allo-HSCT may overcome the poor prognosis of AML-MRC. PMID:26084204

  19. Recruitment of myeloid but not endothelial precursor cells facilitates tumor regrowth after local irradiation.

    PubMed

    Kozin, Sergey V; Kamoun, Walid S; Huang, Yuhui; Dawson, Michelle R; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G

    2010-07-15

    Tumor neovascularization and growth might be promoted by the recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC), which include endothelial precursor cells and "vascular modulatory" myelomonocytic (CD11b+) cells. BMDCs may also drive tumor regrowth after certain chemotherapeutic and vascular disruption treatments. In this study, we evaluated the role of BMDC recruitment in breast and lung carcinoma xenograft models after local irradiation (LI). We depleted the bone marrow by including whole-body irradiation (WBI) of 6 Gy as part of a total tumor dose of 21 Gy, and compared the growth delay with the one achieved after LI of 21 Gy. In both models, the inclusion of WBI induced longer tumor growth delays. Moreover, WBI increased lung tumor control probability by LI. Exogenous delivery of BMDCs from radiation-nave donors partially abrogated the WBI effect. Myeloid BMDCs, primarily macrophages, rapidly accumulated in tumors after LI. Intratumoral expression of stromal-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha), a chemokine that promotes tissue retention of BMDCs, was noted 2 days after LI. Conversely, treatment with an inhibitor of SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4 (AMD3100) with LI significantly delayed tumor regrowth. However, when administered starting from 5 days post-LI, AMD3100 treatment was ineffective. Lastly, with restorative bone marrow transplantation of Tie2-GFP-labeled BMDC population, we observed an increased number of monocytes but not endothelial precursor cells in tumors that recurred following LI. Our results suggest that an increase in intratumoral SDF-1alpha triggered by LI recruits myelomonocytes/macrophages which promotes tumor regrowth. PMID:20631066

  20. Promotion of Expansion and Differentiation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Interleukin-27 into Myeloid Progenitors to Control Infection in Emergency Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Chiba, Yukino; Hisada, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Fumie; Yoshida, Hiroki; Nakae, Susumu; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ema, Hideo; Mizuguchi, Junichiro; Yoshimoto, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Emergency myelopoiesis is inflammation-induced hematopoiesis to replenish myeloid cells in the periphery, which is critical to control the infection with pathogens. Previously, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-γ were demonstrated to play a critical role in the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors, leading to production of mature myeloid cells, although their inhibitory effects on hematopoiesis were also reported. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of emergency myelopoiesis during infection remains incompletely understood. Here, we clarify that one of the interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines, IL-27, plays an important role in the emergency myelopoiesis. Among various types of hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, IL-27 predominantly and continuously promoted the expansion of only Lineage−Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, especially long-term repopulating HSCs and myeloid-restricted progenitor cells with long-term repopulating activity, and the differentiation into myeloid progenitors in synergy with stem cell factor. These progenitors expressed myeloid transcription factors such as Spi1, Gfi1, and Cebpa/b through activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3, and had enhanced potential to differentiate into migratory dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, and mast cells, and less so into macrophages, and basophils, but not into plasmacytoid DCs, conventional DCs, T cells, and B cells. Among various cytokines, IL-27 in synergy with the stem cell factor had the strongest ability to augment the expansion of LSK cells and their differentiation into myeloid progenitors retaining the LSK phenotype over a long period of time. The experiments using mice deficient for one of IL-27 receptor subunits, WSX-1, and IFN-γ revealed that the blood stage of malaria infection enhanced IL-27 expression through IFN-γ production, and the IL-27 then promoted the expansion of LSK cells, differentiating and mobilizing them into spleen, resulting in enhanced production of neutrophils to control the infection. Thus, IL-27 is one of the limited unique cytokines directly acting on HSCs to promote differentiation into myeloid progenitors during emergency myelopoiesis. PMID:26991425

  1. Promotion of Expansion and Differentiation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Interleukin-27 into Myeloid Progenitors to Control Infection in Emergency Myelopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Jun-Ichi; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Chiba, Yukino; Hisada, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Fumie; Yoshida, Hiroki; Nakae, Susumu; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ema, Hideo; Mizuguchi, Junichiro; Yoshimoto, Takayuki

    2016-03-01

    Emergency myelopoiesis is inflammation-induced hematopoiesis to replenish myeloid cells in the periphery, which is critical to control the infection with pathogens. Previously, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-γ were demonstrated to play a critical role in the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors, leading to production of mature myeloid cells, although their inhibitory effects on hematopoiesis were also reported. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of emergency myelopoiesis during infection remains incompletely understood. Here, we clarify that one of the interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines, IL-27, plays an important role in the emergency myelopoiesis. Among various types of hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, IL-27 predominantly and continuously promoted the expansion of only Lineage-Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, especially long-term repopulating HSCs and myeloid-restricted progenitor cells with long-term repopulating activity, and the differentiation into myeloid progenitors in synergy with stem cell factor. These progenitors expressed myeloid transcription factors such as Spi1, Gfi1, and Cebpa/b through activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3, and had enhanced potential to differentiate into migratory dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, and mast cells, and less so into macrophages, and basophils, but not into plasmacytoid DCs, conventional DCs, T cells, and B cells. Among various cytokines, IL-27 in synergy with the stem cell factor had the strongest ability to augment the expansion of LSK cells and their differentiation into myeloid progenitors retaining the LSK phenotype over a long period of time. The experiments using mice deficient for one of IL-27 receptor subunits, WSX-1, and IFN-γ revealed that the blood stage of malaria infection enhanced IL-27 expression through IFN-γ production, and the IL-27 then promoted the expansion of LSK cells, differentiating and mobilizing them into spleen, resulting in enhanced production of neutrophils to control the infection. Thus, IL-27 is one of the limited unique cytokines directly acting on HSCs to promote differentiation into myeloid progenitors during emergency myelopoiesis. PMID:26991425

  2. Efficacy of myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adult patients with MLL-ELL-positive acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Muto, Tomoya; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Sugita, Yasumasa; Tsukamoto, Shokichi; Sakai, Shio; Takeda, Yusuke; Mimura, Naoya; Ohwada, Chikako; Sakaida, Emiko; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Iseki, Tohru; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2015-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with mixed lineage leukemia-eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia (MLL-ELL) is a rare subtype of MLL-rearranged AML. The outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for patients with this disease remains unknown. In the present study, we retrospectively investigated the efficacy of allo-HSCT in eight adult MLL-ELL-positive AML patients. Although all eight patients achieved first complete remission (CR1), three (37.5 %) patients experienced relapse after induction therapy. Five (62.5 %) patients underwent allo-HSCT during CR1, whereas two (25.0 %) underwent allo-HSCT during disease relapse, and one (12.5 %) during CR2. All three patients who received allo-HSCT beyond CR1 died due to AML progression after allo-HSCT. Of the five patients who received allo-HSCT during CR1, three (60.0 %) remained alive at study conclusion. The overall survival rate at five years was 50.0 %. Intriguingly, clonally expanded non-leukemic cells expressing MLL-ELL during consolidation therapy were found to be eradicated after allo-HSCT during the monitoring of minimal residual disease in one patient; this indicates that allo-HSCT is efficacious for eliminating pre-leukemic cells resistant to chemotherapy. In conclusion, allo-HSCT soon after CR1 represents a promising therapeutic option for adult AML patients with MLL-ELL, although the outcome of allo-HSCT for patients beyond CR1 was dismal. PMID:25758097

  3. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  4. Epigenetic changes during hematopoietic cell granulocytic differentiation comparative analysis of primary CD34+ cells, KG1 myeloid cells and mature neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epigenetic regulation is known to affect gene expression, and recent research shows that aberrant DNA methylation patterning and histone modifications may play a role in leukemogenesis. In order to highlight the co-operation of epigenetic mechanisms acting during the latter process it is important to clarify their potential as biomarkers of granulocytic differentiation. Results In this study we investigated epigenetic alterations in human hematopoietic cells at a distinct differentiation stages: primary hematopoietic CD34+ cells, KG1 myeloid leukemic cells, whose development is stopped at early stage of differentiation, and mature neutrophils. We focused on the epigenetic status of cell cycle regulating (p15, p16) and differentiation related (E-cadherin and RAR?) genes. We found that the methylation level in promoter regions of some of these genes was considerably higher in KG1 cells and lower in CD34+ cells and human neutrophils. As examined and evaluated by computer-assisted methods, histone H3 and H4 modifications, i.e. H3K4Me3, H3K9Ac, H3K9Ac/S10Ph and H4 hyperAc, were similar in CD34+ cells and human mature neutrophils. By contrast, in the KG1 cells, histone H3 and H4 modifications were quite high and increased after induction of granulocytic differentiation with the HDAC inhibitor phenyl butyrate. Conclusions We found the methylation status of the examined gene promoters and histone modifications to be characteristically associated with the hematopoietic cell progenitor state, induced to differentiate myeloid KG1 cells and normal blood neutrophils. This could be achieved through epigenetic regulation of E-cadherin, p15, p16 and RAR? genes expression caused by DNA methylation/demethylation, core and linker histones distribution in stem hematopoietic cells, induced to differentiation KG1 cells and mature human neutrophils, as well as the histone modifications H3K4Me3, H3K9Ac, H3K9Ac/S10Ph and H4 hyperAc in relation to hematopoietic cell differentiation to granulocyte. These findings also suggest them as potentially important biomarkers of hematopoietic cell granulocytic differentiation and could be valuable for leukemia induced differentiation therapy. PMID:24443786

  5. Thrombopoietin cooperates with FLT3-ligand in the generation of plasmacytoid dendritic cell precursors from human hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Antonenko, Svetlana; Sederstrom, Joel M.; Liang, Xueqing; Chan, Anissa S. H.; Kanzler, Holger; Blom, Bianca; Blazar, Bruce R.; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2005-01-01

    Type 1 interferon–producing cells (IPCs), also known as plasmacytoid dendritic cell (DC) precursors, represent the key effectors in antiviral innate immunity and triggers for adaptive immune responses. IPCs play important roles in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and in modulating immune responses after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Understanding IPC development from hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) may provide critical information in controlling viral infection, autoimmune SLE, and graft-versus-host disease. FLT3-ligand (FLT3-L) represents a key IPC differentiation factor from HPCs. Although hematopoietic cytokines such as interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-7, stem cell factor (SCF), macrophage–colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF), and granulocyte M-CSF (GM-CSF) promote the expansion of CD34+ HPCs in FLT3-L culture, they strongly inhibit HPC differentiation into IPCs. Here we show that thrombopoietin (TPO) cooperates with FLT3-L, inducing CD34+HPCs to undergo a 400-fold expansion in cell numbers and to generate more than 6 × 106 IPCs per 106 CD34+ HPCs within 30 days in culture. IPCs derived from HPCs in FLT3-L/TPO cultures display blood IPC phenotype and have the capacity to produce large amounts of interferon-α (IFN-α) and to differentiate into mature DCs. This culture system, combined with the use of adult peripheral blood CD34+ HPCs purified from G-CSF–mobilized donors, permits the generation of more than 109 IPCs from a single blood donor. PMID:14670916

  6. Assessment of PET/CT in multifocal myeloid sarcomas with loss of TET2: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yu; Tao, Yongguang; Fu, Chunyan; Jia, Jiantao; Liu, Shuang; Xiao, Desheng

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma is a rare solid tumor consisting of leukemic myeloblasts and/or myeloid precursors occurring outside the blood or bone marrow. The unique site with myeloid sarcoma has been reported, the multiple sites of myeloid sarcoma have rarely been cited in the medical literature. Here we report that the unusual clinical presentation and management of myeloid sarcoma in multiple sites with PET-CT, highlighting the utility of PET-CT was useful in detecting and monitoring myeloid sarcoma. We also found that loss of TET2 and gain of 5 hmC in the case of myeloid sarcoma, indicating the mechanism for myeloid sarcoma is totally different with other hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:26722587

  7. Consequences of irradiation on bone and marrow phenotypes, and its relation to disruption of hematopoietic precursors

    PubMed Central

    Green, Danielle E.; Rubin, Clinton T.

    2014-01-01

    The rising levels of radiation exposure, specifically for medical treatments and accidental exposures, have added great concern for the long term risks of bone fractures. Both the bone marrow and bone architecture are devastated following radiation exposure. Even sub-lethal doses cause a deficit to the bone marrow microenvironment, including a decline in hematopoietic cells, and this deficit occurs in a dose dependent fashion. Certain cell phenotypes though are more susceptible to radiation damage, with mesenchymal stem cells being more resilient than the hematopoietic stem cells. The decline in total bone marrow hematopoietic cells is accompanied with elevated adipocytes into the marrow cavity, thereby inhibiting hematopoiesis and recovery of the bone marrow microenvironment. Poor bone marrow is also associated with a decline in bone architectural quality. Therefore, the ability to maintain the bone marrow microenvironment would hinder much of the trabecular bone loss caused by radiation exposure, ultimately decreasing some comorbidities in patients exposed to radiation. PMID:24607941

  8. The oncofusion protein FUS-ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-04-14

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS-ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS-ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS-ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS-ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS-ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  9. The oncofusion protein FUS–ERG targets key hematopoietic regulators and modulates the all-trans retinoic acid signaling pathway in t(16;21) acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sotoca, A M; Prange, K H M; Reijnders, B; Mandoli, A; Nguyen, L N; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2016-01-01

    The ETS transcription factor ERG has been implicated as a major regulator of both normal and aberrant hematopoiesis. In acute myeloid leukemias harboring t(16;21), ERG function is deregulated due to a fusion with FUS/TLS resulting in the expression of a FUS–ERG oncofusion protein. How this oncofusion protein deregulates the normal ERG transcription program is unclear. Here, we show that FUS–ERG acts in the context of a heptad of proteins (ERG, FLI1, GATA2, LYL1, LMO2, RUNX1 and TAL1) central to proper expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell hematopoietic phenotype. Moreover, in t(16;21) FUS–ERG co-occupies genomic regions bound by the nuclear receptor heterodimer RXR:RARA inhibiting target gene expression and interfering with hematopoietic differentiation. All-trans retinoic acid treatment of t(16;21) cells as well as FUS–ERG knockdown alleviate the myeloid-differentiation block. Together, the results suggest that FUS–ERG acts as a transcriptional repressor of the retinoic acid signaling pathway. PMID:26148230

  10. Outcomes of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children and Young Adults with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: A CIBMTR Cohort Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Sonali; Sparapani, Rodney; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Malone, Adriana; Olsson, Richard; Hamadani, Mehdi; Daly, Andrew; Bacher, Ulrike; Wirk, Baldeep M; Kamble, Rammurti T; Gale, Robert P; Wood, William A; Hale, Gregory; Wiernik, Peter H; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Marks, David; Ustun, Celalettin; Munker, Reinhold; Savani, Bipin N; Alyea, Edwin; Popat, Uday; Sobecks, Ronald; Kalaycio, Matt; Maziarz, Richard; Hijiya, Nobuko; Saber, Wael

    2016-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in children and young adults is uncommon. Young patients have long life expectancies and low morbidity with hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Prolonged tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) use may cause significant morbidity. In addition, indication for HCT in patients in the first chronic phase is not established. We hence retrospectively evaluated outcomes in 449 CML patients with early disease receiving myeloablative HCT reported to the CIBMTR. We analyzed various factors affecting outcome, specifically the effect of age and pre-HCT TKI in pediatric patients (age < 18 years, n = 177) and young adults (age 18 to 29 years, n = 272) with the goal of identifying prognostic factors. Post-HCT probability rates of 5-year overall survival (OS) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) were 75% and 59%, respectively. Rates of OS and LFS were 76% and 57% in <18-year and 74% and 60% in 18- to 29-year group, respectively, by univariate analysis (P = .1 and = .6). Five-year rates of OS for HLA matched sibling donor (MSD) and bone marrow (BM) stem cell source were 83% and 80%, respectively. In multivariate analysis there was no effect of age (<18 versus 18 to 29) or pre-HCT TKI therapy on OS, LFS, transplant related mortality, or relapse. Favorable factors for OS were MSD (P < .001) and recent HCT (2003 to 2010; P = .04). LFS was superior with MSD (P < .001), BM as graft source (P = .001), and performance scores > 90 (P = .03) compared with unrelated or mismatched peripheral blood stem cells donors and recipients with lower performance scores. Older age was associated with increased incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (P = .0002). In the current era, HCT outcomes are similar in young patients and children with early CML, and best outcomes are achieved with BM grafts and MSD. PMID:26964698

  11. The hematopoietic stem cell in chronic phase CML is characterized by a transcriptional profile resembling normal myeloid progenitor cells and reflecting loss of quiescence.

    PubMed

    Bruns, I; Czibere, A; Fischer, J C; Roels, F; Cadeddu, R-P; Buest, S; Bruennert, D; Huenerlituerkoglu, A N; Stoecklein, N H; Singh, R; Zerbini, L F; Jäger, M; Kobbe, G; Gattermann, N; Kronenwett, R; Brors, B; Haas, R

    2009-05-01

    We found that composition of cell subsets within the CD34+ cell population is markedly altered in chronic phase (CP) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Specifically, proportions and absolute cell counts of common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors (MEP) are significantly greater in comparison to normal bone marrow whereas absolute numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are equal. To understand the basis for this, we performed gene expression profiling (Affymetrix HU-133A 2.0) of the distinct CD34+ cell subsets from six patients with CP CML and five healthy donors. Euclidean distance analysis revealed a remarkable transcriptional similarity between the CML patients' HSC and normal progenitors, especially CMP. CP CML HSC were transcriptionally more similar to their progeny than normal HSC to theirs, suggesting a more mature phenotype. Hence, the greatest differences between CP CML patients and normal donors were apparent in HSC including downregulation of genes encoding adhesion molecules, transcription factors, regulators of stem-cell fate and inhibitors of cell proliferation in CP CML. Impaired adhesive and migratory capacities were functionally corroborated by fibronectin detachment analysis and transwell assays, respectively. Based on our findings we propose a loss of quiescence of the CML HSC on detachment from the niche leading to expansion of myeloid progenitors. PMID:19158832

  12. Myeloid Zinc Finger 1 (MZF-1) Regulates Expression of the CCN2/CTGF and CCN3/NOV Genes in the Hematopoietic Compartment.

    PubMed

    Piszczatowski, Richard T; Rafferty, Brian J; Rozado, Andre; Parziale, James V; Lents, Nathan H

    2015-11-01

    Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2/CTGF) and Nephroblastoma Overexpressed (CCN3/NOV) execute key functions within the hematopoietic compartment. Both are abundant in the bone marrow stroma, which is a niche for hematopoiesis and supports marrow function. Roles for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol) and all-trans retinoic acid in the bone marrow have also been elucidated. Interestingly, some of the annotated roles of these vitamins overlap with established functions of CCN2 and CCN3. Yet, no factor has been identified that unifies these observations. In this study, we report the regulation of the CTGF and NOV genes by Myeloid Zinc Finger-1 (MZF-1), a hematopoietic transcription factor. We show the interaction of MZF-1 with the CTGF and NOV promoters in several cell types. Up-regulation of MZF-1 via calcitriol and vitamin A induces expression of CTGF and NOV, implicating a role for these vitamins in the functions of these two genes. Lastly, knockdown of MZF1 reduces levels of CTGF and NOV. Collectively, our results argue that MZF-1 regulates the CTGF and NOV genes in the hematopoietic compartment, and may be involved in their respective functions in the stroma. PMID:25899830

  13. Hematopoietic Colony Formation from Human Growth Factor-Dependent TF1 Cells and Human Cord Blood Myeloid Progenitor Cells Depends on SHP2 Phosphatase Function

    PubMed Central

    Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Gotoh, Akihiko; Braun, Stephen E.; Lu, Li; Cooper, Scott; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Li, Xing Jun

    2013-01-01

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase, SHP2, is widely expressed; however, previous studies demonstrated that hematopoietic cell development more stringently requires Shp2 expression compared to other tissues. Furthermore, somatic gain-of-function SHP2 mutants are commonly found in human myeloid leukemias. Given that pharmacologic inhibitors to SHP2 phosphatase activity are currently in development as putative antileukemic agents, we conducted a series of experiments examining the necessity of SHP2 phosphatase activity for human hematopoiesis. Anti-sense oligonucleotides to human SHP2 coding sequences reduced human cord blood- and human cell line, TF1-derived colony formation. Expression of truncated SHP2 bearing its Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, but lacking the phosphatase domain similarly reduced human cord blood- and TF1-derived colony formation. Mechanistically, expression of truncated SHP2 reduced the interaction between endogenous, full-length SHP2 with the adapter protein, Grb2. To verify the role of SHP2 phosphatase function in human hematopoietic cell development, human cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with a leukemia-associated phosphatase gain-of-function SHP2 mutant or with a phosphatase dead SHP2 mutant, which indicated that increased phosphatase function enhanced, while decreased SHP2 phosphatase function reduced, human cord blood-derived colonies. Collectively, these findings indicate that SHP2 phosphatase function regulates human hematopoietic cell development and imply that the phosphatase component of SHP2 may serve as a pharmacologic target in human leukemias bearing increased SHP2 phosphatase activity. PMID:23082805

  14. Ischemic Stroke Activates Hematopoietic Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Courties, Gabriel; Herisson, Fanny; Sager, Hendrik B.; Heidt, Timo; Ye, Yuxiang; Wei, Ying; Sun, Yuan; Severe, Nicolas; Dutta, Partha; Scharff, Jennifer; Scadden, David T.; Weissleder, Ralph; Swirski, Filip K.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Nahrendorf, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The mechanisms leading to an expanded neutrophil and monocyte supply after stroke are incompletely understood. Objective To test the hypothesis that transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in mice leads to activation of hematopoietic bone marrow stem cells. Methods and Results Serial in vivo bioluminescence reporter gene imaging in mice with tMCAO revealed that bone marrow cell cycling peaked 4 days after stroke (p<0.05 versus pre tMCAO). FACS and cell cycle analysis showed activation of the entire hematopoietic tree, including myeloid progenitors. The cycling fraction of the most upstream hematopoietic stem cells increased from 3.34%±0.19 to 7.32±0.52 after tMCAO (p<0.05). In vivo microscopy corroborated proliferation of adoptively transferred hematopoietic progenitors in the bone marrow of mice with stroke. The hematopoietic system’s myeloid bias was reflected by increased expression of myeloid transcription factors, including PU.1 (p<0.05), and by a decline in lymphocyte precursors. In mice after tMCAO, tyrosine hydroxylase levels in sympathetic fibers and bone marrow noradrenaline levels rose (p<0.05, respectively), associated with a decrease of hematopoietic niche factors that promote stem cell quiescence. In mice with genetic deficiency of the β3 adrenergic receptor, hematopoietic stem cells did not enter the cell cycle in increased numbers after tMCAO (naive control, 3.23±0.22; tMCAO, 3.74±0.33, p=0.51). Conclusions Ischemic stroke activates hematopoietic stem cells via increased sympathetic tone, leading to a myeloid bias of hematopoiesis and higher bone marrow output of inflammatory Ly6Chigh monocytes and neutrophils. PMID:25362208

  15. A novel role of hematopoietic CCL5 in promoting triple-negative mammary tumor progression by regulating generation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Lv, Dandan; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Kurt, Robert A; Bu, Wen; Li, Yi; Ma, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    CCL5 is a member of the CC chemokine family expressed in a wide array of immune and non-immune cells in response to stress signals. CCL5 expression correlates with advanced human breast cancer. However, its functional significance and mode of action have not been established. Here, we show that CCL5-deficient mice are resistant to highly aggressive, triple-negative mammary tumor growth. Hematopoietic CCL5 is dominant in this phenotype. The absence of hematopoietic CCL5 causes aberrant generation of CD11b+/Gr-1+, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the bone marrow in response to tumor growth by accumulating Ly6Chi and Ly6G+ MDSCs with impaired capacity to suppress cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells. These properties of CCL5 are observed in both orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors. Antibody-mediated systemic blockade of CCL5 inhibits tumor progression and enhances the efficacy of therapeutic vaccination against non-immunogenic tumors. CCL5 also helps maintain the immunosuppressive capacity of human MDSCs. Our study uncovers a novel, chemokine-independent activity of the hematopoietically derived CCL5 that promotes mammary tumor progression via generating MDSCs in the bone marrow in cooperation with tumor-derived colony-stimulating factors. The study sheds considerable light on the interplay between the hematopoietic compartment and tumor niche. Because of the apparent dispensable nature of this molecule in normal physiology, CCL5 may represent an excellent therapeutic target in immunotherapy for breast cancer as well as a broad range of solid tumors that have significant amounts of MDSC infiltration. PMID:23266888

  16. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hong; Cooper, Stacy; Friedman, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f);CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f);Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic-specific Cebpa expression, with enhancer deletion leading to impaired myelopoiesis and potentially preleukemic progenitor expansion. PMID:26937964

  17. In Vivo Deletion of the Cebpa +37 kb Enhancer Markedly Reduces Cebpa mRNA in Myeloid Progenitors but Not in Non-Hematopoietic Tissues to Impair Granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Cooper, Stacy; Friedman, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains a +37 kb, evolutionarily conserved 440 bp enhancer that directs high-level expression to myeloid progenitors in transgenic mice. The enhancer is bound and activated by Runx1, Scl, GATA2, C/EBPα, c-Myb, Pu.1, and additional Ets factors in myeloid cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated replacement of the wild-type enhancer with a variant mutant in its seven Ets sites leads to 20-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in the 32Dcl3 myeloid cell line. To determine the effect of deleting the enhancer in vivo, we now characterize C57BL/6 mice in which loxP sites flank a 688 bp DNA segment containing the enhancer. CMV-Cre mediated germline deletion resulted in diminution of the expected number of viable Enh(f/f);CMV-Cre offspring, with 28-fold reduction in marrow Cebpa mRNA but normal levels in liver, lung, adipose, intestine, muscle, and kidney. Cre-transduction of lineage-negative marrow cells in vitro reduced Cebpa mRNA 12-fold, with impairment of granulocytic maturation, morphologic blast accumulation, and IL-3 dependent myeloid colony replating for >12 generations. Exposure of Enh(f/f);Mx1-Cre mice to pIpC led to 14-fold reduction of Cebpa mRNA in GMP or CMP, 30-fold reduction in LSK, and <2-fold reduction in the LSK/SLAM subset. FACS analysis of marrow from these mice revealed 10-fold reduced neutrophils, 3-fold decreased GMP, and 3-fold increased LSK cells. Progenitor cell cycle progression was mildly impaired. Granulocyte and B lymphoid colony forming units were reduced while monocytic and erythroid colonies were increased, with reduced Pu.1 and Gfi1 and increased Egr1 and Klf4 in GMP. Finally, competitive transplantation indicated preservation of functional long-term hematopoietic stem cells upon enhancer deletion and confirmed marrow-intrinsic impairment of granulopoiesis and B cell generation with LSK and monocyte lineage expansion. These findings demonstrate a critical role for the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer for hematopoietic-specific Cebpa expression, with enhancer deletion leading to impaired myelopoiesis and potentially preleukemic progenitor expansion. PMID:26937964

  18. Repercussion of Megakaryocyte-Specific Gata1 Loss on Megakaryopoiesis and the Hematopoietic Precursor Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Meinders, Marjolein; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Scheenstra, Maaike R.; De Cuyper, Iris M.; Papadopoulos, Petros; Németh, Tamás; Mócsai, Attila; van den Berg, Timo K.; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2016-01-01

    During hematopoiesis, transcriptional programs are essential for the commitment and differentiation of progenitors into the different blood lineages. GATA1 is a transcription factor expressed in several hematopoietic lineages and essential for proper erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Megakaryocyte-specific genes, such as GP1BA, are known to be directly regulated by GATA1. Mutations in GATA1 can lead to dyserythropoietic anemia and pseudo gray-platelet syndrome. Selective loss of Gata1 expression in adult mice results in macrothrombocytopenia with platelet dysfunction, characterized by an excess of immature megakaryocytes. To specifically analyze the impact of Gata1 loss in mature committed megakaryocytes, we generated Gata1-Lox|Pf4-Cre mice (Gata1cKOMK). Consistent with previous findings, Gata1cKOMK mice are macrothrombocytopenic with platelet dysfunction. Supporting this notion we demonstrate that Gata1 regulates directly the transcription of Syk, a tyrosine kinase that functions downstream of Clec2 and GPVI receptors in megakaryocytes and platelets. Furthermore, we show that Gata1cKOMK mice display an additional aberrant megakaryocyte differentiation stage. Interestingly, these mice present a misbalance of the multipotent progenitor compartment and the erythroid lineage, which translates into compensatory stress erythropoiesis and splenomegaly. Despite the severe thrombocytopenia, Gata1cKOMK mice display a mild reduction of TPO plasma levels, and Gata1cKOMK megakaryocytes show a mild increase in Pf4 mRNA levels; such a misbalance might be behind the general hematopoietic defects observed, affecting locally normal TPO and Pf4 levels at hematopoietic stem cell niches. PMID:27152938

  19. Distinct regulation of c-myb gene expression by HoxA9, Meis1 and Pbx proteins in normal hematopoietic progenitors and transformed myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Dassé, E; Volpe, G; Walton, D S; Wilson, N; Del Pozzo, W; O'Neill, L P; Slany, R K; Frampton, J; Dumon, S

    2012-01-01

    The proto-oncogenic protein c-Myb is an essential regulator of hematopoiesis and is frequently deregulated in hematological diseases such as lymphoma and leukemia. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the aberrant expression of c-Myb in myeloid leukemia, we analyzed and compared c-myb gene transcriptional regulation using two cell lines modeling normal hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and transformed myelomonocytic blasts. We report that the transcription factors HoxA9, Meis1, Pbx1 and Pbx2 bind in vivo to the c-myb locus and maintain its expression through different mechanisms in HPCs and leukemic cells. Our analysis also points to a critical role for Pbx2 in deregulating c-myb expression in murine myeloid cells cotransformed by the cooperative activity of HoxA9 and Meis1. This effect is associated with an intronic positioning of epigenetic marks and RNA polymerase II binding in the orthologous region of a previously described alternative promoter for c-myb. Taken together, our results could provide a first hint to explain the abnormal expression of c-myb in leukemic cells. PMID:22829978

  20. Interaction between normal and CML hematopoietic progenitors and stroma influences abnormal hematopoietic development.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Elvira Alicia Aparicio; Da Rocha Silla, Lúcia Mariano; Cañedo, Andrés Delgado; Allebrandt, Waldir Francisco; Fogliatto, Laura; Nardi, Nance Beyer

    2004-06-01

    Several studies have shown defective progenitor-stromal interactions in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), and adhesive defects induced by BCR/ABL have been described. However, controversial results have been reported, and the role of the stroma in abnormal development of the hematopoietic system is not clear. In this study, CML hematopoietic and irradiated stromal cells were co-cultured in different combinations for 10 or 21 days. Maintenance of viable cells was dependent both on the sources of hematopoietic progenitors and stromal adherent layers, with normal cells performing better than their leukemic counterparts. The frequency of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells in the non-adherent fraction was more related to the source of hematopoietic cells than of stroma, and hematopoietic cells from normal subjects showed better performance. The simultaneous analysis of different combinations of normal and leukemic precursor cells and stromal layers, as done in the present work, suggests that the outcome of the interaction depends on characteristics of both compartments. This hematopoietic system development is influenced by intrinsic qualities of both hematopoietic stem cells and the supportive stroma. PMID:15186718

  1. Ezh2 Controls an Early Hematopoietic Program and Growth and Survival Signaling in Early T Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Danis, Etienne; Yamauchi, Taylor; Echanique, Kristen; Zhang, Xi; Haladyna, Jessica N; Riedel, Simone S; Zhu, Nan; Xie, Huafeng; Orkin, Stuart H; Armstrong, Scott A; Bernt, Kathrin M; Neff, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    Early T cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL) is an aggressive subtype of ALL distinguished by stem-cell-associated and myeloid transcriptional programs. Inactivating alterations of Polycomb repressive complex 2 components are frequent in human ETP-ALL, but their functional role is largely undefined. We have studied the involvement of Ezh2 in a murine model of NRASQ61K-driven leukemia that recapitulates phenotypic and transcriptional features of ETP-ALL. Homozygous inactivation of Ezh2 cooperated with oncogenic NRASQ61K to accelerate leukemia onset. Inactivation of Ezh2 accentuated expression of genes highly expressed in human ETP-ALL and in normal murine early thymic progenitors. Moreover, we found that Ezh2 contributes to the silencing of stem-cell- and early-progenitor-cell-associated genes. Loss of Ezh2 also resulted in increased activation of STAT3 by tyrosine 705 phosphorylation. Our data mechanistically link Ezh2 inactivation to stem-cell-associated transcriptional programs and increased growth/survival signaling, features that convey an adverse prognosis in patients. PMID:26904942

  2. Identification of early myeloid progenitors as immunosuppressive cells

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shiming; Qin, Baoxiong; He, Huan; Zhan, Jinxi; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Xinming; Yang, Liu; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhou, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), precursors of mature immune cells, may play a direct role in immunosurveillance. Early myeloid progenitors are the major components of HSPCs and they often undergo extensive expansion in stress as a result of myeloid-biased hematopoiesis. Yet, the precise function of early myeloid progenitors remains unclear. Here we show that during tumor progression, mouse granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (GMPs) but not common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) are markedly expanded within the bone marrow and blood of mice. Interestingly, both GMPs and CMPs freshly isolated from either tumor-bearing or naïve animals are capable of inhibiting polyclonal stimuli- and alloantigen-induced T cell proliferation, with tumor host-derived cells having elevated activities. Strikingly, these early myeloid progenitor cells even display much stronger suppressive capacity than the classical myeloid-derived suppressive cells. Analysis of GMPs indicates that they express iNOS and can secrete high levels of NO. Further studies unusing iNOS specific inhibitors reveal that the immunosuppression of GMPs is, to a large extent, NO-dependent. GMPs can also efficiently induce regulatory T cell development. These studies demonstrate that early myeloid progenitors can act as immunosuppressive cells. This finding provides novel insights into the functional diversity and plasticity of early myeloid progenitor cells. PMID:26979287

  3. Identification of early myeloid progenitors as immunosuppressive cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shiming; Qin, Baoxiong; He, Huan; Zhan, Jinxi; Wu, Qiong; Zhang, Xinming; Yang, Liu; Qu, Chunfeng; Zhou, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), precursors of mature immune cells, may play a direct role in immunosurveillance. Early myeloid progenitors are the major components of HSPCs and they often undergo extensive expansion in stress as a result of myeloid-biased hematopoiesis. Yet, the precise function of early myeloid progenitors remains unclear. Here we show that during tumor progression, mouse granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (GMPs) but not common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) are markedly expanded within the bone marrow and blood of mice. Interestingly, both GMPs and CMPs freshly isolated from either tumor-bearing or naïve animals are capable of inhibiting polyclonal stimuli- and alloantigen-induced T cell proliferation, with tumor host-derived cells having elevated activities. Strikingly, these early myeloid progenitor cells even display much stronger suppressive capacity than the classical myeloid-derived suppressive cells. Analysis of GMPs indicates that they express iNOS and can secrete high levels of NO. Further studies unusing iNOS specific inhibitors reveal that the immunosuppression of GMPs is, to a large extent, NO-dependent. GMPs can also efficiently induce regulatory T cell development. These studies demonstrate that early myeloid progenitors can act as immunosuppressive cells. This finding provides novel insights into the functional diversity and plasticity of early myeloid progenitor cells. PMID:26979287

  4. Evaluation of hematopoietic cells and myeloid/erythroid ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Tadjalli, Mina; Nazifi, Saeed; Haghjoo, Rahil

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the normal hematopoiesis, cellular components and myeloid/erythroid (M/E) ratio in the bone marrow of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus), bone marrow samples were collected from the proximal tibiotarsus bone of 16 clinically healthy adult pheasant. The bone marrow smears were stained using the Giemsa stain. The results indicated that the development and formation of blood cells in the bone marrow of pheasant were similar to other birds, whereas the morphology of the cells was similar to chickens, ducks, quail, and black-head gull. The mean M/E ratio was 1.24, the mean erythroid percentage was 42.24, the mean myeloid percentage was 52.62, and the mean percentage of all other cells percentage was 5.38. There was no significant difference in any of the cellular composition between male and female. PMID:25653783

  5. TSC-22 contributes to hematopoietic precursor cell proliferation and repopulation and is epigenetically silenced in large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ershler, Maxim; Yu, Li; Wei, Min; Hackanson, Björn; Yokohama, Akihiko; Mitsui, Takeki; Liu, Chunhui; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Liu, Shujun; Liu, Zhongfa; Trotta, Rossana; Liu, Chang-gong; Liu, Xiuping; Huang, Kun; Visser, Jan; Marcucci, Guido; Plass, Christoph; Belyavsky, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant methylation of tumor suppressor genes can lead to their silencing in many cancers. TSC-22 is a gene silenced in several solid tumors, but its function and the mechanism(s) responsible for its silencing are largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the TSC-22 promoter is methylated in primary mouse T or natural killer (NK) large granular lymphocyte (LGL) leukemia and this is associated with down-regulation or silencing of TSC-22 expression. The TSC-22 deregulation was reversed in vivo by a 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine therapy of T or NK LGL leukemia, which significantly increased survival of the mice bearing this disease. Ectopic expression of TSC-22 in mouse leukemia or lymphoma cell lines resulted in delayed in vivo tumor formation. Targeted disruption of TSC-22 in wild-type mice enhanced proliferation and in vivo repopulation efficiency of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs). Collectively, our data suggest that TSC-22 normally contributes to the regulation of HPC function and is a putative tumor suppressor gene that is hypermethylated and silenced in T or NK LGL leukemia. PMID:19329776

  6. PBX3 and MEIS1 Cooperate in Hematopoietic Cells to Drive Acute Myeloid Leukemias Characterized by a Core Transcriptome of the MLL-Rearranged Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zejuan; Chen, Ping; Su, Rui; Hu, Chao; Li, Yuanyuan; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Zuo, Zhixiang; Gurbuxani, Sandeep; Arnovitz, Stephen; Weng, Hengyou; Wang, Yungui; Li, Shenglai; Huang, Hao; Neilly, Mary Beth; Wang, Gang Greg; Jiang, Xi; Liu, Paul P; Jin, Jie; Chen, Jianjun

    2016-02-01

    Overexpression of HOXA/MEIS1/PBX3 homeobox genes is the hallmark of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid leukemia (AML). HOXA9 and MEIS1 are considered to be the most critical targets of MLL fusions and their coexpression rapidly induces AML. MEIS1 and PBX3 are not individually able to transform cells and were therefore hypothesized to function as cofactors of HOXA9. However, in this study, we demonstrate that coexpression of PBX3 and MEIS1 (PBX3/MEIS1), without ectopic expression of a HOX gene, is sufficient for transformation of normal mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in vitro. Moreover, PBX3/MEIS1 overexpression also caused AML in vivo, with a leukemic latency similar to that caused by forced expression of MLL-AF9, the most common form of MLL fusions. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of hematopoietic cells demonstrated that PBX3/MEIS1 overexpression, but not HOXA9/MEIS1, HOXA9/PBX3, or HOXA9 overexpression, recapitulated the MLL-fusion-mediated core transcriptome, particularly upregulation of the endogenous Hoxa genes. Disruption of the binding between MEIS1 and PBX3 diminished PBX3/MEIS1-mediated cell transformation and HOX gene upregulation. Collectively, our studies strongly implicate the PBX3/MEIS1 interaction as a driver of cell transformation and leukemogenesis, and suggest that this axis may play a critical role in the regulation of the core transcriptional programs activated in MLL-rearranged and HOX-overexpressing AML. Therefore, targeting the MEIS1/PBX3 interaction may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to treat these AML subtypes. Cancer Res; 76(3); 619-29. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26747896

  7. Splenic irradiation before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myeloid leukemia: long-term follow-up of a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gratwohl, Alois; Iacobelli, Simona; Bootsman, Natalia; van Biezen, Anja; Baldomero, Helen; Arcese, William; Arnold, Renate; Bron, Dominique; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ernst, Peter; Ferrant, Augustin; Frassoni, Francesco; Gahrton, Gösta; Richard, Carlos; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Link, Hartmut; Niederwieser, Dietger; Ruutu, Tapani; Schattenberg, Anton; Schmitz, Norbert; Torres-Gomez, Antonio; Zwaan, Ferry; Apperley, Jane; Olavarria, Eduardo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2016-05-01

    In the context of discussions on the reproducibility of clinical studies, we reanalyzed a prospective randomized study on the role of splenic irradiation as adjunct to the conditioning for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Between 1986 and 1989, a total of 229 patients with CML were randomized; of these, 225 (98 %; 112 with, 113 without splenic irradiation) could be identified in the database and their survival updated. Results confirmed the early findings with no significant differences in all measured endpoints (overall survival at 25 years: 42.7 %, 32.0-52.4 % vs 52.9 %, 43.2-62.6 %; p = 0.355, log rank test). Additional splenic irradiation failed to reduce relapse incidence. It did not increase non-relapse mortality nor the risk of late secondary malignancies. Comforting are the long-term results from this predefined consecutive cohort of patients: more than 60 % were alive at plus 25 years when they were transplanted with a low European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT) risk sore. This needs to be considered today when treatment options are discussed for patients who failed initial tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and have an available low risk HLA-identical donor. PMID:26994010

  8. Evaluation of immunomodulatory treatment based on conventional and lineage-specific chimerism analysis in patients with myeloid malignancies after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeiser, R; Spyridonidis, A; Wäsch, R; Ihorst, G; Grüllich, C; Bertz, H; Finke, J

    2005-05-01

    Both conventional chimerism analysis (CCA) and lineage-specific chimerism analysis (LCA) have potential pitfalls as diagnostic means for the detection of minimal residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (aHCT). Therefore, the present study examines the results of both methods in order to determine how predictive consecutive evaluations were, with respect to the risk that the patient would relapse during post-transplant follow-up and with respect to responsiveness to immunomodulatory treatment. A total of 168 individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (n = 137) and myelo dysplastic syndrome (n = 31) were investigated with CCA and LCA at mean intervals of 24 days (range: 11-116). The median follow-up after myeloablative aHCT was 22 months (range: 4-49). Of 168 patients, 65 experienced a clinical relapse after aHCT. CCA and LCA were comparatively sensitive and specific for relapse at the intervals of chimerism testing employed in this study. Of 32 patients, 10 who were offered donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) treatment for increasing (n = 29) or stable (n = 3) mixed chimerism (MC) achieved at least transitory CC. The observation that all patients with increasing MC relapsed despite DLI treatment (54%) or withdrawal of immune suppression (24%) indicates that novel strategies to deal with rapidly evolving relapse in AML patients, such as shortening of chimerism monitoring intervals, need to be evaluated. PMID:15772700

  9. High rate of hematological responses to sorafenib in FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia relapsed after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Freitas, Tiago; Marktel, Sarah; Piemontese, Simona; Carrabba, Matteo G; Tresoldi, Cristina; Messina, Carlo; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Assanelli, Andrea; Corti, Consuelo; Bernardi, Massimo; Peccatori, Jacopo; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Relapse represents the most significant cause of failure of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for FLT3-ITD-positive acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and available therapies are largely unsatisfactory. In this study, we retrospectively collected data on the off-label use of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, either alone or in association with hypomethylating agents and adoptive immunotherapy, in 13 patients with post-transplantation FLT3-ITD-positive AML relapses. Hematological response was documented in 12 of 13 patients (92%), and five of 13 (38%) achieved complete bone marrow remission. Treatment was overall manageable in the outpatient setting, although all patients experienced significant adverse events, especially severe cytopenias (requiring a donor stem cell boost in five patients) and typical hand-foot syndrome. None of the patients developed graft-vs.-host disease following sorafenib alone, whereas this was frequently observed when this was given in association with donor T-cell infusions. Six patients are alive and in remission at the last follow-up, and four could be bridged to a second allogeneic HSCT, configuring a 65 ± 14% overall survival at 100 d from relapse. Taken together, our data suggest that sorafenib might represent a valid treatment option for patients with FLT3-ITD-positive post-transplantation relapses, manageable also in combination with other therapeutic strategies. PMID:26260140

  10. In vitro differentiation of murine hematopoietic progenitor cells toward the myeloid lineage occurs in response to Staphylococcus aureus and yeast species.

    PubMed

    Maneu, Victoria; Estévez, Miguel Ángel; de Dios, Sara; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, María Luisa; Megías, Javier

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of inactivated microbial stimuli (Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Saccharomyces boulardii, and Staphylococcus aureus) on the in vitro differentiation of lineage negative (Lin(-)) hematopoietic progenitor mouse cells. Purified Lin(-) progenitors were co-cultured for 7 days with the stimuli, and cell differentiation was determined by flow cytometry analysis. All the stimuli assayed caused differentiation toward the myeloid lineage. S. boulardii and particularly C. glabrata were the stimuli that induced in a minor extent differentiation of Lin(-) cells, as the major population of differentiated cells corresponded to monocytes, whereas C. albicans and S. aureus induced differentiation beyond monocytes: to monocyte-derived dendritic cells and macrophages, respectively. Interestingly, signaling through TLR2 by its pure ligand Pam3CSK4 directed differentiation of Lin(-) cells almost exclusively to macrophages. These data support the notion that hematopoiesis can be modulated in response to microbial stimuli in a pathogen-dependent manner, being determined by the pathogen-associated molecular patterns and the pattern-recognition receptors involved, in order to generate the populations of mature cells required to deal with the pathogen. PMID:24650426

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia: t(8;21) and inv(16) represent different clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Miyamura, Koichi; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Kasai, Masaharu; Maruta, Atsuo; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Tanosaki, Ryuji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Koda, Kyuhei; Yago, Kazuhiro; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yoshida, Takashi; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Kodera, Yoshihisa

    2009-02-26

    We analyzed 338 adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t(8;21) and inv(16) undergoing stem cell transplantation (SCT) who were registered in the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation database. At 3 years, overall survival (OS) of patients with t(8;21) and inv(16) was 50% and 72%, respectively (P= .002). Although no difference was observed when restricted to allogeneic SCT in first complete remission (CR; 84% and 74%), OS of patients with t(8;21) and inv(16) undergoing allogeneic SCT in second or third CR (45% and 86% at 3 years; P= .008) was different. OS was not different between patients in first CR who received allogeneic SCT and those who received autologous SCT for both t(8;21) AML (84% vs 77%; P= .49) and inv(16) AML (74% vs 59%; P= .86). Patients with inv(16) not in CR did better after allogeneic SCT than those with t(8;21) (70% and 18%; P= .03). Patients with t(8;21) and inv(16) should be managed differently as to the application of SCT. SCT in first CR is not necessarily recommended for inv(16). For t(8;21) patients in first CR, a prospective trial is needed to clarify the significance of autologous SCT and allogeneic SCT over chemotherapy. PMID:19126873

  12. Manganese superoxide dismutase depletion in murine hematopoietic stem cells perturbs iron homeostasis, globin switching, and epigenetic control in erythrocyte precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Case, Adam J.; Madsen, Joshua M.; Motto, David G.; Meyerholz, David K.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2012-01-01

    Heme synthesis partially occurs in the mitochondrial matrix, thus there is a high probability that enzymes and intermediates important in the production of heme will be exposed to metabolic byproducts including reactive oxygen species. In addition, the need for ferrous iron for heme production, Fe-S coordination, and other processes occurring in the mitochondrial matrix suggests that aberrant fluxes of reactive oxygen species in this compartment might perturb normal iron homeostasis. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2) is an anti-oxidant enzyme that governs steady-state levels of the superoxide in the mitochondrial matrix. Using hematopoietic stem cell-specific conditional Sod2 knock-out mice we observed increased superoxide concentrations in red cell progeny which caused significant pathologies including impaired erythrocytes and decreased ferrochelatase activity. Animals lacking Sod2 expression in erythroid precursors also displayed extramedullary hematopoiesis and systemic iron redistribution. Additionally, the increase in superoxide flux in erythroid precursors caused abnormal gene regulation of hematopoietic transcription factors, globins, and iron-response genes. Moreover, the erythroid precursors also displayed evidence of global changes of histone post-translational modifications, a likely cause of at least some of the aberrant gene expression noted. From a therapeutic translational perspective, mitochondrially-targeted superoxide-scavenging anti-oxidants partially rescued the observed phenotype. Taken together, our findings illuminate the superoxide sensitivity of normal iron homeostasis in erythrocyte precursors and suggest a probable link between mitochondrial redox metabolism and epigenetic control of nuclear gene regulation during mammalian erythropoiesis. PMID:23219873

  13. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Acute Myeloid Leukemia: No Impact of Pre-transplant Extramedullary Disease on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Sagun D.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Wang, Hai-Lin; Akpek, Görgün; Copelan, Edward A.; Freytes, César; Gale, Robert Peter; Hamadani, Mehdi; Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Reshef, Ran; Ritchie, David S.; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N.; Seber, Adriana; Shea, Thomas C.; Tallman, Martin S.; Wirk, Baldeep; Bunjes, Donald W.; Devine, Steven M.; de Lima, Marcos; Weisdorf, Daniel J.; Uy, Geoffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of extramedullary disease (EMD) in AML on the outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is unknown. Using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) we compared the outcomes of patients who had EMD of AML at any time prior to transplant to a cohort of AML patients without EMD. We reviewed data AML from 9,797 patients including 814 with EMD from 310 reporting centers and 44 different countries who underwent alloHCT between and 1995–2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) after alloHCT. Secondary outcomes included leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse rate, and treatment-related mortality (TRM). In a multivariate analysis, the presence of EMD did not affect either OS (HR 1.00, 95% CI 0.91–1.09), LFS (0.98, 0.89–1.09), TRM (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.80–1.16, p=0.23) or relapse (RR =1.03, 95% CI, 0.92–1.16; p=0.62). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with EMD was not influenced by the location, timing of EMD, or intensity of conditioning regimen. The presence of EMD in AML does not affect transplant outcomes and should not be viewed as an independent adverse prognostic feature. PMID:25915806

  14. Reduced-intensity conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in elderly or infirm patients with advanced myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Federmann, Birgit; Buechele, Corina; Helwig, Andrea; Schmohl, Jörg; Vogel, Wichard; Faul, Christoph; Kanz, Lothar; Bethge, Wolfgang A

    2016-01-01

    We report a retrospective single-center analysis of 112 consecutive patients that underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) with fludarabine (FLU) and busulfan (BU) for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and myeloproliferative syndrome (MPS) from 2005 to 2014. Three-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 46 and 58 %, respectively. Patients ≥60 years of age showed a similar outcome compared to younger patients (3-year OS 55 vs. 61 %, p = 0.96; 3-year EFS 46 vs. 46 %, p = 0.82). Cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 3 years adjusted for relapse as competing risk was 25 % for patients aged <60 years and 15 % for older patients (p = 0.15). Infusions of higher CD34(+) blood stem cell doses were associated with a significantly better outcome in the elderly subgroup (3-year OS 82 vs. 39 %, p = 0.007). Moreover, complete donor chimerism at day +100 was associated with a significantly improved survival (3-year OS 69 vs. 23 %, p = 0.003). In conclusion, our data suggest that RIC with FLU/BU enables long-term disease-free survival even in an elderly patient population. Age has no negative impact on the outcome of allogeneic HCT, and decision for transplant should be based on disease risk and performance status rather than age alone. PMID:26411736

  15. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is an Effective Salvage Therapy for Patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Presenting with Advanced Disease or Failing Treatment with Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Anish P; Barnett, Michael J; Broady, Raewyn C; Hogge, Donna E; Song, Kevin W; Toze, Cynthia L; Nantel, Stephen H; Power, Maryse M; Sutherland, Heather J; Nevill, Thomas J; Abou Mourad, Yasser; Narayanan, Sujaatha; Gerrie, Alina S; Forrest, Donna L

    2015-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remains the only known curative therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML); however, it is rarely utilized given the excellent long-term results with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine HSCT outcomes for patients with CML who failed TKI therapy or presented in advanced phase and to identify predictors of survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Fifty-one patients with CML underwent HSCT for advanced disease at diagnosis (n = 15), TKI resistance as defined by the European LeukemiaNet guidelines (n = 30), TKI intolerance (n = 2), or physician preference (n = 4). At a median follow-up of 71.9 months, the 8-year overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), relapse, and NRM were 68%, 46%, 41%, and 23%, respectively. In univariate analysis, predictors of OS included first chronic phase (CP1) disease status at HSCT (P = .0005), European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation score 1 to 4 (P = .04), and complete molecular response (CMR) to HSCT (P < .0001). Donor (female) to patient (male) gender combination (P = .02) and CMR to HSCT (P < .0001) predicted lower relapse. In multivariate analysis, CMR to HSCT remained an independent predictor of OS (odds ratio [OR], 43), EFS (OR, 56) and relapse (OR, 29). This report indicates that the outlook is excellent for those patients who remain in CP1 at the time of HSCT and achieve a CMR after HSCT. However, only approximately 50% of those in advanced phase at HSCT are long-term survivors. This highlights the ongoing need to try to identify patients earlier, before disease progression, who are destined to fail this treatment to optimize transplantation outcomes. PMID:25865648

  16. Impact of Cranial Irradiation Added to Intrathecal Conditioning in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Central Nervous System Involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Douglas, James G.; Storer, Barry E.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Storb, Rainer

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Neither the prognostic importance nor the appropriate management of central nervous system (CNS) involvement is known for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We examined the impact of a CNS irradiation boost to standard intrathecal chemotherapy (ITC). Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2005, a total of 648 adult AML patients received a myeloablative HCT: 577 patients were CNS negative (CNS-), and 71 were CNS positive (CNS+). Of the 71 CNS+ patients, 52 received intrathecal chemotherapy alone (CNS+ITC), and 19 received ITC plus an irradiation boost (CNS+RT). Results: The CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT patients had 1- and 5-year relapse-free survivals (RFS) of 43% and 35%, 15% and 6%, and 37% and 32%, respectively. CNS+ITC patients had a statistically significant worse RFS compared with CNS- patients (hazard ratio [HR], 2.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-3.6; p < 0.0001). CNS+RT patients had improved relapse free survival over that of CNS+ITC patients (HR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8; p = 0.01). The 1- and 5-year overall survivals (OS) of patients with CNS-, CNS+ITC, and CNS+RT, were 50% and 38%, 21% and 6%, and 53% and 42%, respectively. The survival of CNS+RT were significantly better than CNS+ITC patients (p = 0.004). After adjusting for known risk factors, CNS+RT patients had a trend toward lower relapse rates and reduced nonrelapse mortality. Conclusions: CNS+ AML is associated with a poor prognosis. The role of a cranial irradiation boost to intrathecal chemotherapy appears to mitigate the risk of CNS disease, and needs to be further investigated to define optimal treatment strategies.

  17. Impact of age on outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with reduced intensity conditioning in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Jun; Kanamori, Heiwa; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Iwato, Koji; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Okumura, Hirokazu; Onizuka, Makoto; Maesako, Yoshitomo; Teshima, Takanori; Kobayashi, Naoki; Morishima, Yasuo; Hirokawa, Makoto; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yano, Shingo; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies have repeatedly reported that increasing age is a significant risk factor for worse outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) among patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, more recent studies reported conflicting results regarding the association between age and outcomes in elderly patients. Therefore, we conducted a large-scale, nationwide retrospective study to examine the impact of age on outcomes of allo-HSCT with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) for AML patients who were older than 50 years. Of the 757 patients, 89 patients (11.8%) were 50-54, 249 patients (32.9%) were 55-59, 301 patients (39.8%) were 60-64 and 118 patients (15.6%) were ≥65 years old. The 3-year overall survival (OS) (47.8, 45.2, 37.9, and 36.6% for patients aged 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, and ≥65 years, respectively, P = 0.24) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (24.0, 22.8, 29.2, and 27.6% for patients aged 50-54, 55-59, 60-64, and ≥65 years, respectively, P = 0.49) were not significantly different among the four age groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that increased age had no significant effect on OS or NRM after adjusting for covariates. These results suggested that advanced patient age is not a contraindication for RIC allo-HSCT in elderly AML patients. Am. J. Hematol. 91:302-307, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26663096

  18. Epigenetics in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plass, Christoph; Oakes, Christopher; Blum, William; Marcucci, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a disease characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of clonal neoplastic hematopoietic precursor cells. This leads to the disruption of normal hematopoiesis and bone marrow failure. Major breakthroughs in the past have contributed to our understanding of the genetic failures and the changed biology in AML cells that underlie the initiation and progression of the disease. It is now recognized that not only genetic but also epigenetic alterations are similarly important in this process. Since these alterations do not change the DNA sequences and are pharmacologically reversible, they have been regarded as optimal targets for what is now known as epigenetic therapy. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of normal epigenetic processes, outline our knowledge of epigenetic alterations in AML, and discuss how this information is being used to improve current therapy of this disease. PMID:18692688

  19. Monosomal karyotype as an adverse prognostic factor in patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in first complete remission: a retrospective survey on behalf of the ALWP of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Brands-Nijenhuis, Angelique V M; Labopin, Myriam; Schouten, Harry C; Volin, Liisa; Socié, Gérard; Cornelissen, Jan J; Huynh, Anne; Ljungman, Per; Malard, Florent; Esteve, Jordi; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-02-01

    Despite the overall benefit from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation observed in patients with poor cytogenetic risk acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission, the precise effect of this procedure for different poor-risk subtypes has not been fully analyzed. This retrospective analysis was performed to investigate whether allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation performed in first complete remission in patients with monosomal karyotype can overcome the adverse prognosis associated with these patients. Of the 4635 patients included in the study, 189 (4%) harbored a monosomal karyotype. The presence of a monosomal karyotype was associated with a worse outcome, with an inferior leukemia-free survival and overall survival (5-year leukemia-free survival and overall survival: 24±3% and 26±3% vs. 53±1% and 57±1% in monosomal-karyotype and non-monosomal-karyotype, respectively; P<0.0001) and higher relapse risk after transplantation (cumulative incidence of relapse at 5 years: 56±4% in monosomal-karyotype vs. 28±1% in non-monosomal-karyotype; P<0.0001). The adverse negative impact of monosomal karyotype cytogenetics was confirmed in the entire cohort in a multivariate analysis [Hazard Ratio (HR): 1.88, 95% Confidence Interval (CI):1.29-2.73, P=0.001 for relapse incidence; HR:1.71, 95%CI:1.27-2.32, P<0.0001 for leukemia-free survival; HR:1.81, 95%CI:1.32-2.48, P=0.0002 for overall survival], and was independent of the presence of other poor-risk cytogenetic subtypes. In summary, monosomal karyotype arises as a strong negative prognostic feature in acute myeloid leukemia also in patients who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission, stressing the need to develop additional pre- and post-transplantation strategies aimed at improving overall results. Nonetheless, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in early phase is currently the best therapy for this very poor-risk acute myeloid leukemia subtype. PMID:26589909

  20. Survival of patients with acute myeloid leukemia relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a center for international blood and marrow transplant research study.

