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Sample records for heme oxygenase-1 protein

  1. Covalent heme attachment to the protein in human heme oxygenase-1 with selenocysteine replacing the His25 proximal iron ligand.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongying; Trnka, Michael J; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Ouellet, Hugues; Wang, Yongqiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2009-03-01

    To characterize heme oxygenase with a selenocysteine (SeCys) as the proximal iron ligand, we have expressed truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) His25Cys, in which Cys-25 is the only cysteine, in the Escherichia coli cysteine auxotroph strain BL21(DE3)cys. Selenocysteine incorporation into the protein was demonstrated by both intact protein mass measurement and mass spectrometric identification of the selenocysteine-containing tryptic peptide. One selenocysteine was incorporated into approximately 95% of the expressed protein. Formation of an adduct with Ellman's reagent (DTNB) indicated that the selenocysteine in the expressed protein was in the reduced state. The heme-His25SeCys hHO-1 complex could be prepared by either (a) supplementing the overexpression medium with heme, or (b) reconstituting the purified apoprotein with heme. Under reducing conditions in the presence of imidazole, a covalent bond is formed by addition of the selenocysteine residue to one of the heme vinyl groups. No covalent bond is formed when the heme is replaced by mesoheme, in which the vinyls are replaced by ethyl groups. These results, together with our earlier demonstration that external selenolate ligands can transfer an electron to the iron [Y. Jiang, P.R. Ortiz de Montellano, Inorg. Chem. 47 (2008) 3480-3482 ], indicate that a selenyl radical is formed in the hHO-1 His25SeCys mutant that adds to a heme vinyl group. PMID:19135260

  2. Tumoral Immune Suppression by Macrophages Expressing Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha and Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, James N.; Magiera, Lukasz; Kraman, Matthew; Fearon, Douglas T.

    2013-01-01

    The depletion of tumor stromal cells that are marked by their expression of the membrane protein fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP) overcomes immune suppression and allows an anti-cancer cell immune response to control tumor growth. In subcutaneous tumors established with immunogenic Lewis lung carcinoma cells expressing ovalbumin (LL2/OVA), the FAP+ population comprises CD45+ and CD45− cells. In the present study, we further characterize the tumoral FAP+/CD45+ population as a minor sub-population of F4/80hi/CCR2+/CD206+ M2 macrophages. Using bone marrow chimeric mice in which the primate diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) is restricted either to the FAP+/CD45+ or to the FAP+/CD45− subset, we demonstrate by conditionally depleting each subset that both independently contribute to the immune suppressive tumor microenvironment. A basis for the function of the FAP+/CD45+ subset is shown to be the immune inhibitory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The FAP+/CD45+ cells are the major tumoral source of HO-1, and an inhibitor of HO-1, Sn mesoporphyrin, causes the same extent of immune-dependent arrest of LL2/OVA tumor growth as does the depletion of these cells. Since this observation of immune suppression by HO-1 expressed by the FAP+/CD45+ stromal cell is replicated in a transplanted model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we conclude that pharmacologically targeting this enzyme may improve cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24778275

  3. Protein assay for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induced by chemicals in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yohei; Ohshida, Keiyu; Sasago, Kaori

    2009-12-01

    Levels of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress response protein, were measured to examine oxidative stress induced by several chemicals in HepG2 cells with and without S9mix using an ELISA. CdCl(2), heme, and diclofenac sodium salt (diclofenac) were used as inducers of HO-1. Acetaminophen (AAP) and cyclophosphamide (CP) were used as oxidative stress inducers. Stannic mesoporphyrin (SnMP) was used as an inhibitor of HO activity. Cytotoxicity was determined, and HO-1 levels were measured in HepG2 cells exposed to chemicals other than CP with non-metabolic activation without S9mix, and to diclofenac, AAP and CP with metabolic activation with S9mix. HO-1 levels were increased by CdCl(2) (7.5 microM), heme (10, 100 microM), and stannic mesoporphyrin (SnMP) (10 microM), but were not changed by AAP, and were decreased by diclofenac. HO-1 levels were increased by diclofenac (300 microM), and CP (36 microM), but were unaffected by AAP because of low sensitivity in HepG2 cells. The induction of HO-1 expression was first observed in cultured HepG2 cells treated with CP under conditions involving metabolic activation. These results showed the measurement of HO-1 protein levels in this system is useful when assessing oxidative stress as a tool for detecting drug toxicity. PMID:19952508

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1: A Metabolic Nike

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Correa-Costa, Matheus; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Otterbein, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme degradation, which was described more than 30 years ago, is still very actively explored with many novel discoveries on its role in various disease models every year. Recent Advances: The heme oxygenases (HO) are metabolic enzymes that utilize NADPH and oxygen to break apart the heme moiety liberating biliverdin (BV), carbon monoxide (CO), and iron. Heme that is derived from hemoproteins can be toxic to the cells and if not removed immediately, it causes cell apoptosis and local inflammation. Elimination of heme from the milieu enables generation of three products that influences numerous metabolic changes in the cell. Critical Issues: CO has profound effects on mitochondria and cellular respiration and other hemoproteins to which it can bind and affect their function, while BV and bilirubin (BR), the substrate and product of BV, reductase, respectively, are potent antioxidants. Sequestration of iron into ferritin and its recycling in the tissues is a part of the homeodynamic processes that control oxidation-reduction in cellular metabolism. Further, heme is an important component of a number of metabolic enzymes, and, therefore, HO-1 plays an important role in the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Future Directions: In this review, we describe the cross-talk between heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its products with other metabolic pathways. HO-1, which we have labeled Nike, the goddess who personified victory, dictates triumph over pathophysiologic conditions, including diabetes, ischemia, and cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1709–1722. PMID:24180257

  5. Protein therapy using heme-oxygenase-1 fused to a polyarginine transduction domain attenuates cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoyuki; Hänggi, Daniel; Wu, Yumei; Michiue, Hiroyuki; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Ono, Shigeki; Matsui, Hideki; Date, Isao; Steiger, Hans-Jakob

    2011-11-01

    A sequence of 11 consecutive arginine residues (11R) is one of the best protein transduction domains for introducing proteins into cell membranes. Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is involved in heme catabolism and reduces the contractile effect of hemoglobin after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Therefore, we constructed 11R-fused HO-1 protein to achieve successful transduction of the protein into the cerebral arteries and examined the therapeutic effect of the 11R-HO-1 protein for cerebral vasospasm (CV) after SAH. We injected the 11R-HO-1 protein into the cisterna magna of male rats and, several hours after the injection, performed immunofluorescence staining and western blotting analysis of the rat basilar arteries (BAs) to determine transduction efficacy. We also assessed intraarterial HO-1 activity as cGMP (cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate) accumulation in SAH and determined whether protein transduction of 11R-HO-1 quantified the therapeutic effect in a rat double-hemorrhage model of SAH. The BAs expressed significantly more HO-1 in the group injected with 11R-HO-1 (3.56±0.54 (11R-HO-1) versus control (saline)), and transduction of 11R-HO-1 resulted in higher activity (>3.25-fold) in rat BAs with SAH. Moreover, the results of the rat double-hemorrhage model showed that the 11R-HO-1 protein significantly attenuated CV after SAH (317.59±23.48 μm (11R-HO-1) versus 270.08±14.66 μm (11R-fused enhanced green fluorescent protein), 252.05±13.95 μm (saline), P<0.01). PMID:21654696

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 system and gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao; Fan, Wen-Guo; Li, Dong-Pei; Lin, Marie CM; Kung, Hsiangfu

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) system catabolizes heme into three products: carbon monoxide, biliverdin/bilirubin and free iron. It is involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. A great deal of data has demonstrated the roles of HO-1 in the formation, growth and metastasis of tumors. The interest in this system by investigators involved in gastrointestinal tumors is fairly recent, and few papers on HO-1 have touched upon this subject. This review focuses on the current understanding of the physiological significance of HO-1 induction and its possible roles in the gastrointestinal tumors studied to date. The implications for possible therapeutic manipulation of HO-1 in gastrointestinal tumors are also discussed. PMID:20518085

  7. Transduction of PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 fusion protein reduces myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Yun; Yan, Xue-Tao; Wang, Yan-Lin; Wang, Cheng-Yao; Zhang, Zong-Ze; Li, Hui; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies have uncovered that overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by induction or gene transfer provides myocardial protection. In the present study, we investigated whether HO-1 protein mediated by cell-penetrating peptide PEP-1 could confer cardioprotection in a rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia by occluding the left anterior descending coronary artery and to 120 minutes of reperfusion to prepare the model of I/R. Animals were randomized to receive PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein or saline 30 minutes before a 30-minute occlusion. I/R increased myocardial infarct size and levels of malondialdehyde, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 and reduced myocardial superoxide dismutase activity. Administration of PEP-1-HO-1 reduced myocardial infarct size and levels of malondialdehyde, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 and increased myocardial superoxide dismutase and HO-1 activities. His-probe protein was only detected in PEP-1-HO-1-transduced hearts. In addition, transduction of PEP-1-HO-1 markedly reduced elevated myocardial tissue nuclear factor-κB induced by I/R. The results suggested that transduction of PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein decreased myocardial reperfusion injury, probably by attenuating the production of oxidants and proinflammatory cytokines regulated by nuclear factor-κB. PMID:23921302

  8. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Lanceta, Lilibeth; Mattingly, Jacob M.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer) and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by “loose” (probably intralysosomal) iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment). Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity–CO and bilirubin–have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity. PMID:26270345

  9. Regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Okinaga, S; Takahashi, K; Takeda, K; Yoshizawa, M; Fujita, H; Sasaki, H; Shibahara, S

    1996-06-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 is an essential enzyme in heme catabolism, and its human gene promoter contains a putative heat shock element (HHO-HSE). This study was designed to analyze the regulation of human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression under thermal stress. The amounts of heme oxygenase-1 protein were not increased by heat shock (incubation at 42 degrees C) in human alveolar macrophages and in a human erythroblastic cell line, YN-1-0-A, whereas heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was noticeably induced. However, heat shock factor does bind in vitro to HHO-HSE and the synthetic HHO-HSE by itself is sufficient to confer the increase in the transient expression of a reporter gene upon heat shock. The deletion of the sequence, located downstream from HHO-HSE, resulted in the activation of a reporter gene by heat shock. These results suggest that HHO-HSE is potentially functional but is repressed in vivo. Interestingly, heat shock abolished the remarkable increase in the levels of heme oxygenase-1 mRNA in YN-1-0-A cells treated with hemin or cadmium, in which HSP70 mRNA was noticeably induced. Furthermore, transient expression assays showed that heat shock inhibits the cadmium-mediated activation of the heme oxygenase-1 promoter, whereas the HSP70 gene promoter was activated upon heat shock. Such regulation of heme oxygenase-1 under thermal stress may be of physiologic significance in erythroid cells. PMID:8652820

  10. Heme activates the heme oxygenase-1 gene in renal epithelial cells by stabilizing Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Alam, Jawed; Killeen, Erin; Gong, Pengfei; Naquin, Ryan; Hu, Bin; Stewart, Daniel; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Nath, Karl A

    2003-04-01

    The mechanism of heme oxygenase-1 gene (ho-1) activation by heme in immortalized rat proximal tubular epithelial cells was examined. Analysis of the ho-1 promoter identified the heme-responsive sequences as the stress-response element (StRE), multiple copies of which are present in two enhancer regions, E1 and E2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays identified Nrf2, MafG, ATF3, and Jun and Fos family members as StRE-binding proteins; binding of Nrf2, MafG, and ATF3 was increased in response to heme. Dominant-negative mutants of Nrf2 and Maf, but not of c-Fos and c-Jun, inhibited basal and heme-induced expression of an E1-controlled luciferase gene. Heme did not affect the transcription activity of Nrf2, dimerization between Nrf2 and MafG, or the level of MafG, but did stimulate expression of Nrf2. Heme did not influence the level of Nrf2 mRNA but increased the half-life of Nrf2 protein from approximately 10 min to nearly 110 min. These results indicate that heme promotes stabilization of Nrf2, leading to accumulation of Nrf2. MafG dimers that bind to StREs to activate the ho-1 gene. PMID:12453873

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates mitochondrial quality control in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Boddu, Ravindra; Guo, Lingling; Tisher, Cornelia C.; Traylor, Amie M.; Patel, Bindiya; Joseph, Reny; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Suliman, Hagir B.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2016-01-01

    The cardioprotective inducible enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) degrades prooxidant heme into equimolar quantities of carbon monoxide, biliverdin, and iron. We hypothesized that HO-1 mediates cardiac protection, at least in part, by regulating mitochondrial quality control. We treated WT and HO-1 transgenic mice with the known mitochondrial toxin, doxorubicin (DOX). Relative to WT mice, mice globally overexpressing human HO-1 were protected from DOX-induced dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac cytoarchitectural derangement, and infiltration of CD11b+ mononuclear phagocytes. Cardiac-specific overexpression of HO-1 ameliorated DOX-mediated dilation of the sarcoplasmic reticulum as well as mitochondrial disorganization in the form of mitochondrial fragmentation and increased numbers of damaged mitochondria in autophagic vacuoles. HO-1 overexpression promotes mitochondrial biogenesis by upregulating protein expression of NRF1, PGC1α, and TFAM, which was inhibited in WT animals treated with DOX. Concomitantly, HO-1 overexpression inhibited the upregulation of the mitochondrial fission mediator Fis1 and resulted in increased expression of the fusion mediators, Mfn1 and Mfn2. It also prevented dynamic changes in the levels of key mediators of the mitophagy pathway, PINK1 and parkin. Therefore, these findings suggest that HO-1 has a novel role in protecting the heart from oxidative injury by regulating mitochondrial quality control. PMID:27110594

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  13. Heatstroke Effect on Brain Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Ting; Liu, Tsung-Ta; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Chen, Chun-Chi; Kung, Woon-Man; Huang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Tien-Jen; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Wei, Li

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high environmental temperature leading to increased core body temperature above 40°C and central nervous system abnormalities such as convulsions, delirium, or coma is defined as heat stroke. Studies in humans and animals indicate that the heat shock responses of the host contribute to multiple organ injury and death during heat stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin-has an important role in the neuroprotective mechanism against ischemic stroke. Here, we investigated the role of endogenous HO-1 in heat-induced brain damage in rats. RT-PCR results revealed that levels of HO-1 mRNA peaked at 0 h after heat exposure and immunoblot analysis revealed that the maximal protein expression occurred at 1 h post-heat exposure. Subsequently, we detected the HO-1 expression in the cortical brain cells and revealed the neuronal cell morphology. In conclusion, HO-1 is a potent protective molecule against heat-induced brain damage. Manipulation of HO-1 may provide a potential therapeutic approach for heat-related diseases. PMID:26392811

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 modulates fetal growth in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kreiser, Doron; Nguyen, Xuandai; Wong, Ron; Seidman, Daniel; Stevenson, David; Quan, Shou; Abraham, Nader; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2002-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality as well as with lifelong cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Deficiency of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is associated with growth restriction in mice and in humans, suggesting a role for HO-1 in fetal growth and maintenance of pregnancy. We hypothesized that modulation of HO-1 in the pregnant rat would alter fetal growth. In pregnant dams, placental HO activity was significantly inhibited with zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol, and HO-1 protein was increased by transducing adenoviral human HO-1. Inhibition of HO-1 by zinc deuteroporphyrin IX 2,4 bis glycol resulted in a significant decrease in pup size, whereas transfection with hHO-1 resulted in increased pup size. Furthermore, the expression of IGF binding protein-1 and its receptor paralleled the expression of HO-1 in the placenta and were significantly modulated by modification of HO-1 along with the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor. These observations demonstrate that HO-1 modulates fetal growth by its effects on placental growth factors. PMID:12065678

  15. Curcumin inhibits HCV replication by induction of heme oxygenase-1 and suppression of AKT

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, MING-HO; LEE, MING-YANG; CHUANG, JING-JING; LI, YI-ZHEN; NING, SIN-TZU; CHEN, JUNG-CHOU; LIU, YI-WEN

    2012-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 130–170 million people worldwide, no vaccines are available. HCV is an important cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, leading to the need for liver transplantation. In this study, curcumin, a constituent used in traditional Chinese medicine, has been evaluated for its anti-HCV activity and mechanism, using a human hepatoma cell line containing the HCV genotype 1b subgenomic replicon. Below the concentration of 20% cytotoxicity, curcumin dose-dependently inhibited HCV replication by luciferase reporter gene assay, HCV RNA detection and HCV protein analysis. Under the same conditions, curcumin also dose-dependently induced heme oxygenase-1 with the highest induction at 24 h. Hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 inducer, also inhibited HCV protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. The knockdown of heme oxygenase-1 partially reversed the curcumin-inhibited HCV protein expression. In addition to the heme oxygenase-1 induction, signaling molecule activities of AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were inhibited by curcumin. Using specific inhibitors of PI3K-AKT, MEK-ERK and NF-κB, the results suggested that only PI3K-AKT inhibition is positively involved in curcumin-inhibited HCV replication. Inhibition of ERK and NF-κB was likely to promote HCV protein expression. In summary, curcumin inhibited HCV replication by heme oxygenase-1 induction and AKT pathway inhibition. Although curcumin also inhibits ERK and NF-κB activities, it slightly increased the HCV protein expression. This result may provide information when curcumin is used as an adjuvant in anti-HCV therapy. PMID:22922731

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 and Carbon Monoxide Promote Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection.

    PubMed

    Stolt, Claudia; Schmidt, Imke H E; Sayfart, Yana; Steinmetz, Ivo; Bast, Antje

    2016-08-01

    The environmental bacterium and potential biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei causes melioidosis, an often fatal infectious disease. Increased serum bilirubin has been shown to be a negative predictive factor in melioidosis patients. We therefore investigated the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of heme into the bilirubin precursor biliverdin, ferrous iron, and CO during B. pseudomallei infection. We found that infection of murine macrophages induces HO-1 expression, involving activation of several protein kinases and the transcription factor nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Deficiency of Nrf2 improved B. pseudomallei clearance by macrophages, whereas Nrf2 activation by sulforaphane and tert-butylhydroquinone with subsequent HO-1 induction enhanced intracellular bacterial growth. The HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin IX diminished proinflammatory cytokine levels, leading to an increased bacterial burden in macrophages. In contrast, HO-1 gene knockdown reduced the survival of intramacrophage B. pseudomallei Pharmacological administration of cobalt protoporphyrin IX to mice resulted in an enhanced bacterial load in various organs and was associated with higher mortality of intranasally infected mice. The unfavorable outcome of B. pseudomallei infection after HO-1 induction was associated with higher serum IL-6, TNF-α, and MCP-1 levels but decreased secretion of IFN-γ. Finally, we demonstrate that the CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 increases the B. pseudomallei load in macrophages and mice. Thus, our data suggest that the B. pseudomallei-mediated induction of HO-1 and the release of its metabolite CO impair bacterial clearance in macrophages and during murine melioidosis. PMID:27316684

  17. Association of Nuclear Factor-Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2, Thioredoxin Interacting Protein, and Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Polymorphisms with Diabetes and Obesity in Mexican Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Osorio, Angélica Saraí; González-Reyes, Susana; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Rodríguez-Arellano, Martha Eunice; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Barquera, Rodrigo; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear factor-erythroid 2- (NF-E2-) related factor 2 (Nrf2) is abated and its ability to reduce oxidative stress is impaired in type 2 diabetes and obesity. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore if polymorphisms in Nrf2 and target genes are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican mestizo subjects. The rs1800566 of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene, rs7211 of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) gene, rs2071749 of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene, and the rs6721961 and the rs2364723 from Nrf2 gene were genotyped in 627 diabetic subjects and 1020 controls. The results showed that the rs7211 polymorphism is a protective factor against obesity in nondiabetic subjects (CC + CT versus TT, OR = 0.40, P = 0.005) and in women (CC versus CT + TT, OR = 0.7, P = 0.016). TT carriers had lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and lower body mass index. The rs2071749 was positively associated with obesity (AA versus AG + GG, OR = 1.25, P = 0.026). Finally, the rs6721961 was negatively associated with diabetes in men (CC versus CA + AA, OR = 0.62, P = 0.003). AA carriers showed lower glucose concentrations. No association was found for rs1800566 and rs2364723 polymorphisms. In conclusion, the presence of Nrf2 and related genes polymorphisms are associated with diabetes and obesity in Mexican patients. PMID:27274779

  18. Crocin Suppresses LPS-Stimulated Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Upregulation of Heme Oxygenase-1 via Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Park, Ga-Young; Bang, Soo Young; Park, Sun Young; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Kim, YoungHee

    2014-01-01

    Crocin is a water-soluble carotenoid pigment that is primarily used in various cuisines as a seasoning and coloring agent, as well as in traditional medicines for the treatment of edema, fever, and hepatic disorder. In this study, we demonstrated that crocin markedly induces the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) which leads to an anti-inflammatory response. Crocin inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production via downregulation of nuclear factor kappa B activity in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. These effects were abrogated by blocking of HO-1 expression or activity. Crocin also induced Ca2+ mobilization from intracellular pools and phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 4 (CAMK4). CAMK4 knockdown and kinase-dead mutant inhibited crocin-mediated HO-1 expression, Nrf2 activation, and phosphorylation of Akt, indicating that HO-1 expression is mediated by CAMK4 and that Akt is a downstream mediator of CAMK4 in crocin signaling. Moreover, crocin-mediated suppression of iNOS expression was blocked by CAMK4 inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that crocin suppresses LPS-stimulated expression of iNOS by inducing HO-1 expression via Ca2+/calmodulin-CAMK4-PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling cascades. Our findings provide a novel molecular mechanism for the inhibitory effects of crocin against endotoxin-mediated inflammation. PMID:24839356

  19. Protective role of heme oxygenase-1 in atrial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yung-Hsin; Hsu, Lung-An; Chen, Ying-Hwa; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Chang, Gwo-Jyh; Chen, Wei-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium constitutes the main feature of atrial fibrillation (AF), which is characterized by increased oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent anti-oxidant system that may provide protection against various oxidative stress-related diseases. The aim of this study is to investigate whether HO-1 has a protective effect on AF-related remodeling. Cultured atrium-derived myocytes (HL-1 cell line) were used to evaluate tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, structural, and electrical remodeling. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was utilized to assess collagen (a main fibrosis-related protein) expression in atrial fibroblasts. Tachypacing in HL-1 myocytes and treatment of atrial fibroblasts with TGF-β enhanced the expression of HO-1, both of which were mediated by the activation of nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2. Over-expression of HO-1 in HL-1 cells attenuated tachypacing-induced oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, down-regulation of L-type calcium channel, and shortening of action potential duration. Furthermore, HO-1 over-expression in atrial fibroblasts blocked the up-regulation of collagen by TGF-β, implicating a protective role of HO-1 in structural and electrical remodeling in the atrium. In vivo, HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited a higher degree of oxidative stress, myofibril degradation, and collagen deposit in their atria than wild-type mice. Moreover, burst atrial pacing induced a greater susceptibility to AF in HO-1(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In conclusion, a negative-feedback regulation of HO-1 in activated atrial myocytes and fibroblasts may provide protection against AF-related remodeling and AF development. PMID:27562817

  20. Generation and Characterization of Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Transgenic Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J.; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D.; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  1. Generation and characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 transgenic pigs.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Hye-Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Yang, Jaeseok; Cho, Bumrae; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Park, Sol Ji; Hurh, Sunghoon; Kim, Hwajung; Lee, Eun Mi; Ro, Han; Kang, Jung Taek; Kim, Su Jin; Won, Jae-Kyung; O'Connell, Philip J; Kim, Hyunil; Surh, Charles D; Lee, Byeong-Chun; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Xenotransplantation using transgenic pigs as an organ source is a promising strategy to overcome shortage of human organ for transplantation. Various genetic modifications have been tried to ameliorate xenograft rejection. In the present study we assessed effect of transgenic expression of human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an inducible protein capable of cytoprotection by scavenging reactive oxygen species and preventing apoptosis caused by cellular stress during inflammatory processes, in neonatal porcine islet-like cluster cells (NPCCs). Transduction of NPCCs with adenovirus containing hHO-1 gene significantly reduced apoptosis compared with the GFP-expressing adenovirus control after treatment with either hydrogen peroxide or hTNF-α and cycloheximide. These protective effects were diminished by co-treatment of hHO-1 antagonist, Zinc protoporphyrin IX. We also generated transgenic pigs expressing hHO-1 and analyzed expression and function of the transgene. Human HO-1 was expressed in most tissues, including the heart, kidney, lung, pancreas, spleen and skin, however, expression levels and patterns of the hHO-1 gene are not consistent in each organ. We isolate fibroblast from transgenic pigs to analyze protective effect of the hHO-1. As expected, fibroblasts derived from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs were significantly resistant to both hydrogen peroxide damage and hTNF-α and cycloheximide-mediated apoptosis when compared with wild-type fibroblasts. Furthermore, induction of RANTES in response to hTNF-α or LPS was significantly decreased in fibroblasts obtained from the hHO-1 transgenic pigs. These findings suggest that transgenic expression of hHO-1 can protect xenografts when exposed to oxidative stresses, especially from ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or acute rejection mediated by cytokines. Accordingly, hHO-1 could be an important candidate molecule in a multi-transgenic pig strategy for xenotransplantation. PMID:23071605

  2. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Expressing Heme Oxygenase-1 Reverse Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Olin D.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Chang, Mun Seog; Vergadi, Eleni; Lee, Changjin; Aslam, Muhammad; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Liu, Xianlan; Baveja, Rajiv; Kourembanas, Stella

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains a serious disease, and, while current treatments may prolong and improve quality of life, search for novel and effective therapies is warranted. Using genetically-modified mouse lines, we tested the ability of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (MSCs), to treat chronic hypoxia-induced PAH. Recipient mice were exposed for five weeks to normobaric hypoxia (8%–10% O2), MSC preparations were delivered through jugular vein injection and their effect on PAH was assessed after two additional weeks in hypoxia. Donor MSCs derived from wild-type (WT) mice or Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) null mice (Hmox1KO) conferred partial protection from PAH when transplanted into WT or Hmox1KO recipients, whereas treatment with MSCs isolated from transgenic mice harboring a human HO-1 transgene under the control of surfactant protein C promoter (SHO1 line) reversed established disease in WT recipients. SH01-MSC treatment of Hmox1KO animals, which develop right ventricular (RV) infarction under prolonged hypoxia, resulted in normal RV systolic pressure, significant reduction of RV hypertrophy and prevention of RV infarction. Donor MSCs isolated from a bitransgenic mouse line with doxycycline-inducible, lung-specific expression of HO-1 exhibited similar therapeutic efficacy only upon doxycycline treatment of the recipients. In vitro experiments indicate that potential mechanisms of MSC action include modulation of hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation. Cumulative, our results demonstrate that MSCs ameliorate chronic hypoxia – induced PAH and their efficacy is highly augmented by lung-specific HO-1 expression in the transplanted cells, suggesting an interplay between HO-1 dependent and HO-1 independent protective pathways. PMID:20957739

  3. CO-releasing molecules and increased heme oxygenase-1 induce protein S-glutathionylation to modulate NF-κB activity in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Po-Yen; Li, Chia-Yu; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Yang, Yan-Chang; Yang, Po-Min; Wung, Being-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Protein glutathionylation is a protective mechanism that functions in response to mild oxidative stress. Carbon monoxide (CO) can increase the reactive oxygen species concentration from a low level via the inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase. We therefore hypothesized that CO would induce NF-κB-p65 glutathionylation and then show anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we found that CO-releasing molecules suppress TNFα-induced monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and reduce ICAM-1 expression. Moreover, CO donors were further found to exert their inhibitory effects by blocking NF-κB-p65 nuclear translocation, but do so independent of IκBα degradation, in TNFα-treated ECs. In addition, p65 protein glutathionylation represents the response signal to CO donors and is reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Thiol modification of the cysteine residue in the p65 RHD region was required for the CO-modulated NF-κB activation. The suppression of p65 glutathionylation by a GSH synthesis inhibitor, BSO, and by catalase could also attenuate TNFα-induced p65 nuclear translocation and ICAM-1 expression. CO donors induce Nrf2 activation and Nrf2 siRNA suppresses CO-induced p65 glutathionylation and inhibition. Furthermore, we found that the CO donors induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which increases p65 glutathionylation. In contrast, HO-1 siRNA attenuates CO donor- and hemin-induced p65 glutathionylation. Our results thus indicate that the glutathionylation of p65 is likely to be responsible for CO-mediated NF-κB inactivation and that the HO-1-dependent pathway may prolong the inhibitory effects of CO donors upon TNFα treatment of ECs. PMID:24512908

  4. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J.; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B.; Deng, Alicia C.; Spin, Joshua M.; Stevenson, David K.; Dalman, Ronald L.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression Affects Murine Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Junya; Wong, Ronald J; Morisawa, Takeshi; Hsu, Mark; Maegdefessel, Lars; Zhao, Hui; Kalish, Flora; Kayama, Yosuke; Wallenstein, Matthew B; Deng, Alicia C; Spin, Joshua M; Stevenson, David K; Dalman, Ronald L; Tsao, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is a cytoprotective enzyme upregulated in the vasculature by increased flow and inflammatory stimuli. Human genetic data suggest that a diminished HO-1 expression may predispose one to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development. In addition, heme is known to strongly induce HO-1 expression. Utilizing the porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) model of AAA induction in HO-1 heterozygous (HO-1+/-, HO-1 Het) mice, we found that a deficiency in HO-1 leads to augmented AAA development. Peritoneal macrophages from HO-1+/- mice showed increased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including MCP-1, TNF-alpha, IL-1-beta, and IL-6, but decreased expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta. Furthermore, treatment with heme returned AAA progression in HO-1 Het mice to a wild-type profile. Using a second murine AAA model (Ang II-ApoE-/-), we showed that low doses of the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor rosuvastatin can induce HO-1 expression in aortic tissue and suppress AAA progression in the absence of lipid lowering. Our results support those studies that suggest that pleiotropic statin effects might be beneficial in AAA, possibly through the upregulation of HO-1. Specific targeted therapies designed to induce HO-1 could become an adjunctive therapeutic strategy for the prevention of AAA disease. PMID:26894432

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates tumor angiogenesis of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Sunamura, Makoto; Duda, Dan G; Ghattas, Maivel H; Lozonschi, Lucian; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Yamauchi, Jun-Ichiro; Matsuno, Seiki; Shibahara, Shigeki; Abraham, Nader G

    2003-01-01

    Angiogenesis is necessary for the continued growth of solid tumors, invasion and metastasis. Several studies clearly showed that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in angiogenesis. In this study, we used the vital microscope system, transparent skinfold model, lung colonization model and transduced pancreatic cancer cell line (Panc-1)/human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) cells, to precisely analyze, for the first time, the effect of hHO-1 gene on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Our results revealed that HO-1 stimulates angiogenesis of pancreatic carcinoma in severe combined immune deficient mice. Overexpression of human hHO-1 after its retroviral transfer into Panc-1 cells did not interfere with tumor growth in vitro. While in vivo the development of tumors was accelerated upon transfection with hHO-1. On the other hand, inhibition of heme oxygenase (HO) activity by stannous mesoporphyrin was able transiently to delay tumor growth in a dose dependent manner. Tumor angiogenesis was markedly increased in Panc-1/hHO-1 compared to mock transfected and wild type. Lectin staining and Ki-67 proliferation index confirmed these results. In addition hHO-1 stimulated in vitro tumor angiogenesis and increased endothelial cell survival. In a lung colonization model, overexpression of hHO-1 increased the occurrence of metastasis, while inhibition of HO activity by stannous mesoporphyrin completely inhibited the occurrence of metastasis. In conclusion, overexpression of HO-1 genes potentiates pancreatic cancer aggressiveness, by increasing tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis and that the inhibition of the HO system may be of useful benefit for the future treatment of the disease. PMID:14517400