    PubMed

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Logan, Brent R; Wang, Hai-Lin; Devine, Steven M; de Lima, Marcos; Bunjes, Donald W; Zhang, Mei-Jie

    2015-03-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) remains a major therapeutic challenge. We studied outcomes of 1788 AML patients relapsing after alloHCT (1990 to 2010) during first or second complete remission (CR) to identify factors associated with longer postrelapse survival. Median time to post-HCT relapse was 7 months (range, 1 to 177). At relapse, 1231 patients (69%) received intensive therapy, including chemotherapy alone (n = 660), donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) chemotherapy (n = 202), or second alloHCT chemotherapy DLI (n = 369), with subsequent CR rates of 29%. Median follow-up after relapse was 39 months (range, <1 to 193). Survival for all patients was 23% at 1 year after relapse; however, 3-year overall survival correlated with time from HCT to relapse (4% for relapse during the 1- to 6-month period, 12% during the 6-month to 2-year period, 26% during the 2- to 3-year period, and 38% for ?3 years). In multivariable analysis, lower mortality was significantly associated with longer time from alloHCT to relapse (relative risk, .55 for 6 months to 2 years; relative risk, .39 for 2 to 3 years; and relative risk, .28 for ?3 years; P < .0001) and a first HCT using reduced-intensity conditioning (relative risk, .77; 95% confidence interval [CI], .66 to .88; P = .0002). In contrast, inferior survival was associated with age >40 years (relative risk, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.24 to 1.64; P < .0001), active graft-versus-host disease at relapse (relative risk, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.13 to 1.39; P < .0001), adverse cytogenetics (relative risk, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.71; P = .0062), mismatched unrelated donor (relative risk, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.22 to 2.13; P = .0008), and use of cord blood for first HCT (relative risk, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.42; P = .0078). AML relapse after alloHCT predicted poor survival; however, patients who relapsed ?6 months after their initial alloHCT had better survival and may benefit from intensive therapy, such as second alloHCT DLI. PMID:25460355

  1. Efficacy of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Intermediate-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia Adult Patients in First Complete Remission: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honghu; Dou, Liping; Liu, Daihong; Fu, Lin; Ma, Cong; Ma, Xuebin; Yao, Yushi; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Lijun; Zhao, Yu; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lili; Li, Yonghui; Yu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and consolidation chemotherapy have been used to treat intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in first complete remission (CR1). However, it is still unclear which treatments are most effective for these patients. The aim of our study was to analyze the relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) benefit of allogeneic HSCT (alloHSCT) for intermediate-risk AML patients in CR1. A meta-analysis of prospective trials comparing alloHSCT to non-alloHSCT (autologous HSCT [autoHSCT] and/or chemotherapy) was undertaken. We systematically searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library though October 2014, using keywords and relative MeSH or Emtree terms, allogeneic; acut* and leukem*/aml/leukaem*/leucem*/leucaem*; and nonlympho* or myelo*. A total of 7053 articles were accessed. The primary outcomes were RFS and OS, while the secondary outcomes were treatment-related mortality (TRM) and relapse rate (RR). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for each outcome. The primary outcomes were RFS and OS, while the secondary outcomes were TRM and RR. We included 9 prospective controlled studies including 1950 adult patients. Patients with intermediate-risk AML in CR1 who received either alloHSCT or non-alloHSCT were considered eligible. AlloHSCT was found to be associated with significantly better RFS, OS, and RR than non-alloHSCT (HR, 0.684 [95% CI: 0.48, 0.95]; HR, 0.76 [95% CI: 0.61, 0.95]; and HR, 0.58 [95% CI: 0.45, 0.75], respectively). TRM was significantly higher following alloHSCT than non-alloHSCT (HR, 3.09 [95% CI: 1.38, 6.92]). However, subgroup analysis showed no OS benefit for alloHSCT over autoHSCT (HR, 0.99 [95% CI: 0.70, 1.39]). In conclusion, alloHSCT is associated with more favorable RFS, OS, and RR benefits (but not TRM outcomes) than non-alloHSCT generally, but does not have an OS advantage over autoHSCT specifically, in patients with intermediate-risk AML in CR1. PMID:26197471

  2. NUP98 gene fusions and hematopoietic malignancies: common themes and new biologic insights

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Sheryl M.; Slape, Christopher I.

    2011-01-01

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements of the Nucleoporin 98 gene (NUP98), primarily balanced translocations and inversions, are associated with a wide array of hematopoietic malignancies. NUP98 is known to be fused to at least 28 different partner genes in patients with hematopoietic malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in blast crisis, myelodysplastic syndrome, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and bilineage/biphenotypic leukemia. NUP98 gene fusions typically encode a fusion protein that retains the amino terminus of NUP98; in this context, it is important to note that several recent studies have demonstrated that the amino-terminal portion of NUP98 exhibits transcription activation potential. Approximately half of the NUP98 fusion partners encode homeodomain proteins, and at least 5 NUP98 fusions involve known histone-modifying genes. Several of the NUP98 fusions, including NUP98-homeobox (HOX)A9, NUP98-HOXD13, and NUP98-JARID1A, have been used to generate animal models of both lymphoid and myeloid malignancy; these models typically up-regulate HOXA cluster genes, including HOXA5, HOXA7, HOXA9, and HOXA10. In addition, several of the NUP98 fusion proteins have been shown to inhibit differentiation of hematopoietic precursors and to increase self-renewal of hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, providing a potential mechanism for malignant transformation. PMID:21948299

  3. Differential sensitivity of T lymphocytes and hematopoietic precursor cells to photochemotherapy with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light.

    PubMed

    Mabed, Mohamed; Coffe, Christian; Racadot, Evelyne; Angonin, Regis; Pavey, Jean-Jaques; Tiberghien, Pierre; Herve, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    The combination of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and long wave ultraviolet radiation (UV-A) has immunomodulatory effects and might abolish both graft-vs-host and host-vs-graft reactions after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In the present study, we have confirmed the sensitivity of T lymphocytes to 8-MOP treatment plus UV-A exposure as evidenced by the abrogation of the alloreactivity in mixed lymphocyte cultures as well as the inhibition of the response to phytohemagglutinin A. However, the clonogenic capacity of the bone marrow hematopoietic progenitors was inhibited with UV-A doses lower than the doses needed to inhibit T-lymphocytes alloreactivity. Moreover, long-term bone marrow cultures showed that 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment had detrimental effects on the more immature bone marrow stem cells. These data were confirmed when murine bone marrow graft was treated with 8-MOP, exposed to UV-A, then transplanted into semiallogeneic recipient mice. The treated cells could not maintain their clonogenic capacity in vivo resulting in death of all animals. Taken together, these data show that ex vivo 8-MOP plus UV-A treatment of the marrow graft cannot be used to prevent post-bone marrow transplantation alloreactivity. PMID:16208471

  4. CBFB-MYH11/RUNX1 together with a compendium of hematopoietic regulators, chromatin modifiers and basal transcription factors occupies self-renewal genes in inv(16) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mandoli, A; Singh, A A; Jansen, P W T C; Wierenga, A T J; Riahi, H; Franci, G; Prange, K; Saeed, S; Vellenga, E; Vermeulen, M; Stunnenberg, H G; Martens, J H A

    2014-04-01

    Different mechanisms for CBF?-MYH11 function in acute myeloid leukemia with inv(16) have been proposed such as tethering of RUNX1 outside the nucleus, interference with transcription factor complex assembly and recruitment of histone deacetylases, all resulting in transcriptional repression of RUNX1 target genes. Here, through genome-wide CBF?-MYH11-binding site analysis and quantitative interaction proteomics, we found that CBF?-MYH11 localizes to RUNX1 occupied promoters, where it interacts with TAL1, FLI1 and TBP-associated factors (TAFs) in the context of the hematopoietic transcription factors ERG, GATA2 and PU.1/SPI1 and the coregulators EP300 and HDAC1. Transcriptional analysis revealed that upon fusion protein knockdown, a small subset of the CBF?-MYH11 target genes show increased expression, confirming a role in transcriptional repression. However, the majority of CBF?-MYH11 target genes, including genes implicated in hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal such as ID1, LMO1 and JAG1, are actively transcribed and repressed upon fusion protein knockdown. Together these results suggest an essential role for CBF?-MYH11 in regulating the expression of genes involved in maintaining a stem cell phenotype. PMID:24002588

  5. Ectopic TAL-1/SCL expression in phenotypically normal or leukemic myeloid precursors: proliferative and antiapoptotic effects coupled with a differentiation blockade.

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, G L; Tocci, A; Botta, R; Facchiano, F; Testa, U; Vitelli, L; Valtieri, M; Croce, C M; Peschle, C

    1997-01-01

    The TAL-1 gene specifies a basic helix-loop-helix domain (bHLH) transcription factor, which heterodimerizes with E2A gene family proteins. tal-1 protein is abnormally expressed in the majority of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). tal-1 is expressed and plays a significant role in normal erythropoietic differentiation and maturation, while its expression in early myeloid differentiation is abruptly shut off at the level of late progenitors/early differentiated precursors (G. L. Condorelli, L. Vitelli, M. Valtieri, I. Marta, E. Montesoro, V. Lulli, R. Baer, and C. Peschle, Blood 86:164-175, 1995). We show that in late myeloid progenitors (the phenotypically normal murine 32D cell line) and early leukemic precursors (the human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cell line) ectopic tal-1 expression induces (i) a proliferative effect under suboptimal culture conditions (i.e., low growth factor and serum concentrations respectively), via an antiapoptotic effect in 32D cells or increased DNA synthesis in HL-60 cells, and (ii) a total or marked inhibitory effect on differentiation, respectively, on granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-induced granulopoiesis in 32D cells or retinoic acid- and vitamin D3-induced granulo- and monocytopoiesis in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, experiments with 32D temperature-sensitive p53 cells indicate that aberrant tal-1 expression at the permissive temperature does not exert a proliferative effect but causes p53-mediated apoptosis, i.e., the tal-1 proliferative effect depends on the integrity of the cell cycle checkpoints of the host cell, as observed for c-myc and other oncogenes. tal-1 mutant experiments indicate that ectopic tal-1 effects are mediated by both the DNA-binding and the heterodimerization domains, while the N-terminally truncated tal-1 variant (M3) expressed in T-ALL malignant cells mimics the effects of the wild-type protein. Altogether, our results (i) indicate proliferative and antidifferentiative effects of ectopic tal-1 expression, (ii) shed light on the underlying mechanisms (i.e., requirement for the integrity of the tal-1 bHLH domain and cell cycle checkpoints in the host cell, particularly p53), and (iii) provide new experimental models to further investigate these mechanisms. PMID:9111367

  6. Homeostatic action of adenosine A3 and A1 receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Michal; Pospísil, Milan; Znojil, Vladimír; Holá, Jirina; Streitová, Denisa; Vacek, Antonín

    2008-07-01

    Two adenosine receptor agonists, N6-(3-iodobenzyl)adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), which selectively activate adenosine A3 and A1 receptors, respectively, were tested for their ability to influence proliferation of granulocytic and erythroid cells in femoral bone marrow of mice using morphological criteria. Agonists were given intraperitoneally to mice in repeated isomolar doses of 200 nmol/kg. Three variants of experiments were performed to investigate the action of the agonists under normal resting state of mice and in phases of cell depletion and subsequent regeneration after treatment with the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. In the case of granulopoiesis, IB-MECA 1) increased by a moderate but significant level proliferation of cells under normal resting state; 2) strongly increased proliferation of cells in the cell depletion phase; but 3) did not influence cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. CPA did not influence cell proliferation under normal resting state and in the cell depletion phase, but strongly suppressed the overshooting cell proliferation in the regeneration phase. The stimulatory effect of IB-MECA on cell proliferation of erythroid cells was observed only when this agonist was administered during the cell depletion phase. CPA did not modulate erythroid proliferation in any of the functional states investigated, probably due to the lower demand for cell production as compared with granulopoiesis. The results indicate opposite effects of the two adenosine receptor agonists on proliferation of hematopoietic cells and suggest the plasticity and homeostatic role of the adenosine receptor expression. PMID:18445770

  7. Cell cycle control in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schnerch, Dominik; Yalcintepe, Jasmin; Schmidts, Andrea; Becker, Heiko; Follo, Marie; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the result of a multistep transforming process of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs) which enables them to proceed through limitless numbers of cell cycles and to become resistant to cell death. Increased proliferation renders these cells vulnerable to acquiring mutations and may favor leukemic transformation. Here, we review how deregulated cell cycle control contributes to increased proliferation in AML and favors genomic instability, a prerequisite to confer selective advantages to particular clones in order to adapt and independently proliferate in the presence of a changing microenvironment. We discuss the connection between differentiation and proliferation with regard to leukemogenesis and outline the impact of specific alterations on response to therapy. Finally, we present examples, how a better understanding of cell cycle regulation and deregulation has already led to new promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:22957304

  8. Cell cycle control in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schnerch, Dominik; Yalcintepe, Jasmin; Schmidts, Andrea; Becker, Heiko; Follo, Marie; Engelhardt, Monika; Wäsch, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the result of a multistep transforming process of hematopoietic precursor cells (HPCs) which enables them to proceed through limitless numbers of cell cycles and to become resistant to cell death. Increased proliferation renders these cells vulnerable to acquiring mutations and may favor leukemic transformation. Here, we review how deregulated cell cycle control contributes to increased proliferation in AML and favors genomic instability, a prerequisite to confer selective advantages to particular clones in order to adapt and independently proliferate in the presence of a changing microenvironment. We discuss the connection between differentiation and proliferation with regard to leukemogenesis and outline the impact of specific alterations on response to therapy. Finally, we present examples, how a better understanding of cell cycle regulation and deregulation has already led to new promising therapeutic strategies. PMID:22957304

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia: therapeutic impact of epigenetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Altucci, Lucia; Clarke, Nicole; Nebbioso, Angela; Scognamiglio, Annamaria; Gronemeyer, Hinrich

    2005-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not a single disease but a group of malignancies in which the clonal expansion of various types of hematopoietic precursor cells in the bone marrow leads to perturbation of the delicate balance between self-renewal and differentiation that is characteristic of normal hematopoiesis. An increasing number of genetic aberrations, such as chromosomal translocations that alter the function of transcription regulatory factors, has been identified as the cause of AML and shown to act by deregulating gene programming at both the genetic and epigenetic level. While the genetic aberrations occurring in acute myeloid leukemia are fairly well understood, we have only recently become aware of the epigenetic deregulation associated with leukemia, in particular with myeloid leukemias. The deposition of epigenetic "marks" on chromatin - post-translational modifications of nucleosomal proteins and methylation of particular DNA sequences - is accomplished by enzymes, which are often embedded in multi-subunit "machineries" that have acquired aberrant functionalities during leukemogenesis. These enzymes are targets for so-called "epi-drugs". Indeed, recent results indicate that epi-drugs may constitute an entirely novel type of anti-cancer drugs with unanticipated potential. Proof-of-principle comes from studies with histone deacetylase inhibitors, promising novel anti-cancer drugs. In this review we focus on the epigenetic mechanisms associated with acute myeloid leukemogenesis and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic modulators such as histone deacetylase and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors. PMID:15964234

  10. Isolation of a candidate human hematopoietic stem-cell population.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, C M; Weissman, I L; Tsukamoto, A S; Buckle, A M; Peault, B

    1992-01-01

    We have identified a rare (0.05-0.1%) subset of human fetal bone marrow cells that contains multipotent hematopoietic precursors. The population of human precursor cells that express Thy-1 and CD34 but no known lineage markers is enriched for clonogenic activity that establishes long-term, multilineage (myelomonocytic and B lymphoid) cultures on mouse marrow stromal lines. Further, the Thy-1+CD34+ subset that takes up little of the fluorescent mitochondrial dye rhodamine 123 contains virtually all the cells that establish long-term cultures. In human fetal thymus transplanted into SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice, Thy-1+CD34+ fetal bone marrow cells differentiate into T lymphocytes. In two of nine cases, allogeneic Thy-1+CD34+ cells could engraft intact human fetal bone marrow grown in SCID mice, resulting in donor-derived myeloid and B cells. By extrapolation, the rare human Thy-1+Lin-CD34+ cell population contains pluripotent hematopoietic progenitors; we propose that it is highly enriched for candidate hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:1372992

  11. Gradual Rarefaction of Hematopoietic Precursors and Atrophy in a Depleted microRNA 29a, b and c Environment

    PubMed Central

    Kauffman, Lauren; Balatti, Veronica; Cascione, Luciano; Fadda, Paolo; Racke, Frederick; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Costinean, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background The self-renewing ability of HSCs is fundamental for the maintenance of a pool of bone marrow precursors throughout the life of an individual. The genetic mechanisms underlying such a complex process are still poorly understood. Results and Significance Here, we show that constitutive in vivo deletion of miR29ab1 leads to reduced number of HSCs and that miR29ab1 deficient bone marrow cannot repopulate the bone marrow of irradiated mice. An Affymetrix analysis of the miR29ab1 knockout mice identifies key proteins that could be responsible for this phenotype, as DNMT3a and b. Moreover, our findings reveal that whereas miR29b2c knockout mice do not exhibit any spontaneous abnormality, the double knock out – miR29ab1b2c – has marked generalized atrophy, raising the possibility that the two bi-cistrons might cooperate in order to maintain the stem cell number in general, not only limited to the bone marrow. PMID:26147501

  12. Mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Damon, Lloyd E; Damon, Lauren E

    2009-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells can be mobilized out of the bone marrow into the blood for the reconstitution of hematopoiesis following high-dose therapy. Methods to improve mobilization efficiency and yields are rapidly emerging. Traditional methods include chemotherapy with or without myeloid growth factors. Plerixafor, a novel agent that disrupts the CXCR4-CXCL12 bond, the primary hematopoietic stem cell anchor in the bone marrow, has recently been US FDA-approved for mobilizing hematopoietic stem cells in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Plerixafor and myeloid growth factors as single agents appear safe to use in family or volunteer hematopoietic stem cells donors. Plerixafor mobilizes leukemic stem cells and is not approved for use in patients with acute leukemia. Patients failing to mobilize adequate hematopoietic stem cells with myeloid growth factors can often be successfully mobilized with chemotherapy plus myeloid growth factors or with plerixafor and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. PMID:21082960

  13. Outcomes of Patients with Myeloid Malignancies Treated with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation from Matched Unrelated Donors Compared with One Human Leukocyte Antigen Mismatched Related Donors Using HLA Typing at 10 Loci

    PubMed Central

    Ciurea, Stefan O.; Saliba, Rima M.; Rondon, Gabriela; Patah, Poliana A.; Aung, Fleur; Cano, Pedro; Andersson, Borje S.; Kebriaei, Partow; Popat, Uday; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Champlin, Richard E.; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Most candidates for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) lack a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling donor. Some patients may have a related donor with whom they are mismatched at 1 antigen/allele. It is not known whether such a match is preferable to a matched unrelated donor (MUD). We evaluated the outcomes (survival, relapse, nonrelapse mortality [NRM]) of all 28 patients with a single HLA antigen/allele mismatch identified through high-resolution HLA typing at HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1, and all 318 patients with myeloid malignancies who received transplants from a 10/10 MUD treated during the same period of time at a single institution. Overall, outcomes for patients treated from a 1-antigen/allele mismatch related donor were significantly worse than from a MUD, primarily because of increased NRM. Overall survival (OS) rates at 3 years for 1-antigen/allele mismatched related donor and MUD transplant recipients were 19% and 45% (P =.007), and NRM rates were 40% and 26% (P =.05), respectively. Patients with class I mismatches appeared to have poorer OS than did patients with class II mismatches. A higher incidence of graft rejection was identified in the mismatched related donor group (P =.02). These results indicate that transplant outcomes are better with a MUD than with a 1 antigen/allele-mismatched related donor. PMID:20969970

  14. Assessing the efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation (allo-HSCT) by analyzing survival end points in defined groups of acute myeloid leukemia patients: a retrospective, multicenter Polish Adult Leukemia Group study.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Sebastian; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Kuliczkowski, Kazimierz; Skotnicki, Aleksander; Hellmann, Andrzej; Kyrcz-Krzemien, Slawomira; Dmoszynska, Anna; Sułek, Kazimierz; Kloczko, Janusz; Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw W; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Zdziarska, Barbara; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Pluta, Agnieszka; Komarnicki, Mieczyslaw; Giebel, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The importance of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) for survival outcomes in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) currently remains unclear. The study aimed to compare measures of clinical treatment for patients with AML in CR1 (the first complete remission) with or without being subjected to allo-HSCT. These consisted of leukemia-free survival (LFS), overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR), and non-relapse mortality disease (NRM). Subjects were 622 patients, median age of 44, forming part of the prospective, randomized, and multicenter clinical Polish Adult Leukemia Group trials during 1999-2008. The Mantel-Byar approach was used to assess allo-HSCT on survival endpoints, accounting for a changing transplant status. Undergoing allo-HSCT significantly improved the LFS and OS for the entire group of patients with AML in CR1, along with the DAC induction subgroup and for the group with unfavorable cytogenetics aged 41-60. The CIR demonstrated that allo-HSCT reduced the risk of relapse for patients with AML in CR1 and those with an unfavorable cytogenetic risk. In addition, the NRM analysis showed that allo-HSCT significantly reduced the risk of death unrelated to relapse for the entire group of AML patients in CR1 and aged 41-60. The allo-HSCT treatment particularly benefitted survival for the AML in CR1 group having an unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis. PMID:26149802

  15. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation after conditioning with I-131-anti-CD45 antibody plus fludarabine and low-dose total body irradiation for elderly patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    SciTech Connect

    Pagel, John M.; Gooley, T. A.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Wilson, Wendy A.; Sandmaier, B. M.; Matthews, D. C.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Gopal, Ajay K.; Martin, P. J.; Storb, R.; Press, Oliver W.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2009-12-24

    We conducted a study to estimate the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of I-131-anti-CD45 antibody (Ab; BC8) that can be combined with a standard reduced-intensity conditioning regimen before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Fifty-eight patients older than 50 years with advanced acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were treated with (131)I-BC8 Ab and fludarabine plus 2 Gy total body irradiation. Eighty-six percent of patients had AML or MDS with greater than 5% marrow blasts at the time of transplantation. Treatment produced a complete remission in all patients, and all had 100% donor-derived CD3(+) and CD33(+) cells in the blood by day 28 after the transplantation. The MTD of I-131-BC8 Ab delivered to liver was estimated to be 24 Gy. Seven patients (12%) died of nonrelapse causes by day 100. The estimated probability of recurrent malignancy at 1 year is 40%, and the 1-year survival estimate is 41%. These results show that CD45-targeted radiotherapy can be safely combined with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen to yield encouraging overall survival for older, high-risk patients with AML or MDS. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00008177.

  16. Outcome of Second Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Relapse of Myeloid Malignancies following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Retrospective Cohort on Behalf of the Grupo Español de Trasplante Hematopoyetico.

    PubMed

    Orti, Guillermo; Sanz, Jaime; Bermudez, Arancha; Caballero, Dolores; Martinez, Carmen; Sierra, Jorge; Cabrera Marin, José R; Espigado, Ildefonso; Solano, Carlos; Ferrà, Christelle; García-Noblejas, Ana; Jimenez, Santiago; Sampol, Antonia; Yañez, Lucrecia; García-Gutiérrez, Valentin; Pascual, Maria Jesus; Jurado, Manuel; Moraleda, José M; Valcarcel, David; Sanz, Miguel A; Carreras, Enric; Duarte, Rafael F

    2016-03-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents the most effective immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myeloid malignancies. However, disease relapse remains the most common cause of treatment failure. By performing a second allo-HCT, durable remission can be achieved in some patients. However, a second allo-HCT is of no benefit for the majority of patients, so this approach requires further understanding. We present a retrospective cohort of 116 patients diagnosed with AML, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative disorders who consecutively underwent a second allo-HCT for disease relapse. The median age was 38 years (range, 4 to 69 years). Sixty-three patients were alive at last follow-up. The median follow-up of the whole cohort was 193 days (range, 2 to 6724 days) and the median follow-up of survivors was 1628 days (range, 52 to 5518 days). Overall survival (OS) at 5 years was 32% (SE ± 4.7%). Multivariate analysis identified active disease status (P < .001) and second allo-HCT < 430 days (the median of the time to second transplantation) after the first transplantation (P < .001) as factors for poor prognosis, whereas the use of an HLA-identical sibling donor for the second allo-HCT was identified as a good prognostic factor (P < .05) for OS. The use of myeloablative conditioning (P = .01), active disease (P = .02), and a donor other than an HLA-identical sibling (others versus HLA-identical siblings) (P = .009) were factors statistically significant for nonrelapse mortality in multivariate analysis. Time to second transplantation was statistically significant (P = .001) in the relapse multivariate analysis, whereas multivariate analysis identified active disease status (P < .001) and time to second transplantation (P < .001) as poor prognosis factors for disease-free survival. This study confirms active disease and early relapse as dismal prognostic factors for a second allo-HCT. Using a different donor at second allo-HCT did not appear to change outcome, but using an HLA-identical sibling donor for a second transplantation appears to be associated with better survival. Further studies are warranted. PMID:26631751

  17. Transcription factor profiling in individual hematopoietic progenitors by digital RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Luigi; Bryder, David; Weissman, Irving L.; Quake, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    We report here a systematic, quantitative population analysis of transcription factor expression within developmental progenitors, made possible by a microfluidic chip-based “digital RT-PCR” assay that can count template molecules in cDNA samples prepared from single cells. In a survey encompassing five classes of early hematopoietic precursor, we found markedly heterogeneous expression of the transcription factor PU.1 in hematopoietic stem cells and divergent patterns of PU.1 expression within flk2− and flk2+ common myeloid progenitors. The survey also revealed significant differences in the level of the housekeeping transcript GAPDH across the surveyed populations, which demonstrates caveats of normalizing expression data to endogenous controls and underscores the need to put gene measurement on an absolute, copy-per-cell basis. PMID:17098862

  18. Primitive lymphohematopoietic precursor cell lines generated in culture from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak stage mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Palacios, R; Imhof, B A

    1996-12-16

    During mouse development, the first lymphohematopoietic precursor cells and myeloid or erythroid cell lineage-determined cells can be detected in the yolk sac at days 8-8.5 of gestation. The characteristics of the cells that give rise to these yolk sac primitive lymphohematopoietic cells and the molecular events controlling this process remain poorly defined. We show here that cell suspensions from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak stage embryo proper generated early immature PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- hematopoietic cells and some Mac-1+ myeloid and TER 119+ erythroid cells after co-culture with the yolk sac-derived stromal cell line YS6 without addition of exogenous cytokines. Purified Lin- hematopoietic cells generated in these cultures did not express genes known to be transcribed at early stages of lymphoid, myeloid or erythroid cell differentiation and were able to give rise to T and B lymphocytes, myeloid cells and erythroid cells after appropriate further induction in vitro. Several cell lines were established in culture with a mixture of four cytokines from the PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- cell population. The cell lines shared phenotypic and genotypic characteristics with the PgP-1+ Joro 177+ Lin- cell population generated in culture from day 7 embryo proper and they were able to reconstitute the lymphohematopoietic system of irradiated mice. Taken together these results support a model of lymphohematopoiesis in which cells from day 7 early-mid-primitive streak mouse embryo proper migrate and colonize the visceral yolk sac. There they generate primitive lymphohematopoietic precursor cells and the first erythroid and myeloid hematopoietic cells under the influence of yolk sac stromal cells like the YS6 cells described here. PMID:9003763

  19. Linkage between dendritic- and T-cell commitments in human circulating hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F.; Moore, Malcolm A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2014-01-01

    The relationships between commitments of dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells in human hematopoietic stem cells are not well-understood. In this study, we enumerate and characterize conventional-DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid-DC (pDC) precursors in association with T-cell and thymus-derived types of NK-cell precursors among CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) circulating in human peripheral blood (PB). By limiting-dilution analyses using co-culture with stroma cells expressing Notch1 ligand, the precursor frequencies (PFs) of DCs in HPCs were found to significantly correlate with T-cell PFs, but not with NK-cell PFs, among healthy donors. Clonal analyses showed that the majority of T/NK-dual and T-single lineage precursors - but only a minority of NK-single lineage precursors - were associated with the generation of DC progenies. All clones producing both DC and T-cell progenies were found with monocyte and/or granulocyte progenies, suggesting DC differentiation via myeloid DC pathways. Analyses of PB HPC subpopulations revealed that the lineage split between DC and T/NK-cell progenitor occurs at the stage prior to bifurcation into T- and NK-cell lineages. The findings suggest a strong linkage between DC and T-cell commitments, which may be imprinted in circulating lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitors or in more upstream HPCs. PMID:24835400

  20. CD25 expression on residual leukemic blasts at the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant predicts relapse in patients with acute myeloid leukemia without complete remission.

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Shuntaro; Doki, Noriko; Kurosawa, Shuhei; Yamaguchi, Tsukasa; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Harada, Kaito; Yamamoto, Keita; Hino, Yutaro; Shingai, Naoki; Senoo, Yasushi; Hattori, Keiichiro; Igarashi, Aiko; Najima, Yuho; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Haraguchi, Kyoko; Okuyama, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Kazuteru

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies have shown that CD25 expression at the time of diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) may be associated with an unfavorable outcome. We focus on patients with AML without complete remission (CR) and examine the clinical correlation between surface CD25 expression at the time of transplant and subsequent transplant outcomes. We observed a significant difference in overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) between CD25 positive (+) (n = 22) and negative (-) groups (n = 44) (2-year OS; CD25 (+) group: 5% vs. CD25 (-) group: 40%, p < 0.0001, 2-year DFS; 5% vs. 29%, p < 0.0001, 2-year CIR; 77% vs. 52%, p = 0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that CD25 expression was an independent adverse factor for OS (p = 0.002) and relapse (p = 0.001). Patients with AML with residual CD25 positive blasts at the time of transplant may require additional therapy before or after transplant to improve survival. PMID:26422713

  1. Improved outcome in relapsed and refractory myeloid malignancies for unrelated vs related donor allogeneic peripheral blood-derived hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Denz, U; Bertz, H; Ihorst, G; Wäsch, R; Finke, J

    2010-08-01

    There are limited data on the comparison of unrelated vs related peripheral blood-derived hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients with AML and its implications in high-risk patients. In this single-center retrospective study, we report on a total of 92 consecutive patients with AML (n=87) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n=5), who were treated between 1996 and 2006 with a uniform preparative regimen of BU and CY and peripheral blood-derived HCT from related (n=46) or unrelated donors (n=46). At transplantation, 45 patients were in CR, 11 were untreated and 36 had relapsed or refractory disease. Median follow-up was 864 days after transplant (range 24-3798). At 5 years after HCT, cumulative incidences for relapse (32% of all patients) and nonrelapse mortality (NRM; 17%) were low. The 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS) and OS rates were 36 and 45% for related and 47 and 57% for unrelated patients, respectively (RFS P=0.43; OS P=0.28). High-risk patients with an unfavorable remission status before HCT benefited more from unrelated HCT than related HCT, showing a significantly better 5-year RFS of 46% (95% confidence interval (CI) 27-65) vs 22% (95% CI 4-40) (P=0.04). Unrelated HCT benefited high-risk AML patients with an unfavorable remission status better than related HCT. PMID:20062094

  2. Targeting interleukin-2 to the bone marrow stroma for therapy of acute myeloid leukemia relapsing after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schliemann, Christoph; Gutbrodt, Katrin L; Kerkhoff, Andrea; Pohlen, Michele; Wiebe, Stefanie; Silling, Gerda; Angenendt, Linus; Kessler, Torsten; Mesters, Rolf M; Giovannoni, Leonardo; Schäfers, Michael; Altvater, Bianca; Rossig, Claudia; Grünewald, Inga; Wardelmann, Eva; Köhler, Gabriele; Neri, Dario; Stelljes, Matthias; Berdel, Wolfgang E

    2015-05-01

    The antibody-based delivery of IL2 to extracellular targets expressed in the easily accessible tumor-associated vasculature has shown potent antileukemic activity in xenograft and immunocompetent murine models of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), especially in combination with cytarabine. Here, we report our experience with 4 patients with relapsed AML after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT), who were treated with the immunocytokine F16-IL2, in combination with low-dose cytarabine. One patient with disseminated extramedullary AML lesions achieved a complete metabolic response identified by PET/CT, which lasted 3 months. Two of 3 patients with bone marrow relapse achieved a blast reduction with transient molecular negativity. One of the 2 patients enjoyed a short complete remission before AML relapse occurred 2 months after the first infusion of F16-IL2. In line with a site-directed delivery of the cytokine, F16-IL2 led to an extensive infiltration of immune effector cells in the bone marrow. Grade 2 fevers were the only nonhematologic side effects in 2 patients. Grade 3 cytokine-release syndrome developed in the other 2 patients but was manageable in both cases with glucocorticoids. The concept of specifically targeting IL2 to the leukemia-associated stroma deserves further evaluation in clinical trials, especially in patients who relapse after allo-HSCT. PMID:25672398

  3. Comparison of Reduced-Intensity and Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens for Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nor-Azimah; Mohd-Idris, Mohd-Razif; Jamaluddin, Fariza Wan; Tumian, NorRafeah; Sze-Wei, Ernie Yap; Muhammad, Norasiah; Nai, Ming Lai

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the indications to perform reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (RIC-HCT) are based on data derived mainly from large registry and single-centre retrospective studies. Thus, at the present time, there is limited direct evidence supporting the current practice in selecting patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for RIC versus myeloablative conditioning (MAC) transplants. To determine the relationship between dose intensity of conditioning regimen and survival outcomes after allografting in AML/ALL patients, we performed a meta-analysis of 23 clinical trials reported between 1990 and 2013 involving 15,258 adult patients that compare survival outcomes after RIC-HCT versus MAC-HCT. RIC-HCT resulted in comparable <2-year and 2–6 year overall survival (OS) rates post-transplantation even though the RIC-HCT recipients were older and had more active disease than MAC-HCT recipients. The 2–6 year progression-free survival (PFS), nonrelapse mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD rates were reduced after RIC-HCT, but relapse rate was increased. Similar outcomes were observed regardless of disease type and status at transplantation. Odds ratio for all outcomes remained comparable with or without performing separate analyses for the year of HCT and for retrospective versus prospective studies. Among RIC-HCT recipients, survival rates were superior if patients were in CR at transplantation. Significant inter-study heterogeneity for aGvHD data and publication bias for PFS data were observed. This meta-analysis showed no OS benefit of MAC-HCT over RIC-HCT across the entire cohort of patients suggesting that RIC-HCT could be an effective therapeutic option for AML/ALL patients who are ineligible for MAC-HCT and CR status is preferred before RIC-HCT. PMID:25072307

  4. Phase II Trial of Reduced-Intensity Busulfan/Clofarabine Conditioning with Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, and Acute Lymphoid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    El-Jawahri, Areej; Li, Shuli; Ballen, Karen K; Cutler, Corey; Dey, Bimalangshu R; Driscoll, Jessica; Hunnewell, Chrisa; Ho, Vincent T; McAfee, Steven L; Poliquin, Cathleen; Saylor, Meredith; Soiffer, Robert J; Spitzer, Thomas R; Alyea, Edwin; Chen, Yi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Clofarabine has potent antileukemia activity and its inclusion in reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) for acute leukemia could potentially improve outcomes. We conducted a phase II study of busulfan (.8 mg/kg i.v. twice daily on days -5, -4, -3, and -2) with clofarabine (40 mg/m(2) i.v. daily on days -5, -4, -3, and -2) conditioning before allogeneic 8/8 HLA-matched related or unrelated HSCT. The primary endpoint was donor neutrophil engraftment by day +40. Secondary endpoints included nonrelapse mortality (NRM), acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Thirty-four patients (acute myeloid leukemia [AML], n = 25; myelodysplastic syndromes, n = 5; and acute lymphoid leukemia, n = 4) were enrolled. Day 40+ engraftment with donor chimerism was achieved in 33 of 34 patients with 1 patient dying before count recovery. Day 100 and 1-year NRM were 5.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 17.4) and 24% (95% CI, 11 to 39), respectively. The 2-year relapse rate was 26% (95% CI, 13 to 42). Cumulative incidences of acute and chronic GVHD were 21% and 44%, respectively. The 2-year PFS was 50% (95% CI, 32 to 65) and OS was 56% (95% CI, 38 to 71). For patients with AML in first complete remission, 2-year PFS and OS were both 82% (95% CI, 55 to 94). RIC with busulfan and clofarabine leads to successful engraftment with acceptable rates of NRM and GVHD. PMID:26260679

  5. Comparison of reduced-intensity and myeloablative conditioning regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdul Wahid, S Fadilah; Ismail, Nor-Azimah; Mohd-Idris, Mohd-Razif; Jamaluddin, Fariza Wan; Tumian, NorRafeah; Sze-Wei, Ernie Yap; Muhammad, Norasiah; Nai, Ming Lai

    2014-11-01

    Currently, the indications to perform reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (RIC-HCT) are based on data derived mainly from large registry and single-centre retrospective studies. Thus, at the present time, there is limited direct evidence supporting the current practice in selecting patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) for RIC versus myeloablative conditioning (MAC) transplants. To determine the relationship between dose intensity of conditioning regimen and survival outcomes after allografting in AML/ALL patients, we performed a meta-analysis of 23 clinical trials reported between 1990 and 2013 involving 15,258 adult patients that compare survival outcomes after RIC-HCT versus MAC-HCT. RIC-HCT resulted in comparable <2-year and 2-6 year overall survival (OS) rates post-transplantation even though the RIC-HCT recipients were older and had more active disease than MAC-HCT recipients. The 2-6 year progression-free survival (PFS), nonrelapse mortality, acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and chronic GvHD rates were reduced after RIC-HCT, but relapse rate was increased. Similar outcomes were observed regardless of disease type and status at transplantation. Odds ratio for all outcomes remained comparable with or without performing separate analyses for the year of HCT and for retrospective versus prospective studies. Among RIC-HCT recipients, survival rates were superior if patients were in CR at transplantation. Significant inter-study heterogeneity for aGvHD data and publication bias for PFS data were observed. This meta-analysis showed no OS benefit of MAC-HCT over RIC-HCT across the entire cohort of patients suggesting that RIC-HCT could be an effective therapeutic option for AML/ALL patients who are ineligible for MAC-HCT and CR status is preferred before RIC-HCT. PMID:25072307

  6. Phase II Study of Haploidentical Natural Killer Cell Infusion for Treatment of Relapsed or Persistent Myeloid Malignancies Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Brian C; Le Luduec, Jean-Benoit; Forlenza, Christopher; Jakubowski, Ann A; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Young, James W; Hsu, Katharine C

    2016-04-01

    We conducted a phase 2 study to determine the efficacy of HLA-haploidentical related donor natural killer (NK) cells after cyclophosphamide-based lymphodepletion in patients with relapsed or progressive acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Eight patients (2 with MDS and 6 with AML) were treated with cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg on day -3 and day -2 before infusion of NK cells isolated from a haploidentical related donor. One patient also received fludarabine 25 mg/m(2)/day for 4 days. Six doses of 1 million units of interleukin-2 (IL-2) were administered on alternating days beginning on day -1. The median number of NK cells infused was 10.6 × 10(6)/kg (range, 4.3 to 22.4 × 10(6)/kg), and the median number of CD3 cells infused was 2.1 × 10(3)/kg (range, 1.9 to 40 × 10(3)/kg). NK infusions were well tolerated, with a median time to neutrophil recovery of 19 days (range, 7 days to not achieved) and no incidence of graft-versus-host disease after NK infusion. One patient with AML and 1 patient with MDS achieved a complete response, but relapsed at 1.7 and 1.8 months, respectively. One patient with MDS experienced resolution of dysplastic features but persistence of clonal karyotype abnormalities; this patient was stable at 65 months after NK cell therapy. The median duration of survival was 12.9 months (range, 0.8 to 65.3 months). Chimerism analysis of CD3(-)/CD56(+) peripheral blood cells did not detect any circulating haploidentical NK cells after infusion. NK phenotyping was performed in 7 patients during and after IL-2 infusion. We found a slight trend toward greater expression of KIR2DL2/2DL3/2DS2 (5% versus 28%; P = .03) at 14 days in patients who survived longer than 6 months from NK cell infusion (n = 4) compared with those who died within 6 months of NK cell therapy (n = 3). In summary, our data support the safety of haploidentical NK cell infusion after allogeneic HCT. PMID:26772158

  7. Comparison of Outcomes for Pediatric Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission and Undergoing Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation With Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Based on Either Intravenous Busulfan or Total Body Irradiation: A Report From the Japanese Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Hiroyuki; Kato, Motohiro; Kudo, Kazuko; Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Miyamura, Takako; Goto, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Jiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Terui, Kiminori; Ogawa, Atsushi; Kawano, Yoshifumi; Inoue, Masami; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Yamashita, Takuya; Adachi, Souichi

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly receive myeloablative conditioning regimens based on busulfan (BU) or total body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT); however, the optimal conditioning regimen remains unclear. To identify which of these regimens is better for pediatric patients, we performed a retrospective analysis of nationwide registration data collected in Japan between 2006 and 2011 to assess the outcomes of patients receiving these regimens before a first allo-HCT. Myeloablative conditioning regimens based on i.v. BU (i.v. BU-MAC) (n = 69) or TBI (TBI-MAC) (n = 151) were compared in pediatric AML patients in first or second complete remission (CR1/CR2). The incidences of sinusoid obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease, and early nonrelapse mortality (NRM) before day 100 were similar for both conditioning groups; however, the incidence of bacterial infection during the acute period was higher in the TBI-MAC group (P = .008). Both groups showed a similar incidence of NRM, and there was no significant difference in the incidence of relapse between the groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no significant differences in the 2-year relapse-free survival rates for the i.v. BU-MAC and TBI-MAC groups in the CR1/CR2 setting (71% versus 67%, P = .36; hazard ratio, .73; 95% CI, .43 to 1.24, respectively). TBI-MAC was no better than i.v. BU-MAC for pediatric AML patients in remission. Although this retrospective registry-based analysis has several limitations, i.v. BU-MAC warrants further evaluation in a prospective trial. PMID:26271192

  8. DNMT3A R882 Mutation with FLT3-ITD Positivity Is an Extremely Poor Prognostic Factor in Patients with Normal-Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Sook; Kim, Hyeoung-Joon; Kim, Yeo-Kyeoung; Lee, Seun-Shin; Jung, Sung-Hoon; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Lee, Je-Jung; Kim, Nan Young; Choi, Seung Hyun; Jung, Chul Won; Jang, Jun-Ho; Kim, Hee Je; Moon, Joon Ho; Sohn, Sang Kyun; Won, Jong-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic relevance of epigenetic modifying genes (DNMT3A, TET2, and IDH1/2) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has been investigated extensively. However, the prognostic implications of these mutations after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have not been evaluated comprehensively in patients with normal-karyotype (NK)-AML. A total of 115 patients who received allogeneic HCT for NK-AML were retrospectively evaluated for the FLT3-ITD, NPM1, CEBPA, DNMT3A, TET2, IDH1/2, WT1, NRAS, ASXL2, FAT1, DNAH11, and GATA2 mutations in diagnostic samples and analyzed for long-term outcomes after allogeneic HCT. The prevalence rates for the mutations were as follows: FLT3-ITD positivity (FLT3-ITD(pos)) (32.2%), NPM1 mutation (43.5%), CEBPA mutation (double) (24.6%), DNMT3A mutation (DNMT3A(mut)) (31.3%), DNMT3A R882(mut) (18.3%), TET2 mutation (8.7%), and IDH1/2 mutation (16.5%). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 57.3% and 58.1%, respectively. A multivariate analysis revealed that FLT3-ITD(pos) (hazard ratio, [HR], 2.23; P = .006) and DNMT3A R882(mut) (HR, 2.74; P = .002) were unfavorable prognostic factors for OS. In addition, both mutations were significant risk factors for EFS and relapse. People with DNMT3A R882(mut) accompanied by FLT3-ITD(pos) had worse OS and EFS, and higher relapse rates than those with the other mutations, which were confirmed in a propensity score 1:2 matching analysis. These results suggest that DNMT3A R882(mut), particularly when accompanied by FLT3-ITD(pos), is a significant prognostic factor for inferior transplantation survival outcome by increasing relapse risk, even after allogeneic HCT. PMID:26234722

  9. NUP98-HOXA9 induces long-term proliferation and blocks differentiation of primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Akiko; Goolsby, Charles; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2006-07-01

    NUP98-HOXA9, the chimeric protein resulting from the t(7;11)(p15;p15) chromosomal translocation, is a prototype of several NUP98 fusions that occur in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia. We examined its effect on differentiation, proliferation, and gene expression in primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. Colony-forming cell (CFC) assays in semisolid medium combined with morphologic examination and flow cytometric immunophenotyping revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 increased the numbers of erythroid precursors and impaired both myeloid and erythroid differentiation. In continuous liquid culture, cells transduced with NUP98-HOXA9 exhibited a biphasic growth curve with initial growth inhibition followed by enhanced long-term proliferation, suggesting an increase in the numbers of primitive self-renewing cells. This was confirmed by a dramatic increase in the numbers of long-term culture-initiating cells, the most primitive hematopoietic cells detectable in vitro. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on hematopoietic cell proliferation and differentiation, oligonucleotide microarray analysis was done at several time points over 16 days, starting at 6 hours posttransduction. The early growth suppression was preceded by up-regulation of IFNbeta1 and accompanied by marked up-regulation of IFN-induced genes, peaking at 3 days posttransduction. In contrast, oncogenes such as homeobox transcription factors, FLT3, KIT, and WT1 peaked at 8 days or beyond, coinciding with increased proliferation. In addition, several putative tumor suppressors and genes associated with hematopoietic differentiation were repressed at later time points. These findings provide a comprehensive picture of the changes in proliferation, differentiation, and global gene expression that underlie the leukemic transformation of human hematopoietic cells by NUP98-HOXA9. PMID:16818636

  10. Coordinate regulation of HOX genes in human hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Magli, M.C.; Barba, P.; Celetti, A.; De Vita, G.; Cillo, C.; Boncinelli, E. )

    1991-07-15

    Hematopoiesis is a continuous process in which precursor cells proliferate and differentiate throughout life. However, the molecular mechanisms that govern this process are not clearly defined. Homeobox-containing genes, encoding DNA-binding homeodomains. are a network of genes highly conserved throughout evolution. They are organized in clusters expressed in the developing embryo with a positional hierarchy. The authors have analyzed expression of the four human HOX loci in erythroleukemic, promyelocytic, and monocytic cell lines to investigate whether the physical organization of human HOX genes reflects a regulatory hierarchy involved in the differentiation process of hematopoietic cells. The results demonstrate that cells representing various stages of hematopoietic differentiation display differential patterns of HOX gene expression and that HOX genes are coordinately switched on or off in blocks that may include entire loci. The entire HOX4 locus is silent in all lines analyzed and almost all the HOX2 genes are active in erythroleukemic cells and turned off in myeloid-restricted cells. The observations provide information about the regulation of HOX genes and suggest that the coordinate regulation of these genes may play an important role in lineage determination during early steps of hematopoiesis.

  11. Vav1 is a crucial molecule in monocytic/macrophagic differentiation of myeloid leukemia-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Bertagnolo, Valeria; Nika, Ervin; Brugnoli, Federica; Bonora, Massimo; Grassilli, Silvia; Pinton, Paolo; Capitani, Silvano

    2011-07-01

    Vav1 is a critical signal transducer for both the development and function of normal hematopoietic cells, in which it regulates the acquisition of maturation-related properties, including adhesion, motility, and phagocytosis. Vav1 is also important for the agonist-induced maturation of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL)-derived promyelocytes, in which it promotes the acquisition of a mature phenotype by playing multiple functions at both cytoplasmic and nuclear levels. We investigated the possible role of Vav1 in the differentiation of leukemic precursors to monocytes/macrophages. Tumoral promyelocytes in which Vav1 was negatively modulated were induced to differentiate into monocytes/macrophages with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and monitored for their maturation-related properties. We found that Vav1 was crucial for the phenotypical differentiation of tumoral myeloid precursors to monocytes/macrophages, in terms of CD11b expression, adhesion capability and cell morphology. Confocal analysis revealed that Vav1 may synergize with actin in modulating nuclear morphology of PMA-treated adherent cells. Our data indicate that, in tumoral promyelocytes, Vav1 is a component of lineage-specific transduction machineries that can be recruited by various differentiating agents. Since Vav1 plays a central role in the completion of the differentiation program of leukemic promyelocytes along diverse hematopoietic lineages, it can be considered a common target for developing new therapeutic strategies for the various subtypes of myeloid leukemias. PMID:21647562

  12. Coordinated and unique functions of the E-selectin ligand ESL-1 during inflammatory and hematopoietic recruitment in mice.

    PubMed

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Leiva, Magdalena; Stadtmann, Anika; Pitaval, Christophe; Ortega-Rodríguez, Inés; Wild, Martin K; Lee, Brendan; Zarbock, Alexander; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2013-12-01

    Beyond its well-established roles in mediating leukocyte rolling, E-selectin is emerging as a multifunctional receptor capable of inducing integrin activation in neutrophils, and of regulating various biological processes in hematopoietic precursors. Although these effects suggest important homeostatic contributions of this selectin in the immune and hematologic systems, the ligands responsible for transducing these effects in different leukocyte lineages are not well defined. We have characterized mice deficient in E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), or in both P-selectin glycoprotein-1 (PSGL-1) and ESL-1, to explore and compare the contributions of these glycoproteins in immune and hematopoietic cell trafficking. In the steady state, ESL-1 deficiency resulted in a moderate myeloid expansion that became more prominent when both glycoproteins were eliminated. During inflammation, PSGL-1 dominated E-selectin binding, rolling, integrin activation, and extravasation of mature neutrophils, but only the combined deficiency in PSGL-1 and ESL-1 completely abrogated leukocyte recruitment. Surprisingly, we find that the levels of ESL-1 were strongly elevated in hematopoietic progenitor cells. These elevations correlated with a prominent function of ESL-1 for E-selectin binding and for migration of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the bone marrow. Our results uncover dominant roles for ESL-1 in the immature compartment, and a functional shift toward PSGL-1 dependence in mature neutrophils. PMID:24106206

  13. Lead and catechol hematotoxicity in vitro using human and murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Van Den Heuvel, R L; Leppens, H; Schoeters, G E

    1999-04-01

    In vitro cloning assays for hematopoietic myeloid and erythroid precursor cells have been used as screening systems to investigate the hematotoxic potential of environmental chemicals in humans and mice. Granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (CFU-GM) from human umbilical cord blood and from mouse bone marrow (Balb/c and B6C3F1) were cultured in the presence of lead and the benzene metabolite catechol. Erythroid precursors (BFU-E) from human umbilical cord blood were cultured in the presence of lead. The in vitro exposure of the human and murine cells resulted in a dose-dependent depression of the colony numbers. The concentration effect relationship was studied. Results showed that: (1) Based on calculated IC50 values, human progenitors are more sensitive to lead and catechol than are murine progenitors. The dose that caused a 50% decrease in colony formation after catechol exposure was 6 times higher for murine cells (IC50 = 24 micromol/L) than for human cord blood cells (IC50 = 4 micromol/L). Lead was 10-15 times more toxic to human hematopoietic cells (IC50 = 61 micromol/L) than to murine bone marrow cells from both mice strains tested (Balb/c, IC50 = 1060 micromol/L; B6C3F1, IC50 = 536 micromol/L). (2) A lineage specificity was observed after exposure to lead. Human erythroid progenitors (hBFU-E) (IC50 = 3.31 micromol/L) were found to be 20 times more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of lead than were myeloid precursors (hCFU-GM) (IC50 = 63.58 micromol/L). (3) Individual differences in the susceptibility to the harmful effect of lead were seen among cord blood samples. (4) Toxicity of lead to progenitor cells occurred at environmentally relevant concentrations. PMID:10408357

  14. MicroRNA-223 dose levels fine tune proliferation and differentiation in human cord blood progenitors and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gentner, Bernhard; Pochert, Nicole; Rouhi, Arefeh; Boccalatte, Francesco; Plati, Tiziana; Berg, Tobias; Sun, Su Ming; Mah, Sarah M; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Ruschmann, Jens; Muranyi, Andrew; Leierseder, Simon; Argiropoulos, Bob; Starczynowski, Daniel T; Karsan, Aly; Heuser, Michael; Hogge, Donna; Camargo, Fernando D; Engelhardt, Stefan; Döhner, Hartmut; Buske, Christian; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Naldini, Luigi; Humphries, R Keith; Kuchenbauer, Florian

    2015-10-01

    A precise understanding of the role of miR-223 in human hematopoiesis and in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still lacking. By measuring miR-223 expression in blasts from 115 AML patients, we found significantly higher miR-223 levels in patients with favorable prognosis, whereas patients with low miR-223 expression levels were associated with worse outcome. Furthermore, miR-223 was hierarchically expressed in AML subpopulations, with lower expression in leukemic stem cell-containing fractions. Genetic depletion of miR-223 decreased the leukemia initiating cell (LIC) frequency in a myelomonocytic AML mouse model, but it was not mandatory for rapid-onset AML. To relate these observations to physiologic myeloid differentiation, we knocked down or ectopically expressed miR-223 in cord-blood CD34⁺ cells using lentiviral vectors. Although miR-223 knockdown delayed myeloerythroid precursor differentiation in vitro, it increased myeloid progenitors in vivo following serial xenotransplantation. Ectopic miR-223 expression increased erythropoiesis, T lymphopoiesis, and early B lymphopoiesis in vivo. These findings broaden the role of miR-223 as a regulator of the expansion/differentiation equilibrium in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells where its impact is dose- and differentiation-stage-dependent. This also explains the complex yet minor role of miR-223 in AML, a heterogeneous disease with variable degree of myeloid differentiation. PMID:26163797

  15. MicroRNA-223 dose levels fine tune proliferation and differentiation in human cord blood progenitors and acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gentner, Bernhard; Pochert, Nicole; Rouhi, Arefeh; Boccalatte, Francesco; Plati, Tiziana; Berg, Tobias; Sun, Su Ming; Mah, Sarah M.; Mirkovic-Hösle, Milijana; Ruschmann, Jens; Muranyi, Andrew; Leierseder, Simon; Argiropoulos, Bob; Starczynowski, Daniel T.; Karsan, Aly; Heuser, Michael; Hogge, Donna; Camargo, Fernando D.; Engelhardt, Stefan; Döhner, Hartmut; Buske, Christian; Jongen-Lavrencic, Mojca; Naldini, Luigi; Humphries, R. Keith; Kuchenbauer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    A precise understanding of the role of miR-223 in human hematopoiesis and in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is still lacking. By measuring miR-223 expression in blasts from 115 AML patients, we found significantly higher miR-223 levels in patients with favorable prognosis, whereas patients with low miR-223 expression levels were associated with worse outcome. Furthermore, miR-223 was hierarchically expressed in AML subpopulations, with lower expression in leukemic stem cell–containing fractions. Genetic depletion of miR-223 decreased the leukemia initiating cell (LIC) frequency in a myelomonocytic AML mouse model, but it was not mandatory for rapid-onset AML. To relate these observations to physiologic myeloid differentiation, we knocked down or ectopically expressed miR-223 in cord-blood CD34+ cells using lentiviral vectors. Although miR-223 knockdown delayed myeloerythroid precursor differentiation in vitro, it increased myeloid progenitors in vivo following serial xenotransplantation. Ectopic miR-223 expression increased erythropoiesis, T lymphopoiesis, and early B lymphopoiesis in vivo. These findings broaden the role of miR-223 as a regulator of the expansion/differentiation equilibrium in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells where its impact is dose- and differentiation-stage-dependent. This also explains the complex yet minor role of miR-223 in AML, a heterogeneous disease with variable degree of myeloid differentiation. PMID:26163797

  16. C-Myb(+) erythro-myeloid progenitor-derived fetal monocytes give rise to adult tissue-resident macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hoeffel, Guillaume; Chen, Jinmiao; Lavin, Yonit; Low, Donovan; Almeida, Francisca F; See, Peter; Beaudin, Anna E; Lum, Josephine; Low, Ivy; Forsberg, E Camilla; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Ng, Lai Guan; Chan, Jerry K Y; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Samokhvalov, Igor M; Merad, Miriam; Ginhoux, Florent

    2015-04-21

    Although classified as hematopoietic cells, tissue-resident macrophages (MFs) arise from embryonic precursors that seed the tissues prior to birth to generate a self-renewing population, which is maintained independently of adult hematopoiesis. Here we reveal the identity of these embryonic precursors using an in utero MF-depletion strategy and fate-mapping of yolk sac (YS) and fetal liver (FL) hematopoiesis. We show that YS MFs are the main precursors of microglia, while most other MFs derive from fetal monocytes (MOs). Both YS MFs and fetal MOs arise from erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) generated in the YS. In the YS, EMPs gave rise to MFs without monocytic intermediates, while EMP seeding the FL upon the establishment of blood circulation acquired c-Myb expression and gave rise to fetal MOs that then seeded embryonic tissues and differentiated into MFs. Thus, adult tissue-resident MFs established from hematopoietic stem cell-independent embryonic precursors arise from two distinct developmental programs. PMID:25902481

  17. Ontogeny of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Kleer, Ismé; Willems, Fabienne; Lambrecht, Bart; Goriely, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    Granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs) represent a subgroup of leukocytes, collectively called myeloid cells. During the embryonic development of mammalians, myelopoiesis occurs in a stepwise fashion that begins in the yolk sac and ends up in the bone marrow (BM). During this process, these early monocyte progenitors colonize various organs such as the brain, liver, skin, and lungs and differentiate into resident macrophages that will self-maintain throughout life. DCs are constantly replenished from BM precursors but can also arise from monocytes in inflammatory conditions. In this review, we summarize the different types of myeloid cells and discuss new insights into their early origin and development in mice and humans from fetal to adult life. We specifically focus on the function of monocytes, macrophages, and DCs at these different developmental stages and on the intrinsic and environmental influences that may drive these adaptations. PMID:25232355

  18. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1-Responsive Macrophage Precursors Reside in the Amphibian (Xenopus laevis) Bone Marrow Rather than the Hematopoietic Sub-Capsular Liver

    PubMed Central

    Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Macrophage precursors originate from, and undergo lineage commitment within designated sites of hematopoiesis, such as the mammalian bone marrow. These cells subsequently differentiate in response to stimulation with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1). The amphibian bone marrow, unlike that of mammals, has been overlooked as a source of leukocyte precursors in favor of the liver sub-capsular region, where hematopoiesis occurs in anurans. Here we report that the bone marrow rather than the liver periphery provides macrophage progenitors to the amphibian Xenopus laevis. We identified the amphibian CSF-1, examined its gene expression in developing and virally infected X. laevis and produce it in recombinant form (rXlCSF-1). This rXlCSF-1 did not bind or elicit proliferation/differentiation of sub-cortical liver cells. Surprisingly, a sub-population of bone marrow cells engaged this growth factor and formed rXlCSF-1-concentration-dependant colonies in semi-solid medium. Furthermore, rXlCSF-1-treated bone marrow (but not liver) cultures comprised of cells with characteristic macrophage morphology and high gene expression of the macrophage marker, colony stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R). Together, our findings indicate that in contrast to all other vertebrates studied to date, Xenopus committed macrophage precursors populations are not present in the central site of hematopoiesis, but reside in the bone marrow. PMID:23485675

  19. Adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptors in hematopoiesis. 1. Expression of receptor mRNA in four mouse hematopoietic precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Streitová, D; Sefc, L; Savvulidi, F; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Hofer, M

    2010-01-01

    Four mouse bone marrow or thymus cell populations, namely granulopoietic/monocytopoietic, erythropoietic, B-lymphopoietic, and T-lymphopoietic precursor cells have been assayed by RT-PCR technique for the presence and relative amounts of adenosine A(1), A(2a), A(2b), and A(3) receptor mRNA. It has been found that (i) all four populations studied express all four adenosine receptor subtypes, (ii) the A(1), receptor is the least expressed in all populations studied, (iii) the A(3) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of granulopoietic/monocytopoietic and erythropoietic cells, (iv) the A(2a) receptor is markedly expressed in the populations of B-lymphopoietic and T-lymphopoietic cells, and v) the A(2b) receptor does not predominate in any of the precursor cells studied. Our data offer a new possibility for the assessment of the readiness of these cells to respond, by receptor-mediated mechanisms, to adenosine or its analogs present in the tissues as a result of endogenous processes and/or following their administration. PMID:19249907

  20. Rosiglitazone promotes the differentiation of Langerhans cells and inhibits that of other dendritic cell types from CD133 positive hematopoietic precursors.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Maria Ida; Bacci, Stefano; Santosuosso, Michela; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Aldinucci, Alessandra; Ballerini, Clara; Guasti, Daniele; Calosi, Laura; Bosi, Alberto; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2014-03-01

    Dendritic cells and their precursors express PPAR-gamma, whose stimulation has inhibitory effects on the maturation and function of dendritic cells in vivo. Dendritic cells can differentiate in vitro from CD133+ progenitors; the influence of PPAR-gamma stimulation on this process is unknown. We have addressed the effect of PPAR-gamma agonist rosiglitazone, at a concentration as used in clinics, on the differentiation of dendritic cells from human CD133+ progenitors. Cells were harvested from cord blood by density gradient and immunomagnetic separation, and cultured for 18 days with fetal calf serum, cytokines and 1 μmol/L rosiglitazone. Analyses included flow cytometry, electron microscopy and mixed lymphocyte reaction. As expected, control cells generated without rosiglitazone were dendritic, expressed MHC-II, CD80, CD83 and CD86 and stimulated mixed reaction potently. A minority of cells expressed the Langerhans cell marker CD207/langerin, but none contained Birbeck granules. With rosiglitazone much fewer cells were generated; they were all dendritic, expressed differentiation and maturation-related antigens in higher percentage and were better stimulators of lymphocytes than those generated without the drug. The vast majority of cells expressed CD207/langerin and many contained Birbeck granules, i.e. were full-fledged Langerhans cells. We conclude that stimulation of PPAR-gamma, while negatively affecting the number of generated cells, promotes the maturation of human cord blood CD133 positive precursors into efficient, immunostimulating dendritic cells with a Langerhans cell phenotype. PMID:23881602

  1. MicroRNAs in Myeloid Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Maria; Calin, George Adrian

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are 19-24 nucleotides noncoding RNAs which silence modulate the expression of target genes by binding to the messenger RNAs. Myeloid malignancies include a broad spectrum of acute and chronic disorders originating from from the clonal transformation of a hematopoietic stem cell. Specific genetic abnormalities may define myeloid malignancies, such as translocation t(9;22) that represent the hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia. Although next-generation sequencing pro-vided new insights in the genetic characterization and pathogenesis of myeloid neoplasms, the molecular mechanisms underlying myeloid neoplasms are lacking in most cases. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that the expression levels of specific miRNAs may vary among patients with myeloid malignancies compared with healthy individuals and partially unveiled how miRNAs participate in the leukemic transformation process. Finally, in vitro experiments and pre-clinical model provided preliminary data of the safety and efficacy of miRNA inhibitory molecules, opening new avenue in the treatment of myeloid hematological malignancies. PMID:27047254

  2. Differentiation and Characterization of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dipti; Shah, Hetavi Parag; Malu, Krishnakumar; Berliner, Nancy; Gaines, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recent molecular studies of myeloid differentiation have utilized several in vitro models of myelopoiesis, generated from either ex vivo differentiated bone marrow progenitors or induced immortalized myeloid cell lines. Ex vivo differentiation begins with an enriched population of bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells generated by lineage depletion and/or positive selection for CD34+ antigen (human) or Sca-1+ (mouse) cells, which are then expanded and subsequently induced in vitro in a process that recapitulates normal myeloid development. Myeloid cell lines include two human leukemic cell lines, NB-4 and HL-60, which have been demonstrated to undergo retinoic acid–induced myeloid development, however, both cell lines exhibit defects in the upregulation of late-expressed neutrophil-specific genes. Multiple murine factor–dependent cell models of myelopoiesis are also available that express the full range of neutrophil maturation markers, including: 32Dcl3 cells, which undergo G-CSF-induced myeloid maturation, EML/EPRO cells, which develop into mature neutrophils in response to cytokines and retinoic acid, and ER-Hoxb8 cells, which undergo myeloid maturation upon removal of estradial in the maintenance medium. In this unit, the induction of myeloid maturation in each of these model systems is described, including their differentiation to either neutrophils or macrophages, if applicable. Commonly used techniques to test for myeloid characteristics of developing cells are also described, including flow cytometry and real time RT-PCR. Together, these assays provide a solid foundation for in vitro investigations of myeloid development with either human or mouse models. PMID:24510620

  3. Hhex is Required at Multiple Stages of Adult Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Smith, Elizabeth; Mathias, Elizabeth; Elliott, Natalina; Cleveland, Susan M.; Tripathi, Rati M.; Layer, Justin H.; Chen, Xi; Guo, Yan; Shyr, Yu; Hamid, Rizwan; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2015-01-01

    Hhex encodes a homeodomain transcription factor that is widely expressed in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. Its enforced expression induces T-cell leukemia and we have implicated it as an important oncogene in early T-cell precursor leukemias where it is immediately downstream of an LMO2-associated protein complex. Conventional Hhex knockouts cause embryonic lethality precluding analysis of adult hematopoiesis. Thus, we induced highly efficient conditional knockout (cKO) using vav-Cre transgenic mice. Hhex cKO mice were viable and born at normal litter sizes. At steady state, we observed a defect in B-cell development that we localized to the earliest B-cell precursor, the pro-B-cell stage. Most remarkably, bone marrow transplantation using Hhex cKO donor cells revealed a more profound defect in all hematopoietic lineages. In contrast, sublethal irradiation resulted in normal myeloid cell repopulation of the bone marrow but markedly impaired repopulation of T- and B-cell compartments. We noted that Hhex cKO stem and progenitor cell populations were skewed in their distribution and showed enhanced proliferation compared to WT cells. Our results implicate Hhex in the maintenance of LT-HSCs and in lineage allocation from multipotent progenitors especially in stress hematopoiesis. PMID:25968920

  4. Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, and Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Followed By Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant, Tacrolimus, and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Myeloid Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Hematopoietic/Lymphoid Cancer; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  5. Microglia Versus Myeloid Cell Nomenclature during Brain Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Greter, Melanie; Lelios, Iva; Croxford, Andrew Lewis

    2015-01-01

    As immune sentinels of the central nervous system (CNS), microglia not only respond rapidly to pathological conditions but also contribute to homeostasis in the healthy brain. In contrast to other populations of the myeloid lineage, adult microglia derive from primitive myeloid precursors that arise in the yolk sac early during embryonic development, after which they self-maintain locally and independently of blood-borne myeloid precursors. Under neuro-inflammatory conditions such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, circulating monocytes invade the CNS parenchyma where they further differentiate into macrophages or inflammatory dendritic cells. Often it is difficult to delineate resident microglia from infiltrating myeloid cells using currently known markers. Here, we will discuss the current means to reliably distinguish between these populations, and which recent advances have helped to make clear definitions between phenotypically similar, yet functionally diverse myeloid cell types. PMID:26074918

  6. Myeloid Cell Nuclear Differentiation Antigen (MNDA) Expression Distinguishes Extramedullary Presentations of Myeloid Leukemia From Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Ryan C; Kim, Jinah; Natkunam, Yasodha; Sundram, Uma; Freud, Aharon G; Gammon, Bryan; Cascio, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid neoplasms constitute one of the most common malignancies in adults. In most cases these proliferations initially manifest in the blood and marrow; however, extramedullary involvement may precede blood or marrow involvement in a subset of cases, making a definitive diagnosis challenging by morphologic and immunohistochemical assessment alone. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, aggressive entity that frequently presents in extramedullary sites and can show morphologic and immunophenotypic overlap with myeloid neoplasms. Given that BPDCN and myeloid neoplasms may both initially present in extramedullary sites and that novel targeted therapies may be developed that exploit the unique molecular signature of BPDCN, new immunophenotypic markers that can reliably separate myeloid neoplasms from BPDCN are desirable. We evaluated the utility of myeloid cell nuclear differentiation antigen (MNDA) expression in a series of extramedullary myeloid leukemias (EMLs) and BPDCN. Forty biopsies containing EML and 19 biopsies containing BPDCN were studied by MNDA immunohistochemistry. The majority of myeloid neoplasms showed nuclear expression of MNDA (65%). In contrast, all cases of BPDCN lacked MNDA expression. These findings show that MNDA is expressed in the majority of EMLs and support the inclusion of MNDA immunohistochemistry in the diagnostic evaluation of blastic hematopoietic infiltrates, particularly when the differential diagnosis is between myeloid leukemia and BPDCN. PMID:26796502

  7. Characterization of macrophage- and granulocyte-inducing proteins for normal and leukemic myeloid cells produced by the Krebs ascites tumor.