  7. Interaction of nitric oxide with human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Lu, Shen; Moënne-Loccoz, Pierre; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2003-01-24

    NO and CO may complement each other as signaling molecules in some physiological situations. We have examined the binding of NO to human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1), an enzyme that oxidizes heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron, to determine whether inhibition of hHO-1 by NO can contribute to the signaling interplay of NO and CO. An Fe(3+)-NO hHO-1-heme complex is formed with NO or the NO donors NOC9 or 2-(N,N-diethylamino)-diazenolate-2-oxide.sodium salt. Resonance Raman spectroscopy shows that ferric hHO-1-heme forms a 6-coordinated, low spin complex with NO. The nu(N-O) vibration of this complex detected by Fourier transform IR is only 4 cm(-1) lower than that of the corresponding metmyoglobin (met-Mb) complex but is broader, suggesting a greater degree of ligand conformational freedom. The Fe(3+)-NO complex of hHO-1 is much more stable than that of met-Mb. Stopped-flow studies indicate that k(on) for formation of the hHO-1-heme Fe(3+)-NO complex is approximately 50-times faster, and k(off) 10 times slower, than for met-Mb, resulting in K(d) = 1.4 microm for NO. NO thus binds 500-fold more tightly to ferric hHO-1-heme than to met-Mb. The hHO-1 mutations E29A, G139A, D140A, S142A, G143A, G143F, and K179A/R183A do not significantly diminish the tight binding of NO, indicating that NO binding is not highly sensitive to mutations of residues that normally stabilize the distal water ligand. As expected from the K(d) value, the enzyme is reversibly inhibited upon exposure to pathologically, and possibly physiologically, relevant concentrations of NO. Inhibition of hHO-1 by NO may contribute to the pleiotropic responses to NO and CO. PMID:12433915

  8. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K; Yu, K N; Han, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1-10cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  9. Role of heme Oxygenase-1 in low dose Radioadaptive response

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lingzhi; Ma, Jie; Chen, Guodong; Hou, Jue; Hei, Tom K.; Yu, K.N.; Han, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Radioadaptive response (RAR) is an important phenomenon induced by low dose radiation. However, the molecular mechanism of RAR is obscure. In this study, we focused on the possible role of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in RAR. Consistent with previous studies, priming dose of X-ray radiation (1–10 cGy) induced significant RAR in normal human skin fibroblasts (AG 1522 cells). Transcription and translation of HO-1 was up-regulated more than two fold by a priming dose of radiation (5 cGy). Zinc protoporphyrin Ⅸ, a specific competitive inhibitor of HO-1, efficiently inhibited RAR whereas hemin, an inducer of HO-1, could mimic priming dose of X-rays to induce RAR. Knocking down of HO-1 by transfection of HO-1 siRNA significantly attenuated RAR. Furthermore, the expression of HO-1 gene was modulated by the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), which translocated from cytoplasm to nucleus after priming dose radiation and enhance the antioxidant level of cells. PMID:26966892

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression. We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells. In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26418896

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages controls prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Zsuzsanna; Li, Mailin; Csizmadia, Eva; Döme, Balazs; Johansson, Martin; Persson, Jenny Liao; Seth, Pankaj; Otterbein, Leo; Wegiel, Barbara

    2015-10-20

    Innate immune cells strongly influence cancer growth and progression via multiple mechanisms including regulation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). In this study, we investigated whether expression of the metabolic gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in tumor microenvironment imparts significant effects on prostate cancer progression.We showed that HO-1 is expressed in MARCO-positive macrophages in prostate cancer (PCa) xenografts and human prostate cancers. We demonstrated that macrophage specific (LyzM-Cre) conditional deletion of HO-1 suppressed growth of PC3 xenografts in vivo and delayed progression of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in TRAMP mice. However, initiation and progression of cancer xenografts in the presence of macrophages lacking HO-1 resulted in loss of E-cadherin, a known marker of poor prognosis as well as EMT. Application of CO, a product of HO-1 catalysis, increased levels of E-cadherin in the adherens junctions between cancer cells. We further showed that HO-1-driven expression of E-cadherin in cancer cells cultured in the presence of macrophages is dependent on mitochondrial activity of cancer cells.In summary, these data suggest that HO-1-derived CO from tumor-associated macrophages influences, in part, E-cadherin expression and thus tumor initiation and progression. PMID:26418896

  12. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates alcoholic liver steatosis: histopathological study

    PubMed Central

    Palipoch, Sarawoot; Koomhin, Phanit; Punsawad, Chuchard; Na-Ek, Prasit; Sattayakhom, Apsorn; Suwannalert, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the most important causes of hepatic steatosis, which involves oxidative stress. In particular, increased oxidative stress has been strongly linked to stimulation of the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This study aimed to investigate whether HO-1 could alleviates alcoholic steatosis in rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: 1) the control group, 2) the EtOH group, 3) the EtOH + ZnPP-IX group and 4) the EtOH + Hemin group. Liver histopathology was investigated in weeks 1 and 4 after the start of the treatment period. Alcohol treatment significantly increased the hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, an oxidative stress marker. In addition, it increased the triglyceride, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in both weeks. Gross examination demonstrated a yellowish and slightly enlarged liver in the alcohol-treated rats. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and Oil Red O staining indicated hepatic steatosis, which was characterized by diffuse, extensive fatty accumulation and discrete lipid droplets of variable size in hepatocytes of the alcohol-treated rats. Administration of the HO-1 inducer hemin resulted in upregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression, reduced the MDA, triglyceride, ALT and AST levels and alleviated alcoholic hepatic steatosis, whereas administration of the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX) resulted in downregulation of hepatic HO-1 gene expression and could not alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis either week. In conclusion, HO-1 could alleviate alcoholic hepatic steatosis in male Wistar rats and may be useful in development of a new therapeutic approach. PMID:26989297

  13. Natural heme oxygenase-1 inducers in hepatobiliary function

    PubMed Central

    Volti, Giovanni Li; Sacerdoti, David; Giacomo, Claudia Di; Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Scacco, Antonio; Murabito, Paolo; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Gazzolo, Diego; Abella, Raul; Frigiola, Alessandro; Galvano, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Many physiological effects of natural antioxidants, their extracts or their major active components, have been reported in recent decades. Most of these compounds are characterized by a phenolic structure, similar to that of α-tocopherol, and present antioxidant properties that have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. Polyphenols may increase the capacity of endogenous antioxidant defences and modulate the cellular redox state. Changes in the cellular redox state may have wide-ranging consequences for cellular growth and differentiation. The majority of in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far have attributed the protective effect of bioactive polyphenols to their chemical reactivity toward free radicals and their capacity to prevent the oxidation of important intracellular components. However, in recent years a possible novel aspect in the mode of action of these compounds has been suggested; that is, the ultimate stimulation of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway is likely to account for the established and powerful antioxidant/anti-inflammatory properties of these polyphenols. The products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly carbon monoxide (CO) and biliverdin/bilirubin have been shown to exert protective effects in several organs against oxidative and other noxious stimuli. In this context, it is interesting to note that induction of HO-1 expression by means of natural compounds contributes to protection against liver damage in various experimental models. The focus of this review is on the significance of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against various stressors in several pathological conditions. PMID:18985801

  14. Isotetrandrine ameliorates tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative stress through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lidong; Ci, Xinxin; Lv, Hongming; Wang, Xiaosong; Qin, F Xiaofeng; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-08-01

    1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine, a naturally occurring plant alkaloid found in Mahonia of Berberidaceae, possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties, but the antioxidative activity and mechanism action remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated the antioxidative effect and mechanism of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage in HepG2 cells. We found that 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine suppressed cytotoxicity, reactive oxygen species generation, and glutathione depletion. Additionally, our study confirmed that 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine significantly increased the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 expression and nuclear translocation of factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Specifically, the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 induced by 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine was associated with Nrf2 negative regulatory protein Keap1 inactivation and phosphorylation of both extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase. Preincubation with thiol-reducing agents reduced 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression, and treatment with either extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors attenuated the levels of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine-induced Nrf2 activation and heme oxygenase-1 expression. Furthermore, the cytoprotective effect of 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine was abolished by heme oxygenase-1, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors. These results indicated that the 1R, 1'S-isotetrandrine ameliorated tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced oxidative damage through upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 expression by the dissociation of Nrf2 from Nrf2-Keap1 complex via extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation and Keap1 inactivation. PMID:27190261

  15. A Heme Oxygenase-1 Transducer Model of Degenerative and Developmental Brain Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Schipper, Hyman M.; Song, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a 32 kDa protein which catalyzes the breakdown of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide and biliverdin. The Hmox1 promoter contains numerous consensus sequences that render the gene exquisitely sensitive to induction by diverse pro-oxidant and inflammatory stimuli. In “stressed” astroglia, HO-1 hyperactivity promotes mitochondrial iron sequestration and macroautophagy and may thereby contribute to the pathological iron deposition and bioenergetic failure documented in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and certain neurodevelopmental conditions. Glial HO-1 expression may also impact neuroplasticity and cell survival by modulating brain sterol metabolism and the proteasomal degradation of neurotoxic proteins. The glial HO-1 response may represent a pivotal transducer of noxious environmental and endogenous stressors into patterns of neural damage and repair characteristic of many human degenerative and developmental CNS disorders. PMID:25761244

  16. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Na+-H+ Exchanger 1 Protein Plays a Crucial Role in Imatinib-resistant Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Fang, Qin; Wang, Ping; Gao, Rui; Wu, Weibing; Lu, Tangsheng; Cao, Lu; Hu, Xiuying; Wang, Jishi

    2015-01-01

    Resistance toward imatinib (IM) and other BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors remains troublesome in the treatment of advanced stage chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The aim of this study was to estimate the reversal effects of down-regulation of Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1) on the chemoresistance of BCR-ABL-positive leukemia patients' cells and cell lines. After treatment with the specific NHE1 inhibitor cariporide to decrease intracellular pH (pHi), the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels of the K562R cell line and cells from IM-insensitive CML patients decreased. HO-1, as a Bcr/Abl-dependent survival molecule in CML cells, is important for the resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with newly diagnosed CML or IM-resistant CML. Silencing PKC-β and Nrf-2 or treatment with inhibitors of p38 pathways obviously blocked NHE1-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, treatment with HO-1 or p38 inhibitor plus IM increased the apoptosis of the K562R cell line and IM-insensitive CML patients' cells. Inhibiting HO-1 enhanced the activation of caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. Hence, the results support the anti-apoptotic role of HO-1 induced by NHE1 in the K562R cell line and IM-insensitive CML patients and provide a mechanism by which inducing HO-1 expression via the PKC-β/p38-MAPK pathway may promote tumor resistance to oxidative stress. PMID:25802333

  17. Alternative 5’ Untranslated Regions Are Involved in Expression Regulation of Human Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Marcel; Sponholz, Christoph; Slaba, Monique; Wissuwa, Bianka; Claus, Ralf A.; Menzel, Uwe; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bauer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs2071746 and a (GT)n microsatellite within the human gene encoding heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) are associated with incidence or outcome in a variety of diseases. Most of these associations involve either release of heme or oxidative stress. Both polymorphisms are localized in the promoter region, but previously reported correlations with heme oxygenase-1 expression remain not coherent. This ambiguity suggests a more complex organization of the 5’ gene region which we sought to investigate more fully. We evaluated the 5‘ end of HMOX1 and found a novel first exon 1a placing the two previously reported polymorphisms in intronic or exonic positions within the 5’ untranslated region respectively. Expression of exon 1a can be induced in HepG2 hepatoma cells by hemin and is a repressor of heme oxygenase-1 translation as shown by luciferase reporter assays. Moreover, minigene approaches revealed that the quantitative outcome of alternative splicing within the 5’ untranslated region is affected by the (GT)n microsatellite. This data supporting an extended HMOX1 gene model and provide further insights into expression regulation of heme oxygenase-1. Alternative splicing within the HMOX1 5' untranslated region contributes to translational regulation and is a mechanistic feature involved in the interplay between genetic variations, heme oxygenase-1 expression and disease outcome. PMID:24098580

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee

    2015-01-01

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1−/− fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death. PMID:26405158

  19. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  20. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 suppresses heat shock protein 90 and the proliferation of human breast cancer cells through its byproduct carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wen-Ying; Chen, Yen-Chou; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Lin, Chun-Mao; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Chen, Ku-Chung; Lin, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is an oxidative stress-response enzyme which catalyzes the degradation of heme into bilirubin, ferric ion, and carbon monoxide (CO). Induction of HO-1 was reported to have antitumor activity; the inhibitory mechanism, however, is still unclear. In the present study, we found that treatment with [Ru(CO){sub 3}Cl{sub 2}]{sub 2} (RuCO), a CO-releasing compound, reduced the growth of human MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Analysis of growth-related proteins showed that treatment with RuCO down-regulated cyclinD1, CDK4, and hTERT protein expressions. Interestingly, RuCO treatment resulted in opposite effects on wild-type and mutant p53 proteins. These results were similar to those of cells treated with geldanamycin (a heat shock protein (HSP)90 inhibitor), suggesting that RuCO might affect HSP90 activity. Moreover, RuCO induced mutant p53 protein destabilization accompanied by promotion of ubiquitination and proteasome degradation. The induction of HO-1 by cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP) showed consistent results, while the addition of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), an HO-1 enzymatic inhibitor, diminished the RuCO-mediated effect. RuCO induction of HO-1 expression was reduced by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor (SB203580). Additionally, treatment with a chemopreventive compound, curcumin, induced HO-1 expression accompanied with reduction of HSP90 client protein expression. The induction of HO-1 by curcumin inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoyl-13-acetate (TPA)-elicited matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and tumor invasion. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence underlying HO-1's antitumor mechanism. CO, a byproduct of HO-1, suppresses HSP90 protein activity, and the induction of HO-1 may possess potential as a cancer therapeutic. - Highlights: • CO and HO-1 inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells. • CO and HO-1 attenuated HSP90 and its client proteins expression. • CO induced mutant p53 protein ubiquitination and

  1. Recombinant truncated and microsomal heme oxygenase-1 and -2: differential sensitivity to inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Vukomanovic, Dragic; McLaughlin, Brian; Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Dercho, Ryan A; Kinobe, Robert T; Hum, Maaike; Brien, James F; Jia, Zongchao; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji

    2010-04-01

    Recombinant truncated forms of heme oxygenase-1 and -2 (HO-1 and HO-2) were compared with their crude microsomal counterparts from brain and spleen tissue of adult male rats with respect to their inhibition by azole-based, nonporphyrin HO inhibitors. The drugs tested were an imidazole-alcohol, an imidazole-dioxolane, and a triazole-ketone. Both the recombinant and crude forms of HO-2 were similarly inhibited by the 3 drugs. The crude microsomal spleen form of HO-1 was more susceptible to inhibition than was the truncated recombinant form. This difference is attributed to the extra amino acids in the full-length enzyme. These observations may be relevant in the design of drugs as inhibitors of HO and other membrane proteins. PMID:20555417

  2. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 attenuates chemotherapy-induced pulmonary toxicity in rats: A possible link between heme oxygenase-1 and NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Raheem, Ihab Talat; Omran, Gamal Abd El-Hay

    2016-03-01

    A critical restriction in the use of bleomycin (BLM) is development of pulmonary fibrosis via oxidative and inflammatory mechanisms. Drugs that induce heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) like hemin (HEM), have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Accordingly, it is worth to test HEM against BLM-induced lung Injury. Four groups of rats were used: control group; HEM group (50 mg/kg, i.p.); BLM group (5 mg/kg, intratracheal single injection) and HEM+BLM group (HEM administered 1 day before BLM injection and continued for 14 days). At the end of experiment, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and NO levels were estimated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Hydroxyproline (HP), myeloperoxidase (MPO), IL-6, GSH, MDA levels and SOD activity were determined in lung tissues. In addition, expression of HO-1 and NF-κB protein in lung tissues was determined using both western blot and immunohistochemical techniques. Also lung tissues were investigated histopathologically. BLM produced lung damage as indicated from the elevation in LDH and NO, perturbation in lung oxidative stress indicators, increased HP, MPO, IL-6 contents and NF-κB expression. On the other side, HEM, reduced BLM harmful effects as noticed from amelioration of biochemical markers and histopathological lesions, which is concomitant with over-expression of HO-1. Therefore, induction of HO-1 in lung by HEM may alleviate the lung damaging effects of BLM. PMID:27113308

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against vascular constriction and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duckers, H J; Boehm, M; True, A L; Yet, S F; San, H; Park, J L; Clinton Webb, R; Lee, M E; Nabel, G J; Nabel, E G

    2001-06-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) is an inducible protein activated in systemic inflammatory conditions by oxidant stress. Vascular injury is characterized by a local reparative process with inflammatory components, indicating a potential protective role for HO-1 in arterial wound repair. Here we report that HO-1 directly reduces vasoconstriction and inhibits cell proliferation during vascular injury. Expression of HO-1 in arteries stimulated vascular relaxation, mediated by guanylate cyclase and cGMP, independent of nitric oxide. The unexpected effects of HO-1 on vascular smooth muscle cell growth were mediated by cell-cycle arrest involving p21Cip1. HO-1 reduced the proliferative response to vascular injury in vivo; expression of HO-1 in pig arteries inhibited lesion formation and Hmox1-/- mice produced hyperplastic arteries compared with controls. Induction of the HO-1 pathway moderates the severity of vascular injury by at least two adaptive mechanisms independent of nitric oxide, and is a potential therapeutic target for diseases of the vasculature. PMID:11385506

  4. Human biliverdin reductase is a leucine zipper-like DNA-binding protein and functions in transcriptional activation of heme oxygenase-1 by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Salim, Mohammad; Maines, Mahin D

    2002-03-15

    Human biliverdin reductase (hBVR) is a serine/threonine kinase that catalyzes reduction of the heme oxygenase (HO) activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. A domain of biliverdin reductase (BVR) has primary structural features that resemble leucine zipper proteins. A heptad repeat of five leucines (L(1)--L(5)), a basic domain, and a conserved alanine characterize the domain. In hBVR, a lysine replaces L(3). The secondary structure model of hBVR predicts an alpha-helix-turn-beta-sheet for this domain. hBVR translated by the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system appears on a nondenaturing gel as a single band with molecular mass of approximately 69 kDa. The protein on a denaturing gel separates into two anti-hBVR immunoreactive proteins of approximately 39.9 + 34.6 kDa. The dimeric form, but not purified hBVR, binds to a 100-mer DNA fragment corresponding to the mouse HO-1 (hsp32) promoter region encompassing two activator protein (AP-1) sites. The specificity of DNA binding is suggested by the following: (a) hBVR does not bind to the same DNA fragment with one or zero AP-1 sites; (b) a 56-bp random DNA with one AP-1 site does not form a complex with hBVR; (c) in vitro translated HO-1 does not interact with the 100-mer DNA fragment with two AP-1 sites; (d) mutation of Lys(143), Leu(150), or Leu(157) blocks both the formation of the approximately 69-kDa specimens and hBVR DNA complex formation; and (e) purified preparations of hBVR or hHO-1 do not bind to DNA with two AP-1 sites. The potential significance of the AP-1 binding is suggested by the finding that the response of HO-1, in COS cells stably transfected with antisense hBVR, with 66% reduced BVR activity, to superoxide anion (O(2)()) formed by menadione is attenuated, whereas induction by heme is not affected. We propose a role for BVR in the signaling cascade for AP-1 complex activation necessary for HO-1 oxidative stress response. PMID:11773068

  5. Adenoviral transfer of the heme oxygenase-1 gene protects striatal astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Teng, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Jing; Chau, Lee-Young; Galunic, Nicholas; Regan, Raymond F

    2004-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced in the CNS after hemorrhage, and may have an effect on injury to surrounding tissue. Hemin, the preferred substrate of HO, is a neurotoxin that is present in intracranial hematomas. In a prior study, we observed that HO inhibitors increased the vulnerability of cultured cortical astrocytes to heme-mediated oxidative injury. To investigate the effect of HO more specifically, we used an adenoviral vector encoding the human HO-1 gene to specifically increase HO-1 expression. Incubation with 100 MOI of the HO-1 adenovirus (Adv-HHO-1) for 24 h increased both HO-1 protein and HO activity; a control adenovirus lacking the HO-1 gene had no effect. Using a DNA probe that was specific for human HO-1, 80.5 +/- 7.2% of astrocytes were observed to be infected by in situ hybridization. The cell death produced by 30-60 microM hemin was significantly reduced by pretreatment with 100 MOI Adv-HHO-1, as assessed by LDH release, propidium iodide exclusion, and MTT reduction assay. The threefold increase in cell protein oxidation produced by hemin was also attenuated in cultures pretreated with Adv-HHO-1. These results support the hypothesis that HO-1 protects astrocytes from heme-mediated oxidative injury. Specifically increasing astrocytic HO-1 by gene transfer may have a beneficial effect on hemorrhagic CNS injury. PMID:15474356

  6. Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Efficiently Catabolizes Heme in the Absence of Biliverdin Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Warren J.; Backes, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) uses molecular oxygen and electrons from NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase to convert heme to CO, ferrous iron, and biliverdin (BV). Enzymatic studies with the purified 30-kDa form of HO-1 routinely use a coupled assay containing biliverdin reductase (BVR), which converts BV to bilirubin (BR). BVR is believed to be required for optimal HO-1 activity. The goal of this study was to determine whether HO-1 activity could be monitored directly by following BV generation or iron release (using the ferrous iron chelator, ferrozine) in the absence of BVR. Using assays for each of the three end products, we found that HO-1 activity was stimulated in the presence of catalase and comparable rates were measured with each assay. Absorbance scans revealed characteristic spectra for BR, BV, and/or the ferrozine-iron complex. The optimal conditions were slightly different for the direct and coupled assays. BSA activated the coupled but inhibited the direct assays, and the assays had different pH optima. By measuring the activity of BVR directly using BV as a substrate, these differences were attributed to different enzymatic properties of BVR and HO-1. Thus, BVR is not needed to measure the activity of HO-1 when catalase is present. In fact, the factors affecting catalysis by HO-1 are better understood using the direct assays because the coupled assay can be influenced by properties of BVR. PMID:20679134

  7. Concurrent expression of heme oxygenase-1 and p53 in human retinal pigment epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang Yull; Jo, Hong Jae; Kim, Kang Mi; Song, Ju Dong; Chung, Hun Taeg; Park, Young Chul

    2008-01-25

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress-responsive protein that is known to regulate cellular functions such as cell proliferation, inflammation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effects of HO activity on the expression of p53 in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) induced the expression of both HO-1 and p53 without significant toxicity to the cells. In addition, the blockage of HO activity with the iron chelator DFO or with HO-1 siRNA inhibited the CoPP-induced expression of p53. Similarly, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO, suppressed p53 expression in ARPE-19 cells, although ZnPP increased the level of HO-1 protein while inhibiting HO activity. Also, CoPP-induced p53 expression was not affected by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based on these results, we conclude that HO activity is involved in the regulation of p53 expression in a ROS-independent mechanism, and also suggest that the expression of p53 in ARPE-19 cells is associated with heme metabolites such as biliverdin/bilirubin, carbon monoxide, and iron produced by the activity of HO.

  8. Cytoprotective role of heme oxygenase-1 and heme degradation derived end products in liver injury.

    PubMed

    Origassa, Clarice Silvia Taemi; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva

    2013-10-27

    The activation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) appears to be an endogenous defensive mechanism used by cells to reduce inflammation and tissue damage in a number of injury models. HO-1, a stress-responsive enzyme that catabolizes heme into carbon monoxide (CO), biliverdin and iron, has previously been shown to protect grafts from ischemia/reperfusion and rejection. In addition, the products of the HO-catalyzed reaction, particularly CO and biliverdin/bilirubin, have been shown to exert protective effects in the liver against a number of stimuli, as in chronic hepatitis C and in transplanted liver grafts. Furthermore, the induction of HO-1 expression can protect the liver against damage caused by a number of chemical compounds. More specifically, the CO derived from HO-1-mediated heme catabolism has been shown to be involved in the regulation of inflammation; furthermore, administration of low concentrations of exogenous CO has a protective effect against inflammation. Both murine and human HO-1 deficiencies have systemic manifestations associated with iron metabolism, such as hepatic overload (with signs of a chronic hepatitis) and iron deficiency anemia (with paradoxical increased levels of ferritin). Hypoxia induces HO-1 expression in multiple rodent, bovine and monkey cell lines, but interestingly, hypoxia represses expression of the human HO-1 gene in a variety of human cell types (endothelial cells, epithelial cells, T cells). These data suggest that HO-1 and CO are promising novel therapeutic molecules for patients with inflammatory diseases. In this review, we present what is currently known regarding the role of HO-1 in liver injuries and in particular, we focus on the implications of targeted induction of HO-1 as a potential therapeutic strategy to protect the liver against chemically induced injury. PMID:24179613

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  10. Functional imaging: monitoring heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weisheng; Reilly-Contag, Pamela; Stevenson, David K.; Contag, Christopher H.

    1999-07-01

    The regulation of genetic elements can be monitored in living animals using photoproteins as reporters. Heme oxygenase (HO) is the key catabolic enzyme in the heme degradation pathway. Here, HO expression serves as a model for in vivo functional imaging of transcriptional regulation of a clinically relevant gene. HO enzymatic activity is inhibited by heme analogs, metalloporphyrins, but many members of this family of compounds also activate transcription of the HO-1 promoter. The degree of transcriptional activation by twelve metalloporphyrins, differing at the central metal and porphyrin ring substituents, was evaluated in both NIH 3T3 stable lines and transgenic animals containing HO-1 promoter-luciferase gene fusions. In the correlative cell culture assays, the metalloporphyrins increased transcription form the full length HO promoter fusion to varying degrees, but none increased transcription from a truncated HO-1 promoter. These results suggested that one or both of the two distal enhancer elements located at -4 and -10 Kb upstream from transcriptional start are required for HO-1 induction by heme and its analogs. The full-length HO-1-luc fusion was then evaluated as a transgene in mice. It was possible to monitor the effects of the metalloporphyrins, SnMP and ZnPP, in living animals over time. This spatiotemporal analyses of gene expression in vivo implied that alterations in porphyrin ring substituents and the central metal may affect the extent of gene activation. These data further indicate that using photoprotein reporters, subtle differences in gene expression can be monitored in living animals.

  11. Vasculoprotective effects of heme oxygenase-1 in a murine model of hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Alex Mitsialis, S; Liu, Xianlan; Kourembanas, Stella

    2012-04-15

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by simplified alveolarization and arrested vascular development of the lung with associated evidence of endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, increased oxidative damage, and iron deposition. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to be protective in the pathogenesis of diseases of inflammatory and oxidative etiology. Because HO-1 is involved in the response to oxidative stress produced by hyperoxia and is critical for cellular heme and iron homeostasis, it could play a protective role in BPD. Therefore, we investigated the effect of HO-1 in hyperoxia-induced lung injury using a neonatal transgenic mouse model with constitutive lung-specific HO-1 overexpression. Hyperoxia triggered an increase in pulmonary inflammation, arterial remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy that was attenuated by HO-1 overexpression. In addition, hyperoxia led to pulmonary edema, hemosiderosis, and a decrease in blood vessel number, all of which were markedly improved in HO-1 overexpressing mice. The protective vascular response may be mediated at least in part by carbon monoxide, due to its anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and antiapoptotic properties. HO-1 overexpression, however, did not prevent alveolar simplification nor altered the levels of ferritin and lactoferrin, proteins involved in iron binding and transport. Thus the protective mechanisms elicited by HO-1 overexpression primarily preserve vascular growth and barrier function through iron-independent, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory pathways. PMID:22287607

  12. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  13. In vivo regulation of the heme oxygenase-1 gene in humanized transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Traylor, Amie M.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Hull, Travis D.; George, James F.; Mikhail, Fady M.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in heme degradation producing equimolar amounts of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. Induction of HO-1 is a beneficial response to tissue injury in diverse animal models of diseases including acute kidney injury. In vitro analysis has shown that the human HO-1 gene is transcriptionally regulated by changes in chromatin conformation but whether such control occurs in vivo is not known. To enable such analysis, we generated transgenic mice, harboring an 87-kb bacterial artificial chromosome expressing human HO-1 mRNA and protein and bred these mice with HO-1 knockout mice to generate humanized BAC transgenic mice. This successfully rescued the phenotype of the knockout mice including reduced birth rates, tissue iron overload, splenomegaly, anemia, leukocytosis, dendritic cell abnormalities and survival after acute kidney injury induced by rhabdomyolysis or cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Transcription factors such as USF1/2, JunB, Sp1, and CTCF were found to associate with regulatory regions of the human HO-1 gene in the kidney following rhabdomyolysis. Chromosome Conformation Capture and ChIP-loop assays confirmed this in the formation of chromatin looping in vivo. Thus, these bacterial artificial chromosome humanized HO-1 mice are a valuable model to study the human HO-1 gene providing insight to the in vivo architecture of the gene in acute kidney injury and other diseases. PMID:22495295

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects melanocytes from stress-induced cell death: implications for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Elassiuty, Yasser E.; Klarquist, Jared; Speiser, Jodi; Yousef, Randa M.; EL Refaee, Abdelaziz A.; Hunter, Nahla S.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Gundeti, Mohan; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, Ludmila; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    To study protection of melanocytes from stress-induced cell death by heme oxygenases during depigmentation and repigmentation in vitiligo, expression of isoforms 1 and 2 was studied in cultured control and patient melanocytes and normal skin explants exposed to UV or bleaching agent 4-TBP. Similarly, expression of heme oxygenases was followed in skin from vitiligo patients before and after PUVA treatment. Single and double immunostainings were used in combination with light and confocal microscopic analysis and Western blotting. Melanocyte expression of heme oxygenase 1 is upregulated, whereas heme oxygenase 2 is reduced in response to UV and 4-TBP. Upregulation of inducible heme oxygenase 1 was also observed in UV-treated explant cultures, in skin of successfully PUVA-treated patients and in melanocytes cultured from vitiligo non-lesional skin. Heme oxygenase encoding genes were subsequently cloned to study consequences of either gene product on cell viability, demonstrating that HO-1 but not HO-2 overexpression offers protection from stress-induced cell death in MTT assays. HO-1 expression by melanocytes may contribute to beneficial effects of UV treatment for vitiligo patients. PMID:21426408

  15. Ascorbic acid partly antagonizes resveratrol mediated heme oxygenase-1 but not paraoxonase-1 induction in cultured hepatocytes - role of the redox-regulated transcription factor Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both resveratrol and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) are frequently used in complementary and alternative medicine. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms for potential health benefits of resveratrol and its interactions with ascorbic acid. Methods The antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 were analysed for their mRNA and protein levels in HUH7 liver cells treated with 10 and 25 μmol/l resveratrol in the absence and presence of 100 and 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Additionally the transactivation of the transcription factor Nrf2 and paraoxonase-1 were determined by reporter gene assays. Results Here, we demonstrate that resveratrol induces the antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1 and paraoxonase-1 in cultured hepatocytes. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by resveratrol was accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 transactivation. Resveratrol mediated Nrf2 transactivation as well as heme oxygenase-1 induction were partly antagonized by 1000 μmol/l ascorbic acid. Conclusions Unlike heme oxygenase-1 (which is highly regulated by Nrf2) paraoxonase-1 (which exhibits fewer ARE/Nrf2 binding sites in its promoter) induction by resveratrol was not counteracted by ascorbic acid. Addition of resveratrol to the cell culture medium produced relatively low levels of hydrogen peroxide which may be a positive hormetic redox-signal for Nrf2 dependent gene expression thereby driving heme oxygenase-1 induction. However, high concentrations of ascorbic acid manifold increased hydrogen peroxide production in the cell culture medium which may be a stress signal thereby disrupting the Nrf2 signalling pathway. PMID:21199573

  16. Butylated Hydroxyanisole Stimulates Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Expression and Inhibits Neointima Formation in Rat Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Azam, Mohammed A.; Peyton, Kelly J.; Ensenat, Diana; Keswani, Amit N.; Wang, Hong; Durante, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) is a synthetic phenolic compound that is a potent inducer of phase II genes. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a vasoprotective protein that is upregulated by phase II inducers, the present study examined the effects of BHA on HO-1 gene expression and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. Methods The regulation of HO-1 gene expression and vascular cell growth by BHA was studied in cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and in balloon injured rat carotid arteries. Results Treatment of cultured smooth muscle cells with BHA stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein, mRNA and promoter activity in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. BHA-mediated HO-1 expression was dependent on the activation of NF-E2-related factor-2 by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. BHA also inhibited cell cycle progression and DNA synthesis in a HO-1-dependent manner. In addition, the local perivascular delivery of BHA immediately after arterial injury of rat carotid arteries induced HO-1 protein expression and markedly attenuated neointima formation. Conclusions These studies demonstrate that BHA stimulates HO-1 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells, and that the induction of HO-1 contributes to the antiproliferative actions of this phenolic antioxidant. BHA represents a potentially novel therapeutic agent in treating or preventing vasculoproliferative disease. PMID:17320844

  17. Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 promotes oxidative mitochondrial damage in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Su, Haixiang; Song, Sisi; Paudel, Hemant K; Schipper, Hyman M

    2006-03-01

    Glial heme oxygenase-1 is over-expressed in the CNS of subjects with Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Up-regulation of HO-1 in rat astroglia has been shown to facilitate iron sequestration by the mitochondrial compartment. To determine whether HO-1 induction promotes mitochondrial oxidative stress, assays for 8-epiPGF(2alpha) (ELISA), protein carbonyls (ELISA) and 8-OHdG (HPLC-EC) were used to quantify oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, respectively, in mitochondrial fractions and whole-cell compartments derived from cultured rat astroglia engineered to over-express human (h) HO-1 by transient transfection. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion and the MTT assay, and cell proliferation was determined by [3H] thymidine incorporation and total cell counts. In rat astrocytes, hHO-1 over-expression (x 3 days) resulted in significant oxidative damage to mitochondrial lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, partial growth arrest, and increased cell death. These effects were attenuated by incubation with 1 microM tin mesoporphyrin, a competitive HO inhibitor, or the iron chelator, deferoxamine. Up-regulation of HO-1 engenders oxidative mitochondrial injury in cultured rat astroglia. Heme-derived ferrous iron and carbon monoxide (CO) may mediate the oxidative modification of mitochondrial lipids, proteins and nucleic acids in these cells. Glial HO-1 hyperactivity may contribute to cellular oxidative stress, pathological iron deposition, and bioenergetic failure characteristic of degenerating and inflamed neural tissues and may constitute a rational target for therapeutic intervention in these conditions. PMID:16222706

  18. A knockdown with smoke model reveals FHIT as a repressor of Heme oxygenase 1

    PubMed Central

    Boylston, Jennifer A; Brenner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene deletions are among the earliest and most frequent events in carcinogenesis, particularly in carcinogen-exposed tissues. Though FHIT has been established as an authentic tumor suppressor, the mechanism underlying tumor suppression remains opaque. Most experiments designed to clarify FHIT function have analyzed the consequence of re-expressing FHIT in FHIT-negative cells. However, carcinogenesis occurs in cells that transition from FHIT-positive to FHIT-negative. To better understand cancer development, we induced FHIT loss in human bronchial epithelial cells with RNA interference. Because FHIT is a demonstrated target of carcinogens in cigarette smoke, we combined FHIT silencing with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) exposure and measured gene expression consequences by RNA microarray. The data indicate that FHIT loss enhances the expression of a set of oxidative stress response genes after exposure to CSE, including the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) at the RNA and protein levels. Data are consistent with a mechanism in which Fhit protein is required for accumulation of the transcriptional repressor of HMOX1, Bach1 protein. We posit that by allowing superinduction of oxidative stress response genes, loss of FHIT creates a survival advantage that promotes carcinogenesis. PMID:25486479

  19. Arsenic promotes angiogenesis in vitro via a heme oxygenase-1-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Dan; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Hitron, Andrew; Zhang Zhuo; Xu Mei; Chen Gang; Luo Jia; Jiang Binghua; Fang Jing; Shi Xianglin

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis and vessel remodeling are fundamental to the pathogenesis of a number of diseases caused by environmental arsenic exposure, including tumorigenesis and cardiovascular diseases. Arsenic (AsIII) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis and vascular remodeling in vivo. However, the exact molecular mechanisms accounting for arsenic-induced angiogenesis are not clear. The present study investigates the role of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in sodium arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro. Transwell assay, three-dimensional Matrigel assay, RT-PCR, ELISA and immunoblotting were used to determine cell migration, vascular tube formation, mRNA and protein expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assay were applied to examine the DNA binding with protein and HO-1 transcriptional activity. Here, we report that low concentrations of arsenite (0.1-1 muM) stimulated cell migration and vascular tube formation in human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC). Arsenite induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. Knock down of HO-1 expression decreased arsenite-induced VEGF expression, cell migration, and tube formation. We showed that arsenite promoted dissociation of Bach1 (a transcriptional repressor) from the HO-1 enhancers and increased Nrf2 binding to these elements. Site directed mutagenesis assay identified that Bach1 cysteine residues 557 and 574 were essential for the induction of HO-1 gene in response to arsenite. These findings demonstrate a role for HO-1 in arsenite-mediated angiogenesis in vitro.

  20. Andrographolide stimulates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2-heme oxygenase 1 signaling in primary cerebral endothelial cells for definite protection against ischemic stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Chen, Ray-Jade; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Lu, Wan-Jung; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Yang, Chih-Hao; Chang, Chao-Chien; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Lin, Kuan-Hung; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2016-04-01

    Stroke pathogenesis involves complex oxidative stress-related pathways. The nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) pathways have been considered molecular targets in pharmacologic intervention for ischemic diseases. Andrographolide, a labdane diterpene, has received increasing attention in recent years because of its various pharmacologic activities. We determined that andrographolide modulates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-Nrf2-HO-1 signaling cascade in primary cerebral endothelial cells (CECs) to provide positive protection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic stroke in rats. In the present study, andrographolide (10 μM) increased HO-1 protein and messenger RNA expressions, Nrf2 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation in CECs, and these activities were disrupted by a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor PD98059 or c-Jun amino-terminal kinase inhibitor SP600125. Similar results were observed in confocal microscopy analysis. Moreover, andrographolide-induced Nrf2 and HO-1 protein expressions were significantly inhibited by Nrf2 small interfering RNA. Moreover, HO-1 knockdown attenuated the protective effect of andrographolide against oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced CEC death. Andrographolide (0.1 mg/kg) significantly suppressed free radical formation, blood-brain barrier disruption, and brain infarction in MCAO-insulted rats, and these effects were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX. The mechanism is attributable to HO-1 activation, as directly evidenced by andrographolide-induced pronounced HO-1 expression in brain tissues, which was highly localized in the cerebral capillary. In conclusion, andrographolide increased Nrf2-HO-1 expression through p38 MAPK regulation, confirming that it provides protection against MCAO-induced brain injury. These findings provide strong evidence that andrographolide could

  1. Characterization of a Wheat Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene and Its Responses to Different Abiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dao-kun; Jin, Qi-jiang; Xie, Yan-jie; Liu, Ya-hui; Lin, Yu-ting; Shen, Wen-biao; Zhou, Yi-jun

    2011-01-01

    In animals and recently in plants, heme oxygenase-1 (HO1) has been found to confer protection against a variety of oxidant-induced cell and tissue injuries. In this study, a wheat (Triticum aestivum) HO1 gene TaHO1 was cloned and sequenced. It encodes a polypeptide of 31.7 kD with a putative N-terminal plastid transit peptide. The amino acid sequence of TaHO1 was found to be 78% similar to that of maize HO1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TaHO1 clusters together with the HO1-like sequences in plants. The purified recombinant TaHO1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli was active in the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXa (BV), and showed that the Vmax was 8.8 U·mg−1 protein with an apparent Km value for hemin of 3.04 μM. The optimum Tm and pH were 35 °C and 7.4, respectively. The result of subcellular localization of TaHO1 showed that the putative transit peptide was sufficient for green fluorescent protein (GFP) to localize in chloroplast and implied that TaHO1 gene product is at least localized in the chloroplast. Moreover, we found that TaHO1 mRNA could be differentially induced by the well-known nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), gibberellin acid (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and NaCl treatments. Therefore, the results suggested that TaHO1 might play an important role in abiotic stress responses. PMID:22174625

  2. Oxidative stress suppression by luteolin-induced heme oxygenase-1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Gui-bo; Sun, Xiao; Wang, Min; Ye, Jing-xue; Si, Jian-yong; Xu, Hui-bo; Meng, Xiang-bao; Qin, Meng; Sun, Jing; Wang, Hong-wei; Sun, Xiao-bo

    2012-12-01

    Luteolin enhances cellular antioxidant defense capacity. ► Luteolin increases the expression of heme oxygenase-1 protein levels. ► Luteolin activates Akt and ERK signal pathways.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy in podocytes as a protective mechanism against high glucose-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Chenglong; Zheng, Haining; Huang, Shanshan; You, Na; Xu, Jiarong; Ye, Xiaolong; Zhu, Qun; Feng, Yamin; You, Qiang; Miao, Heng; Ding, Dafa; Lu, Yibing

    2015-10-01

    Injury and loss of podocytes play vital roles in diabetic nephropathy progression. Emerging evidence suggests autophagy, which is induced by multiple stressors including hyperglycemia, plays a protective role. Meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) possesses powerful anti-apoptotic properties. Therefore, we investigated the impact of autophagy on podocyte apoptosis under diabetic conditions and its association with HO-1. Mouse podocytes were cultured in vitro; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Transmission electron microscopy and biochemical autophagic flux assays were used to measure the autophagy markers microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II) and beclin-1. LC3-II and beclin-1 expression peaked 12–24 h after exposing podocytes to high glucose. Inhibition of autophagy with 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 siRNAs or Atg 5 siRNAs sensitized cells to apoptosis, suggesting autophagy is a survival mechanism. HO-1 inactivation inhibited autophagy, which aggravated podocyte injury in vitro. Hemin-induced autophagy also protected podocytes from hyperglycemia in vitro and was abrogated by HO-1 siRNA. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase phosphorylation was higher in hemin-treated and lower in HO-1 siRNA-treated podocytes. Suppression of AMPK activity reversed HO-1-mediated Beclin-1 upregulation and autophagy, indicating HO-1-mediated autophagy is AMPK dependent. These findings suggest HO-1 induction and regulation of autophagy are potential therapeutic targets for diabetic nephropathy. - Highlights: • High glucose leads to increased autophagy in podocytes at an early stage. • The early autophagic response protects against high glucose-induced apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 enhances autophagy and decreases high glucose -mediated apoptosis. • Heme oxygenase-1 induces autophagy through the activation of AMPK.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 promotes tumor progression and metastasis of colorectal carcinoma cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Geom Seog; Jiang, Wen-Yi; Chi, Jin Hua; Jin, Hao; Park, Won-Chul; Sohn, Dong Hwan; Park, Pil-Hoon; Lee, Sung Hee

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is upregulated in colorectal carcinoma (CRC) cells. However, the role of HO-1 in the metastatic potential of CRC remains to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential of HO-1 to control the antitumor immunity of CRC. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role in the immune surveillance system. Hemin-induced HO-1 expression suppressed the expression of ICAM-1 in human CRC cells. HO-1 regulated ICAM-1 expression via tristetraprolin, an mRNA-binding protein, at the posttranscriptional level in CRC cells. The upregulated HO-1 expression in CRC cells markedly decreased the adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear lymphocytes (PBMLs) to CRC cells and PBML-mediated cytotoxicity against CRC cells. Production of CXCL10, an effector T cell-recruiting chemokine, was significantly reduced by the increased HO-1 expression. The expression of the CXCL10 receptor, CXCR3, decreased significantly in PBMLs that adhered to CRC cells. HO-1 expression correlated negatively, although nonsignificantly, with ICAM-1 and CXCL10 expression in xenograft tumors. Taken together, our data suggest that HO-1 expression is functionally linked to the mediation of tumor progression and metastasis of CRC cells by inhibiting antitumor immunity. PMID:26087182

  5. Heme-oxygenase-1 implications in cell morphology and the adhesive behavior of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gueron, Geraldine; Giudice, Jimena; Valacco, Pia; Paez, Alejandra; Elguero, Belen; Toscani, Martin; Jaworski, Felipe; Leskow, Federico Coluccio; Cotignola, Javier; Marti, Marcelo; Binaghi, Maria; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. Although previous studies in PCa have focused on cell adherens junctions (AJs), key players in metastasis, they have left the molecular mechanisms unexplored. Inflammation and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical in the regulation of cell adhesion and the integrity of the epithelium. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative and inflammatory damage. Here, we investigated whether HO-1 is implicated in the adhesive and morphological properties of tumor cells. Genes differentially regulated by HO-1 were enriched for cell motility and adhesion biological processes. HO-1 induction, increased E-cadherin and β-catenin levels. Immunofluorescence analyses showed a striking remodeling of E-cadherin/β-catenin based AJs under HO-1 modulation. Interestingly, the enhanced levels of E-cadherin and β-catenin coincided with a markedly change in cell morphology. To further our analysis we sought to identify HO-1 binding proteins that might participate in the regulation of cell morphology. A proteomics approach identified Muskelin, as a novel HO-1 partner, strongly implicated in cell morphology regulation. These results define a novel role for HO-1 in modulating the architecture of cell-cell interactions, favoring a less aggressive phenotype and further supporting its anti-tumoral function in PCa. PMID:24961479

  6. Palbinone from Paeonia suffruticosa protects hepatic cells via up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Ha, Do Thi; Phuong, Tran Thi; Oh, Joonseok; Bae, Kihwan; Thuan, Nguyen Duy; Na, Minkyun

    2014-02-01

    Paeonia suffruticosa has been traditionally employed for vitalizing blood circulation and alleviating liver and inflammatory diseases. The pathways by which palbinone (PB) isolated from P. suffruticosa mediates heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction were investigated using the specific inhibitors for PI3K and mitogen activated protein kinases pathways. The effect of PB-treatment on Nrf2 translocalization and HO-1-antioxidant response element (ARE) regulation was examined employing Western blot and luciferase assays. PB induced HO-1 expression via the activation of Nrf2 in the hepatic cells, and ARE-dependent genes were stimulated via the PB-mediated Nrf2 activation. PB-mediated HO-1 expression could be involved with PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways. Our study suggests the mechanism by which PB induces HO-1 expression in the hepatic cells. This might substantiate the traditional applications of P. suffruticosa for the treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases including oxidant and inflammatory-mediated vascular and liver diseases. PMID:23595773

  7. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Bao Hui; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation, we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector. The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-1, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. PMID:12118938

  8. Endotoxin-induced down-regulation of Elk-3 facilitates heme oxygenase-1 induction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chung, Su Wol; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Layne, Matthew D; Perrella, Mark A

    2006-02-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme that is acutely induced by inflammatory stimuli, and the products of HO-1-mediated heme degradation have anti-inflammatory properties. In many different pathophysiologic states, the up-regulation of HO-1 has been shown to be beneficial in combating the detrimental consequences of increased inflammation. Ets transcription factors are known to be important mediators of inflammatory responses, and the ternary complex factor subfamily of Ets proteins has both transcriptional activation and repression activity. The present study demonstrates that of several ternary complex factor subfamily members, only Elk-3 represses HO-1 promoter activity in macrophages. Endotoxin administration to macrophages led to a dose-dependent decrease in endogenous Elk-3 mRNA levels, and this reduction in Elk-3 preceded the LPS-mediated up-regulation of HO-1 message. Analogous results also occurred in lung tissue of mice exposed to endotoxin. Two putative Ets binding sites (EBS1 and EBS2) are present in the downstream region of the murine HO-1 promoter (bp -125 and -93, respectively), and we recently showed that the EBS2 site is essential for HO-1 induction by endotoxin. In contrast, the present study demonstrates that the repressive effect of Elk-3 on HO-1 promoter activity is dependent on the EBS1 site. Taken together, our data reveal that Elk-3 serves as an important repressor of HO-1 gene transcription and contributes to the tight control of HO-1 gene regulation in the setting of inflammatory stimuli. PMID:16456000

  9. Targeting heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide for therapeutic modulation of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-01-01

    The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) enzyme system remains an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. HO-1, a cellular stress protein, serves a vital metabolic function as the rate-limiting step in the degradation of heme to generate carbon monoxide (CO), iron, and biliverdin-IXα (BV), the latter which is converted to bilirubin-IXα (BR). HO-1 may function as a pleiotropic regulator of inflammatory signaling programs through the generation of its biologically active end products, namely CO, BV and BR. CO, when applied exogenously, can affect apoptotic, proliferative, and inflammatory cellular programs. Specifically, CO can modulate the production of proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory cytokines and mediators. HO-1 and CO may also have immunomodulatory effects with respect to regulating the functions of antigen-presenting cells, dendritic cells, and regulatory T cells. Therapeutic strategies to modulate HO-1 in disease include the application of natural-inducing compounds and gene therapy approaches for the targeted genetic overexpression or knockdown of HO-1. Several compounds have been used therapeutically to inhibit HO activity, including competitive inhibitors of the metalloporphyrin series or noncompetitive isoform-selective derivatives of imidazole-dioxolanes. The end products of HO activity, CO, BV and BR may be used therapeutically as pharmacologic treatments. CO may be applied by inhalation or through the use of CO-releasing molecules. This review will discuss HO-1 as a therapeutic target in diseases involving inflammation, including lung and vascular injury, sepsis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and transplant rejection. PMID:26166253

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Corexit 9500A-Induced Respiratory Epithelial Injury across Species

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, Octavio M.; Karki, Suman; Surolia, Ranu; Wang, Zheng; Watson, R. Douglas; Thannickal, Victor J.; Powell, Mickie; Watts, Stephen; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Batra, Hitesh; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Corexit 9500A (CE) on respiratory epithelial surfaces of terrestrial mammals and marine animals are largely unknown. This study investigated the role of CE-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-apoptotic and antioxidant activity, in human bronchial airway epithelium and the gills of exposed aquatic animals. We evaluated CE-mediated alterations in human airway epithelial cells, mice lungs and gills from zebrafish and blue crabs. Our results demonstrated that CE induced an increase in gill epithelial edema and human epithelial monolayer permeability, suggesting an acute injury caused by CE exposure. CE induced the expression of HO-1 as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), which are associated with ROS production. Importantly, CE induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptosis of epithelial cells. The expression of the intercellular junctional proteins, such as tight junction proteins occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), ZO-2 and adherens junctional proteins E-cadherin and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), were remarkably inhibited by CE, suggesting that these proteins are involved in CE-induced increased permeability and subsequent apoptosis. The cytoskeletal protein F-actin was also disrupted by CE. Treatment with carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) significantly inhibited CE-induced ROS production, while the addition of HO-1 inhibitor, significantly increased CE-induced ROS production and apoptosis, suggesting a protective role of HO-1 or its reaction product, CO, in CE-induced apoptosis. Using HO-1 knockout mice, we further demonstrated that HO-1 protected against CE-induced inflammation and cellular apoptosis and corrected CE-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin and FAK. These observations suggest that CE activates CRP and NOX4-mediated ROS production, alters permeability by inhibition of junctional proteins, and leads to caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells, while HO-1 and its

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 protects corexit 9500A-induced respiratory epithelial injury across species.

    PubMed

    Li, Fu Jun; Duggal, Ryan N; Oliva, Octavio M; Karki, Suman; Surolia, Ranu; Wang, Zheng; Watson, R Douglas; Thannickal, Victor J; Powell, Mickie; Watts, Stephen; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Batra, Hitesh; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-01-01

    The effects of Corexit 9500A (CE) on respiratory epithelial surfaces of terrestrial mammals and marine animals are largely unknown. This study investigated the role of CE-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-apoptotic and antioxidant activity, in human bronchial airway epithelium and the gills of exposed aquatic animals. We evaluated CE-mediated alterations in human airway epithelial cells, mice lungs and gills from zebrafish and blue crabs. Our results demonstrated that CE induced an increase in gill epithelial edema and human epithelial monolayer permeability, suggesting an acute injury caused by CE exposure. CE induced the expression of HO-1 as well as C-reactive protein (CRP) and NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), which are associated with ROS production. Importantly, CE induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptosis of epithelial cells. The expression of the intercellular junctional proteins, such as tight junction proteins occludin, zonula occludens (ZO-1), ZO-2 and adherens junctional proteins E-cadherin and Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK), were remarkably inhibited by CE, suggesting that these proteins are involved in CE-induced increased permeability and subsequent apoptosis. The cytoskeletal protein F-actin was also disrupted by CE. Treatment with carbon monoxide releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) significantly inhibited CE-induced ROS production, while the addition of HO-1 inhibitor, significantly increased CE-induced ROS production and apoptosis, suggesting a protective role of HO-1 or its reaction product, CO, in CE-induced apoptosis. Using HO-1 knockout mice, we further demonstrated that HO-1 protected against CE-induced inflammation and cellular apoptosis and corrected CE-mediated inhibition of E-cadherin and FAK. These observations suggest that CE activates CRP and NOX4-mediated ROS production, alters permeability by inhibition of junctional proteins, and leads to caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells, while HO-1 and its

  12. Arsenic Trioxide Activate Transcription of Heme Oxygenase-1 by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of NFE2L2

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Zhen; Zhong, Lingzhi; Mou, Yan; Wang, Xiaotong; Zhang, Haiying; Wang, Yang; Xia, Jianxin; Li, Ronggui; Wang, Zonggui

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study, we found that induced expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma MG63 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO). The present study was aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of HO-1 that occurs after exposure of MG63 cells to ATO. First, using RT-QPCT and Western-blot, we found that ATO strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in these human osteosarcoma cells. Then by analyzing HO-1 mRNA of MG63 cells exposed to ATO in the presence and absence of a transcription inhibitor Actinomycin-D (Act-D), we demonstrated that ATO activates HO-1 expression in MG63 cells by regulating the transcription of the gene. Finally, through the analysis of the NFE2L2 protein levels among the total cellular and nuclear proteins by Western-blot and Immunocytochemical staning, we determined that ATO enhanced the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 (NFE2L2), also known as Nrf2. From these results we have concluded that transcription activation of HO-1 resulting from the nuclear translocation of NFE2L2 is the underlying molecular mechanism for its high induction, which, in turn, is responsible for the resistance of human osteosarcoma cells to ATO treatment. PMID:26283888

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1/Carbon Monoxide System and Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation into Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Suliman, Hagir B.; Zobi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into energetically efficient cardiomyocytes contributes to functional cardiac repair and is envisioned to ameliorate progressive degenerative cardiac diseases. Advanced cell maturation strategies are therefore needed to create abundant mature cardiomyocytes. In this study, we tested whether the redox-sensitive heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide (HO-1/CO) system, operating through mitochondrial biogenesis, acts as a mechanism for ES cell differentiation and cardiomyocyte maturation. Results: Manipulation of HO-1/CO to enhance mitochondrial biogenesis demonstrates a direct pathway to ES cell differentiation and maturation into beating cardiomyocytes that express adult structural markers. Targeted HO-1/CO interventions up- and downregulate specific cardiogenic transcription factors, transcription factor Gata4, homeobox protein Nkx-2.5, heart- and neural crest derivatives-expressed protein 1, and MEF2C. HO-1/CO overexpression increases cardiac gene expression for myosin regulatory light chain 2, atrial isoform, MLC2v, ANP, MHC-β, and sarcomere α-actinin and the major mitochondrial fusion regulators, mitofusin 2 and MICOS complex subunit Mic60. This promotes structural mitochondrial network expansion and maturation, thereby supporting energy provision for beating embryoid bodies. These effects are prevented by silencing HO-1 and by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species scavenging, while disruption of mitochondrial biogenesis and mitochondrial DNA depletion by loss of mitochondrial transcription factor A compromise infrastructure. This leads to failure of cardiomyocyte differentiation and maturation and contractile dysfunction. Innovation: The capacity to augment cardiomyogenesis via a defined mitochondrial pathway has unique therapeutic potential for targeting ES cell maturation in cardiac disease. Conclusion: Our findings establish the HO-1/CO system and redox regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis as

  14. Physiological cyclic strain promotes endothelial cell survival via the induction of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-ming; Peyton, Kelly J.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are constantly subjected to cyclic strain that arises from periodic change in vessel wall diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Application of physiological levels of cyclic strain inhibits EC apoptosis; however, the underlying mechanism is not known. Since heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a potent inhibitor of apoptosis, the present study investigated whether HO-1 contributes to the antiapoptotic action of cyclic strain. Administration of physiological cyclic strain (6% at 1 Hz) to human aortic ECs stimulated an increase in HO-1 activity, protein, and mRNA expression. The induction of HO-1 was preceded by a rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nrf2 protein expression. Cyclic strain also stimulated an increase in HO-1 promoter activity that was prevented by mutating the antioxidant responsive element in the promoter or by overexpressing dominant-negative Nrf2. In addition, the strain-mediated induction of HO-1 and activation of Nrf2 was abolished by the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. Finally, application of cyclic strain blocked inflammatory cytokine-mediated EC death and apoptosis. However, the protective action of cyclic strain was reversed by the HO inhibitor tin protoporphyrin-IX and was absent in ECs isolated from HO-1-deficient mice. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that a hemodynamically relevant level of cyclic strain stimulates HO-1 gene expression in ECs via the ROS-Nrf2 signaling pathway to inhibit EC death. The ability of cyclic strain to induce HO-1 expression may provide an important mechanism by which hemodynamic forces promote EC survival and vascular homeostasis. PMID:23604711

  15. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-C.; Wang, J.-Y.

    2009-11-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death and glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.

  16. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Akeem O; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM. PMID:25620054

  17. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Renal Interstitial Inflammation and Fibrosis Induced by Unilateral Ureter Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-Si; Zhang, Qing-Fang; Wang, Yu-Xiao; Zhao, Shi-Lei; Yu, Jing; Wang, Chang; Qin, Ying; Wei, Qiu-Ju; Lv, Gui-Xiang; Li, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis plays an important role in the onset and progression of chronic kidney diseases. Many studies have demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is involved in diverse biological processes as a cytoprotective molecule, including anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic, antiproliferative, and immunomodulatory effects. However, the mechanisms of HO-1 prevention in renal interstitial fibrosis remain unknown. In this study, HO-1 transgenic (TG) mice were employed to investigate the effect of HO-1 on renal fibrosis using a unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO) model and to explore the potential mechanisms. We found that HO-1 was adaptively upregulated in kidneys of both TG and wild type (WT) mice after UUO. The levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were increased in TG mice compared with WT mice under normal conditions. HO-1 expression was further enhanced after UUO and remained high during the entire experimental process. Renal interstitial fibrosis in the TG group was significantly attenuated compared with that in the WT group after UUO. Moreover, overexpression of HO-1 inhibited the loss of peritubular capillaries. In addition, UUO-induced activation and proliferation of myofibroblasts were suppressed by HO-1 overexpression. Furthermore, HO-1 restrained tubulointerstitial infiltration of macrophages and regulated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in UUO mice. We also found that high expression of HO-1 inhibited reactivation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which could play a crucial role in attenuating renal fibrosis. In conclusion, these data suggest that HO-1 prevents renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis possibly by regulating the inflammatory response and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. This study provides evidence that augmentation of HO-1 levels may be a therapeutic strategy against renal interstitial fibrosis. PMID:26765329

  18. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lu; Qiao, Jing; Nguyen, David; Struckhoff, Amanda P; Doyle, Lisa; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P; Renne, Rolf; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-03-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several malignancies, including Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients such as HIV+ subpopulation and lack effective therapeutic options. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported as an important regulator of endothelial cell cycle control, proliferation and angiogenesis. HO-1 has also been found to be highly expressed in KSHV-infected endothelial cells and oral AIDS-KS lesions. We previously demonstrate that the multifunctional glycoprotein CD147 is required for KSHV/LANA-induced endothelial cell invasiveness. During the identification of CD147 controlled downstream genes by microarray analysis, we found that the expression of HO-1 is significantly elevated in both CD147-overexpressing and KSHV-infected HUVEC cells when compared to control cells. In the current study, we further identify the regulation of HO-1 expression and mediated cellular functions by both CD147 and KSHV-encoded LANA proteins. Targeting HO-1 by either RNAi or the chemical inhibitor, SnPP, effectively induces cell death of KSHV-infected endothelial cells (the major cellular components of KS) through DNA damage and necrosis process. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that SnPP treatment significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the important role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenesis of KSHV-infected endothelial cells, the underlying regulatory mechanisms for HO-1 expression and targeting HO-1 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against KSHV-related malignancies. PMID:26859574

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 determines the differential response of breast cancer and normal cells to piperlongumine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ha-Na; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, BoRa; Kim, Wonki; Hong, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yun-Han; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Surh, Young-Joon; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-04-01

    Piperlongumine, a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, selectively increases reactive oxygen species production and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying piperlongumine-induced selective killing of cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that human breast cancer MCF-7 cells are sensitive to piperlongumine-induced apoptosis relative to human MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, this opposing effect of piperlongumine appears to be mediated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Piperlongumine upregulated HO-1 expression through the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. However, knockdown of HO-1 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity abolished the ability of piperlongumine to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, whereas those promoted apoptosis in MCF-10A cells, indicating that HO-1 has anti-tumor functions in cancer cells but cytoprotective functions in normal cells. Moreover, it was found that piperlongumine-induced Nrf2 activation, HO-1 expression and cancer cell apoptosis are not dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Instead, piperlongumine, which bears electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups, appears to inactivate Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) through thiol modification, thereby activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and subsequently upregulating HO-1 expression, which accounts for piperlongumine-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that direct interaction of piperlongumine with Keap1 leads to the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, and HO-1 determines the differential response of breast normal cells and cancer cells to piperlongumine. PMID:25813625

  20. Heme Oxygenase-1 Determines the Differential Response of Breast Cancer and Normal Cells to Piperlongumine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ha-Na; Jin, Hyeon-Ok; Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jin-Hee; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, BoRa; Kim, Wonki; Hong, Sung-Eun; Lee, Yun-Han; Chang, Yoon Hwan; Hong, Seok-Il; Hong, Young Jun; Park, In-Chul; Surh, Young-Joon; Lee, Jin Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Piperlongumine, a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, selectively increases reactive oxygen species production and apoptotic cell death in cancer cells but not in normal cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying piperlongumine-induced selective killing of cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we observed that human breast cancer MCF-7 cells are sensitive to piperlongumine-induced apoptosis relative to human MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. Interestingly, this opposing effect of piperlongumine appears to be mediated by heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Piperlongumine upregulated HO-1 expression through the activation of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) signaling in both MCF-7 and MCF-10A cells. However, knockdown of HO-1 expression and pharmacological inhibition of its activity abolished the ability of piperlongumine to induce apoptosis in MCF-7 cells, whereas those promoted apoptosis in MCF-10A cells, indicating that HO-1 has anti-tumor functions in cancer cells but cytoprotective functions in normal cells. Moreover, it was found that piperlongumine-induced Nrf2 activation, HO-1 expression and cancer cell apoptosis are not dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Instead, piperlongumine, which bears electrophilic α,β-unsaturated carbonyl groups, appears to inactivate Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) through thiol modification, thereby activating the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and subsequently upregulating HO-1 expression, which accounts for piperlongumine-induced apoptosis in cancer cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that direct interaction of piperlongumine with Keap1 leads to the upregulation of Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression, and HO-1 determines the differential response of breast normal cells and cancer cells to piperlongumine. PMID:25813625

  1. Role of heme oxygenase-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, David; Struckhoff, Amanda P.; Doyle, Lisa; Bonstaff, Karlie; Del Valle, Luis; Parsons, Chris; Toole, Bryan P.; Renne, Rolf; Qin, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is the etiologic agent of several malignancies, including Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), which preferentially arise in immunocompromised patients such as HIV+ subpopulation and lack effective therapeutic options. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported as an important regulator of endothelial cell cycle control, proliferation and angiogenesis. HO-1 has also been found to be highly expressed in KSHV-infected endothelial cells and oral AIDS-KS lesions. We previously demonstrate that the multifunctional glycoprotein CD147 is required for KSHV/LANA-induced endothelial cell invasiveness. During the identification of CD147 controlled downstream genes by microarray analysis, we found that the expression of HO-1 is significantly elevated in both CD147-overexpressing and KSHV-infected HUVEC cells when compared to control cells. In the current study, we further identify the regulation of HO-1 expression and mediated cellular functions by both CD147 and KSHV-encoded LANA proteins. Targeting HO-1 by either RNAi or the chemical inhibitor, SnPP, effectively induces cell death of KSHV-infected endothelial cells (the major cellular components of KS) through DNA damage and necrosis process. By using a KS-like nude mouse model, we found that SnPP treatment significantly suppressed KSHV-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate the important role of HO-1 in the pathogenesis and tumorigenesis of KSHV-infected endothelial cells, the underlying regulatory mechanisms for HO-1 expression and targeting HO-1 may represent a promising therapeutic strategy against KSHV-related malignancies. PMID:26859574

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Bolisetty, Subashini; DeAlmeida, Angela; Litovsky, Silvio H.; Prabhu, Sumanth D.; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F.