    PubMed

    Lipton, J H; Sachs, L

    1981-04-01

    Medium from serum-free cultures of Krebs ascites tumor cells contains two macrophage and granulocyte inducing (MGI) activities that can act on the myeloid precursors of these hematopoietic cells. One activity, MGI-1, induced the formation of macrophage and granulocyte colonies from normal myeloid precursors. The second activity, MGI-2, induced macrophage and granulocyte differentiation in myeloid leukemic cells that no longer required MGI-1 for colony formation. The medium contained one species of MGI-1 and two species of MGI-2. One species of MGI-2, MGI-2A, copurified through five stages of purification with MGI-1, but separated from the other MGI-2 species, MGI-2B, at an early stage in purification. MGI-1, MGI-2A and MGI-2B were purified 1490, 1140 and 678-fold, respectively. When bands with biological activity gel from non-denaturing polyacrylamide gels were run on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, MGI-1 and MGI-2A activities were associated with similar Mr and each activity showed two bands, one of 23 000 and the other 25 000. MGI-2B activity showed one band with a Mr of 45 000. Secretion did not appear to involve glycosylation, none of the species bound to concanavalin A, soybean agglutinin, or wheat germ agglutinin agarose columns and they did not appear to contain carbohydrates. The assays for MGI-1 and MGI-2 activities were not affected by adding protease inhibitors. But MGI-2 was more readily destroyed by treatment with proteases and was more labile at high temperature and low pH than MGI-1. It is suggested that the level of cellular proteases may play a role in regulating the relative amounts of MGI-1 and MGI-2 that are present in vivo. PMID:7013820

  8. Reduced-Intensity Conditioning Combined with (188)Rhenium Radioimmunotherapy before Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Elderly Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: The Role of In Vivo T Cell Depletion.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sebastian; Strumpf, Annette; Schetelig, Johannes; Wunderlich, Gerd; Ehninger, Gerhard; Kotzerke, Jörg; Bornhäuser, Martin

    2015-10-01

    The combination of reduced-intensity conditioning, (188)rhenium anti-CD66 radioimmunotherapy, and in vivo T cell depletion was successfully applied in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Within a prospective phase II protocol, we investigated whether a dose reduction of alemtuzumab (from 75 mg to 50 mg MabCampath) would improve leukemia-free survival by reducing the incidence of relapse. Fifty-eight patients (median age, 67 years; range, 54 to 76) received radioimmunotherapy followed by fludarabine 150 mg/m(2) and busulfan 8 mg/kg combined with either 75 mg (n = 26) or 50 mg (n = 32) alemtuzumab. Although we observed a trend towards a shorter duration of neutropenia in the 50 mg group (median, 19 versus 21 days; P = .07), the time from transplantation to neutrophil and platelet engraftment as well as the overall incidence of engraftment did not differ. The incidence of severe acute graft-versus-host disease tended to be higher after the lower alemtuzumab dose (17% versus 4%; P = .15). No significant differences in the cumulative incidences of relapse (38% versus 35%; P = .81) or nonrelapse mortality (46% versus 27%; P = .31) were observed. Accordingly, disease-free and overall survival were not significantly different between groups. Although the feasibility of radioimmunotherapy plus reduced-intensity conditioning could be demonstrated in elderly patients, the dose reduction of alemtuzumab had no positive impact on overall outcome. PMID:26001695

  9. Donor Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Profile Bx1 Imparts a Negative Effect and Centromeric B-Specific Gene Motifs Render a Positive Effect on Standard-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Myelodysplastic Syndrome Patient Survival after Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaojing; Wang, Miao; Zhou, Huifen; Zhang, Huanhuan; Wu, Xiaojin; Yuan, Xiaoni; Li, Yang; Wu, Depei; He, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Donor killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) group B profiles (Bx) and homozygous of centromeric motif B (Cen-B/B) are the most preferable KIR gene content motifs for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The risk of transplant from Bx1 donors and the benefit of the presence of Cen-B (regardless of number) were observed for standard-risk acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (AML/MDS) patients in this 4-year retrospective study. A total of 210 Chinese patients who underwent unrelated donor HSCT were investigated. Donor KIR profile Bx was associated with significantly improved overall survival (OS; P = .026) and relapse-free survival (RFS; P = .021) and reduced nonrelapse mortality (NRM; P = .017) in AML/MDS patients. A significantly lower survival rate was observed for transplants from Bx1 donors compared with Bx2, Bx3, and Bx4 donors for patients in first complete remission (n = 82; OS: P = .024; RFS: P = .021). Transplant from donors with Cen-B resulted in improved OS (HR = .256; 95% CI, .084 to .774; P = .016) and RFS (HR = .252; 95% CI, .084 to .758; P = .014) in AML/MDS patients at standard risk. However, this particular effect did not increase with a higher number of Cen-B motifs (cB/B versus cA/B; OS: P = .755; RFS: P = .768). No effect was observed on high-risk AML/MDS, acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and chronic myelogenous leukemia patients. Avoiding the selection of HSCT donors of KIR profile Bx1 is strongly advisable for standard-risk AML/MDS patients. The presence of the Cen-B motif rather than its number was more important in donor selection for the Chinese population. PMID:26371372

  10. Myeloid malignancies: mutations, models and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Myeloid malignant diseases comprise chronic (including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia) and acute (acute myeloid leukemia) stages. They are clonal diseases arising in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Mutations responsible for these diseases occur in several genes whose encoded proteins belong principally to five classes: signaling pathways proteins (e.g. CBL, FLT3, JAK2, RAS), transcription factors (e.g. CEBPA, ETV6, RUNX1), epigenetic regulators (e.g. ASXL1, DNMT3A, EZH2, IDH1, IDH2, SUZ12, TET2, UTX), tumor suppressors (e.g. TP53), and components of the spliceosome (e.g. SF3B1, SRSF2). Large-scale sequencing efforts will soon lead to the establishment of a comprehensive repertoire of these mutations, allowing for a better definition and classification of myeloid malignancies, the identification of new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets, and the development of novel therapies. Given the importance of epigenetic deregulation in myeloid diseases, the use of drugs targeting epigenetic regulators appears as a most promising therapeutic approach. PMID:22823977

  11. PTPIP51-a myeloid lineage specific protein interacts with PTP1B in neutrophil granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Brobeil, Alexander; Graf, Michaela; Oeschger, Sabine; Steger, Klaus; Wimmer, Monika

    2010-08-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase interacting protein 51 (PTPIP51) was identified as an in vitro interacting partner of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) and T-cell protein tyrosine phosphatase (TCPTP). The full-length form of PTPIP51 encompasses 470aas and has a molecular weight of 52kDa. The physiological function is poorly understood but an involvement in differentiation processes and apoptosis has been suggested. Preliminary observations suggested differences in PTPIP51 expression in blood cells. To analyze a possible involvement of PTPIP51 in hematopoietic processes, we studied its expression in samples of peripheral venous blood (PVB), umbilical cord blood (UCB) and human bone marrow (HBM). In both, PVB and UCB PTPIP51 expression was restricted to neutrophil granulocytes. In HBM samples, besides in mature neutrophil ganulocytes PTPIP51 protein and mRNA was present in myeloid precursor cells of neutrophils. The expression of PTPIP51 in neutrophil granulocytes was corroborated by immunoblot analysis exhibiting different molecular weight forms of PTPIP51 protein. Anti-peptide antibodies, identifying specific regions of the PTPIP51 protein (C-terminus, N-terminus and aas114-129) revealed a distinct isoform expression pattern in neutrophil granulocytes of different sources. In PVB and UCB neutrophil granulocytes reacted positive for all three peptide antibodies. In contrast, neutrophils of HBM express solely an N-terminal variant of PTPIP51 protein, lacking the C-terminal and aas114-129 sequence. Immunocytochemical results displayed a strict co-localization of PTPIP51 and PTP1B in PVB and UCB. The interaction of both proteins was verified by a proximity ligation assay. Neither proliferating cells, as identified by PCNA immunostaining, nor apoptotic cells, labeled by TUNEL assay, displayed an immunoreactivity for PTPIP51 in HBM. In fact, PTPIP51 expression was restricted to myeloid precursor cells undergoing differentiation. In blood cells therefore, PTPIP51 expression is restricted to differentiating and mature neutrophil granulocytes. PMID:20627780

  12. Human bone marrow granulocyte-macrophageal colonies (GM-Cs) in vitro: myeloid cells in health and in cases of myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zvetkova, E; Savov, Y; Gluhcheva, Y; Ilieva, I; Bichkidjieva, E; Katzarova, E; Tsenov, I

    2004-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of granulocyte/macrophageal (GM-) colonies and clusters, obtained in vitro (in semi-solid agar cultures) from bone marrow hematopoietic myeloid progenitors pertain to leukocyte hemorheology of healthy persons and patients with myeloid leukemias. The morphological features of in vitro growing myeloid progenitors, granulocytes and macrophages of healthy persons differ in their cell size, shape and degree of differentiation from the cultivated marrow cells in cases of acute and chronic myeloid leukaemia. In this malignant disease, the rheological properties of leukocytes (granulocytes/macrophages) were found to provide diagnostic information. Further studies should be undertaken to examine whether the method could be useful in defining survival, prognosis and therapeutical approach in cases of myeloid leukemia. PMID:15258392

  13. MicroRNA-486-5p is an erythroid oncomiR of the myeloid leukemias of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Lital; Vendramini, Elena; Ge, Yubin; Goren, Yaron; Birger, Yehudit; Tijssen, Marloes R; McNulty, Maureen; Geron, Ifat; Schwartzman, Omer; Goldberg, Liat; Chou, Stella T; Pitman, Holly; Weiss, Mitchell J; Michaeli, Shulamit; Sredni, Benjamin; Göttgens, Berthold; Crispino, John D; Taub, Jeffrey W; Izraeli, Shai

    2015-02-19

    Children with Down syndrome (DS) are at increased risk for acute myeloid leukemias (ML-DS) characterized by mixed megakaryocytic and erythroid phenotype and by acquired mutations in the GATA1 gene resulting in a short GATA1s isoform. The chromosome 21 microRNA (miR)-125b cluster has been previously shown to cooperate with GATA1s in transformation of fetal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we report that the expression of miR-486-5p is increased in ML-DS compared with non-DS acute megakaryocytic leukemias (AMKLs). miR-486-5p is regulated by GATA1 and GATA1s that bind to the promoter of its host gene ANK1. miR-486-5p is highly expressed in mouse erythroid precursors and knockdown (KD) in ML-DS cells reduced their erythroid phenotype. Ectopic expression and KD of miR-486-5p in primary fetal liver hematopoietic progenitors demonstrated that miR-486-5p cooperates with Gata1s to enhance their self renewal. Consistent with its activation of AKT, overexpression and KD experiments showed its importance for growth and survival of human leukemic cells. Thus, miR-486-5p cooperates with GATA1s in supporting the growth and survival, and the aberrant erythroid phenotype of the megakaryocytic leukemias of DS. PMID:25533034

  14. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seed, T. M.

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). In our laboratory we have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3-26.3 cGy d^-1). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific (three major responding subgroups identified) and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup 1), the failure to augment basic repair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments (particularly marked within erythroid compartments) that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccommodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3) appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high-tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity. The kinetics of these repair-mediated, regenerative hematopoietic responses within the major subgroups are under study and should provide useful insights into the nature of hematopoietic accommodation (or its failure) under greatly extended periods of chronic, low-daily-dose ionizing radiation exposure.

  15. [Mutations of epigenetic regulator genes and myeloid malignancies].

    PubMed

    Muto, Tomoya; Sashida, Goro; Oshima, Motohiko; Iwama, Atsushi

    2015-11-01

    Recent genome studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in various myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm. These mutations frequently occur in epigenetic regulator genes, and functions of the proteins encoded by these genes in hematopoietic cells have been extensively analyzed, as reported recently. It is noteworthy that several epigenetic regulator genes, such as DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1, have also been identified in pre-leukemic stem cells. As targeting pre-leukemic stem cells would be a promising therapeutic approach, further investigations of epigenetic abnormalities in hematopoietic cells are anticipated to lead to the development of novel epigenetic therapies. In this review, we discuss recent genetic and functional data regarding epigenetic regulator genes and the future landscape of this new research field. PMID:26666714

  16. FHL2 regulates hematopoietic stem cell functions under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Hou, Y; Wang, X; Li, L; Fan, R; Chen, J; Zhu, T; Li, W; Jiang, Y; Mittal, N; Wu, W; Peace, D; Qian, Z

    2015-03-01

    FHL2, a member of the four and one half LIM domain protein family, is a critical transcriptional modulator. Here, we identify FHL2 as a critical regulator of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that is essential for maintaining HSC self-renewal under regenerative stress. We find that Fhl2 loss has limited effects on hematopoiesis under homeostatic conditions. In contrast, Fhl2-null chimeric mice reconstituted with Fhl2-null bone marrow cells developed abnormal hematopoiesis with significantly reduced numbers of HSCs, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs), red blood cells and platelets as well as hemoglobin levels. In addition, HSCs displayed a significantly reduced self-renewal capacity and were skewed toward myeloid lineage differentiation. We find that Fhl2 loss reduces both HSC quiescence and survival in response to regenerative stress, probably as a consequence of Fhl2-loss-mediated downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase-inhibitors, including p21(Cip) and p27(Kip1). Interestingly, FHL2 is regulated under the control of a tissue-specific promoter in hematopoietic cells and it is downregulated by DNA hypermethylation in the leukemia cell line and primary leukemia cells. Furthermore, we find that downregulation of FHL2 frequently occurs in myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia patients, raising a possibility that FHL2 downregulation has a role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. PMID:25179730

  17. Mapping of MN1 Sequences Necessary for Myeloid Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Kandilci, Ayten; Surtel, Jacqueline; Janke, Laura; Neale, Geoffrey; Terranova, Sabrina; Grosveld, Gerard C.

    2013-01-01

    The MN1 oncogene is deregulated in human acute myeloid leukemia and its overexpression induces proliferation and represses myeloid differentiation of primitive human and mouse hematopoietic cells, leading to myeloid leukemia in mouse models. To delineate the sequences within MN1 necessary for MN1-induced leukemia, we tested the transforming capacity of in-frame deletion mutants, using retroviral transduction of mouse bone marrow. We found that integrity of the regions between amino acids 12 to 458 and 1119 to 1273 are required for MN1’s in vivo transforming activity, generating myeloid leukemia with some mutants also producing T-cell lympho-leukemia and megakaryocytic leukemia. Although both full length MN1 and a mutant that lacks the residues between 12–228 (Δ12–228 mutant) repressed myeloid differentiation and increased myeloproliferative activity in vitro, the mutant lost its transforming activity in vivo. Both MN1 and Δ12–228 increased the frequency of common myeloid progentiors (CMP) in vitro and microarray comparisons of purified MN1-CMP and Δ12–228-CMP cells showed many differentially expressed genes including Hoxa9, Meis1, Myb, Runx2, Cebpa, Cebpb and Cebpd. This collection of immediate MN1-responsive candidate genes distinguishes the leukemic activity from the in vitro myeloproliferative capacity of this oncoprotein. PMID:23626719

  18. The molecular basis of myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    KITAMURA, Toshio; INOUE, Daichi; OKOCHI-WATANABE, Naoko; KATO, Naoko; KOMENO, Yukiko; LU, Yang; ENOMOTO, Yutaka; DOKI, Noriko; UCHIDA, Tomoyuki; KAGIYAMA, Yuki; TOGAMI, Katsuhiro; KAWABATA, Kimihito C.; NAGASE, Reina; HORIKAWA, Sayuri; HAYASHI, Yasutaka; SAIKA, Makoto; FUKUYAMA, Tomofusa; IZAWA, Kumi; OKI, Toshihiko; NAKAHARA, Fumio; KITAURA, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid malignancies consist of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). The latter two diseases have preleukemic features and frequently evolve to AML. As with solid tumors, multiple mutations are required for leukemogenesis. A decade ago, these gene alterations were subdivided into two categories: class I mutations stimulating cell growth or inhibiting apoptosis; and class II mutations that hamper differentiation of hematopoietic cells. In mouse models, class I mutations such as the Bcr-Abl fusion kinase induce MPN by themselves and some class II mutations such as Runx1 mutations induce MDS. Combinations of class I and class II mutations induce AML in a variety of mouse models. Thus, it was postulated that hematopoietic cells whose differentiation is blocked by class II mutations would autonomously proliferate with class I mutations leading to the development of leukemia. Recent progress in high-speed sequencing has enabled efficient identification of novel mutations in a variety of molecules including epigenetic factors, splicing factors, signaling molecules and proteins in the cohesin complex; most of these are not categorized as either class I or class II mutations. The functional consequences of these mutations are now being extensively investigated. In this article, we will review the molecular basis of hematological malignancies, focusing on mouse models and the interfaces between these models and clinical findings, and revisit the classical class I/II hypothesis. PMID:25504228

  19. What Is Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Leukemia--Acute Myeloid (Myelogenous) Download Printable Version [PDF] » View ... the topics below to get started. What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? What is acute myeloid leukemia? ...

  20. KIT mutation in mast cells and other bone marrow hematopoietic cell lineages in systemic mast cell disorders: a prospective study of the Spanish Network on Mastocytosis (REMA) in a series of 113 patients.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Montero, Andres C; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Teodosio, Cristina; Sanchez, Maria Luz; Nunez, Rosa; Prados, Aranzazu; Aldanondo, Isabel; Sanchez, Laura; Dominguez, Mercedes; Botana, Luis M; Sanchez-Jimenez, Francisca; Sotlar, Karl; Almeida, Julia; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto

    2006-10-01

    Despite the relevance of the c-kit/stem cell factor (SCF) signaling pathway in mast cell (MC) diseases, the exact frequency of KIT mutations in different compartments of bone marrow (BM) hematopoietic cells of individuals with systemic mastocytosis (SM), and its different diagnostic categories, remains unknown. In this study, we prospectively analyzed the presence of KIT mutations in fluorescence-activated cell-sorting (FACS)- purified populations of BM MCs (n = 113) and other BM cell compartments (n = 67) from adults with SM. Our results show the presence of D816V KIT mutation in virtually all adults (93%) with indolent and aggressive forms of SM, except well-differentiated SM (29%), while other KIT mutations were rarely (< 3%) detected. In around one-third of patients with mutated MCs, the KIT mutation was also detected in CD34+ hematopoietic cells and eosinophils, and, to a lesser extent, in monocytic, neutrophil-lineage BM precursor cells and lymphocytes. Most patient with poor-prognosis SM (81%) carried the KIT mutation in 2 or more BM myeloid cell populations, while this was detected in a smaller proportion (27%) of indolent cases. These results would support the notion that KIT mutation is a hallmark of adult SM where it targets a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, and may contribute to explaining previously observed discrepancies in the literature. PMID:16741248

  1. Acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stone, Richard M; O'Donnell, Margaret R; Sekeres, Mikkael A

    2004-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have not yet led to major improvements in disease-free and overall survival of adults with this disease. Only about one-third of those between ages 18-60 who are diagnosed with AML can be cured; disease-free survival is rare and current therapy devastating in older adults. In this chapter, challenges in the management of the adult with AML are discussed, including ongoing questions concerning the optimal choice of induction and postremission therapy such as the rationale for and role of allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation in a variety of settings, the special considerations pertaining to the older patient, and the development of new, so-called targeted therapies. In Section I, Dr. Richard Stone reviews state-of the-art therapy in AML in the era of change from a morphological to a genetically based classification system. Questions being addressed in ongoing randomized cooperative group trials include anthracycline dose during induction, the efficacy of drug-resistance modulators, and the utility of pro-apoptotic agents such as the anti-bcl-2 antisense oligonucloetide. Developmental therapeutics in AML include drug resistance modulation, anti-angiogenic strategies, immunotherapy, and signal transduction-active agents, particularly the farnesyl transferase inhibitors as well as those molecules that inhibit the FLT3 tyrosine kinase, activated via mutation in 30% of patients. In Section II Dr. Margaret O'Donnell discusses the role of stem cell transplantation in AML. Several advances including expanded donor pools, the movement toward peripheral blood stem cell collection, newer immunosuppressive drugs and antifungals, and particularly the advent of nonmyeloablative transplant have made the allogeneic option more viable. The subset-specific role for high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support and/or for allogeneic transplant in AML patients in first remission is outlined. Although preconceived notions about the role of transplant abound, the clinical data supporting a risk-adapted approach are covered. Finally, guidance concerning the use of nonmyeloablative or reduced-intensity allogeneic transplantation is provided. In Section III Dr. Mikkael Sekeres reviews the approach to the older patient with AML. Unique biological and therapeutic considerations make AML in this age group a vastly different disease than that in younger adults. The outcome data, including the role of specific anthracylines, hematopoietic growth factors, and drug-resistance modulators, are summarized. Communicating with older adults with AML and their families regarding selection of the optimal treatment strategy, often a stark choice between induction chemotherapy and palliative care, is covered. PMID:15561679

  2. Dnmt3a regulates myeloproliferation and liver-specific expansion of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Guryanova, O A; Lieu, Y K; Garrett-Bakelman, F E; Spitzer, B; Glass, J L; Shank, K; Martinez, A B V; Rivera, S A; Durham, B H; Rapaport, F; Keller, M D; Pandey, S; Bastian, L; Tovbin, D; Weinstein, A R; Teruya-Feldstein, J; Abdel-Wahab, O; Santini, V; Mason, C E; Melnick, A M; Mukherjee, S; Levine, R L

    2016-05-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) mutations are observed in myeloid malignancies, including myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Transplantation studies have elucidated an important role for Dnmt3a in stem cell self-renewal and in myeloid differentiation. Here, we investigated the impact of conditional hematopoietic Dnmt3a loss on disease phenotype in primary mice. Mx1-Cre-mediated Dnmt3a ablation led to the development of a lethal, fully penetrant MPN with myelodysplasia (MDS/MPN) characterized by peripheral cytopenias and by marked, progressive hepatomegaly. We detected expanded stem/progenitor populations in the liver of Dnmt3a-ablated mice. The MDS/MPN induced by Dnmt3a ablation was transplantable, including the marked hepatomegaly. Homing studies showed that Dnmt3a-deleted bone marrow cells preferentially migrated to the liver. Gene expression and DNA methylation analyses of progenitor cell populations identified differential regulation of hematopoietic regulatory pathways, including fetal liver hematopoiesis transcriptional programs. These data demonstrate that Dnmt3a ablation in the hematopoietic system leads to myeloid transformation in vivo, with cell-autonomous aberrant tissue tropism and marked extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) with liver involvement. Hence, in addition to the established role of Dnmt3a in regulating self-renewal, Dnmt3a regulates tissue tropism and limits myeloid progenitor expansion in vivo. PMID:26710888

  3. Ectopic expression ofHOXC6 blocks myeloid differentiation and predisposes to malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Heckl, Dirk; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Nelson, Veronica; Beard, Brian C.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis by retroviral vectors has led to the discovery of many oncogenes associated with leukemia. Here we investigated the role of HOXC6, identified by proximal retrovirus insertion a large animal stem cell gene therapy study, for a potential involvement in hematopoietic stem cell activity and hematopoietic fate decision. HOXC6 was overexpressed in the murine bone marrow transplantation model and tested in a competitive repopulation assay in comparison to the known hematopoietic stem cell expansion factor, HOXB4. We have identified HOXC6 as a factor that enhances competitive repopulation capacity in vivo and colony formation in vitro. Ectopic HOXC6 expression also induced strong myeloid differentiation and expansion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors/common myeloid progenitors (GMPs/CMPs) in vivo, resulting in myeloid malignancies with low penetrance (3 out of 17 mice), likely in collaboration with Meis1 due to a provirus integration mapped to the 3' region in the malignant clone. We characterized the molecular basis of HOXC6-induced myeloid differentiation and malignant cell transformation with complementary DNA microarray analysis. Overexpression of HOXC6 induced a gene expression signature similar to several acute myeloid leukemia subtypes when compared to normal GMPs/CMPs. These results demonstrate HOXC6 as a regulator in hematopoiesis and its involvement in malignant transformation. PMID:24513167

  4. Distinct myeloid progenitor-differentiation pathways identified through single-cell RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Drissen, Roy; Buza-Vidas, Natalija; Woll, Petter; Thongjuea, Supat; Gambardella, Adriana; Giustacchini, Alice; Mancini, Elena; Zriwil, Alya; Lutteropp, Michael; Grover, Amit; Mead, Adam; Sitnicka, Ewa; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Nerlov, Claus

    2016-06-01

    According to current models of hematopoiesis, lymphoid-primed multi-potent progenitors (LMPPs) (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)Flt3(hi)) and common myeloid progenitors (CMPs) (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)CD34(+)CD41(hi)) establish an early branch point for separate lineage-commitment pathways from hematopoietic stem cells, with the notable exception that both pathways are proposed to generate all myeloid innate immune cell types through the same myeloid-restricted pre-granulocyte-macrophage progenitor (pre-GM) (Lin(-)Sca-1(-)c-Kit(+)CD41(-)FcγRII/III(-)CD150(-)CD105(-)). By single-cell transcriptome profiling of pre-GMs, we identified distinct myeloid differentiation pathways: a pathway expressing the gene encoding the transcription factor GATA-1 generated mast cells, eosinophils, megakaryocytes and erythroid cells, and a pathway lacking expression of that gene generated monocytes, neutrophils and lymphocytes. These results identify an early hematopoietic-lineage bifurcation that separates the myeloid lineages before their segregation from other hematopoietic-lineage potential. PMID:27043410

  5. IGK with conserved IGKV/IGKJ repertoire is expressed in acute myeloid leukemia and promotes leukemic cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoping; He, Zhiqiao; Hu, Fanlei; Chen, Lei; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that immunoglobulin heavy chain genes were expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells. In this study, we further demonstrated that rearranged Ig κ light chain was also frequently expressed in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines (6/6), primary myeloblasts from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (17/18), and mature monocytes (11/12) and neutrophils (3/12) from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, but not or only rarely expressed in mature neutrophils (0/8) or monocytes (1/8) from healthy individuals. Interestingly, myeloblasts and mature monocytes/neutrophils shared several restricted IGKV and IGKJ gene usages but with different expression frequency. Surprisingly, almost all of the acute myeloid leukemia-derived IGKV showed somatic hypermutation; in contrast, mature myeloid cells-derived IGKV rarely had somatic hypermutation. More importantly, although IGK expression appeared not to affect cell proliferation, reduced IGK expression led to a decrease in cell migration in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines HL-60 and NB4, whereas increased IGK expression promoted their motility. In summary, IGK is expressed in myeloblasts and mature myeloid cells from patients with non-hematopoietic neoplasms, and is involved in cell migration. These results suggest that myeloid cells-derived IgK may have a role in leukemogenesis and may serve as a novel tumor marker for monitoring minimal residual disease and developing target therapy. PMID:26429876

  6. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  7. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Hoggatt, Jonathan; Kfoury, Youmna; Scadden, David T

    2016-05-23

    Regulation of stem cells in adult tissues is a key determinant of how well an organism can respond to the stresses of physiological challenge and disease. This is particularly true of the hematopoietic system, where demands on host defenses can call for an acute increase in cell production. Hematopoietic stem cells receive the regulatory signals for cell production in adult mammals in the bone marrow, a tissue with higher-order architectural and functional organization than previously appreciated. Here, we review the data defining particular structural components and heterologous cells in the bone marrow that participate in hematopoietic stem cell function. Further, we explore the case for stromal-hematopoietic cell interactions contributing to neoplastic myeloid disease. As the hematopoietic regulatory networks in the bone marrow are revealed, it is anticipated that strategies will emerge for how to enhance or inhibit production of specific blood cells. In that way, the control of hematopoiesis will enter the domain of therapies to modulate broad aspects of hematopoiesis, both normal and malignant. PMID:27193455

  8. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. PMID:26774386

  9. Production and analysis of HH 10 monoclonal antibodies reactive to immature hematopoietic cells and their use for monitoring acute leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Naoe, T; Hiraiwa, A; Namikawa, R; Suzuki, S; Yamada, K; Shiku, H

    1985-06-01

    A clone of murine monoclonal antibody HH 10 (IgM) was raised by fusing NS-1 myeloma cells and spleen cells of a mouse hyperimmunized with acute promyelocytic leukemia cells. Serological analysis by means of immune adherence assays showed that HH 10 reacts with immature hematopoietic cells including thymocytes and myeloid precursor cells (defined as colony-forming units in culture assays). The antibodies were not reactive to either peripheral blood cells or bone marrow cells obtained from normal individuals. Lymphoid blasts induced with phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, or concanavalin A were also non-reactive, and all non-hematopoietic cultured cells examined were also negative. The antibodies were, however, reactive to leukemia cells in 67 cases out of 91 cases (74%) of acute leukemia. In patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 43 out of 52 cases (83%) were positive and, in particular, all of 12 T-cell-type acute leukemias were reactive to HH 10. Comparison of percent HH 10 positive cells in the bone marrow of patients with acute leukemia with the results of cytological studies showed a good correlation. Analysis of sequentially collected bone marrow cells of acute leukemia patients using HH 10 revealed its usefulness for monitoring leukemia cells. PMID:3926583

  10. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase gamma, Ptp gamma, regulates hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sorio, C; Melotti, P; D'Arcangelo, D; Mendrola, J; Calabretta, B; Croce, C M; Huebner, K

    1997-07-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells have been a useful model system for the study of various aspects of hematopoietic differentiation. Because we had observed a sharp peak of expression of the receptor tyrosine phosphatase gamma (Ptp gamma) gene between 14 and 18 days of ES-derived embryoid body differentiation, we investigated the effect of perturbation of expression of the Ptp gamma gene on ES cell differentiation, first by analyzing the effect of Ptp gamma overexpression. The murine full-length Ptp gamma cDNA in an expression vector was transfected into ES-D3 cells and stably transfected clones were isolated. Ptp gamma was expressed as an approximately 230-kD cell surface protein, and differentiating ES clones that overexpressed Ptp gamma gave rise to a normal number of hematopoietic colonies, approximately 1 CFU per 100 cells. There was, however, a significant increase of expression of early hematopoietic markers in colonies from Ptp gamma overexpressing ES cells. To confirm that the pertubation of hematopoietic differentiation was a result of Ptp gamma overexpression, we isolated ES stem cell clones expressing Ptp gamma antisense constructs and assayed embryoid bodies for the presence of hematopoietic precursors. We observed a complete absence of methylcellulose colonies, indicating absence of hematopoietic lineages. Results of these experiments point to an essential role for Ptp gamma in hematopoietic differentiation. PMID:9207437

  11. Immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2005-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies have become part of standard cancer treatment. Chimeric and humanized antibodies have demonstrated activity against a variety of tumors. Although the humanized anti-CD33 antibody HuM195 has only modest activity against overt acute myeloid leukemia (AML), it can eliminate minimal residual disease in acute promyelocytic leukemia. High-dose radioimmunotherapy with b-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45, and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of antileukemic therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Conversely, a-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213 or actinium-225 offers the possibility of selective tumor cell kill while sparing surrounding normal tissues. Targeted chemotherapy with the anti-CD33- calicheamicin construct gemtuzumab ozogamicin has produced remissions in relapsed AML and appears promising when used in combination with standard chemotherapy for newly diagnosed AML. T-cell recognition of peptide antigens presented on the cell surface in combination with major histocompatibility complex antigen provides another potentially promising approach for the treatment of AML. PMID:16091194

  12. Myeloid lineage skewing due to exacerbated NF-κB signaling facilitates osteopenia in Scurfy mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T H-P; Swarnkar, G; Mbalaviele, G; Abu-Amer, Y

    2015-01-01

    Immune surveillance through Foxp3+ regulatory T cells plays a crucial role in bone homeostasis. Scurfy, the mouse model of autoimmune IPEX syndrome, bears a loss-of-function mutation in Foxp3 that leads to multi-organ inflammation. Herein, we report that scurfy mice exhibit severe bone loss mediated by accelerated osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, Foxp3 deficiency results in the upregulation of NF-κB in T helper cells through the loss of repressive Foxp3/NEMO interaction, thereby unleashing NF-κB-mediated over-production of pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines. Flow cytometry analysis shows marked increase in lin-Sca-1+c-kit+ hematopoietic stem cells (LSK HSCs) and granulocyte/macrophage progenitors (GMPs) in bone marrow of scurfy mice with corresponding exacerbated osteoclastogenic potential, implying that osteoclast progenitors are affected at a very primitive stage in this disorder. Scurfy LSK HSCs exhibit greater sensitivity to M-CSF and contain abundant PU.1+ Sf LSK HSCs compared with WT. Accordingly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of M-CSF or mTOR signaling, but not IL-17 signaling, attenuates osteoclastogenesis and osteopenia in scurfy. Thus, our study suggests that Foxp3 deficiency leads to osteopenia owing to dysregulated NF-κB activity and subsequent cytokine-mediated hyper-proliferation of myeloid precursors, and positions the NF-κB pathway as a potential target for therapeutic intervention for this disorder. PMID:25880090

  13. Epigenetic control of dendritic cell development and fate determination of common myeloid progenitor by Mysm1.

    PubMed

    Won, Haejung; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Yates, Peter; Sanchez, Suzi; Jones, Lindsey; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi

    2014-10-23

    The mechanisms controlling the development of dendritic cells (DCs) remain incompletely understood. Using an Mysm1 knockout (Mysm1(-/-)) mouse model, we identified the histone H2A deubiquitinase Mysm1, as a critical regulator in DC differentiation. Mysm1(-/-) mice showed a global reduction of DCs in lymphoid organs, whereas development of granulocytes and macrophages were not severely affected. Hematopoietic progenitors and DC precursors were significantly decreased in Mysm1(-/-) mice and defective in Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3(Flt3) ligand-induced, but not in granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced DC differentiation in vitro. Molecular studies demonstrated that the developmental defect of DCs from common myeloid progenitor (CMP) in Mysm1(-/-) mice is associated with decreased Flt3 expression and that Mysm1 derepresses transcription of the Flt3 gene by directing histone modifications at the Flt3 promoter region. Two molecular mechanisms were found to be responsible for the selective role of Mysm1 in lineage determination of DCs from CMPs: the selective expression of Mysm1 in a subset of CMPs and the different requirement of Mysm1 for PU.1 recruitment to the Flt3 locus vs GM-CSF-α and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor receptor loci. In conclusion, this study reveals an essential role of Mysm1 in epigenetic regulation of Flt3 transcription and DC development, and it provides a novel mechanism for lineage determination from CMP. PMID:25217698

  14. t(3;21)(q26;q22): a recurring chromosomal abnormality in therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rubin, C M; Larson, R A; Anastasi, J; Winter, J N; Thangavelu, M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D; Le Beau, M M

    1990-12-15

    We have identified an identical reciprocal translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 3 and 21 with breakpoints at bands 3q26 and 21q22, [t(3;21)(q26;q22)], in the malignant cells from five adult patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML). Primary diagnoses were Hodgkin's disease in two patients and ovarian carcinoma, breast cancer, and polycythemia vera in one patient each. Patients had been treated with chemotherapy including an alkylating agent for their primary disease 1 to 18 years before the development of t-MDS or t-AML. We have not observed the t(3;21) in over 1,500 patients with a myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia arising de novo or in over 1,000 patients with lymphoid malignancies. We have previously reported that the t(3;21) occurs in Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Thus, the t(3;21) appears to be limited to t-MDS/t-AML and CML, both of which represent malignant disorders of an early hematopoietic precursor cell. These results provide a new focus for the study of therapy-related leukemia at the molecular level. PMID:2265251

  15. Hematopoietic tissue repair under chronic low daily dose irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.M.

    1994-12-01

    The capacity of the hematopoietic system to repair constantly accruing cellular damage under chronic, low daily dose gamma irradiation is essential for the maintenance of a functional hematopoietic system, and, in turn, long term survival. In certain individuals, however, such continuous cycles of damage and repair provide an essential inductive environment for selected types of hematopathologies, e.g., myeloid leukemia (ML). We have been studying temporal and causal relationships between hematopoietic capacity, associated repair functions, and propensities for hematologic disease in canines under variable levels of chronic radiation stress (0.3{minus}26.3 cGy d{sup {minus}1}). Results indicate that the maximum exposure rate tolerated by the hematopoietic system is highly individual-specific and is based largely on the degree to which repair capacity, and, in turn, hematopoietic restoration, is augmented under chronic exposure. In low-tolerance individuals (prone to aplastic anemia, subgroup (1), the failure to augment basic m-pair functions seemingly results in a progressive accumulation of genetic and cellular damage within vital progenitorial marrow compartments particularly marked within erythroid compartments. that results in loss of reproductive capacity and ultimately in collapse of the hematopoietic system. The high-tolerance individuals (radioaccomodated and either prone- or not prone to ML, subgroup 2 & 3 appear to minimize the accumulating damage effect of daily exposures by extending repair functions, which preserves reproductive integrity and fosters regenerative hematopoietic responses. As the strength of the regenerative response manifests the extent of repair augmentation, the relatively strong response of high- tolerance individuals progressing to patent ML suggests an insufficiency of repair quality rather than repair quantity.

  16. MOZ is essential for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Katsumoto, Takuo; Aikawa, Yukiko; Iwama, Atsushi; Ueda, Shinobu; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2006-05-15

    Monocytic leukemia zinc-finger protein (MOZ), a MYST family histone acetyltransferase, is involved in the chromosome translocations associated with acute myeloid leukemia. MOZ acts as a transcriptional coactivator for AML1, which is essential for establishment of definitive hematopoiesis. To investigate the roles of MOZ in normal hematopoiesis, we generated MOZ-null mice. MOZ-/- mice died around embryonic day 15 (E15). In MOZ-/- E14.5 embryos, hematopoietic stem cells, lineage-committed progenitors, and B lineage cells were severely reduced. On the other hand, arrest of erythroid maturation and elevated myeloid lineage populations were observed. MOZ-deficient fetal liver cells could not reconstitute hematopoiesis of recipients after transplantation. Analysis using microarray and flow cytometry revealed that expression of thrombopoietin receptor (c-Mpl), HoxA9, and c-Kit was down-regulated. These results show that MOZ is required for maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells, and that it plays a role in differentiation of erythroid and myeloid cells. Some aspects of the MOZ-/- phenotype are similar to that observed in PU.1-deficient mice. MOZ was able to interact with PU.1 and activate PU.1-dependent transcription, thus suggesting a physical and functional link between PU.1 and MOZ. PMID:16702405

  17. Donor cell myeloid sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Walshauser, Mark A; Go, Aileen; Sojitra, Payal; Venkataraman, Girish; Stiff, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Donor cell derived malignancies are a rare and interesting complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. We present a case of a 56-year-old male with donor cell myeloid sarcoma of the stomach and myocardium. PMID:24822132

  18. Donor Cell Myeloid Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Walshauser, Mark A.; Sojitra, Payal

    2014-01-01

    Donor cell derived malignancies are a rare and interesting complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. We present a case of a 56-year-old male with donor cell myeloid sarcoma of the stomach and myocardium. PMID:24822132

  19. Pathogenic microRNA’s in myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Khalaj, Mona; Tavakkoli, Montreh; Stranahan, Alec W.; Park, Christopher Y.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have significantly improved our understanding of the role microRNAs (miRNAs) play in regulating normal hematopoiesis. miRNAs are critical for maintaining hematopoietic stem cell function and the development of mature progeny. Thus, perhaps it is not surprising that miRNAs serve as oncogenes and tumor suppressors in hematologic malignancies arising from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, such as the myeloid disorders. A number of studies have extensively documented the widespread dysregulation of miRNA expression in human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), inspiring numerous explorations of the functional role of miRNAs in myeloid leukemogenesis. While these investigations have confirmed that a large number of miRNAs exhibit altered expression in AML, only a small fraction has been confirmed as functional mediators of AML development or maintenance. Herein, we summarize the miRNAs for which strong experimental evidence supports their functional roles in AML pathogenesis. We also discuss the implications of these studies on the development of miRNA-directed therapies in AML. PMID:25477897

  20. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia. PMID:26876264

  1. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development.

    PubMed

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha; Gutti, Ravi Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  2. Apoptosis: role in myeloid cell development

    PubMed Central

    Sarvothaman, Shilpa; Undi, Ram Babu; Pasupuleti, Satya Ratan; Gutti, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is the process that generates blood cells in an organism from the pluripotent stem cells. Hematopoietic stem cells are characterized by their ability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation. The self-renewing ability ensures that these pluripotent cells are not depleted from the bone marrow niche. A proper balance between cell death and cell survival is necessary to maintain a homeostatic condition, hence, apoptosis, or programmed cell death, is an essential step in hematopoiesis. Recent studies, however, have introduced a new aspect to this process, citing the significance of the apoptosis mediator, caspase, in cell development and differentiation. Extensive research has been carried out to study the possible role of caspases and other apoptosis related factors in the developmental processes. This review focuses on the various apoptotic factors involved in the development and differentiation of myeloid lineage cells: erythrocytes, megakaryocytes, and macrophages. PMID:26157776

  3. Functions of TET Proteins in Hematopoietic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae-A; An, Jungeun; Ko, Myunggon

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-characterized epigenetic modification that plays central roles in mammalian development, genomic imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and silencing of retrotransposon elements. Aberrant DNA methylation pattern is a characteristic feature of cancers and associated with abnormal expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes or repair genes. Ten-eleven-translocation (TET) proteins are recently characterized dioxygenases that catalyze progressive oxidation of 5-methylcytosine to produce 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and further oxidized derivatives. These oxidized methylcytosines not only potentiate DNA demethylation but also behave as independent epigenetic modifications per se. The expression or activity of TET proteins and DNA hydroxymethylation are highly dysregulated in a wide range of cancers including hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies, and accumulating evidence points TET proteins as a novel tumor suppressor in cancers. Here we review DNA demethylation-dependent and -independent functions of TET proteins. We also describe diverse TET loss-of-function mutations that are recurrently found in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies and their potential roles in hematopoietic transformation. We discuss consequences of the deficiency of individual Tet genes and potential compensation between different Tet members in mice. Possible mechanisms underlying facilitated oncogenic transformation of TET-deficient hematopoietic cells are also described. Lastly, we address non-mutational mechanisms that lead to suppression or inactivation of TET proteins in cancers. Strategies to restore normal 5mC oxidation status in cancers by targeting TET proteins may provide new avenues to expedite the development of promising anti-cancer agents. PMID:26552488

  4. Hematopoietic ontogeny and its relevance for pediatric leukemias.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, Ion; Sgura, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    Fetal and infant hematopoiesis display characteristics different from the adult one: our suggestion is that these features may help to explain the peculiar incidence rates of acute leukemias. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are fast-cycling (those in adults instead are largely quiescent) and studies in mice demonstrated that their relative contribution to myelo- and lymphopoiesis varies during development. We hypothesize that during development some of the "hits" needed for the onset of leukemia are usually occurring (being part of the normal development), so leukemogenesis needs less mutations than in adults to take place and therefore it's more probable. The switch between the relative incidence of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias may be related to the changes of the percentage of lymphoid-deficient and lymphoid-proficient sub-set of HSCs during development. Further investigations may clarify this hypothesis, elucidating also the roles of the different microenvironments in determining the myeloid/lymphoid predisposition of the HSCs. PMID:26880643

  5. Toll-like receptor signaling in hematopoietic homeostasis and the pathogenesis of hematologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Cannova, Joseph; Breslin S J, Peter; Zhang, Jiwang

    2015-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which are found in innate immune cells, are essential mediators of rapid inflammatory responses and appropriate T-cell activation in response to infection and tissue damage. Accumulating evidence suggests that TLR signaling is involved in normal hematopoiesis and specific hematologic pathologies. Particular TLRs and their downstream signaling mediators are expressed not only in terminally differentiated innate immune cells but also in early hematopoietic progenitors. Sterile activation of TLR signaling is required to generate early embryonic hematopoietic progenitor cells. In adult animals, TLR signaling directly or indirectly promotes differentiation of myeloid cells at the expense of that of lymphoid cells and the self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells during infection and tissue damage. Activating mutations of the MyD88 gene, which codes for a key adaptor involved in TLR signaling, are commonly detected in B-cell lymphomas and other B-cell hematopathologies. Dysregulated TLR signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of many hematopoietic disorders, including bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndrome, and acute myeloid leukemia. Complete elucidation of the molecular mechanisms by which TLR signaling mediates the regulation of both normal and pathogenic hematopoiesis will prove valuable to the development of targeted therapies and strategies for improved treatment of hematopoietic disorders. PMID:26297301

  6. Cul4A is required for hematopoietic cell viability and its deficiency leads to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Waning, David L.; Li, Binghui; Jia, Nan; Naaldijk, Yahaira; Goebel, W. Scott; HogenEsch, Harm

    2008-01-01

    In vitro studies indicate that Cul4A ubiquitin ligases target for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis regulators of cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, development, and DNA repair. In hematopoietic cell lines, studies by our group and others showed that Cul4A ligases regulate proliferation and differentiation in maturing myeloid and erythroid cells. In vivo, Cul4A-deficient embryos die in utero. Cul4A haploinsufficient mice are viable but have fewer erythroid and primitive myeloid progenitors. Yet, little more is known about Cul4A function in vivo. To examine Cul4A function in adults, we generated mice with interferon-inducible deletion of Cul4A. Cul4A deficiency resulted in DNA damage and apoptosis of rapidly dividing cells, and mutant mice died within 3 to 10 days after induction with dramatic atrophy of the intestinal villi, bone marrow, and spleen, and with hematopoietic failure. Cul4A deletion in vivo specifically increased cellular levels of the Cul4A ligase targets Cdt1 and p27Kip1 but not other known targets. Bone marrow transplantation studies with Cul4A deletion in engrafted cells specifically isolated analysis of Cul4A function to hematopoietic cells and resulted in hematopoietic failure. These recipients died within 9 to 11 days, demonstrating that in hematopoietic cells, Cul4A is essential for survival. PMID:18339895

  7. Ectopic bone formation in severely combat-injured orthopedic patients -- a hematopoietic niche.

    PubMed

    Davis, Thomas A; Lazdun, Yelena; Potter, Benjamin K; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2013-09-01

    Combat-related heterotopic ossification (HO) has emerged as a common and problematic complication of modern wartime extremity injuries, contributing to substantial patient morbidity and loss of function. We have previously reported that HO-forming patients exhibit a more pronounced systemic and local inflammatory response very early in the wound healing process. Moreover, traumatized muscle-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells from these patients have a skewed differentiation potential toward bone. Here, we demonstrate that HO lesions excised from this patient population contain highly vascularized, mature, cancellous bone containing adipogenic marrow. Histologic analysis showed immature hematopoietic cells located within distinct foci in perivascular regions. The adipogenic marrow often contained low numbers of functional erythroid (BFU-E), myeloid (CFU-GM, CFU-M) and multilineage (CFU-GEMM) colony-forming hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). Conversely, tissue from control muscle and non-HO traumatic wound granulation tissue showed no evidence of hematopoietic progenitor cell activity. In summary, our findings suggest that ectopic bone can provide an appropriate hematopoietic microenvironment for supporting the proliferation and differentiation of HPCs. This reactive and vibrant cell population may help maintain normal hematopoietic function, particularly in those with major extremity amputations who have sustained both massive blood loss, prompting systemic marrow stimulation, as well as loss of available native active marrow space. These findings begin to characterize the functional biology of ectopic bone and elucidate the interactions between HPC and non-hematopoietic cell types within the ectopic intramedullary hematopoietic microenvironmental niche identified. PMID:23727270

  8. A Rare Complication Developing After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Wernicke’s Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Solmaz, Soner; Gereklioğlu, Çiğdem; Tan, Meliha; Demir, Şenay; Yeral, Mahmut; Korur, Aslı; Boğa, Can; Özdoğu, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin. Thiamine deficiency can present as a central nervous system disorder known as Wernicke’s encephalopathy, which classically manifests as confusion, ataxia, and ophthalmoplegia. Wernicke’s encephalopathy has rarely been reported following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Herein, we report Wernicke’s encephalopathy in a patient with acute myeloid leukemia who had been receiving prolonged total parenteral nutrition after haploidentical allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported from Turkey in the literature. PMID:25912759

  9. MOZ-TIF2, but not BCR-ABL, confers properties of leukemic stem cells to committed murine hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Huntly, Brian J P; Shigematsu, Hirokazu; Deguchi, Kenji; Lee, Benjamin H; Mizuno, Shinichi; Duclos, Nicky; Rowan, Rebecca; Amaral, Sonia; Curley, David; Williams, Ifor R; Akashi, Koichi; Gilliland, D Gary

    2004-12-01

    To better understand the origin of leukemic stem cells, we tested the hypothesis that all leukemia oncogenes could transform committed myeloid progenitor cells lacking the capacity for self-renewal, as has recently been reported for MLL-ENL. Flow-sorted populations of common myeloid progenitors and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors were transduced with the oncogenes MOZ-TIF2 and BCR-ABL, respectively. MOZ-TIF2-transduced progenitors could be serially replated in methylcellulose cultures and continuously propagated in liquid culture, and resulted in an acute myeloid leukemia in vivo that could be serially transplanted. In contrast, BCR-ABL transduction conferred none of these properties to hematopoietic progenitors. These data demonstrate that some, but not all, leukemia oncogenes can confer properties of leukemic stem cells to hematopoietic progenitors destined to undergo apoptotic cell death. PMID:15607963

  10. Neutrophil biology and the next generation of myeloid growth factors.

    PubMed

    Dale, David C

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the body's critical phagocytic cells for defense against bacterial and fungal infections; bone marrow must produce approximately 10 x 10(9) neutrophils/kg/d to maintain normal blood neutrophil counts. Production of neutrophils depends on myeloid growth factors, particularly granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). After the original phase of development, researchers modified these growth factors to increase their size and delay renal clearance, increase their biologic potency, and create unique molecules for business purposes. Pegylated G-CSF is a successful product of these efforts. Researchers have also tried to identify small molecules to serve as oral agents that mimic the parent molecules, but these programs have been less successful. In 2006, the European Medicines Agency established guidelines for the introduction of new biologic medicinal products claimed to be similar to reference products that had previously been granted marketing authorization in the European community, called bio-similars. Globally, new and copied versions of G-CSF and other myeloid growth factors are now appearing. Some properties of the myeloid growth factors are similar to other agents, offering opportunities for the development of alternative drugs and treatments. For example, recent research shows that hematopoietic progenitor cells can be mobilized with a chemokine receptor antagonist, chemotherapy, G-CSF, and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Advances in neutrophil biology coupled with better understanding and development of myeloid growth factors offer great promise for improving the care of patients with cancer and many other disorders. PMID:19176209

  11. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion; E-mail: bkatz@tasmc.healt.gov.il

    2005-10-07

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RAR{alpha} and PLZF-RAR{alpha} fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RAR{alpha} from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells.

  12. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Geyh, S; Rodrguez-Paredes, M; Jger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:26601782

  13. Chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Apperley, Jane F

    2015-04-11

    In less than 10 years, the prognosis of chronic myeloid leukaemia has changed from that of a fatal disease to a disorder amenable simply to lifelong oral medication and compatible with a normal lifespan. This change has been made possible by a deep understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and a determination to develop targeted and selective drugs. This Seminar summarises the presentation, pathophysiology, diagnosis and monitoring technology, treatment options, side-effects, and outcomes of chronic myeloid leukaemia, and discusses the possibility of cure-ie, stable undetectable or low level disease in the absence of medication. Chronic myeloid leukaemia continues to instruct us in the mechanisms of leukaemogenesis and provides hope not only for similar developments in management of other malignancies, but also for the remarkable speed with which these can move from bench to bedside. PMID:25484026

  14. Leukemia-Associated Cohesin Mutants Dominantly Enforce Stem Cell Programs and Impair Human Hematopoietic Progenitor Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Claire; Shen, Ying; Xavy, Seethu; Zhao, Feifei; Reinisch, Andreas; Li, Rui; Corces, M Ryan; Flynn, Ryan A; Buenrostro, Jason D; Chan, Steven M; Thomas, Daniel; Koenig, Julie L; Hong, Wan-Jen; Chang, Howard Y; Majeti, Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    Recurrent mutations in cohesin complex proteins have been identified in pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells and during the early development of acute myeloid leukemia and other myeloid malignancies. Although cohesins are involved in chromosome separation and DNA damage repair, cohesin complex functions during hematopoiesis and leukemic development are unclear. Here, we show that mutant cohesin proteins block differentiation of human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in vitro and in vivo and enforce stem cell programs. These effects are restricted to immature HSPC populations, where cohesin mutants show increased chromatin accessibility and likelihood of transcription factor binding site occupancy by HSPC regulators including ERG, GATA2, and RUNX1, as measured by ATAC-seq and ChIP-seq. Epistasis experiments show that silencing these transcription factors rescues the differentiation block caused by cohesin mutants. Together, these results show that mutant cohesins impair HSPC differentiation by controlling chromatin accessibility and transcription factor activity, possibly contributing to leukemic disease. PMID:26607380

  15. Hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Trigg, Michael E

    2004-04-01

    The hematopoietic system of the young child acquires, through time, the ability to cope with exposure to a number of environmental toxins and infectious agents. Occasionally, severe aplastic anemia occurs secondary to exposure to some of these toxins or infectious agents. The occurrence of severe aplastic anemia provides an opportunity to study the maturation of the hematopoietic system because often the immune system is partially intact. Hematopoietic stem cell transplants permit the study of the complete reconstitution of the hematopoietic and immunologic system. Stem cell transplants are often used to treat severe aplastic anemia or, alternatively, may be part of the treatment for an underlying malignant disease or a genetic disease. Sources of stem cells and the age of the recipient and donor have an impact on the success of the stem cell transplant. A stem cell transplantation provides a window of opportunity to study and observe the normal maturation of the immune system and the sensitivity. Very clearly, children recover from severe aplastic anemia and stem cell transplantations more readily with fewer problems and complications than adults. The environmental risks that a child who received a stem cell transplantation faces are related primarily to the deficiencies of the hematopoietic system and immune system during the recovery phase. Therefore, diminished resistance to infectious agents, primarily viruses and other opportunistic organisms, are the primary risk that children who are recovering from these transplantations face. There are few data on the susceptibility of these children to the toxic effects of other environmental toxicants during the recovery period, which may take years before complete recovery. PMID:15060199

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia transformed to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia: a report from the MPN Subcommittee of the Chronic Malignancies Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lussana, Federico; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Finazzi, Maria Chiara; van Biezen, Anja; Scholten, Marijke; Oldani, Elena; Carobbio, Alessandra; Iacobelli, Simona; Finke, Jurgen; Nagler, Arnon; Volin, Liisa; Lamy, Thierry; Arnold, Renate; Mohty, Mohamad; Michallet, Mauricette; de Witte, Theo; Olavarria, Eduardo; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    The clinical course of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia is potentially associated with long-term severe complications, such as evolution to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is currently the only potentially curative treatment for advanced polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia. We analyzed 250 consecutive patients with an initial diagnosis of polycythemia vera (n=120) or essential thrombocythemia (n=130), who underwent transplantation due to progression to myelofibrosis (n=193) or acute myeloid leukemia (n=57) and who were reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry between 1994 and 2010. Their median age was 56 years (range, 22–75) and in 52% of cases the interval between diagnosis and transplantation was 10 years or more. With a median follow-up from transplantation of 13 months, the 3-year overall survival rate and relapse incidence were 55% and 32%, respectively. In univariate analysis, the main parameters that negatively affected post-transplantation outcomes were older age (>55 years), a diagnosis at transplant of acute myeloid leukemia and the use of an unrelated donor. The overall 3-year cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality was 28%, but was significantly higher in older patients than in younger ones (>55 years, 35% versus 20%, P=0.032), in those transplanted from an unrelated donor rather than a related donor (34% versus 18%, P=0.034) and in patients with a diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia compared to myelofibrosis (29% versus 27%, P=0.045). This large retrospective study confirms that transplantation is potentially curative for patients with end-stage polycythemia vera/essential thrombocythemia progressing to myelofibrosis or acute myeloid leukemia. Relapse and non-relapse mortality remain unsolved problems for which innovative treatment approaches need to be assessed. PMID:24389309

  17. Low-level GATA2 overexpression promotes myeloid progenitor self-renewal and blocks lymphoid differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Satish K; Johnson, Kyle; Throm, Stacy L; Pestina, Tamara I; Neale, Geoffrey; Persons, Derek A

    2015-07-01

    The transcription factor GATA2 is highly expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and is downregulated during lineage maturation. Gain of function mutations, loss of function mutations, and overexpression of GATA2 have been reported in acute myeloid leukemia. In previous studies, we and others showed that GATA2 overexpression at high levels, similar to that seen in hematopoietic stem cells, blocked differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors. To better understand the effects of GATA2, we designed a Tamoxifen-inducible GATA2-estrogen receptor (ERT) vector. In the absence of Tamoxifen, small amounts of GATA2-ERT were still able to enter the nucleus in mouse bone marrow (BM) cells, providing us with a tool to test the effects of low-level GATA2 overexpression. We observed that this low-level GATA2 overexpression enhanced self-renewal of myeloid progenitors in vitro and resulted in immortalization of BM cells to myeloid cell lines. Continuous GATA2-ERT expression was required for the proliferation of these immortalized lines. Myeloid expansion and a block in T and B lineage differentiation were observed in mice transplanted with GATA2-ERT-expressing BM cells. Myeloid expansion occurred after the granulocyte monocyte progenitor stage, and lymphoid block was distal to the common lymphoid progenitor in transgenic mice. GATA2 appeared to induce growth via downstream activation of Nmyc and Hoxa9. Our results demonstrate that GATA2 overexpression at low level confers self-renewal capacity to myeloid progenitors and is relevant to myeloid leukemia development. PMID:25907033

  18. Systemic mastocytosis associated with acute myeloid leukemia: case report and implications for disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Escribano, Luis; Garca-Montero, Andrés; Núñez-López, Rosa; López-Jiménez, Javier; Almeida, Julia; Prados, Aranzazu; Orfao, Alberto

    2004-07-01

    Mastocytosis may be associated with clonal nonmast cell lineage hematologic diseases, including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative disorders, and acute myeloid leukemia. Here we present a patient with the simultaneous diagnosis of mastocytosis and an acute myeloid leukemia, M2 subtype in the French-American-British classification, with t(8;21) carrying a population of immature mast cell precursors, and discuss this presentation in the context of a potential pathogenetic cellular link between this leukemia and mastocytosis. PMID:15241340

  19. Spleens of myelofibrosis patients contain malignant hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Prakash, Sonam; Lu, Min; Tripodi, Joseph; Ye, Fei; Najfeld, Vesna; Li, Yan; Schwartz, Myron; Weinberg, Rona; Roda, Paul; Orazi, Attilio; Hoffman, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem cell behavior is thought to be largely determined by intrinsic properties and by regulatory signals provided by the microenvironment. Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by hematopoiesis occurring not only in the marrow but also in extramedullary sites such as the spleen. In order to study the effects of these different microenvironments on primitive malignant hematopoietic cells, we phenotypically and functionally characterized splenic and peripheral blood (PB) MF CD34+ cells from patients with MF. MF spleens contained greater numbers of malignant primitive HPCs than PB. Transplantation of PB MF CD34+ cells into immunodeficient (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγnull) mice resulted in a limited degree of donor cell chimerism and a differentiation program skewed toward myeloid lineages. By contrast, transplanted splenic MF CD34+ cells achieved a higher level of chimerism and generated both myeloid and lymphoid cells that contained molecular or cytogenetic abnormalities indicating their malignant nature. Only splenic MF CD34+ cells were able to sustain hematopoiesis for prolonged periods (9 months) and were able to engraft secondary recipients. These data document the existence of MF stem cells (MF-SCs) that reside in the spleens of MF patients and demonstrate that these MF-SCs retain a differentiation program identical to that of normal hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:23023702

  20. Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying B | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Redefining Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis as a Myeloid Dysplasia and Identifying Biomarkers for Early Detection and Risk Assessment. This application addresses Program Announcement PA-09-197: Biomarkers for Early Detection of Hematopoietic Malignancies (R01). The overall aim of this project is to identify novel biomarkers that may be used to diagnose and treat patients with Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (LCH). LCH occurs with similar frequency as other rare malignancies including Hodgkin's lymphoma and AML. |

  1. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  2. IFN Regulatory Factor 8 Represses GM-CSF Expression in T cells to Affect Myeloid Cell Lineage Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Paschall, Amy V.; Zhang, Ruihua; Qi, Chen-Feng; Bardhan, Kankana; Peng, Liang; Lu, Geming; Yang, Jianjun; Merad, Miriam; McGaha, Tracy; Zhou, Gang; Mellor, Andrew; Abrams, Scott I.; Morse, Herbert C.; Ozato, Keiko; Xiong, Huabao; Liu, Kebin

    2015-01-01

    During hematopoiesis, hematopoietic stem cells constantly differentiate into granulocytes and macrophages via a distinct differentiation program that is tightly controlled by myeloid lineage-specific transcription factors. Mice with a null mutation of IFN Regulatory Factor 8 (IRF8) accumulate CD11b+Gr1+ myeloid cells that phenotypically and functionally resemble tumor-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), indicating an essential role of IRF8 in myeloid cell lineage differentiation. However, IRF8 is expressed in various types of immune cells and whether IRF8 functions intrinsically or extrinsically in regulation of myeloid cell lineage differentiation is not fully understood. Here we report an intriguing finding that although IRF8-deficient mice exhibit deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and resultant accumulation of CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs, surprisingly, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in myeloid cells exhibit no abnormal myeloid cell lineage differentiation. Instead, mice with IRF8 deficiency only in T cells exhibited deregulated myeloid cell differentiation and MDSC accumulation. We further demonstrated that IRF8-deficient T cells exhibit elevated GM-CSF expression and secretion. Treatment of mice with GM-CSF increased MDSC accumulation, and adoptive transfer of IRF8-deficient T cells, but not GM-CSF-deficient T cells, increased MDSC accumulation in the recipient chimeric mice. Moreover, overexpression of IRF8 decreased GM-CSF expression in T cells. Our data determine that in addition to its intrinsic function as an apoptosis regulator in myeloid cells, IRF8 also acts extrinsically to represses GM-CSF expression in T cells to control myeloid cell lineage differentiation, revealing a novel mechanism that the adaptive immune component of the immune system regulates the innate immune cell myelopoiesis in vivo. PMID:25646302

  3. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Myeloid Leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Christian M.; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F.

    2013-01-01

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to “malignant” DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias. PMID:24427158

  4. Expression of BCR/ABL and BCL-2 in myeloid progenitors leads to myeloid leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Traver, David; Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Akashi, Koichi; Lagasse, Eric; Weissman, Irving L.

    2003-01-01

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder (MPD) that, over time, progresses to acute leukemia. Both processes are closely associated with the t(9;22) chromosomal translocation that creates the BCR/ABL fusion gene in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their progeny. Chronic myelogenous leukemia is therefore classified as an HSC disorder in which a clone of multipotent HSCs is likely to be malignantly transformed, although direct evidence for malignant t(9;22)+ HSCs is lacking. To test whether HSC malignancy is required, we generated hMRP8p210BCR/ABL transgenic mice in which expression of BCR/ABL is absent in HSCs and targeted exclusively to myeloid progenitors and their myelomonocytic progeny. Four of 13 BCR/ABL transgenic founders developed a chronic MPD, but only one progressed to blast crisis. To address whether additional oncogenic events are required for progression to acute disease, we crossed hMRP8p210BCR/ABL mice to apoptosis-resistant hMRP8BCL-2 mice. Of 18 double-transgenic animals, 9 developed acute myeloid leukemias that were transplantable to wild-type recipients. Taken together, these data indicate that a MPD can arise in mice without expression of BCR/ABL in HSCs and that additional mutations inhibiting programmed cell death may be critical in the transition of this disease to blast-crisis leukemia. PMID:12890867

  5. microRNAs in the pathogenesis of MDS and myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su Jung; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent insights of the roles of microRNAs in pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies and tantalising prospects of microRNA therapy. Recent findings New roles for microRNAs in biological and disease processes are constantly being discovered. However, while great effort has been put into identifying and cataloguing aberrantly expressed microRNAs in leukaemia, very little is known about the functional consequences of their deregulation in myeloid malignancies. This review will discuss the significance of powerful oncogenic microRNAs such as miR-22 in self-renewal and transformation of hematopoietic stem cells, as well as their ability to induce epigenetic alterations in the pathogenesis of the stem cell disorder MDS and myeloid leukaemia. Summary Improved understanding of biological roles of microRNAs in pathogenesis of hematological malignancies will allow rational stratification of patients and provide new therapeutic entries for the treatment of MDS and leukaemia. PMID:24870972

  6. Mcl1 haploinsufficiency protects mice from Myc-induced acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Zhifu; Luo, Hui; Payton, Jacqueline E.; Cain, Jennifer; Ley, Timothy J.; Opferman, Joseph T.; Tomasson, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Antiapoptotic BCL2 family members have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), but the functional significance and relative importance of individual proteins (e.g., BCL2, BCL-XL, and myeloid cell leukemia 1 [MCL1]) remain poorly understood. Here, we examined the expression of BCL2, BCL-XL, and MCL1 in primary human hematopoietic subsets and leukemic blasts from AML patients and found that MCL1 transcripts were consistently expressed at high levels in all samples tested. Consistent with this, Mcl1 protein was also highly expressed in myeloid leukemic blasts in a mouse Myc-induced model of AML. We used this model to test the hypothesis that Mcl1 facilitates AML development by allowing myeloid progenitor cells to evade Myc-induced cell death. Indeed, activation of Myc for 7 days in vivo substantially increased myeloid lineage cell numbers, whereas hematopoietic stem, progenitor, and B-lineage cells were depleted. Furthermore, Mcl1 haploinsufficiency abrogated AML development. In addition, deletion of a single allele of Mcl1 from fully transformed AML cells substantially prolonged the survival of transplanted mice. Conversely, the rapid lethality of disease was restored by coexpression of Bcl2 and Myc in Mcl1-haploinsufficient cells. Together, these data demonstrate a critical and dose-dependent role for Mcl1 in AML pathogenesis in mice and suggest that MCL1 may be a promising therapeutic target in patients with de novo AML. PMID:20484815

  7. Isolation and characterization of hematopoietic stem cells in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Isao; Katakura, Fumihiko; Moritomo, Tadaaki

    2016-05-01

    Despite 400 million years of evolutionary divergence, hematopoiesis is highly conserved between mammals and teleost fish. All types of mature blood cells including the erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid lineages show a high degree of similarity to their mammalian counterparts at the morphological and molecular level. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are cells that are capable of self-renewal and differentiating into all hematopoietic lineages over the lifetime of an organism. The study of HSCs has been facilitated through bone marrow transplantation experiments developed in the mouse model. In the last decade, the zebrafish and clonal ginbuna carp (Carassius auratus langsdorfii) have emerged as new models for the study of HSCs. This review highlights the recent progress and future prospects of studying HSCs in teleost fish. Transplantation assays using these teleost models have demonstrated the presence of HSCs in the kidney, which is the major hematopoietic organ in teleost fish. Moreover, it is possible to purify HSCs from the kidney utilizing fluorescent dyes or transgenic animals. These teleost models will provide novel insights into the universal mechanisms of HSC maintenance, homeostasis, and differentiation among vertebrates. PMID:26801099

  8. IL12B expression is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Reeme, Allison E.; Miller, Halli E.; Robinson, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary IL12B is required for resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, promoting the initiation and maintenance of Mtb-specific effector responses. While this makes the IL12-pathway an attractive target for experimental tuberculosis (TB) therapies, data regarding what lineages express IL12B after infection is established are limited. This is not obvious in the lung, an organ in which both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages produce IL12p40 upon pathogen encounter. Here, we use radiation bone marrow chimeras and Yet40 reporter mice to determine what lineages produce IL12p40 during experimental TB. We observed that hematopoietic IL12p40-production was sufficient to control Mtb, with no contribution by non-hematopoietic lineages. Furthermore, rather than being produced by a single subset, IL12p40 was produced by cells that were heterogenous in their size, granularity, autofluorescence and expression of CD11c, CD11b and CD8α. While depending on the timepoint and tissue examined, the surface phenotype of IL12p40-producers most closely resembled macrophages based on previous surveys of lung myeloid lineages. Importantly, depletion of CDllchi cells during infection had no affect on lung IL12p40-concentrations. Collectively, our data demonstrate that IL12p40 production is sustained by a heterogenous population of myeloid lineages during experimental TB, and that redundant mechanisms of IL12p40-production exist when CD11chi lineages are absent. PMID:23491716

  9. Discovery of survival factor for primitive chronic myeloid leukemia cells using induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Suknuntha, Kran; Ishii, Yuki; Tao, Lihong; Hu, Kejin; McIntosh, Brian E; Yang, David; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Wang, Jean Y J; Thomson, James; Slukvin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    A definitive cure for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires identifying novel therapeutic targets to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs). However, the rarity of LSCs within the primitive hematopoietic cell compartment remains a major limiting factor for their study in humans. Here we show that primitive hematopoietic cells with typical LSC features, including adhesion defect, increased long-term survival and proliferation, and innate resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, can be generated de novo from reprogrammed primary CML cells. Using CML iPSC-derived primitive leukemia cells, we discovered olfactomedin 4 (OLFM4) as a novel factor that contributes to survival and growth of somatic lin(-)CD34(+) cells from bone marrow of patients with CML in chronic phase, but not primitive hematopoietic cells from normal bone marrow. Overall, this study shows the feasibility and advantages of using reprogramming technology to develop strategies for targeting primitive leukemia cells. PMID:26561938

  10. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces leukemic but not normal hematopoietic cell death in a dose-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays a role in the regulation of hematopoietic cell homeostasis. In particular, the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) range from hematopoietic cell proliferation to cell death, depending on its concentration in the intracellular milieu. In this work, we evaluated the effects of an oxidative environment on normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells by stimulating normal human (umbilical cord blood) and murine (bone marrow) hematopoietic cells, as well as human myeloid leukemic cells (HL-60 lineage), upon H2O2 stimulus. Total cell populations and primitive subsets were evaluated for each cell type. H2O2 stimulus induces HL-60 cell death, whereas the viability of human and murine normal cells was not affected. The effects of H2O2 stimulus on hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell subsets were examined and the normal primitive cells were found to be unaffected; however, the percentage of leukemic stem cells (LSC) increased in response to H2O2, while clonogenic ability of these cells to generate myeloid clones was inhibited. In addition, H2O2 stimulus caused a decrease in the levels of p-AKT in HL-60 cells, which most likely mediates the observed decrease of viability. In summary, we found that at low concentrations, H2O2 preferentially affects both the LSC subset and total HL-60 cells without damage normal cells. PMID:24365069

  11. C/EBPα and DEK coordinately regulate myeloid differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Koleva, Rositsa I.; Ficarro, Scott B.; Radomska, Hanna S.; Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J.; Alberta, John A.; Webber, James T.; Luckey, C. John; Marcucci, Guido; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor C/EBPα is a critical mediator of myeloid differentiation and is often functionally impaired in acute myeloid leukemia. Recent studies have suggested that oncogenic FLT3 activity disrupts wild-type C/EBPα function via phosphorylation on serine 21 (S21). Despite the apparent role of pS21 as a negative regulator of C/EBPα transcription activity, the mechanism by which phosphorylation tips the balance between transcriptionally competent and inhibited forms remains unresolved. In the present study, we used immuno-affinity purification combined with quantitative mass spectrometry to delineate the proteins associated with C/EBPα on chromatin. We identified DEK, a protein with genetic links to leukemia, as a member of the C/EBPα complexes, and demonstrate that this association is disrupted by S21 phosphorylation. We confirmed that DEK is recruited specifically to chromatin with C/EBPα to enhance GCSFR3 promoter activation. In addition, we demonstrated that genetic depletion of DEK reduces the ability of C/EBPα to drive the expression of granulocytic target genes in vitro and disrupts G-CSF–mediated granulocytic differentiation of fresh human BM-derived CD34+ cells. Our data suggest that C/EBPα and DEK coordinately activate myeloid gene expression and that S21 phosphorylation on wild-type C/EBPα mediates protein interactions that regulate the differentiation capacity of hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:22474248

  12. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ravi; Fischer, Kari R.; Choi, Hyejin; El Rayes, Tina; Ryu, Seongho; Nasar, Abu; Spinelli, Cathy F.; Andrews, Weston; Elemento, Olivier; Nolan, Daniel; Stiles, Brendon; Rafii, Shahin; Narula, Navneet; Davuluri, Ramana; Altorki, Nasser K.; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor “activated/reprogrammed” stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils) identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7) and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1) were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value. PMID:26046767

  13. Autophagy limits proliferation and glycolytic metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Alexander S; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Stranks, Amanda; Williams, Owen; De Boer, Jasper; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion; McGouran, Joanna; Kessler, Benedikt; Khandwala, Shivani; Chowdhury, Onima; Puleston, Daniel; Phadwal, Kanchan; Mortensen, Monika; Ferguson, David; Soilleux, Elizabeth; Woll, Petter; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.; Simon, Anna Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Decreased autophagy contributes to malignancies, however it is unclear how autophagy impacts on tumour growth. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an ideal model to address this as (i) patient samples are easily accessible, (ii) the hematopoietic stem and progenitor population (HSPC) where transformation occurs is well characterized, and (iii) loss of the key autophagy gene Atg7 in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) leads to a lethal pre-leukemic phenotype in mice. Here we demonstrate that loss of Atg5 results in an identical HSPC phenotype as loss of Atg7, confirming a general role for autophagy in HSPC regulation. Compared to more committed/mature hematopoietic cells, healthy human and mouse HSCs displayed enhanced basal autophagic flux, limiting mitochondrial damage and reactive oxygen species in this long-lived population. Taken together, with our previous findings these data are compatible with autophagy limiting leukemic transformation. In line with this, autophagy gene losses are found within chromosomal regions that are commonly deleted in human AML. Moreover, human AML blasts showed reduced expression of autophagy genes, and displayed decreased autophagic flux with accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria indicating that deficient autophagy may be beneficial to human AML. Crucially, heterozygous loss of autophagy in an MLL-ENL model of AML led to increased proliferation in vitro, a glycolytic shift, and more aggressive leukemias in vivo. With autophagy gene losses also identified in multiple other malignancies, these findings point to low autophagy providing a general advantage for tumour growth. PMID:26568842

  14. Post-remission therapy for acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schlenk, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Induction followed by post-remission therapy including intensive chemotherapy with high-dose cytarabine, autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is recognized as the main road towards cure in acute myeloid leukemia. In recent years, also a renaissance of maintenance therapy after completion of intensive consolidation has been observed with the introduction of kinase inhibitors and demethylating agents in clinical trials. Greater insight into the genetic background of the disease fostered the extension of disease classification and pretreatment risk-categorization by gene mutations. In addition, the pre-treatment risk-defining parameters have been supplemented by markers evaluated at distinct time points during treatment and follow up. In this context, minimal residual disease assessment is increasingly used to dynamically fine tune treatment recommendations. Currently, the gold standard to counterbalance a higher risk of relapse by treatment strategies based on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with grafts from matched related or unrelated donors is still valuable, whereas autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation showed promising results especially in patients categorized as low-risk. Nonetheless, more targeted approaches including kinase inhibitors and demethylating agents in combination with or sequentially before or after intensive chemotherapy are currently in clinical evaluation and may lead to more genotype- instead of purely risk-adapted treatment strategies. PMID:25420282

  15. Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    HAWLEY, ROBERT G.; RAMEZANI, ALI; HAWLEY, TERESA S.

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have the capacity to self-renew and the potential to differentiate into all of the mature blood cell types. The ability to prospectively identify and isolate HSCs has been the subject of extensive investigation since the first transplantation studies implying their existence almost 50 years ago. Despite significant advances in enrichment protocols, the continuous in vitro propagation of human HSCs has not yet been achieved. This chapter describes current procedures used to phenotypically and functionally characterize candidate human HSCs and initial efforts to derive permanent human HSC lines. PMID:17141055

  16. Dual mechanisms by which miR-125b represses IRF4 to induce myeloid and B-cell leukemias.

    PubMed

    So, Alex Yick-Lun; Sookram, Reeshelle; Chaudhuri, Aadel A; Minisandram, Aarathi; Cheng, David; Xie, Catherine; Lim, Ee Lyn; Flores, Yvette Garcia; Jiang, Shuai; Kim, Jocelyn Tammy; Keown, Christopher; Ramakrishnan, Parameswaran; Baltimore, David

    2014-08-28

    The oncomir microRNA-125b (miR-125b) is upregulated in a variety of human neoplastic blood disorders and constitutive upregulation of miR-125b in mice can promote myeloid and B-cell leukemia. We found that miR-125b promotes myeloid and B-cell neoplasm by inducing tumorigenesis in hematopoietic progenitor cells. Our study demonstrates that miR-125b induces myeloid leukemia by enhancing myeloid progenitor output from stem cells as well as inducing immortality, self-renewal, and tumorigenesis in myeloid progenitors. Through functional and genetic analyses, we demonstrated that miR-125b induces myeloid and B-cell leukemia by inhibiting interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) but through distinct mechanisms; it induces myeloid leukemia through repressing IRF4 at the messenger RNA (mRNA) level without altering the genomic DNA and induces B-cell leukemia via genetic deletion of the gene encoding IRF4. PMID:25006123

  17. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 mutations prime the all-trans retinoic acid myeloid differentiation pathway in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boutzen, Héléna; Saland, Estelle; Larrue, Clément; de Toni, Fabienne; Gales, Lara; Castelli, Florence A; Cathebas, Mathilde; Zaghdoudi, Sonia; Stuani, Lucille; Kaoma, Tony; Riscal, Romain; Yang, Guangli; Hirsch, Pierre; David, Marion; De Mas-Mansat, Véronique; Delabesse, Eric; Vallar, Laurent; Delhommeau, François; Jouanin, Isabelle; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Le Cam, Laurent; Linares, Laetitia K; Junot, Christophe; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vergez, François; Récher, Christian; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel

    2016-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by the accumulation of malignant blasts with impaired differentiation programs caused by recurrent mutations, such as the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations found in 15% of AML patients. These mutations result in the production of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG), leading to a hypermethylation phenotype that dysregulates hematopoietic differentiation. In this study, we identified mutant R132H IDH1-specific gene signatures regulated by key transcription factors, particularly CEBPα, involved in myeloid differentiation and retinoid responsiveness. We show that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) at clinically achievable doses markedly enhanced terminal granulocytic differentiation in AML cell lines, primary patient samples, and a xenograft mouse model carrying mutant IDH1. Moreover, treatment with a cell-permeable form of 2-HG sensitized wild-type IDH1 AML cells to ATRA-induced myeloid differentiation, whereas inhibition of 2-HG production significantly reduced ATRA effects in mutant IDH1 cells. ATRA treatment specifically decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis of mutant IDH1 blasts in vitro. ATRA also reduced tumor burden of mutant IDH1 AML cells xenografted in NOD-Scid-IL2rγ(null)mice and markedly increased overall survival, revealing a potent antileukemic effect of ATRA in the presence of IDH1 mutation. This therapeutic strategy holds promise for this AML patient subgroup in future clinical studies. PMID:26951332

  18. Hematopoietic stimulation by porphyrin photosensitizers (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Julia G.; Hunt, David W. C.; Mitchell, David W.; Jamieson, Catriona H. M.

    1992-06-01

    The effects of the photosensitizers, PhotofrinTM and benozoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD) on a variety of hematopoietic cell functions have been studied, both in the presence and absence of light activation. A marked increase in hematopoiesis was observed in the bone marrow and spleens of DBA/2 mice administered high dose Photofrin but not BPD. This was manifested in an increased relative spleen weight, nucleated spleen cell number and circulating white blood cell concentration 7 days following Photofrin injection. We have shown that BPD and light doses just below phototoxic ranges stimulate the growth of human colony forming committed myeloid progenitors as well as pluripotent stem cells grown in long term marrow culture. Studies on the effect of BPD on the function of T lymphocytes in the absence of light has also demonstrated a stimulatory effect. The dose range in which this is observed is considerably broader than that observed with light activation. The mechanisms involved in this stimulatory effect have been studied and are discussed.

  19. Common marmoset CD117+ hematopoietic cells possess multipotency.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Shin; Nunomura, Satoshi; Mori, Shuya; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Itoh, Toshio; Takabayashi, Shuji; Okada, Yoshinori; Yahata, Takashi; Shiina, Takashi; Katoh, Hideki; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tani, Kenzaburo; Ando, Kiyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Habu, Sonoko; Sasaki, Erika; Kametani, Yoshie

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of the hematopoiesis of non-human primates is important to clarify the evolution of primate-specific hematopoiesis and immune regulation. However, the engraftment and development of the primate hematopoietic system are well-documented only in humans and are not clear in non-human primates. Callithrix jacchus (common marmoset, CM) is a New World monkey with a high rate of pregnancy and small size that lives in closed colonies. As stem cell factor (SCF) is an essential molecule for hematopoietic stem cell development in mice and humans, we focused on CD117, the SCF receptor, and examined whether CD117-expressing cells possess the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell characteristics of newborn marmoset-derived hematopoietic cells that can develop into T cells and B cells. When CD117(+) cell fractions of the bone marrow were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD (non-obese diabetic)/Shi-scid, common γc-null (NOG) mice, these cells engrafted efficiently in the bone marrow and spleens of the NOG mice. The CD117(+) cells developed into myeloid lineage cells, CD20(+) B cells and CD3(+) T cells, which could express CM cytokines in vivo. The development of B cells did not precede that of T cells. The development of CD8(+) T cells was dominant in NOG mice. The engraftment was comparable for both CD117(+)CD34(+) cells and CD117(+)CD34(-) cells. These results suggest that the CD117(+) cell fraction can differentiate into all three cell lineages, and the development of marmoset immunity in the xenogeneic environment follows diverse developmental pathways compared with human immunity. PMID:25977306

  20. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Togarrati, P. Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W.; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L.

    2014-01-01

    Although in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation is a promising strategy to treat congenital hematopoietic disorders, levels of engraftment have not been therapeutic for diseases in which donor cells have no survival advantage. We used an antibody against the murine c-Kit receptor (ACK2) to deplete fetal host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and increase space within the hematopoietic niche for donor cell engraftment. Fetal mice were injected with ACK2 on embryonic days 13.5 to 14.5 and surviving pups were transplanted with congenic hematopoietic cells on day of life 1. Low-dose ACK2 treatment effectively depleted HSCs within the bone marrow with minimal toxicity and the antibody was cleared from the serum before the neonatal transplantation. Chimerism levels were significantly higher in treated pups than in controls; both myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism increased because of higher engraftment of HSCs in the bone marrow. To test the strategy of repeated HSC depletion and transplantation, some mice were treated with ACK2 postnatally, but the increase in engraftment was lower than that seen with prenatal treatment. We demonstrate a successful fetal conditioning strategy associated with minimal toxicity. Such strategies could be used to achieve clinically relevant levels of engraftment to treat congenital stem cell disorders. PMID:24879814

  1. In utero depletion of fetal hematopoietic stem cells improves engraftment after neonatal transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Derderian, S Christopher; Togarrati, P Priya; King, Charmin; Moradi, Patriss W; Reynaud, Damien; Czechowicz, Agnieszka; Weissman, Irving L; MacKenzie, Tippi C

    2014-08-01

    Although in utero hematopoietic cell transplantation is a promising strategy to treat congenital hematopoietic disorders, levels of engraftment have not been therapeutic for diseases in which donor cells have no survival advantage. We used an antibody against the murine c-Kit receptor (ACK2) to deplete fetal host hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and increase space within the hematopoietic niche for donor cell engraftment. Fetal mice were injected with ACK2 on embryonic days 13.5 to 14.5 and surviving pups were transplanted with congenic hematopoietic cells on day of life 1. Low-dose ACK2 treatment effectively depleted HSCs within the bone marrow with minimal toxicity and the antibody was cleared from the serum before the neonatal transplantation. Chimerism levels were significantly higher in treated pups than in controls; both myeloid and lymphoid cell chimerism increased because of higher engraftment of HSCs in the bone marrow. To test the strategy of repeated HSC depletion and transplantation, some mice were treated with ACK2 postnatally, but the increase in engraftment was lower than that seen with prenatal treatment. We demonstrate a successful fetal conditioning strategy associated with minimal toxicity. Such strategies could be used to achieve clinically relevant levels of engraftment to treat congenital stem cell disorders. PMID:24879814

  2. Stem Cell Biomarkers in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Yun; Forrest, Donna; Smith, Clayton; Eaves, Allen; Eaves, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal multi-step myeloproliferative disease that is initially produced and ultimately sustained by a rare subpopulation of BCR-ABL+ cells with multi-lineage stem cell properties. These BCR-ABL+ CML stem cells are phenotypically similar to normal hematopoietic stem cells which are also maintained throughout the course of the disease at varying levels in different patients. Defining the unique properties of the leukemic stem cells that produce the chronic phase of CML has therefore had to rely heavily on access to samples from rare patients in which the stem cell compartment is dominated by leukemic elements. Here we review past and ongoing approaches using such samples to identify biologically and clinically relevant biomarkers of BCR-ABL+ stem cells that explain their unusual biology and that may help to design, or at least predict, improved treatment responses in CML patients. These studies are of particular interest in light of recent evidence that chronic phase CML stem cells are not only innately resistant to imatinib mesylate and other drugs that target the BCR-ABL oncoprotein, but are also genetically unstable. PMID:18525114

  3. Alternative Donor Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bejanyan, Nelli; Haddad, Housam; Brunstein, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is a potentially curative therapy for adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but its use for consolidation therapy after first remission with induction chemotherapy used to be limited to younger patients and those with suitable donors. The median age of AML diagnosis is in the late 60s. With the introduction of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), many older adults are now eligible to receive allo-HCT, including those who are medically less fit to receive myeloablative conditioning. Furthermore, AML patients commonly have no human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical or medically suitable sibling donor available to proceed with allo-HCT. Technical advances in donor matching, suppression of alloreactivity, and supportive care have made it possible to use alternative donors, such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) and partially HLA-matched related (haploidentical) donors. Outcomes after alternative donor allo-HCT are now approaching the outcomes observed for conventional allo-HCT with matched related and unrelated donors. Thus, with both UCB and haploidentical donors available, lack of donor should rarely be a limiting factor in offering an allo-HCT to adults with AML. PMID:26239557

  4. Hematopoietic activity in putative mouse primordial germ cell populations.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, Maria Lucia; Klinger, Francesca Gioia; Farini, Donatella; Di Carlo, Anna; Carsetti, Rita; Giorda, Ezio; De Felici, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    In the present paper, starting from the observation of heterogeneous expression of the GOF-18?PE-GFP Pou5f1 (Oct3/4) transgene in putative mouse PGC populations settled in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, we identified various OCT3/4 positive populations showing distinct expression of PGC markers (BLIMP-1, AP, TG-1, STELLA) and co-expressing several proteins (CD-34, CD-41, FLK-1) and genes (Brachyury, Hox-B4, Scl/Tal-1 and Gata-2) of hematopoietic precursors. Moreover, we found that Oct3/4-GFP(weak) CD-34(weak/high) cells possess robust hematopoietic colony forming activity (CFU) in vitro. These data indicate that the cell population usually considered PGCs moving toward the gonadal ridges encompasses a subset of cells co-expressing several germ cell and hematopoietic markers and possessing hematopoietic activity. These results are discussed within of the current model of germline segregation. PMID:25684074

  5. Misfolded N-CoR is Linked to the Ectopic Reactivation of CD34/Flt3-Based Stem-Cell Phenotype in Promyelocytic and Monocytic Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nin, Dawn Sijin; Li, Feng; Visvanathan, Sridevi; Khan, Matiullah

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) is the key component of generic co-repressor complex essential for the transcriptional control of genes involved in cellular hemostasis. We have recently reported that N-CoR actively represses Flt3, a key factor of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) self-renewal and growth, and that de-repression of Flt3 by the misfolded N-CoR plays an important role in the pathogenesis of promyelocytic and monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The leukemic cells derived from the promyelocytic and monocytic AML are distinctly characterized by the ectopic reactivation of stem cell phenotypes in relatively committed myeloid compartment. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is not known. Here, we report that N-CoR function is essential for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to the cells of myeloid lineage and that loss of N-CoR function due to misfolding is linked to the ectopic reactivation of generic stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Analysis of N-CoR and Flt3 transcripts in mouse hematopoietic cells revealed a positive correlation between N-CoR level and the commitment of myeloid cells and an inverse correlation between N-CoR and Flt3 levels in primitive as well as committed myeloid cells. Enforced N-CoR expression in mouse HSCs inhibited their growth and self-renewal potentials and promoted maturation toward cells of myeloid lineage, suggesting a role of N-CoR in the commitment of cells of myeloid lineage. In contrast to AML cells with natively folded N-CoR, primary and secondary promyelocytic and monocytic AML cells harboring the misfolded N-CoR were highly positive for Flt3 and myeloid antigen-based HSC marker CD34. Genetic and therapeutic restoration of N-CoR conformation significantly down-regulated the CD34 levels in monocytic AML cells, suggesting an important role of N-CoR in the suppression of CD34-based HSC phenotypes. These findings collectively suggest that N-CoR is crucial for the commitment of primitive hematopoietic cells to cells of myeloid lineage and that misfolded N-CoR may contribute to transformation of committed myeloid cells through the ectopic reactivation of Flt3/CD34-based stem cell phenotypes in promyelocytic and monocytic AML. Moreover, these findings provide novel mechanistic insights into the formation of leukemic stem cells in subsets of AML and identify the misfolded N-CoR as a subtype-specific biomarker of AML. PMID:26500885

  6. In vivo inhibition of c-MYC in myeloid cells impairs tumor-associated macrophage maturation and pro-tumoral activities.

    PubMed

    Pello, Oscar M; Chvre, Raphael; Laoui, Damya; De Juan, Alba; Lolo, Fidel; Andrs-Manzano, Mara Jess; Serrano, Manuel; Van Ginderachter, Jo A; Andrs, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1?) that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Myc(fl/fl) LysM(cre/+) mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23028984

  7. In Vivo Inhibition of c-MYC in Myeloid Cells Impairs Tumor-Associated Macrophage Maturation and Pro-Tumoral Activities

    PubMed Central

    Pello, Oscar M.; De Juan, Alba; Lolo, Fidel; Andrés-Manzano, María Jesús; Serrano, Manuel; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.; Andrés, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Although tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are involved in tumor growth and metastasis, the mechanisms controlling their pro-tumoral activities remain largely unknown. The transcription factor c-MYC has been recently shown to regulate in vitro human macrophage polarization and be expressed in macrophages infiltrating human tumors. In this study, we exploited the predominant expression of LysM in myeloid cells to generate c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice, which lack c-Myc in macrophages, to investigate the role of macrophage c-MYC expression in cancer. Under steady-state conditions, immune system parameters in c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice appeared normal, including the abundance of different subsets of bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, precursors and circulating cells, macrophage density, and immune organ structure. In a model of melanoma, however, TAMs lacking c-Myc displayed a delay in maturation and showed an attenuation of pro-tumoral functions (e.g., reduced expression of VEGF, MMP9, and HIF1α) that was associated with impaired tissue remodeling and angiogenesis and limited tumor growth in c-Mycfl/fl LysMcre/+ mice. Macrophage c-Myc deletion also diminished fibrosarcoma growth. These data identify c-Myc as a positive regulator of the pro-tumoral program of TAMs and suggest c-Myc inactivation as an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:23028984

  8. Acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Asim; Bjorkholm, Magnus; Gale, Rosemary E; Levine, Ross L; Jordan, Craig T; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bloomfield, Clara D; Estey, Eli; Burnett, Alan; Cornelissen, Jan J; Scheinberg, David A; Bouscary, Didier; Linch, David C

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a disorder characterized by a clonal proliferation derived from primitive haematopoietic stem cells or progenitor cells. Abnormal differentiation of myeloid cells results in a high level of immature malignant cells and fewer differentiated red blood cells, platelets and white blood cells. The disease occurs at all ages, but predominantly occurs in older people (>60 years of age). AML typically presents with a rapid onset of symptoms that are attributable to bone marrow failure and may be fatal within weeks or months when left untreated. The genomic landscape of AML has been determined and genetic instability is infrequent with a relatively small number of driver mutations. Mutations in genes involved in epigenetic regulation are common and are early events in leukaemogenesis. The subclassification of AML has been dependent on the morphology and cytogenetics of blood and bone marrow cells, but specific mutational analysis is now being incorporated. Improvements in treatment in younger patients over the past 35 years has largely been due to dose escalation and better supportive care. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation may be used to consolidate remission in those patients who are deemed to be at high risk of relapse. A plethora of new agents - including those targeted at specific biochemical pathways and immunotherapeutic approaches - are now in trial based on improved understanding of disease pathophysiology. These advances provide good grounds for optimism, although mortality remains high especially in older patients. PMID:27159408

  9. CD41+ c-myb+ precursors colonize the zebrafish pronephros by a novel migration route to initiate adult hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Julien Y; Kim, Albert D; Teng, Shutian; Traver, David

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the vertebrate blood lineages is complex, with multiple waves of hematopoietic precursors arising in different embryonic locations. Monopotent, or primitive, precursors first give rise to embryonic macrophages or erythrocytes. Multipotent, or definitive, precursors are subsequently generated to produce the adult hematopoietic lineages. In both the zebrafish and the mouse, the first definitive precursors are committed erythromyeloid progenitors (EMPs) that lack lymphoid differentiation potential. We previously showed that zebrafish EMPs arise in the posterior blood island independently from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). In this report, we demonstrate that a fourth wave of hematopoietic precursors arise slightly later in the zebrafish aorta/gonad/mesonephros (AGM) equivalent. We have identified and prospectively isolated these cells by CD41 and c-myb expression. Unlike EMPs, CD41+ AGM cells colonize the thymus to generate rag-2+ T lymphocyte precursors. Timelapse imaging and lineage tracing analyses demonstrate that AGM-derived precursors utilize a previously undescribed migration pathway along the pronephric tubules to initiate adult hematopoiesis in the developing kidney, the teleostean equivalent of mammalian bone marrow. Finally, we have analyzed the gene expression profiles of EMPs and AGM precursors to better understand the molecular cues that pattern the first definitive hematopoietic cells in the embryo. Together, these studies suggest that expression of CD41 and c-myb marks nascent HSCs in the zebrafish AGM, and provide the means to further dissect HSC generation and function in the early vertebrate embryo. PMID:18417622

  10. Dnmt3a loss predisposes murine hematopoietic stem cells to malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Mayle, Allison; Yang, Liubin; Rodriguez, Benjamin; Zhou, Ting; Chang, Edmund; Curry, Choladda V.; Challen, Grant A.; Li, Wei; Wheeler, David; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) is mutated in hematologic malignancies affecting myeloid, mixed, and lymphoid lineages, and these mutations are associated with poor prognosis. Past studies in mice revealed Dnmt3a-knockout (KO) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) had increased self-renewal, but no leukemia was observed. Here, all lethally irradiated mice transplanted with Dnmt3a-deleted HSCs died within 1 year. Animals were diagnosed with a spectrum of malignancies similar to those seen in patients with DNMT3A mutations, including myelodysplastic syndrome, acute myeloid leukemia, primary myelofibrosis, and T- and B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. In some cases, acquired malignancies exhibited secondary mutations similar to those identified in patients. Loss of Dnmt3a led to disturbed methylation patterns that were distinct in lymphoid and myeloid disease, suggesting lineage-specific methylation aberrations promoted by Dnmt3a loss. Global hypomethylation was observed in all of the malignancies, but lymphoid malignancies also exhibited hypermethylation, particularly at promoter regions. This mouse model underscores the important role of Dnmt3a in normal hematopoietic development and demonstrates that Dnmt3a loss of function confers a preleukemic phenotype on murine HSCs. This model may serve as a tool to study DNMT3A mutation-associated malignancies and for developing targeted strategies for eliminating preleukemic cells for prevention and treatment of hematologic malignancies in the future. PMID:25416277

  11. Reticular dysgenesis–associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman

    2015-01-01

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  12. Reticular dysgenesis-associated AK2 protects hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Rissone, Alberto; Weinacht, Katja Gabriele; la Marca, Giancarlo; Bishop, Kevin; Giocaliere, Elisa; Jagadeesh, Jayashree; Felgentreff, Kerstin; Dobbs, Kerry; Al-Herz, Waleed; Jones, Marypat; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Kirby, Martha; Wincovitch, Stephen; Simon, Karen Lyn; Itan, Yuval; DeVine, Alex; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Schambach, Axel; Sood, Raman; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Candotti, Fabio

    2015-07-27

    Adenylate kinases (AKs) are phosphotransferases that regulate the cellular adenine nucleotide composition and play a critical role in the energy homeostasis of all tissues. The AK2 isoenzyme is expressed in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is mutated in reticular dysgenesis (RD), a rare form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in humans. RD is characterized by a maturation arrest in the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, leading to early onset, recurrent, and overwhelming infections. To gain insight into the pathophysiology of RD, we studied the effects of AK2 deficiency using the zebrafish model and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from fibroblasts of an RD patient. In zebrafish, Ak2 deficiency affected hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) development with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis. AK2-deficient iPSCs recapitulated the characteristic myeloid maturation arrest at the promyelocyte stage and demonstrated an increased AMP/ADP ratio, indicative of an energy-depleted adenine nucleotide profile. Antioxidant treatment rescued the hematopoietic phenotypes in vivo in ak2 mutant zebrafish and restored differentiation of AK2-deficient iPSCs into mature granulocytes. Our results link hematopoietic cell fate in AK2 deficiency to cellular energy depletion and increased oxidative stress. This points to the potential use of antioxidants as a supportive therapeutic modality for patients with RD. PMID:26150473

  13. Current progress in the development of a cell-based vaccine for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Klammer, Matthias; Roddie, Patrick H

    2006-04-01

    Evidence that immunological control contributes to the elimination of residual leukemia has emerged from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This review assesses the current understanding of immunobiology of acute myeloid leukemia and how dendritic cells and T cells may be harnessed using in vitro and in vivo priming techniques. Preclinical and clinical dendritic cell vaccine trials reported to date are considered and the prospects for immunotherapy with dendritic cell-based vaccine constructs evaluated. PMID:16608421

  14. Telomere loss in Philadelphia-negative hematopoiesis after successful treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: evidence for premature aging of the myeloid compartment.

    PubMed

    Lobetti-Bodoni, Chiara; Ferrero, Dario; Genuardi, Elisa; Passera, Roberto; Bernocco, Elisa; Sia, Daniela; Grignani, Giovanni; Crisà, Elena; Monitillo, Luigia; Rocci, Alberto; Drandi, Daniela; Giai, Valentina; Zanni, Manuela; Boi, Michela; Isaia, Gianluca; Barbero, Daniela; Lunghi, Monia; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Radaelli, Franca; Pini, Massimo; Pregno, Patrizia; Carlo-Stella, Carmelo; Gaidano, Gianluca; Boccadoro, Mario; Ladetto, Marco

    2012-07-01

    Telomere shortening, a well-known marker of aging and cellular stress, occurs under several conditions in the hematopoietic compartment, including aplastic anemia and following iatrogenic noxae. We decided to verify whether pathological telomere erosion also arises in restored Philadelphia-negative (Ph-negative) hematopoiesis following successful treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Eighty-one CML patients in complete cytogenetic remission were compared to 76 age-matched healthy subjects. Myeloid cells of CML patients had shorter telomeres than controls (6521 bp vs 7233 bp, p<0.001). This difference was specific for the myeloid compartment, since it was not observed in lymphoid cells (6774 bp vs 6909 bp, p=0.620). Acquired Ph-negative cytogenetic abnormalities (p=0.010), lack of complete molecular remission (p=0.016) and age (p=0.013) were independent predictors of telomere shortening. Telomere dynamics were assessed over a median follow-up period of 22 months. We documented accelerated non-physiological ongoing telomere shortening in 17/59 CML patients (28%). Patients experiencing grade 2-4 hematological toxicity, during CML remission possessed significantly shorter telomeres compared to those lacking toxicity (p=0.005 for any toxicity, p=0.007 for anemia). CML patients suffer from significant and often ongoing telomere stress resulting in premature and selective aging of the myeloid compartment which might have long-term consequences on function and integrity of Ph-negative hematopoiesis. PMID:22687638

  15. Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Inaba, Hiroto

    2012-01-01

    Summary Although acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has long been recognized for its morphological and cytogenetic heterogeneity, recent high-resolution genomic profiling has demonstrated a complexity even greater than previously imagined. This complexity can be seen in the number and diversity of genetic alterations, epigenetic modifications, and characteristics of the leukaemic stem cells. The broad range of abnormalities across different AML subtypes suggests that improvements in clinical outcome will require the development of targeted therapies for each subtype of disease and the design of novel clinical trials to test these strategies. It is highly unlikely that further gains in long-term survival rates will be possible by mere intensification of conventional chemotherapy. In this review, we summarize recent studies that provide new insight into the genetics and biology of AML, discuss risk stratification and therapy for this disease, and profile some of the therapeutic agents currently under investigation. PMID:22966788

  16. Primary parietal myeloid sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Mohan, Dilip; Ghosal, Nandita; Nandeesh, Bevinahalli N.; Hegde, Alangar S.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial occurrence of myeloid sarcoma without any evidence of systemic hematological disorder is uncommon. We report the case of a 17-year-old girl who presented with features of raised intracranial pressure and paraparesis of short duration. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a 6 cm bilateral middle 1/3rd para sagittal contrast enhancing extra-axial mass with mass effect. The tumor was subtotally excised. Histology and immunohistochemistry proved to be a myelosarcoma. Further evaluation done with peripheral blood smear and bone marrow biopsy ruled out the possibility of leukemia or myeloproliferative disorder. She was referred for chemotherapy and clinically showed improvement after 6 months of follow-up. Authors report a case of intracranial myelosarcoma which closely resembled meningioma both radiologically and in intraoperative morphological appearance. Authors discuss in detail the radiological and histological features of myelosarcoma along with differential diagnoses and treatment options.

  17. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  18. Transduction of feline hematopoietic cells by oncoretroviral vectors pseudotyped with the subgroup A feline leukemia virus (FeLV-A).

    PubMed

    Josephson, N C; Sabo, K M; Abkowitz, J L

    2000-07-01

    The domestic cat is an outbred species with many identified analogues of human genetic diseases. Therefore, it has the potential to serve as a large animal model for evaluating the feasibility of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. This study compared gene transfer rates into feline hematopoietic progenitors by oncoretroviral vectors pseudotyped with the subgroup A feline leukemia virus (FeLV-A), the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV), and the murine amphotropic virus. Gene transfer rates were superior with the FeLV-A pseudotypes, which were then tested for their ability to transduce a cat hematopoietic repopulating cell. At more than 1 year posttransplantation, persistent marking was seen in both lymphoid and myeloid lineages of a myeloablated domestic cat that had received autologous marrow cells transduced with an FeLV-A pseudotyped vector. PMID:10899828

  19. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Kenigsberg, Ephraim; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Winter, Deborah; Lara-Astiaso, David; Gury, Meital; Weiner, Assaf; David, Eyal; Cohen, Nadav; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt; Haas, Simon; Schlitzer, Andreas; Mildner, Alexander; Ginhoux, Florent; Jung, Steffen; Trumpp, Andreas; Porse, Bo Torben; Tanay, Amos; Amit, Ido

    2015-12-17

    Within the bone marrow, stem cells differentiate and give rise to diverse blood cell types and functions. Currently, hematopoietic progenitors are defined using surface markers combined with functional assays that are not directly linked with in vivo differentiation potential or gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we comprehensively map myeloid progenitor subpopulations by transcriptional sorting of single cells from the bone marrow. We describe multiple progenitor subgroups, showing unexpected transcriptional priming toward seven differentiation fates but no progenitors with a mixed state. Transcriptional differentiation is correlated with combinations of known and previously undefined transcription factors, suggesting that the process is tightly regulated. Histone maps and knockout assays are consistent with early transcriptional priming, while traditional transplantation experiments suggest that in vivo priming may still allow for plasticity given strong perturbations. These data establish a reference model and general framework for studying hematopoiesis at single-cell resolution. PMID:26627738

  20. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-25

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. Decitabine and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. [Hematopoietic functions in hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Shvets, V N; Portugalov, V V

    1976-09-01

    Materials on the state of hemopoietic organs and peripheral blood of mice and rats kept under hypokinetic conditions for from 1 to 60 days are presented. The changes occurring in the lymphoid tissue (involution of thymo-lymphatic apparatus, lymphopenia and neutrophilosis) have been shown to result from the state of stress. In the bone marrow of animals there occurs activation of erythropoiesis (erythroblasts-polychromatophilic normoblasts) at early (up to 15 days) term of hypokinesia, followed by its inhibition on the 60th day of the experiment. The study of kinetics of the amount of hemopoietic stem cells in the spleen and bone marrow of the femur of mice kept under hypokinesia for 1-45 days suggests the amount of stem cells in the spleen to decrease exponentially while in the bone marrow it changes undulatorily with the maximum on the 1st-3d and 30th-45th days of hypokinesia. Shifts in the number of the stem cell population are accompanied by changes in the direction of their differentiation. The stem cells of the bone marrow manifest higher potencies to form colonies of the erythroid type as compared with the stem cells of intact animals. Possible mechanisms underlying the inhibition of lymph-and erythropoiesis and changes of the stem cell differentiation from the myeloid way to the erythroid way under conditions of hypokinesia are discussed. PMID:791200

  3. Transcriptional mechanisms regulating myeloid-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Skalnik, David G

    2002-02-01

    Myeloid blood cells comprise an important component of the immune system. Proper control of both lineage- and stage-specific gene expression is required for normal myeloid cell development and function. In recent years, a relatively small number of critical transcriptional regulators have been identified that serve important roles both in myeloid cell development and regulation of lineage-restricted gene expression in mature myeloid cells. This review summarizes our current understanding of the regulation of lineage- and stage-restricted transcription during myeloid cell differentiation, how critical transcriptional regulators control myeloid cell development, and how perturbations in transcription factor function results in the development of leukemia. PMID:11891042

  4. Hematopoietic Neoplasias in Horses: Myeloproliferative and Lymphoproliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ, Ana; RIBER, Cristina; TRIGO, Pablo; CASTEJÓN, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Leukemia, i.e., the neoplasia of one or more cell lines of the bone marrow, although less common than in other species, it is also reported in horses. Leukemia can be classified according to the affected cells (myeloproliferative or lymphoproliferative disorders), evolution of clinical signs (acute or chronic) and the presence or lack of abnormal cells in peripheral blood (leukemic, subleukemic and aleukemic leukemia). The main myeloproliferative disorders in horses are malignant histiocytosis and myeloid leukemia, the latter being classified as monocytic and myelomonocytic, granulocytic, primary erythrocytosis or polycythemia vera and megakaryocytic leukemia. The most common lymphoproliferative disorders in horses are lymphoid leukemia, plasma cell or multiple myeloma and lymphoma. Lymphoma is the most common hematopoietic neoplasia in horses and usually involves lymphoid organs, without leukemia, although bone marrow may be affected after metastasis. Lymphoma could be classified according to the organs involved and four main clinical categories have been established: generalized-multicentric, alimentary-gastrointestinal, mediastinal-thymic-thoracic and cutaneous. The clinical signs, hematological and clinical pathological findings, results of bone marrow aspirates, involvement of other organs, prognosis and treatment, if applicable, are presented for each type of neoplasia. This paper aims to provide a guide for equine practitioners when approaching to clinical cases with suspicion of hematopoietic neoplasia. PMID:24833969

  5. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for GATA2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Jennifer; Cuellar-Rodriguez, Jennifer; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Zerbe, Christa; Calvo, Katherine; Hughes, Thomas; Hakim, Fran; Cole, Kristen; Parta, Mark; Freeman, Alexandra; Holland, Steven M; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2014-12-01

    We treated 14 patients with GATA2 deficiency using a nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation regimen. Four patients received peripheral blood stem cells from matched related donors (MRD), 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cells from matched unrelated donors (URD), 4 patients received hematopoietic stem cells from umbilical cord blood donors (UCB), and 2 patients received bone marrow cells from haploidentical related donors. MRD and URD recipients received conditioning with 3days of fludarabine and 200cGy total body irradiation (TBI). Haploidentical related donor recipients and UCB recipients received cyclophosphamide and 2 additional days of fludarabine along with 200 cGY TBI. MRD, URD, and UCB recipients received tacrolimus and sirolimus for post-transplantation immunosuppression, whereas haploidentical recipients received high-dose cyclophosphamide followed by tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Eight patients are alive with reconstitution of the severely deficient monocyte, Bcell, and natural killer cell populations and reversal of the clinical phenotype at a median follow-up of 3.5years. Two patients (1 URD recipient and 1 UCB recipient) rejected the donor graft and 1 MRD recipient relapsed with myelodysplastic syndrome after transplantation. We are currently using a high-dose conditioning regimen with busulfan and fludarabine in patients with GATA2 deficiency to achieve more consistent engraftment and eradication of the malignant myeloid clones. PMID:25111582

  6. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Petz, Lawrence D; Burnett, John C; Li, Haitang; Li, Shirley; Tonai, Richard; Bakalinskaya, Milena; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Armitage, Sue; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Regan, Donna M; Clark, Pamela; Querol, Sergio; Gutman, Jonathan A; Spellman, Stephen R; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV/AIDS using HCT in patients with HIV-1 and malignancy have yielded mixed results, as encouraging evidence for virus eradication in a few cases has been offset by poor clinical outcomes due to the underlying cancer or other complications. Such clinical strategies have relied on HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that harbor the natural CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation or that have been genetically modified for HIV-resistance. Nevertheless, HCT with HIV-resistant cord blood remains a promising option, particularly with inventories of CCR5-∆32/∆32 units or with genetically modified, human leukocyte antigen-matched cord blood. PMID:26251620

  7. Progress toward curing HIV infection with hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Petz, Lawrence D; Burnett, John C; Li, Haitang; Li, Shirley; Tonai, Richard; Bakalinskaya, Milena; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Armitage, Sue; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Regan, Donna M; Clark, Pamela; Querol, Sergio; Gutman, Jonathan A; Spellman, Stephen R; Gragert, Loren; Rossi, John J

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 infection afflicts more than 35 million people worldwide, according to 2014 estimates from the World Health Organization. For those individuals who have access to antiretroviral therapy, these drugs can effectively suppress, but not cure, HIV-1 infection. Indeed, the only documented case for an HIV/AIDS cure was a patient with HIV-1 and acute myeloid leukemia who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from a graft that carried the HIV-resistant CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation. Other attempts to establish a cure for HIV/AIDS using HCT in patients with HIV-1 and malignancy have yielded mixed results, as encouraging evidence for virus eradication in a few cases has been offset by poor clinical outcomes due to the underlying cancer or other complications. Such clinical strategies have relied on HIV-resistant hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells that harbor the natural CCR5-∆32/∆32 mutation or that have been genetically modified for HIV-resistance. Nevertheless, HCT with HIV-resistant cord blood remains a promising option, particularly with inventories of CCR5-∆32/∆32 units or with genetically modified, human leukocyte antigen-matched cord blood. PMID:26251620

  8. Inflammatory signaling regulates embryonic hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Esain, Virginie; Teng, Li; Xu, Jian; Kwan, Wanda; Frost, Isaura M.; Yzaguirre, Amanda D.; Cai, Xiongwei; Cortes, Mauricio; Maijenburg, Marijke W.; Tober, Joanna; Dzierzak, Elaine; Orkin, Stuart H.; Tan, Kai; Speck, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying signaling pathways that regulate hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) formation in the embryo will guide efforts to produce and expand HSPCs ex vivo. Here we show that sterile tonic inflammatory signaling regulates embryonic HSPC formation. Expression profiling of progenitors with lymphoid potential and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from aorta/gonad/mesonephros (AGM) regions of midgestation mouse embryos revealed a robust innate immune/inflammatory signature. Mouse embryos lacking interferon γ (IFN-γ) or IFN-α signaling and zebrafish morphants lacking IFN-γ and IFN-ϕ activity had significantly fewer AGM HSPCs. Conversely, knockdown of IFN regulatory factor 2 (IRF2), a negative regulator of IFN signaling, increased expression of IFN target genes and HSPC production in zebrafish. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) and expression analyses demonstrated that IRF2-occupied genes identified in human fetal liver CD34+ HSPCs are actively transcribed in human and mouse HSPCs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the primitive myeloid population contributes to the local inflammatory response to impact the scale of HSPC production in the AGM region. Thus, sterile inflammatory signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway regulating the production of HSPCs during embryonic development. PMID:25395663

  9. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  10. Signaling pathways implicated in hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Diana; Krstic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Vlaski, Marija; Petakov, Marijana; Jovcic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Nevenka; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the signal transduction pathways associated with the clonal development of myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells. The contribution of particular signaling molecules of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and PI-3 kinase signaling to the growth of murine bone marrow colony forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and erythroid (burst forming unit-erythroid [BFU-E] and colony forming unit-erythroid [CFU-E]) progenitors was examined in studies performed in the presence or absence of specific signal transduction inhibitors. The results clearly pointed to different signal transducing intermediates that are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation depending on the cell lineage, as well as on the progenitors' maturity. Lineage-specific differences were obtained when chemical inhibitors specific for receptor- or nonreceptor-PTKs, as well as for the main groups of distinctly regulated MAPK cascades, were used because all of these compounds suppressed the growth of erythroid progenitors, with no major effects on myeloid progenitors. At the same time, differential involvement of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK transduction pathway was observed in the proliferation and/or differentiation of early, BFU-E, and late, CFU-E, erythroid progenitor cells. The results also demonstrated that phosphatydylinositol (PI)-3 kinase and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcriptional factor were required for maintenance of both myeloid and erythroid progenitor cell function. Overall, the data obtained indicated that committed hematopoietic progenitors express a certain level of constitutive signaling activity that participates in the regulation of normal steady-state hematopoiesis and point to the importance of evaluating the impact of signal transduction inhibitors on normal bone marrow when used as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:17202596

  11. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Robert; Ettel, Mark; Cho, Margaret; Chan, Alexander; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Neto, Antonio G

    2016-03-15

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia. PMID:26989468

  12. Myeloid sarcoma presenting as a colon polyp and harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Robert; Ettel, Mark; Cho, Margaret; Chan, Alexander; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Neto, Antonio G

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma, also known as granulocytic sarcoma or chloroma is an unusual accumulation of malignant myeloid precursor cells in an extramedullary site, which disrupts the normal architecture of the involved tissue. It is known to occur more commonly in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and less commonly in those with myelodysplastic syndrome and myeloproliferative neoplasm, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia. The most common sites of involvement include bone, skin and lymph nodes. However, rare cases have been reported in the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, or breast. Most commonly, a neoplastic extramedullary proliferation of myeloid precursors in a patient would have systemic involvement of a myeloid neoplasm, including in the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Infrequently, extramedullary disease may be the only site of involvement. It may also occur as a localized antecedent to more generalized disease or as a site of recurrence. Herein, we present the first case in the English literature of a patient presenting with an isolated site of myeloid sarcoma arising in the form of a colonic polyp which, after subsequent bone marrow biopsy, was found to be a harbinger of chronic myelogenous leukemia. PMID:26989468

  13. Growth factor-activated stem cell circuits and stromal signals cooperatively accelerate non-integrated iPSC reprogramming of human myeloid progenitors.