    2013-01-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (MHC-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice) with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed stop signal (CBA-flox mice). MHC-HO-1 overexpress the HO-1 gene and enzymatically protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on two consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  3. Reduction of bilirubin by targeting human heme oxygenase-1 through siRNA.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Li, Chun-E; Jin, You-Xin; Shi, Yi; Xu, Li-Qing; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang; Zhang, Zi-Li

    2007-04-01

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia is a common clinical condition caused mainly by the increased production and decreased excretion of bilirubin. Current treatment is aimed at reducing the serum levels of bilirubin. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme that generates bilirubin. In this study we intended to suppress HO-1 using the RNA interference technique. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-A, -B, and -C were designed based on human HO-1 (hHO-1) mRNA sequences. siRNA was transfected into a human hepatic cell line (HL-7702). hHO-1 transcription and protein levels were then determined. In addition, the inhibitory effect of siRNA on hHO-1 was assessed in cells treated with hemin or transfected with an hHO-1 plasmid. siRNA-C showed the most potent suppressive effect on hHO-1. This inhibition is dose and time dependent. Compared with control, both hemin and hHO-1 plasmids up-regulated hHO-1 expression in HL-7702 cells. However, the up-regulation was significantly attenuated by siRNA-C. Furthermore, the decrease in hHO-1 activity was coincident with the suppression of its transcription. Finally, siRNA-C was shown to reduce hHO-1 enzymatic activity and bilirubin levels. Thus, this study provides a novel therapeutic rationale by blocking bilirubin formation via siRNA for preventing and treating neonatal hyperbilirubinemia and bilirubin encephalopathy at an early clinical stage. PMID:17392485

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects the heart from acute injury caused by inducible Cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Hull, Travis D; Bolisetty, Subhashini; DeAlmeida, Angela C; Litovsky, Silvio H; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Agarwal, Anupam; George, James F

    2013-08-01

    The protective effect of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in cardiovascular disease has been previously demonstrated using transgenic animal models in which HO-1 is constitutively overexpressed in the heart. However, the temporal requirements for protection by HO-1 induction relative to injury have not been investigated, but are essential to employ HO-1 as a therapeutic strategy in human cardiovascular disease states. Therefore, we generated mice with cardiac-specific, tamoxifen (TAM)-inducible overexpression of a human HO-1 (hHO-1) transgene (myosin heavy chain (MHC)-HO-1 mice) by breeding mice with cardiac-specific expression of a TAM-inducible Cre recombinase (MHC-Cre mice), with mice containing an hHO-1 transgene preceded by a floxed-stop signal. MHC-HO-1 mice overexpress HO-1 mRNA and the enzymatically active protein following TAM administration (40 mg/kg body weight on 2 consecutive days). In MHC-Cre controls, TAM administration leads to severe, acute cardiac toxicity, cardiomyocyte necrosis, and 80% mortality by day 3. This cardiac toxicity is accompanied by a significant increase in inflammatory cells in the heart that are predominantly neutrophils. In MHC-HO-1 mice, HO-1 overexpression ameliorates the depression of cardiac function and high mortality rate observed in MHC-Cre mice following TAM administration and attenuates cardiomyocyte necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These results highlight that HO-1 induction is sufficient to prevent the depression of cardiac function observed in mice with TAM-inducible Cre recombinase expression by protecting the heart from necrosis and neutrophil infiltration. These findings are important because MHC-Cre mice are widely used in cardiovascular research despite the limitations imposed by Cre-induced cardiac toxicity, and also because inflammation is an important pathological component of many human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23732814

  5. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  6. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Hwang, Jinha; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP)-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located -374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1 expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at -374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the -374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI patients and control

  7. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Improves Cardiac Function following Myocardial Ischemia by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Issan, Yossi; Kornowski, Ran; Aravot, Dan; Shainberg, Asher; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Sodhi, Komal; Abraham, Nader G.; Hochhauser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI) and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation. Methods In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured. Results HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospho kinase (CK), decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS) was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05). CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01), reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively). CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05). The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05). CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05) in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects. Conclusions HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by

  8. Wild-type macrophages reverse disease in heme oxygenase 1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Ghosh, Manik C; Ollivierre, Wade; Weitzel, R Patrick; Eckhaus, Michael A; Tisdale, John F; Yachie, Akihiro; Rouault, Tracey A

    2014-08-28

    Loss-of-function mutation in the heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) gene causes a rare and lethal disease in children, characterized by severe anemia and intravascular hemolysis, with damage to endothelia and kidneys. Previously, we found that macrophages engaged in recycling of red cells were depleted from the tissues of Hmox1(-/-) mice, which resulted in intravascular hemolysis and severe damage to the endothelial system, kidneys, and other organs. Here, we report that subablative bone marrow transplantation (BMT) has a curative effect for disease in Hmox1(-/-) animals as a result of restoration of heme recycling by repopulation of the tissues with wild-type macrophages. Although engraftment was transient, BMT reversed anemia, normalized blood chemistries and iron metabolism parameters, and prevented renal damage. The largest proportion of donor-derived cells was observed in the livers of transplanted animals. These cells, identified as Kupffer cells with high levels of Hmox1 expression, persisted months after transient engraftment of the donor bone marrow and were responsible for the full restoration of heme-recycling ability in Hmox1(-/-) mice and reversing Hmox1-deficient phenotype. Our findings suggest that BMT or the development of specific cell therapies to repopulate patients' tissues with wild-type or reengineered macrophages represent promising approaches for HMOX1 deficiency treatment in humans. PMID:24963040

  9. Positive and negative regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, S; Takahashi, Y; Ito, K; Nagano, T; Shibahara, S; Miura, T

    1999-10-28

    To elucidate the regulation of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene expression, we assessed approximately 4 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the hHO-1 gene for basal promoter activity and sequenced approximately 2 kb of the 5'-flanking region. A series of deletion mutants of the 5'-flanking region linked to the luciferase gene was constructed. Basal level expression of these constructs was tested in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and HeLa cervical cancer cells. By measuring luciferase activity, which was transiently expressed in the transfected cells, we found a positive regulatory region at position -1976 to -1655 bp. This region functions in HepG2 cells but not in HeLa cells. A negative regulatory region was also found at position -981 to -412 bp that functions in both HepG2 cells and HeLa cells. PMID:10542320

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 protects endothelial cells from the toxicity of air pollutant chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lawal, Akeem O.; Zhang, Min; Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A.

    2015-05-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEPs on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs) were treated with an organic extract of DEPs from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4 h. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and unfolded protein respone (UPR) gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25 μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but to a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMECs from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM. - Highlights: • We examined the role of HO-1 expression on diesel exhaust particle (DEP) in endothelial cells. • DEPs exert cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs). • DEPs induce HO-1 expression in HMECs. • HO-1 protects against the oxidative stress induced by DEps. • HO-1 attenuates the proinflammatory effects

  11. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  12. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice’s brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  13. Human heme oxygenase 1 is a potential host cell factor against dengue virus replication.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Kai; Lin, Chun-Kuang; Wu, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Chen, Wei-Chun; Young, Kung-Chia; Lee, Jin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection and replication induces oxidative stress, which further contributes to the progression and pathogenesis of the DENV infection. Modulation of host antioxidant molecules may be a useful strategy for interfering with DENV replication. In this study, we showed that induction or exogenous overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant enzyme, effectively inhibited DENV replication in DENV-infected Huh-7 cells. This antiviral effect of HO-1 was attenuated by its inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), suggesting that HO-1 was an important cellular factor against DENV replication. Biliverdin but not carbon monoxide and ferrous ions, which are products of the HO-1 on heme, mediated the HO-1-induced anti-DENV effect by non-competitively inhibiting DENV protease, with an inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.55 ± 0.38 μM. Moreover, HO-1 induction or its exogenous overexpression, rescued DENV-suppressed antiviral interferon response. Moreover, we showed that HO-1 induction by cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) and andrographolide, a natural product, as evidenced by a significant delay in the onset of disease and mortality, and virus load in the infected mice's brains. These findings clearly revealed that a drug or therapy that induced the HO-1 signal pathway was a promising strategy for treating DENV infection. PMID:27553177

  14. Capsaicin Ameliorates Cisplatin-Induced Renal Injury through Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Shen, AiHua; Lee, Subin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; Park, Raekil; So, Hong-Seob

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy agents. However, its use is limited due to its toxicity in normal tissues, including the kidney and ear. In particular, nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme metabolism, has been implicated in a various cellular processes, such as inflammatory injury and anti-oxidant/oxidant homeostasis. Capsaicin is reported to have therapeutic potential in cisplatin-induced renal failures. However, the mechanisms underlying its protective effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain largely unknown. Herein, we demonstrated that administration of capsaicin ameliorates cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction by assessing the levels of serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) as well as tissue histology. In addition, capsaicin treatment attenuates the expression of inflammatory mediators and oxidative stress markers for renal damage. We also found that capsaicin induces HO-1 expression in kidney tissues and HK-2 cells. Notably, the protective effects of capsaicin were completely abrogated by treatment with either the HO inhibitor ZnPP IX or HO-1 knockdown in HK-2 cells. These results suggest that capsaicin has protective effects against cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction through induction of HO-1 as well as inhibition oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24642709

  15. Impact of heme oxygenase-1 on cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia.

    PubMed

    Hascalovici, Jacob R; Song, Wei; Vaya, Jacob; Khatib, Soliman; Fuhrman, Bianca; Aviram, Michael; Schipper, Hyman M

    2009-01-01

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol (CH) metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased neural tissues. The liver X receptor (LXR) is a molecular sensor of CH homeostasis. In the current study, we determined the effects of HO-1 over-expression and its byproducts iron (Fe(2+)), carbon monoxide (CO) and bilirubin on CH biosynthesis, CH efflux and oxysterol formation in cultured astroglia. HO-1/LXR interactions were also investigated in the context of CH efflux. hHO-1 over-expression for 3 days ( approximately 2-3-fold increase) resulted in a 30% increase in CH biosynthesis and a two-fold rise in CH efflux. Both effects were abrogated by the competitive HO inhibitor, tin mesoporphyrin. CO, released from administered CORM-3, significantly enhanced CH biosynthesis; a combination of CO and iron stimulated CH efflux. Free iron increased oxysterol formation three-fold. Co-treatment with LXR antagonists implicated LXR activation in the modulation of CH homeostasis by heme degradation products. In Alzheimer's disease and other neuropathological states, glial HO-1 induction may transduce ambient noxious stimuli (e.g. beta-amyloid) into altered patterns of glial CH homeostasis. As the latter may impact synaptic plasticity and neuronal repair, modulation of glial HO-1 expression (by pharmacological or other means) may confer neuroprotection in patients with degenerative brain disorders. PMID:19046352

  16. Role of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Postnatal Differentiation of Stem Cells: A Possible Cross-Talk with MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kozakowska, Magdalena; Szade, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) converts heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous ions, but its cellular functions are far beyond heme metabolism. HO-1 via heme removal and degradation products acts as a cytoprotective, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and proangiogenic protein, regulating also a cell cycle. Additionally, HO-1 can translocate to nucleus and regulate transcription factors, so it can also act independently of enzymatic function. Recent Advances: Recently, a body of evidence has emerged indicating a role for HO-1 in postnatal differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. Maturation of satellite cells, skeletal myoblasts, adipocytes, and osteoclasts is inhibited by HO-1, whereas neurogenic differentiation and formation of cardiomyocytes perhaps can be enhanced. Moreover, HO-1 influences a lineage commitment in pluripotent stem cells and maturation of hematopoietic cells. It may play a role in development of osteoblasts, but descriptions of its exact effects are inconsistent. Critical Issues: In this review we discuss a role of HO-1 in cell differentiation, and possible HO-1-dependent signal transduction pathways. Among the potential mediators, we focused on microRNA (miRNA). These small, noncoding RNAs are critical for cell differentiation. Recently we have found that HO-1 not only influences expression of specific miRNAs but also regulates miRNA processing enzymes. Future Directions: It seems that interplay between HO-1 and miRNAs may be important in regulating fates of stem and progenitor cells and needs further intensive studies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1827–1850. PMID:24053682

  17. Astrocyte Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 Improves Outcome after Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Roetling, Jing; Song, Wei; Schipper, Hyman M.; Regan, Christopher S.; Regan, Raymond F.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting reaction of heme breakdown, and may have both antioxidant and pro-oxidant effects. In prior studies, HO-1 overexpression protected astrocytes from heme-mediated injury in vitro. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that selective astrocyte overexpression of HO-1 improves outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods Male and female transgenic mice overexpressing human HO-1 driven by the GFAP promoter (GFAP.HMOX1) and wild-type controls received striatal injections of autologous blood (25 μl). Blood-brain barrier disruption was assessed by Evans blue assay and striatal cell viability by MTT assay. Neurological deficits were quantified by digital analysis of spontaneous cage activity, adhesive removal, and elevated body swing tests. Results Mortality rate for wild-type mice was 34.8% and was similar for males and females; all GFAP.HMOX1 mice survived. Striatal Evans blue leakage at 24 hours was 23.4+/−3.2 ng in surviving WT mice, compared with 10.9+/−1.8 ng in transgenics. Peri-hematomal cell viability was reduced to 61±4% of contralateral at 3 days in WT mice, v. 80±4% in transgenics. Focal neurological deficits were significantly reduced in GFAP.HMOX1 mice, and spontaneous cage activity was increased. Conclusions Selective HO-1 overexpression in astrocytes reduces mortality, blood-brain barrier disruption, peri-hematomal cell injury, and neurological deficits in an autologous blood injection ICH model. Genetic or pharmacologic therapies that acutely increase astrocyte HO-1 may be beneficial after ICH. PMID:25690543

  18. Measurement of membrane-bound human heme oxygenase-1 activity using a chemically defined assay system.

    PubMed

    Huber, Warren J; Marohnic, Christopher C; Peters, Michelle; Alam, Jawed; Reed, James R; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Backes, Wayne L

    2009-04-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes heme degradation in a reaction requiring NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR). Although most studies with HO used a soluble 30-kDa form, lacking the C-terminal membrane-binding region, recent reports show that the catalytic behavior of this enzyme is very different if this domain is retained; the overall activity was elevated 5-fold, and the K(m) for CPR decreased approximately 50-fold. The goal of these studies was to accurately measure HO activity using a coupled assay containing purified biliverdin reductase (BVR). This allows measurement of bilirubin formation after incorporation of full-length CPR and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) into a membrane environment. When rat liver cytosol was used as the source of partially purified BVR, the reaction remained linear for 2 to 3 min; however, the reaction was only linear for 10 to 30 s when an equivalent amount of purified, human BVR (hBVR) was used. This lack of linearity was not observed with soluble HO-1. Optimal formation of bilirubin was achieved with concentrations of bovine serum albumin (0.25 mg/ml) and hBVR (0.025-0.05 microM), but neither supplement increased the time that the reaction remained linear. Various concentrations of superoxide dismutase had no effect on the reaction; however, when catalase was included, the reactions were linear for at least 4 to 5 min, even at high CPR levels. These results not only show that HO-1-generated hydrogen peroxide leads to a decrease in HO-1 activity but also provide for a chemically defined system to be used to examine the function of full-length HO-1 in a membrane environment. PMID:19131520

  19. Proximal tubule-targeted heme oxygenase-1 in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Traylor, Amie; Joseph, Reny; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2016-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and iron. The beneficial effects of HO-1 expression are not merely due to degradation of the pro-oxidant heme but are also credited to the by-products that have potent, protective effects, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and prosurvival properties. This is well reflected in the preclinical animal models of injury in both renal and nonrenal settings. However, excessive accumulation of the by-products can be deleterious and lead to mitochondrial toxicity and oxidative stress. Therefore, use of the HO system in alleviating injury merits a targeted approach. Based on the higher susceptibility of the proximal tubule segment of the nephron to injury, we generated transgenic mice using cre-lox technology to enable manipulation of HO-1 (deletion or overexpression) in a cell-specific manner. We demonstrate the validity and feasibility of these mice by breeding them with proximal tubule-specific Cre transgenic mice. Similar to previous reports using chemical modulators and global transgenic mice, we demonstrate that whereas deletion of HO-1, specifically in the proximal tubules, aggravates structural and functional damage during cisplatin nephrotoxicity, selective overexpression of HO-1 in proximal tubules is protective. At the cellular level, cleaved caspase-3 expression, a marker of apoptosis, and p38 signaling were modulated by HO-1. Use of these transgenic mice will aid in the evaluation of the effects of cell-specific HO-1 expression in response to injury and assist in the generation of targeted approaches that will enhance recovery with reduced, unwarranted adverse effects. PMID:26672618

  20. Altered heme catabolism by heme oxygenase-1 caused by mutations in human NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Amit V.; Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Mutations in POR identified from patients lead to reduced HO-1 activities. {yields} POR mutation Y181D affecting FMN binding results in total loss of HO-1 activity. {yields} POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F, lost 50-70% activity. {yields} Mutations in FAD binding domain, R457H, Y459H and V492E lost all HO-1 activity. {yields} POR polymorphisms P228L, R316W, G413S, A503V and G504R have normal activity. -- Abstract: Human heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) carries out heme catabolism supported by electrons supplied from the NADPH through NADPH P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Previously we have shown that mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of mutations in POR on HO-1 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified HO-1 to measure heme degradation in a coupled assay using biliverdin reductase. Here we show that mutations in POR found in patients may reduce HO-1 activity, potentially influencing heme catabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had total loss of HO-1 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 50-70% activity. The POR variants P228L, R316W and G413S, A503V and G504R identified as polymorphs had close to WT activity. Loss of HO-1 activity may result in increased oxidative neurotoxicity, anemia, growth retardation and iron deposition. Further examination of patients affected with POR deficiency will be required to assess the metabolic effects of reduced HO-1 activity in affected individuals.

  1. AZD3582 increases heme oxygenase-1 expression and antioxidant activity in vascular endothelial and gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Georg; Grosser, Nina; Hoogstraate, Janet; Schröder, Henning

    2005-06-01

    AZD3582 [4-(nitrooxy)-butyl-(2S)-2-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-propanoate] is a COX-inhibiting nitric oxide donator (CINOD). Incubation of human endothelial cells (derived from umbilical cord) with AZD3582 (10-100muM) led to increased expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 mRNA and protein. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a crucial mediator of antioxidant and tissue-protective actions. In contrast, naproxen (a non-selective NSAID) and rofecoxib (a selective inhibitor of COX-2), did not affect HO-1 expression. Pre-treating endothelial cells with AZD3582 at concentrations that were effective at inducing HO-1 also reduced NADPH-dependent production of oxygen radicals. Antioxidant activity in the endothelial cells persisted after AZD3582 had been washed out from the incubation medium. When added exogenously to the cells at low micromolar concentrations, the HO-1 metabolite, bilirubin, virtually abolished NADPH-dependent oxidative stress. AZD3582-induced blockade of free-radical formation was reversed in the presence of the HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP). Similar results were obtained in human gastric mucosal cells (KATO-III). Our results demonstrate that HO-1 is a novel target of AZD3582. PMID:15911218

  2. Orthodontic Forces Induce the Cytoprotective Enzyme Heme Oxygenase-1 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Suttorp, Christiaan M.; Xie, Rui; Lundvig, Ditte M. S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Anne Marie; Uijttenboogaart, Jasper Tom; Van Rheden, René; Maltha, Jaap C.; Wagener, Frank A. D. T. G.

    2016-01-01

    Orthodontic forces disturb the microenvironment of the periodontal ligament (PDL), and induce craniofacial bone remodeling which is necessary for tooth movement. Unfortunately, orthodontic tooth movement is often hampered by ischemic injury and cell death within the PDL (hyalinization) and root resorption. Large inter-individual differences in hyalinization and root resorption have been observed, and may be explained by differential protection against hyalinization. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) forms an important protective mechanism by breaking down heme into the strong anti-oxidants biliverdin/bilirubin and the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. These versatile HO-1 products protect against ischemic and inflammatory injury. We postulate that orthodontic forces induce HO-1 expression in the PDL during experimental tooth movement. Twenty-five 6-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. The upper three molars at one side were moved mesially using a Nickel-Titanium coil spring, providing a continuous orthodontic force of 10 cN. The contralateral side served as control. After 6, 12, 72, 96, and 120 h groups of rats were killed. On parasagittal sections immunohistochemical staining was performed for analysis of HO-1 expression and quantification of osteoclasts. Orthodontic force induced a significant time-dependent HO-1 expression in mononuclear cells within the PDL at both the apposition- and resorption side. Shortly after placement of the orthodontic appliance HO-1 expression was highly induced in PDL cells but dropped to control levels within 72 h. Some osteoclasts were also HO-1 positive but this induction was shown to be independent of time- and mechanical stress. It is tempting to speculate that differential induction of tissue protecting- and osteoclast activating genes in the PDL determine the level of bone resorption and hyalinization and, subsequently, “fast” and “slow” tooth movers during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27486402

  3. Downregulation of Heme Oxygenase 1 (HO-1) Activity in Hematopoietic Cells Enhances Their Engraftment After Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Adamiak, Mateusz; Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Grubczak, Kamil; Rzeszotek, Sylwia; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is an inducible stress-response enzyme that not only catalyzes the degradation of heme (e.g., released from erythrocytes) but also has an important function in various physiological and pathophysiological states associated with cellular stress, such as ischemic/reperfusion injury. HO-1 has a well-documented anti-inflammatory potential, and HO-1 has been reported to have a negative effect on adhesion and migration of neutrophils in acute inflammation in a model of peritonitis. This finding is supported by our recent observation that hematopoietic stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) from HO-1 KO mice are easy mobilizers, since they respond better to peripheral blood chemotactic gradients than wild-type littermates. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that transient inhibition of HO-1 by nontoxic small-molecule inhibitors would enhance migration of HSPCs in response to bone marrow chemoattractants and thereby facilitate their homing. To directly address this issue, we generated several human hematopoietic cell lines in which HO-1 was upregulated or downregulated. We also exposed murine and human BM-derived cells to small-molecule activators and inhibitors of HO-1. Our results indicate that HO-1 is an inhibitor of hematopoietic cell migration in response to crucial BM homing chemoattractants such as stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Most importantly, our in vitro and in vivo animal experiments demonstrate for the first time that transiently inhibiting HO-1 activity in HSPCs by small-molecule inhibitors improves HSPC engraftment. We propose that this simple and inexpensive strategy could be employed in the clinical setting to improve engraftment of HSPCs, particularly in those situations in which the number of HSPCs available for transplant is limited (e.g., when transplanting umbilical cord blood). PMID:27412411

  4. Astroglia overexpressing heme oxygenase-1 predispose co-cultured PC12 cells to oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Song, Linyang; Song, Wei; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-08-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and pathologic iron deposition in the substantia nigra pars compacta of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) remain unclear. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the oxidative degradation of heme to ferrous iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin, is upregulated in affected PD astroglia and may contribute to abnormal mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. To determine whether glial HO-1 hyper-expression is toxic to neuronal compartments, we co-cultured dopaminergic PC12 cells atop monolayers of human (h) HO-1 transfected, sham-transfected, or non-transfected primary rat astroglia. We observed that PC12 cells grown atop hHO-1 transfected astrocytes, but not the astroglia themselves, were significantly more susceptible to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM)-induced death (assessed by nuclear ethidium monoazide bromide staining and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase immunofluorescence microscopy) relative to control preparations. In the experimental group, PC12 cell death was attenuated significantly by the administration of the HO inhibitor, SnMP (1.5 microM), the antioxidant, ascorbate (200 microM), or the iron chelators, deferoxamine (400 microM), and phenanthroline (100 microM). Exposure to conditioned media derived from HO-1 transfected astrocytes also augmented PC12 cell killing in response to dopamine (1 microM) + H(2)O(2) (1 microM) relative to control media. In PD brain, overexpression of HO-1 in nigral astroglia and accompanying iron liberation may facilitate the bioactivation of dopamine to neurotoxic free radical intermediates and predispose nearby neuronal constituents to oxidative damage. PMID:17526019

  5. Carbon monoxide mediates heme oxygenase 1 induction via Nrf2 activation in hepatoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bok-Soo; Heo, JungHee; Kim, Yong-Man; Shim, Sang Moo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Kim, Young-Myeong; Chung, Hun-Taeg . E-mail: htchung@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2006-05-12

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) are two gas molecules which have cytoprotective functions against oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in many cell types. Currently, it is known that NO produced by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) induces heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) expression and CO produced by the HO1 inhibits inducible NOS expression. Here, we first show CO-mediated HO1 induction and its possible mechanism in human hepatocytes. Exposure of HepG2 cells or primary hepatocytes to CO resulted in dramatic induction of HO1 in dose- and time-dependent manner. The CO-mediated HO1 induction was abolished by MAP kinase inhibitors (MAPKs) but not affected by inhibitors of PI3 kinase or NF-{kappa}B. In addition, CO induced the nuclear translocation and accumulation of Nrf2, which suppressed by MAPKs inhibitors. Taken together, we suggest that CO induces Nrf2 activation via MAPKs signaling pathways, thereby resulting in HO1 expression in HepG2 cells.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates the immune response to influenza virus infection and vaccination in aged mice.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Nathan W; Weaver, Eric A; May, Shannon M; Croatt, Anthony J; Foreman, Oded; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A; Barry, Michael A; Nath, Karl A; Badley, Andrew D

    2012-07-01

    Underlying mechanisms of individual variation in severity of influenza infection and response to vaccination are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression on vaccine response and outcome of influenza infection. HO-1-deficient and wild-type (WT) mice (kingdom, Animalia; phylum, Chordata; genus/species, Mus musculus) were infected with influenza virus A/PR/8/34 with or without prior vaccination with an adenoviral-based influenza vaccine. A genome-wide association study evaluated the expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HO-1 gene and the response to influenza vaccination in healthy humans. HO-1-deficient mice had decreased survival after influenza infection compared to WT mice (median survival 5.5 vs. 6.5 d, P=0.016). HO-1-deficient mice had impaired production of antibody following influenza vaccination compared to WT mice (mean antibody titer 869 vs. 1698, P=0.02). One SNP in HO-1 and one SNP in the constitutively expressed isoform HO-2 were independently associated with decreased antibody production after influenza vaccination in healthy human volunteers (P=0.017 and 0.014, respectively). HO-1 deficient mice were paired with sex- and age-matched WT controls. HO-1 affects the immune response to both influenza infection and vaccination, suggesting that therapeutic induction of HO-1 expression may represent a novel adjuvant to enhance influenza vaccine effectiveness. PMID:22490782

  7. Myelodysplastic syndrome macrophages have aberrant iron storage and heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Nybakken, Grant; Gratzinger, Dita

    2016-08-01

    Iron overload and transfusion dependance portend poor risk in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS); bone marrow macrophages store iron and limit oxidative damage through heme oxygenase-1 (HO1). We assessed iron stores and macrophage HO1 expression in MDS using image analysis of intact diagnostic bone marrow biopsies and qualitative scoring of marrow aspirate iron among 129 cytopenic patients, 67 with MDS and 62 similarly aged patients with benign cytopenias. Using double immunofluorescence and sequential iron and immunohistochemistry staining, we showed that marrow iron colocalizes with HO1 and H-ferritin to CD163 + macrophages. Marrow iron was elevated in MDS independent of transfusion status, a finding of potential utility in distinguishing benign cytopenia from MDS. Among MDS patients only, CD163 + macrophage density and HO1 and H-ferritin expression by CD163 + macrophages increased in tandem with marrow iron. High HO1 was significantly associated with shorter overall survival among MDS patients independent of IPSSR and history of transfusion. PMID:26758041

  8. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP(+)- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP(+) or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  9. Targeted expression of heme oxygenase-1 prevents the pulmonary inflammatory and vascular responses to hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamino, Tohru; Christou, Helen; Hsieh, Chung-Ming; Liu, Yuxiang; Dhawan, Vijender; Abraham, Nader G.; Perrella, Mark A.; Mitsialis, S. Alex; Kourembanas, Stella

    2001-07-01

    Chronic hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension with smooth muscle cell proliferation and matrix deposition in the wall of the pulmonary arterioles. We demonstrate here that hypoxia also induces a pronounced inflammation in the lung before the structural changes of the vessel wall. The proinflammatory action of hypoxia is mediated by the induction of distinct cytokines and chemokines and is independent of tumor necrosis factor- signaling. We have previously proposed a crucial role for heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in protecting cardiomyocytes from hypoxic stress, and potent anti-inflammatory properties of HO-1 have been reported in models of tissue injury. We thus established transgenic mice that constitutively express HO-1 in the lung and exposed them to chronic hypoxia. HO-1 transgenic mice were protected from the development of both pulmonary inflammation as well as hypertension and vessel wall hypertrophy induced by hypoxia. Significantly, the hypoxic induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines was suppressed in HO-1 transgenic mice. Our findings suggest an important protective function of enzymatic products of HO-1 activity as inhibitors of hypoxia-induced vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory pathways.