    PubMed

    Park, Tea Soon; Huo, Jeffrey S; Peters, Ann; Talbot, C Conover; Verma, Karan; Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Kaplan, Ian M; Zambidis, Elias T

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral conversion of skin or blood cells into clinically useful human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) occurs in only rare fractions (~0.001%-0.5%) of donor cells transfected with non-integrating reprogramming factors. Pluripotency induction of developmentally immature stem-progenitors is generally more efficient than differentiated somatic cell targets. However, the nature of augmented progenitor reprogramming remains obscure, and its potential has not been fully explored for improving the extremely slow pace of non-integrated reprogramming. Here, we report highly optimized four-factor reprogramming of lineage-committed cord blood (CB) myeloid progenitors with bulk efficiencies of ~50% in purified episome-expressing cells. Lineage-committed CD33(+)CD45(+)CD34(-) myeloid cells and not primitive hematopoietic stem-progenitors were the main targets of a rapid and nearly complete non-integrated reprogramming. The efficient conversion of mature myeloid populations into NANOG(+)TRA-1-81(+) hiPSC was mediated by synergies between hematopoietic growth factor (GF), stromal activation signals, and episomal Yamanaka factor expression. Using a modular bioinformatics approach, we demonstrated that efficient myeloid reprogramming correlated not to increased proliferation or endogenous Core factor expressions, but to poised expression of GF-activated transcriptional circuits that commonly regulate plasticity in both hematopoietic progenitors and embryonic stem cells (ESC). Factor-driven conversion of myeloid progenitors to a high-fidelity pluripotent state was further accelerated by soluble and contact-dependent stromal signals that included an implied and unexpected role for Toll receptor-NFκB signaling. These data provide a paradigm for understanding the augmented reprogramming capacity of somatic progenitors, and reveal that efficient induced pluripotency in other cell types may also require extrinsic activation of a molecular framework that commonly regulates self-renewal and differentiation in both hematopoietic progenitors and ESC. PMID:22905176

  14. New answers to old questions from genome-wide maps of DNA methylation in hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mira; Goodell, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is a well-studied epigenetic modification essential for efficient cellular differentiation. Aberrant DNA methylation patterns are a characteristic feature of cancer including myeloid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recurrent mutations in DNA modifying enzymes were identified in AML and linked to distinct DNA methylation signatures. In addition, discovery of Tet enzymes provided new mechanisms for the reversal of DNA methylation. Advances in base-resolution profiling of DNA methylation have enabled a more comprehensive understanding of the methylome landscape in the genome. This review will summarize and discuss the key questions in the function of DNA methylation in the hematopoietic system, including recent studies that have elucidated where and how DNA methylation regulates diverse biological processes in the genome. PMID:24993071

  15. Hypoxia and HIFs in regulating the development of the hematopoietic system

    PubMed Central

    Imanirad, Parisa; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Many physiologic processes during the early stages of mammalian ontogeny, particularly placental and vascular development, take place in the low oxygen environment of the uterus. Organogenesis is affected by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors that are sensors of hypoxia. In response to hypoxia, HIFs activate downstream target genes – growth and metabolism factors. During hematopoietic system ontogeny, blood cells and hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells are respectively generated from mesodermal precursors, hemangioblasts, and from a specialized subset of endothelial cells that are hemogenic. Since HIFs are known to play a central role in vascular development, and hematopoietic system development occurs in parallel to that of the vascular system, several studies have examined the role of HIFs in hematopoietic development. The response to hypoxia has been examined in early and mid-gestation mouse embryos through genetic deletion of HIF subunits. We review here the data showing that hematopoietic tissues of the embryo are hypoxic and express HIFs and HIF downstream targets, and that HIFs regulate the development and function of hematopoietic progenitor/stem cells. PMID:24103835

  16. Acute myeloid leukemia in children: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Taga, Takashi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) accounts for 25% of pediatric leukemia and affects approximately 180 patients annually in Japan. The treatment outcome for pediatric AML has improved through advances in chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), supportive care, and optimal risk stratification. Currently, clinical pediatric AML studies are conducted separately according to the AML subtypes: de novo AML, acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), and myeloid leukemia with Down syndrome (ML-DS). Children with de novo AML are treated mainly with anthracyclines and cytarabine, in some cases with HSCT, and the overall survival (OS) rate now approaches 70%. Children with APL are treated with an all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-combined regimen with an 80-90% OS. Children with ML-DS are treated with a less intensive regimen compared with non-DS patients, and the OS is approximately 80%. HSCT in first remission is restricted to children with high-risk de novo AML only. To further improve outcomes, it will be necessary to combine more accurate risk stratification strategies using molecular genetic analysis with assessment of minimum residual disease, and the introduction of new drugs in international collaborative clinical trials. PMID:26645706

  17. Does Teno Torque Virus Induce Autoimmunity After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation? A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Maximova, Natalia; Pizzol, Antonio; Ferrara, Giovanna; Maestro, Alessandra; Tamaro, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Teno Torque virus, member of the family of Anelloviridae, has been associated with many autoimmune diseases such as idiopathic hepatitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and multiple sclerosis. Its viral load tends to be higher in the bone marrow and in tissues with high turnover rate. We report here a case of an 11-month-old infant affected by acute myeloid leukemia who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and after 6 months had autoimmune hepatitis and atopic dermatitis. Extremely high-cytokine IP-10 and eotaxin levels were found in her sera, and serological tests and RT-PCR for viruses showed positive results exclusively for Teno Torque virus. PMID:24942030

  18. Stem Cell Modeling of Core Binding Factor Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mosna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Even though clonally originated from a single cell, acute leukemia loses its homogeneity soon and presents at clinical diagnosis as a hierarchy of cells endowed with different functions, of which only a minority possesses the ability to recapitulate the disease. Due to their analogy to hematopoietic stem cells, these cells have been named “leukemia stem cells,” and are thought to be chiefly responsible for disease relapse and ultimate survival after chemotherapy. Core Binding Factor (CBF) Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is cytogenetically characterized by either the t(8;21) or the inv(16)/t(16;16) chromosomal abnormalities, which, although being pathognomonic, are not sufficient per se to induce overt leukemia but rather determine a preclinical phase of disease when preleukemic subclones compete until the acquisition of clonal dominance by one of them. In this review we summarize the concepts regarding the application of the “leukemia stem cell” theory to the development of CBF AML; we will analyze the studies investigating the leukemogenetic role of t(8;21) and inv(16)/t(16;16), the proposed theories of its clonal evolution, and the role played by the hematopoietic niches in preserving the disease. Finally, we will discuss the clinical implications of stem cell modeling of CBF AML for the therapy of the disease. PMID:26880987

  19. Flotillins Are Involved in the Polarization of Primitive and Mature Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Lawrence; Beckmann, Julia; Magenau, Astrid; Boneberg, Eva-Maria; Gaus, Katharina; Viola, Antonella; Giebel, Bernd; Illges, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Background Migration of mature and immature leukocytes in response to chemokines is not only essential during inflammation and host defense, but also during development of the hematopoietic system. Many molecules implicated in migratory polarity show uniform cellular distribution under non-activated conditions, but acquire a polarized localization upon exposure to migratory cues. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we present evidence that raft-associated endocytic proteins (flotillins) are pre-assembled in lymphoid, myeloid and primitive hematopoietic cells and accumulate in the uropod during migration. Furthermore, flotillins display a polarized distribution during immunological synapse formation. Employing the membrane lipid-order sensitive probe Laurdan, we show that flotillin accumulation in the immunological synapse is concomittant with membrane ordering in these regions. Conclusions Together with the observation that flotillin polarization does not occur in other polarized cell types such as polarized epithelial cells, our results suggest a specific role for flotillins in hematopoietic cell polarization. Based on our results, we propose that in hematopoietic cells, flotillins provide intrinsic cues that govern segregation of certain microdomain-associated molecules during immune cell polarization. PMID:20027317

  20. A 54-Year-Old Woman with Donor Cell Origin of Multiple Myeloma after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for the Treatment of CML

    PubMed Central

    Maestas, Erika; Jain, Shikha; Stiff, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is a myeloproliferative disorder that may be treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). While posttransplantation relapse of disease resulting from a failure to eradicate the patient's original leukemia could occur, patients may also rarely develop a secondary malignancy or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) of donor origin termed donor cell leukemia (DCL). Cases of donor-derived acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or MDS after HSCT or solid tumor transplantation have been published. However, very few cases of donor-derived multiple myeloma (MM) exist. We describe a patient who developed a donor-derived MM following allogeneic HSCT from a sibling donor. PMID:26989529

  1. In vitro generation of hematopoietic stem cells from an embryonic stem cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Golunski, E; Samaridis, J

    1995-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are unique in that they give rise both to new stem cells (self-renewal) and to all blood cell types. The cellular and molecular events responsible for the formation of HSC remain unknown mainly because no system exists to study it. Embryonic stem (ES) cells were induced to differentiate by coculture with the stromal cell line RP010 and the combination of interleukin (IL) 3, IL-6, and F (cell-free supernatants from cultures of the FLS4.1 fetal liver stromal cell line). Cell cytometry analysis of the mononuclear cells produced in the cultures was consistent with the presence of PgP-1+ Lin- early hematopoietic (B-220- Mac-1- JORO 75- TER 119-) cells and of fewer B-220+ IgM- B-cell progenitors and JORO 75+ T-lymphocyte progenitors. The cell-sorter-purified PgP-1+ Lin- cells produced by induced ES cells could repopulate the lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid lineages of irradiated mice. The ES-derived PgP-1+ Lin- cells must possess extensive self-renewal potential, as they were able to produce hematopoietic repopulation of secondary mice recipients. Indeed, marrow cells from irradiated mice reconstituted (15-18 weeks before) with PgP-1+ Lin- cell-sorter-purified cells generated by induced ES cells repopulated the lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid lineages of secondary mouse recipients assessed 16-20 weeks after their transfer into irradiated secondary mice. The results show that the culture conditions described here support differentiation of ES cells into hematopoietic cells with functional properties of HSC. It should now be possible to unravel the molecular events leading to the formation of HSC. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7638225

  2. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-19

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  3. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, R.A.; LeBeau, M.M.; Vardiman, J.W.; Rowley, J.D.

    1996-12-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase 11, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11 q23 or 21 q22. The MLL gene at 11 q23 or the AML1 gene at 21 q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 1 1 q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11 q23 or 21 q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. 32 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Myeloid leukemia after hematotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Larson, R A; LeBeau, M M; Vardiman, J W; Rowley, J D

    1996-01-01

    One of the most serious consequences of cancer therapy is the development of a second cancer, especially leukemia. Several distinct subsets of therapy-related leukemia can now be distinguished. Classic therapy-related myeloid leukemia typically occurs 5 to 7 years after exposure to alkylating agents and/or irradiation, has a myelodysplastic phase with trilineage involvement, and is characterized by abnormalities of the long arms of chromosomes 5 and/or 7. Response to treatment is poor, and allogenic bone marrow transplantation is recommended. Leukemia following treatment with agents that inhibit topoisomerase II, however, has a shorter latency, no preleukemic phase, a monoblastic, myelomonocytic, or myeloblastic phenotype, and balanced translocations, most commonly involving chromosome bands 11q23 or 21q22. The MLL gene at 11q23 or the AML1 gene at 21q22 are almost uniformly rearranged. MLL is involved with many fusion gene partners. Therapy-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia also occurs with 11q23 rearrangements. Therapy-related leukemias with 11q23 or 21q22 rearrangements, inv(16) or t(15;17), have a more favorable response to treatment and a clinical course similar to their de novo counterparts. PMID:9118910

  5. Hematopoietic stem cells: multiparameter regulation.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Wang, Yiwei; Liu, Tianqing

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are capable to self-renew with multi-potency which generated much excitement in clinical therapy. However, the main obstacle of HSCs in clinical application was insufficient number of HSCs which were derived from either bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord blood. This review briefly discusses the indispensable utility of growth factors and cytokines, stromal cells, extracellular matrix, bionic scaffold and microenvironment aiming to control the hematopoiesis in all directions and provide a better and comprehensive understanding for in vitro expansion of hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:26883144

  6. To Transplant or Not to Transplant for Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An Ever-Evolving Decision

    PubMed Central

    Gerds, Aaron T.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, a group of experts charged by the American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation critically reviewed the available literature and summarized the indications for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation versus chemotherapy in adults with acute myeloid leukemia. Much of the resulting position statement was based on studies conducted nearly 2 decades ago, and may not accurately represent current treatment. As a result of advances in both therapeutic regimens and supportive care, a number of recent studies have demonstrated clear and consistent improvements in the outcomes of patients receiving chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. In addition, prognostic accuracy has improved with the identification of mutations not detected by traditional cytogenetics. With these advancements in prognostic accuracy and treatment, it is now appropriate to revisit the indications for transplantation versus chemotherapy. PMID:23187771

  7. [Bone marrow microenvironment in chronic myeloid leukemia: implications for disease physiopathology and response to treatment].

    PubMed

    Aristizábal, José Alejandro; Chandia, Mauricio; Del Cañizo, María Consuelo; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín

    2014-05-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative neoplasm related to the presence of the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene, linked to t (9;22) (q34;q11). It is originated from an abnormal hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized as its normal counterparts by long-term self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation. Both leukemic and quiescent normal hematopoietic stem cells preferentially reside in the osteoblastic niche. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are located near them, playing a critical role in their regulation. Currently, with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy, long term clinical responses are achieved in most CML cases. However, late treatment failures may be observed related to the persistence of leukemic stem cells. The interactions between the leukemic stem cell and the microenvironment may be responsible in part for these events. We review the interactions between the leukemic stem cell and BM stroma and its potential clinical and therapeutic implications. PMID:25427017

  8. Essential role for telomerase in chronic myeloid leukemia induced by BCR-ABL in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Barajas-Diego, Marcos; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; González-Herrero, Inés; Flores, Teresa; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2012-01-01

    The telomerase protein is constitutively activated in malignant cells from many patients with cancer, including the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but whether telomerase is essential for the pathogenesis of this disease is not known. Here, we used telomerase deficient mice to determine the requirement for telomerase in CML induced by BCR-ABL in mouse models of CML. Loss of one telomerase allele or complete deletion of telomerase prevented the development of leukemia induced by BCR-ABL. However, BCR-ABL was expressed and active in telomerase heterozygous and null leukemic hematopoietic stem cells. These results demonstrate that telomerase is essential for oncogene-induced reprogramming of hematopoietic stem cells in CML development and validate telomerase and the genes it regulates as targets for therapy in CML. PMID:22408137

  9. BMP signaling balances murine myeloid potential through SMAD-independent p38MAPK and NOTCH pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Brandoch D.

    2014-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling regulates early hematopoietic development, proceeding from mesoderm patterning through the progressive commitment and differentiation of progenitor cells. The BMP pathway signals largely through receptor-mediated activation of Mothers Against Decapentaplegic homolog (SMAD) proteins, although alternate pathways are modulated through various components of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Using a conditional, short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-based knockdown system in the context of differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we demonstrated previously that Smad1 promotes hemangioblast specification, but then subsequently restricts primitive progenitor potential. Here we show that co-knockdown of Smad5 restores normal progenitor potential of Smad1-depleted cells, suggesting opposing functions for Smad1 and Smad5. This balance was confirmed by cotargeting Smad1/5 with a specific chemical antagonist, LDN193189 (LDN). However, we discovered that LDN treatment after hemangioblast commitment enhanced primitive myeloid potential. Moreover, inhibition with LDN (but not SMAD depletion) increased expression of Delta-like ligands Dll1 and Dll3 and NOTCH activity; abrogation of NOTCH activity restored LDN-enhanced myeloid potential back to normal, corresponding with expression levels of the myeloid master regulator, C/EBPα. LDN but not SMAD activity was also associated with activation of the p38MAPK pathway, and blocking this pathway was sufficient to enhance myelopoiesis. Therefore, NOTCH and p38MAPK pathways balance primitive myeloid progenitor output downstream of the BMP pathway. PMID:24894772

  10. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Wouters, Bas; Balastik, Martin; Shapiro-Koss, Clara; Zhang, Hong; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Radomska, Hanna S.; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Amabile, Giovanni; Ye, Min; Zhang, Junyan; Lowers, Irene; Avellino, Roberto; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E.; Valk, Peter J.M.; Delwel, Ruud; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    C/EBPs are a family of transcription factors that regulate growth control and differentiation of various tissues. We found that C/EBPγ is highly upregulated in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples characterized by C/EBPα hypermethylation/silencing. Similarly, C/EBPγ was upregulated in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking C/EBPα, as C/EBPα mediates C/EBPγ suppression. Studies in myeloid cells demonstrated that CEBPG overexpression blocked neutrophilic differentiation. Further, downregulation of Cebpg in murine Cebpa-deficient stem/progenitor cells or in human CEBPA-silenced AML samples restored granulocytic differentiation. In addition, treatment of these leukemias with demethylating agents restored the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ balance and upregulated the expression of myeloid differentiation markers. Our results indicate that C/EBPγ mediates the myeloid differentiation arrest induced by C/EBPα deficiency and that targeting the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ axis rescues neutrophilic differentiation in this unique subset of AMLs. PMID:23160200

  11. C/EBPγ deregulation results in differentiation arrest in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Wouters, Bas; Balastik, Martin; Shapiro-Koss, Clara; Zhang, Hong; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; DiRuscio, Annalisa; Radomska, Hanna S; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Amabile, Giovanni; Ye, Min; Zhang, Junyan; Lowers, Irene; Avellino, Roberto; Melnick, Ari; Figueroa, Maria E; Valk, Peter J M; Delwel, Ruud; Tenen, Daniel G

    2012-12-01

    C/EBPs are a family of transcription factors that regulate growth control and differentiation of various tissues. We found that C/EBPγ is highly upregulated in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples characterized by C/EBPα hypermethylation/silencing. Similarly, C/EBPγ was upregulated in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells lacking C/EBPα, as C/EBPα mediates C/EBPγ suppression. Studies in myeloid cells demonstrated that CEBPG overexpression blocked neutrophilic differentiation. Further, downregulation of Cebpg in murine Cebpa-deficient stem/progenitor cells or in human CEBPA-silenced AML samples restored granulocytic differentiation. In addition, treatment of these leukemias with demethylating agents restored the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ balance and upregulated the expression of myeloid differentiation markers. Our results indicate that C/EBPγ mediates the myeloid differentiation arrest induced by C/EBPα deficiency and that targeting the C/EBPα-C/EBPγ axis rescues neutrophilic differentiation in this unique subset of AMLs. PMID:23160200

  12. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Can acute myeloid leukemia be found early? Can acute myeloid leukemia be prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... 2016 Back to top » Guide Topics What Is Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, ...

  13. Cancer-Associated Myeloid Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaeminck, Yannick; González-Rascón, Anna; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Breckpot, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid cells are critically involved in the pathophysiology of cancers. In the tumor microenvironment (TME), they comprise tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), neutrophils (TANs), dendritic cells, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, which are further subdivided into a monocytic subset and a granulocytic subset. Some of these myeloid cells, in particular TAMs and TANs, are divided into type 1 or type 2 cells, according to the paradigm of T helper type 1 or type 2 cells. Type 1-activated cells are generally characterized as cells that aid tumor rejection, while all other myeloid cells are shown to favor tumor progression. Moreover, these cells are often at the basis of resistance to various therapies. Much research has been devoted to study the biology of myeloid cells. This endeavor has proven to be challenging, as the markers used to categorize myeloid cells in the TME are not restricted to particular subsets. Also from a functional and metabolic point of view, myeloid cells share many features. Finally, myeloid cells are endowed with a certain level of plasticity, which further complicates studying them outside their environment. In this article, we challenge the exclusive use of cell markers to unambiguously identify myeloid cell subsets in the TME. We further propose to divide myeloid cells into myeloid regulatory or stimulatory cells according to their pro- or antitumor function, because we contend that for therapeutic purposes it is not targeting the cell subsets but rather targeting their protumor traits; hence, myeloid regulatory cells will push antitumor immunotherapy to the next level. PMID:27065074

  14. Use of molecular markers to determine postremission treatment in acute myeloid leukemia with normal cytogenetics.

    PubMed

    Copelan, Edward A; Grunwald, Michael R; Druhan, Lawrence J; Avalos, Belinda R

    2015-12-01

    Most patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be induced into complete remission, but postremission treatment is required for cure. The choice of postremission therapy in a majority of nonelderly patients, between intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, is largely determined by the results of conventional cytogenetic analysis. In 45% of patients with a normal karyotype, the presence or absence of specific molecular mutations should be used to determine the prognosis and postremission treatment. In addition, the identification of mutations may indicate a role for targeted intervention, including following transplantation. PMID:26459077

  15. Germline duplication of ATG2B and GSKIP predisposes to familial myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Saliba, Joseph; Saint-Martin, Ccile; Di Stefano, Antonio; Lenglet, Galle; Marty, Caroline; Keren, Boris; Pasquier, Florence; Valle, Vronique Della; Secardin, Lise; Leroy, Gwendoline; Mahfoudhi, Emna; Grosjean, Sarah; Droin, Nathalie; Diop, M'boyba; Dessen, Philippe; Charrier, Sabine; Palazzo, Alberta; Merlevede, Jane; Meniane, Jean-Cme; Delaunay-Darivon, Christine; Fuseau, Pascal; Isnard, Franoise; Casadevall, Nicole; Solary, Eric; Debili, Najet; Bernard, Olivier A; Raslova, Hana; Najman, Albert; Vainchenker, William; Bellann-Chantelot, Christine; Plo, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    No major predisposition gene for familial myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has been identified. Here we demonstrate that the autosomal dominant transmission of a 700-kb duplication in four genetically related families predisposes to myeloid malignancies, including MPN, frequently progressing to leukemia. Using induced pluripotent stem cells and primary cells, we demonstrate that overexpression of ATG2B and GSKIP enhances hematopoietic progenitor differentiation, including of megakaryocytes, by increasing progenitor sensitivity to thrombopoietin (TPO). ATG2B and GSKIP cooperate with acquired JAK2, MPL and CALR mutations during MPN development. Thus, the germline duplication may change the fitness of cells harboring signaling pathway mutations and increases the probability of disease development. PMID:26280900

  16. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Biochemical correction of X-CGD by a novel chimeric promoter regulating high levels of transgene expression in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Giorgia; Almarza, Elena; Brendel, Christian; Choi, Uimook; Beilin, Chiara; Blundell, Michael P; Haria, Sneha; Parsley, Kathryn L; Kinnon, Christine; Malech, Harry L; Bueren, Juan A; Grez, Manuel; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (X-CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the CYBB gene encoding the phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidase catalytic subunit gp91(phox). A recent clinical trial for X-CGD using a spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV)-based γ-retroviral vector has demonstrated clear therapeutic benefits in several patients although complicated by enhancer-mediated mutagenesis and diminution of effectiveness over time due to silencing of the viral long terminal repeat (LTR). To improve safety and efficacy, we have designed a lentiviral vector that directs transgene expression primarily in myeloid cells. To this end, we created a synthetic chimeric promoter that contains binding sites for myeloid transcription factors CAAT box enhancer-binding family proteins (C/EBPs) and PU.1, which are highly expressed during granulocytic differentiation. As predicted, the chimeric promoter regulated higher reporter gene expression in myeloid than in nonmyeloid cells, and in human hematopoietic progenitors upon granulocytic differentiation. In a murine model of stem cell gene therapy for X-CGD, the chimeric vector resulted in high levels of gp91(phox) expression in committed myeloid cells and granulocytes, and restored normal NADPH-oxidase activity. These findings were recapitulated in human neutrophils derived from transduced X-CGD CD34(+) cells in vivo, and suggest that the chimeric promoter will have utility for gene therapy of myeloid lineage disorders such as CGD. PMID:20978475

  18. Molecular Pathways: Myeloid Complicity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and pro-tumorigenic phenotype. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifesta continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. PMID:25047706

  19. The Role of PTEN in Myeloid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Panuzzo, Cristina; Crivellaro, Sabrina; Carrà, Giovanna; Torti, Davide; Guerrasio, Angelo; Saglio, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    PTEN deletion in the mouse and in the zebrafish highlights the essential role of this tumor suppressor in the development of myeloid malignancies, in particular acute myeloid leukemia and myeloproliferative disorders. In humans, extensive genetic sequences of myeloid malignancies did not reveal recurrent PTEN mutations and deletions. However, PTEN was shown to be functionally inactivated in several acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia samples, through both post-trasductional modifications, changes in protein levels and cellular compartmentalization. Notably, non genomic inactivation of PTEN in myeloid malignancies could represent a challenging therapeutic opportunity for these diseases. Targeting those mechanisms that affect PTEN function could indeed promote PTEN reactivation with consequent cancer selective apoptosis induction. In this review we will describe the role of PTEN in the development of myeloid malignancies. PMID:26734127

  20. Hematopoietic Origin of Murine Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Lindsay T.; Mehrotra, Meenal; LaRue, Amanda C.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple origins, including the bone marrow, have been suggested to contribute to fibroblast populations in the lung. Using bone marrow reconstitution strategies, the present study tested the hypothesis that the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gives rise to lung tissue fibroblasts in vivo. Data demonstrate that the nonadherent bone marrow fraction is enriched for CD45+ HSC-derived cells and was able to reconstitute hematopoiesis in lethally irradiated animals. Analysis of peripheral blood and lung tissues from engrafted mice demonstrated the ability of this population to give rise to CD45+/Discoidin-Domain Receptor-2+ (DDR2) circulating fibroblast precursors (CFPs) in blood and fibroblast populations in lung. An HSC origin for lung fibroblasts was confirmed using a novel clonal cell transplantation method in which the bone marrow is reconstituted by a clonal population derived from a single HSC. Together, these findings provide evidence for an HSC contribution to lung fibroblasts and demonstrate a circulating intermediate through the CD45+/DDR2+ HSC-derived CFP. PMID:26185498

  1. Impaired functionality and homing of Fancg-deficient hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Barroca, Vilma; Mouthon, Marc Andr; Lewandowski, Daniel; Brunet de la Grange, Philippe; Gauthier, Laurent Robert; Pflumio, Franoise; Boussin, Franois Dominique; Arwert, Fre; Riou, Lydia; Allemand, Isabelle; Romeo, Paul Henri; Fouchet, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a human rare genetic disorder characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow (BM) failure and predisposition to leukemia. The progressive aplastic anemia suggests a defect in the ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to sustain hematopoieis. We have examined the role of the nuclear FA core complex gene Fancg in the functionality of HSC. In Fancg-/- mice, we observed a decay of long-term HSC and multipotent progenitors that account for the reduction in the LSK compartment containing primitive hematopoietic cells. Fancg-/- lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cells were also affected, and myeloid progenitors show compromised in vitro functionality. HSC from Fancg-/- mice failed to engraft and to reconstitute at short and long term the hematopoiesis in a competitive transplantation assay. Fancg-/- LSK cells showed a loss of quiescence, an impaired migration in vitro in response to the chemokine CXCL12 and a defective homing to the BM after transplantation. Finally, the expression of several key genes involved in self-renewal, quiescence and migration of HSC was dysregulated in Fancg-deficient LSK subset. Collectively, our data reveal that Fancg should play a role in the regulation of physiological functions of HSC. PMID:21968513

  2. Activation of Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells Promotes Immunosuppression Within the Pre-metastatic Niche.

    PubMed

    Giles, Amber Jin; Reid, Caitlin Marie; Evans, Justin DeWayne; Murgai, Meera; Vicioso, Yorleny; Highfill, Steven Lorenz; Kasai, Miki; Vahdat, Linda; Mackall, Crystal Lee; Lyden, David; Wexler, Leonard; Kaplan, Rosandra Natasha

    2016-03-15

    Metastatic tumors have been shown to establish microenvironments in distant tissues that are permissive to disseminated tumor cells. Hematopoietic cells contribute to this microenvironment, yet the precise initiating events responsible for establishing the pre-metastatic niche remain unclear. Here, we tracked the developmental fate of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in tumor-bearing mice. We show that a distant primary tumor drives the expansion of HSPCs within the bone marrow and their mobilization to the bloodstream. Treatment of purified HSPCs cultured ex vivo with tumor-conditioned media induced their proliferation as well as their differentiation into immunosuppressive myeloid cells. We furthered tracked purified HSPCs in vivo and found they differentiated into myeloid-derived suppressor cells in early metastatic sites of tumor-bearing mice. The number of CD11b(+)Ly6g(+) cells in metastatic sites was significantly increased by HSPC mobilization and decreased if tumor-mediated mobilization was inhibited. Moreover, pharmacologic mobilization of HSPCs increased metastasis, whereas depletion of Gr1(+) cells abrogated the metastasis-promoting effects of HSPC mobilization. Finally, we detected elevated levels of HSPCs in the circulation of newly diagnosed cancer patients, which correlated with increased risk for metastatic progression. Taken together, our results highlight bone marrow activation as one of the earliest steps of the metastatic process and identify circulating HSPCs as potential clinical indicators of metastatic niche formation. Cancer Res; 76(6); 1335-47. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719537

  3. IFN-? causes aplastic anemia by altering hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell composition and disrupting lineage differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Karwan, Megan; Saleh, Bahara; Hodge, Deborah L.; Chan, Tim; Boelte, Kimberly C.; Keller, Jonathan R.; Young, Howard A.

    2014-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is characterized by hypocellular marrow and peripheral pancytopenia. Because interferon gamma (IFN-?) can be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of AA patients, it has been hypothesized that autoreactive T lymphocytes may be involved in destroying the hematopoietic stem cells. We have observed AA-like symptoms in our IFN-? adenylate-uridylaterich element (ARE)deleted (del) mice, which constitutively express a low level of IFN-? under normal physiologic conditions. Because no T-cell autoimmunity was observed, we hypothesized that IFN-? may be directly involved in the pathophysiology of AA. In these mice, we did not detect infiltration of T cells in bone marrow (BM), and the existing T cells seemed to be hyporesponsive. We observed inhibition in myeloid progenitor differentiation despite an increase in serum levels of cytokines involved in hematopoietic differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, there was a disruption in erythropoiesis and B-cell differentiation. The same phenomena were also observed in wild-type recipients of IFN-? ARE-del BM. The data suggest that AA occurs when IFN-? inhibits the generation of myeloid progenitors and prevents lineage differentiation, as opposed to infiltration of activated T cells. These results may be useful in improving treatment as well as maintaining a disease-free status. PMID:25342713

  4. Phosphatase of regenerating liver in hematopoietic stem cells and hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Chen, Sisi; Gao, Rui; Bai, Yunpeng; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatases of regenerating liver (PRLs), consisting PRL1, PRL2 and PRL3, are dual-specificity protein phosphatases that have been implicated as biomarkers and therapeutic targets in several solid tumors. However, their roles in hematological malignancies are largely unknown. Recent findings demonstrate that PRL2 is important for hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and proliferation. In addition, both PRL2 and PRL3 are highly expressed in some hematological malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), multiple myeloma (MM) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Moreover, PRL deficiency impairs the proliferation and survival of leukemia cells through regulating oncogenic signaling pathways. While PRLs are potential novel therapeutic targets in hematological malignancies, their exact biological function and cellular substrates remain unclear. This review will discuss how PRLs regulate hematopoietic stem cell behavior, what signaling pathways are regulated by PRLs, and how to target PRLs in hematological malignancies. An improved understanding of how PRLs function and how they are regulated may facilitate the development of PRL inhibitors that are effective in cancer treatment. PMID:25486470

  5. Tet2 disruption leads to enhanced self-renewal and altered differentiation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kunimoto, Hiroyoshi; Fukuchi, Yumi; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Sadahira, Ken; Ikeda, Yasuo; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Somatic mutation of ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2) gene is frequently found in human myeloid malignancies. Recent reports showed that loss of Tet2 led to pleiotropic hematopoietic abnormalities including increased competitive repopulating capacity of bone marrow (BM) HSCs and myeloid transformation. However, precise impact of Tet2 loss on the function of fetal liver (FL) HSCs has not been examined. Here we show that disruption of Tet2 results in the expansion of Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells in FL. Furthermore, Tet2 loss led to enhanced self-renewal and long-term repopulating capacity of FL-HSCs in in vivo serial transplantation assay. Disruption of Tet2 in FL also led to altered differentiation of mature blood cells, expansion of common myeloid progenitors and increased resistance for hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) to differentiation stimuli in vitro. These results demonstrate that Tet2 plays a critical role in homeostasis of HSCs and HPCs not only in the BM, but also in FL. PMID:22355785

  6. Distinct Sources of Hematopoietic Progenitors Emerge before HSCs and Provide Functional Blood Cells in the Mammalian Embryo.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Kathleen E; Frame, Jenna M; Fegan, Katherine H; Bowen, James R; Conway, Simon J; Catherman, Seana C; Kingsley, Paul D; Koniski, Anne D; Palis, James

    2015-06-30

    Hematopoietic potential arises in mammalian embryos before adult-repopulating hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). At embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5), we show the first murine definitive erythro-myeloid progenitors (EMPs) have an immunophenotype distinct from primitive hematopoietic progenitors, maturing megakaryocytes and macrophages, and rare B cell potential. EMPs emerge in the yolk sac with erythroid and broad myeloid, but not lymphoid, potential. EMPs migrate to the fetal liver and rapidly differentiate, including production of circulating neutrophils by E11.5. Although the surface markers, transcription factors, and lineage potential associated with EMPs overlap with those found in adult definitive hematopoiesis, they are present in unique combinations or proportions that result in a specialized definitive embryonic progenitor. Furthermore, we find that embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived hematopoiesis recapitulates early yolk sac hematopoiesis, including primitive, EMP, and rare B cell potential. EMPs do not have long-term potential when transplanted in immunocompromised adults, but they can provide transient adult-like RBC reconstitution. PMID:26095363

  7. Dasatinib promotes the activation of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Duyvestyn, Johanna M; Taylor, Samuel J; Dagger, Samantha A; Langdon, Wallace Y

    2016-05-01

    Dasatinib is an orally available broad-spectrum tyrosine kinase inhibitor that is widely used to treat chronic myeloid leukemia. It is also in clinical trials for the treatment of other malignancies, including solid tumors. Despite its wide use, little is known of its effects on normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Here, we study wild-type mice dosed with dasatinib and find that it causes the transient induction of proliferation of quiescent hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This finding was unexpected given the ability of dasatinib to inhibit c-Kit signaling and promote cell cycle arrest in many cell types. The transient induction of HSC proliferation in dasatinib-dosed mice coincided with a marked induction in the expression of Sca-1 and phospho-S6. Also evident at this time was a rapid but transient loss of lineage-committed hematopoietic progenitors that express high levels of c-Kit and the induction of stem cell factor in the serum. These findings suggest that activation of quiescent HSCs is part of a rapid rescue response that restores hematopoietic progenitors to pretreatment levels. This restoration coincides with HSCs returning to quiescence, and the expression of Sca-1 and phospho-S6 reverting to pre-treatment levels, even though dasatinib dosing is maintained. These data suggest that equilibrium is reached between the opposing forces of dasatinib and hematopoietic growth factors. The transient induction of HSC proliferation provided a window of opportunity whereby these cells became sensitive to killing by the cytotoxic drug 5-fluorouracil. PMID:26921649

  8. Enhanced polyamine catabolism disturbs hematopoietic lineage commitment and leads to a myeloproliferative disease in mice overexpressing spermidine/spermine N¹-acetyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Pirnes-Karhu, Sini; Mäntymaa, Pentti; Sironen, Reijo; Mäkinen, Petri I; Wojciechowski, Sara; Juutinen, Sisko; Koistinaho, Jari; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Jantunen, Esa; Alhonen, Leena; Uimari, Anne

    2014-03-01

    Spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase (SSAT) regulates intracellular polyamine levels by catabolizing spermidine and spermine which are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation. Hematological characterization of SSAT overexpressing mice (SSAT mice) revealed enhanced myelopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis leading to increased amounts of myeloid cells in bone marrow, peripheral blood, and spleen compared to wild-type animals. The level of SSAT activity in the bone marrow cells was associated with the bone marrow cellularity and spleen weight which both were significantly increased in SSAT mice. The result of bone marrow transplantations indicated that both the intrinsic SSAT overexpression of bone marrow cells and bone marrow microenvironment had an impact on the observed hematopoietic phenotype. The Lineage-negative Sca-1(+) c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment in SSAT mice, showed enhanced proliferation, increased proportion of long-term HSCs and affected expression of transcription factors associated with lineage priming and myeloid differentiation. The proportions of common myeloid and megakaryocytic/erythroid progenitors were decreased and the proportion of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors was increased in SSAT bone marrow. The data suggest that SSAT overexpression and the concomitantly accelerated polyamine metabolism in hematopoietic cells and bone marrow microenvironment affect lineage commitment and lead to the development of a mouse myeloproliferative disease in SSAT mice. PMID:23836421

  9. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Michael G.; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R.; Moore, Kateri A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  10. Making a Hematopoietic Stem Cell.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Michael G; Pereira, Carlos-Filipe; Lemischka, Ihor R; Moore, Kateri A

    2016-03-01

    Previous attempts to either generate or expand hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in vitro have involved either ex vivo expansion of pre-existing patient or donor HSCs or de novo generation from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), comprising both embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs alleviated ESC ethical issues but attempts to generate functional mature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) have been largely unsuccessful. New efforts focus on directly reprogramming somatic cells into definitive HSCs and HSPCs. To meet clinical needs and to advance drug discovery and stem cell therapy, alternative approaches are necessary. In this review, we synthesize the strategies used and the key findings made in recent years by those trying to make an HSC. PMID:26526106

  11. Assessment of Benzene-Induced Hematotoxicity Using a Human-Like Hematopoietic Lineage in NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγnull Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Tsujimura, Noriyuki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Hosokawa, Masahito; Otsuka, Kensuke; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Nakasono, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advancements, it is still difficult to evaluate in vivo responses to toxicants in humans. Development of a system that can mimic the in vivo responses of human cells will enable more accurate health risk assessments. A surrogate human hematopoietic lineage can be established in NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mice by transplanting human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (Hu-NOG mice). Here, we first evaluated the toxic response of human-like hematopoietic lineage in NOG mice to a representative toxic agent, benzene. Flow cytometric analysis showed that benzene caused a significant decrease in the number of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in the bone marrow and the number of human leukocytes in the peripheral blood and hematopoietic organs. Next, we established chimeric mice by transplanting C57BL/6 mouse-derived bone marrow cells into NOG mice (Mo-NOG mice). A comparison of the degree of benzene-induced hematotoxicity in donor-derived hematopoietic lineage cells within Mo-NOG mice indicated that the toxic response of Hu-NOG mice reflected interspecies differences in susceptibilities to benzene. Responses to the toxic effects of benzene were greater in lymphoid cells than in myeloid cells in Mo-NOG and Hu-NOG mice. These findings suggested that Hu-NOG mice may be a powerful in vivo tool for assessing hematotoxicity in humans, while accounting for interspecies differences. PMID:23226520

  12. Transduction of human NOD/SCID-repopulating cells with both lymphoid and myeloid potential by foamy virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Josephson, Neil C.; Vassilopoulos, George; Trobridge, Grant D.; Priestley, Greg V.; Wood, Brent L.; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Russell, David W.

    2002-01-01

    The efficiency of gene transfer into human hematopoietic stem cells by oncoretroviral vectors is too low for effective gene therapy of most hematologic diseases. Retroviral vectors based on the nonpathogenic foamy viruses (FV) are an alternative gene-transfer system. In this study, human umbilical cord blood CD34+ cells were transduced with FV vectors by a single 10-h exposure to vector stocks and then injected into sublethally irradiated nonobese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. At 5–7 weeks after transplantation, high transgene expression rates were observed in engrafted human hematopoietic cells, including over 60% of clonogenic progenitors. Significant transgene silencing did not occur. We developed an approach for expanding human cell populations derived from transplanted mice to show that multiple SCID repopulating cells (SRCs) had been transduced, including some that were capable of both lymphoid and myeloid differentiation. These findings demonstrate for the first time that human pluripotent (lympho-myeloid) hematopoietic stem cells repopulate NOD/SCID mice and can be efficiently transduced by FV vectors. PMID:12060773

  13. Aberrant Myeloid Differentiation Contributes to the Development of Osteoporosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Steven D; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also known as von Recklinghausen disease, is a common autosomal dominant genetic disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3000 individuals worldwide. NF1 results from heritable or spontaneous mutations of the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. NF1 encodes the protein neurofibromin, which functions to negatively regulate Ras-activity. Approximately 50 % of NF1 patients develop osteopenia or osteoporosis, resulting in significantly increased rates of long-bone fracture and morbidity. While defective osteoblast bone anabolism has been implicated as a central factor in the pathogenesis of NF1 associated skeletal deficits, recent data suggest that NF1 (Nf1) haploinsufficiency within the hematopoietic compartment, particularly in osteoclasts and myeloid progenitors, plays a pivotal role in engendering NF1 osseous manifestations. In this chapter, we review the latest data from clinical studies and murine models delineating a critical role for hematopoietic compartment, myeloid progenitors of NF1 (Nf1) haploinsufficient and their progeny-osteoclasts, in the pathogenesis of NF1 associated osteopenia/osteoporosis and discuss putative targets for future therapeutics. PMID:26932441

  14. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy.

    PubMed

    Wang, L D; Rao, T N; Rowe, R G; Nguyen, P T; Sullivan, J L; Pearson, D S; Doulatov, S; Wu, L; Lindsley, R C; Zhu, H; DeAngelo, D J; Daley, G Q; Wagers, A J

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration and tumor progression. Dysregulated MC development leads to systemic mastocytosis (SM), a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused MC accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-MC progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced MC specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced MCs appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of MC terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human MC leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal MCs from patients with SM. This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in MC disease. PMID:25655194

  15. The role of Lin28b in myeloid and mast cell differentiation and mast cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leo D.; Rao, Tata Nageswara; Rowe, R. Grant; Nguyen, Phi T.; Sullivan, Jessica L.; Pearson, Daniel S.; Doulatov, Sergei; Wu, Linwei; Lindsley, R. Coleman; Zhu, Hao; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Daley, George Q.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are critical components of the innate immune system and important for host defense, allergy, autoimmunity, tissue regeneration, and tumor progression. Dysregulated mast cell development leads to systemic mastocytosis, a clinically variable but often devastating family of hematologic disorders. Here we report that induced expression of Lin28, a heterochronic gene and pluripotency factor implicated in driving a fetal hematopoietic program, caused mast cell accumulation in adult mice in target organs such as the skin and peritoneal cavity. In vitro assays revealed a skewing of myeloid commitment in LIN28B-expressing hematopoietic progenitors, with increased levels of LIN28B in common myeloid and basophil-mast cell progenitors altering gene expression patterns to favor cell fate choices that enhanced mast cell specification. In addition, LIN28B-induced mast cells appeared phenotypically and functionally immature, and in vitro assays suggested a slowing of mast cell terminal differentiation in the context of LIN28B upregulation. Finally, interrogation of human mast cell leukemia samples revealed upregulation of LIN28B in abnormal mast cells from patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). This work identifies Lin28 as a novel regulator of innate immune function and a new protein of interest in mast cell disease. PMID:25655194

  16. [The hematopoietic stem cell niche].

    PubMed

    Kunisaki, Yuya

    2015-10-01

    Somatic stem cells self-renew to maintain tissue homeostasis for the lifetime of organisms through tightly controlled proliferation and differentiation. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are essentially required for hematopoietic homeostasis. Therefore, they not only ensure lifelong replenishment of all blood lineages, but also maintain a constant pool. Cell cycle quiescence is a critical feature contributing to stem cell maintenance. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of bone marrow (BM) microenvironments that regulate HSC functions (HSC niches). In the HSC field, there has been considerable interest and debate regarding whether or not quiescence and proliferation of HSCs is regulated by distinct niches. Previous reports suggest that quiescent HSCs reside near osteoblasts in the BM whereas actively cycling HSCs are found near sinusoids. However, this popular concept has not been supported by rigorous analyses. To gain more insight into the spatial localization of HSCs, we have developed a whole-mount staining technique that allows precise measurements of 3D distances of HSCs from structures and allows computational simulation to define the significance of these interactions. This novel approach has allowed us to uncover two distinct types of vessels associated with quiescent and proliferating HSCs and to underscore the importance of arteriolar vessels for stem cell quiescence. We will discuss the crosstalk between the two hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells with a review of the recent literature. PMID:26458426

  17. Characterizing the human hematopoietic CDome

    PubMed Central

    Barnkob, Mike Stein; Simon, Christian; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we performed extensive semi-automated data collection from the primary and secondary literature in an effort to characterize the expression of all membrane proteins within the CD scheme on hematopoietic cells. Utilizing over 6000 data points across 305 CD molecules on 206 cell types, we seek to give a preliminary characterization of the “human hematopoietic CDome.” We encountered severe gaps in the knowledge of CD protein expression, mostly resulting from incomplete and unstructured data generation, which we argue inhibit both basic research as well as therapies seeking to target membrane proteins. We detail these shortcomings and propose strategies to overcome these issues. Analyzing the available data, we explore the functional characteristics of the CD molecules both individually and across the groups of hematopoietic cells on which they are expressed. We compare protein and mRNA data for a subset of CD molecules, and explore cell functions in the context of CD protein expression. We find that the presence and function of CD molecules serve as good indicators for the overall function of the cells that express them, suggesting that increasing our knowledge about the cellular CDome may serve to stratify cells on a more functional level. PMID:25309582

  18. Deficiency of the ribosome biogenesis gene Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells causes neutropenia in mice by attenuating lineage progression in myelocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zambetti, Noemi A.; Bindels, Eric M. J.; Van Strien, Paulina M. H.; Valkhof, Marijke G.; Adisty, Maria N.; Hoogenboezem, Remco M.; Sanders, Mathijs A.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Touw, Ivo P.; Raaijmakers, Marc H. G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome is a congenital bone marrow failure disorder characterized by debilitating neutropenia. The disease is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the SBDS gene, implicated in ribosome biogenesis, but the cellular and molecular events driving cell specific phenotypes in ribosomopathies remain poorly defined. Here, we established what is to our knowledge the first mammalian model of neutropenia in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome through targeted downregulation of Sbds in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells expressing the myeloid transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (Cebpa). Sbds deficiency in the myeloid lineage specifically affected myelocytes and their downstream progeny while, unexpectedly, it was well tolerated by rapidly cycling hematopoietic progenitor cells. Molecular insights provided by massive parallel sequencing supported cellular observations of impaired cell cycle exit and formation of secondary granules associated with the defect of myeloid lineage progression in myelocytes. Mechanistically, Sbds deficiency activated the p53 tumor suppressor pathway and induced apoptosis in these cells. Collectively, the data reveal a previously unanticipated, selective dependency of myelocytes and downstream progeny, but not rapidly cycling progenitors, on this ubiquitous ribosome biogenesis protein, thus providing a cellular basis for the understanding of myeloid lineage biased defects in Shwachman-Diamond syndrome. PMID:26185170

  19. The Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (TET2) gene in hematopoiesis and hematopoietic diseases.

    PubMed

    Solary, E; Bernard, O A; Tefferi, A; Fuks, F; Vainchenker, W

    2014-03-01

    Ten-Eleven Translocation-2 (TET2) inactivation through loss-of-function mutation, deletion and IDH1/2 (Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and 2) gene mutation is a common event in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies. TET2 gene mutations similar to those observed in myeloid and lymphoid malignancies also accumulate with age in otherwise healthy subjects with clonal hematopoiesis. TET2 is one of the three proteins of the TET (Ten-Eleven Translocation) family, which are evolutionarily conserved dioxygenases that catalyze the conversion of 5-methyl-cytosine (5-mC) to 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-hmC) and promote DNA demethylation. TET dioxygenases require 2-oxoglutarate, oxygen and Fe(II) for their activity, which is enhanced in the presence of ascorbic acid. TET2 is the most expressed TET gene in the hematopoietic tissue, especially in hematopoietic stem cells. In addition to their hydroxylase activity, TET proteins recruit the O-linked β-D-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) enzyme to chromatin, which promotes post-transcriptional modifications of histones and facilitates gene expression. The TET2 level is regulated by interaction with IDAX, originating from TET2 gene fission during evolution, and by the microRNA miR-22. TET2 has pleiotropic roles during hematopoiesis, including stem-cell self-renewal, lineage commitment and terminal differentiation of monocytes. Analysis of Tet2 knockout mice, which are viable and fertile, demonstrated that Tet2 functions as a tumor suppressor whose haploinsufficiency initiates myeloid and lymphoid transformations. This review summarizes the recently identified TET2 physiological and pathological functions and discusses how this knowledge influences our therapeutic approaches in hematological malignancies and possibly other tumor types. PMID:24220273

  20. Ethanol exhibits specificity in its effects on differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhou, Huijuan; Chervenak, Robert; Moscatello, Kim M.; Brunson, Lee Ellen; Chervenak, Deborah C.; Wolcott, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol is a known teratogen but the mechanisms by which this simple compound affects fetal development remain unresolved. The goal of the current study was to determine the mechanism by which ethanol affects lymphoid differentiation using an in vitro model of ethanol exposure. Primitive hematopoietic oligoclonal neonatal progenitor cells (ONP), with the phenotype Lin−HSAloCD43loSca-1−c-Kit+ that are present in neonatal but not adult bone marrow were sorted from the bone marrow of 2-week-old C57BL/6J mice and cultured under conditions that favor either B cell or myeloid cell differentiation with or without addition of ethanol. The overall growth of the ONP cells was not significantly affected by inclusion of up to 100mM ethanol in the culture medium. However, the differentiation of the progenitor cells along the B-cell pathway was significantly impaired by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. Exposure of ONP cells to 100mM ethanol resulted in greater than 95% inhibition of B cell differentiation. Conversely, ethanol concentrations up to and including 100mM had no significant effect on differentiation along the myeloid pathway. The effect of ethanol on transcription factor expression was consistent with the effects on differentiation. ONP cells grown in 100mM ethanol failed to up-regulate Pax5 and EBF, transcriptional regulators that are necessary for B cell development. However, ethanol had no significant effect on the up-regulation of PU.1, a transcription factor that, when expressed in high concentration, favors myeloid cell development. Taken together, these results suggest that ethanol has specificity in its effects on differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:18834972

  1. Angiotensin II Regulation of Proliferation, Differentiation, and Engraftment of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seungbum; Zingler, Michael; Harrison, Jeffrey K; Scott, Edward W; Cogle, Christopher R; Luo, Defang; Raizada, Mohan K

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that differentiation and mobilization of hematopoietic cell are critical in the development and establishment of hypertension and hypertension-linked vascular pathophysiology. This, coupled with the intimate involvement of the hyperactive renin-angiotensin system in hypertension, led us to investigate the hypothesis that chronic angiotensin II (Ang II) infusion affects hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regulation at the level of the bone marrow. Ang II infusion resulted in increases in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (83%) and long-term HSC (207%) in the bone marrow. Interestingly, increases of HSCs and long-term HSCs were more pronounced in the spleen (228% and 1117%, respectively). Furthermore, we observed higher expression of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 in these HSCs, indicating there was increased myeloid differentiation in Ang II-infused mice. This was associated with accumulation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2(+) proinflammatory monocytes in the spleen. In contrast, decreased engraftment efficiency of GFP(+) HSC was observed after Ang II infusion. Time-lapse in vivo imaging and in vitro Ang II pretreatment demonstrated that Ang II induces untimely proliferation and differentiation of the donor HSC resulting in diminished HSC engraftment and bone marrow reconstitution. We conclude that (1) chronic Ang II infusion regulates HSC proliferation, mediated by angiotensin receptor type 1a, (2) Ang II accelerates HSC to myeloid differentiation resulting in accumulation of C-C chemokine receptor type 2(+) HSCs and inflammatory monocytes in the spleen, and (3) Ang II impairs homing and reconstitution potentials of the donor HSCs. These observations highlight the important regulatory roles of Ang II on HSC proliferation, differentiation, and engraftment. PMID:26781279

  2. Chronic myeloid leukemia with monoclonal gammopathy terminating in myeloid crisis and immunoblastic lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Larocca, L M; Zollino, M; Carbone, A; Eboli, M L; Mango, G; Leone, G

    1989-04-30

    A patient, with chronic myeloid leukemia and IgA monoclonal gammopathy, who contemporaneously developed myeloid blast crisis and immunoblastic lymphoma is reported. Cytogenetic studies showed complex chromosome abnormalities concerning chromosomes 8, 14 and 22, other than the Ph chromosome. A possible relationship between the emergence of immunoblasts from slow proliferating lymphoplasmacytoid cells, myeloid blasts crisis and chromosomal changes is discussed. PMID:2741214

  3. Cohesin mutations in myeloid malignancies: underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recently, whole genome sequencing approaches have pinpointed mutations in genes that were previously not associated with cancer. For Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML), and other myeloid disorders, these approaches revealed a high prevalence of mutations in genes encoding the chromosome cohesion complex, cohesin. Cohesin mutations represent a novel genetic pathway for AML, but how AML arises from these mutations is unknown. This review will explore the potential mechanisms by which cohesin mutations contribute to AML and other myeloid malignancies. PMID:24904756

  4. Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in the Developing World: Experience from a Center in Western India

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chirag A.; Karanwal, Arun; Desai, Maharshi; Pandya, Munjal; Shah, Ravish; Shah, Rutvij

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience of first 50 consecutive hematopoietic stem-cell transplants (HSCT) done between 2007 and 2012 at the Apollo Hospital, Gandhinagar, 35 autologous HSCT and 15 allogeneic HSCT. Indications for autologous transplant were multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and acute myeloid leukemia, and indications for allogeneic transplants were thalassemia major, aplastic anaemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukaemia. The median age of autologous and allogeneic patient's cohort was 50 years and 21 years, respectively. Median follow-up period for all patients was 39 months. Major early complications were infections, mucositis, acute graft versus host disease, and venoocclusive disease. All of our allogeneic and autologous transplant patients survived during the first month of transplant. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 20% (N = 3) in our allogeneic and 3% (N = 1) in autologous patients. Causes of these deaths were disease relapse, sepsis, hemorrhagic complications, and GVHD. 46% of our autologous and 47% of our allogeneic patients are in complete remission phase after a median follow-up of 39 months. 34% of our autologous patients and 13% of our allogeneic patients had disease relapse. Overall survival rate in our autologous and allogeneic patients is 65.7% and 57.1%, respectively. Our results are comparable to many national and international published reports. PMID:25722722

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: a focus on hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Nishihori, Taiga; Mahfouz, Rami A; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2013-07-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is an exceedingly rare disorder categorized under acute myeloid leukemia by the World Health Organization. Phenotypically, malignant cells coexpress CD4(+) and CD56(+) without coexpressing common lymphoid or myeloid lineage markers. BPDCN frequently expresses CD123, TCL1, BDCA-2, and CD2AP. Restriction of CD2AP expression to plasmacytoid dendritic cells makes it a useful tool to help confirm diagnosis. Clonal complex chromosome aberrations are described in two-thirds of cases. Eighty percent of BPDCN cases present with nonspecific dermatological manifestations, prompting inclusion in the differential diagnosis of atypical skin rashes refractory to standard treatment. Prognosis is poor, with a median survival of less than 18 months. No prospective randomized data exist to define the most optimal frontline chemotherapy. Current practice considers acute myeloid leukemia-like or acute lymphoblastic leukemia-like regimens acceptable for induction treatment. Unfortunately, responses are short-lived, with second remissions difficult to achieve, underscoring the need to consider hematopoietic cell transplantation early in the disease course. Allografting, especially if offered in first remission, can result in long-term remissions. Preclinical data suggest a potential role for immunomodulatory agents in BPCDN. However, further research efforts are needed to better understand BPDCN biology and to establish evidence-based treatment algorithms that might ultimately improve overall prognosis of this disease. PMID:23396213

  6. Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the developing world: experience from a center in Western India.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag A; Karanwal, Arun; Desai, Maharshi; Pandya, Munjal; Shah, Ravish; Shah, Rutvij

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience of first 50 consecutive hematopoietic stem-cell transplants (HSCT) done between 2007 and 2012 at the Apollo Hospital, Gandhinagar, 35 autologous HSCT and 15 allogeneic HSCT. Indications for autologous transplant were multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and acute myeloid leukemia, and indications for allogeneic transplants were thalassemia major, aplastic anaemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukaemia. The median age of autologous and allogeneic patient's cohort was 50 years and 21 years, respectively. Median follow-up period for all patients was 39 months. Major early complications were infections, mucositis, acute graft versus host disease, and venoocclusive disease. All of our allogeneic and autologous transplant patients survived during the first month of transplant. Transplant related mortality (TRM) was 20% (N = 3) in our allogeneic and 3% (N = 1) in autologous patients. Causes of these deaths were disease relapse, sepsis, hemorrhagic complications, and GVHD. 46% of our autologous and 47% of our allogeneic patients are in complete remission phase after a median follow-up of 39 months. 34% of our autologous patients and 13% of our allogeneic patients had disease relapse. Overall survival rate in our autologous and allogeneic patients is 65.7% and 57.1%, respectively. Our results are comparable to many national and international published reports. PMID:25722722

  7. Cohesin loss alters adult hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis, leading to myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Mullenders, Jasper; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lhoumaud, Priscillia; Keller, Matthew; Pae, Juhee; Wang, Kun; Kayembe, Clarisse; Rocha, Pedro P.; Raviram, Ramya; Gong, Yixiao; Premsrirut, Prem K.; Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Bonneau, Richard; Skok, Jane A.; Cimmino, Luisa; Hoehn, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The cohesin complex (consisting of Rad21, Smc1a, Smc3, and Stag2 proteins) is critically important for proper sister chromatid separation during mitosis. Mutations in the cohesin complex were recently identified in a variety of human malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To address the potential tumor-suppressive function of cohesin in vivo, we generated a series of shRNA mouse models in which endogenous cohesin can be silenced inducibly. Notably, silencing of cohesin complex members did not have a deleterious effect on cell viability. Furthermore, knockdown of cohesin led to gain of replating capacity of mouse hematopoietic progenitor cells. However, cohesin silencing in vivo rapidly altered stem cells homeostasis and myelopoiesis. Likewise, we found widespread changes in chromatin accessibility and expression of genes involved in myelomonocytic maturation and differentiation. Finally, aged cohesin knockdown mice developed a clinical picture closely resembling myeloproliferative disorders/neoplasms (MPNs), including varying degrees of extramedullary hematopoiesis (myeloid metaplasia) and splenomegaly. Our results represent the first successful demonstration of a tumor suppressor function for the cohesin complex, while also confirming that cohesin mutations occur as an early event in leukemogenesis, facilitating the potential development of a myeloid malignancy. PMID:26438359

  8. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  9. Delineation of human cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cell subsets with a unique monoclonal antibody AY19.

    PubMed

    Abadie-Fauconnier, L; Carosella, E D; Gluckman, E; Mansur, I G; Menier, C; Boumsell, L; Bensussan, A

    1998-05-01

    AY19, a unique mAb was used to better characterize the umbilical cord blood hematopoietic progenitor subpopulations. This mAb identifies an 85 kDa cell surface glycoprotein. In this present study we showed that AY19 mAb is reactive with 50-60% of the CD34+ cord blood cells. Extensive phenotypical studies revealed that AY19 mAb defines a novel CD34+ subset different from the ones defined by anti-CD90, anti-CD38, anti-CD33, anti-CD71, anti-CD19, anti-CD7 or anti-HLA-DR mAbs. We show that AY19 mAb reacts with both primitive and committed progenitors including myeloid and lymphoid progenitors. In addition, sorted CD34+high/AY19+ cells contain an increased number of CFU-GM and a decreased number of BFU-E compared with sorted CD34+high/AY19- cells. We show that AY19 mAb exhibits agonistic properties by inducing a significant increase in the size of CFU-GM colonies when added to serum-free liquid cultures of hematopoietic progenitors. This suggests that AY19 mAb identifies a cell surface receptor which may be involved in the regulation of hematopoietic cell proliferation. PMID:9672150

  10. HOXB4 enforces equivalent fates of ES-cell-derived and adult hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Pilat, Sandra; Carotta, Sebastian; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Kamino, Kenji; Mairhofer, Andreas; Will, Elke; Modlich, Ute; Steinlein, Peter; Ostertag, Wolfram; Baum, Christopher; Beug, Hartmut; Klump, Hannes

    2005-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is an important tool for experimental and clinical applied hematology. However, techniques that allow for gene targeting, subsequent in vitro selection, and expansion of genetically defined clones are available only for ES cells. Such molecularly defined and, hence, “safe” clones would be highly desirable for somatic gene therapy. Here, we demonstrate that in vitro differentiated ES cells completely recapitulate the growth and differentiation properties of adult bone marrow cells, in vitro and in vivo, when ectopically expressing HOXB4. Myeloid development was enforced and (T) lymphoid development suppressed over a wide range of expression levels, whereas only high expression levels of the transcription factor were detrimental for erythroid development. This indicates a close association between the amounts of ectopic HOXB4 present within a progenitor cell and and the decision to self renew or differentiate. Because HOXB4 mediates similar fates of ES-derived and bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells, the primitive embryonic cells can be considered a promising alternative for investigating hematopoietic reconstitution, in vivo, based on well defined clones. Provided that HOXB4 levels are kept within a certain therapeutic window, ES cells also carry the potential of efficient and safe somatic gene therapy. PMID:16093308

  11. Association of acute myeloid leukemia's most immature phenotype with risk groups and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Jonathan M; Zeidner, Joshua F; Morse, Sarah; Blackford, Amanda L; Perkins, Brandy; Yanagisawa, Breann; Zhang, Hao; Morsberger, Laura; Karp, Judith; Ning, Yi; Gocke, Christopher D; Rosner, Gary L; Smith, B Douglas; Jones, Richard J

    2016-05-01

    The precise phenotype and biology of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells remain controversial, in part because the "gold standard" immunodeficient mouse engraftment assay fails in a significant fraction of patients and identifies multiple cell-types in others. We sought to analyze the clinical utility of a novel assay for putative leukemia stem cells in a large prospective cohort. The leukemic clone's most primitive hematopoietic cellular phenotype was prospectively identified in 109 newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia patients, and analyzed against clinical risk groups and outcomes. Most (80/109) patients harbored CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells in 47 of the 80 patients displayed intermediate aldehyde dehydrogenase expression, while normal CD34(+)CD38(-) hematopoietic stem cells expressed high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase. In the other 33/80 patients, the CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells exhibited high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and most (28/33, 85%) harbored poor-risk cytogenetics or FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 internal tandem translocations. No CD34(+) leukemia cells could be detected in 28/109 patients, including 14/21 patients with nucleophosmin-1 mutations and 6/7 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. The patients with CD34(+)CD38(-) leukemia cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity manifested a significantly lower complete remission rate, as well as poorer event-free and overall survivals. The leukemic clone's most immature phenotype was heterogeneous with respect to CD34, CD38, and ALDH expression, but correlated with acute myeloid leukemia risk groups and outcomes. The strong clinical correlations suggest that the most immature phenotype detectable in the leukemia might serve as a biomarker for "clinically-relevant" leukemia stem cells. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01349972. PMID:26819054

  12. BCR-ABL1-Associated Reduction of Beta Catenin Antagonist Chibby1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Aluigi, Michela; Luatti, Simona; Castagnetti, Fausto; Testoni, Nicoletta; Soverini, Simona; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Beta Catenin signaling is critical for the self-renewal of leukemic stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia. It is driven by multiple events, enhancing beta catenin stability and promoting its transcriptional co-activating function. We investigated the impact of BCR-ABL1 on Chibby1, a beta catenin antagonist involved in cell differentiation and transformation. Relative proximity of the Chibby1 encoding gene (C22orf2) on chromosome 22q12 to the BCR breakpoint (22q11) lets assume its involvement in beta catenin activation in chronic myeloid leukemia as a consequence of deletions of distal BCR sequences encompassing one C22orf2 allele. Forty patients with chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase were analyzed for C22orf2 relocation and Chibby1 expression. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses established that the entire C22orf2 follows BCR regardless of chromosomes involved in the translocation. In differentiated hematopoietic progenitors (bone marrow mononuclear cell fractions) of 30/40 patients, the expression of Chibby1 protein was reduced below 50% of the reference value (peripheral blood mononuclear cell fractions of healthy persons). In such cell context, Chibby1 protein reduction is not dependent on C22orf2 transcriptional downmodulation; however, it is strictly dependent upon BCR-ABL1 expression because it was not observed at the moment of major molecular response under tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. Moreover, it was not correlated with the disease prognosis or response to therapy. Most importantly, a remarkable Chibby1 reduction was apparent in a putative BCR-ABL1+ leukemic stem cell compartment identified by a CD34+ phenotype compared to more differentiated hematopoietic progenitors. In CD34+ cells, Chibby1 reduction arises from transcriptional events and is driven by C22orf2 promoter hypermethylation. These results advance low Chibby1 expression associated with BCR-ABL1 as a component of beta catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells. PMID:24339928

  13. Chemopreventive Effects of Dietary Eicosapentaenoic Acid Supplementation in Experimental Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Finch, Emily R; Kudva, Avinash K; Quickel, Michael D; Goodfield, Laura L; Kennett, Mary J; Whelan, Jay; Paulson, Robert F; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2015-10-01

    Current therapies for treatment of myeloid leukemia do not eliminate leukemia stem cells (LSC), leading to disease relapse. In this study, we supplemented mice with eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5), a polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acid, at pharmacologic levels, to examine whether the endogenous metabolite, cyclopentenone prostaglandin delta-12 PGJ3 (Δ(12)-PGJ3), was effective in targeting LSCs in experimental leukemia. EPA supplementation for 8 weeks resulted in enhanced endogenous production of Δ(12)-PGJ3 that was blocked by indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor. Using a murine model of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) induced by bone marrow transplantation of BCR-ABL-expressing hematopoietic stem cells, mice supplemented with EPA showed a decrease in the LSC population, and reduced splenomegaly and leukocytosis, when compared with mice on an oleic acid diet. Supplementation of CML mice carrying the T315I mutation (in BCR-ABL) with EPA resulted in a similar effect. Indomethacin blocked the EPA effect and increased the severity of BCR-ABL-induced CML and decreased apoptosis. Δ(12)-PGJ3 rescued indomethacin-treated BCR-ABL mice and decreased LSCs. Inhibition of hematopoietic-prostaglandin D synthase (H-PGDS) by HQL-79 in EPA-supplemented CML mice also blocked the effect of EPA. In addition, EPA supplementation was effective in a murine model of acute myeloid leukemia. EPA-supplemented mice exhibited a decrease in leukemia burden and a decrease in the LSC colony-forming unit (LSC-CFU). The decrease in LSCs was confirmed through serial transplantation assays in all disease models. The results support a chemopreventive role for EPA in myeloid leukemia, which is dependent on the ability to efficiently convert EPA to endogenous COX-derived prostanoids, including Δ(12)-PGJ3. PMID:26290393

  14. Rapid myeloid recovery as a possible mechanism of whole-body radioadaptive response.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Koana, Takao; Tomita, Masanori; Ogata, Hiromitsu; Tauchi, Hiroshi

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism underlying the radioadaptive response that rescues mice from hematopoietic failure. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with low-dose acute X rays (0.5 Gy) for priming 2 weeks prior to a high-dose (6 Gy) challenge irradiation. Bone marrow cells, erythrocytes and platelets in low-dose-preirradiated mice showed earlier recovery after the challenge irradiation than those in mice subjected only to the challenge irradiation. This suggests that hematopoiesis is enhanced after a challenge irradiation in preirradiated mice. The rapid recovery of bone marrow cells after the challenge irradiation was consistent with the proliferation of hematopoietic progenitors expressing the cell surface markers Lin-, Sca-1- and c-Kit+ in low-dose-preirradiated mice. A subpopulation of myeloid (Mac-1+/Gr-1+) cells, which were descendants of Lin-, Sca-1- and c-Kit+ cells, rapidly recovered in the bone marrow of low-dose-preirradiated mice, whereas the number of B-lymphoid (CD19+/B220+) cells did not show a statistically significant increase. Plasma cytokine profiles were analyzed using antibody arrays, and results indicated that the concentrations of several growth factors for myelopoiesis after the challenge irradiation were considerably increased by low-dose preirradiation. The rapid recovery of erythrocytes and platelets but not leukocytes was observed in the peripheral blood of preirradiated mice, suggesting that low-dose preirradiation triggered the differentiation to myelopoiesis. Thus the adaptive response induced by low-dose preirradiation in terms of the recovery kinetics of the number of hematopoietic cells may be due to the rapid recovery of the number of myeloid cells after high-dose irradiation. PMID:18763856

  15. Aging-like Phenotype and Defective Lineage Specification in SIRT1-Deleted Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Bigarella, Carolina L.; Liang, Raymond; Izac, Brigitte; Dieguez-Gonzalez, Rebeca; Barbet, Gaetan; Donovan, Michael; Brugnara, Carlo; Blander, Julie M.; Sinclair, David A.; Ghaffari, Saghi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aging hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit defective lineage specification that is thought to be central to increased incidence of myeloid malignancies and compromised immune competence in the elderly. Mechanisms underlying these age-related defects remain largely unknown. We show that the deacetylase Sirtuin (SIRT)1 is required for homeostatic HSC maintenance. Differentiation of young SIRT1-deleted HSCs is skewed toward myeloid lineage associated with a significant decline in the lymphoid compartment, anemia, and altered expression of associated genes. Combined with HSC accumulation of damaged DNA and expression patterns of age-linked molecules, these have striking overlaps with aged HSCs. We further show that SIRT1 controls HSC homeostasis via the longevity transcription factor FOXO3. These findings suggest that SIRT1 is essential for HSC homeostasis and lineage specification. They also indicate that SIRT1 might contribute to delaying HSC aging. PMID:25068121

  16. Targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Rosenblat, Todd L

    2014-01-01

    Because alpha-particles have a shorter range and a higher linear energy transfer (LET) compared with beta-particles, targeted alpha-particle immunotherapy offers the potential for more efficient tumor cell killing while sparing surrounding normal cells. To date, clinical studies of alpha-particle immunotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have focused on the myeloid cell surface antigen CD33 as a target using the humanized monoclonal antibody lintuzumab. An initial phase I study demonstrated the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of bismuth-213 ((213)Bi)-labeled lintuzumab. In a subsequent study, (213)Bi-lintuzumab produced remissions in some patients with AML after partial cytoreduction with cytarabine, suggesting the utility of targeted alpha-particle therapy for small-volume disease. The widespread use of (213)Bi, however, is limited by its short half-life. Therefore, a second-generation construct containing actinium-225 ((225)Ac), a radiometal that generates four alpha-particle emissions, was developed. A phase I trial demonstrated that (225)Ac-lintuzumab is safe at doses of 3 μCi/kg or less and has antileukemic activity across all dose levels studied. Fractionated-dose (225)Ac-lintuzumab in combination with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) is now under investigation for the management of older patients with untreated AML in a multicenter trial. Preclinical studies using (213)Bi- and astatine-211 ((211)At)-labeled anti-CD45 antibodies have shown that alpha-particle immunotherapy may be useful as part conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation. The use of novel pretargeting strategies may further improve target-to-normal organ dose ratios. PMID:24857092

  17. 3q26/EVI1 rearrangements in myeloid hemopathies: a cytogenetic review.

    PubMed

    De Braekeleer, Marc; Le Bris, Marie-Jose; De Braekeleer, Etienne; Basinko, Audrey; Morel, Frdric; Douet-Guilbert, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The EVI1 gene, located in chromosomal band 3q26, is a transcription factor that has stem cell-specific expression pattern and is essential for the regulation of self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells. It is now recognized as one of the dominant oncogenes associated with myeloid leukemia. EVI1 overexpression is associated with minimal to no response to chemotherapy and poor clinical outcome. Several chromosomal rearrangements involving band 3q26 are known to induce EVI1 overexpression. They are mainly found in acute myeloid leukemia and blastic phase of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia, more rarely in myelodysplastic syndromes. They include inv(3)(q21q26), t(3;3)(q21;q26), t(3;21)(q26;q22), t(3;12)(q26;p13) and t(2;3)(p15-23;q26). However, many other chromosomal rearrangements involving 3q26/EVI1 have been identified. The precise molecular event has not been elucidated in the majority of these chromosomal abnormalities and most gene partners remain unknown. PMID:26043219

  18. XIAP inhibitors induce differentiation and impair clonogenic capacity of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Etxabe, Amaia; Pratcorona, Marta; Tesi, Niccolò; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili; Urbano-Ispizua, Alvaro; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M

    2014-06-30

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a neoplasia characterized by the rapid expansion of immature myeloid blasts in the bone marrow, and marked by poor prognosis and frequent relapse. As such, new therapeutic approaches are required for remission induction and prevention of relapse. Due to the higher chemotherapy sensitivity and limited life span of more differentiated AML blasts, differentiation-based therapies are a promising therapeutic approach. Based on public available gene expression profiles, a myeloid-specific differentiation-associated gene expression pattern was defined as the therapeutic target. A XIAP inhibitor (Dequalinium chloride, DQA) was identified in an in silico screening searching for small molecules that induce similar gene expression regulation. Treatment with DQA, similarly to Embelin (another XIAP inhibitor), induced cytotoxicity and differentiation in AML. XIAP inhibition differentially impaired cell viability of the most primitive AML blasts and reduced clonogenic capacity of AML cells, sparing healthy mature blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that XIAP constitutes a potential target for AML treatment and support the evaluation of XIAP inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:24952669

  19. XIAP inhibitors induce differentiation and impair clonogenic capacity of acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Martínez, Daniel; Nomdedeu, Meritxell; Lara-Castillo, María Carmen; Etxabe, Amaia; Pratcorona, Marta; Tesi, Niccolò; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Rozman, María; Montserrat, Emili; Urbano-Ispizua, Álvaro; Esteve, Jordi; Risueño, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a neoplasia characterized by the rapid expansion of immature myeloid blasts in the bone marrow, and marked by poor prognosis and frequent relapse. As such, new therapeutic approaches are required for remission induction and prevention of relapse. Due to the higher chemotherapy sensitivity and limited life span of more differentiated AML blasts, differentiation-based therapies are a promising therapeutic approach. Based on public available gene expression profiles, a myeloid-specific differentiation-associated gene expression pattern was defined as the therapeutic target. A XIAP inhibitor (Dequalinium chloride, DQA) was identified in an in silico screening searching for small molecules that induce similar gene expression regulation. Treatment with DQA, similarly to Embelin (another XIAP inhibitor), induced cytotoxicity and differentiation in AML. XIAP inhibition differentially impaired cell viability of the most primitive AML blasts and reduced clonogenic capacity of AML cells, sparing healthy mature blood and hematopoietic stem cells. Taken together, these results suggest that XIAP constitutes a potential target for AML treatment and support the evaluation of XIAP inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:24952669

  20. Neurofibromin Deficient Myeloid Cells are Critical Mediators of Aneurysm Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fang; Downing, Brandon D.; Smiley, Lucy C.; Mund, Julie A.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Sarchet, Kara N.; Hinds, Daniel M.; Kamendulis, Lisa M.; Hingtgen, Cynthia M.; Case, Jamie; Clapp, D. Wade; Conway, Simon J.; Stansfield, Brian K.; Ingram, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder resulting from mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity in circulating hematopoietic and vascular wall cells, which are critical for maintaining vessel wall homeostasis. NF1 patients have evidence of chronic inflammation resulting in development of premature cardiovascular disease, including arterial aneurysms, which may manifest as sudden death. However, the molecular pathogenesis of NF1 aneurysm formation is unknown. Method and Results Utilizing an angiotensin II-induced aneurysm model, we demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) enhanced aneurysm formation with myeloid cell infiltration and increased oxidative stress in the vessel wall. Using lineage-restricted transgenic mice, we show loss of a single Nf1 allele in myeloid cells is sufficient to recapitulate the Nf1+/− aneurysm phenotype in vivo. Finally, oral administration of simvastatin or the antioxidant apocynin, reduced aneurysm formation in Nf1+/− mice. Conclusion These data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that Nf1+/− myeloid cells are the cellular triggers for aneurysm formation in a novel model of NF1 vasculopathy and provide a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24370551

  1. Splenic myeloid metaplasia, histiocytosis, and hypersplenism in the dog (65 cases).

    PubMed

    Spangler, W L; Kass, P H

    1999-11-01

    Splenectomy specimens from 65 dogs with severe, diffuse, sustained, and progressive splenomegaly were examined. The clinical signs, hematology, and serum chemistry values in for the dogs were not useful diagnostic features. Microscopic changes in the spleens were distinctive and consisted of 1) myeloid metaplasia, 2) histiocytosis, 3) erythrophagocytosis, and 4) thrombosis with segmental infarction. Ultrastructural features suggested proliferative changes in the splenic reticular cells and macrophages (reticular meshwork) that described a continuum from reactive changes associated with immunologic damage of erythrocytes to neoplastic proliferation of histiocytic components. Thirty percent of the dogs survived 12 months. Approximately one half (53%) of the dogs with complete postmortem evaluations showed multiorgan involvement with a tissue distribution and cell morphology consistent with histiocytic neoplasia. For the remaining dogs (47%), only splenic pathology was consistently present, and a specific cause of death was often not evident. Distinctive histologic changes in the splenic tissues-including mitotic activity, erythrophagocytosis, giant cell formation, thrombosis/ infarction, and the proportion and distribution of histiocytic and hematopoietic cells-were statistically evaluated for prognostic relevance. The presence of giant cells was the only reliable prognostic feature, and that was indicative of a fatal outcome. These descriptive changes of myeloid metaplasia in the canine spleen are compared with the human clinical and pathologic syndromes of 1) agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, 2) hemophagocytic syndromes, and 3) hypersplenism. These diseases in humans produce histopathologic changes in the spleen that are similar to those observed in the canine splenic tissue we examined in this study. PMID:10568439

  2. Identification of hematopoietic-specific regulatory elements from the CD45 gene and use for lentiviral tracking of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Khanh L.; Das, Satyabrata; Yu, Shuyang; Barr, Jennifer Y.; Jena, Snehalata; Kim, Eunmi; Zavazava, Nicolas; Colgan, John D.; Xue, Hai-Hui; Levasseur, Dana N.

    2014-01-01

    The development of a hematopoietic reporter is crucial for determining the fate of lineages derived from cell-based therapies. A marking system will enable safer embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell-based derivation of blood lineages, and facilitate the development of efficient cellular reprogramming strategies based on direct fibroblast conversion. Here we report that the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is an ideal candidate gene on which to base a hematopoietic reporter. CD45 regulatory elements were discovered by analyzing transcription factor chromatin occupancy (ChIP-seq) and promoter nuclease sensitivity (DNase-seq) to identify minimally sufficient sequences required for expression. After cloning the CD45 regulatory elements into an attenuated lentiviral backbone, we found that two transcriptional initiation regions were essential for high-level expression. Expressing CD45 promoters containing these regions and tethered to GFP in a primary B cell differentiation assay and a transplantation model resulted in high levels of GFP in lymphoid, myeloid and nucleated erythroid cells in mouse and human blood cell lineages. Moreover, high GFP levels remained five months following secondary transplantation, indicating persistence of the reporter. No CD45 driven GFP expression is observed following fibroblast or ES cell transduction. The GFP reporter is seen only after ES cells differentiate into hematopoietic cell progenitors and lineages, suggesting that this hematopoietic reporter system could be useful in validating potential autologous blood cell therapies. PMID:24852660

  3. Identification of hematopoietic-specific regulatory elements from the CD45 gene and use for lentiviral tracking of transplanted cells.

    PubMed

    Duong, Khanh L; Das, Satyabrata; Yu, Shuyang; Barr, Jennifer Y; Jena, Snehalata; Kim, Eunmi; Zavazava, Nicolas; Colgan, John D; Xue, Hai-Hui; Levasseur, Dana N

    2014-09-01

    The development of a hematopoietic reporter is crucial for determining the fate of lineages derived from cell-based therapies. A marking system will enable safer embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cell-based derivation of blood lineages and facilitate the development of efficient cellular reprogramming strategies based on direct fibroblast conversion. Here we report that the protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is an ideal candidate gene on which to base a hematopoietic reporter. CD45 regulatory elements were discovered by analyzing transcription factor chromatin occupancy (ChIP-seq) and promoter nuclease sensitivity (DNase-seq) to identify minimally sufficient sequences required for expression. After cloning the CD45 regulatory elements into an attenuated lentiviral backbone, we found that two transcriptional initiation regions were essential for high-level expression. Expressing CD45 promoters containing these regions and tethered to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a primary B-cell differentiation assay and a transplantation model resulted in high levels of GFP in lymphoid, myeloid, and nucleated erythroid cells in mouse and human blood cell lineages. Moreover, GFP levels remained high 5 months after secondary transplantation, indicating persistence of the reporter. No CD45-driven GFP expression is observed after fibroblast or embryonic stem cell transduction. The GFP reporter is seen only after embryonic stem cells differentiate into hematopoietic cell progenitors and lineages, suggesting that this hematopoietic reporter system could be useful in validating potential autologous blood cell therapies. PMID:24852660

  4. Olive leaf components apigenin 7-glucoside and luteolin 7-glucoside direct human hematopoietic stem cell differentiation towards erythroid lineage.

    PubMed

    Samet, Imen; Villareal, Myra O; Motojima, Hideko; Han, Junkyu; Sayadi, Sami; Isoda, Hiroko

    2015-06-01

    The generation of blood cellular components from hematopoietic stem cells is important for the therapy of a broad spectrum of hematological disorders. In recent years, several lines of evidence suggested that certain nutrients, vitamins and flavonoids may have important roles in controlling the stem cell fate decision by maintaining their self-renewal or stimulating the lineage-specific differentiation. In this study, main olive leaf phytochemicals oleuropein (Olp), apigenin 7-glucoside (Api7G) and luteolin 7-glucoside (Lut7G) were investigated for their potential effects on hematopoietic stem cell differentiation using both phenotypic and molecular analysis. Oleuropein and the combination of the three compounds enhanced the differentiation of CD34+ cells into myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes progenitors and inhibited the commitment to megakaryocytic and erythroid lineages. Treatment with Lut7G stimulated both the erythroid and the myeloid differentiation, while treatment with Api7G specifically induced the differentiation of CD34+ cells towards the erythroid lineage and inhibited the myeloid differentiation. Erythroid differentiation induced by Api7G and Lut7G treatments was confirmed by the increase in hemoglobin genes expressions (α-hemoglobin, β-hemoglobin and γ-hemoglobin) and erythroid transcription factor GATA1 expression. As revealed by microarray analysis, the mechanisms underlying the erythroid differentiation-inducing effect of Api7G on hematopoietic stem cells involves the activation of JAK/STAT signaling pathway. These findings prove the differentiation-inducing effects of olive leaf compounds on hematopoietic stem cells and highlight their potential use in the ex vivo generation of blood cells. PMID:26299581

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia in the era of precision medicine: recent advances in diagnostic classification and risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Kansal, Rina

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a genetically heterogeneous myeloid malignancy that occurs more commonly in adults, and has an increasing incidence, most likely due to increasing age. Precise diagnostic classification of AML requires clinical and pathologic information, the latter including morphologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic and molecular genetic analysis. Risk stratification in AML requires cytogenetics evaluation as the most important predictor, with genetic mutations providing additional necessary information. AML with normal cytogenetics comprises about 40%-50% of all AML, and has been intensively investigated. The currently used 2008 World Health Organization classification of hematopoietic neoplasms has been proposed to be updated in 2016, also to include an update on the classification of AML, due to the continuously increasing application of genomic techniques that have led to major advances in our knowledge of the pathogenesis of AML. The purpose of this review is to describe some of these recent major advances in the diagnostic classification and risk stratification of AML. PMID:27144061

  6. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

    PubMed Central

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes1, but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing2–4 to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), leading to clonal outgrowth and myeloid malignancy. We thereby generated models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with cooperating mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors, and mediators of cytokine signaling, recapitulating the combinations of mutations observed in the human disease. Our results suggest that lentivirus-delivered sgRNA:Cas9 genome editing should be useful to engineer a broad array of in vivo cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease. PMID:24952903

  7. Myeloid Leukemias and Virally Induced Lymphomas in Miniature Inbred Swine: Development of a Large Animal Tumor Model

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Matar, Abraham J.; Huang, Christene A.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the Massachusetts General Hospital miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in major histocompatibility characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model. PMID:26635868

  8. Chemokine polyreactivity of IL7Rα+CSF-1R+ lympho-myeloid progenitors in the developing fetal liver

    PubMed Central

    Kajikhina, Katja; Melchers, Fritz; Tsuneto, Motokazu

    2015-01-01

    In murine ontogeny, fetal liver is the major hemato- and B-lymphopoietic site until birth. Hematopoiesis develops in largely non-hematopoietic niches, which provide contacts, chemokines and cytokines that induce migration, residence, proliferation and differentiation of progenitors. Within early multipotent progenitors an IL7Rα+CSF-1R+ subset expressed a mixture of lymphoid- and myeloid-specific genes and differentiated to lymphoid and myeloid lineages in vitro. By contrast, IL7Rα+ cells were lymphoid-committed, and CSF-1R+ cells were erythro-myeloid-restricted. To respond to a multitude of chemokines single biphenotypic cells expressed CXCR4 and as many as five other chemokine receptors. The monopotent IL7Rα+ and CSF-1R+progenitors all expressed CXCR4, and mutually exclusive, more restricted sets of the analysed five chemokine receptors. This study proposes that chemokine polyreactive, cytokine-bipotent and monopotent progenitors transmigrate through LYVE-1high endothelium, attracted by selected chemokines, and reach the IL7- and CSF-1-producing ALCAMhigh mesenchymal niche, attracted by other sets of chemokines, to differentiate to B-lymphoid respectively myeloid cells. PMID:26235516

  9. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Au, W Y; Ma, S K; Lie, A K W; Liang, R; Cheng, T; Kwong, Y L

    2002-03-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is an X-linked hemolytic enzymopathy affecting 3% of Southern Chinese males. Among 275 adult allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (SCT), five cases (1.8%) each of donors and recipients were G6PD deficient. Among 107 autologous SCT, four patients (3.7%) were G6PD deficient. All subjects were male, except for two female patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The incidence of G6PD deficiency in female CML patients was significantly higher than the background female incidence (P = 0.004), but comparable with that in the males (P = 0.664). There was no significant hemolysis or delay in red cell engraftment, and all but one patient converted to donor G6PD screening status. One female patient achieved partial correction of her G6PD status and relapsed at 10 months. We suggest that G6PD deficiency should be tested for in all marrow donors and recipients in susceptible populations. From our data, there is a suggestion of increased clinical incidence of G6PD deficiency in female patients with multi-lineage clonal marrow disorders. PMID:11919729

  10. Inherited BCL10 deficiency impairs hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Juan Manuel; Martinez-Barricarte, Rubén; García-Gómez, Sonia; Mazariegos, Marina S.; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; ρlvarez, Rita; Jiménez-Reinoso, Anaïs; del Pino, Lucia; Rodríguez-Pena, Rebeca; Ferreira, Antonio; Hernández-Jiménez, Enrique; Toledano, Victor; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Díaz-Almirón, Mariana; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Unzueta-Roch, José L.; Sánchez-Ramón, Silvia; Regueiro, Jose R.; López-Granados, Eduardo; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pérez de Diego, Rebeca

    2014-01-01

    Heterotrimers composed of B cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10), mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1), and caspase recruitment domain–containing (CARD) family adaptors play a role in NF-κB activation and have been shown to be involved in both the innate and the adaptive arms of immunity in murine models. Moreover, individuals with inherited defects of MALT1, CARD9, and CARD11 present with immunological and clinical phenotypes. Here, we characterized a case of autosomal-recessive, complete BCL10 deficiency in a child with a broad immunodeficiency, including defects of both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic immunity. The patient died at 3 years of age and was homozygous for a loss-of-expression, loss-of-function BCL10 mutation. The effect of BCL10 deficiency was dependent on the signaling pathway, and, for some pathways, the cell type affected. Despite the noted similarities to BCL10 deficiency in mice, including a deficient adaptive immune response, human BCL10 deficiency in this patient resulted in a number of specific features within cell populations. Treatment of the patient’s myeloid cells with a variety of pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) elicited a normal response; however, NF-κB–mediated fibroblast functions were dramatically impaired. The results of this study indicate that inherited BCL10 deficiency should be considered in patients with combined immunodeficiency with B cell, T cell, and fibroblast defects. PMID:25365219

  11. FOXF1 inhibits hematopoietic lineage commitment during early mesoderm specification.

    PubMed

    Fleury, Maud; Eliades, Alexia; Carlsson, Peter; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie

    2015-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms orchestrating early mesoderm specification are still poorly understood. In particular, how alternate cell fate decisions are regulated in nascent mesoderm remains mostly unknown. In the present study, we investigated both in vitro in differentiating embryonic stem cells, and in vivo in gastrulating embryos, the lineage specification of early mesodermal precursors expressing or not the Forkhead transcription factor FOXF1. Our data revealed that FOXF1-expressing mesoderm is derived from FLK1(+) progenitors and that in vitro this transcription factor is expressed in smooth muscle and transiently in endothelial lineages, but not in hematopoietic cells. In gastrulating embryos, FOXF1 marks most extra-embryonic mesoderm derivatives including the chorion, the allantois, the amnion and a subset of endothelial cells. Similarly to the in vitro situation, FOXF1 expression is excluded from the blood islands and blood cells. Further analysis revealed an inverse correlation between hematopoietic potential and FOXF1 expression in vivo with increased commitment toward primitive erythropoiesis in Foxf1-deficient embryos, whereas FOXF1-enforced expression in vitro was shown to repress hematopoiesis. Altogether, our data establish that during gastrulation, FOXF1 marks all posterior primitive streak extra-embryonic mesoderm derivatives with the remarkable exception of the blood lineage. Our study further suggests that this transcription factor is implicated in actively restraining the specification of mesodermal progenitors to hematopoiesis. PMID:26293303

  12. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Origin of BRAFV600E Mutations in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Young Rock; Lito, Piro; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Hu, Wenhuo; Beguelin, Wendy; Monette, Sebastien; Duy, Cihangir; Rampal, Raajit; Telis, Leon; Patel, Minal; Kim, Min Kyung; Huberman, Kety; Bouvier, Nancy; Berger, Michael F.; Melnick, Ari M.; Rosen, Neal; Tallman, Martin S.

    2014-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by somatic BRAFV600E mutations. The malignant cell in HCL has immunophenotypic features of a mature B cell, but no normal counterpart along the continuum of developing B lymphocytes has been delineated as the cell of origin. We find that the BRAFV600E mutation is present in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in HCL patients, and that these patients exhibit marked alterations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) frequencies. Quantitative sequencing analysis revealed a mean BRAFV600E-mutant allele frequency of 4.97% in HSCs from HCL patients. Moreover, transplantation of BRAFV600E-mutant HSCs from an HCL patient into immunodeficient mice resulted in stable engraftment of BRAFV600E-mutant human hematopoietic cells, revealing the functional self-renewal capacity of HCL HSCs. Consistent with the human genetic data, expression of BRafV600E in murine HSPCs resulted in a lethal hematopoietic disorder characterized by splenomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, increased circulating soluble CD25, and increased clonogenic capacity of B lineage cells—all classic features of human HCL. In contrast, restricting expression of BRafV600E to the mature B cell compartment did not result in disease. Treatment of HCL patients with vemurafenib, an inhibitor of mutated BRAF, resulted in normalization of HSPC frequencies and increased myeloid and erythroid output from HSPCs. These findings link the pathogenesis of HCL to somatic mutations that arise in HSPCs and further suggest that chronic lymphoid malignancies may be initiated by aberrant HSCs. PMID:24871132

  13. Nutritional status of patients submitted to transplantation of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, rika Elias; Guerra, Daiane Cristina; Baluz, Ktia; de Resende Furtado, Wander; da Silva Bouzas, Luis Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the nutritional status of adult patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at two different time points (admission and discharge). Methods A retrospective, descriptive and quantitative study was performed based on clinical, laboratory and nutritional data obtained from medical records of adult patients of both genders submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a bone marrow transplantation reference center in Rio de Janeiro in the period from 2010 to 2013. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS software (version 22.0). Results Sixty-four patients were evaluated. The mean age was 42.13.2 years and the most prevalent disease was acute myeloid leukemia (39%). There was a high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea (100%), vomiting (97%) and mucositis (93%). Between admission and discharge there was a significant decrease in the median weight (?2.5kg; 71.5 vs. 68.75kg; p-value<0.001), body mass index (?0.9kg/m2; 24.8 vs. 24.4kg/m2; p-value<0.001), and serum albumin levels (?0.2g/dL; 3.7 vs. 3.6g/dL; p-value=0.024). The survival time after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation correlated negatively with C-reactive protein at discharge (CC=?0.72; p-value<0.001) and positively with serum albumin levels (CC=0.56; p-value=0.004) and with high total protein level at discharge (CC=0.53; p-value=0.006). Conclusion Our results suggest that patients submitted to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have compromised nutritional status during the hospital stay for transplantation. PMID:25453651

  14. The histone H2A deubiquitinase Usp16 regulates hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell function.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yue; Jones, Amanda E; Yang, Wei; Liu, Shanrun; Dai, Qian; Liu, Yudong; Swindle, C Scott; Zhou, Dewang; Zhang, Zhuo; Ryan, Thomas M; Townes, Tim M; Klug, Christopher A; Chen, Dongquan; Wang, Hengbin

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms play important regulatory roles in hematopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. Subunits of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), the major histone H2A ubiquitin ligase, are critical for both normal and pathological hematopoiesis; however, it is unclear which of the several counteracting H2A deubiquitinases functions along with PRC1 to control H2A ubiquitination (ubH2A) level and regulates hematopoiesis in vivo. Here we investigated the function of Usp16 in mouse hematopoiesis. Conditional deletion of Usp16 in bone marrow resulted in a significant increase of global ubH2A level and lethality. Usp16 deletion did not change HSC number but was associated with a dramatic reduction of mature and progenitor cell populations, revealing a role in governing HSC lineage commitment. ChIP- and RNA-sequencing studies in HSC and progenitor cells revealed that Usp16 bound to many important hematopoietic regulators and that Usp16 deletion altered the expression of genes in transcription/chromosome organization, immune response, hematopoietic/lymphoid organ development, and myeloid/leukocyte differentiation. The altered gene expression was partly rescued by knockdown of PRC1 subunits, suggesting that Usp16 and PRC1 counterbalance each other to regulate cellular ubH2A level and gene expression in the hematopoietic system. We further discovered that knocking down Cdkn1a (p21cip1), a Usp16 target and regulated gene, rescued the altered cell cycle profile and differentiation defect of Usp16-deleted HSCs. Collectively, these studies identified Usp16 as one of the histone H2A deubiquitinases, which coordinates with the H2A ubiquitin ligase PRC1 to regulate hematopoiesis, and revealed cell cycle regulation by Usp16 as key for HSC differentiation. PMID:26699484

  15. Dasatinib, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Clostridium difficile infection in Chilean patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pilcante, Javier; Rojas, Patricio; Ernst, Daniel; Sarmiento, Mauricio; Ocqueteau, Mauricio; Bertin, Pablo; García, Maria; Rodriguez, Maria; Jara, Veronica; Ajenjo, Maria; Ramirez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Patients submitted to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection and multiple risk factors have been identified. Published reports have indicated an incidence from 9% to 30% of transplant patients however to date there is no information about infection in these patients in Chile. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed of patients who developed C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantations from 2000 to 2013. Statistical analysis used the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software. Results Two hundred and fifty patients were studied (mean age: 39 years; range: 17–69), with 147 (59%) receiving allogeneic transplants and 103 (41%) receiving autologous transplants. One hundred and ninety-two (77%) patients had diarrhea, with 25 (10%) cases of C. difficile infection being confirmed. Twenty infected patients had undergone allogeneic transplants, of which ten had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, three had acute myeloid leukemia and seven had other diseases (myelodysplastic syndrome, chronic myeloid leukemia, severe aplastic anemia). In the autologous transplant group, five patients had C. difficile infection; two had multiple myeloma, one had amyloidosis, one had acute myeloid leukemia and one had germinal carcinoma. The overall incidence of C. difficile infection was 4% within the first week, 6.4% in the first month and 10% in one year, with no difference in overall survival between infected and non-infected groups (72.0% vs. 67.6%, respectively; p-value = 0.56). Patients infected after allogeneic transplants had a slower time to neutrophil engraftment compared to non-infected patients (17.5 vs. 14.9 days, respectively; p-value = 0.008). In the autologous transplant group there was no significant difference in the neutrophil engraftment time between infected and non-infected patients (12.5 days vs. 11.8 days, respectively; p-value = 0.71). In the allogeneic transplant group, the median time to acute graft-versus-host disease was similar between the two groups (p-value = 0.08), as was the incidence of grades 1–4 acute graft-versus-host disease (40% vs. 48%; p-value >0.05). Conclusion The incidence of C. difficile infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation was low, with a significant number of cases occurring shortly after transplantation. Allogeneic transplants had a three-time higher risk of infection compared to autologous transplants, but this was not associated with increased mortality, decreased overall survival or higher risk of acute graft-versus-host disease. PMID:26670401

  17. Myeloid Dendritic Cells are Potential Players in Human Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Ciaramella, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s diseases (AD) and Parkinson’s diseases (PD) are devastating neurodegenerative disturbances, wherein neuroinflammation is a chronic pathogenic process with high therapeutic potential. Major mediators of AD/PD neuroimmune processes are resident immune cells, but immune cells derived from periphery may also participate and to some extent modify neuroinflammation. Specifically, blood borne myeloid cells emerge as crucial components of AD/PD progression and susceptibility. Among these, dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune orchestrators and players of brain immune surveillance; we candidate them as potential mediators of both AD and PD and as relevant cell model for unraveling myeloid cell role in neurodegeneration. Hence, we recapitulate and discuss emerging data suggesting that blood-derived DCs play a role in experimental and human neurodegenerative diseases. In humans, in particular, DCs are modified by in vitro culture with neurodegeneration-associated pathogenic factors and dysregulated in AD patients, while the levels of DC precursors are decreased in AD and PD patients’ blood, possibly as an index of their recruitment to the brain. Overall, we emphasize the need to explore the impact of DCs on neurodegeneration to uncover peripheral immune mechanisms of pathogenic importance, recognize potential biomarkers, and improve therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26734003

  18. Myeloperoxidase-Dependent Oxidation of Etoposide in Human Myeloid Progenitor CD34+ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlasova, Irina I.; Feng, Wei-Hong; Goff, Julie P.; Giorgianni, Angela; Do, Duc; Gollin, Susanne M.; Lewis, Dale W.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-01-01

    Etoposide is a widely used anticancer drug successfully used for the treatment of many types of cancer in children and adults. Its use, however, is associated with an increased risk of development of secondary acute myelogenous leukemia involving the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene (11q23) translocations. Previous studies demonstrated that the phenoxyl radical of etoposide can be produced by action of myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme found in developing myeloid progenitor cells, the likely origin for myeloid leukemias. We hypothesized, therefore, that one-electron oxidation of etoposide by MPO to its phenoxyl radical is important for converting this anticancer drug to genotoxic and carcinogenic species in human CD34+ myeloid progenitor cells. In the present study, using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we provide conclusive evidence for MPO-dependent formation of etoposide phenoxyl radicals in growth factor-mobilized CD34+ cells isolated from human umbilical cord blood and demonstrate that MPO-induced oxidation of etoposide is amplified in the presence of phenol. Formation of etoposide radicals resulted in the oxidation of endogenous thiols, thus providing evidence for etoposide-mediated MPO-catalyzed redox cycling that may play a role in enhanced etoposide genotoxicity. In separate studies, etoposide-induced DNA damage and MLL gene rearrangements were demonstrated to be dependent in part on MPO activity in CD34+ cells. Together, our results are consistent with the idea that MPO-dependent oxidation of etoposide in human hematopoietic CD34+ cells makes these cells especially prone to the induction of etoposide-related acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:21097707

  19. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with Isolated Trisomy 19 Associated with Diffuse Myelofibrosis and Osteosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stelling, Adam; Jonas, Brian A.; Rashidi, Hooman H.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Chen, Mingyi

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF), per WHO criteria, is a clonal myeloproliferative neoplasm that usually presents with a proliferation of granulocytic and megakaryocytic lineages with an associated fibrous deposition and extramedullary hematopoiesis. The bone marrow histologic findings of this disorder are typically characterized by the presence of myeloid metaplasia with an associated reactive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and osteosclerosis. However, marked myelofibrosis is not solely confined to PMF and may also be associated with other conditions including but not limited to acute megakaryoblastic leukemias (FAB AML-M7). Here, we describe a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with marked myelofibrosis with osteosclerosis and an isolated trisomy 19. A 19-year-old male presented with severe bone pain of one week duration with a complete blood cell count and peripheral smear showing a mild anemia and occasional circulating blasts. A follow up computed tomography (CT) scan showed diffuse osteosclerosis with no evidence of hepatosplenomegaly or lymphadenopathy. Subsequently, the bone marrow biopsy showed markedly sclerotic bony trabeculae and a hypercellular marrow with marked fibrosis and intervening sheets of immature myeloid cells consistent with myeloblasts with monocytic differentiation. Importantly, these myeloblasts were negative for megakaryocytic markers (CD61 and vWF), erythroid markers (hemoglobin and E-cadherin), and lymphoid markers (CD3, CD19, and TdT). Metaphase cytogenetics showed an isolated triosomy 19 with no JAK2 V617F mutation. The patient was treated with induction chemotherapy followed by allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation which subsequently resulted in a rapid resolution of bone marrow fibrosis, suggesting graft-anti-fibrosis effect. This is a rare case of a non-megakaryoblastic acute myeloid leukemia with myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis with trisomy 19 that may provide insights into the prognosis and therapeutic options of future cases. PMID:26694466

  20. Frequent genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome with normal karyotype

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Tadayuki; Ogawa, Seishi; Dugas, Martin; Kawamata, Norihiko; Yamamoto, Go; Nannya, Yasuhito; Sanada, Masashi; Miller, Carl W.; Yung, Amanda; Schnittger, Susanne; Haferlach, Torsten; Haferlach, Claudia; Koeffler, H. Phillip

    2009-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemia is a clonal hematopoietic malignant disease; about 45–50% of cases do not have detectable chromosomal abnormalities. Here, we identified hidden genomic alterations and novel disease-related regions in normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome samples. Design and Methods Thirty-eight normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome samples were analyzed with high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray using a new algorithm: allele-specific copy-number analysis using anonymous references (AsCNAR). Expression of mRNA in these samples was determined by mRNA microarray analysis. Results Eighteen samples (49%) showed either one or more genomic abnormalities including duplication, deletion and copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity. Importantly, 12 patients (32%) had copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity, causing duplication of either mutant FLT3 (2 cases), JAK2 (1 case) or AML1/RUNX1 (1 case); and each had loss of the normal allele. Nine patients (24%) had small copy-number changes (< 10 Mb) including deletions of NF1, ETV6/TEL, CDKN2A and CDKN2B. Interestingly, mRNA microarray analysis showed a relationship between chromosomal changes and mRNA expression levels: loss or gain of chromosomes led, respectively, to either a decrease or increase of mRNA expression of genes in the region. Conclusions This study suggests that at least one half of cases of normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome have readily identifiable genomic abnormalities, as found by our analysis; the high frequency of copy-number neutral loss of heterozygosity is especially notable. PMID:19144660

  1. Inhibition of Grb2 expression demonstrates an important role in BCR-ABL-mediated MAPK activation and transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Hardik; Li, Liang; Chu, Su; Rossi, John; Yee, Jiing-Kuan; Bhatia, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) results from expression of the BCR/ABL oncogene in a primitive hematopoietic cell. However BCR/ABL-activated signaling mechanisms are dependent on the cellular context in which it is expressed, and mechanisms underlying primitive human hematopoietic cell transformation by BCR-ABL are not well understood. Our previous studies have shown that BCR/ABL-Y177 plays an essential role in Ras activation and human hematopoietic progenitor transformation in CML. The adapter protein growth factor receptor binding protein-2 (Grb2) can bind phosphorylated BCR/ABL-Y177, induce Grb2-SoS complex formation, and activate Ras signaling. We investigated the role of Grb2 in CML progenitor transformation by co-transducing human CD34+ cells with lentivirus vectors expressing shRNA to Grb2 and retrovirus vectors expressing BCR/ABL. We show that Grb2 knockdown significantly inhibits proliferation and survival of BCR-ABL-expressing CD34+ cells, but not control CD34+ cells. Grb2 knockdown reduced MAPK activity in BCR-Abl-expressing hematopoietic cells. We conclude that inhibition of Grb2 expression demonstrates an important role in BCR-ABL mediated MAPK activation and transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells. These results support further investigation of downstream effectors of Grb2-mediated signals and targeting of Grb2 interactions in the treatment of CML. PMID:21072043

  2. Insights into cell ontogeny, age, and acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chaudhury, Shahzya S; Morison, Jessica K; Gibson, Brenda E S; Keeshan, Karen

    2015-09-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitor cells (HSPCs). The pathogenesis of AML involves cytogenetic abnormalities, genetic mutations, and epigenetic anomalies. Although it is widely accepted that the cellular biology, gene expression, and epigenetic landscape of normal HSCs change with age, little is known about the interplay between the age at which the cell becomes leukemic and the resultant leukemia. Despite its rarity, childhood AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. Treatment is in general extrapolated from adult AML on the assumption that adult AML and pediatric AML are similar biological entities. However, distinct biological processes and epigenetic modifications in pediatric and adult AML may mean that response to novel therapies in children may differ from that in adults with AML. A better understanding of the key pathways involved in transformation and how these differ between childhood and adult AML is an important step in identifying effective treatment. This review highlights both the commonalities and differences between pediatric and adult AML disease biology with respect to age. PMID:26051919

  3. Hsp90 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Khajapeer, Kalubai Vari; Baskaran, Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematological malignancy that arises due to reciprocal translocation of 3′ sequences from c-Abelson (ABL) protooncogene of chromosome 9 with 5′ sequence of truncated break point cluster region (BCR) on chromosome 22. BCR-ABL is a functional oncoprotein p210 that exhibits constitutively activated tyrosine kinase causing genomic alteration of hematopoietic stem cells. BCR-ABL specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) successfully block CML progression. However, drug resistance owing to BCR-ABL mutations and overexpression is still an issue. Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) function as molecular chaperones facilitating proper folding of nascent polypeptides. Their increased expression under stressful conditions protects cells by stabilizing unfolded or misfolded peptides. Hsp90 is the major mammalian protein and is required by BCR-ABL for stabilization and maturation. Hsp90 inhibitors destabilize the binding of BCR-ABL protein thus leading to the formation of heteroprotein complex that is eventually degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Results of many novel Hsp90 inhibitors that have entered into various clinical trials are encouraging. The present review targets the current development in the CML treatment by availing Hsp90 specific inhibitors. PMID:26770832

  4. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dombret, Hervé; Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  5. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  6. Sex differences in the incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Jankovic, Gradimir M; Tiu, Ramon V; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Jackson, Robert C; Hlatky, Lynn R; Gale, Robert Peter; Sachs, Rainer K

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which is caused by BCR/ABL chimeric oncogene formation in a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), increases with age and exposure to ionizing radiation. CML is a comparatively well-characterized neoplasm, important for its own sake and useful for insights into other neoplasms. Here, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) CML data are analyzed after considering possible misclassification of chronic myelo-monocytic leukemia as CML. For people older than 25 years, plots of male and female CML log incidences versus age at diagnosis are approximately parallel straight lines with males either above or to the left of females. This is consistent with males having a higher risk of developing CML or a shorter latency from initiation to diagnosis of CML. These distinct mechanisms cannot be distinguished using SEER data alone. Therefore, CML risks among male and female Japanese A-bomb survivors are also analyzed. The present analyses suggest that sex differences in CML incidence more likely result from differences in risk than in latency. The simplest but not the sole interpretation of this is that males have more target cells at risk to develop CML. Comprehensive mathematical models of CML could lead to a better understanding of the role of HSCs in CML and other preleukemias that can progress to acute leukemia. PMID:24337217

  7. Sex differences in the incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Gradimir M.; Tiu, Ramon V.; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Jackson, Robert C.; Hlatky, Lynn R.; Gale, Robert Peter; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), which is caused by BCR/ABL chimeric oncogene formation in a pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), increases with age and exposure to ionizing radiation. CML is a comparatively well-characterized neoplasm, important for its own sake and useful for insights into other neoplasms. Here, Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) CML data are analyzed after considering possible misclassification of chronic myelo-monocytic leukemia as CML. For people older than 25 years, plots of male and female CML log incidences versus age at diagnosis are approximately parallel straight lines with males either above or to the left of females. This is consistent with males having a higher risk of developing CML or a shorter latency from initiation to diagnosis of CML. These distinct mechanisms cannot be distinguished using SEER data alone. Therefore, CML risks among male and female Japanese A-bomb survivors are also analyzed. The present analyses suggest that sex differences in CML incidence more likely result from differences in risk than in latency. The simplest but not the sole interpretation of this is that males have more target cells at risk to develop CML. Comprehensive mathematical models of CML could lead to a better understanding of the role of HSCs in CML and other preleukemias that can progress to acute leukemia. PMID:24337217

  8. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. An overview of chronic myeloid leukemia and its animal models.