  10. Modulation of Melanogenesis by Heme Oxygenase-1 via p53 in Normal Human Melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hee-Sun; Jin, Suna

    2016-01-01

    As a key regulator of melanogenesis, p53 controls microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) and tyrosinase expression. The anti-oxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is induced by various forms of cellular stress and diverse oxidative stimuli. However, few studies have examined the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of HO-1 in melanogenesis and the mechanism underlying this relationship. Cultures of normal human melanocytes were treated with the HO-1 inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or the HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP). We then measured the melanin content of the cells. Additional analyses consisted of Western blotting and RT-PCR. The results showed that the cellular melanin content was increased by CoPP and decreased by ZnPP. The Western blot and RT-PCR analyses showed that CoPP increased p53, MITF and tyrosinase levels, and ZnPP reduced all of them. The knockdown of p53 by siRNA transfection was followed by large decreases in the expression levels of p53, MITF and tyrosinase at 3 h of transfection. The presence of CoPP or ZnPP had no significant increased or decreased effects on MITF and tyrosinase levels from 15 h in the siRNA transfectants. Our results suggest that HO-1 modulates melanogenesis in human melanocytes via a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:26865999

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 is dispensable for the anti-inflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Hegde, Pushpa; Das, Mrinmoy; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Canale, Fernando; Muñoz, Marcos; Sharma, Varun K.; Dimitrov, Jordan D.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin G (IVIG) is used in the therapy of various autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. The mechanisms by which IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects are not completely understood. IVIG interacts with numerous components of the immune system including dendritic cells, macrophages, T and B cells and modulate their functions. Recent studies have reported that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory response in several pathologies. Several therapeutic agents exert anti-inflammatory effects via induction of HO-1. Therefore, we aimed at exploring if anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG are mediated via HO-1 pathway. Confirming the previous reports, we report that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects on innate cells as shown by the inhibitory effects on IL-6 and nitric oxide production and confers protection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. However, these effects were not associated with an induction of HO-1 either in innate cells such as monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages or in the kidneys and liver of IVIG-treated EAE mice. Also, inhibition of endogenous HO-1 did not modify anti-inflammatory effects of IVIG. These results thus indicate that IVIG exerts anti-inflammatory effects independent of HO-1 pathway. PMID:26796539

  12. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 by chamomile protects murine macrophages against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Shukla, Sanjeev; Kanwal, Rajnee; Srivastava, Janmejai K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Aims Protection of cells from oxidative insult may be possible through direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species, or through stimulation of intracellular antioxidant defense mechanisms by induction of antioxidant gene expression. In this study we investigated the cytoprotective effect of chamomile and elucidated the underlying mechanisms. Main Methods The cytoprotective effect of chamomile was examined on H2O2-induced cellular stress in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. Key Findings RAW 264.7 murine macrophages treated with chamomile were protected from cell death caused by H2O2. Treatment with 50 μM H2O2 for 6 h caused significant increase in cellular stress accompanied by cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Pretreatment with chamomile at 10-20 μg/mL for 16 h followed by H2O2 treatment protected the macrophages against cell death. Chamomile exposure significantly increased the expression of antioxidant enzymes viz. heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx-1), and thioredoxin-1 (Trx-1) in a dose-dependent manner, compared with their respective controls. Chamomile increased nuclear translocation of Nrf2 with increased phosphorylated Nrf2 levels, and binding to the antioxidant response element in the nucleus. Significance These molecular findings for the first time provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the induction of phase 2 enzymes through the Keap1-Nrf2 signaling pathway by chamomile, and provide evidence that chamomile possesses antioxidant and cytoprotective properties. PMID:22683429

  13. Differences in vulnerability of neurons and astrocytes to heme oxygenase-1 modulation: Implications for mitochondrial ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaojun; Song, Ning; Guo, Xinli; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Haoyun; Xie, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Induction of the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was observed in both astrocytes and neurons in the substantia nigra of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the current study, we investigated whether HO-1 behaves differently between neurons and astrocytes under the condition of neurotoxicity related to PD. The results showed a time-dependent HO-1 upregulation in primary cultured ventral mesencephalon neurons and astrocytes treated with the mitochondria complex I inhibitor 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or recombinant α-synuclein. However, HO-1 upregulation appeared much later in neurons than in astrocytes. The HO-1 inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) aggravated MPP+- or α-synuclein-induced oxidative damage in both astrocytes and neurons, indicating that this HO-1 response was cytoprotective. For neurons, the HO-1 activator cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPPIX) exerted protective effects against MPP+ or α-synuclein during moderate HO-1 upregulation, but it aggravated damage at the peak of the HO-1 response. For astrocytes, CoPPIXalways showed protective effects. Higher basal and CoPPIX-induced mitochondrial ferritin (MtFt) levels were detected in astrocytes. Lentivirus-mediated MtFt overexpression rescued the neuronal damage induced by CoPPIX, indicating that large MtFt buffering capacity contributes to pronounced HO-1 tolerance in astrocytes. Such findings suggest that astrocyte-targeted HO-1 interventions and MtFt modulations have potential as novel pharmacological strategies in PD. PMID:27097841

  14. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency accompanies neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Alexander J.; Kovacsics, Colleen E.; Cross, Stephanie A.; Vance, Patricia J.; Kolson, Lorraine L.; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Kolson, Dennis L.

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible, detoxifying enzyme that is critical for limiting oxidative stress, inflammation, and cellular injury within the CNS and other tissues. Here, we demonstrate a deficiency of HO-1 expression in the brains of HIV-infected individuals. This HO-1 deficiency correlated with cognitive dysfunction, HIV replication in the CNS, and neuroimmune activation. In vitro analysis of HO-1 expression in HIV-infected macrophages, a primary CNS HIV reservoir along with microglia, demonstrated a decrease in HO-1 as HIV replication increased. HO-1 deficiency correlated with increased culture supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity, suggesting a link among HIV infection, macrophage HO-1 deficiency, and neurodegeneration. HO-1 siRNA knockdown and HO enzymatic inhibition in HIV-infected macrophages increased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. In contrast, increasing HO-1 expression through siRNA derepression or with nonselective pharmacologic inducers, including the CNS-penetrating drug dimethyl fumarate (DMF), decreased supernatant glutamate and neurotoxicity. Furthermore, IFN-γ, which is increased in CNS HIV infection, reduced HO-1 expression in cultured human astrocytes and macrophages. These findings indicate that HO-1 is a protective host factor against HIV-mediated neurodegeneration and suggest that HO-1 deficiency contributes to this degeneration. Furthermore, these results suggest that HO-1 induction in the CNS of HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy could potentially protect against neurodegeneration and associated cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25202977

  15. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 expression on sterol homeostasis in rat astroglia.

    PubMed

    Vaya, Jacob; Song, Wei; Khatib, Soliman; Geng, Guoyan; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-03-15

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and altered cholesterol metabolism are characteristic of Alzheimer-diseased (AD) neural tissues. Central oxidation of cholesterol to oxysterols has been implicated in neuroembryogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and membrane repair. In the current study, we demonstrated that transient transfection of rat astroglia with human (h)ho-1 cDNA for 3 days significantly decreased intracellular cholesterol concentrations and increased levels of four oxysterol species (measured by GC/MS) compared to untreated control cultures and HO-1-transfected cells exposed to the HO inhibitor, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP). Relative to control preparations, oxidative stress was augmented in mitochondria (isolated by subcellular fractionation) and culture media derived from HO-1-transfected astrocytes, as evidenced by enhanced oxidation of the synthetic reporter molecules, linoleoyl tyrosine (LT), linoleoyl tyrosine cholesterol ester (LTC), or linoleoyl tyrosine deoxyguanosyl ester (LTG; measured by GC/MS and LC/MS/MS). We also observed enhanced oxidation of exogenous LTC in human neuroblastoma (M17) cells exposed for 18 h to conditioned media collected from HO-1-transfected astrocytes relative to control media. In AD and other pathological states, glial HO-1 induction may transduce ambient noxious stimuli (e.g., beta-amyloid) into altered patterns of glial sterol metabolism which, in turn, may affect neuronal membrane turnover, survival, and adaptability. PMID:17320768

  16. Unconjugated bilirubin mediates heme oxygenase-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Li; Tian, Xiao Yu; Liu, Limei; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhang, Yang; Han, Quan-Bin; Ho, Hing-Man; Wang, Nanping; Wong, Siu Ling; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Yu, Jun; Ng, Chi-Fai; Yao, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts vasoprotective effects. Such benefit in diabetic vasculopathy, however, remains unclear. We hypothesize that bilirubin mediates HO-1-induced vascular benefits in diabetes. Diabetic db/db mice were treated with hemin (HO-1 inducer) for 2 weeks, and aortas were isolated for functional and molecular assays. Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured in cultured endothelial cells. Hemin treatment augmented endothelium-dependent relaxations (EDRs) and elevated Akt and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in db/db mouse aortas, which were reversed by the HO-1 inhibitor SnMP or HO-1 silencing virus. Hemin treatment increased serum bilirubin, and ex vivo bilirubin treatment improved relaxations in diabetic mouse aortas, which was reversed by the Akt inhibitor. Biliverdin reductase silencing virus attenuated the effect of hemin. Chronic bilirubin treatment improved EDRs in db/db mouse aortas. Hemin and bilirubin reversed high glucose-induced reductions in Akt and eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. The effect of hemin but not bilirubin was inhibited by biliverdin reductase silencing virus. Furthermore, bilirubin augmented EDRs in renal arteries from diabetic patients. In summary, HO-1-induced restoration of endothelial function in diabetic mice is most likely mediated by bilirubin, which preserves NO bioavailability through the Akt/eNOS/NO cascade, suggesting bilirubin as a potential therapeutic target for clinical intervention of diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:25475440

  17. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulation in the Brain: Implications for HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S; Kolson, Dennis L

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a highly inducible and ubiquitous cellular enzyme that subserves cytoprotective responses to toxic insults, including inflammation and oxidative stress. In neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and multiple sclerosis, HO-1 expression is increased, presumably reflecting an endogenous neuroprotective response against ongoing cellular injury. In contrast, we have found that in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection of the brain, which is also associated with inflammation, oxidative stress and neurodegeneration, HO-1 expression is decreased, likely reflecting a unique role for HO-1 deficiency in neurodegeneration pathways activated by HIV infection. We have also shown that HO-1 expression is significantly suppressed by HIV replication in cultured macrophages which represent the primary cellular reservoir for HIV in the brain. HO-1 deficiency is associated with release of neurotoxic levels of glutamate from both HIV-infected and immune-activated macrophages; this glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity is suppressed by pharmacological induction of HO-1 expression in the macrophages. Thus, HO-1 induction could be a therapeutic strategy for neuroprotection against HIV infection and other neuroinflammatory brain diseases. Here, we review various stimuli and signaling pathways regulating HO-1 expression in macrophages, which could promote neuronal survival through HO-1-modulation of endogenous antioxidant and immune modulatory pathways, thus limiting the oxidative stress that can promote HIV disease progression in the CNS. The use of pharmacological inducers of endogenous HO-1 expression as potential adjunctive neuroprotective therapeutics in HIV infection is also discussed. PMID:24862327

  18. ATF4-dependent induction of heme oxygenase 1 prevents anoikis and promotes metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Sayers, Carly M.; Verginadis, Ioannis I.; Lehman, Stacey L.; Cheng, Yi; Cerniglia, George J.; Tuttle, Stephen W.; Feldman, Michael D.; Zhang, Paul J.L.; Fuchs, Serge Y.; Diehl, J. Alan; Koumenis, Constantinos

    2015-01-01

    The integrated stress response (ISR) is a critical mediator of cancer cell survival, and targeting the ISR inhibits tumor progression. Here, we have shown that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a master transcriptional effector of the ISR, protects transformed cells against anoikis — a specialized form of apoptosis — following matrix detachment and also contributes to tumor metastatic properties. Upon loss of attachment, ATF4 activated a coordinated program of cytoprotective autophagy and antioxidant responses, including induced expression of the major antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). HO-1 upregulation was the result of simultaneous activation of ATF4 and the transcription factor NRF2, which converged on the HO1 promoter. Increased levels of HO-1 ameliorated oxidative stress and cell death. ATF4-deficient human fibrosarcoma cells were unable to colonize the lungs in a murine model, and reconstitution of ATF4 or HO-1 expression in ATF4-deficient cells blocked anoikis and rescued tumor lung colonization. HO-1 expression was higher in human primary and metastatic tumors compared with noncancerous tissue. Moreover, HO-1 expression correlated with reduced overall survival of patients with lung adenocarcinoma and glioblastoma. These results establish HO-1 as a mediator of ATF4-dependent anoikis resistance and tumor metastasis and suggest ATF4 and HO-1 as potential targets for therapeutic intervention in solid tumors. PMID:26011642

  19. Overexpressed human heme Oxygenase-1 decreases adipogenesis in pigs and porcine adipose-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun Jung; Koo, Ok Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-11-27

    Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) are multipotent, which means they are able to differentiate into several lineages in vivo and in vitro under proper conditions. This indicates it is possible to determine the direction of differentiation of ADSC by controlling the microenvironment. Heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a type of antioxidant enzyme, attenuates adipogenicity and obesity. We produced transgenic pigs overexpressing human HO-1 (hHO-1-Tg), and found that these animals have little fatty tissue when autopsied. To determine whether overexpressed human HO-1 suppresses adipogenesis in pigs, we analyzed body weight increases of hHO-1-Tg pigs and wild type (WT) pigs of the same strain, and induced adipogenic differentiation of ADSC derived from WT and hHO-1-Tg pigs. The hHO-1-Tg pigs had lower body weights than WT pigs from 16 weeks of age until they died. In addition, hHO-1-Tg ADSC showed reduced adipogenic differentiation and expression of adipogenic molecular markers such as PPARγ and C/EBPα compared to WT ADSC. These results suggest that HO-1 overexpression reduces adipogenesis both in vivo and in vitro, which could support identification of therapeutic targets of obesity and related metabolic diseases. PMID:26471299

  20. Neuroprotective effects of Argon are mediated via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1 in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Felix; Kaufmann, Kai B; Coburn, Mark; Lagrèze, Wolf Alexander; Roesslein, Martin; Biermann, Julia; Buerkle, Hartmut; Loop, Torsten; Goebel, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Retinal ischemia and reperfusion injuries (R-IRI) damage neuronal tissue permanently. Recently, we demonstrated that Argon exerts anti-apoptotic and protective properties. The molecular mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that Argon inhalation exert neuroprotective effects in rats retinal ganglion cells (RGC) via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heat-shock proteins. Inhalation of Argon (75 Vol%) was performed after R-IRI on the rats' left eyes for 1 h immediately or with delay. Retinal tissue was harvested after 24 h to analyze mRNA and protein expression of heat-shock proteins -70, -90 and heme-oxygenase-1, mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38, JNK, ERK-1/2) and histological changes. To analyze ERK dependent effects, the ERK inhibitor PD98059 was applicated prior to Argon inhalation. RGC count was analyzed 7 days after injury. Statistics were performed using anova. Argon significantly reduced the R-IRI-affected heat-shock protein expression (p < 0.05). While Argon significantly induced ERK-1/2 expression (p < 0.001), inhibition of ERK-1/2 before Argon inhalation resulted in significantly lower vital RGCs (p < 0.01) and increase in heme-oxygenase-1 (p < 0.05). R-IRI-induced RGC loss was reduced by Argon inhalation (p < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry suggested ERK-1/2 activation in Müller cells. We conclude, that Argon treatment protects R-IRI-induced apoptotic loss of RGC via an ERK-1/2 dependent regulation of heme-oxygenase-1. We proposed the following possible mechanism for Argon-mediated neuroprotection: Argon exerts its protective effects via an induction of an ERK with subsequent suppression of the heat shock response. In conclusion, ischemia and reperfusion injuries and subsequent neuronal apoptosis are attenuated. These novel findings may open up new opportunities for Argon as a therapeutic option, especially since Argon is not toxic. PMID:25876941

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells elevate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells of asthmatic patients via heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-guo; Zhuan-sun, Yong-xun; Wen, Bing; Wu, Hao; Huang, Feng-ting; Ghimire, Hridaya bibhu; Ran, Pi-xin

    2013-09-01

    Up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a new target in the treatment of asthma. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can up-regulate CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in vitro, meanwhile, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays an important role in the development and maintenance of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. However the mechanism has not yet been adequately understood. Hence, we wondered what effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 made on regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from asthmatic patients and healthy controls were co-cultured with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which were pretreated with Hemin (the revulsive of Heme Oxygenase-1), Protoporphyrin Ⅸ zinc (the inhibitor of Heme Oxygenase-1) and saline. The expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in MSCs was enhanced by Hemin and inhibited by Protoporphyrin  zinc in vitro. Overexpression of Heme Oxygenase-1 elevated the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells, meanwhile, inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 decreased the proportion of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells in CD4+ T cells as compared with mesenchymal stem cells alone. Taken together, these data demonstrated that Heme Oxygenase-1 contributed to the up-regulation of CD4+CD25+CD127low/- regulatory T cells mediated by mesenchymal stem cells in asthma.  PMID:23893806

  2. Combined inhibition of Hsp90 and heme oxygenase-1 induces apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Ignazio; Parenti, Rosalba; Zappalà, Agata; Vanella, Luca; Tibullo, Daniele; Pepe, Francesco; Onni, Toniangelo; Li Volti, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones involved in post-translational folding, stability, activation and maturation of many proteins that are essential mediators of signal transduction and cell cycle progression. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has recently emerged as an attractive therapeutic target in cancer treatment since it may act as a key regulator of various oncogene products and cell-signaling molecules. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1; also known as Hsp32) is an inducible enzyme participating in heme degradation and involved in oxidative stress resistance. Recent studies indicate that HO-1 activation may play a role in tumor development and progression. In the present study we investigated the chemotherapic effects of combining an Hsp90 inhibitor (NMS E973) and an HO-1 inhibitor (SnMP) on A375 melanoma cells. NMS E973 treatment was able to reduce cell viability and induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress (i.e. Ire1α, ERO1, PDI, BIP and CHOP). Interestingly, no significant effect was observed in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Finally, NMS E973 treatment resulted in a significant HO-1 overexpression, which in turn serves as a possible chemoresistance molecular mechanism. Interestingly, the combination of NMS E973 and SnMP produced an increase of ROS and reduced cell viability compared to NMS E973 treatment alone. The inhibitors combination exhibited higher ER stress, apoptosis as evidenced by bifunctional apoptosis regulator (BFAR) mRNA expression and lower phosphorylation of Akt when compared to NMS E973 alone. In conclusion, these data suggest that HO-1 inhibition potentiates NMS E973 toxicity and may be exploited as a strategy for melanoma treatment. PMID:26493719

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 induction attenuates imiquimod-induced psoriasiform inflammation by negative regulation of Stat3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Xie, Sijing; Su, Zhonglan; Song, Shiyu; Xu, Hui; Chen, Gang; Cao, Wangsen; Yin, Shasha; Gao, Qian; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress-inducible protein with a potential anti-inflammatory effect, plays an important role in skin injury and wound healing. However, the function of HO-1 in cutaneous inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis, remains unknown. The abnormal activation of Stat3, a known transcription factor that induces inflammation and regulates cell differentiation, is directly involved in the pathogenesis and development of psoriasis. Hence, targeting Stat3 is potentially beneficial in the treatment of psoriasis. In this study, HO-1 activation significantly alleviated the disease-related pathogenesis abnormality. To determine the mechanism by which HO-1 exerts immune protection on Th17-related cytokines, IL6/IL22-induced Stat3 activation was significantly suppressed, accompanied by decreased cell proliferation and reversed abnormal cell proliferation. Importantly, HO-1-induced Stat3 suppression was mediated through the activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Overall, our study provides direct evidence indicating that HO-1 might be a useful therapeutic target for psoriasis. SHP-1-mediated suppression of Stat3 activation after HO-1 activation is a unique molecular mechanism for the regulation of Stat3 activation. PMID:26893174

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 dependant pathway contributes to protection by tetramethylpyrazine against chronic hypoxic injury on medulla oblongata in rats.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Hou, Xuefei; Chen, Li; Zhou, Hua; Gong, Yanju; Dai, Liqun; Zheng, Yu

    2016-02-15

    Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), one of the active ingredients of the Chinese herb Lingusticum Wallichii (Chuan Xiong) has been proved to protect the medulla oblongata from chronic hypoxia injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the protective effects of TMP are associated with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) dependant pathway in adult rats. The morphological changes of neurons in the hypoglossal nucleus (12N), the nucleus ambiguus (Amb), the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the pre-Bötzinger complex (pre-BötC) were investigated by Nissl staining; the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured to evaluate the anti-oxidant effect; some apoptosis parameters, Bax mRNA and Bcl-2 mRNA, were tested; and the double immunochemistry staining of active caspase-3/NeuN was performed. Meanwhile, the HO-1 protein expression and heme oxygenase (HO) activity were examined. Tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP), a potent inhibitor of HO, was used to further confirm the effect of HO-1. We found that TMP ameliorated the neuron loss in 12N, Amb and NTS, the decrease in SOD activity and the increase in MDA content, the decrease in Bcl-2 mRNA of medulla oblongata (P<0.05), and the increase in percentage of apoptotic neurons in Amb (P<0.05) induced by chronic hypoxia. Co-administration with SnPP abolished the beneficial effects above of TMP to some extent (P<0.05). Moreover, TMP significantly increased HO activity and HO-1 protein expression, which was most likely enhanced in the neurons (P<0.05), and co-administration of SnPP reduced these up-regulated effects (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that HO-1 dependant pathway may be involved in the protective action of TMP against chronic hypoxic damage on medulla oblongata in the rats. PMID:26810525

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 protects against Alzheimer's amyloid-β1-42-induced toxicity via carbon monoxide production

    PubMed Central

    Hettiarachchi, N; Dallas, M; Al-Owais, M; Griffiths, H; Hooper, N; Scragg, J; Boyle, J; Peers, C

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible enzyme up-regulated in Alzheimer's disease, catabolises heme to biliverdin, Fe2+ and carbon monoxide (CO). CO can protect neurones from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting Kv2.1 channels, which mediates cellular K+ efflux as an early step in the apoptotic cascade. Since apoptosis contributes to the neuronal loss associated with amyloid β peptide (Aβ) toxicity in AD, we investigated the protective effects of HO-1 and CO against Aβ1-42 toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells, employing cells stably transfected with empty vector or expressing the cellular prion protein, PrPc, and rat primary hippocampal neurons. Aβ1-42 (containing protofibrils) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability, attributable at least in part to induction of apoptosis, with the PrPc-expressing cells showing greater susceptibility to Aβ1-42 toxicity. Pharmacological induction or genetic over-expression of HO-1 significantly ameliorated the effects of Aβ1-42. The CO-donor CORM-2 protected cells against Aβ1-42 toxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Electrophysiological studies revealed no differences in the outward current pre- and post-Aβ1-42 treatment suggesting that K+ channel activity is unaffected in these cells. Instead, Aβ toxicity was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, and by the CaMKKII inhibitor, STO-609. Aβ also activated the downstream kinase, AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). CO prevented this activation of AMPK. Our findings indicate that HO-1 protects against Aβ toxicity via production of CO. Protection does not arise from inhibition of apoptosis-associated K+ efflux, but rather by inhibition of AMPK activation, which has been recently implicated in the toxic effects of Aβ. These data provide a novel, beneficial effect of CO which adds to its growing potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:25501830

  6. Proinflammatory cytokines promote glial heme oxygenase-1 expression and mitochondrial iron deposition: implications for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mehindate, K; Sahlas, D J; Frankel, D; Mawal, Y; Liberman, A; Corcos, J; Dion, S; Schipper, H M

    2001-06-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines, pathological iron deposition, and oxidative stress have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). HO-1 mRNA levels and mitochondrial uptake of [(55)Fe]Cl(3)-derived iron were measured in rat astroglial cultures exposed to interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) or tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alone or in combination with the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitors, tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) or dexamthasone (DEX), or interferon beta1b (INF-beta). HO-1 expression in astrocytes was evaluated by immunohistochemical staining of spinal cord tissue derived from MS and control subjects. IL-1beta or TNF-alpha promoted sequestration of non-transferrin-derived (55)Fe by astroglial mitochondria. HO-1 inhibitors, mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MTP) blockers and antioxidants significantly attenuated cytokine-related mitochondrial iron sequestration in these cells. IFN-beta decreased HO-1 expression and mitochondrial iron sequestration in IL-1beta- and TNF-alpha-challenged astroglia. The percentage of astrocytes coexpressing HO-1 in affected spinal cord from MS patients (57.3% +/- 12.8%) was significantly greater (p < 0.05) than in normal spinal cord derived from controls subjects (15.4% +/- 8.4%). HO-1 is over-expressed in MS spinal cord astroglia and may promote mitochondrial iron deposition in MS plaques. In MS, IFN-beta may attenuate glial HO-1 gene induction and aberrant mitochondrial iron deposition accruing from exposure to proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:11389189

  7. Isoflurane post-treatment improves pulmonary vascular permeability via upregulation of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiang; Hu, Rong; Sun, Yu; Li, Qifang; Jiang, Hong

    2013-09-01

    Isoflurane (ISO) has been shown to attenuate acute lung injury (ALI). Induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression provide cytoprotection in lung and vascular injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of post-treatment with isoflurane on lung vascular permeability and the role of HO-1 in an ALI rat model induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of four groups: sham group, sham rats post-treated with vehicle (Sham); CLP group, CLP rats post-treated with vehicle (CLP); ISO group, CLP rats post-treated with isoflurane (ISO); and ZnPP group, CLP rats injected with zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, 1 hour before the operation, and post-treated with isoflurane (ZnPP). Isoflurane (1.4%) was administered 2 hour after CLP. At 24 hour after CLP, the extent of ALI was evaluated by lung wet/dry ratio, Evans blue dye (EBD) extravasation, lung permeability index (LPI), as well as histological and immunohistochemical examinations. We also determined pulmonary iNOS and HO-1 expression. Compared with the CLP group, the isoflurane post-treatment group showed improved pulmonary microvascular permeability as detected by EBD extravasation, LPI, as well as histological and immunohistochemical examinations. Furthermore, isoflurane decreased iNOS and increased HO-1 expression in lung tissue. Pretreatment with ZnPP prevented the protective effects of isoflurane in rats. These findings indicate that the protective role of isoflurane post-conditioning against CLP-induced lung injury may be associated with its role in upregulating HO-1 in ALI. PMID:23919323

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 induction modulates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction through upregulation of ecSOD.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansoor; Zhao, Xiangmin; Kelly, Melissa R; Kandhi, Sharath; Perez, Oscar; Abraham, Nader G; Wolin, Michael S

    2009-10-01

    Endothelium-denuded bovine pulmonary arteries (BPA) contract to hypoxia through a mechanism potentially involving removing a superoxide-derived hydrogen peroxide-mediated relaxation. BPA organ cultured for 24 h with 0.1 mM cobalt chloride (CoCl(2)) to increase the expression and activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is accompanied by a decrease in 5 microM lucigenin-detectable superoxide and an increase in horseradish peroxidase-luminol detectable peroxide levels. Force development to KCl in BPA was not affected by increases in HO-1, but the hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) response was decreased. Organ culture with a HO-1 inhibitor (10 microM chromium mesoporphyrin) reversed the effects of HO-1 on HPV and peroxide. Treatment of HO-1-induced BPA with extracellular catalase resulted in reversal of the attenuation of HPV without affecting the force development to KCl. Increasing intracellular peroxide scavenging with 0.1 mM ebselen increased force development to KCl and partially reversed the decrease in HPV seen on induction of HO-1. HO-1 induction increases extracellular (ec) superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression without changing Cu,Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD levels. HO-1-induced BPA rings treated with the copper chelator 10 mM diethyldithiocarbamate to inactivate ecSOD and Cu,Zn-SOD showed increased superoxide and decreased peroxide to levels equal to non-HO-1-induced rings, whereas the addition of SOD to freshly isolated BPA rings attenuated HPV similar to HO-1 induction with CoCl(2). Therefore, HO-1 induction in BPA increases ecSOD expression associated with enhanced generation of peroxide in amounts that may not be adequately removed during hypoxia, leading to an attenuation of HPV. PMID:19666846

  9. Galantamine and carbon monoxide protect brain microvascular endothelial cells by heme oxygenase-1 induction

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Atsunori; Kaczorowski, David J.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Lei Jing; Faleo, Gaetano; Deguchi, Kentaro; McCurry, Kenneth R.; Billiar, Timothy R.; Kanno, Shinichi

    2008-03-14

    Galantamine, a reversible inhibitor of acetylcholine esterase (AChE), is a novel drug treatment for mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interestingly, it has been suggested that galantamine treatment is associated with more clinical benefit in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease compared to other AChE inhibitors. We hypothesized that the protective effects of galantamine would involve induction of the protective gene, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), in addition to enhancement of the cholinergic system. Brain microvascular endothelial cells (mvECs) were isolated from spontaneous hypertensive rats. Galantamine significantly reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cell death of mvECs in association with HO-1 induction. These protective effects were completely reversed by nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) inhibition or HO inhibition. Furthermore, galantamine failed to induce HO-1 in mvECs which lack inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), supplementation of a nitric oxide (NO) donor or iNOS gene transfection on iNOS-deficient mvECs resulted in HO-1 induction with galantamine. These data suggest that the protective effects of galantamine require NF-{kappa}B activation and iNOS expression, in addition to HO-1. Likewise, carbon monoxide (CO), one of the byproducts of HO, up-regulated HO-1 and protected mvECs from oxidative stress in a similar manner. Our data demonstrate that galantamine mediates cytoprotective effects on mvECs through induction HO-1. This pharmacological action of galantamine may, at least in part, account for the superior clinical efficacy of galantamine in vascular dementia and Alzheimer disease.

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Dysregulates Macrophage Polarization and the Immune Response to Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; de Sablet, Thibaut; Delgado, Alberto G.; Bravo, Luis E.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori incites a futile inflammatory response, which is the key feature of its immunopathogenesis. This leads to the ability of this bacterial pathogen to survive in the stomach and cause peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Myeloid cells recruited to the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection have been directly implicated in the modulation of host defense against the bacterium and gastric inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an inducible enzyme that exhibits anti-inflammatory functions. Our aim was to analyze the induction and role of HO-1 in macrophages during H. pylori infection. We now show that phosphorylation of the H. pylori virulence factor cytotoxin associated gene A (CagA) in macrophages results in expression of hmox-1, the gene encoding HO-1, through p38/nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 signaling. Blocking phagocytosis prevented CagA phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. The expression of HO-1 was also increased in gastric mononuclear cells of human patients and macrophages of mice infected with cagA+ H. pylori strains. Genetic ablation of hmox-1 in H. pylori-infected mice increased histologic gastritis, which was associated with enhanced M1/Th1/Th17 responses, decreased Mreg response, and reduced H. pylori colonization. Gastric macrophages of H. pylori-infected mice and macrophages infected in vitro with this bacterium showed an M1/Mreg mixed polarization type; deletion of hmox-1 or inhibition of HO-1 in macrophages caused an increased M1 and a decreased of Mreg phenotype. These data highlight a mechanism by which H. pylori impairs the immune response and favors its own survival via activation of macrophage HO-1. PMID:25108023

  11. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 Expression Underlies Distinct Disease Profiles in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Bruno B; Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Amaral, Eduardo P; Riteau, Nicolas; Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Tosh, Kevin W; Maier, Nolan; Conceição, Elisabete L; Kubler, Andre; Sridhar, Rathinam; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Jawahar, Mohideen S; Barbosa, Theolis; Manganiello, Vincent C; Moss, Joel; Fontana, Joseph R; Marciano, Beatriz E; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Jackson, Sharon H; Moayeri, Mahtab; Leppla, Stephen; Sereti, Irini; Barber, Daniel L; Nutman, Thomas B; Babu, Subash; Sher, Alan

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is characterized by oxidative stress and lung tissue destruction by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The interplay between these distinct pathological processes and the implications for TB diagnosis and disease staging are poorly understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) levels were previously shown to distinguish active from latent TB, as well as successfully treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. MMP-1 expression is also associated with active TB. In this study, we measured plasma levels of these two important biomarkers in distinct TB cohorts from India and Brazil. Patients with active TB expressed either very high levels of HO-1 and low levels of MMP-1 or the converse. Moreover, TB patients with either high HO-1 or MMP-1 levels displayed distinct clinical presentations, as well as plasma inflammatory marker profiles. In contrast, in an exploratory North American study, inversely correlated expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 was not observed in patients with other nontuberculous lung diseases. To assess possible regulatory interactions in the biosynthesis of these two enzymes at the cellular level, we studied the expression of HO-1 and MMP-1 in M. tuberculosis-infected human and murine macrophages. We found that infection of macrophages with live virulent M. tuberculosis is required for robust induction of high levels of HO-1 but not MMP-1. In addition, we observed that CO, a product of M. tuberculosis-induced HO-1 activity, inhibits MMP-1 expression by suppressing c-Jun/AP-1 activation. These findings reveal a mechanistic link between oxidative stress and tissue remodeling that may find applicability in the clinical staging of TB patients. PMID:26268658

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Endothelial Cells from the Toxicity of Air Pollutant Chemicals

    PubMed Central

    Dittmar, Michael; Lulla, Aaron; Araujo, Jesus A.