    PubMed

    Ma, WeiXu; Ma, Ning; Chen, XiaoHui; Zhang, YiYue; Zhang, WenQing

    2015-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a form of leukemia characterized by the presence of clonal bone marrow stem cells with the proliferation of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) and their precursors. CML is a type of myeloproliferative disease associated with a characteristic chromosomal translocation called the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome or t (9;22) translocation (BCR-ABL). CML is now usually treated with targeted drugs called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The mechanism and natural history of CML is still unclear. Here, we summarize the present CML animal disease models and compare them with each other. Meanwhile, we propose that it is a very wise choice to establish zebrafish (Danio rerio) CML model mimics clinical CML. This model could be used to learn more about the mechanism of CML, and to aid in the development of new drugs to treat CML. PMID:26582013

  10. Leukemic Stem Cell Frequency: A Strong Biomarker for Clinical Outcome in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Terwijn, Monique; Zeijlemaker, Wendelien; Kelder, Angèle; Rutten, Arjo P.; Snel, Alexander N.; Scholten, Willemijn J.; Pabst, Thomas; Verhoef, Gregor; Löwenberg, Bob; Zweegman, Sonja; Ossenkoppele, Gert J.; Schuurhuis, Gerrit J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Treatment failure in acute myeloid leukemia is probably caused by the presence of leukemia initiating cells, also referred to as leukemic stem cells, at diagnosis and their persistence after therapy. Specific identification of leukemia stem cells and their discrimination from normal hematopoietic stem cells would greatly contribute to risk stratification and could predict possible relapses. Results For identification of leukemic stem cells, we developed flow cytometric methods using leukemic stem cell associated markers and newly-defined (light scatter) aberrancies. The nature of the putative leukemic stem cells and normal hematopoietic stem cells, present in the same patient's bone marrow, was demonstrated in eight patients by the presence or absence of molecular aberrancies and/or leukemic engraftment in NOD-SCID IL-2Rγ-/- mice. At diagnosis (n = 88), the frequency of the thus defined neoplastic part of CD34+CD38- putative stem cell compartment had a strong prognostic impact, while the neoplastic parts of the CD34+CD38+ and CD34- putative stem cell compartments had no prognostic impact at all. After different courses of therapy, higher percentages of neoplastic CD34+CD38- cells in complete remission strongly correlated with shorter patient survival (n = 91). Moreover, combining neoplastic CD34+CD38- frequencies with frequencies of minimal residual disease cells (n = 91), which reflect the total neoplastic burden, revealed four patient groups with different survival. Conclusion and Perspective Discrimination between putative leukemia stem cells and normal hematopoietic stem cells in this large-scale study allowed to demonstrate the clinical importance of putative CD34+CD38- leukemia stem cells in AML. Moreover, it offers new opportunities for the development of therapies directed against leukemia stem cells, that would spare normal hematopoietic stem cells, and, moreover, enables in vivo and ex vivo screening for potential efficacy and toxicity of new therapies. PMID:25244440

  11. Thrombomucin, a Novel Cell Surface Protein that Defines Thrombocytes and Multipotent Hematopoietic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    McNagny, Kelly M.; Pettersson, Inger; Rossi, Fabio; Flamme, Ingo; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Graf, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    MEP21 is an avian antigen specifically expressed on the surface of Myb-Ets–transformed multipotent hematopoietic precursors (MEPs) and of normal thrombocytes. Using nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometry, we have sequenced and subsequently cloned the MEP21 cDNA and named the gene thrombomucin as it encodes a 571–amino acid protein with an extracellular domain typical of the mucin family of proteoglycans. Thrombomucin is distantly related to CD34, the best characterized and most used human hematopoietic stem cell marker. It is also highly homologous in its transmembrane/intracellular domain to podocalyxinlike protein–1, a rabbit cell surface glycoprotein of kidney podocytes. Single cell analysis of yolk sac cells from 3-d-old chick embryos revealed that thrombomucin is expressed on the surface of both lineage-restricted and multipotent progenitors. In the bone marrow, thrombomucin is also expressed on mono- and multipotent progenitors, showing an overlapping but distinct expression pattern from that of the receptor-type stem cell marker c-kit. These observations strengthen the notion that the Myb-Ets oncoprotein can induce the proliferation of thrombomucin-positive hematopoietic progenitors that have retained the capacity to differentiate along multiple lineages. They also suggest that thrombomucin and CD34 form a family of stem cell–specific proteins with possibly overlapping functions in early hematopoietic progenitors. PMID:9298993

  12. Endothelium and NOTCH specify and amplify aorta-gonad-mesonephros-derived hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hadland, Brandon K; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Poulos, Michael G; Moon, Randall T; Butler, Jason M; Rafii, Shahin; Bernstein, Irwin D

    2015-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) first emerge during embryonic development within vessels such as the dorsal aorta of the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, suggesting that signals from the vascular microenvironment are critical for HSC development. Here, we demonstrated that AGM-derived endothelial cells (ECs) engineered to constitutively express AKT (AGM AKT-ECs) can provide an in vitro niche that recapitulates embryonic HSC specification and amplification. Specifically, nonengrafting embryonic precursors, including the VE-cadherin-expressing population that lacks hematopoietic surface markers, cocultured with AGM AKT-ECs specified into long-term, adult-engrafting HSCs, establishing that a vascular niche is sufficient to induce the endothelial-to-HSC transition in vitro. Subsequent to hematopoietic induction, coculture with AGM AKT-ECs also substantially increased the numbers of HSCs derived from VE-cadherin⁺CD45⁺ AGM hematopoietic cells, consistent with a role in supporting further HSC maturation and self-renewal. We also identified conditions that included NOTCH activation with an immobilized NOTCH ligand that were sufficient to amplify AGM-derived HSCs following their specification in the absence of AGM AKT-ECs. Together, these studies begin to define the critical niche components and resident signals required for HSC induction and self-renewal ex vivo, and thus provide insight for development of defined in vitro systems targeted toward HSC generation for therapeutic applications. PMID:25866967

  13. Endothelium and NOTCH specify and amplify aorta-gonad-mesonephros–derived hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hadland, Brandon K.; Varnum-Finney, Barbara; Poulos, Michael G.; Moon, Randall T.; Butler, Jason M.; Rafii, Shahin; Bernstein, Irwin D.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) first emerge during embryonic development within vessels such as the dorsal aorta of the aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region, suggesting that signals from the vascular microenvironment are critical for HSC development. Here, we demonstrated that AGM-derived endothelial cells (ECs) engineered to constitutively express AKT (AGM AKT-ECs) can provide an in vitro niche that recapitulates embryonic HSC specification and amplification. Specifically, nonengrafting embryonic precursors, including the VE-cadherin–expressing population that lacks hematopoietic surface markers, cocultured with AGM AKT-ECs specified into long-term, adult-engrafting HSCs, establishing that a vascular niche is sufficient to induce the endothelial-to-HSC transition in vitro. Subsequent to hematopoietic induction, coculture with AGM AKT-ECs also substantially increased the numbers of HSCs derived from VE-cadherin+CD45+ AGM hematopoietic cells, consistent with a role in supporting further HSC maturation and self-renewal. We also identified conditions that included NOTCH activation with an immobilized NOTCH ligand that were sufficient to amplify AGM-derived HSCs following their specification in the absence of AGM AKT-ECs. Together, these studies begin to define the critical niche components and resident signals required for HSC induction and self-renewal ex vivo, and thus provide insight for development of defined in vitro systems targeted toward HSC generation for therapeutic applications. PMID:25866967

  14. Absence of a Red Blood Cell Phenotype in Mice with Hematopoietic Deficiency of SEC23B

    PubMed Central

    Khoriaty, Rami; Vasievich, Matthew P.; Jones, Morgan; Everett, Lesley; Chase, Jennifer; Tao, Jiayi; Siemieniak, David; Zhang, Bin; Maillard, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II (CDAII) is an autosomal recessive disease of ineffective erythropoiesis characterized by increased bi/multinucleated erythroid precursors in the bone marrow. CDAII results from mutations in SEC23B. The SEC23 protein is a core component of coat protein complex II-coated vesicles, which transport secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. Though the genetic defect underlying CDAII has been identified, the pathophysiology of this disease remains unknown. We previously reported that SEC23B-deficient mice die perinatally, exhibiting massive pancreatic degeneration, with this early mortality limiting evaluation of the adult hematopoietic compartment. We now report that mice with SEC23B deficiency restricted to the hematopoietic compartment survive normally and do not exhibit anemia or other CDAII characteristics. We also demonstrate that SEC23B-deficient hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) do not exhibit a disadvantage at reconstituting hematopoiesis when compared directly to wild-type HSC in a competitive repopulation assay. Secondary bone marrow transplants demonstrated continued equivalence of SEC23B-deficient and WT HSC in their hematopoietic reconstitution potential. The surprising discordance in phenotypes between SEC23B-deficient mice and humans may reflect an evolutionary shift in SEC23 paralog function and/or expression, or a change in a specific COPII cargo critical for erythropoiesis. PMID:25071156

  15. Activin A in combination with OP9 cells facilitates development of Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(-) and Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(+) hematopoietic mesodermal cells from murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Saeka; Ogawa, Minetaro

    2015-11-20

    Lateral mesoderm-derived hemogenic endothelial cells are known to originate the definitive hematopoietic lineage in mouse embryogenesis. The developmental process of the definitive hematopoietic lineage can be recapitulated by inducing differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in a co-culture system with OP9 stromal cells. However, the signaling molecules that can modulate the development of the definitive hematopoietic lineage in the OP9 co-culture system have yet to be identified. Here we report that activin A enhanced the hematopoietic potential of endothelial cells derived from ES cells in the OP9 co-culture system. Activin A in combination with OP9 cells augmented development of Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(+) early mesodermal cells and Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(-) lateral mesodermal cells from ES cells. These Flk-1(+) mesodermal cells further differentiated into CD41(+) endothelial cells, which preferentially possessed high hematopoietic potential. Furthermore, Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(+) cells but not Flk-1(+) PDGFRα(-) cells produced hematopoietic progenitors with a bimodal pattern when cultured as an aggregate with OP9 cells. Our results suggest that activin A in combination with OP9 cells facilitates differentiation of ES cells to Flk-1(+) mesodermal cells, which encompass various precursors that separately contribute to the development of hematopoietic lineages. PMID:26417686

  16. Delineation of Natural Killer Cell Differentiation from Myeloid Progenitors in Human

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingfeng; Ye, Weijian; Jian Tan, Wei; Mei Yong, Kylie Su; Liu, Min; Qi Tan, Shu; Loh, Eva; TE Chang, Kenneth; Chye Tan, Thiam; Preiser, Peter R.; Chen, Jianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of natural killer (NK) cell development in human is incomplete partly because of limited access to appropriate human tissues. We have developed a cytokine-enhanced humanized mouse model with greatly improved reconstitution and function of human NK cells. Here we report the presence of a cell population in the bone marrow of the cytokine-treated humanized mice that express both NK cell marker CD56 and myeloid markers such as CD36 and CD33. The CD56+CD33+CD36+ cells are also found in human cord blood, fetal and adult bone marrow. Although the CD56+CD33+CD36+ cells do not express the common NK cell functional receptors and exhibit little cytotoxic and cytokine-producing activities, they readily differentiate into mature NK cells by acquiring expression of NK cell receptors and losing expression of the myeloid markers. Further studies show that CD33+CD36+ myeloid NK precursors are derived from granulo-myelomonocytic progenitors. These results delineate the pathway of human NK cell differentiation from myeloid progenitors in the bone marrow and suggest the utility of humanized mice for studying human hematopoiesis. PMID:26456148

  17. Technical Advance: Transcription factor, promoter, and enhancer utilization in human myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Anagha; Pooley, Christopher; Freeman, Tom C.; Lennartsson, Andreas; Babina, Magda; Schmidl, Christian; Geijtenbeek, Teunis; Michoel, Tom; Severin, Jessica; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Kawaji, Hideya; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Rehli, Michael; Hume, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of myeloid cells from their progenitors is regulated at the level of transcription by combinatorial control of key transcription factors influencing cell-fate choice. To unravel the global dynamics of this process at the transcript level, we generated transcription profiles for 91 human cell types of myeloid origin by use of CAGE profiling. The CAGE sequencing of these samples has allowed us to investigate diverse aspects of transcription control during myelopoiesis, such as identification of novel transcription factors, miRNAs, and noncoding RNAs specific to the myeloid lineage. We further reconstructed a transcription regulatory network by clustering coexpressed transcripts and associating them with enriched cis-regulatory motifs. With the use of the bidirectional expression as a proxy for enhancers, we predicted over 2000 novel enhancers, including an enhancer 38 kb downstream of IRF8 and an intronic enhancer in the KIT gene locus. Finally, we highlighted relevance of these data to dissect transcription dynamics during progressive maturation of granulocyte precursors. A multifaceted analysis of the myeloid transcriptome is made available (www.myeloidome.roslin.ed.ac.uk). This high-quality dataset provides a powerful resource to study transcriptional regulation during myelopoiesis and to infer the likely functions of unannotated genes in human innate immunity. PMID:25717144

  18. Molecular pathways: myeloid complicity in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-10-15

    Cancer-induced inflammation results in accumulation of myeloid cells. These myeloid cells include progenitors and progeny of monocytes, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. It has become increasingly evident that tumor-dependent factors can condition myeloid cells toward an immunosuppressive and protumorigenic phenotype. Thus, myeloid cells are not simply bystanders in malignancy or barometers of disease burden. Reflecting their dynamic and plastic nature, myeloid cells manifest a continuum of cellular differentiation and are intimately involved at all stages of neoplastic progression. They can promote tumorigenesis through both immune-dependent and -independent mechanisms and can dictate response to therapies. A greater understanding of the inherent plasticity and relationships among myeloid subsets is needed to inform therapeutic targeting. New clinical trials are being designed to modulate the activities of myeloid cells in cancer, which may be essential to maximize the efficacy of both conventional cytotoxic and immune-based therapies for solid tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 20(20); 5157-70. ©2014 AACR. PMID:25047706

  19. Gastric myeloid sarcoma without acute myeloblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Li; Tao, Jin; Li, Jian-Zhong; Chen, Xiao-Liang; Chen, Jian-Ning; Shao, Chun-Kui; Wu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid sarcomas (MS) involve extramedullary blast proliferation from one or more myeloid lineages that replace the original tissue architecture, and these neoplasias are called granulocytic sarcomas, chloromas or extramedullary myeloid tumors. Such tumors develop in lymphoid organs, bones (e.g., skulls and orbits), skin, soft tissue, various mucosae, organs, and the central nervous system. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement is rare, while the occurrence of myeloid sarcomas in patients without leukemia is even rare. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old man who presented with epigastric pain and progressive jaundice. An upper GI endoscopy had shown extensive multifocal hyperemic fold thickening and the spread of nodular lesions in the body of the stomach. Biopsies from the gastric lesions indicated myeloid sarcoma of the stomach. However, concurrent peripheral blood and bone marrow examinations showed no evidence of acute myeloid leukemia. For diagnosis, the immunohistochemical markers must be checked when evaluating a suspected myeloid sarcoma case. Accurate MS diagnosis determines the appropriate therapy and prognosis. PMID:25717265

  20. Generation of axolotl hematopoietic chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, David; Scott, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Wound repair is an extremely complex process that requires precise coordination between various cell types including immune cells. Unfortunately, in mammals this usually results in scar formation instead of restoration of the original fully functional tissue, otherwise known as regeneration. Various animal models like frogs and salamanders are currently being studied to determine the intracellular and intercellular pathways, controlled by gene expression, that elicit cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration of cells during regenerative healing. Now, the necessary genetic tools to map regenerative pathways are becoming available for the axolotl salamander, thus allowing comparative studies between scarring and regeneration. Here, we describe in detail three methods to produce axolotl hematopoietic cell-tagged chimeras for the study of hematopoiesis and regeneration. PMID:26366424

  1. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  2. A monoclonal antibody that recognizes B cells and B cell precursors in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Coffman, R.L.; Weissman, I.L.

    1981-02-01

    The monoclonal antibody, RA3-2C2, appears to be specific for cells within the B cell lineage. This antibody does not recognize thymocytes, peripheral T cells, or nonlymphoid hematopoietic cells in the spleen or bone marrow. Nor does it recognize the pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells, the spleen colony-forming unit, All sIg+ B cells and most plasma cells are RA3-2C2+. In addition, approximately 20% of nucleated bone marrow cells are RA3-2C2+ but sIg-. This population contains B cell precursors that can give rise to sIg+ cells within 2 d in vitro.

  3. Hematopoietic progenitors express neural genes.

    PubMed

    Goolsby, James; Marty, Marie C; Heletz, Dafna; Chiappelli, Joshua; Tashko, Gerti; Yarnell, Deborah; Fishman, Paul S; Dhib-Jalbut, Suhayl; Bever, Christopher T; Pessac, Bernard; Trisler, David

    2003-12-01

    Bone marrow, or cells selected from bone marrow, were reported recently to give rise to cells with a neural phenotype after in vitro treatment with neural-inducing factors or after delivery into the brain. However, we showed previously that untreated bone marrow cells express products of the neural myelin basic protein gene, and we demonstrate here that a subset of ex vivo bone marrow cells expresses the neurogenic transcription factor Pax-6 as well as neuronal genes encoding neurofilament H, NeuN (neuronal nuclear protein), HuC/HuD (Hu-antigen C/Hu-antigen D), and GAD65 (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65), as well as the oligodendroglial gene encoding CNPase (2',3' cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase). In contrast, astroglial glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) was not detected. These cells also were CD34+, a marker of hematopoietic stem cells. Cultures of these highly proliferative CD34+ cells, derived from adult mouse bone marrow, uniformly displayed a phenotype comparable with that of hematopoietic progenitor cells (CD45+, CD34+, Sca-1+, AA4.1+, cKit+, GATA-2+, and LMO-2+). The neuronal and oligodendroglial genes expressed in ex vivo bone marrow also were expressed in all cultured CD34+ cells, and GFAP was not observed. After CD34+ cell transplantation into adult brain, neuronal or oligodendroglial markers segregated into distinct nonoverlapping cell populations, whereas astroglial GFAP appeared, in the absence of other neural markers, in a separate set of implanted cells. Thus, neuronal and oligodendroglial gene products are present in a subset of bone marrow cells, and the expression of these genes can be regulated in brain. The fact that these CD34+ cells also express transcription factors (Rex-1 and Oct-4) that are found in early development elicits the hypothesis that they may be pluripotent embryonic-like stem cells. PMID:14634211

  4. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, Yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b(+) Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b(+) Ly6C(high) monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  5. mTOR masters monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells in mice with allografts or tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tingting; Zhao, Yang; Wang, Hao; Li, yang; Shao, Lijuan; Wang, Ruoyu; Lu, Jun; Yang, Zhongzhou; Wang, Junjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    CD11b+ Gr1+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in controlling the processes of tumors, infections, autoimmunity and graft rejection. Immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RPM), targeting on the key cellular metabolism molecule mTOR, is currently used in clinics to treat patients with allo-grafts, autoimmune diseases and tumors. However, the effect of RPM on MDSCs has not been studied. RPM significantly decreases the cell number and the immunosuppressive ability on T cells of CD11b+ Ly6Chigh monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs) in both allo-grafts-transplanted and tumor-bearing mice respectively. Mice with a myeloid-specific deletion of mTOR have poor M-MDSCs after grafting with allo-skin tissue or a tumor. Grafting of allo-skin or tumors significantly activates glycolysis pathways in myeloid precursor cells in bone marrow, which is inhibited by RPM or mTOR deletion. 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of the glycolytic pathway, inhibits M-MDSC differentiation from precursors, while enhancing glycolysis by metformin significantly rescues the RPM-caused deficiency of M-MDSCs. Therefore, we offer evidence supporting that mTOR is an intrinsic factor essential for the differentiation and immunosuppressive function of M-MDSCs and that these metabolism-relevant medicines may impact MDSCs-mediated immunosuppression or immune tolerance induction, which is of considerable clinical importance in treating graft rejection, autoimmune diseases and cancers. PMID:26833095

  6. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rosshandler, Yasmin; Shen, Ann Q; Cortes, Jorge; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2016-05-01

    Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic or accelerated phase resistant to two or more tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarizes the mode of action, pharmacokinetics, efficacy and safety of omacetaxine mepesuccinate. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has activity in chronic myeloid leukemia, especially in the chronic phase, regardless of the presence of ABL1 kinase domain mutations. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate has distinct but manageable adverse events profile. Omacetaxine mepesuccinate is a treatment option for a subset of patients with refractory chronic myeloid leukemia. PMID:26853281

  7. Homoharringtonine and omacetaxine for myeloid hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Homoharringtonine (HHT), a plant alkaloid with antitumor properties originally identified nearly 40 years ago, has a unique mechanism of action by preventing the initial elongation step of protein synthesis. HHT has been used widely in China for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Omacetaxine, a semisynthetic form of HHT, with excellent bioavailability by the subcutaneous route, has recently been approved by FDA of the United States for the treatment of CML refractory to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This review summarized preclinical and clinical development of HHT and omacetaxine for myeloid hematological malignancies. PMID:24387717

  8. Polyimide Precursor Solid Residuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A polyimide precursor solid residuum is an admixture of an aromatic dianhydride or derivative thereof and an aromatic diamine or derivative thereof plus a complexing agent, which is complexed with the admixture by hydrogen bonding. The polyimide precursor solid residuum is effectively employed in the preparation of polyimide foam and the fabrication of polyimide foam structures.

  9. Ten-Eleven-Translocation 2 (TET2) negatively regulates homeostasis and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Ko, Myunggon; Bandukwala, Hozefa S; An, Jungeun; Lamperti, Edward D; Thompson, Elizabeth C; Hastie, Ryan; Tsangaratou, Angeliki; Rajewsky, Klaus; Koralov, Sergei B; Rao, Anjana

    2011-08-30

    The Ten-Eleven-Translocation 2 (TET2) gene encodes a member of TET family enzymes that alters the epigenetic status of DNA by oxidizing 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Somatic loss-of-function mutations of TET2 are frequently observed in patients with diverse myeloid malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndromes, myeloproliferative neoplasms, and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. By analyzing mice with targeted disruption of the Tet2 catalytic domain, we show here that Tet2 is a critical regulator of self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Tet2 deficiency led to decreased genomic levels of 5hmC and augmented the size of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell pool in a cell-autonomous manner. In competitive transplantation assays, Tet2-deficient HSCs were capable of multilineage reconstitution and possessed a competitive advantage over wild-type HSCs, resulting in enhanced hematopoiesis into both lymphoid and myeloid lineages. In vitro, Tet2 deficiency delayed HSC differentiation and skewed development toward the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Our data indicate that Tet2 has a critical role in regulating the expansion and function of HSCs, presumably by controlling 5hmC levels at genes important for the self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation of HSCs. PMID:21873190

  10. Effects of cell cycle activation on the short-term engraftment properties of ex vivo expanded murine hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Szilvassy, S J; Meyerrose, T E; Grimes, B

    2000-05-01

    Loss of long-term hematopoietic stem cell function in vitro is associated with cell cycle progression. To determine whether cytokine-induced proliferation also limits the rate of short-term engraftment and potential clinical utility of ex vivo expanded hematopoietic cells, murine Sca-1(+)c-kit(+)Lin(-) cells were cultured in interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem cell factor, flk-2 ligand, and thrombopoietin for 7 days. Cells amplified 2000-fold were then stained with Hoechst 33342, separated into G(0)/G(1) (72% +/- 3%) or S/G(2)/M (27% +/- 3%) fractions by flow sorting, and injected into lethally irradiated mice. Although long-term (more than 6 months) engraftment of lymphoid and myeloid lineages was greater in primary and secondary recipients of expanded cells residing in G(0)/G(1) at the time of transplantation, there were no noted differences in the short-term (less than 6 weeks) recovery kinetics of circulating blood cells. When hematopoietic cells were expanded in cultures containing the tetrapeptide stem cell inhibitor N-Acetyl-Ser-Asp-Lys-Pro (AcSDKP) to reduce progenitor cycling prior to transplantation, again there were no differences observed in short-term reconstitution by inhibited or uninhibited cells. Interestingly, AcSDKP significantly accelerated engraftment by expanded hematopoietic cells when administered in vivo at the time of transplantation. Leukocytes recovered to 20% of normal levels approximately 1 week faster, and thrombocytopenia was largely abrogated in AcSDKP-treated versus untreated mice. Therefore, while AcSDKP can accelerate the engraftment of ex vivo expanded hematopoietic progenitors, which suggests a relatively simple approach to improve their clinical utility, its effects appear unrelated to cell cycle arrest. (Blood. 2000;95:2829-2837) PMID:10779428

  11. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Otten, Jeroen J. T.; de Jager, Saskia C. A.; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Seijkens, Tom; Bot, Ilze; Wijnands, Erwin; Beckers, Linda; Westra, Marijke M.; Bot, Martine; Busch, Matthias; Bermudez, Beatriz; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2013-01-01

    Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr−/−) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2+/− chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2+/− chimeras. LDLr−/− mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2flox/flox; n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.—Otten, J. J. T., de Jager, S. C. A., Kavelaars, A., Seijkens, T., Bot, I., Wijnands, E., Beckers, L., Westra, M. M., Bot, M., Busch, M., Bermudez, B., van Berkel, T. J. C., Heijnen, C. J., Biessen, E. A. L. Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice. PMID:23047899

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for inherited bone marrow failure syndromes.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Peffault de Latour, Régis

    2016-04-01

    Inherited bone marrow failure (IBMF) syndromes are a heterogeneous group of rare hematological disorders characterized by the impairment of hematopoiesis, which harbor specific clinical presentations and pathogenic mechanisms. Some of these syndromes may progress through clonal evolution, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most prominent are failures of DNA repair such as Fanconi Anemia and much rarer failure of ribosomal apparatus, e.g., Diamond Blackfan Anemia or of telomere elongation such as dyskeratosis congenita. In these congenital disorders, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often a consideration. However, HSCT will not correct the underlying disease and possible co-existing extra-medullary (multi)-organ defects, but will improve BMF. Indications as well as transplantation characteristics are most of the time controversial in this setting because of the rarity of reported cases. The present paper proposes a short overview of current practices. PMID:26872907

  13. C/EBPa controls acquisition and maintenance of adult hematopoietic stem cell quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Min; Zhang, Hong; Amabile, Giovanni; Yang, Henry; Staber, Philipp B.; Zhang, Pu; Levantini, Elena; Alberich-Jordà, Meritxell; Zhang, Junyan; Kawasaki, Akira; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In blood, transcription factor C/EBPa is essential for myeloid differentiation and has been implicated in regulating self-renewal of fetal liver (FL) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). However, its function in adult HSCs has remained unknown. Here, using an inducible knockout model we found that C/EBPa deficient adult HSCs underwent a pronounced expansion with enhanced proliferation, characteristics resembling FL HSCs. Consistently, transcription profiling of C/EBPa deficient HSCs revealed a gene expression programme similar to FL HSCs. Moreover we observed that age-specific C/EBPa expression correlated with its inhibitory effect on HSC cell cycle. Mechanistically we identified N-Myc as C/EBPa downstream target, and loss of C/EBPa resulted in de-repression of N-Myc. Our data establish C/EBPa as a central determinant in the switch from fetal to adult HSCs. PMID:23502316

  14. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-01

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia. PMID:26333776

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction underlies the progressive lymphocytopenia in XLF/Cernunnos deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Avagyan, Serine; Churchill, Michael; Yamamoto, Kenta; Crowe, Jennifer L.; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J.; Zheng, Tian; Mukherjee, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF/Cernunnos) is a component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand DNA break repair. XLF-deficient patients develop a severe progressive lymphocytopenia. Although NHEJ is required for V(D)J recombination and lymphocyte development, XLF-deficient mice have normal V(D)J recombination, highlighting the need for an alternative mechanism for the lymphocytopenia. Here, we report that XLF-deficient mice recapitulate the age-dependent lymphocytopenia of patients. We show that XLF deficiency leads to premature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), measured by decreased functional capacity in transplantation assays, preferential myeloid reconstitution, and reduced self-renewal at a young age. We propose that premature aging of HSCs, together with previously reported defects in class-switch recombination and memory immune response, underlies the progressive and severe lymphocytopenia in XLF-deficient patients in the absence of measurable V(D)J recombination defects. PMID:25075129

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell dysfunction underlies the progressive lymphocytopenia in XLF/Cernunnos deficiency.

    PubMed

    Avagyan, Serine; Churchill, Michael; Yamamoto, Kenta; Crowe, Jennifer L; Li, Chen; Lee, Brian J; Zheng, Tian; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Zha, Shan

    2014-09-01

    XRCC4-like factor (XLF/Cernunnos) is a component of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway of double-strand DNA break repair. XLF-deficient patients develop a severe progressive lymphocytopenia. Although NHEJ is required for V(D)J recombination and lymphocyte development, XLF-deficient mice have normal V(D)J recombination, highlighting the need for an alternative mechanism for the lymphocytopenia. Here, we report that XLF-deficient mice recapitulate the age-dependent lymphocytopenia of patients. We show that XLF deficiency leads to premature aging of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), measured by decreased functional capacity in transplantation assays, preferential myeloid reconstitution, and reduced self-renewal at a young age. We propose that premature aging of HSCs, together with previously reported defects in class-switch recombination and memory immune response, underlies the progressive and severe lymphocytopenia in XLF-deficient patients in the absence of measurable V(D)J recombination defects. PMID:25075129

  17. Cul4A is required for hematopoietic stem-cell engraftment and self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Binghui; Jia, Nan; Waning, David L.; Yang, Feng-Chun; Haneline, Laura S.

    2007-01-01

    Several hematopoietic stem-cell (HSC) regulators are controlled by ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, so the ubiquitin pathway might modulate HSC function. However, this hypothesis has not been formally tested. Cul4A encodes a core subunit of one ubiquitin ligase. Whereas Cul4A-deficient embryos die in utero, Cul4A-haploinsufficient mice are viable but exhibit abnormal hematopoiesis (fewer erythroid and primitive myeloid progenitors). Given these data, we examined whether Cul4A+/− HSCs might also be impaired. Using bone marrow transplantation assays, we determined that Cul4A+/− HSCs exhibit defects in engraftment and self-renewal capacity. These studies are the first to demonstrate that ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is important for HSC function. Further, they indicate that a Cul4A ubiquitin ligase targets for degradation one or multiple HSC regulators. PMID:17616641

  18. TGFβ restores hematopoietic homeostasis after myelosuppressive chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Brenet, Fabienne; Kermani, Pouneh; Spektor, Roman; Rafii, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Myelosuppression is a life-threatening complication of antineoplastic therapy, but treatment is restricted to a few cytokines with unilineage hematopoietic activity. Although hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are predominantly quiescent during homeostasis, they are rapidly recruited into cell cycle by stresses, including myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Factors that induce HSCs to proliferate during stress have been characterized, but it is not known how HSC quiescence is then reestablished. In this study, we show that TGFβ signaling is transiently activated in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) during hematopoietic regeneration. Blockade of TGFβ signaling after chemotherapy accelerates hematopoietic reconstitution and delays the return of cycling HSCs to quiescence. In contrast, TGFβ blockade during homeostasis fails to induce cycling of HSPCs. We identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Cdkn1c (p57) as a key downstream mediator of TGFβ during regeneration because the recovery of chimeric mice, incapable of expressing p57 in HSPCs, phenocopies blockade of TGFβ signaling after chemotherapy. This study demonstrates that context-dependent activation of TGFβ signaling is central to an unrecognized counterregulatory mechanism that promotes homeostasis once hematopoiesis has sufficiently recovered from myelosuppressive chemotherapy. These results open the door to new, potentially superior, approaches to promote multilineage hematopoietic recovery by blocking the TGFβ signaling that dampens regeneration. PMID:23440043

  19. FGF signaling restricts hematopoietic stem cell specification via modulation of the BMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pouget, Claire; Peterkin, Tessa; Simões, Filipa Costa; Lee, Yoonsung; Traver, David; Patient, Roger

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are produced during embryogenesis from the floor of the dorsal aorta. The localization of HSCs is dependent upon the presence of instructive signals on the ventral side of the vessel. The nature of the extrinsic molecular signals that control the aortic hematopoietic niche is currently poorly understood. Here we demonstrate a novel requirement for FGF signaling in the specification of aortic hemogenic endothelium. Our results demonstrate that FGF signaling normally acts to repress BMP activity in the subaortic mesenchyme through transcriptional inhibition of bmp4, as well as through activation of two BMP antagonists, noggin2 and gremlin1a. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a key role for FGF signaling in establishment of the developmental HSC niche via its regulation of BMP activity in the subaortic mesenchyme. These results should help inform strategies to recapitulate the development of HSCs in vitro from pluripotent precursors. PMID:25429520

  20. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; López-Contreras, Andrés J.; Martínez, Dolores; Cañamero, Marta; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Isern, Joan; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Méndez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Replicative stress during embryonic development influences ageing and predisposition to disease in adults. A protective mechanism against replicative stress is provided by the licensing of thousands of origins in G1 that are not necessarily activated in the subsequent S-phase. These ‘dormant' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our results indicate that hematopoietic progenitors are particularly sensitive to replication stress, and full origin licensing ensures their correct differentiation and functionality. PMID:26456157

  1. Progressive maturation toward hematopoietic stem cells in the mouse embryo aorta

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Jean-Charles; Clapes, Thomas; Klaus, Anna; Papazian, Natalie; Onderwater, Jos; Mommaas-Kienhuis, Mieke; Cupedo, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of cells attached to the endothelium of the main embryonic arteries were first observed a century ago. Present in most vertebrate species, such clusters, or intraaortic hematopoietic clusters (IAHCs), derive from specialized hemogenic endothelial cells and contain the first few hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generated during embryonic development. However, some discrepancies remained concerning the spatio-temporal appearance and the numbers of IAHCs and HSCs. Therefore, the exact cell composition and function of IAHCs remain unclear to date. We show here that IAHCs contain pre-HSCs (or HSC precursors) that can mature into HSCs in vivo (as shown by the successful long-term multilineage reconstitution of primary neonates and secondary adult recipients). Such IAHC pre-HSCs could contribute to the HSC pool increase observed at midgestation. The novel insights in pre-HSC to HSC transition represent an important step toward generating transplantable HSCs in vitro that are needed for autologous HSC transplantation therapies. PMID:25301706

  2. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  3. Leukemic marrow infiltration reveals a novel role for Egr3 as a potent inhibitor of normal hematopoietic stem cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hui; Hao, Sha; Liu, Yanfeng; Pang, Yakun; Ma, Shihui; Dong, Fang; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Guoguang; Li, Shaoguang; Yuan, Weiping; Cheng, Tao

    2015-09-10

    Cytopenias resulting from the impaired generation of normal blood cells from hematopoietic precursors are important contributors to morbidity and mortality in patients with leukemia. However, the process by which normal hematopoietic cells are overtaken by emerging leukemia cells and how different subsets of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are distinctly influenced during leukemic cell infiltration is poorly understood. To investigate these important questions, we used a robust nonirradiated mouse model of human MLL-AF9 leukemia to examine the suppression of HSCs and HPCs during leukemia cell expansion in vivo. Among all the hematopoietic subsets, long-term repopulating HSCs were the least reduced, whereas megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitors were the most significantly suppressed. Notably, nearly all of the HSCs were forced into a noncycling state in leukemic marrow at late stages, but their reconstitution potential appeared to be intact upon transplantation into nonleukemic hosts. Gene expression profiling and further functional validation revealed that Egr3 was a strong limiting factor for the proliferative potential of HSCs. Therefore, this study provides not only a molecular basis for the more tightened quiescence of HSCs in leukemia, but also a novel approach for defining functional regulators of HSCs in disease. PMID:26186938

  4. Constitutive activation of Akt by Flt3 internal tandem duplications is necessary for increased survival, proliferation, and myeloid transformation.

    PubMed

    Brandts, Christian H; Sargin, Bülent; Rode, Miriam; Biermann, Christoph; Lindtner, Beate; Schwäble, Joachim; Buerger, Horst; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Choudhary, Chunaram; McMahon, Martin; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Serve, Hubert

    2005-11-01

    Up to 30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harbor internal tandem duplications (ITD) within the FLT3 gene, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase. These mutations induce constitutive tyrosine kinase activity in the absence of the natural Flt3 ligand and confer growth factor independence, increased proliferation, and survival to myeloid precursor cells. The signaling pathways and downstream nuclear targets mediating leukemic transformation are only partly identified. Here, we show that the presence of Flt3-ITD constitutively activates Akt (PKB), a key serine-threonine kinase within the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Constitutive activation of Akt phosphorylated and inhibited the transcription factor Foxo3a. Restored Foxo3a activity reversed Flt3-ITD-mediated growth properties and dominant-negative Akt prevented Flt3-ITD-mediated cytokine independence. Conditional Akt activation targeted to the cell membrane induced cytokine-independent survival, cell cycle progression, and proliferation. Importantly, Akt activation was sufficient to cause in vitro transformation of 32D myeloid progenitor cells and in vivo promoted the development of a leukemia-like myeloid disease. Akt phosphorylation was found in myeloid blasts of 86% of AML patients, suggesting an important role in leukemogenesis. In summary, Akt is necessary for increased survival, proliferation, and leukemic transformation by Flt3-ITD, possibly by inactivation of Foxo transcription factors. These findings indicate that Akt and Foxo transcription factors are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in AML. PMID:16266983

  5. Diet-induced obesity in mice diminishes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Susan M; Seijkens, Tom T P; Kusters, Pascal J H; Beckers, Linda; den Toom, Myrthe; Smeets, Esther; Levels, Johannes; de Winther, Menno P J; Lutgens, Esther

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, characterized by leukocytosis and inflammation in the adipose tissue. Continuous activation of the immune system is a stressor for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in the bone marrow (BM). Here we studied how diet-induced obesity (DIO) affects HSPC population dynamics in the BM. Eight groups of age-matched C57Bl/6 mice received a high-fat diet (45% kilocalories from fat) ranging from 1 d up to 18 wk. The obesogenic diet caused decreased proliferation of lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+) (LSK) cells in the BM and a general suppression of progenitor cell populations including common lymphoid progenitors and common myeloid progenitors. Within the LSK population, DIO induced a shift in stem cells that are capable of self-renewal toward maturing multipotent progenitor cells. The higher differentiation potential resulted in increased lymphoid and myeloid ex vivo colony-forming capacity. In a competitive BM transplantation, BM from obese animals showed impaired multilineage reconstitution when transplanted into chow-fed mice. Our data demonstrate that obesity stimulates the differentiation and reduces proliferation of HSPCs in the BM, leading to a decreased HSPC population. This implies that the effects of obesity on HSPCs hampers proper functioning of the immune system.-Van den Berg, S. M., Seijkens, T. T. P., Kusters, P. J. H., Beckers, L., den Toom, M., Smeets, E., Levels, J., de Winther, M. P. J., Lutgens, E. Diet-induced obesity in mice diminishes hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in the bone marrow. PMID:26813974

  6. Differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells in irradiated mouse thymic lobes. Kinetics and phenotype of progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Spangrude, G.J.; Scollay, R. )

    1990-12-01

    To define cell populations which participate in the very early stages of T cell development in the mouse thymus, we enriched hematopoietic stem cells from mouse bone marrow and injected them into thymic lobes of irradiated Ly-5 congenic recipients. The progeny of the stem cells were identified and their phenotypes were determined by two-color flow cytometry for the expression of various cell surface differentiation Ag during the course of their subsequent intrathymic development. The majority of the differentiation which occurred in the first 10 days after intrathymic cell transfer was myeloid in nature; hence, this study demonstrates that the irradiated thymus is not strictly selective for T cell development. Further, the maximum rate of T cell development was observed after intrathymic injection of 200 stem cells. Donor-derived cells which did not express Ag characteristic of the myeloid lineage could be detected and their phenotypes could be determined by flow cytometry as early as 7 days after intrathymic injection. At this time, the cells were still very similar phenotypically to the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells. Exceptions to this were the expression of stem cell Ag 2 and a decrease in the level of MHC class I Ag expression. After 9 days, the donor-derived cells expressed high levels of the Thy-1 Ag and proceeded to change in cell surface phenotype as differentiation continued. These cell phenotypes are described for the time frame ending 18 days after injection, when most donor-derived cells were phenotypically small CD4+ CD8+ (double-positive) thymocytes.

  7. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-30

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Immunoregulatory and antimicrobial activities of myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Bogdan, Christian

    2007-02-01

    180 scientists recently met at the 20th Annual meeting of the European Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Society to discuss the interaction between interferons, myeloid cells, TLR, killing mechanisms and microbial pathogens. PMID:17273996

  10. Myeloid cells in cancer-related inflammation.

    PubMed

    Caronni, Nicoletta; Savino, Benedetta; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2015-02-01

    Myeloid cells are key elements of the cancer-related inflammation with the potential to support not only tumor growth but also invasion and metastasis. Tumor-derived factors affect myeloid cell differentiation inducing a phenotype that supports tumor growth, inducing immunosuppression, angiogenesis and tissue remodeling. Soluble mediators, produced at primary tumor site, can also act in a remote mode inducing the release from bone marrow of myeloid cells that have immunosuppressive activities in tumor-draining lymphoid organs and can predispose to colonization when migrate to metastatic organs. We will here review current knowledge on the contribution of tumor-derived signals that affect polarized activation of myeloid cells, their bone marrow release and recruitment to metastatic sites with a particular focus on the role of chemokines. PMID:25454487

  11. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-O-gallate induces cell death by acid sphingomyelinase activation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YUHUI; KUMAZOE, MOTOFUMI; BAE, JAEHOON; YAMADA, SHUHEI; TAKAI, MIKA; HIDAKA, SHIORI; YAMASHITA, SHUYA; KIM, YOONHEE; WON, YEONGSEON; MURATA, MOTOKI; TSUKAMOTO, SHUNTARO; TACHIBANA, HIROFUMI

    2015-01-01

    An epidemiological study showed that green tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of hematopoietic malignancy. The major green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG) is reported to have anticancer effects. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a major hematopoietic malignancy characterized by expansion of myeloid cells. In the present study, we showed EGCG-induced acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activation and lipid raft clustering in CML cells. The ASM inhibitor desipramine significantly reduced EGCG-induced cell death. Protein kinase Cδ is a well-known kinase that plays an important role in ASM activation. We observed EGCG-induced phos-phorylation of protein kinase Cδ at Ser664. Importantly, EGCG-induced ASM activation was significantly reduced by pretreatment of CML cells with the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor NS2028, suggesting that EGCG induced ASM activation through the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway. Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of a cGMP-negative regulator enhanced the anti-CML effect of EGCG. These results indicate that EGCG-induced cell death via the cGMP/ASM pathway in CML cells. PMID:26135316

  12. Green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-O-gallate induces cell death by acid sphingomyelinase activation in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhui; Kumazoe, Motofumi; Bae, Jaehoon; Yamada, Shuhei; Takai, Mika; Hidaka, Shiori; Yamashita, Shuya; Kim, Yoonhee; Won, Yeongseon; Murata, Motoki; Tsukamoto, Shuntaro; Tachibana, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    An epidemiological study showed that green tea consumption is associated with a reduced risk of hematopoietic malignancy. The major green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin?3-O-gallate (EGCG) is reported to have anticancer effects. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a major hematopoietic malignancy characterized by expansion of myeloid cells. In the present study, we showed EGCG-induced acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) activation and lipid raft clustering in CML cells. The ASM inhibitor desipramine significantly reduced EGCG-induced cell death. Protein kinaseC? is a well?known kinase that plays an important role in ASM activation. We observed EGCG-induced phosphorylation of protein kinaseC? at Ser664. Importantly, EGCG-induced ASM activation was significantly reduced by pretreatment of CML cells with the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor NS2028, suggesting that EGCG induced ASM activation through the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway. Indeed, pharmacological inhibition of a cGMP-negative regulator enhanced the anti-CML effect of EGCG. These results indicate that EGCG-induced cell death via the cGMP/ASM pathway in CML cells. PMID:26135316

  13. Control of Both Myeloid Cell Infiltration and Angiogenesis by CCR1 Promotes Liver Cancer Metastasis Development in Mice12

    PubMed Central

    Rodero, Mathieu Paul; Auvynet, Constance; Poupel, Lucie; Combadière, Behazine; Combadière, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Expression of the CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) by tumor cells has been associated with protumoral activity; however, its role in nontumoral cells during tumor development remains elusive. Here, we investigated the role of CCR1 deletion on stromal and hematopoietic cells in a liver metastasis tumor model. Metastasis development was strongly impaired in CCR1-deficient mice compared to control mice and was associated with reduced liver monocyte infiltration. To decipher the role of myeloid cells, sublethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with CCR1-deficient bone marrow (BM) and showed better survival rates than the control reconstituted mice. These results point toward the involvement of CCR1 myeloid cell infiltration in the promotion of tumor burden. In addition, survival rates were extended in CCR1-deficient mice receiving either control or CCR1-deficient BM, indicating that host CCR1 expression on nonhematopoietic cells also supports tumor growth. Finally, we found defective tumor-induced neoangiogenesis (in vitro and in vivo) in CCR1-deficient mice. Overall, our results indicate that CCR1 expression by both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells favors tumor aggressiveness. We propose CCR1 as a potential therapeutical target for liver metastasis therapy. PMID:23730212

  14. Knockdown of SALL4 Protein Enhances All-trans Retinoic Acid-induced Cellular Differentiation in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Liu, Liang; Leung, Lai-Han; Cooney, Austin J; Chen, Changyi; Rosengart, Todd K; Ma, Yupo; Yang, Jianchang

    2015-04-24

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is a differentiation agent that revolutionized the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. However, it has not been useful for other types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Here we explored the effect of SALL4, a stem cell factor, on ATRA-induced AML differentiation in both ATRA-sensitive and ATRA-resistant AML cells. Aberrant SALL4 expression has been found in nearly all human AML cases, whereas, in normal bone marrow and peripheral blood cells, its expression is only restricted to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. We reason that, in AMLs, SALL4 activation may prevent cell differentiation and/or protect self-renewal that is seen in normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Indeed, our studies show that ATRA-mediated myeloid differentiation can be largely blocked by exogenous expression of SALL4, whereas ATRA plus SALL4 knockdown causes significantly increased AML differentiation and cell death. Mechanistic studies indicate that SALL4 directly associates with retinoic acid receptor ? and modulates ATRA target gene expression. SALL4 is shown to recruit lysine-specific histone demethylase 1 (LSD1) to target genes and alter the histone methylation status. Furthermore, coinhibition of LSD1 and SALL4 plus ATRA treatment exhibited the strongest anti-AML effect. These findings suggest that SALL4 plays an unfavorable role in ATRA-based regimes, highlighting an important aspect of leukemia therapy. PMID:25737450

  15. Therapeutically targeting SELF-reinforcing leukemic niches in acute myeloid leukemia: A worthy endeavor?

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, Paolo; Farina, Mirko; Boni, Marina; Dambruoso, Irene; Calvello, Celeste

    2016-05-01

    A tight relationship between the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) population and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has been convincingly established. The AML clone contains leukemic stem cells (LSCs) that compete with normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for niche occupancy and remodel the niche; whereas, the BM microenvironment might promote AML development and progression not only through hypoxia and homing/adhesion molecules, but also through genetic defects. Although it is still unknown whether the niche influences treatment results or contains any potential target for treatment, this dynamic AML-niche interaction might be a promising therapeutic objective to significantly improve the AML cure rate. Am. J. Hematol. 91:507-517, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26822317

  16. Epigenetic Regulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal (Gupta), Sampa; Baumann, Heinz; Wetzler, Meir

    2009-01-01

    We have demonstrated that constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 activity, observed in approximately 50% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases, is associated with adverse treatment outcome. Constitutive STAT3 activation may result from the expression of oncogenic protein tyrosine kinases or from autocrine stimulation by hematopoietic growth factors. These causes are generally neither necessary nor sufficient for leukemogenesis; additional transforming events or growth stimulatory processes are needed. Here we review the literature addressing epigenetic regulation as a mechanism controlling STAT3 signaling in AML. A better understanding of mechanisms of dysregulation of STAT signaling pathways may serve as a basis for designing novel therapeutic strategies that target these pathways in leukemia cells. PMID:18192010

  17. Transplant to treatment-free remission: the evolving view of 'cure' in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yong, Agnes S M; Brissot, Eolia; Rubinstein, Sam; Savani, Bipin N; Mohty, Mohamad

    2015-12-01

    Before the introduction of the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) imatinib, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) was the leading indication for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), and allogeneic HSCT remains the only treatment recognized as curative for CML. The success of imatinib and other TKIs (e.g., nilotinib, dasatinib) has made allogeneic HSCT a later-line therapy that is reserved only for advanced-phase, high-risk, or TKI-resistant patients with CML. Accumulating evidence from clinical trials investigating treatment-free remission suggests that TKIs may also provide an operational cure for some patients with CML. Herein, we discuss the concept of cure in CML and the current roles of both HSCT and TKIs in the treatment of CML. PMID:26364871

  18. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-15

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Isomeric Trisaryloxycyclotriphosphazene Polymer Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Kumar, Devendra

    1990-01-01

    Substances useful for making heat-and fire-resistant polymers. Cyclotriphosphazene-based monomers and polymer precursors led to development of high-temperature materials. Cyclotriphosphazene-derived monomers, polymer precursors, and polymers becoming important from both industrial and scientific points of view. Presence of phosphazene moiety in cyclotriphosphazene-based monomers and polymer precursors expected to impact special properties in desired high-performance materials containing inorganic backbones for aerospace applications. Useful for obtaining heat-and fire-resistant polymers for composites, adhesives, molding powders, and coating laminates. Also used in structures (e.g. secondary structures in aircraft), in construction of spacecraft, and in electronics and computer industries.

  20. Early myeloid cell-specific expression of the human cathepsin G gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Grisolano, J L; Sclar, G M; Ley, T J

    1994-09-13

    The human cathepsin G (CG) gene is expressed only in promyelocytes and encodes a neutral serine protease that is packaged in the azurophil (primary) granules of myeloid cells. To define the cis-acting DNA elements that are responsible for promyelocyte-specific "targeting," we injected a 6-kb transgene containing the entire human CG gene, including coding sequences contained in a 2.7-kb region, approximately 2.5 kb of 5' flanking sequence, and approximately 0.8 kb of 3' flanking sequence. Seven of seven "transient transgenic" murine embryos revealed human CG expression in the fetal livers at embryonic day 15. Stable transgenic founder lines were created with the same 6-kb fragment; four of five founder lines expressed human CG in the bone marrow. The level of human CG expression was relatively low per gene copy when compared with the endogenous murine CG gene, and expression was integration-site dependent; however, the level of gene expression correlated roughly with gene copy number. The human CG transgene and the endogenous murine CG gene were coordinately expressed in the bone marrow and the spleen. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic bone marrow revealed that the human CG protein was expressed exclusively in myeloid cells. Expression of human CG protein was highest in myeloid precursors and declined in mature myeloid cells. These data suggest that the human CG gene was appropriately targeted and developmentally regulated, demonstrating that the cis-acting DNA sequences required for the early myeloid cell-specific expression of human CG are present in this small genomic fragment. PMID:8090757

  1. Isolated duodenal myeloid sarcoma associated with the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion gene followed by acute myeloid leukemia progression: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, BO; YOU, PENG; ZHU, PING; DU, ZUNGUO; WU, BEIQIAN; XU, XIAOPING; CHEN, ZI

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid sarcoma (MS) is a rare disease that presents as an extramedullary tumorous mass of immature myeloid precursors. The majority of MS are identified in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and rarely present as a primary isolated MS without AML. In addition, inversion of chromosome 16 [inv(16)] and the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion gene are rarely associated with MS. The current study reports a female patient with an isolated duodenal MS, who developed AML-M4 associated with the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion gene and 48,XX,inv(16),+13,+22. A review of previously reported cases of isolated MS with the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion gene was also performed. Isolated MS with the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion gene was often observed in abdominal lesions, with the intestinal tract being the predominantly involved site. In addition, patients with isolated MS with the CBFβ/MYH11 fusion exhibited a high risk of developing systemic AML. The diagnosis of isolated MS may be particularly challenging and, therefore, determining the optimal standard treatment for isolated MS is required. PMID:25120702

  2. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-11

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Oblimersen, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Earthquakes: hydrogeochemical precursors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Manga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is a long-sought goal. Changes in groundwater chemistry before earthquakes in Iceland highlight a potential hydrogeochemical precursor, but such signals must be evaluated in the context of long-term, multiparametric data sets.

  5. Targeted disruption of the PU.1 gene results in multiple hematopoietic abnormalities.

    PubMed Central

    McKercher, S R; Torbett, B E; Anderson, K L; Henkel, G W; Vestal, D J; Baribault, H; Klemsz, M; Feeney, A J; Wu, G E; Paige, C J; Maki, R A

    1996-01-01

    PU.1 is a member of the ets family of transcription factors and is expressed exclusively in cells of the hematopoietic lineage. Mice homozygous for a disruption in the PU.1 DNA binding domain are born alive but die of severe septicemia within 48 h. The analysis of these neonates revealed a lack of mature macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells, although erythrocytes and megakaryocytes were present. The absence of lymphoid commitment and development in null mice was not absolute, since mice maintained on antibiotics began to develop normal appearing T cells 3-5 days after birth. In contrast, mature B cells remained undetectable in these older mice. Within the myeloid lineage, despite a lack of macrophages in the older antibiotic-treated animals, a few cells with the characteristics of neutrophils began to appear by day 3. While the PU.1 protein appears not to be essential for myeloid and lymphoid lineage commitment, it is absolutely required for the normal differentiation of B cells and macrophages. Images PMID:8896458

  6. A focused review of hematopoietic neoplasms occurring in the therapy-related setting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liping; Wang, Sa A

    2014-01-01

    Hematological neoplasms developed in patients with a history of cytotoxic therapies comprise a group of diseases with a poor clinical outcome, and collectively categorized as “therapy-related myeloid neoplasms” (t-MN) in the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) Classification. In recent years, numerous publications have emerged, and these studies have greatly expanded the scope of our understanding in this field. We here focused our review on several selected areas including secondary malignancies occurring in patients with autoimmune diseases; radiation therapy alone as a causative agent; the similarity and differences between therapy-related myelodysplastic syndromes (t-MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (t-AML); clinical behavior and treatment outcome of t-AML patients with favorable cytogenetics; the incidence and clinical features of myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms, as well as acute lymphoblastic leukemia and myeloproliferative neoplasms in patients with prior cytotoxic exposure. These recent studies have shown that therapy-related hematopoietic neoplasms are heterogeneous, and may manifest in various forms, more complex than we have recognized previously. Cytogenetic abnormalities and underlying mutations are likely to be the major factors dictating prognosis. PMID:25120730

  7. Hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) as a therapeutic target in immune and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Poh, Ashleigh R; O'Donoghue, Robert J J; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-06-30

    The hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) is a member of the SRC family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (SFKs), and is expressed in cells of the myeloid and B-lymphocyte cell lineages. Excessive HCK activation is associated with several types of leukemia and enhances cell proliferation and survival by physical association with oncogenic fusion proteins, and with functional interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. Elevated HCK activity is also observed in many solid malignancies, including breast and colon cancer, and correlates with decreased patient survival rates. HCK enhances the secretion of growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines from myeloid cells, and promotes macrophage polarization towards a wound healing and tumor-promoting alternatively activated phenotype. Within tumor associated macrophages, HCK stimulates the formation of podosomes that facilitate extracellular matrix degradation, which enhance immune and epithelial cell invasion. By virtue of functional cooperation between HCK and bona fide oncogenic tyrosine kinases, excessive HCK activation can also reduce drug efficacy and contribute to chemo-resistance, while genetic ablation of HCK results in minimal physiological consequences in healthy mice. Given its known crystal structure, HCK therefore provides an attractive therapeutic target to both, directly inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and indirectly curb the source of tumor-promoting changes in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26087188

  8. Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Guilan; Shen, Min; Vermeulen, Roel; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Linet, Martha S.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens. PMID:22643707

  9. The Oncogenic TLS-ERG Fusion Protein Exerts Different Effects in Hematopoietic Cells and Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Junhui; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Blackburn, Michael L.; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Mei, Qi; Roth, Gerald J.; Chansky, Howard A.; Yang, Liu

    2005-01-01

    The oncogenic TLS-ERG fusion protein is found in human myeloid leukemia and Ewing's sarcoma as a result of specific chromosomal translocation. To unveil the potential mechanism(s) underlying cellular transformation, we have investigated the effects of TLS-ERG on both gene transcription and RNA splicing. Here we show that the TLS protein forms complexes with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the serine-arginine family of splicing factors in vivo. Deletion analysis of TLS-ERG in both mouse L-G myeloid progenitor cells and NIH 3T3 fibroblasts revealed that the RNA Pol II-interacting domain of TLS-ERG resides within the first 173 amino acids. While TLS-ERG repressed expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by glycoprotein IX promoter in L-G cells but not in NIH 3T3 cells, the fusion protein was able to affect splicing of the E1A reporter in NIH 3T3 cells but not in L-G cells. To identify potential target genes of TLS-ERG, the fusion protein and its mutants were stably expressed in both L-G and NIH 3T3 cells through retroviral transduction. Microarray analysis of RNA samples from these cells showed that TLS-ERG activates two different sets of genes sharing little similarity in the two cell lines. Taken together, these results suggest that the oncogenic TLS-ERG fusion protein transforms hematopoietic cells and fibroblasts via different pathways. PMID:15988032

  10. Hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) as a therapeutic target in immune and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Poh, Ashleigh R.; O'Donoghue, Robert J.J.; Ernst, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The hematopoietic cell kinase (HCK) is a member of the SRC family of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (SFKs), and is expressed in cells of the myeloid and B-lymphocyte cell lineages. Excessive HCK activation is associated with several types of leukemia and enhances cell proliferation and survival by physical association with oncogenic fusion proteins, and with functional interactions with receptor tyrosine kinases. Elevated HCK activity is also observed in many solid malignancies, including breast and colon cancer, and correlates with decreased patient survival rates. HCK enhances the secretion of growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines from myeloid cells, and promotes macrophage polarization towards a wound healing and tumor-promoting alternatively activated phenotype. Within tumor associated macrophages, HCK stimulates the formation of podosomes that facilitate extracellular matrix degradation, which enhance immune and epithelial cell invasion. By virtue of functional cooperation between HCK and bona fide oncogenic tyrosine kinases, excessive HCK activation can also reduce drug efficacy and contribute to chemo-resistance, while genetic ablation of HCK results in minimal physiological consequences in healthy mice. Given its known crystal structure, HCK therefore provides an attractive therapeutic target to both, directly inhibit the growth of cancer cells, and indirectly curb the source of tumor-promoting changes in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26087188

  11. MN1-Fli1 oncofusion transforms murine hematopoietic progenitor cells into acute megakaryoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Wenge, D V; Felipe-Fumero, E; Angenendt, L; Schliemann, C; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, L H; Thiede, C; Ehninger, G; Berdel, W E; Arteaga, M-F; Mikesch, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Long-term outcome of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) patients without Down's syndrome remains poor. Founding mutations and chimeric oncogenes characterize various AMKL subtypes. However, for around one third of all cases the underlying mechanisms of AMKL leukemogenesis are still largely unknown. Recently, an in-frame fusion of meningeoma 1-friend leukemia virus integration 1 (MN1-Fli1) gene was detected in a child with AMKL. We intended to investigate the potential role of this oncofusion in leukemogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Strikingly, expression of MN1-Fli1 in murine hematopoietic progenitor cells was sufficient to induce leukemic transformation generating immature myeloid cells with cytomorphology and expression of surface markers typical for AMKL. Systematic structure function analyses revealed FLS and 3'ETS domains of Fli1 as decisive domains for the AMKL phenotype. Our data highlight an important role of MN1-Fli1 in AMKL leukemogenesis and provide a basis for research assessing the value of this oncofusion as a future diagnostic marker and/or therapeutic target in AMKL patients. PMID:26690545

  12. Comparative Analysis of the Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells from Placenta, Cord Blood, and Fetal Liver, Based on Their Immunophenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, Maria D.; Kyryk, Vitaliy M.; Svitina, Hanna M.; Shablii, Yulia M.; Lukash, Lubov L.; Lobyntseva, Galina S.; Shablii, Volodymyr A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of human hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) with the CD34+CD45lowSSClow phenotype from full-term placental tissue (FTPT) as compared to cord blood (CB) and fetal liver (FL) cells. We demonstrated the presence of cell subpopulations at various stages of the differentiation with such immunophenotypes as CD34+/lowCD45low/−, CD34++CD45low/−, CD34+++CD45low/−, CD34+/lowCD45hi, and CD34++CD45hi in both first trimester placental tissue (FiTPT) and FTPT which implies their higher phenotypic heterogeneity compared to CB. HPCs of the FTPT origin expressed the CD90 antigen at a higher level compared to its expression by the CB HPCs and the CD133 antigen expression being at the same level in both cases. The HPCs compartment of FTPT versus CB contained higher number of myeloid and erythroid committed cells but lower number of myeloid and lymphoid ones compared to FL HPCs. HPCs of the FTPT and CB origin possess similar potentials for the multilineage differentiation in vitro and similar ratios of myeloid and erythroid progenitors among the committed cells. This observation suggests that the active hematopoiesis occurs in the FTPT. We obtained viable HPCs from cryopreserved placental tissue fragments allowing us to develop procedures for banking and testing of placenta-derived HPCs for clinical use. PMID:26347038

  13. Genome-wide lineage-specific transcriptional networks underscore Ikaros-dependent lymphoid priming in Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Samuel Yao-Ming; Yoshida, Toshimi; Zhang, Jiangwen; Georgopoulos, Katia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Here we investigate the mechanisms that underlie the induction of developmental potential and establishment of cell fate during early hematopoiesis. A cascade of lineage-affiliated gene expression signatures, primed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and differentially propagated in lineage-restricted progenitors, is identified. First evidence is provided for a stochastic sampling of lymphoid, erythroid and myeloid transcripts in HSC and multipotent progenitors (MPP). Multi-lineage priming is subsequently resolved upon lineage restrictions. Nonetheless, an unexpected association of lymphoid and myeloid signatures is detected past a nominal myeloid restriction point and a previously unappreciated lymphoid potential is revealed for this stage in development. New insight is provided into Ikaros' role as a bivalent regulator of multi-lineage priming during early hematopoiesis. Whereas Ikaros is responsible for activation of a cascade of lymphoid signatures in the HSC, at subsequent restriction points it is also involved in the repression of lineage-inappropriate signatures including stem cell-specific genes. PMID:19345118

  14. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34(+)CD45(+) progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34(+)CD41(+) progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS. PMID:26502776

  15. Mitochondria defects are involved in lead-acetate-induced adult hematopoietic stem cell decline.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Jia, Dao-Yong; Cai, Shi-Zhong; Li, Cheng-Peng; Zhang, Meng-Si; Zhang, Yan-Yan; Yan, Chong-Huai; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2015-05-19

    Occupational high-grade lead exposure has been reduced in recent decades as a result of increased regulation. However, environmental lead exposure remains widespread, and is associated with severe toxicity implicated in human diseases. We performed oral intragastric administration of various dose lead acetate to adult Sprague Dawley rats to define the role of lead exposure in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) function, and to clarify its underlying mechanism. Lead acetate-exposed rats exhibited developmental abnormalities in myeloid and lymphoid lineages, and a significant decline in immune functions. It also showed HSCs functional decline associated with senescent phenotype with low grade lead acetate exposure or apoptotic phenotype with relative higher grade dose exposure. Mechanistic exploration showed a significant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the lead acetate-exposed CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment, which correlated with functional defects in cellular mitochondria. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C led to reversion of the CD90(+)CD45(-) compartment functional decline. These results indicate that lead acetate perturbs the hematopoietic balance of adult HSCs, associated with cellular mitochondria defects, increased intracellular ROS generation. PMID:25800560

  16. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  17. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E; Tenen, Daniel G

    2013-02-21

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications. PMID:23212524

  18. In vivo generation of transplantable human hematopoietic cells from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Amabile, Giovanni; Welner, Robert S.; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Ye, Min; Kocher, Olivier; Neuberg, Donna S.; Khrapko, Konstantin; Silberstein, Leslie E.

    2013-01-01

    Lineage-restricted cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state known as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells through overexpression of 4 transcription factors. iPS cells are similar to human embryonic stem (hES) cells and have the same ability to generate all the cells of the human body, including blood cells. However, this process is extremely inefficient and to date has been unsuccessful at differentiating iPS into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We hypothesized that iPS cells, injected into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ immunocompromised (NSG) mice could give rise to hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) during teratoma formation. Here, we report a novel in vivo system in which human iPS cells differentiate within teratomas to derive functional myeloid and lymphoid cells. Similarly, HSPCs can be isolated from teratoma parenchyma and reconstitute a human immune system when transplanted into immunodeficient mice. Our data provide evidence that in vivo generation of patient customized cells is feasible, providing materials that could be useful for transplantation, human antibody generation, and drug screening applications. PMID:23212524

  19. Incomplete Splicing, Cell Division Defects and Hematopoietic Blockage in dhx8 Mutant Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    English, Milton A.; Lei, Lin; Blake, Trevor; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Sood, Raman; Azuma, Mizuki; Hickstein, Dennis; Liu, P. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate hematopoiesis is a complex developmental process that is controlled by genes in diverse pathways. To identify novel genes involved in early hematopoiesis, we conducted an ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis screen in zebrafish. The mummy (mmy) line was investigated because of its multiple hematopoietic defects. Homozygous mmy embryos lacked circulating blood cells types and were dead by 30 hours post-fertilization (hpf). The mmy mutants did not express myeloid markers and had significantly decreased expression of progenitor and erythroid markers in primitive hematopoiesis. Through positional cloning, we identified a truncation mutation in dhx8 in the mmy fish. dhx8 is the zebrafish ortholog of the yeast splicing factor prp22, which is a DEAH-box RNA helicase. Mmy mutants had splicing defects in many genes, including several hematopoietic genes. Mmy embryos also showed cell division defects as characterized by disorganized mitotic spindles and formation of multiple spindle poles in mitotic cells. These cell division defects were confirmed by DHX8 knockdown in HeLa cells. Together, our results confirm that dhx8 is involved in mRNA splicing and suggest that it is also important for cell division during mitosis. This is the first vertebrate model for dhx8, whose function is essential for primitive hematopoiesis in developing embryos. PMID:22411201

  20. Lineage-restricted expression of homeobox-containing genes in human hematopoietic cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, W.F.; Largman, C.; Lowney, P.; Corral, J.C.; Detmer, K.; Hack, F.M.; Lawrence, H.J. Univ. of California, Davis ); Hauser, C.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors investigated the role of homeobox-containing genes in human hematopoiesis because homeobox genes (i) control cell fate in the Drosophila embryo, (ii) are expressed in specific patterns in human embryos, and (iii) appear to function as transcription factors that control cell phenotype in other mammalian organs. Using four homeobox probes from the HOX2 locus and a previously undescribed homeobox cDNA (PL1), they screened mRNAs from 18 human leukemic cell lines representing erythroid, myeloid, and T- and B-cell lineages. Complex patterns of lineage-restricted expression are observed. No single homeobox gene is expressed in all types of hematopoietic cells, but each cell type exhibits homeobox gene expression. They have demonstrated (i) lineage-restricted expression of five homeobox genes in erythroid and monocytic cell lines; (ii) expression of additional homeobox genes in other cell lineages (HL-60 and lymphoid cells); (iii) expression of one homeobox gene in normal marrow cells; and (iv) modulation of expression during differentiation. These data suggest that these genes play a role in human hematopoietic development and lineage commitment.