    2015-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are a major component of diesel emissions, responsible for a large portion of their toxicity. In this study, we examined the toxic effects of DEP on endothelial cells and the role of DEP-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC) were treated with an organic extract of DEP from an automobile engine (A-DEP) or a forklift engine (F-DEP) for 1 and 4 hours. ROS generation, cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase leakage, expression of HO-1, inflammatory genes, cell adhesion molecules and UPR gene were assessed. HO-1 expression and/or activity were inhibited by siRNA or Tin protoporphyrin (Sn PPIX) and enhanced by an expression plasmid or Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPPIX). Exposure to 25 μg/ml of A-DEP and F-DEP significantly induced ROS production, cellular toxicity and greater levels of inflammatory and cellular adhesion molecules but in a different degree. Inhibition of HO-1 enzymatic activity with SnPPIX and silencing of the HO-1 gene by siRNA enhanced DEP-induced ROS production, further decreased cell viability and increased expression of inflammatory and cell adhesion molecules. On the other hand, overexpression of the HO-1 gene by a pcDNA 3.1D/V5-HO-1 plasmid significantly mitigated ROS production, increased cell survival and decreased the expression of inflammatory genes. HO-1 expression protected HMEC from DEP-induced prooxidative and proinflammatory effects. Modulation of HO-1 expression could potentially serve as a therapeutic target in an attempt to inhibit the cardiovascular effects of ambient PM. PMID:25620054

  13. Identification of heme oxygenase-1–specific regulatory CD8+ T cells in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Sørensen, Rikke Bæk; Brimnes, Marie K.; Svane, Inge Marie; Becker, Jürgen C.; thor Straten, Per

    2009-01-01

    Treg deficiencies are associated with autoimmunity. Conversely, CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs accumulate in the tumor microenvironment and are associated with prevention of antitumor immunity and anticancer immunotherapy. Recently, CD4+ Tregs have been much studied, but little is known about CD8+ Tregs and the antigens they recognize. Here, we describe what we believe to be the first natural target for CD8+ Tregs. Naturally occurring HLA-A2–restricted CD8+ T cells specific for the antiinflammatory molecule heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were able to suppress cellular immune responses with outstanding efficacy. HO-1–specific CD8+ T cells were detected ex vivo and in situ among T cells from cancer patients. HO-1–specific T cells isolated from the peripheral blood of cancer patients inhibited cytokine release, proliferation, and cytotoxicity of other immune cells. Notably, the inhibitory effect of HO-1–specific T cells was far more pronounced than that of conventional CD4+CD25+CD127– Tregs. The inhibitory activity of HO-1–specific T cells seemed at least partly to be mediated by soluble factors. Our data link the cellular stress response to the regulation of adaptive immunity, expand the role of HO-1 in T cell–mediated immunoregulation, and establish a role for peptide-specific CD8+ T cells in regulating cellular immune responses. Identification of potent antigen-specific CD8+ Tregs may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions in both autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:19662679

  14. Protection from ischemic heart injury by a vigilant heme oxygenase-1 plasmid system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao Liang; Tang, Yi; Zhang, Y Clare; Qian, Keping; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2004-04-01

    Although human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) could provide a useful approach for cellular protection in the ischemic heart, constitutive overexpression of hHO-1 may lead to unwanted side effects. To avoid this, we designed a hypoxia-regulated hHO-1 gene therapy system that can be switched on and off. This vigilant plasmid system is composed of myosin light chain-2v promoter and a gene switch that is based on an oxygen-dependent degradation domain from the hypoxia inducible factor-1-alpha. The vector can sense ischemia and switch on the hHO-1 gene system, specifically in the heart. In an in vivo experiment, the vigilant hHO-1 plasmid or saline was injected intramyocardially into myocardial infarction mice or sham operation mice. After gene transfer, expression of hHO-1 was only detected in the ischemic heart treated with vigilant hHO-1 plasmids. Masson trichrome staining showed significantly fewer fibrotic areas in vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice compared with saline control (43.0%+/-4.8% versus 62.5%+/-3.3%, P<0.01). The reduction of interstitial fibrosis is accompanied by an increase in myocardial hHO-1 expression in peri-infarct border areas, concomitant with higher Bcl-2 levels and lower Bax, Bak, and caspase 3 levels in the ischemic myocardium compared with saline control. By use of a cardiac catheter, heart from vigilant hHO-1 plasmids-treated mice showed improved recovery of contractile and diastolic performance after myocardial infarction compared with saline control. This study documents the beneficial regulation and therapeutic potential of vigilant plasmid-mediated hHO-1 gene transfer. This novel gene transfer strategy can provide cardiac-specific protection from future repeated bouts of ischemic injury. PMID:14981066

  15. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits postmyocardial infarct remodeling and restores ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Pachori, Alok S; Ward, Christopher A; Davis, J Paul; Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Kong, Deling; Zhang, Lunan; Murduck, Jared; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Perrella, Mark A; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J; Melo, Luis G

    2006-02-01

    We reported previously that predelivery of the anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) to the heart by adeno associated virus (AAV) markedly reduces injury after acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on postinfarction recovery has not been investigated. In the current study, we assessed the effect of HO-1 gene delivery on post-MI left ventricle (LV) remodeling and function using echocardiographic imaging and histomorphometric approaches. Two groups of Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 4 x 10(11) particles of AAV-LacZ (control) or AAV-hHO-1 in the LV wall. Eight wk after gene transfer, the animals were subjected to 30 min of ischemia by ligation of left anterior descending artery (LAD) followed by reperfusion. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained in a blinded fashion prior and at 1.5 and 3 months after I/R. Ejection fraction (EF) was reduced by 13% and 40% in the HO-1 and LacZ groups, respectively at 1.5 months after MI. Three months after MI, EF recovered fully in the HO-1, but only partially in the LacZ-treated animals. Post-MI LV dimensions were markedly increased and the anterior wall was markedly thinned in the LacZ-treated animals compared with the HO-1-treated animals. Significant myocardial scarring and fibrosis were observed in the LacZ-group in association with elevated levels of interstitial collagen I and III and MMP-2 activity. Post-MI myofibroblast accumulation was reduced in the HO-1-treated animals, and retroviral overexpression of HO-1 reduced proliferation of isolated cardiac fibroblasts. Our data indicate that rAAV-HO-1 gene transfer markedly reduces fibrosis and ventricular remodeling and restores LV function and chamber dimensions after myocardial infarction. PMID:16449792

  16. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 protects against nutritional fibrosing steatohepatitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an antioxidant defense enzyme, has been shown to protect against oxidant-induced liver injury. However, its role on liver fibrosis remains unclear. This study aims to elucidate the effect and the mechanism of HO-1 in nutritional fibrosing steatohepatitis in mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed with a methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet for eight weeks to induce hepatic fibrosis. HO-1 chemical inducer (hemin), HO-1 chemical inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP-IX) and/or adenovirus carrying HO-1 gene (Ad-HO-1) were administered to mice, respectively. Liver injury was assessed by serum ALT, AST levels and histological examination; hepatic lipid peroxides levels were determined; the expression levels of several fibrogenic related genes were assayed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot. Results MCD feeding mice showed progressive hepatic injury including hepatic steatosis, inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis. Induction of HO-1 by hemin or Ad-HO-1 significantly attenuated the severity of liver injury. This effect was associated with the up-regulation of HO-1, reduction of hepatic lipid peroxides levels, down-regulation of inflammatory factors tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6 and suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 as well as the pro-fibrotic genes alpha-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-β1, matrix metallopeptidase-2 and matrix metallopeptidase-9. A contrary effect was observed in mice treated with ZnPP-IX. Conclusions The present study provided the evidence for the protective role of HO-1 in ameliorating MCD diet-induced fibrosing steatohepatitis. Modulation of HO-1 expression might serve as a therapeutic approach for fibrotic steatohepatitis. PMID:21314960

  17. Ammonia-induced oxidative damage in neurons is prevented by resveratrol and lipoic acid with participation of heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Flores, Marianne Pires; Leite, Marina Concli; Quincozes-Santos, André; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia is a metabolite that, at high concentrations, is implicated in neurological disorders, such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which is associated with acute or chronic liver failure. Astrocytes are considered the primary target of ammonia toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) because glutamine synthetase (GS), responsible for ammonia metabolism in CNS, is an astrocytic enzyme. Thus, neuronal dysfunction has been associated as secondary to astrocytic impairment. However, we demonstrated that ammonia can induce direct effects on neuronal cells. The cell viability was decreased by ammonia in SH-SY5Y cells and cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, ammonia induced increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased GSH intracellular content, the main antioxidant in CNS. As ammonia neurotoxicity is strongly associated with oxidative stress, we also investigated the potential neuroprotective roles of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RSV) and lipoic acid (LA), against ammonia toxicity in cerebellar granule neurons. RSV and LA were able to prevent the oxidative damage induced by ammonia, maintaining the levels of ROS production and GSH close to basal values. Both antioxidants also decreased ROS production and increased GSH content under basal conditions (in the absence of ammonia). Moreover, we showed that heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), a protein associated with protection against stress conditions, is involved in the beneficial effects of RSV and LA in cerebellar granule neurons. Thus, this study reinforces the neuroprotective effects of RSV and LA. Although more studies in vivo are required, RSV and LA could represent interesting therapeutic strategies for the management of HE. PMID:26003724

  18. Induction of heme oxygenase 1 by arsenite inhibits cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xi; Pi Jingbo; Liu Wenlan; Hudson, Laurie G.; Liu Kejian; Feng Changjian

    2009-04-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an oxidative stress responsive gene upregulated by various physiological and exogenous stimuli. Arsenite, as an oxidative stressor, is a potent inducer of HO-1 in human and rodent cells. In this study, we investigated the mechanistic role of arsenite-induced HO-1 in modulating tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) induced monocyte adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Arsenite pretreatment, which upregulated HO-1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 protein expression by 50% and 40%, respectively. Importantly, knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abolished the arsenite-induced inhibitory effects. These results indicate that induction of HO-1 by arsenite inhibits the cytokine-induced monocyte adhesion to HUVEC by suppressing adhesion molecule expression. These findings established an important mechanistic link between the functional monocyte adhesion properties of HUVEC and the induction of HO-1 by arsenite.

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 inhibits phosphorylation of the Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA in gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Verriere, Thomas; de Sablet, Thibaut; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The cytotoxin-associated gene A protein (CagA) plays a pivotal role in the etiology of Helicobacter (H.) pylori-associated gastric diseases. CagA is injected into the cytoplasm of host cells by a type IV secretion system, and is phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the host enzyme c-Src. We previously reported that the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibits IL-8 secretion by H. pylori-infected cells. However, the cellular mechanism by which HO-1 regulates the innate immune function of infected cells remains unknown. We now show that nitric oxide and hemin, two inducers of HO-1, decrease the level of phosphorylated CagA (p-CagA) in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells and this is blocked by either pharmacologic inhibition of HO-1 or siRNA knockdown of hmox-1. Moreover, forced expression of HO-1 by transfection of a plasmid expressing hmox-1 also results in a strong attenuation of CagA phosphorylation. This occurs through the inhibition of H. pylori-induced c-Src phosphorylation/activation by HO-1. Consequently, H. pylori-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements and activation of the pro-inflammatory response mediated by p-CagA are inhibited in HO-1-expressing cells. These data highlight a mechanism by which the innate immune response of the host can restrict the pathogenicity of H. pylori by attenuating CagA phosphorylation in gastric epithelial cells. PMID:23051580

  20. eckol enhances heme oxygenase-1 expression through activation of Nrf2/JNK pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Jun, Young-Jin; Lee, Minsup; Shin, Taisun; Yoon, Nayoung; Kim, Ji-Hoe; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2014-01-01

    Eckol isolated from Ecklonia stolonifera was previously reported to exhibit cytoprotective activity with its intrinsic antioxidant activity in in vitro studies. In this study, we characterized the mechanism underlying the eckol-mediated the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Eckol suppressed the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and increased glutathione level in HepG2 cells. Eckol treatment enhanced the expression of HO-1 at the both level of protein and mRNA in HepG2 cells. Enhanced expression of HO-1 by eckol was presumed to be the activation of the nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) demonstrated by its nuclear translocation and increased transcriptional activity. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs) and PI3K/Akt contributed to Nrf2-mediated HO-1 expression. These results demonstrate that the eckol-mediated expression of HO-1 in HepG2 cells is regulated by Nrf2 activation via JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways, suggesting that eckol may be used as a natural antioxidant and cytoprotective agent. PMID:25268719

  1. MicroRNA-218 promotes high glucose-induced apoptosis in podocytes by targeting heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haibo; Wang, Qingjun; Li, Sutong

    2016-03-18

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a mediatory role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we found that miR-218 was upregulated in high glucose (HG) treated podocytes, which are essential components of the glomerular filtration barrier and a major prognostic determinant in diabetic nephropathy. Additionally, up-regulation of miR-218 was accompanied by an increased rate of podocyte death and down-regulation in the level of nephrin, a key marker of podocytes. However, inhibition of miR-218 exerted the opposite effect. In addition, the dual-luciferase reporter assay showed that miR-218 directly targeted the 3'-untranslated region of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and further study confirmed an increase of HO-1 in HG-treated podocytes transfected with anti-miR-218. Knockdown of HO-1 blocked the anti-apoptotic effect of anti-miR-218. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-218 was associated with decreased expression of the known pro-apoptotic molecule p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) activation. Following preconditioning with SB203580, an inhibitor of p38-MAPK, the stimulatory effect of HG on podocyte apoptosis was strikingly ameliorated. These findings suggested that miR-218 accelerated HG-induced podocyte apoptosis through directly down-regulating HO-1 and facilitating p38-MAPK activation. PMID:26876575

  2. Gold nanoparticles induce heme oxygenase-1 expression through Nrf2 activation and Bach1 export in human vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Tsung-Hsuan; Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Tsou, Chih-Jen; Wu, Wen-Bin

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that increased levels and activity of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein ameliorate tissue injuries. In the present study, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of action of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on HO-1 protein expression in human vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The AuNPs induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The induction was reduced by the thiol-containing antioxidants, including N-acetylcysteine and glutathione, but not by the non-thiol-containing antioxidants and inhibitors that block the enzymes for intracellular reactive oxygen species generation. The AuNPs enhanced Nrf2 protein levels but did not affect Nrf2 mRNA expression. In response to the AuNP treatment, the cytosolic Nrf2 translocated to the nucleus, and, concomitantly, Bach1 exited the nucleus and its tyrosine phosphorylation increased. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that the translocated Nrf2 bound to the antioxidant-response element located in the E2 enhancer region of the HO-1 gene promoter and acted as a transcription factor. Although N-acetylcysteine inhibited the AuNP-induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, the AuNPs did not promote intracellular reactive oxygen species production or endoplasmic reticulum stress in the ECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 expression by RNA interference significantly inhibited AuNP-induced HO-1 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. In summary, AuNPs enhance the levels and nuclear translocation of the Nrf2 protein and Bach1 export/tyrosine phosphorylation, leading to Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 E2 enhancer promoter region to drive HO-1 expression in ECs. This study, together with our parallel findings, demonstrates that AuNPs can act as an HO-1 inducer, which may partially contribute to their anti-inflammatory bioactivity in human vascular ECs. PMID:26445536

  3. Structural characterization of human heme oxygenase-1 in complex with azole-based inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Roman, Gheorghe; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2010-03-01

    The development of inhibitors specific for heme oxygenases (HO) aims to provide powerful tools in understanding the HO system. Based on the lead structure (2S, 4S)-2-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-2-[(1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl]-4-[((4-aminophenyl)thio)methyl]-1,3-dioxolane (azalanstat, QC-1) we have synthesized structural modifications to develop novel and selective HO inhibitors. The structural study of human HO-1 (hHO-1) in complex with a select group of the inhibitors was initiated using X-ray crystallographic techniques. Comparison of the structures of four such compounds each in complex with hHO-1 revealed a common binding mode, despite having different structural fragments. The compounds bind to the distal side of heme through an azole "anchor" which coordinates with the heme iron. An expansion of the distal pocket, mainly due to distal helix flexibility, allows accommodation of the compounds without displacing heme or the critical Asp140 residue. Rather, binding displaces a catalytically critical water molecule and disrupts an ordered hydrogen-bond network involving Asp140. The presence of a triazole "anchor" may provide further stability via a hydrogen bond with the protein. A hydrophobic pocket acts to stabilize the region occupied by the phenyl or adamantanyl moieties of these compounds. Further, a secondary hydrophobic pocket is formed via "induced fit" to accommodate bulky substituents at the 4-position of the dioxolane ring. PMID:19917515

  4. Anti-inflammatory effect of transduced PEP-1-heme oxygenase-1 in Raw 264.7 cells and a mouse edema model

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Soon Won; Sohn, Eun Jeong; Kim, Dae Won; Jeong, Hoon Jae; Kim, Mi Jin; Ahn, Eun Hee; Kim, Young Nam; Dutta, Suman; Kim, Duk-Soo; Park, Jinseu; Eum, Won Sik; Hwang, Hyun Sook; Choi, Soo Young

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant PEP-1 heme oxygenase-1 expression vector was constructed and overexpressed. {yields} We investigated transduction efficiency of PEP-1-HO-1 protein in Raw 264.7 cells. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 was efficiently transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in a dose and time dependent manner. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 exerted anti-inflammatory activity in Raw 264.7 cells and in a mice edema model. {yields} PEP-1-HO-1 could be used as a therapeutic drug against inflammatory diseases. -- Abstract: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catalyzes the degradation of free heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron (Fe{sup 2+}), is up-regulated by several cellular stress and cell injuries, including inflammation, ischemia and hypoxia. In this study, we examined whether fusion of HO-1 with PEP-1, a protein transduction domain that is able to deliver exogenous molecules to living cells or tissues, would facilitate HO-1 delivery to target cells and tissues, and thereby effectively exert a therapeutically useful response against inflammation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were transduced into Raw 264.7 cells in time- and dose-dependent manners, and were stably maintained in the cells for about 60 h. In addition, fluorescence analysis revealed that only PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins were significantly transduced into the cytoplasm of cells, while HO-1 proteins failed to be transduced. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated Raw 264.7 cells and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced mouse edema model, transduced PEP-1-HO-1 fusion proteins effectively inhibited the overexpression of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. Also, histological analysis demonstrated that PEP-1-HO-1 remarkably suppressed ear edema. The results suggest that the PEP-1-HO-1 fusion protein can be used as a therapeutic molecule against reactive oxygen species-related inflammatory diseases.

  5. Postischemic cardiac recovery in heme oxygenase-1 transgenic ischemic/reperfused mouse myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, Bela; Varga, Balazs; Czompa, Attila; Bak, Istvan; Lekli, Istvan; Gesztelyi, Rudolf; Zsuga, Judit; Kemeny-Beke, Adam; Antal, Miklos; Szendrei, Levente; Tosaki, Arpad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) transgenic mice (Tg) were created using a rat HO-1 genomic transgene. Transgene expression was detected by RT-PCR and Western blots in the left ventricle (LV), right ventricle (RV) and septum (S) in mouse hearts, and its function was demonstrated by the elevated HO enzyme activity. Tg and non-transgenic (NTg) mouse hearts were isolated and subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Significant post-ischemic recovery in coronary flow (CF), aortic flow (AF), aortic pressure (AOP) and first derivative of AOP (AOPdp/dt) were detected in the HO-1 Tg group compared to the NTg values. In HO-1 Tg hearts treated with 50 μmol/kg of tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), an HO enzyme inhibitor, abolished the post-ischemic cardiac recovery. HO-1 related carbon monoxide (CO) production was detected in NTg, HO-1 Tg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups, and a substantial increase in CO production was observed in the HO-1 Tg hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. Moreover, in ischemia/reperfusion-induced tissue Na+ and Ca2+ gains were reduced in HO-1 Tg group in comparison with the NTg and HO-1 Tg + SnPPIX treated groups; furthermore K+ loss was reduced in the HO-1 Tg group. The infarct size was markedly reduced from its NTg control value of 37 ± 4% to 20 ± 6% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and was increased to 47 ± 5% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 knockout (KO) hearts. Parallel to the infarct size reduction, the incidence of total and sustained ventricular fibrillation were also reduced from their NTg control values of 92% and 83% to 25% (P < 0.05) and 8% (P < 0.05) in the HO-1 Tg group, and were increased to 100% and 100% in HO-1 KO−/− hearts. Immunohistochemical staining of HO-1 was intensified in HO-1 Tg compared to the NTg myocardium. Thus, the HO-1 Tg mouse model suggests a valuable therapeutic approach in the treatment of ischemic myocardium. PMID:20716121

  6. Role of the Nrf2-heme oxygenase-1 pathway in silver nanoparticle-mediated cytotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Su Jin; Ryoo, In-geun; Lee, Young Joon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (nano-Ag) have been widely used in various commercial products including textiles, electronic appliances and biomedical products. However, there remains insufficient information on the potential risk of nano-Ag to human health and environment. In the current study, we have investigated the role of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) transcription factor in nano-Ag-induced cytotoxicity. When Nrf2 expression was blocked using interring RNA expression in ovarian carcinoma cell line, nano-Ag treatment showed a substantial decrease in cell viability with concomitant increases in apoptosis and DNA damage compared to the control cells. Target gene analysis revealed that the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was highly elevated by nano-Ag in nonspecific shRNA expressing cells, while Nrf2 knockdown cells (NRF2i) did not increase HO-1 expression. The role of HO-1 in cytoprotection against nano-Ag was reinforced by results using pharmacological inducer of HO-1: cobalt protoporphyrin-mediated HO-1 activation in the NRF2i cells prevented nano-Ag-mediated cell death. Similarly, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of HO-1 in nonspecific control cells exacerbated nano-Ag toxicity. As the upstream signaling mechanism, nano-Ag required the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and p38MAPK signaling cascades for HO-1 induction. The treatment with either PI3K inhibitor or p38MAPK inhibitor suppressed HO-1 induction and intensified nano-Ag-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that Nrf2-dependent HO-1 up-regulation plays a protective role in nano-Ag-induced DNA damage and consequent cell death. In addition, nano-Ag-mediated HO-1 induction is associated with the PI3K and p38MAPK signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Role of Nrf2 signaling in silver nanoparticle toxicity. ► Silver nanoparticle toxicity is increased by Nrf2 blockade. ► Nrf2-dependent HO-1 induction protects cells from silver nanoparticle toxicity. ► PI3K and p38MAPK cascades are

  7. Deletion of Caveolin-1 Protects against Oxidative Lung Injury via Up-Regulation of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yang; Kim, Hong Pyo; Chi, Minli; Ifedigbo, Emeka; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2008-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Hyperoxia causes lung injury in animals and humans, and is an established model of ALI. Caveolin-1, a major constituent of caveolae, regulates numerous biological processes, including cell death and proliferation. Here we demonstrate that caveolin-1–null mice (cav-1−/−) were resistant to hyperoxia-induced death and lung injury. Cav-1−/− mice sustained reduced lung injury after hyperoxia as determined by protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histologic analysis. Furthermore, cav-1−/− fibroblasts and endothelial cells and cav-1 knockdown epithelial cells resisted hyperoxia-induced cell death in vitro. Basal and inducible expression of the stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were markedly elevated in lung tissue or fibroblasts from cav-1−/− mice. Hyperoxia induced the physical interaction between cav-1 and HO-1 in fibroblasts assessed by co-immunoprecipitation studies, which resulted in attenuation of HO activity. Inhibition of HO activity with tin protoporphyrin-IX abolished the survival benefits of cav-1−/− cells and cav-1−/− mice exposed to hyperoxia. The cav-1−/− mice displayed elevated phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p38β expression in lung tissue/cells under basal conditions and during hyperoxia. Treatment with SB202190, an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, decreased hyperoxia-inducible HO-1 expression in wild-type and cav-1−/− fibroblasts. Taken together, our data demonstrated that cav-1 deletion protects against hyperoxia-induced lung injury, involving in part the modulation of the HO-1–cav-1 interaction, and the enhanced induction of HO-1 through a p38 MAPK–mediated pathway. These studies identify caveolin-1 as a novel component involved in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. PMID:18323531

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 10 protects neuron against oxygen–glucose deprivation injury through inducing heme oxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yong-Hua; Yang, Li-Ye; Chen, Wei; Li, Ying-Ke Yuan, Hong-Bin

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • FGF10 attenuates OGD induced injury in cortical neuron. • FGF10 reduces OGD triggered ROS level in cortical neuron. • FGF10 induces HO-1 expression upon OGD stimuli in cortical neuron. • Knockdown of HO-1 impairs the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. - Abstract: Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of structurally related heparin-binding proteins with diverse biological functions. FGFs participate in mitogenesis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, development, differentiation and cell migration. Here, we investigated the potential effect of FGF10, a member of FGFs, on neuron survival in oxygen–glucose deprivation (OGD) model. In primary cultured mouse cortical neurons upon OGD, FGF10 treatment (100 and 1000 ng/ml) attenuated the decrease of cell viability and rescued the LDH release. Tuj-1 immunocytochemistry assay showed that FGF10 promoted neuronal survival. Apoptosis assay with Annexin V + PI by flow cytometry demonstrated that FGF10 treatment reduced apoptotic cell proportion. Moreover, immunoblotting showed that FGF10 alleviated the cleaved caspase-3 upregulation caused by OGD. FGF10 treatment also depressed the OGD-induced increase of caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities. At last, we found FGF10 triggered heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression rather than hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) signaling. Knockdown of HO-1 by siRNA partly abolished the neuroprotection of FGF10 in OGD model. In summary, our observations provide the first evidence for the neuroprotective function of FGF10 against ischemic neuronal injury and suggest that FGF10 may be a promising agent for treatment of ischemic stroke.

  9. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 in renovascular hypertension is associated with inhibition of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Botros, F T; Olszanecki, R; Prieto-Carrasquero, M C; Goodman, A I; Navar, L G; Abraham, N G

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the impact of induction or inhibition of the heme-HO system on renal apoptosis in clipped and non-clipped kidneys from 2K1C hypertensive rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats had a 0.25 mm silver clip placed around the left renal artery. Four groups of rats were studied: sham operated animals, 2K1C control rats, 2K1C rats received weekly injections of CoPP (5 mg/100 g body wt, administered subcutaneously), and 2K1C rats pretreated with SnMP (5 mg/ 100g body wt, administered intraperitoneally three times a week). The animals were sacrificed three weeks after surgery. We measured systolic blood pressure, plasma renin activity, non-clipped and clipped kidney HO-1 and HO-2 protein expression, HO activity, heme content, nitrotyrosine levels, and activation of selected pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. Systolic blood pressure and plasma renin activity were significantly higher in 2K1C rats compared to sham rats. Compared to kidneys from sham animals, clipped kidneys from 2K1C rats showed a significant increase in HO-1 expression with increases in HO activity (26%), heme content (47%) and nitrotyrosine levels (49%), accompanied by an increase in caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity. In contrast, non-clipped kidneys from 2K1C rats showed no differences in HO-1 expression, HO activity, heme content, nitrotyrosine levels and caspase activity compared to sham rats. In clipped kidneys from 2K1C rats, inhibition of HO activity by SnMP augmented caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity and decreased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, while induction of HO-1 with CoPP strongly inhibited the activity of both caspases and increased the induction of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl proteins. These findings demonstrate that the clipped kidneys responded to decreased renal perfusion pressure and increased oxidative stress by activation of the heme-HO system, which exerts antiapoptotic action via mechanisms involving decreased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, and

  10. IRG1 induced by heme oxygenase-1/carbon monoxide inhibits LPS-mediated sepsis and pro-inflammatory cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Jamal Uddin, Md; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Oh Jeong, Sun; Ryter, Stefan W; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2016-01-01

    The immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) protein has crucial functions in embryonic implantation and neurodegeneration. IRG1 promotes endotoxin tolerance by increasing A20 expression in macrophages through reactive oxygen species (ROS). The cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which generates endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), is expressed in the lung during Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) tolerance and cross tolerance. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms and functional links between IRG1 and HO-1 in the innate immune system remain unknown. In the present study, we found that the CO releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2) and chemical inducers of HO-1 increased IRG1 expression in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP) and HO-1 siRNA significantly reduced expression of IRG1 under these conditions. In addition, treatment with CO and HO-1 induction significantly increased A20 expression, which was reversed by ZnPP and HO-1 siRNA. LPS-stimulated TNF-α was significantly decreased, whereas IRG1 and A20 were increased by CORM-2 application and HO-1 induction, which in turn were abrogated by ZnPP. Interestingly, siRNA against IRG1 and A20 reversed the effects of CO and HO-1 on LPS-stimulated TNF-α production. Additionally, CO and HO-1 inducers significantly increased IRG1 and A20 expression and downregulated TNF-α production in a LPS-stimulated sepsis mice model. Furthermore, the effects of CO and HO-1 on TNF-α production were significantly reversed when ZnPP was administered. In conclusion, CO and HO-1 induction regulates IRG1 and A20 expression, leading to inhibition of inflammation in vitro and in an in vivo mice model. PMID:25640654

  11. Ramipril protects the endothelium from high glucose-induced dysfunction through CaMKKβ/AMPK and heme oxygenase-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shiliu; Ge, Xinfa; Wu, Ke; Yang, Huabing; Liu, Yu

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to investigate the effects of ramipril (RPL) on endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes mellitus using cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and a type 2 diabetic animal model. The effect of RPL on vasodilatory function in fat-fed, streptozotocin-treated rats was assessed. RPL treatment of 8 weeks alleviated insulin resistance and inhibited the decrease in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in diabetic rats. RPL treatment also reduced serum advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration and rat aorta reactive oxygen species formation and increased aorta endothelium heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. Exposure of HAECs to high concentrations of glucose induced prolonged oxidative stress, apoptosis, and accumulation of AGEs. These effects were abolished by incubation of ramiprilat (RPT), the active metabolite of RPL. However, treatment of HAECs with STO-609, a CaMKKβ (Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β) inhibitor; compound C, an AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) inhibitor; and Zn(II)PPIX, a selective HO-1 inhibitor, blocked these beneficial effects of RPT. In addition, RPT increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2) nuclear translocation and activation in a CaMKKβ/AMPK pathway-dependent manner, leading to increased expression of the Nrf-2-regulated antioxidant enzyme, HO-1. The inhibition of CaMKKβ or AMPK by pharmaceutical approach ablated RPT-induced HO-1 expression. Taken together, RPL ameliorates insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction in diabetes via reducing oxidative stress. These effects are mediated by RPL activation of CaMKK-β, which in turn activates the AMPK-Nrf-2-HO-1 pathway for enhanced endothelial function. PMID:24741076

  12. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated autophagy protects against pulmonary endothelial cell death and development of emphysema in cadmium-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Surolia, Ranu; Karki, Suman; Kim, Hyunki; Yu, Zhihong; Kulkarni, Tejaswini; Mirov, Sergey B; Carter, A Brent; Rowe, Steven M; Matalon, Sadis; Thannickal, Victor J; Agarwal, Anupam; Antony, Veena B