  1. Absence of WASp Enhances Hematopoietic and Megakaryocytic Differentiation in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Miguel G; Muñoz, Pilar; Sánchez-Gilabert, Almudena; Cobo, Marién; Benabdellah, Karim; Anderson, Per; Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Neth, Olaf; Molinos-Quintana, Agueda; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Martin, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the WAS gene and characterized by severe thrombocytopenia. Although the role of WASp in terminally differentiated lymphocytes and myeloid cells is well characterized, its role in early hematopoietic differentiation and in platelets (Plts) biology is poorly understood. In the present manuscript, we have used zinc finger nucleases targeted to the WAS locus for the development of two isogenic WAS knockout (WASKO) human embryonic stem cell lines (hESCs). Upon hematopoietic differentiation, hESCs-WASKO generated increased ratios of CD34+CD45+ progenitors with altered responses to stem cell factor compared to hESCs-WT. When differentiated toward the megakaryocytic linage, hESCs-WASKO produced increased numbers of CD34+CD41+ progenitors, megakaryocytes (MKs), and Plts. hESCs-WASKO-derived MKs and Plts showed altered phenotype as well as defective responses to agonist, mimicking WAS patients MKs and Plts defects. Interestingly, the defects were more evident in WASp-deficient MKs than in WASp-deficient Plts. Importantly, ectopic WAS expression using lentiviral vectors restored normal Plts development and MKs responses. These data validate the AND-1_WASKO cell lines as a human cellular model for basic research and for preclinical studies for WAS. PMID:26502776

  2. Physiological recirculation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells through blood, lymph and extramedullary tissues

    PubMed Central

    Massberg, Steffen; Schaerli, Patrick; Knezevic-Maramica, Irina; Köllnberger, Maria; Tubo, Noah; Ashley Moseman, E.; Huff, Ines V.; Junt, Tobias; Wagers, Amy J.; Mazo, Irina B.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Constitutive egress of bone marrow (BM)-resident hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) into the blood is a well-established phenomenon, but the ultimate fate and functional relevance of circulating HSPCs is largely unknown. We show that mouse thoracic duct (TD) lymph contains HSPCs that possess short- and long-term multilineage reconstitution capacity. TD-derived HSPCs originate in the BM, enter the blood and traffic to multiple non-lymphoid extramedulary tissues, where they reside for at least 36h until entering draining lymphatics to return to the blood and, eventually, the BM. HSPC egress from extramedullary tissues into lymph depends on sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors, particularly S1P1. Migratory HSPCs proliferate within extramedullary tissues giving rise to tissue-resident myeloid cells, preferentially dendritic cells. HSPC differentiation is amplified upon exposure to Toll-like receptor agonists. Thus, HSPCs can survey peripheral organs and replenish tissue-resident hematopoietic cells by acting as a source of specialized leukocytes during host defense against pathogens. PMID:18045540

  3. Transcriptional, epigenetic and retroviral signatures identify regulatory regions involved in hematopoietic lineage commitment.

    PubMed

    Romano, Oriana; Peano, Clelia; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Petiti, Luca; Poletti, Valentina; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Cavazza, Alessia; Rossi, Claudia; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Giuliana; Bicciato, Silvio; De Bellis, Gianluca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Miccio, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide approaches allow investigating the molecular circuitry wiring the genetic and epigenetic programs of human somatic stem cells. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) give rise to the different blood cell types; however, the molecular basis of human hematopoietic lineage commitment is poorly characterized. Here, we define the transcriptional and epigenetic profile of human HSPC and early myeloid and erythroid progenitors by a combination of Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), ChIP-seq and Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) integration site mapping. Most promoters and transcripts were shared by HSPC and committed progenitors, while enhancers and super-enhancers consistently changed upon differentiation, indicating that lineage commitment is essentially regulated by enhancer elements. A significant fraction of CAGE promoters differentially expressed upon commitment were novel, harbored a chromatin enhancer signature, and may identify promoters and transcribed enhancers driving cell commitment. MLV-targeted genomic regions co-mapped with cell-specific active enhancers and super-enhancers. Expression analyses, together with an enhancer functional assay, indicate that MLV integration can be used to identify bona fide developmentally regulated enhancers. Overall, this study provides an overview of transcriptional and epigenetic changes associated to HSPC lineage commitment, and a novel signature for regulatory elements involved in cell identity. PMID:27095295

  4. Transcriptional, epigenetic and retroviral signatures identify regulatory regions involved in hematopoietic lineage commitment

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Oriana; Peano, Clelia; Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio Malagoli; Petiti, Luca; Poletti, Valentina; Cocchiarella, Fabienne; Rizzi, Ermanno; Severgnini, Marco; Cavazza, Alessia; Rossi, Claudia; Pagliaro, Pasqualepaolo; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Ferrari, Giuliana; Bicciato, Silvio; De Bellis, Gianluca; Mavilio, Fulvio; Miccio, Annarita

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide approaches allow investigating the molecular circuitry wiring the genetic and epigenetic programs of human somatic stem cells. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) give rise to the different blood cell types; however, the molecular basis of human hematopoietic lineage commitment is poorly characterized. Here, we define the transcriptional and epigenetic profile of human HSPC and early myeloid and erythroid progenitors by a combination of Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE), ChIP-seq and Moloney leukemia virus (MLV) integration site mapping. Most promoters and transcripts were shared by HSPC and committed progenitors, while enhancers and super-enhancers consistently changed upon differentiation, indicating that lineage commitment is essentially regulated by enhancer elements. A significant fraction of CAGE promoters differentially expressed upon commitment were novel, harbored a chromatin enhancer signature, and may identify promoters and transcribed enhancers driving cell commitment. MLV-targeted genomic regions co-mapped with cell-specific active enhancers and super-enhancers. Expression analyses, together with an enhancer functional assay, indicate that MLV integration can be used to identify bona fide developmentally regulated enhancers. Overall, this study provides an overview of transcriptional and epigenetic changes associated to HSPC lineage commitment, and a novel signature for regulatory elements involved in cell identity. PMID:27095295

  5. A diffusible signal derived from hematopoietic cells supports the survival and proliferation of regenerative cells during zebrafish fin fold regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tomoya; Nakajima, Teruhiro; Ishida, Takashi; Kudo, Akira; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2015-03-01

    Multicellular organisms maintain body integrity by constantly regenerating tissues throughout their lives; however, the overall mechanism for regulating regeneration remains an open question. Studies of limb and fin regeneration in teleost fish and urodeles have shown the involvement of a number of locally activated signals at the wounded site during regeneration. Here, we demonstrate that a diffusible signal from a distance also play an essential role for regeneration. Among a number of zebrafish mutants, we found that the zebrafish cloche (clo) and tal1 mutants, which lack most hematopoietic tissues, displayed a unique regeneration defect accompanying apoptosis in primed regenerative tissue. Our analyses of the mutants showed that the cells in the primed regenerative tissue are susceptible to apoptosis, but their survival is normally supported by the presence of hematopoietic tissues, mainly the myeloid cells. We further showed that a diffusible factor in the wild-type body fluid mediates this signal. Thus, our study revealed a novel mechanism that the hematopoietic tissues regulate tissue regeneration through a diffusible signal. PMID:25533245

  6. Zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells support hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, survival, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Clyde; Su, Tammy; Lau, Ryan P; Shah, Arpit; Laurie, Payton C; Avalos, Brenda; Aggio, Julian; Harris, Elena; Traver, David; Stachura, David L

    2015-12-01

    Forward genetic screens in zebrafish have been used to identify genes essential for the generation of primitive blood and the emergence of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), but have not elucidated the genes essential for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation and differentiation because of the lack of methodologies to functionally assess these processes. We previously described techniques used to test the developmental potential of HSPCs by culturing them on zebrafish kidney stromal (ZKS) cells, derived from the main site of hematopoiesis in the adult teleost. Here we describe an additional primary stromal cell line we refer to as zebrafish embryonic stromal trunk (ZEST) cells, derived from tissue surrounding the embryonic dorsal aorta, the site of HSC emergence in developing fish. ZEST cells encouraged HSPC differentiation toward the myeloid, lymphoid, and erythroid pathways when assessed by morphologic and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses. Additionally, ZEST cells significantly expanded the number of cultured HSPCs in vitro, indicating that these stromal cells are supportive of both HSPC proliferation and multilineage differentiation. Examination of ZEST cells indicates that they express numerous cytokines and Notch ligands and possess endothelial characteristics. Further characterization of ZEST cells should prove to be invaluable in understanding the complex signaling cascades instigated by the embryonic hematopoietic niche required to expand and differentiate HSPCs. Elucidating these processes and identifying possibilities for the modulation of these molecular pathways should allow the in vitro expansion of HSPCs for a multitude of therapeutic uses. PMID:26391449

  7. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Slovak, M.L.

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  8. [Transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to malignant hematopoietic cells of different origins].

    PubMed

    Wabg, Kai; Peng, Jian-Qinag; Yuan, Zhen-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Bin

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the transfection efficiency of adenoviral vector AD5/F35 to hematopoietic malignant cells lines of various origins and AD5/F35 cytotoxicity. The hematologic malignant cell lines of various origins were transfected by AD5/F35-EGFP at different multiple of infection (MOI) and AD5-EGFP was used as control; the proportion of fluorescence positive cells was detected by flow cytometry; the killing effect of virus on infective target cells was assayed by MTT and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector to cell line of myeloid origin was > 99% at MOI = 30, the transfective efficiency of AD5 vector was 26.4% at MOI = 1,000; the transfection efficiency of AD5/F35 vector and AD5 vector to cell line of B cell origin were 11.7% and 5.7%, respectively, at MOI = 1,000. AD5/F35 and AD5 vectors could not effectively transfect cells of T cell origin, no fluorescence positive cells were detected at MOI = 1,000; no significant killing effect of AD5/F35 vector on infective target cells was observed at MOI = 1,000. It is concluded that AD5/F35 vector infection has definite selectivity to hematologic malignant cells of various origin, the infection ability of AD5/F35 vector to cells of myeloid origin is stronger than that to cells of B cell origin, the cytotoxicity of AD5/F35 vector to infective target cells is small. The AD5/F35 vector is preferable to AD5 vector in respect of infection ability and offers good prospects of application in gene therapy for myeloid leukemia cells as target cells. PMID:16800935

  9. Cytogenetic and molecular delineation of the smallest commonly deleted region of chromosome 5 in malignant myeloid diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Le Beau, M M; Espinosa, R; Neuman, W L; Stock, W; Roulston, D; Larson, R A; Keinanen, M; Westbrook, C A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a whole chromosome 5 or a deletion of its long arm (5q) is a recurring abnormality in malignant myeloid neoplasms. To determine the location of genes on 5q that may be involved in leukemogenesis, we examined the deleted chromosome 5 homologs in a series of 135 patients with malignant myeloid diseases. By comparing the breakpoints, we identified a small segment of 5q, consisting of band 5q31, that was deleted in each patient. This segment has been termed the critical region. Distal 5q contains a number of genes encoding growth factors, hormone receptors, and proteins involved in signal transduction or transcriptional regulation. These include several genes that are good candidates for a tumor-suppressor gene, as well as the genes encoding five hematopoietic growth factors (CSF2, IL3, IL4, IL5, and IL9). By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have refined the localization of these genes to 5q31.1 and have determined the order of these genes and of other markers within 5q31. By hybridizing probes to metaphase cells with overlapping deletions involving 5q31, we have narrowed the critical region to a small segment of 5q31 containing the EGR1 gene. The five hematopoietic growth factor genes and seven other genes are excluded from this region. The EGR1 gene was not deleted in nine other patients with acute myeloid leukemia who did not have abnormalities of chromosome 5. By physical mapping, the minimum size of the critical region was estimated to be 2.8 megabases. This cytogenetic map of 5q31, together with the molecular characterization of the critical region, will facilitate the identification of a putative tumor-suppressor gene in this band. PMID:8516290

  10. NPM1-mutated acute myeloid leukemia of monocytic or myeloid origin exhibit distinct immunophenotypes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Rong; Zhu, Hong-Hu; Ruan, Guo-Rui; Qin, Ya-Zhen; Shi, Hong-Xia; Lai, Yue-Yun; Chang, Yan; Wang, Ya-Zhe; Lu, Dan; Hao, Le; Li, Jin-Lan; Li, Ling-Di; Jiang, Bin; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2013-07-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with mutated nucleophosmin (NPM1m+AML) is a heterogeneous entity. We investigated whether NPM1m+AML with monocytic or myeloid differentiation have distinct immunophenotype. The study included 160 NPM1m+AMLpatients and 178 AML patients without NPM1 mutation and recurrent cytogenetic abnormality (NPM1wt-AML). We analyzed the immunophenotype by flow cytometry. NPM1 mutation was detected by PCR. Compared with NPM1wt-AML patients, NPM1m+AML patients showed higher positive rates of CD33 and CD9 and lower positive rates of CD34, HLA-DR, CD7, CD15 and CD117 (all P<0.05). HLA-DR, CD64, CD14, CD11b, CD15, CD4, CD9 and CD10 were higher (P<0.001) and CD117 was lower (P<0.01) in monocytic NPM1m+AML compared with myeloid NPM1m+AML. Similar rates of lymphoid antigen (CD19, CD2, and CD7) and myeloid antigen (CD13, CD33) positivity were detected in monocytic and myeloid NPM1m+AML. Compared with NPM1wt-AML, CD34 expression was lower both in myeloid and monocytic NPM1m+AML subgroups, although HLA-DR was lower in NPM1m+AML compared with NPM1wt-AML only in myeloid subgroup. Comparisons of NPM1m+AML and NPM1wt-AML showed no differences in monocyte-associated markers such as CD14 and CD11b in myeloid and monocytic subgroup. Myeloid NPM1m+AML correlated with the female gender (P=0.001), lower WBC counts (P=0.04) and higher WT1 transcripts (P=0.006) compared with monocytic NPM1m+AML.These results suggested monocytic and myeloid-derived NPM1m+AML exhibit distinct immunophenotypes. PMID:23601747

  11. Are hematopoietic stem cells involved in hepatocarcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Antonino, Matteo; Del Prete, Valentina; Neve, Viviana; Scavo, Maria Principia; Barone, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The liver has three cell lineages able to proliferate after a hepatic injury: the mature hepatocyte, the ductular “bipolar” progenitor cell termed “oval cell” and the putative periductular stem cell. Hepatocytes can only produce other hepatocytes whereas ductular progenitor cells are considerate bipolar since they can give rise to biliary cells or hepatocytes. Periductular stem cells are rare in the liver, have a very long proliferation potential and may be multipotent, being this aspect still under investigation. They originate in the bone marrow since their progeny express genetic markers of donor hematopoietic cells after bone marrow transplantation. Since the liver is the hematopoietic organ of the fetus, it is possible that hematopoietic stem cells may reside in the liver of the adult. This assumption is proved by the finding that oval cells express hematopoietic markers like CD34, CD45, CD 109, Thy-1, c-kit, and others, which are also expressed by bone marrow-derived hematopoietic stem cells (BMSCs). Few and discordant studies have evaluated the role of BMSC in hepatocarcinogenesis so far and further studies in vitro and in vivo are warranted in order to definitively clarify such an issue. PMID:25202697

  12. Vitamin D level after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Sproat, Lisa; Bolwell, Brian; Rybicki, Lisa; Dean, Robert; Sobecks, Ronald; Pohlman, Brad; Andresen, Steven; Sweetenham, John; Copelan, Edward; Kalaycio, Matt

    2011-07-01

    Vitamin D (VD) deficiency can cause osteomalacia, bone pain, muscle weakness, fatigue, and increased risk of fracture, and may precipitate or exacerbate osteopenia and osteoporosis. Patients receiving treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may have limited exposure to sunlight and often experience gastrointestinal side effects that may decrease their ability to maintain an adequate VDlevel. We hypothesized that patients with AML and ALL would have a low VD level after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), and that these patients would have a high incidence of osteoporosis/osteopenia. We therefore studied the incidence of low VD level and low bone mineral density after HCT. Of 289 patients with AML or ALL undergoing HCT between January 1, 2000, and January 31, 2009, at the Cleveland Clinic, 58 (20.1%) patients had VD testing after HCT. Of these, 52 (89.7%) patients had a low VD level, and 6 (10.3%) had a normal level. Most patients with VD testing had graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and were taking corticosteroids (94.8% and 98.3%, respectively). Of the 49 patients with VD testing who also had bone mineral density testing, 65% had abnormal (low bone density) results. Only 21% of patients with VD testing were taking VD supplements prior to testing, and 65% had an elevated parathyroid hormone level. We found that most patients did not have VD testing after HCT, but those that did were very likely to have a low level and have low bone mineral density. Those with a low VD level were likely to have received corticosteroids, have GVHD, and have an elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) level. Given the potential morbidity of low VD level, VD deficiency should be considered after HCT. Prospective study of VD level and its impact on morbidity and mortality after HCT is warranted. PMID:21193053

  13. C/EBPδ Deficiency Sensitizes Mice to Ionizing Radiation-Induced Hematopoietic and Intestinal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jianhui; Wang, Wenze; Pathak, Rupak; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Junru; Hendrickson, Howard; Boerma, Marjan; Sterneck, Esta; Zhou, Daohong; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the radiation response is critical for developing interventions to mitigate radiation-induced injury to normal tissues. Exposure to radiation leads to increased oxidative stress, DNA-damage, genomic instability and inflammation. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein delta (Cebpd; C/EBPδ is implicated in regulation of these same processes, but its role in radiation response is not known. We investigated the role of C/EBPδ in radiation-induced hematopoietic and intestinal injury using a Cebpd knockout mouse model. Cebpd−/− mice showed increased lethality at 7.4 and 8.5 Gy total-body irradiation (TBI), compared to Cebpd+/+ mice. Two weeks after a 6 Gy dose of TBI, Cebpd−/− mice showed decreased recovery of white blood cells, neutrophils, platelets, myeloid cells and bone marrow mononuclear cells, decreased colony-forming ability of bone marrow progenitor cells, and increased apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells compared to Cebpd+/+ controls. Cebpd−/− mice exhibited a significant dose-dependent decrease in intestinal crypt survival and in plasma citrulline levels compared to Cebpd+/+ mice after exposure to radiation. This was accompanied by significantly decreased expression of γ-H2AX in Cebpd−/− intestinal crypts and villi at 1 h post-TBI, increased mitotic index at 24 h post-TBI, and increase in apoptosis in intestinal crypts and stromal cells of Cebpd−/− compared to Cebpd+/+ mice at 4 h post-irradiation. This study uncovers a novel biological function for C/EBPδ in promoting the response to radiation-induced DNA-damage and in protecting hematopoietic and intestinal tissues from radiation-induced injury. PMID:24747529

  14. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Gori, Jennifer L.; Butler, Jason M.; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G.; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J.; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC–derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina–induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor γ chain–null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood–derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  15. Vascular niche promotes hematopoietic multipotent progenitor formation from pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gori, Jennifer L; Butler, Jason M; Chan, Yan-Yi; Chandrasekaran, Devikha; Poulos, Michael G; Ginsberg, Michael; Nolan, Daniel J; Elemento, Olivier; Wood, Brent L; Adair, Jennifer E; Rafii, Shahin; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represent an alternative hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) source for treating hematopoietic disease. The limited engraftment of human PSC-derived (hPSC-derived) multipotent progenitor cells (MPP) has hampered the clinical application of these cells and suggests that MPP require additional cues for definitive hematopoiesis. We hypothesized that the presence of a vascular niche that produces Notch ligands jagged-1 (JAG1) and delta-like ligand-4 (DLL4) drives definitive hematopoiesis. We differentiated hes2 human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and Macaca nemestrina-induced PSC (iPSC) line-7 with cytokines in the presence or absence of endothelial cells (ECs) that express JAG1 and DLL4. Cells cocultured with ECs generated substantially more CD34+CD45+ hematopoietic progenitors compared with cells cocultured without ECs or with ECs lacking JAG1 or DLL4. EC-induced cells exhibited Notch activation and expressed HSC-specific Notch targets RUNX1 and GATA2. EC-induced PSC-MPP engrafted at a markedly higher level in NOD/SCID/IL-2 receptor γ chain-null (NSG) mice compared with cytokine-induced cells, and low-dose chemotherapy-based selection further increased engraftment. Long-term engraftment and the myeloid-to-lymphoid ratio achieved with vascular niche induction were similar to levels achieved for cord blood-derived MPP and up to 20-fold higher than those achieved with hPSC-derived MPP engraftment. Our findings indicate that endothelial Notch ligands promote PSC-definitive hematopoiesis and production of long-term engrafting CD34+ cells, suggesting these ligands are critical for HSC emergence. PMID:25664855

  16. Sequential morphological characteristics of murine fetal liver hematopoietic microenvironment in Swiss Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Ayres-Silva, Jackline de Paula; Manso, Pedro Paulo de Abreu; Madeira, Mariana Rietmann da Cunha; Pelajo-Machado, Marcelo; Lenzi, Henrique Leonel

    2011-06-01

    Embryonic hematopoiesis occurs via dynamic development with cells migrating into various organs. Fetal liver is the main hematopoietic organ responsible for hematopoietic cell expansion during embryologic development. We describe the morphological sequential characteristics of murine fetal liver niches that favor the settlement and migration of hematopoietic cells from 12 days post-coitum (dpc) to 0 day post-partum. Liver sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Lennert's Giemsa, Sirius Red pH 10.2, Gomori's Reticulin, and Periodic Acid Schiff/Alcian Blue pH 1.0 and pH 2.5 and were analyzed by bright-field microscopy. Indirect imunohistochemistry for fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), and MMP-9 and histochemistry for naphthol AS-D chloroacetate esterase (NCAE) were analyzed by confocal microscopy. The results showed that fibronectin was related to the promotion of hepatocyte and trabecular differentiation; reticular fibers did not appear to participate in fetal hematopoiesis but contributed to the physical support of the liver after 18 dpc. During the immature phase, hepatocytes acted as the fundamental stroma for the erythroid lineage. The appearance of myeloid cells in the liver was related to perivascular and subcapsular collagen, and NCAE preceded MMP-1 expression in neutrophils, an occurrence that appeared to contribute to their liver evasion. Thus, the murine fetal liver during ontogenesis shows two different phases: one immature and mainly endodermic (<14 dpc) and the other more developed (endodermic-mesenchymal; >15 dpc) with the maturation of hepatocytes, a better definition of trabecular pattern, and an increase in the connective tissue in the capsule, portal spaces, and liver parenchyma. The decrease of hepatic hematopoiesis (migration) coincides with hepatic maturation. PMID:21541657

  17. Comparative analysis of the efficiency and specificity of myeloid-Cre deleting strains using ROSA-EYFP reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Abram, Clare L; Roberge, Gray L; Hu, Yongmei; Lowell, Clifford A

    2014-06-01

    Since the first example of conditional gene targeting in mice in 1994, the use of Cre recombinase and loxP flanked sequences has become an invaluable technique to generate tissue and temporal specific gene knockouts. The number of mouse strains expressing floxed-gene sequences, and tissue-specific or temporal-specific Cre-recombinase that have been reported in the literature has grown exponentially. However, increased use of this technology has highlighted several problems that can impact the interpretation of any phenotype observed in these mouse models. In particular, accurate knowledge of the specificity of Cre expression in each strain is critical in order to make conclusions about the role of specific cell types in the phenotypes observed. Cre-mediated deletion specificity and efficiency have been described in many different ways in the literature, making direct comparisons between these Cre strains impossible. Here we report crossing thirteen different myeloid-Cre mouse strains to ROSA-EYFP reporter mice and assaying YFP expression in a variety of naïve unstimulated hematopoietic cells, in parallel. By focusing on myeloid subsets, we directly compare the relative efficiency and specificity of myeloid deletion in these strains under steady-state conditions. PMID:24857755

  18. Comparative analysis of the efficiency and specificity of myeloid-Cre deleting strains using ROSA-EYFP reporter mice

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Clare L.; Roberge, Gray L.; Hu, Yongmei; Lowell, Clifford A.

    2014-01-01

    Since the first example of conditional gene targeting in mice in 1994, the use of Cre recombinase and loxP flanked sequences has become an invaluable technique to generate tissue and temporal specific gene knockouts. The number of mouse strains expressing floxed-gene sequences, and tissue-specific or temporal-specific Cre-recombinase that have been reported in the literature has grown exponentially. However, increased use of this technology has highlighted several problems that can impact the interpretation of any phenotype observed in these mouse models. In particular, accurate knowledge of the specificity of Cre expression in each strain is critical in order to make conclusions about the role of specific cell types in the phenotypes observed. Cre-mediated deletion specificity and efficiency has been described in many different ways in the literature, making direct comparisons between these Cre strains impossible. Here we report crossing thirteen different myeloid-Cre mouse strains to ROSA-EYFP reporter mice and assaying YFP expression in a variety of naïve unstimulated hematopoietic cells, in parallel. By focusing on myeloid subsets, we directly compare the relative efficiency and specificity of myeloid deletion in these strains under steady-state conditions. PMID:24857755

  19. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Rachel C; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-05-28

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ(+) AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ(+) THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34(+) HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  20. Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) regulates lymphoid and myeloid homeostasis through modulation of Notch receptor ligand interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yao, David; Huang, Yuanshuai; Huang, Xiaoran; Wang, Weihuan; Yan, Quanjian; Wei, Lebing; Xin, Wei; Gerson, Stanton; Stanley, Pamela; Lowe, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Notch signaling is essential for lymphocyte development and is also implicated in myelopoiesis. Notch receptors are modified by O-fucosylation catalyzed by protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1). Fringe enzymes add N-acetylglucosamine to O-fucose and modify Notch signaling by altering the sensitivity of Notch receptors to Notch ligands. To address physiologic functions in hematopoiesis of Notch modified by O-fucose glycans, we examined mice with inducible inactivation of Pofut1 using Mx-Cre. These mice exhibited a reduction in T lymphopoiesis and in the production of marginal-zone B cells, in addition to myeloid hyperplasia. Restoration of Notch1 signaling rescued T lymphopoiesis and the marrow myeloid hyperplasia. After marrow transfer, both cell-autonomous and environmental cues were found to contribute to lymphoid developmental defects and myeloid hyperplasia in Pofut1-deleted mice. Although Pofut1 deficiency slightly decreased cell surface expression of Notch1 and Notch2, it completely abrogated the binding of Notch receptors with Delta-like Notch ligands and suppressed downstream Notch target activation, indicating that O-fucose glycans are critical for efficient Notch-ligand binding that transduce Notch signals. The combined data support a key role for the O-fucose glycans generated by Pofut1 in Notch regulation of hematopoietic homeostasis through modulation of Notch-ligand interactions. PMID:21464368

  1. Epigenetic therapy restores normal hematopoiesis in a zebrafish model of NUP98-HOXA9-induced myeloid disease.

    PubMed

    Deveau, A P; Forrester, A M; Coombs, A J; Wagner, G S; Grabher, C; Chute, I C; Léger, D; Mingay, M; Alexe, G; Rajan, V; Liwski, R; Hirst, M; Steigmaier, K; Lewis, S M; Look, A T; Berman, J N

    2015-10-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) occurs when multiple genetic aberrations alter white blood cell development, leading to hyperproliferation and arrest of cell differentiation. Pertinent animal models link in vitro studies with the use of new agents in clinical trials. We generated a transgenic zebrafish expressing human NUP98-HOXA9 (NHA9), a fusion oncogene found in high-risk AML. Embryos developed a preleukemic state with anemia and myeloid cell expansion, and adult fish developed a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). We leveraged this model to show that NHA9 increases the number of hematopoietic stem cells, and that oncogenic function of NHA9 depends on downstream activation of meis1, the PTGS/COX pathway and genome hypermethylation through the DNA methyltransferase, dnmt1. We restored normal hematopoiesis in NHA9 embryos with knockdown of meis1 or dnmt1, as well as pharmacologic treatment with DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors or cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors. DNMT inhibitors reduced genome methylation to near normal levels. Strikingly, we discovered synergy when we combined sub-monotherapeutic doses of a histone deacetylase inhibitor plus either a DNMT inhibitor or COX inhibitor to block the effects of NHA9 on zebrafish blood development. Our work proposes novel drug targets in NHA9-induced myeloid disease, and suggests rational therapies by combining minimal doses of known bioactive compounds. PMID:26017032

  2. Overexpression of sPRDM16 coupled with loss of p53 induces myeloid leukemias in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shing, Danielle C.; Trubia, Maurizio; Marchesi, Francesco; Radaelli, Enrico; Belloni, Elena; Tapinassi, Cinzia; Scanziani, Eugenio; Mecucci, Cristina; Crescenzi, Barbara; Lahortiga, Idoya; Odero, Maria D.; Zardo, Giuseppe; Gruszka, Alicja; Minucci, Saverio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2007-01-01

    Transgenic expression of the abnormal products of acute myeloid leukemiaassociated (AML-associated) primary chromosomal translocations in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells initiates leukemogenesis in mice, yet additional mutations are needed for leukemia development. We report here aberrant expression of PR domain containing 16 (PRDM16) in AML cells with either translocations of 1p36 or normal karyotype. These carried, respectively, relatively high prevalence of mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene and in the nucleophosmin (NPM) gene, which regulates p53. Two protein isoforms are expressed from PRDM16, which differ in the presence or absence of the PR domain. Overexpression of the short isoform, sPRDM16, in mouse bone marrow induced AML with full penetrance, but only in the absence of p53. The mouse leukemias were characterized by multilineage cellular abnormalities and megakaryocyte dysplasia, a common feature of human AMLs with 1p36 translocations or NPM mutations. Overexpression of sPRDM16 increased the pool of HSCs in vivo, and in vitro blocked myeloid differentiation and prolonged progenitor life span. Loss of p53 augmented the effects of sPRDM16 on stem cell number and induced immortalization of progenitors. Thus, overexpression of sPRDM16 induces abnormal growth of stem cells and progenitors and cooperates with disruption of the p53 pathway in the induction of myeloid leukemia. PMID:18037989

  3. VEGFR2+PDGFRbeta+ circulating precursor cells participate in capillary restoration after hyperoxia acute lung injury (HALI).

    PubMed

    Jones, Rosemary; Capen, Diane E; Jacobson, Margaretha; Cohen, Kenneth S; Scadden, David T; Duda, Dan G

    2009-09-01

    The in vivo morphology and phenotype of circulating cells that spontaneously contribute to new vessel formation in adults remain unclear. Here, we use high-resolution imaging and flow cytometry to characterize the morphology and phenotype of a distinct population of circulating mononuclear cells contributing to spontaneous new vessel formation after hyperoxia acute lung injury (HALI). We identify a subpopulation of myeloid (CD11b/Mac1(+)) haematopoietic cells co-expressing vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) and platelet derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRbeta). Moreover, we show that these CD11b(+)VEGFR2(+)PDGFRbeta(+) circulating precursor cells (CPCs) contribute structurally to the luminal surface of capillaries re-forming 2 weeks post-HALI. This indicates that these myeloid CPCs may function, at least transiently, as putative vascular precursors, and has important implications for capillary growth and repair in injury and in pathologies of the lung and other organs. PMID:19426150

  4. Bruceine D induces apoptosis in human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells via mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ye; Lin, Min-Ting; Tung, Ho-Yi; Tang, Si-Li; Yi, Tao; Zhang, Ya-Zhou; Tang, Yi-Na; Zhao, Zhong-Zhen; Chen, Hu-Biao

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), an acquired malignant myeloproliferative disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, is one of the three most common forms of leukemia. In this study, we investigated the effects of bruceine D, which have been isolated from Brucea javanica (L.) Merr. on human chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells. MTT assay was used to evaluate cell growth inhibition. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Western blot was applied to detect expression of cytochrome c, caspases-9, -3, PARP and other proteins. Bruceine D exhibited potent cytotoxicity to K562 cells with IC50 of 6.37 ± 0.39 μM. It led to loss of ΔΨm, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspases-9, -3 and cleavage of PARP, which suggested that bruceine D induced apoptosis of K562 cells through mitochondrial pathway. In addition, bruceine D inhibited the phosphorylation of AKT and ERK. It’s indicative that the potent anticancer activity of bruceine D be related to MAPK and PI3K pathways. PMID:27186433

  5. Acute myeloid leukemia requires Hhex to enable PRC2-mediated epigenetic repression of Cdkn2a.

    PubMed

    Shields, Benjamin J; Jackson, Jacob T; Metcalf, Donald; Shi, Wei; Huang, Qiutong; Garnham, Alexandra L; Glaser, Stefan P; Beck, Dominik; Pimanda, John E; Bogue, Clifford W; Smyth, Gordon K; Alexander, Warren S; McCormack, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    Unlike clustered HOX genes, the role of nonclustered homeobox gene family members in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis has not been extensively studied. Here we found that the hematopoietically expressed homeobox gene Hhex is overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is essential for the initiation and propagation of MLL-ENL-induced AML but dispensable for normal myelopoiesis, indicating a specific requirement for Hhex for leukemic growth. Loss of Hhex leads to expression of the Cdkn2a-encoded tumor suppressors p16(INK4a) and p19(ARF), which are required for growth arrest and myeloid differentiation following Hhex deletion. Mechanistically, we show that Hhex binds to the Cdkn2a locus and directly interacts with the Polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to enable H3K27me3-mediated epigenetic repression. Thus, Hhex is a potential therapeutic target that is specifically required for AML stem cells to repress tumor suppressor pathways and enable continued self-renewal. PMID:26728554

  6. Impact of MLL5 expression on decitabine efficacy and DNA methylation in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Haiyang; Damm, Frederik; Yap, Damian; Schwarzer, Adrian; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Jyotsana, Nidhi; Lübbert, Michael; Bullinger, Lars; Döhner, Konstanze; Geffers, Robert; Aparicio, Samuel; Humphries, R. Keith; Ganser, Arnold; Heuser, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hypomethylating agents are widely used in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and unfit patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, it is not well understood why only some patients respond to hypomethylating agents. We found previously that the effect of decitabine on hematopoietic stem cell viability differed between Mll5 wild-type and null cells. We, therefore, investigated the role of MLL5 expression levels on outcome of acute myeloid leukemia patients who were treated with decitabine. MLL5 above the median expression level predicted longer overall survival independent of DNMT3A mutation status in bivariate analysis (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 292 vs. 167 days; P=0.026). In patients who received three or more courses decitabine, high MLL5 expression and wild-type DNMT3A independently predicted improved overall survival (median overall survival for high vs. low MLL5 expression 468 vs. 243 days; P=0.012). In transformed murine cells, loss of Mll5 was associated with resistance to low-dose decitabine, less global DNA methylation in promoter regions, and reduced DNA demethylation upon decitabine treatment. Together, these data support our clinical observation of improved outcome in decitabine-treated patients who express MLL5 at high levels, and suggest a mechanistic role of MLL5 in the regulation of DNA methylation. PMID:24895338

  7. MLL1 and DOT1L cooperate with meningioma-1 to induce acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Simone S; Haladyna, Jessica N; Bezzant, Matthew; Stevens, Brett; Pollyea, Daniel A; Sinha, Amit U; Armstrong, Scott A; Wei, Qi; Pollock, Roy M; Daigle, Scott R; Jordan, Craig T; Ernst, Patricia; Neff, Tobias; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2016-04-01

    Meningioma-1 (MN1) overexpression is frequently observed in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is predictive of poor prognosis. In murine models, forced expression of MN1 in hematopoietic progenitors induces an aggressive myeloid leukemia that is strictly dependent on a defined gene expression program in the cell of origin, which includes the homeobox genes Hoxa9 and Meis1 as key components. Here, we have shown that this program is controlled by two histone methyltransferases, MLL1 and DOT1L, as deletion of either Mll1 or Dot1l in MN1-expressing cells abrogated the cell of origin-derived gene expression program, including the expression of Hoxa cluster genes. In murine models, genetic inactivation of either Mll1 or Dot1l impaired MN1-mediated leukemogenesis. We determined that HOXA9 and MEIS1 are coexpressed with MN1 in a subset of clinical MN1hi leukemia, and human MN1hi/HOXA9hi leukemias were sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of DOT1L. Together, these data point to DOT1L as a potential therapeutic target in MN1hi AML. In addition, our findings suggest that epigenetic modulation of the interplay between an oncogenic lesion and its cooperating developmental program has therapeutic potential in AML. PMID:26927674

  8. Chemotherapy Plus Sargramostim in Treating Patients With Refractory Myeloid Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Thrombocytopenia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for acute myeloid leukemia What’s new in acute myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  10. What's New in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for chronic myeloid leukemia What`s new in chronic myeloid leukemia research and treatment? Studies ... such as cyclosporine or hydroxychloroquine, with a TKI. New drugs for CML Because researchers now know the ...

  11. MYBL2 is a sub-haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in myeloid malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Stefan; Conover, Lillian F; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Kilpivaara, Outi; Stevenson, Kristen; Neuberg, Donna; Loh, Mignon L; Wu, Wen-Shu; Rodig, Scott J; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Look, A Thomas

    2013-01-01

    A common deleted region (CDR) in both myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) affects the long arm of chromosome 20 and has been predicted to harbor a tumor suppressor gene. Here we show that MYBL2, a gene within the 20q CDR, is expressed at sharply reduced levels in CD34+ cells from most MDS cases (65%; n = 26), whether or not they harbor 20q abnormalities. In a murine competitive reconstitution model, Mybl2 knockdown by RNAi to 20–30% of normal levels in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors resulted in clonal dominance of these ‘sub-haploinsufficient’ cells, which was reflected in all blood cell lineages. By 6 months post-transplantation, the reconstituted mice had developed a clonal myeloproliferative/myelodysplastic disorder originating from the cells with aberrantly reduced Mybl2 expression. We conclude that downregulation of MYBL2 activity below levels predicted by classical haploinsufficiency underlies the clonal expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in a large fraction of human myeloid malignancies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00825.001 PMID:23878725

  12. Targeting acute myeloid leukemia with a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction.

    PubMed

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Dass, Emilie; Coulibaly, Anna; Steinmann, Simone; Jakobs, Anke; Schomburg, Caroline; Trentmann, Amke; Jose, Joachim; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Schmidt, Thomas J; Mller-Tidow, Carsten; Frampton, Jon; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor Myb plays a key role in the hematopoietic system and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. However, because of a lack of suitable inhibitors, the feasibility of therapeutic approaches based on Myb inhibition has not been explored. We have identified the triterpenoid Celastrol as a potent low-molecular-weight inhibitor of the interaction of Myb with its cooperation partner p300. We demonstrate that Celastrol suppresses the proliferative potential of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells while not affecting normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, Celastrol prolongs the survival of mice in a model of an aggressive AML. Overall, our work demonstrates the therapeutic potential of a small molecule inhibitor of the Myb/p300 interaction for the treatment of AML and provides a starting point for the further development of Myb-inhibitory compounds for the treatment of leukemia and, possibly, other tumors driven by deregulated Myb. PMID:26631113

  13. Systems Mapping for Hematopoietic Progenitor Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linghua; Shen, Yong; Jiang, Libo; Yin, Danni; Guo, Jingxin; Zheng, Hui; Sun, Hao; Wu, Rongling; Guo, Yunqian

    2015-01-01

    Cells with the same genotype growing under the same conditions can show different phenotypes, which is known as “population heterogeneity”. The heterogeneity of hematopoietic progenitor cells has an effect on their differentiation potential and lineage choices. However, the genetic mechanisms governing population heterogeneity remain unclear. Here, we present a statistical model for mapping the quantitative trait locus (QTL) that affects hematopoietic cell heterogeneity. This strategy, termed systems mapping, integrates a system of differential equations into the framework for systems mapping, allowing hypotheses regarding the interplay between genetic actions and cell heterogeneity to be tested. A simulation approach based on cell heterogeneity dynamics has been designed to test the statistical properties of the model. This model not only considers the traditional QTLs, but also indicates the methylated QTLs that can illustrate non-genetic individual differences. It has significant implications for probing the molecular, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of hematopoietic progenitor cell heterogeneity. PMID:25970338

  14. Long noncoding RNAs in hematopoietic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Malavé, Norma I; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-05-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery of several classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are indispensable for the regulation of cellular processes. Many of these RNAs are regulatory in nature with functions in gene expression regulation such as piwi-interacting RNAs, small interfering RNAs and micro RNAs. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) comprise the most recently characterized class. LncRNAs are involved in transcriptional regulation, chromatin remodeling, imprinting, splicing, and translation, among other critical functions in the cell. Recent studies have elucidated the importance of lncRNAs in hematopoietic development. Dysregulation of lncRNA expression is a feature of various diseases and cancers, and is also seen in hematopoietic malignancies. This article focuses on lncRNAs that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:26612601

  15. Histone Lysine-specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1) Protein Is Involved in Sal-like Protein 4 (SALL4)-mediated Transcriptional Repression in Hematopoietic Stem Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Souto, Joseph; Liao, Wenbin; Jiang, Yongping; Li, Yangqiu; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Huang, Suming; Rosengart, Todd; Yang, Vincent W.; Schuster, Michael; Ma, Yupo; Yang, Jianchang

    2013-01-01

    The stem cell protein SALL4 plays a critical role in hematopoiesis by regulating the cell fate. In primitive hematopoietic precursors, it activates or represses important genes via recruitment of various epigenetic factors such as DNA methyltransferases, and histone deacylases. Here, we demonstrate that LSD1, a histone lysine demethylase, also participates in the trans-repressive effects of SALL4. Based on luciferase assays, the amine oxidase domain of LSD1 is important in suppressing SALL4-mediated reporter transcription. In freshly isolated adult mouse bone marrows, both SALL4 and LSD1 proteins are preferentially expressed in undifferentiated progenitor cells and co-localize in the nuclei. Further sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that these two factors share the same binding sites at the promoter regions of important hematopoietic regulatory genes including EBF1, GATA1, and TNF. In addition, studies from both gain- and loss-of-function models revealed that SALL4 dynamically controls the binding levels of LSD1, which is accompanied by a reversely changed histone 3 dimethylated lysine 4 at the same promoter regions. Finally, shRNA-mediated knockdown of LSD1 in hematopoietic precursor cells resulted in altered SALL4 downstream gene expression and increased cellular activity. Thus, our data revealed that histone demethylase LSD1 may negatively regulate SALL4-mediated transcription, and the dynamic regulation of SALL4-associated epigenetic factors cooperatively modulates early hematopoietic precursor proliferation. PMID:24163373

  16. Histone lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) protein is involved in Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4)-mediated transcriptional repression in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Souto, Joseph; Liao, Wenbin; Jiang, Yongping; Li, Yangqiu; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Huang, Suming; Rosengart, Todd; Yang, Vincent W; Schuster, Michael; Ma, Yupo; Yang, Jianchang

    2013-11-29

    The stem cell protein SALL4 plays a critical role in hematopoiesis by regulating the cell fate. In primitive hematopoietic precursors, it activates or represses important genes via recruitment of various epigenetic factors such as DNA methyltransferases, and histone deacylases. Here, we demonstrate that LSD1, a histone lysine demethylase, also participates in the trans-repressive effects of SALL4. Based on luciferase assays, the amine oxidase domain of LSD1 is important in suppressing SALL4-mediated reporter transcription. In freshly isolated adult mouse bone marrows, both SALL4 and LSD1 proteins are preferentially expressed in undifferentiated progenitor cells and co-localize in the nuclei. Further sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation assay confirmed that these two factors share the same binding sites at the promoter regions of important hematopoietic regulatory genes including EBF1, GATA1, and TNF. In addition, studies from both gain- and loss-of-function models revealed that SALL4 dynamically controls the binding levels of LSD1, which is accompanied by a reversely changed histone 3 dimethylated lysine 4 at the same promoter regions. Finally, shRNA-mediated knockdown of LSD1 in hematopoietic precursor cells resulted in altered SALL4 downstream gene expression and increased cellular activity. Thus, our data revealed that histone demethylase LSD1 may negatively regulate SALL4-mediated transcription, and the dynamic regulation of SALL4-associated epigenetic factors cooperatively modulates early hematopoietic precursor proliferation. PMID:24163373

  17. t(6;9)(p22;q34)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged pediatric myeloid leukemia: an international study of 62 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Coenen, Eva A.; Forestier, Erik; Harbott, Jochen; Johansson, Bertil; Kerndrup, Gitte; Adachi, Souichi; Auvrignon, Anne; Beverloo, H. Berna; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Chilton, Lucy; Fornerod, Maarten; de Haas, Valérie; Harrison, Christine J.; Inaba, Hiroto; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.; Liang, Der-Cherng; Locatelli, Franco; Masetti, Riccardo; Perot, Christine; Raimondi, Susana C.; Reinhardt, Katarina; Tomizawa, Daisuke; von Neuhoff, Nils; Zecca, Marco; Zwaan, C. Michel; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Hasle, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with t(6;9)(p22;q34) is listed as a distinct entity in the 2008 World Health Organization classification, but little is known about the clinical implications of t(6;9)-positive myeloid leukemia in children. This international multicenter study presents the clinical and genetic characteristics of 62 pediatric patients with t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214-rearranged myeloid leukemia; 54 diagnosed as having acute myeloid leukemia, representing <1% of all childhood acute myeloid leukemia, and eight as having myelodysplastic syndrome. The t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 was associated with relatively late onset (median age 10.4 years), male predominance (sex ratio 1.7), French-American-British M2 classification (54%), myelodysplasia (100%), and FLT3-ITD (42%). Outcome was substantially better than previously reported with a 5-year event-free survival of 32%, 5-year overall survival of 53%, and a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 57%. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first complete remission improved the 5-year event-free survival compared with chemotherapy alone (68% versus 18%; P<0.01) but not the overall survival (68% versus 54%; P=0.48). The presence of FLT3-ITD had a non-significant negative effect on 5-year overall survival compared with non-mutated cases (22% versus 62%; P=0.13). Gene expression profiling showed a unique signature characterized by significantly higher expression of EYA3, SESN1, PRDM2/RIZ, and HIST2H4 genes. In conclusion, t(6;9)/DEK-NUP214 represents a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia with a high risk of relapse, high frequency of FLT3-ITD, and a specific gene expression signature. PMID:24441146

  18. Mgat2 ablation in the myeloid lineage leads to defective glycoantigen T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Sean O; Leal, Sixto M; Abbott, Derek W; Pearlman, Eric; Cobb, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    N-linked glycosylation is a central regulatory factor that influences the immune system in varied and profound ways, including leukocyte homing, T cell receptor signaling and others. Moreover, N-glycan branching has been demonstrated to change as a function of infection and inflammation. Our previous findings suggest that complex-type N-glycans on the class II major histocompatibility complex play an important role in antigen selection within antigen presenting cells (APCs) such that highly branched N-glycans promote polysaccharide (glycoantigen, GlyAg) presentation following Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent antigen processing. In order to explore the impact of N-glycan branching on the myeloid-derived APC population without the confounding problems of altering the branching of lymphocytes and non-hematopoietic cells, we created a novel myeloid-specific knockout of the β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II (Mgat2) enzyme. Using this novel mouse, we found that the reduction in multi-antennary N-glycans characteristic of Mgat2 ablation had no impact on GlyAg-mediated TLR2 signaling. Likewise, no deficits in antigen uptake or cellular homing to lymph nodes were found. However, we discovered that Mgat2 ablation prevented GlyAg presentation and T cell activation in vitro and in vivo without apparent alterations in protein antigen response or myeloid-mediated protection from infection. These findings demonstrate that GlyAg presentation can be regulated by the N-glycan branching pattern of APCs, thereby establishing an in vivo model where the T cell-dependent activity of GlyAgs can be experimentally distinguished from GlyAg-mediated stimulation of the innate response through TLR2. PMID:24310166

  19. The analysis of novel distal Cebpa enhancers and silencers using a transcriptional model reveals the complex regulatory logic of hematopoietic lineage specification.

    PubMed

    Bertolino, Eric; Reinitz, John; Manu

    2016-05-01

    C/EBPα plays an instructive role in the macrophage-neutrophil cell-fate decision and its expression is necessary for neutrophil development. How Cebpa itself is regulated in the myeloid lineage is not known. We decoded the cis-regulatory logic of Cebpa, and two other myeloid transcription factors, Egr1 and Egr2, using a combined experimental-computational approach. With a reporter design capable of detecting both distal enhancers and silencers, we analyzed 46 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in cells representing myeloid progenitors, and derived early macrophages or neutrophils. In addition to novel enhancers, this analysis revealed a surprisingly large number of silencers. We determined the regulatory roles of 15 potential transcriptional regulators by testing 32,768 alternative sequence-based transcriptional models against CRM activity data. This comprehensive analysis allowed us to infer the cis-regulatory logic for most of the CRMs. Silencer-mediated repression of Cebpa was found to be effected mainly by TFs expressed in non-myeloid lineages, highlighting a previously unappreciated contribution of long-distance silencing to hematopoietic lineage resolution. The repression of Cebpa by multiple factors expressed in alternative lineages suggests that hematopoietic genes are organized into densely interconnected repressive networks instead of hierarchies of mutually repressive pairs of pivotal TFs. More generally, our results demonstrate that de novo cis-regulatory dissection is feasible on a large scale with the aid of transcriptional modeling. (1)Current address: Department of Biology, University of North Dakota, 10 Cornell Street, Stop 9019, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9019, USA. PMID:26945717

  20. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  1. Effect of Decitabine Combined with Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation in an Adult Patient with -7/EVI1+ Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yi-Zhi; Su, Gui-Ping; Dai, Yan; He, He-Sheng; Huang, Lai-Quan; Sun, Zi-Min; Huang, Dong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (rAML) have a poor prognosis if they do not undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe a case herein of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with monosomy 7 and EVI1(+)(-7/EVI1(+)) in a patient who failed to achieve a complete remission (CR) after two cycles of standard induction chemotherapy. He subsequently received decitabine (DAC) as "bridge therapy" and directly underwent unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) due to the absence of an available sibling donor. Although DAC treatment did not induce CR, it did produce hematologic improvement and control disease progression with acceptable side effects, thus effectively bridging the time of donor search. Following UCBT, the marrow showed complete hematologic and cytogenetic remission. At present, 18 months after the transplantation, the patient's general condition is still good. PMID:26586716

  2. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-21

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Dolores A; Hess, Rosemary C; Weiss, Mark A

    2015-08-15

    Despite the remarkable progress made in some leukemias such as CML and CLL, cytotoxic treatment for AML remains essentially unchanged over the last 4 decades. Several lines of evidence, including the graft versus leukemia effect associated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), suggest that immunotherapy is an active modality in AML. Given the lack of progress for chemotherapy in this disease, many novel immunologic treatment approaches have been explored. The goals of non-transplant-based immune approaches have largely consisted of the stimulation or restoration of endogenous immune responses or the targeting of specific tumor antigens by immune cells. These strategies have been associated with less toxicity than allogeneic HSCT but typically have inferior efficacy. Allogeneic HSCT exploits major and minor histocompatibility differences between the donor and recipient in order to recognize and eradicate malignancy. With the recognition that the immune system itself provides a basis for treating AML, immunotherapy continues to be an attractive modality to exploit in the treatment of this disease. PMID:26095886

  5. Role of calcium-dependent protein kinases in chronic myeloid leukemia: combined effects of PKC and BCR-ABL signaling on cellular alterations during leukemia development

    PubMed Central

    Mencalha, André L; Corrêa, Stephany; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (PKCs) function in a myriad of cellular processes, including cell-cycle regulation, proliferation, hematopoietic stem cell differentiation, apoptosis, and malignant transformation. PKC inhibitors, when targeted to these pathways, have demonstrated efficacy against several types of solid tumors as well as leukemia. Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) represents 20% of all adult leukemia. The aberrant Philadelphia chromosome has been reported as the main cause of CML development in hematopoietic stem cells, due to the formation of the BCR-ABL oncogene. PKCs and BCR-ABL coordinate several signaling pathways that are crucial to cellular malignant transformation. Experimental and clinical evidence suggests that pharmacological approaches using PKC inhibitors may be effective in the treatment of CML. This mini review summarizes articles from the National Center for Biotechnology Information website that have shown evidence of the involvement of PKC in CML. PMID:25045273

  6. Deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells leads to development of T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma but not myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mirantes, Cristina; Dosil, Maria Alba; Hills, David; Yang, Jian; Eritja, Núria; Santacana, Maria; Gatius, Sònia; Vilardell, Felip; Medvinsky, Alexander; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dolcet, Xavier

    2016-04-14

    Since its discovery in the late 1990s, Pten has turned out to be one of the most important tumor suppressor genes. Pten loss results in increased activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, which is associated with increased proliferation, survival, and neoplastic growth. Here, we have addressed the effects of conditional deletion of Pten in hematopoietic cells by crossing Pten conditional knockout mice with a knock-in mouse expressing the Cre recombinase in the CD45 locus. CD45 is also known as leukocyte common antigen, and it is expressed in virtually all white cells and in hematopoietic stem cells. Using a reporter mouse, we demonstrate that CD45:Cre mouse displays recombinase activity in both myeloid and lymphoid cells. However, deletion of Pten in CD45-expressing cells induces development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and lymphoma, but not other hematologic malignancies. PMID:26773036

  7. Targeting mitochondrial RNA polymerase in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bralha, Fernando N; Liyanage, Sanduni U; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiaoming; Son, Meong Hi; Fung, Thomas A; Chingcuanco, Francine B; Tung, Aveline Y W; Andreazza, Ana C; Psarianos, Pamela; Schimmer, Aaron D; Salmena, Leonardo; Laposa, Rebecca R

    2015-11-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have high oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial mass and low respiratory chain spare reserve capacity. We reasoned that targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), which indirectly controls oxidative phosphorylation, represents a therapeutic strategy for AML. POLRMT-knockdown OCI-AML2 cells exhibited decreased mitochondrial gene expression, decreased levels of assembled complex I, decreased levels of mitochondrially-encoded Cox-II and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. POLRMT-knockdown cells exhibited an increase in complex II of the electron transport chain, a complex comprised entirely of subunits encoded by nuclear genes, and POLRMT-knockdown cells were resistant to a complex II inhibitor theonyltrifluoroacetone. POLRMT-knockdown cells showed a prominent increase in cell death. Treatment of OCI-AML2 cells with 10-50 µM 2-C-methyladenosine (2-CM), a chain terminator of mitochondrial transcription, reduced mitochondrial gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation, and increased cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of normal human hematopoietic cells with 2-CM at concentrations of up to 100 µMdid not alter clonogenic growth, suggesting a therapeutic window. In an OCI-AML2 xenograft model, treatment with 2-CM (70 mg/kg, i.p., daily) decreased the volume and mass of tumours to half that of vehicle controls. 2-CM did not cause toxicity to major organs. Overall, our results in a preclinical model contribute to the functional validation of the utility of targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase as a therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26484416

  8. Epigenetic regulators as promising therapeutic targets in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gallipoli, Paolo; Giotopoulos, George

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the most prevalent acute leukemia in adults, is an aggressive hematological malignancy arising in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. With the exception of a few specific AML subtypes, the mainstays of treatment have not significantly changed over the last 20 years, and are still based on standard cytotoxic chemotherapy. As a result, clinical outcome remains poor for the majority of patients, with overall long-term survival in the region of 20–30%. Recent successes in characterizing the genetic landscape of AML have highlighted that, despite its heterogeneity, many cases of AML carry recurrent mutations in genes encoding epigenetic regulators. Transcriptional dysregulation and altered epigenetic function have therefore emerged as exciting areas in AML research and it is becoming increasingly clear that epigenetic dysfunction is central to leukemogenesis in AML. This has subsequently paved the way for the development of epigenetically targeted therapies. In this review, we will discuss the most recent advances in our understanding of the role of epigenetic dysregulation in AML pathobiology. We will particularly focus on those altered epigenetic programs that have been shown to be central to the development and maintenance of AML in preclinical models. We will discuss the recent development of therapeutics specifically targeting these key epigenetic programs in AML, describe their mechanism of action and present their current clinical development. Finally, we will discuss the opportunities presented by epigenetically targeted therapy in AML and will highlight future challenges ahead for the AML community, to ensure that these novel therapeutics are optimally translated into clinical practice and result in clinical improvement for AML patients. PMID:26137202

  9. Targeting mitochondrial RNA polymerase in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bralha, Fernando N.; Liyanage, Sanduni U.; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiaoming; Son, Meong Hi; Fung, Thomas A.; Chingcuanco, Francine B.; Tung, Aveline Y. W.; Andreazza, Ana C.; Psarianos, Pamela; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Salmena, Leonardo; Laposa, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells have high oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial mass and low respiratory chain spare reserve capacity. We reasoned that targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT), which indirectly controls oxidative phosphorylation, represents a therapeutic strategy for AML. POLRMT-knockdown OCI-AML2 cells exhibited decreased mitochondrial gene expression, decreased levels of assembled complex I, decreased levels of mitochondrially-encoded Cox-II and decreased oxidative phosphorylation. POLRMT-knockdown cells exhibited an increase in complex II of the electron transport chain, a complex comprised entirely of subunits encoded by nuclear genes, and POLRMT-knockdown cells were resistant to a complex II inhibitor theonyltrifluoroacetone. POLRMT-knockdown cells showed a prominent increase in cell death. Treatment of OCI-AML2 cells with 10-50 μM 2-C-methyladenosine (2-CM), a chain terminator of mitochondrial transcription, reduced mitochondrial gene expression and oxidative phosphorylation, and increased cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of normal human hematopoietic cells with 2-CM at concentrations of up to 100 μMdid not alter clonogenic growth, suggesting a therapeutic window. In an OCI-AML2 xenograft model, treatment with 2-CM (70 mg/kg, i.p., daily) decreased the volume and mass of tumours to half that of vehicle controls. 2-CM did not cause toxicity to major organs. Overall, our results in a preclinical model contribute to the functional validation of the utility of targeting the mitochondrial RNA polymerase as a therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:26484416

  10. Canine hematopoietic tumors: diagnosis, treatment and complications

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    Canine hematopoietic tumors constitute a group of neoplasms that are frequently encountered in veterinary practice. Although common, they are also a diagnostically confusing group of tumors due to continued revision of their definition and classification. The confusion that arises from these changes presents the clinician with a perpetual challenge of diagnosis and therapy. Therapy of canine hematopoietic tumors has traditionally evolved from treatment of human patients with similar diseases, and in turn, these neoplasms have served as models for evaluating newer therapies for possible application in human patients. Methods of treatment have included chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation therapy, surgery, and hyperthermia. 9 tabs.

  11. Tet2 facilitates the de-repression of myeloid target genes during C/EBPa induced transdifferentiation of pre-B cells

    PubMed Central

    Kallin, Eric M.; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Christensen, J esper; Cimmino, Luisa; Aifantis, Iannis; Helin, Kristian; Ballestar, Esteban; Gra