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary exposure to cadmium, a major component of cigarette smoke, has a dramatic impact on lung function and the development of emphysema. Cigarette smoke exposure induces heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we employed a truncated mouse model of emphysema by intratracheal instillation of cadmium (CdCl2) solution (0.025% per 1 mg/kg body wt) in HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and overexpressing humanized HO-1 bacterial artificial chromosome (hHO-1BAC) mice. We evaluated the role of HO-1 in cadmium-induced emphysema in mice by analyzing histopathology, micro-computed tomography scans, and lung function tests. CdCl2-exposed HO-1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe emphysema compared with HO-1(+/+) or hHO-1BAC mice. Loss of pulmonary endothelial cells (PECs) from the alveolar capillary membrane is recognized to be a target in emphysema. PECs from HO-1(+/+), HO-1(-/-), and hHO-1BAC were employed to define the underlying molecular mechanism for the protection from emphysema by HO-1. Electron microscopy, expression of autophagic markers (microtubule-associated protein 1B-light chain 3 II, autophagy protein 5, and Beclin1) and apoptotic marker (cleaved caspase 3) suggested induction of autophagy and apoptosis in PECs after CdCl2 treatment. CdCl2-treated HO-1(-/-) PECs exhibited downregulation of autophagic markers and significantly increased cleaved caspase 3 expression and activity (∼4-fold higher). Moreover, hHO-1BAC PECs demonstrated upregulated autophagy and absence of cleaved caspase 3 expression or activity. Pretreatment of HO-1(+/+) PECs with rapamycin induced autophagy and resulted in reduced cell death upon cadmium treatment. Induction of autophagy following CdCl2 treatment was found to be protective from apoptotic cell death. HO-1 induced protective autophagy in PECs and mitigated cadmium-induced emphysema. PMID:26071551

  13. Structural insights into human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition by potent and selective azole-based compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2013-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors, especially those that are isozyme-selective, promises powerful pharmacological tools to elucidate the regulatory characteristics of the HO system. It is already known that HO has cytoprotective properties and may play a role in several disease states, making it an enticing therapeutic target. Traditionally, the metalloporphyrins have been used as competitive HO inhibitors owing to their structural similarity with the substrate, heme. However, given heme's important role in several other proteins (e.g. cytochromes P450, nitric oxide synthase), non-selectivity is an unfortunate side-effect. Reports that azalanstat and other non-porphyrin molecules inhibited HO led to a multi-faceted effort to develop novel compounds as potent, selective inhibitors of HO. This resulted in the creation of non-competitive inhibitors with selectivity for HO, including a subset with isozyme selectivity for HO-1. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures of several complexes of HO-1 with novel inhibitors have been elucidated, which provided insightful information regarding the salient features required for inhibitor binding. This included the structural basis for non-competitive inhibition, flexibility and adaptability of the inhibitor binding pocket, and multiple, potential interaction subsites, all of which can be exploited in future drug-design strategies. PMID:23097500

  14. In vitro evaluation of mitochondrial-chloroplast subcellular localization of heme oxygenase1 (HO1) in Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shubham; Verma, Khushbu; Shekhawat, Gyan Singh

    2014-05-01

    Heme oxygenase1 (HO1) catalyzes the degradation of heme in to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and ferrous ions. Its role in higher plants has been found as an antioxidant and precursor of phytochrome synthesis. The present study focuses on subcellular localization of HO1 in leaves of soybean has been investigated. Most activity appeared to be located within chloroplast due to its role in phytochrome synthesis but mitochondria also share its localization. Mitochondrial location of HO1 might be on its inner membranous space due to its role in the synthesis of electron donor species which facilitates HO1 catalyzed reaction. Study reports the co-localization of HO1 in both chloroplast and mitochondria. PMID:24158377

  15. The PPARγ agonist, rosiglitazone, attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling via heme oxygenase-1 in murine model of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yan-ting; Wang, Gui-zuo; Han, Dong; Wu, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, De-xin; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Yong-hong; Xie, Xin-ming; Li, Shao-jun; Lu, Jia-mei; Liu, Lu; Feng, Wei; Sun, Xiu-zhen; Li, Man-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Rosiglitazone is one of the specific PPARγ agonists showing potential therapeutic effects in asthma. Though PPARγ activation was considered protective in inhibiting airway inflammation and remodeling in asthma, the specific mechanisms are still unclear. This study was aimed to investigate whether heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) related pathways were involved in rosiglitazone-activated PPARγ signaling in asthma treatment. Methods: Asthma was induced in mice by multiple exposures to ovalbumin (OVA) in 8 weeks. Prior to every OVA challenge, the mice received rosiglitazone (5 mg/kg, po). After the mice were sacrificed, the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), blood samples and lungs were collected for analyses. The activities of HO-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 in airway tissue were assessed, and the expression of PPARγ, HO-1 and p21 proteins was also examined. Results: Rosiglitazone administration significantly attenuated airway inflammation and remodeling in mice with OVA-induced asthma, which were evidenced by decreased counts of total cells, eosinophils and neutrophils, and decreased levels of IL-5 and IL-13 in BALF, and by decreased airway smooth muscle layer thickness and reduced airway collagen deposition. Furthermore, rosiglitazone administration significantly increased PPARγ, HO-1 and p21 expression and HO-1 activity, decreased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in airway tissue. All the therapeutic effects of rosiglitazone were significantly impaired by co-administration of the HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP. Conclusion: Rosiglitazone effectively attenuates airway inflammation and remodeling in OVA- induced asthma of mice by activating PPARγ/HO-1 signaling pathway. PMID:25619395

  16. Desoxyrhapontigenin up-regulates Nrf2-mediated heme oxygenase-1 expression in macrophages and inflammatory lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Joo Choi, Ran; Cheng, Mao-sheng; Shik Kim, Yeong

    2014-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an important anti-inflammatory, antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme that is regulated by the activation of the major transcription factor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). In the present study, six stilbene derivatives isolated from Rheum undulatum L. were assessed for their antioxidative potential. In the tert-butylhydroperoxide (t-BHP)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophage cell line, desoxyrhapontigenin was the most potent component that reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and peroxynitrite. In response to desoxyrhapontigenin, the mRNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes were up-regulated. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) confirmed that desoxyrhapontigenin promoted the DNA binding of Nrf2 and increased the expression of antioxidant proteins and enzymes regulated by Nrf2. Further investigation utilizing specific inhibitors of Akt, p38, JNK and ERK demonstrated that the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway mediates HO-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in Nrf2 expression mediated by treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin was reversed by Nrf2 or Akt gene knock-down. In the LPS-induced in vivo lung inflammation model, pretreatment with desoxyrhapontigenin markedly ameliorated LPS-induced lung inflammation and histological changes. Immunohistochemical analysis of Nrf2, HO-1 and p65 was conducted and confirmed that treatment with desoxyrhapontigenin induced Nrf2 and HO-1 expression but reduced p65 expression. These findings suggest that desoxyrhapontigenin may be a potential therapeutic candidate as an antioxidant or an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:24624340

  17. Cross-talk between two antioxidants, thioredoxin reductase and heme oxygenase-1, and therapeutic implications for multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Raninga, Prahlad V; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Vuckovic, Slavica; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Despite recent advancements in anti-myeloma therapies, MM remains an incurable disease. Antioxidant molecules are upregulated in many cancers, correlating with tumor proliferation, survival, and chemoresistance and therefore, have been suggested as potential therapeutic targets. This study investigated the cross-talk between two antioxidant molecules, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and their therapeutic implications in MM. We found that although auranofin, a TrxR inhibitor, significantly inhibited TrxR activity by more than 50% at lower concentrations, myeloma cell proliferation was only inhibited at higher concentrations of auranofin. Inhibition of TrxR using lower auranofin concentrations induced HO-1 protein expression in myeloma cells. Using a sub-lethal concentration of auranofin to inhibit TrxR activity in conjunction with HO-1 inhibition significantly decreased myeloma cell growth and induced apoptosis. TrxR was shown to regulate HO-1 via the Nrf2 signaling pathway in a ROS-dependent manner. Increased HO-1 mRNA levels were observed in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells compared to parent cells and HO-1 inhibition restored the sensitivity to bortezomib in bortezomib-resistant myeloma cells. These findings indicate that concurrent inhibition of HO-1 with either a TrxR inhibitor or with bortezomib would improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. Hence, our findings further support the need to target multiple antioxidant systems alone or in combination with other therapeutics to improve therapeutic outcomes in MM patients. PMID:26795735

  18. Chromium (VI) Inhibits Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression In Vivo and in Arsenic-Exposed Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    O’HARA, KIMBERLEY A.; NEMEC, ANTONIA A.; ALAM, JAWED; KLEI, LINDA R.; MOSSMAN, BROOKE T.; BARCHOWSKY, AARON

    2015-01-01

    Inhaled hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) promotes lung injury and pulmonary diseases through poorly defined mechanisms. One hypothesis for this lung pathogenesis is that Cr(VI) silences induction of cytoprotective genes, such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), whose total lung mRNA levels were reduced 21 days after nasal instillation of potassium dichromate in C57BL/6 mice. To investigate the mechanisms for this inhibition, Cr(VI) effects on basal and arsenic (As(III))-induced HO-1 expression were examined in cultured human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. An effect of Cr(VI) on the low basal HO-1 mRNA and protein levels in BEAS-2B cells was not detectible. In contrast, Cr(VI) added to the cells before As(III), but not simultaneously with As(III), attenuated As(III)-induced HO-1 expression. Transient transfection with luciferase reporter gene constructs controlled by the full length ho-1 promoter or deletion mutants demonstrated that this inhibition occurred in the E1 enhancer region containing critical antioxidant response elements (ARE). Cr(VI) pretreatment inhibited As(III)-induced activity of a transiently expressed reporter construct regulated by three ARE tandem repeats. The mechanism for this Cr(VI)-attenuated transactivation appeared to be Cr(VI) reduction of the nuclear levels of the transcription factor Nrf2 and As(III)-stimulated Nrf2 transcriptional complex binding to the ARE cis element. Finally, exposing cells to Cr(VI) prior to co-exposure with As(III) synergized for apoptosis and loss of membrane integrity. These data suggest that Cr(VI) silences induction of ARE-driven genes required for protection from secondary insults. The data also have important implications for understanding the toxic mechanisms of low level, mixed metal exposures in the lung. PMID:16775837

  19. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreases hepatic cytochrome P-450, especially CYP2B1/2B2, and simultaneously induces heme oxygenase-1 gene expression in scurvy-prone ODS rats.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Misato; Hoshinaga, Yukiko; Miura, Natsuko; Tokuda, Yuki; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the decrease in hepatic cytochrome P-450 (CYP) content in ascorbic acid deficiency was investigated in scurvy-prone ODS rats. First, male ODS rats were fed a diet containing sufficient ascorbic acid (control) or a diet without ascorbic acid (deficient) for 18 days, with or without the intraperitoneal injection of phenobarbital. Ascorbic acid deficiency decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase (COX) complex IV subunit I protein, and simultaneously increased heme oxygenase-1 protein in microsomes and mitochondria. Next, heme oxygenase-1 inducers, that is lipopolysaccharide and hemin, were administered to phenobaribital-treated ODS rats fed sufficient ascorbic acid. The administration of these inducers decreased hepatic microsomal total CYP content, CYP2B1/2B2 protein, and mitochondrial COX complex IV subunit I protein. These results suggested that the stimulation of hepatic heme oxygenase-1 expression by ascorbic acid deficiency caused the decrease in CYP content in liver. PMID:25036135

  20. Heme oxygenase 1 plays role of neuron-protection by regulating Nrf2-ARE signaling post intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing; Xie, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) could be activated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and trigger the expression of ARE regulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) subsequently. This study aims to explore neuroprotection of HO-1 protein in regulating the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in ICH. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was used to establish the ICH model. The zinc porphyrin-9 (ZPP-IX) was used to inhibit the HO-1 expression in ICH rats. The ICH rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, ICH group, ZPP-IX (10 mg/kg) + ICH group and DMSO (10 mg/kg) + ICH group. Neurological scores were evaluated for the 3 groups. Double immunofluorescence staining method was employed to observe the co-expression of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and TNF-α and CD11b in glia cells. Western blot and RT-PCR assay were used to detect the total Nrf2, binding Nrf2, HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α expression. The results indicated that ZPP-IX could aggravate the neurological dyafunstions of ICH rats. The HO-1 level in ZPP-IX group was significantly decreased compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). The binding-Nrf2 protein was significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The NF-κB and TNF-α level were significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The ZPP-IX significantly inhibited the HO-1 and Nrf2, and enhanced NF-κB and TNF-α co-expressing with the CD11b compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HO-1 protein regulates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in ICH model by inhibiting the Nrf2 entering nucleus and activating the NF-κB and TNF-α expression. PMID:26617723

  1. Heme oxygenase 1 plays role of neuron-protection by regulating Nrf2-ARE signaling post intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiao-Ping; Wu, Dan; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Bao, Bing; Xie, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) could be activated in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and trigger the expression of ARE regulated heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) subsequently. This study aims to explore neuroprotection of HO-1 protein in regulating the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway in ICH. In this study, the femoral artery injection method was used to establish the ICH model. The zinc porphyrin-9 (ZPP-IX) was used to inhibit the HO-1 expression in ICH rats. The ICH rats were randomly divided into 3 groups, ICH group, ZPP-IX (10 mg/kg) + ICH group and DMSO (10 mg/kg) + ICH group. Neurological scores were evaluated for the 3 groups. Double immunofluorescence staining method was employed to observe the co-expression of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and TNF-α and CD11b in glia cells. Western blot and RT-PCR assay were used to detect the total Nrf2, binding Nrf2, HO-1, NF-κB and TNF-α expression. The results indicated that ZPP-IX could aggravate the neurological dyafunstions of ICH rats. The HO-1 level in ZPP-IX group was significantly decreased compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). The binding-Nrf2 protein was significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The NF-κB and TNF-α level were significantly increased in ZPP-IX group compared to ICH group (P < 0.05). The ZPP-IX significantly inhibited the HO-1 and Nrf2, and enhanced NF-κB and TNF-α co-expressing with the CD11b compared to the ICH group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, HO-1 protein regulates the Nrf2-ARE pathway in ICH model by inhibiting the Nrf2 entering nucleus and activating the NF-κB and TNF-α expression. PMID:26617723

  2. Amyloid Beta-Mediated Hypomethylation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Correlates with Cognitive Impairment in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hye Youn; Choi, Byung-Ok; Jeong, Jee Hyang; Kong, Kyoung Ae; Hwang, Jinha; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    To identify epigenetically regulated genes involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) we analyzed global mRNA expression and methylation profiles in amyloid precursor protein (APP)-Swedish mutant-expressing AD model cells, H4-sw and selected heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), which is associated with pathological features of AD such as neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. We examined the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of HMOX1 and its application as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for AD. Our results show that HMOX1 mRNA and protein expression was approximately 12.2-fold and 7.9-fold increased in H4-sw cells, respectively. Increased HMOX1 expression was also detected in the brain, particularly the hippocampus, of AD model transgenic mice. However, the methylation of specific CpG sites within its promoter, particularly at CpG located −374 was significantly decreased in H4-sw cells. Treatment of neuroglioma cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine resulted in reduced methylation of HMOX1 promoter accompanied by enhanced HMOX1 expression strongly supporting DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation of HMOX1. Toxic Aβ-induced aberrant hypomethylation of HMOX1 at −374 promoter CpG site was correlated with increased HMOX1expression. In addition to neuroglioma cells, we also found Aβ-induced epigenetic regulation of HMOX1 in human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells. We evaluated DNA methylation status of HMOX1 at −374 promoter CpG site in blood samples from AD patients, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and control individuals using quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. We observed lower methylation of HMOX1 at the −374 promoter CpG site in AD patients compared to MCI and control individuals, and a correlation between Mini-Mental State Examination score and demethylation level. Receiver operating characteristics analysis revealed good discrimination of AD patients from MCI patients and

  3. Comparison of the crystal structure and function to wild-type and His25Ala mutant human heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Li; Xia, Zhen-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme metabolism. It regulates serum bilirubin level. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that the proximal residue histidine 25 (His25) plays a key role in hHO-1 activity. A highly purified hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was generated and crystallized with a new expression system. The crystal structure of the mutant was determined by X-ray diffraction technology and molecular replacement at the resolution of 2.8 A, and the model of hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was refined. The final crystallographic and free R factors were 0.245 and 0.283, respectively. The standard bond length deviation was 0.007 A, and the standard bond angle deviation was 1.3 degrees . The mutation of His25 to Ala led to an empty pocket underneath the ferric ion in the heme, leading to loss of binding iron ligand. Although this did not cause an overall structural change, the enzymatic activity of the mutant hHO-1 was reduced by 90%. By supplementing imidazole, the HO-1 activity was restored approximately 90% to its normal level. These data suggest that Ala25 remains unchanged in the structure compared to His25, but the important catalytic function of hHO-1 is lost. Thus, it appears that His25 is a crucial residue for proper hHO-1 catalysis. PMID:19212657

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 protects regulatory T cells from hypoxia-induced cellular stress in an experimental mouse brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Wainwright, Derek A; Ahmed, Atique U; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2014-01-15

    Two characteristic features of malignant gliomas (MG) are the presence of hypoxia and accumulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a cytoprotective enzyme expressed in high level by Tregs in glioma. In this study, we show that higher HO1 expression in Tregs is associated with increased survival under hypoxic conditions and that HO1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), abrogates the survival benefits. Moreover, SnPP preferentially eliminates Tregs and treatment with SnPP of tumor bearing mice significantly increases survival (23 to 31days (p<0.05)). Thus HO1 inhibition provides another alternative way of therapeutically targeting Tregs in MG. PMID:24268287

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 protects regulatory T cells from hypoxia-induced cellular stress in an experimental mouse brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Ahmed, Atique U.; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Two characteristic features of malignant gliomas (MG) are the presence of hypoxia and accumulation of regulatory T cells (Treg). Heme-oxygenase-1 (HO1) is a cytoprotective enzyme expressed in high level by Tregs in glioma. In this study, we show that higher HO1 expression in Treg is associated with increased survival under hypoxic conditions and that HO1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), abrogate the survival benefits. Moreover, SnPP preferentially eliminates Tregs and treatment of tumor bearing mice with SnPP significantly increases survival (23 to 31 days (p < 0.05)). Thus HO1 inhibition provides another alternative way of therapeutically targeting Tregs in MG. PMID:24268287

  6. Bryonolic Acid: A Large-Scale Isolation and Evaluation of Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression in Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Emily C.; Gatbonton-Schwager, Tonibelle N.; Han, Yong; Clay, Jennifer E.; Letterio, John J.; Tochtrop, Gregory P.

    2010-01-01

    Bryonolic acid (BA) is a triterpenoid found in the Cucurbitaceae family of plants. Our interests in the immunomodulatory effects of this class of natural products led us to discover that BA induces a marked increase in the expression of a phase 2 response enzyme, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in a dose dependent manner. This phenotype has translational implications in malarial disease progression, and consequently we developed a large scale isolation method for BA that will be enabling in terms of future in vitro and in vivo analysis. We have determined ideal growth conditions and time scale for maximizing BA content in the roots of Cucurbita pepo L., and analyzed BA production by HPLC. Large-scale extraction yielded 1.34% BA based on dry weight, allowing for the isolation of BA on a multi-gram scale. PMID:20481554

  7. Heme oxygenase-1 alleviates cigarette smoke-induced restenosis after vascular angioplasty by attenuating inflammation in rat model.

    PubMed

    Ni, Leng; Wang, Zhanqi; Yang, Genhuan; Li, Tianjia; Liu, Xinnong; Liu, Changwei

    2016-03-14

    Cigarette smoke is not only a profound independent risk factor of atherosclerosis, but also aggravates restenosis after vascular angioplasty. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is an endogenous antioxidant and cytoprotective enzyme. In this study, we investigated whether HO-1 upregulating by hemin, a potent HO-1 inducer, can protect against cigarette smoke-induced restenosis in rat's carotid arteries after balloon injury. Results showed that cigarette smoke exposure aggravated stenosis of the lumen, promoted infiltration of inflammatory cells, and induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules after balloon-induced carotid artery injury. HO-1 upregulating by hemin treatment reduced these effects of cigarette smoke, whereas the beneficial effects were abolished in the presence of Zincprotoporphyrin IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. To conclude, hemin has potential therapeutic applications in the restenosis prevention after the smokers' vascular angioplasty. PMID:26809138

  8. Dexamethasone-Conjugated Polyamidoamine Dendrimer for Delivery of the Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene into the Ischemic Brain.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Pureum; Choi, Manbok; Oh, Jungju; Lee, Minhyung

    2015-07-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, the HO-1 gene was delivered into the brain using dexamethasone-conjugated polyamidoamine generation 2 (PAMAM G2-Dexa) for the treatment of ischemic stroke. PAMAM G2-Dexa formed stable complexes with plasmid DNA (pDNA). The pDNA delivery efficiency of PAMAM G2-Dexa was higher than that of polyethylenimine (PEI25k, 25 kDa), dexamethasone-conjugated PEI (PEI-Dexa), and PAMAM G2 in Neuro2A cells. Therapeutic effect of PAMAM G2-Dexa/pHO-1 complexes was evaluated in a stroke animal model. PAMAM G2-Dexa delivered pHO-1 more efficiently into the ischemic brain than PEI25k and PEI-Dexa with higher therapeutic effect. Therefore, PAMAM G2-Dexa/pHO-1 complexes may be useful for ischemic stroke gene therapy. PMID:26033925

  9. Heme oxygenase-1 gene expression modulates angiotensin II-induced increase in blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liming; Quan, Shuo; Nasjletti, Alberto; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Abraham, Nader G

    2004-06-01

    The heme-heme oxygenase (HO) system has been implicated in the regulation of vascular reactivity and blood pressure. This study examines the notion that overexpression of HO decreases pressor responsiveness to angiotensin II (Ang II). Five-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats received an intraleft ventricular injection of approximately 5x10(9) cfu/mL of retroviruses containing human HO-1 sense (LSN-HHO-1), rat HO-1 antisense (LSN-RHO-1-AS), or control retrovirus (LXSN). Three months later, rats were instrumented with femoral arterial and venous catheters for mean arterial pressure (MAP) determination and Ang II administration, respectively. Rats injected with LSN-HHO-1, but not with LXSN, expressed human HO-1 mRNA and protein in several tissues. BP increased with administration of Ang II in rats expressing and not expressing human HO-1. However, the Ang II-induced pressor response (mm Hg) in LSN-HHO-1 rats (16+/-3, 27+/-3, and 38+/-3 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng) was surpassed (P<0.05) in LXSN rats (23+/-1, 37+/-2, and 52+/-2 at 0.5, 2, and 10 ng). Importantly, treating LSN-HHO-1 rats with the HO inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) enhanced (P<0.05) the Ang II-induced pressor response to a level not different from that observed in LXSN rats. Rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS showed a decrease in renal HO-1 protein expression and HO activity relative to control LXSN rats. Administration of Ang II (0.1 to 2 ng) caused small (4 to 5 mm Hg) but significant increases in MAP in rats injected with LSN-RHO-1-AS (P<0.05) compared with rats injected with LXSN. These data demonstrate that overexpression of HO-1 brings about a reduction in pressor responsiveness to Ang II, which is most likely due to increased generation of an HO-1 product, presumably CO, with the ability to inhibit vascular reactivity to constrictor stimuli. PMID:15166181

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 enhances renal mitochondrial transport carriers and cytochrome C oxidase activity in experimental diabetes.

    PubMed

    Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Van Driesche, Sarah; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Yang, Li-Ming; Quan, Shuo; Goodman, Alvin I; Abraham, Nader G

    2006-06-01

    Up-regulation of heme oxygenase (HO-1) by either cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) or human gene transfer improves vascular and renal function by several mechanisms, including increases in antioxidant levels and decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vascular and renal tissue. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of HO-1 overexpression on mitochondrial transporters, cytochrome c oxidase, and anti-apoptotic proteins in diabetic rats (streptozotocin, (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes). Renal mitochondrial carnitine, deoxynucleotide, and ADP/ATP carriers were significantly reduced in diabetic compared with nondiabetic rats (p < 0.05). The citrate carrier was not significantly decreased in diabetic tissue. CoPP administration produced a robust increase in carnitine, citrate, deoxynucleotide, dicarboxylate, and ADP/ATP carriers and no significant change in oxoglutarate and aspartate/glutamate carriers. The increase in mitochondrial carriers (MCs) was associated with a significant increase in cytochrome c oxidase activity. The administration of tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP), an inhibitor of HO-1 activity, prevented the restoration of MCs in diabetic rats. Human HO-1 cDNA transfer into diabetic rats increased both HO-1 protein and activity, and restored mitochondrial ADP/ATP and deoxynucleotide carriers. The increase in HO-1 by CoPP administration was associated with a significant increase in the phosphorylation of AKT and levels of BcL-XL proteins. These observations in experimental diabetes suggest that the cytoprotective mechanism of HO-1 against oxidative stress involves an increase in the levels of MCs and anti-apoptotic proteins as well as in cytochrome c oxidase activity. PMID:16595661

  11. Upregulation of endothelial heme oxygenase-1 expression through the activation of the JNK pathway by sublethal concentrations of acrolein

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.C.; Hsieh, C.W.; Lai, P.H.; Lin, J.B.; Liu, Y.C.; Wung, B.S. . E-mail: bswung@mail.ncyu.edu.tw

    2006-08-01

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde that is present in cigarette smoke. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme activated by various such electrophilic compounds. In this study, the regulatory effects of acrolein upon the expression of HO-1 were investigated in endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrate that acrolein induces the elevation of HO-1 protein levels, and subsequent enzyme activity, at non-cytotoxic concentrations. An additional {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated aldehyde, cinnamaldehyde, was also found to increase HO-1 expression and have less cytotoxicity than acrolein. Moreover, acrolein-mediated HO-1 induction is abrogated in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide. Nrf2 is a transcription factor involved in the induction of HO-1 through an antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter region of the HO-1 gene. We show that acrolein induces Nrf2 translocation and ARE-luciferase reporter activity. Acrolein was also found to induce the production of both superoxide and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at levels greater than 100 {mu}M. However, with the exception of NAC, no antioxidant generated any effect upon acrolein-dependent HO-1 expression in ECs. Our present findings suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may not be a major modulator for HO-1 induction. Using buthionine sulfoximine to deplete the intracellular GSH levels further enhanced the effects of acrolein. We also found that cellular GSH level was rapidly reduced after both 10 and 100 {mu}M acrolein treatment. However, after 6 h of exposure to ECs, only 10 {mu}M acrolein treatment increases GSH level. In addition, only the JNK inhibitor SP600125 and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein had any significant inhibitory impact upon the upregulation of HO-1 by acrolein. Pretreatment with a range of other PI3 kinase inhibitors, including wortmannin and LY294002, showed no effects. Hence, we show in our current experiments that a sublethal concentration of

  12. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ), we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c), the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and μ-opioid receptors (MOR), were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP). The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of CoPP alone or

  13. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the human intestinal epithelial cell line, DLD-1, by the inducers of heme oxygenase 1, bismuth salts, heme, and nitric oxide donors

    PubMed Central

    Cavicchi, M; Gibbs, L; Whittle, B

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) may be involved in the mucosal injury associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In contrast with iNOS, the inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is considered to act as a protective antioxidant system.
AIMS—To evaluate the effects of the known HO-1 inducers, cadmium and bismuth salts, heme, and nitric oxide (NO) donors, on iNOS activity, and expression in the human intestinal epithelial cell line DLD-1.
METHODS—iNOS activity was assessed by the Griess reaction and the radiochemical L-arginine conversion assay. iNOS mRNA and iNOS protein expression were determined by northern and western blotting, respectively.
RESULTS—Cytokine exposure led to induction of iNOS activity, iNOS mRNA, and iNOS protein expression. Preincubation of DLD-1 cells with heme (1-50 µM) inhibited cytokine induced iNOS activity in a concentration dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was abolished by the HO-1 specific inhibitor tin protoporphyrin. Preincubation with NO donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP 1-1000 µM) or S-nitroso-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP 1-1000 µM), or with the heavy metals cadmium chloride (10-40 µM), bismuth citrate, or ranitidine bismuth citrate (10-3000 µM) inhibited iNOS activity in a concentration dependent manner. Moreover, SNP and heme abolished cytokine induced iNOS protein as well as iNOS mRNA expression, whereas cadmium chloride did not modify iNOS protein expression.
CONCLUSIONS—Heme, the heavy metals cadmium and bismuth, as well as NO donors, are potent inhibitors of cytokine induced iNOS activity. Heme and NO donors act at the transcriptional level inhibiting iNOS mRNA expression. Such findings suggest the potential for interplay between the iNOS and HO-1 systems, which may modulate the progress of IBD.


Keywords: inducible nitric oxide synthase; nitric oxide; colonic epithelial cells; cytokines; heme oxygenase-1; bismuth citrate PMID:11076874

  14. Prolonged Neutrophil Dysfunction Following Plasmodium falciparum Malaria is Related to Hemolysis and Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction1

    PubMed Central

    Cunnington, Aubrey J.; Njie, Madi; Correa, Simon; Takem, Ebako N.; Riley, Eleanor M.; Walther, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It is not known why people are more susceptible to bacterial infections such as non-Typhoid Salmonella (NTS) during and after a malaria infection but, in mice, malarial hemolysis impairs resistance to NTS by impairing the neutrophil oxidative burst. This acquired neutrophil dysfunction is a consequence of induction of the cytoprotective, heme degrading enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in neutrophil progenitors in bone marrow. In this study, we assessed whether neutrophil dysfunction occurs in humans with malaria and how this relates to hemolysis. We evaluated neutrophil function in 58 Gambian children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria (55 (95%) with uncomplicated disease), and examined associations with erythrocyte count, haptoglobin, hemopexin, plasma heme, expression of receptors for heme uptake, and HO-1 induction. Malaria caused the appearance of a dominant population of neutrophils with reduced oxidative burst activity, which gradually normalized over 8 weeks of follow-up. The degree of neutrophil impairment correlated significantly with markers of hemolysis and HO-1 induction. HO-1 expression was increased in blood during acute malaria, but at a cellular level HO-1 expression was modulated by changes in surface expression of the haptoglobin receptor (CD163). These findings demonstrate that neutrophil dysfunction occurs in P. falciparum malaria and support the relevance of the mechanistic studies in mice. Furthermore, they suggest the presence of a regulatory pathway to limit HO-1 induction by hemolysis in the context of infection, and indicate new targets for therapeutic intervention to abrogate the susceptibility to bacterial infection in the context of hemolysis in humans. PMID:23100518

  15. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS production by

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibits HLA Class I Antibody-Dependent Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Vijayan, Vijith; Hiller, Oliver; Figueiredo, Constanca; Aljabri, Abid; Blasczyk, Rainer; Theilmeier, Gregor; Becker, Jan Ulrich; Larmann, Jan; Immenschuh, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) is a key limiting factor for long-term graft survival in solid organ transplantation. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I (HLA I) antibodies (Abs) play a major role in the pathogenesis of AMR via their interactions with HLA molecules on vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1 has anti-inflammatory functions in the endothelium. As complement-independent effects of HLA I Abs can activate ECs, it was the goal of the current study to investigate the role of HO-1 on activation of human ECs by HLA I Abs. In cell cultures of various primary human macro- and microvascular ECs treatment with monoclonal pan- and allele-specific HLA I Abs up-regulated the expression of inducible proinflammatory adhesion molecules and chemokines (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [VCAM-1], intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 [ICAM-1], interleukin-8 [IL-8] and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1]). Pharmacological induction of HO-1 with cobalt-protoporphyrin IX reduced, whereas inhibition of HO-1 with either zinc-protoporphyrin IX or siRNA-mediated knockdown increased HLA I Ab-dependent up-regulation of VCAM-1. Treatment with two carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecules, which liberate the gaseous HO product CO, blocked HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation. Finally, in an in vitro adhesion assay exposure of ECs to HLA I Abs led to increased monocyte binding, which was counteracted by up-regulation of HO-1. In conclusion, HLA I Ab-dependent EC activation is modulated by endothelial HO-1 and targeted induction of this enzyme may be a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AMR in solid organ transplantation. PMID:26690352

  17. Heme oxygenase-1-derived bilirubin counteracts HIV protease inhibitor-mediated endothelial cell dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ming; Durante, Zane E; Peyton, Kelly J; Durante, William

    2016-05-01

    The use of HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) has extended the duration and quality of life for HIV-positive individuals. However there is increasing concern that this antiviral therapy may promote premature cardiovascular disease by impairing endothelial cell (EC) function. In the present study, we investigated the effect of HIV PIs on EC function and determined if the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO-1) influences the biological action of these drugs. We found that three distinct PIs, including ritonavir, atazanavir, and lopinavir, stimulated the expression of HO-1 protein and mRNA. The induction of HO-1 was associated with an increase in NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS). PIs also stimulated HO-1 promoter activity and this was prevented by mutating the antioxidant responsive element or by overexpressing dominant-negative Nrf2. In addition, the PI-mediated induction of HO-1 was abolished by N-acetyl-l-cysteine and rotenone. Furthermore, PIs blocked EC proliferation and migration and stimulated the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and the adhesion of monocytes on ECs. Inhibition of HO-1 activity or expression potentiated the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of PIs which was reversed by bilirubin but not carbon monoxide. Alternatively, adenovirus-mediated overexpression of HO-1 attenuated the growth-inhibitory and inflammatory effect of PIs. In contrast, blocking HO-1 activity failed to modify the anti-migratory effect of the PIs. Thus, induction of HO-1 via the ROS-Nrf2 pathway in human ECs counteracts the anti-proliferative and inflammatory actions of PIs by generating bilirubin. Therapeutic approaches targeting HO-1 may provide a novel approach in preventing EC dysfunction and vascular disease in HIV-infected patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy. PMID:26968795

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 induction in hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells protects against liver injury during endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Dorman, Robert B; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Farhood, Anwar; Mayes, January; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2004-01-14

    INTRODUCTION: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a stress response enzyme, which catalyses the breakdown of heme into biliverdin-IX alpha, carbon monoxide and ferrous iron. Under situations of oxidative stress, heat stress, ischemia/reperfusion injury or endotoxemia, HO-1 has been shown to be induced and to elicit a protective effect. The mechanism of how this protective effect is executed is unknown. RESULTS: HO-1 induction with cobalt protoporphorin (Co-PP) dose-dependently protected against apoptotic cell death as well as neutrophil-mediated oncosis in the galactosamine/endotoxin (Gal/ET) shock model. Induction of HO-1 with Co-PP dose-dependently protected against neutrophil-mediated oncosis as indicated by attenuated ALT release and TNF-mediated apoptotic cell death as indicated by reduced caspase-3 activation. HO-1 induction did not attenuate Gal/ET-induced TNF-alpha formation. Furthermore, a similar protective effect with the high dose of Co-PP was observed when animals were treated with Gal/TNF-alpha. CONCLUSIONS: HO-1 induction attenuates apoptosis and neutrophil-mediated oncosis in the Gal/ET shock model. However, the protective effect is not due to the reduction of TNF-alpha release or the attenuation of neutrophil accumulation in the liver sinusoids. PMID:14960194

  19. Cytoprotection of human endothelial cells from menadione cytotoxicity by caffeic acid phenethyl ester: the role of heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyu; Stavchansky, Salomon; Zhao, Baiteng; Bynum, James A; Kerwin, Sean M; Bowman, Phillip D

    2008-09-01

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), derived from various plant sources, has been shown to ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion injury in vivo, and this has been attributed to its ability to reduce oxidative stress. Here we investigated the cytoprotection of CAPE against menadione-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to evaluate potential gene expression involvement. CAPE exhibited dose-dependent cytoprotection of HUVEC. A gene screen with microarrays was performed to identify the potential cytoprotective gene(s) induced by CAPE. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) was highly upregulated by CAPE and this was confirmed with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Inhibition of HO-1 activity using the HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPPIX), resulted in loss of cytoprotection. Carbon monoxide, one of HO-1 catabolic products appeared to play a small role in CAPE protection. Caffeic acid, a potential metabolite of CAPE with similar free radical scavenging ability, however, didn't show any cytoprotective effect nor induce HO-1. These findings suggest an important role of HO-1 induction in CAPE cytoprotection against oxidant stress, which may not relate to CAPE structural antioxidant activity nor to its traditional enzymatic activity in decomposing heme but to a yet to be determined activity. PMID:18573251

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 is critically involved in placentation, spiral artery remodeling, and blood pressure regulation during murine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zenclussen, Maria L.; Linzke, Nadja; Schumacher, Anne; Fest, Stefan; Meyer, Nicole; Casalis, Pablo A.; Zenclussen, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    The onset of pregnancy implies the appearance of a new organ, the placenta. One main function of the placenta is to supply oxygen to the fetus via hemoproteins. In this review, we highlight the importance of the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) for pregnancy to be established and maintained. HO-1 expression is pivotal to promote placental function and fetal development, thus determining the success of pregnancy. The deletion of the gene Hmox1 in mice leads to inadequate remodeling of spiral arteries and suboptimal placentation followed by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) and fetal lethality. A partial Hmox1 deletion leads to IUGR as well, with heterozygote and wild-type fetuses being born, but Hmox1–/– significantly below the expected Mendelian rate. This strong phenotype is associated with diminished number of pregnancy-protective uterine natural killer (uNK) cells. Pregnant heterozygote females develop gestational hypertension. The protective HO-1 effects on placentation and fetal growth can be mimicked by the exogenous administration of carbon monoxide (CO), a product of heme catalyzed by HO-1. CO application promotes the in situ proliferation of uNK cells, restores placentation and fetal growth, while normalizing blood pressure. Similarly, HO-1 inhibition provokes hypertension in pregnant rats. The HO-1/CO axis plays a pivotal role in sustaining pregnancy and aids in the understanding of the biology of pregnancy and reveals a promising therapeutic application in the treatment of pregnancy complications. PMID:25628565

  1. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  2. Carbon Monoxide Mediates the Anti-apoptotic Effects of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Medulloblastoma DAOY Cells via K+ Channel Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Al-Owais, Moza M. A.; Scragg, Jason L.; Dallas, Mark L.; Boycott, Hannah E.; Warburton, Philip; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Boyle, John P.; Peers, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cell survival and proliferation is attributable in part to suppression of apoptotic pathways, yet the mechanisms by which cancer cells resist apoptosis are not fully understood. Many cancer cells constitutively express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which catabolizes heme to generate biliverdin, Fe2+, and carbon monoxide (CO). These breakdown products may play a role in the ability of cancer cells to suppress apoptotic signals. K+ channels also play a crucial role in apoptosis, permitting K+ efflux which is required to initiate caspase activation. Here, we demonstrate that HO-1 is constitutively expressed in human medulloblastoma tissue, and can be induced in the medulloblastoma cell line DAOY either chemically or by hypoxia. Induction of HO-1 markedly increases the resistance of DAOY cells to oxidant-induced apoptosis. This effect was mimicked by exogenous application of the heme degradation product CO. Furthermore we demonstrate the presence of the pro-apoptotic K+ channel, Kv2.1, in both human medulloblastoma tissue and DAOY cells. CO inhibited the voltage-gated K+ currents in DAOY cells, and largely reversed the oxidant-induced increase in K+ channel activity. p38 MAPK inhibition prevented the oxidant-induced increase of K+ channel activity in DAOY cells, and enhanced their resistance to apoptosis. Our findings suggest that CO-mediated inhibition of K+ channels represents an important mechanism by which HO-1 can increase the resistance to apoptosis of medulloblastoma cells, and support the idea that HO-1 inhibition may enhance the effectiveness of current chemo- and radiotherapies. PMID:22593583

  3. Human heme oxygenase-1 gene transfer lowers blood pressure and promotes growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Sabaawy, H E; Zhang, F; Nguyen, X; ElHosseiny, A; Nasjletti, A; Schwartzman, M; Dennery, P; Kappas, A; Abraham, N G

    2001-08-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the conversion of heme to biliverdin, with release of free iron and carbon monoxide. Both heme and carbon monoxide have been implicated in the regulation of vascular tone. A retroviral vector containing human HO-1 cDNA (LSN-HHO-1) was constructed and subjected to purification and concentration of the viral particles to achieve 5x10(9) to 1x10(10) colony-forming units per milliliter. The ability of concentrated infectious viral particles to express human HO-1 (HHO-1) in vivo was tested. A single intracardiac injection of the concentrated infectious viral particles (expressing HHO-1) to 5-day-old spontaneously hypertensive rats resulted in functional expression of the HHO-1 gene and attenuation of the development of hypertension. Rats expressing HHO-1 showed a significant decrease in urinary excretion of a vasoconstrictor arachidonic acid metabolite and a reduction in myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure in isolated arterioles. Unexpectedly, HHO-1 chimeric rats showed a simultaneous significant proportionate increase in somatic growth. Thus, delivery of HHO-1 gene by retroviral vector attenuates the development of hypertension and promotes body growth in spontaneously hypertensive rats. PMID:11509478

  4. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Solip; Nguyen, Van Thu; Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE{sub 2}, butyl lucidenateD{sub 2} (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum. - Highlights: • The anti-inflammatory effects of selected triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum are demonstrated. • Heme oxygenase-1 induction is attributable to the anti-inflammatory properties of these

  5. Heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter polymorphism is associated with reduced incidence of acute chest syndrome among children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Bean, Christopher J.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Ellingsen, Dorothy; Pyle, Meredith E.; Barron-Casella, Emily A.; Casella, James F.; Payne, Amanda B.; Driggers, Jennifer; Trau, Heidi A.; Yang, Genyan; Jones, Kimberly; Ofori-Acquah, Solomon F.; Hooper, W. Craig

    2012-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a common hemolytic disorder with a broad range of complications, including vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome (ACS), pain, and stroke. Heme oxygenase-1 (gene HMOX1; protein HO-1) is the inducible, rate-limiting enzyme in the catabolism of heme and might attenuate the severity of outcomes from vaso-occlusive and hemolytic crises. A (GT)n dinucleotide repeat located in the promoter region of the HMOX1 gene is highly polymorphic, with long repeat lengths linked to decreased activity and inducibility. We examined this polymorphism to test the hypothesis that short alleles are associated with a decreased risk of adverse outcomes (hospitalization for pain or ACS) among a cohort of 942 children with sickle cell disease. Allele lengths varied from 13 to 45 repeats and showed a trimodal distribution. Compared with children with longer allele lengths, children with 2 shorter alleles (4%; ≤ 25 repeats) had lower rates of hospitalization for ACS (incidence rate ratio 0.28, 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.81), after adjusting for sex, age, asthma, percentage of fetal hemoglobin, and α-globin gene deletion. No relationship was identified between allele lengths and pain rate. We provide evidence that genetic variation in HMOX1 is associated with decreased rates of hospitalization for ACS, but not pain. This study is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00072761. PMID:22966170

  6. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A G; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT) n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT) n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk. PMID:25309329

  7. An association study between Heme oxygenase-1 genetic variants and Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Pedro; Martínez, Carmen; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Luengo, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) supplies brain tissues with nutrients, filters harmful compounds from the brain back to the bloodstream, and plays a key role in iron homeostasis in the human brain. Disruptions of the BBB are associated with several neurodegenerative conditions including Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress, iron deposition and mitochondrial impaired function are considered as risk factors for degeneration of the central nervous system. Heme oxygenase (HMOX) degrades heme ring to biliverdin, free ferrous iron and carbon monoxide being the rate-limiting activity in heme catabolism. The isoform HMOX1 is highly inducible in response to reactive oxygen species, which induce an increase in BBB permeability and impair its pathophysiology. Consequently, an over- expression of this enzyme may contribute to the marked iron deposition found in PD. We analyzed the HMOX1 SNPs rs2071746, rs2071747, and rs9282702, a microsatellite (GT)n polymorphism and copy number variations in 691 patients suffering from PD and 766 healthy control individuals. Copy number variations in the HMOX1 gene exist, but these do not seem to be associated with PD risk. In contrast two polymorphisms that modify the transcriptional activity of the gene, namely a VNTR (GT)n and the SNP rs2071746, are strongly associated with PD risk, particularly with the classic PD phenotype and with early onset of the disease. This study indicates that HMOX1 gene variants are associated to the risk of developing some forms of PD, thus adding new information that supports association of HMOX gene variations with PD risk. PMID:25309329

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A.G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls. The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population. PMID:26313808

  9. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Zurdo, Martín; Turpín-Fenoll, Laura; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Adeva-Bartolomé, Teresa; Cubo, Esther; Navacerrada, Francisco; Rojo-Sebastián, Ana; Rubio, Lluisa; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Calleja, Marisol; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Pilo-de-la-Fuente, Belén; Arroyo-Solera, Margarita; García-Albea, Esteban; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-08-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, neuroimaging, and experimental data, suggest that iron deficiency plays an important role in the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome (RLS). Heme-oxygenases (HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, mainly through the degradation of heme to biliverdin, free iron, and carbon monoxide. We analyzed whether HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop RLS.We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations (CNVs) of these genes in 205 subjects RLS and 445 healthy controls.The frequencies of rs2071746TT genotype and rs2071746T allelic variant were significantly lower in RLS patients than that in controls, although the other 3 studied SNPs did not differ between RLS patients and controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset, severity of RLS, family history of RLS, serum ferritin levels, or response to dopaminergic agonist, clonazepam or GABAergic drugs.The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 polymorphism and the risk to develop RLS in the Spanish population. PMID:26313808

  10. A Novel, ;Double-Clamp; Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-08-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be {approx}15 times more potent (IC{sub 50} = 0.27{+-}0.07 {mu}M) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC{sub 50} = 4.0{+-}1.8 {mu}M). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This 'double-clamp' binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors.

  11. A Novel, “Double-Clamp” Binding Mode for Human Heme Oxygenase-1 Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mona N.; Vlahakis, Jason Z.; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A.; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC50 = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC50 = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This “double-clamp” binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  12. A novel, "double-clamp" binding mode for human heme oxygenase-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mona N; Vlahakis, Jason Z; Vukomanovic, Dragic; Lee, Wallace; Szarek, Walter A; Nakatsu, Kanji; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    The development of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors is critical in dissecting and understanding the HO system and for potential therapeutic applications. We have established a program to design and optimize HO inhibitors using structure-activity relationships in conjunction with X-ray crystallographic analyses. One of our previous complex crystal structures revealed a putative secondary hydrophobic binding pocket which could be exploited for a new design strategy by introducing a functional group that would fit into this potential site. To test this hypothesis and gain further insights into the structural basis of inhibitor binding, we have synthesized and characterized 1-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)-4,4-diphenyl-2-butanone (QC-308). Using a carbon monoxide (CO) formation assay on rat spleen microsomes, the compound was found to be ∼15 times more potent (IC(50) = 0.27±0.07 µM) than its monophenyl analogue, which is already a potent compound in its own right (QC-65; IC(50) = 4.0±1.8 µM). The crystal structure of hHO-1 with QC-308 revealed that the second phenyl group in the western region of the compound is indeed accommodated by a definitive secondary proximal hydrophobic pocket. Thus, the two phenyl moieties are each stabilized by distinct hydrophobic pockets. This "double-clamp" binding offers additional inhibitor stabilization and provides a new route for improvement of human heme oxygenase inhibitors. PMID:22276118

  13. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 contributes to survival of Mycobacterium abscessus in human macrophages-like THP-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Maher Y.; Ahmad, Iman M.; Switzer, Barbara; Britigan, Bradley E.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus (M.abs) is a rapidly growing mycobacterial species that infects macrophages, and is an important pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied the early stages of M.abs infection of macrophages, with emphasis on the role of heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in this infection. THP-1 cells were activated using TPA into macrophage-like cells and infected with M.abs for different time points. M.abs infection robustly induced HO-1 expression in the THP-1 cells. Production of HO-1 was p38 MAPK-dependent, as p38 inhibitors suppressed HO-1 induction. Pretreatment with HO-1 inhibitors tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP) significantly inhibited M.abs growth inside macrophages. Furthermore, inhibiting HO-1 using HO-1 siRNA or the HO-1 upstream signaling molecule; Nrf2 using Nrf2 siRNA resulted in similar inhibition of M.abs. In contrast, inducing HO-1 did not increase M.abs intracellular growth above control. Products of HO-1 metabolism of heme are bilirubin, biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron. The addition of either bilirubin or biliverdin, but not CO, completely restored the SnPP inhibitory effect and partially that with HO-1 siRNA. To understand the mechanisms, we used Syto-62 labeled M.abs to infect macrophages. Interestingly, HO-1 inhibition promoted M.abs-containing phagosome fusion with lysosomes, which should enhance M.abs killing. M.abs infection enhanced THP-1 ROS production as demonstrated by increased DHE, DCF fluorescence, and EPR signal. HO-1 inhibition further increased ROS production in infected macrophages. Our results indicate that HO-1 induction is important for M.abs growth during the early stages of infection, and that the HO-1 products bilirubin and biliverdin, perhaps through modulation of intracellular ROS levels, may be involved. PMID:25638774

  14. Preconditioning with soluble guanylate cyclase activation prevents postischemic inflammation and reduces nitrate tolerance in heme oxygenase-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Walter Z; Jones, Allan W; Wang, Meifang; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2013-08-15

    Previously we have shown that, unlike wild-type mice (WT), heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1-/-) mice developed nitrate tolerance and were not protected from inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) when preconditioned with a H2S donor. We hypothesized that stimulation (with BAY 41-2272) or activation (with BAY 60-2770) of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) would precondition HO-1-/- mice against an inflammatory effect of I/R and increase arterial nitrate responses. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize leukocyte rolling and adhesion to postcapillary venules of the small intestine in anesthetized mice. Relaxation to ACh and BAY compounds was measured on superior mesenteric arteries isolated after I/R protocols. Preconditioning with either BAY compound 10 min (early phase) or 24 h (late phase) before I/R reduced postischemic leukocyte rolling and adhesion to sham control levels and increased superior mesenteric artery responses to ACh, sodium nitroprusside, and BAY 41-2272 in WT and HO-1-/- mice. Late-phase preconditioning with BAY 60-2770 was maintained in HO-1-/- and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice pretreated with an inhibitor (dl-propargylglycine) of enzymatically produced H2S. Pretreatment with BAY compounds also prevented the I/R increase in small intestinal TNF-α. We speculate that increasing sGC activity and related PKG acts downstream to H2S and disrupts signaling processes triggered by I/R in part by maintaining low cellular Ca²⁺. In addition, BAY preconditioning did not increase sGC levels, yet increased the response to agents that act on reduced heme-containing sGC. Collectively these actions would contribute to increased nitrate sensitivity and vascular function. PMID:23771693

  15. Inhibition of heme oxygenase-1 enhances the chemosensitivity of laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells to cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xin; Song, Dong-mei; Niu, Ying-hao; Wang, Bao-shan

    2016-04-01

    It has been previously reported that cisplatin is a well-known anticancer drug being used against a wide range of malignancies including head and neck, ovarian and non-small cell lung carcinoma, and demonstrated its anticancer activity by reacting with DNA or changing cell structure, immune response, reactive oxygen species level (ROS). In this research we proved that cisplatin induced cell injuries and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in laryngeal squamous cell cancer Hep-2 cells through ROS generation. The induction of HO-1 clearly protected Hep-2 cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and ROS reaction, and the inhibitor of HO-1 enhanced the cell death and ROS generation induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, the HO-1 expression induced by cisplatin was strongly inhibited by the knockdown of nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf-2), and the oxidative damages induced by cisplatin were significantly enhanced. Therefore, it may be concluded that the inhibition of HO-1 or the knockdown of Nrf-2 significantly enhanced cisplatin's anticancer effects on Hep-2 cells. In clinic, with the overexpression of HO-1 in laryngeal squamous cancer tissues, the combination of cisplatin with the inhibitor of HO-1 or Nrf-2 siRNA may act as a new method to the treatment of laryngeal squamous cancer. PMID:26801320

  16. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction and Organic Nitrate Therapy: Beneficial Effects on Endothelial Dysfunction, Nitrate Tolerance, and Vascular Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Daiber, Andreas; Oelze, Matthias; Wenzel, Philip; Bollmann, Franziska; Pautz, Andrea; Kleinert, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Organic nitrates are a group of very effective anti-ischemic drugs. They are used for the treatment of patients with stable angina, acute myocardial infarction, and chronic congestive heart failure. A major therapeutic limitation inherent to organic nitrates is the development of tolerance, which occurs during chronic treatment with these agents, and this phenomenon is largely based on induction of oxidative stress with subsequent endothelial dysfunction. We therefore speculated that induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) could be an efficient strategy to overcome nitrate tolerance and the associated side effects. Indeed, we found that hemin cotreatment prevented the development of nitrate tolerance and vascular oxidative stress in response to chronic nitroglycerin therapy. Vice versa, pentaerithrityl tetranitrate (PETN), a nitrate that was previously reported to be devoid of adverse side effects, displayed tolerance and oxidative stress when the HO-1 pathway was blocked pharmacologically or genetically by using HO-1+/– mice. Recently, we identified activation of Nrf2 and HuR as a principle mechanism of HO-1 induction by PETN. With the present paper, we present and discuss our recent and previous findings on the role of HO-1 for the prevention of nitroglycerin-induced nitrate tolerance and for the beneficial effects of PETN therapy. PMID:22506100

  17. Depression-like behaviors and heme oxygenase-1 are regulated by Lycopene in lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Fu, Yanyan; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Pan, Wei; Shi, Yue; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xunbao; Qi, Dashi; Li, Lei; Ma, Kai; Tang, Renxian; Zheng, Kuiyang; Song, Yuanjian

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lycopene possesses anti-inflammatory properties in the central nervous system. However, the potential role and the molecular mechanisms of lycopene in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenge inflammation and depression-like behaviors has not been clearly investigated. The present study aimed to assess the effects and the potential mechanisms of lycopene on LPS-induced depression-like behaviors. Lycopene was orally administered (60mg/kg) every day for seven days followed by intraperitoneal LPS injection (1mg/kg). The Forced swim test and tail suspension test were used to detect changes in the depression-like behaviors. ELISA was used to measure the expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) in the plasma. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in the hippocampus. The results showed that pretreatment with lycopene could ameliorate depression-like behaviors. Moreover, lycopene relieved neuronal cell injury in hippocampal CA1 regions. Furthermore, lycopene decreased LPS-induced expression of IL-1β and HO-1 in the hippocampus together with decreasing level of IL-6 and TNF-α in the plasma. Taken together, these results suggest that lycopene can attenuate LPS-induced inflammation and depression-like behaviors, which may be involved in regulating HO-1 in the hippocampus. PMID:27609268

  18. Tanshinone IIA Induces Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression and Inhibits Cyclic Strain-Induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shaowei; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Shih, Nang-Lang; Liu, Ju-Chi; Chen, Jin-Jer; Hong, Hong-Jye; Chan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the main effective component of Salvia miltiorrhiza, known as "Danshen," which has been used in many therapeutic remedies in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the direct effects of tanshinone IIA on vascular endothelial cells have not yet been fully described. In the present study, we demonstrated that tanshinone IIA increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Western blot analyses and experiments with specific inhibitors indicated tanshinone IIA enhanced HO-1 expression through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the subsequent induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. In addition, tanshinone IIA inhibited cyclic strain induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. HO-1 silencing significantly abrogated the repressive effects of tanshinone IIA on strain-induced IL-8 expression, which suggests HO-1 has a role in mediating the effects of tanshinone IIA. This study reports for the first time that tanshinone IIA inhibits cyclic strain-induced IL-8 expression via the induction of HO-1 in endothelial cells, providing valuable new insight into the molecular pathways that may contribute to the effects of tanshinone IIA. PMID:27080946

  19. ACTIVATION OF VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE AND HEME OXYGENASE-1 EXPRESSION BY ELECTROPHILIC NITRO-FATTY ACIDS

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nicholas K.H.; Rudolph, Volker; Cole, Marsha P.; Golin-Bisello, Franca; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Batthyany, Carlos; Freeman, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species mediate a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and endothelial dysfunction, with secondary oxidized and nitrated byproducts of these reactions contributing to the pathogenesis of numerous vascular diseases. While oxidized lipids and lipoproteins exacerbate inflammatory reactions in the vasculature, in stark contrast the nitration of polyunsaturated fatty acids and complex lipids yield electrophilic products that exhibit pluripotent anti-inflammatory signaling capabilities acting via both cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Herein we report that nitro-oleic acid (OA-NO2) treatment increases expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in the vasculature, thus transducing vascular protective effects associated with enhanced NO production. Administration of OA-NO2 via osmotic pump results in a significant increase in eNOS and HO-1 mRNA in mouse aortas. Moreover, HPLC-MS/MS analysis showed that NO2-FAs are rapidly metabolized in cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and treatment with NO2-FAs stimulated the phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1179. These post-translational modifications of eNOS, in concert with elevated eNOS gene expression, contributed to an increase in endothelial NO production. In aggregate, OA-NO2-induced eNOS and HO-1 expression by vascular cells can induce beneficial effects on endothelial function and provide a new strategy for treating various vascular inflammatory and hypertensive disorders. PMID:19857569

  20. Pinocembrin attenuates MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity by the induction of heme oxygenase-1 through ERK1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongquan; Wang, Yumin; Zhao, Linan; Cui, Qifu; Wang, Yuehua; Du, Guanhua

    2016-01-26

    Our recent study demonstrated that pinocembrin (PB), the most abundant flavonoid in propolis, has neuroprotective effect against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced SH-SY5Y neurotoxicity. However, the mechanism as how PB can induce neuroprotection is not known. In the present study, we demonstrate here that PB increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, which conferred protection against MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity, because the inhibitor of HO-1 zinc protoporphyrin-IX attenuated the neuroprotection of PB. PB induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and its cytoprotective effect was abolished by ERK1/2 inhibitors. Meanwhile, we have shown that MPP(+) induce the expression in a concentration-dependent manner in SH-SY5Y cells, which was further enhanced by PB. Taken together, the results suggest that PB enhances HO-1 expression to suppress MPP(+)-induced oxidative damage via ERK1/2 signaling pathways. These results revealed the mechanisms of PB enhances HO-1 expression, and contribute to shed some light on the mechanisms whereby PB inhibits the MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity. These data indicated that PB might provide a valuable therapeutic strategy for the treatment of PD. PMID:26655464

  1. The induction of heme oxygenase-1 modulates bismuth oxide-induced cytotoxicity in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-San; Chang, Hoon-Sang; Bae, Ji-Myung; Park, Sang-Hyuk; Hong, Chan-Ui; Kim, Eun-Cheol

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic and nitric oxide (NO)-inducing effects of bismuth oxide (Bi(2)O(3))-containing Portland cement (BPC) on human dental pulp cells. We also assessed whether heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is involved in BPC-induced cytotoxicity in dental pulp cells. Cytotoxicity and NO production induced by BPC were higher than those induced by Portland cement at 12 and 24 hours, and the former gradually decreased to the level observed for PC. HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA expressions in the BPC group showed maximal increase at 24 hours, and it gradually decreased with increasing cultivation time. Hemin treatment reversed the BPC-induced cytotoxicity, whereas zinc protoporphyrin IX treatment increased the cytotoxicity. These results suggested that NO production by BPC correlates with HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells. Moreover, BPC-induced HO-1 expression in dental pulp cells plays a protective role against the cytotoxic effects of BPC. PMID:17963960

  2. Disruption of Nitric Oxide Signaling by Helicobacter pylori Results in Enhanced Inflammation by Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Verriere, Thomas; Scull, Brooks P.; de Sablet, Thibaut; Glumac, Ashley; Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Correa, Pelayo; Peek, Richard M.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    A strong cellular crosstalk exists between the pathogen Helicobacter pylori and high-output NO production. However, how NO and H. pylori interact to signal in gastric epithelial cells and modulate the innate immune response is unknown. We show that chemical or cellular sources of NO induce the anti-inflammatory effector heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in gastric epithelial cells through a pathway that requires NF-κB. However, H. pylori decreases NO-induced NF-κB activation, thereby inhibiting HO-1 expression. This inhibitory effect of H. pylori results from activation of the transcription factor heat shock factor-1 by the H. pylori virulence factor CagA and by the host signaling molecules ERK1/2 and JNK. Consistent with these findings, HO-1 is downregulated in gastric epithelial cells of patients infected with cagA+, but not cagA− H. pylori. Enhancement of HO-1 activity in infected cells or in H. pylori-infected mice inhibits chemokine generation and reduces inflammation. These data define a mechanism by which H. pylori favors its own pathogenesis by inhibiting HO-1 induction through the action of CagA. PMID:21987660

  3. Anti-inflammatory pathways and alcoholic liver disease: role of an adiponectin/interleukin-10/heme oxygenase-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Palash; Pritchard, Michele T; Nagy, Laura E

    2010-03-21

    The development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a complex process involving both the parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells in the liver. Enhanced inflammation in the liver during ethanol exposure is an important contributor to injury. Kupffer cells, the resident macrophages in liver, are particularly critical to the onset of ethanol-induced liver injury. Chronic ethanol exposure sensitizes Kupffer cells to activation by lipopolysaccharide via Toll-like receptor 4. This sensitization enhances production of inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and reactive oxygen species, that contribute to hepatocyte dysfunction, necrosis, apoptosis, and fibrosis. Impaired resolution of the inflammatory process probably also contributes to ALD. The resolution of inflammation is an active, highly coordinated response that can potentially be manipulated via therapeutic interventions to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent studies have identified an adiponectin/interleukin-10/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway that is profoundly effective in dampening the enhanced activation of innate immune responses in primary cultures of Kupffer cells, as well as in an in vivo mouse model of chronic ethanol feeding. Importantly, induction of HO-1 also reduces ethanol-induced hepatocellular apoptosis in this in vivo model. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the development of therapeutic agents to regulate HO-1 and its downstream targets could be useful in enhancing the resolution of inflammation during ALD and preventing progression of early stages of liver injury. PMID:20238399

  4. Naive human T cells are activated and proliferate in response to the heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Burt, Trevor D; Seu, Lillian; Mold, Jeffrey E; Kappas, Attallah; McCune, Joseph M

    2010-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and its catabolic by-products have potent anti-inflammatory activity in many models of disease. It is not known, however, if HO-1 also plays a role in the homeostatic control of T cell activation and proliferation. We demonstrate here that the HO-1 inhibitor tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP) induces activation, proliferation, and maturation of naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells via interactions with CD14(+) monocytes in vitro. This response is dependent upon interactions of T cells with MHC class I and II on the surface of CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells were able to suppress this proliferation, even though their suppressive activity was itself impaired by SnMP. Given the magnitude of the Ag-independent T cell response induced by SnMP, we speculate that HO-1 plays an important role in dampening nonspecific T cell activation. Based on these findings, we propose a potential role for HO-1 in the control of naive T cell homeostatic proliferation. PMID:20921523

  5. Rupestonic acid derivative YZH-106 suppresses influenza virus replication by activation of heme oxygenase-1-mediated interferon response.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hui-Qiang; Wu, Ping; Hu, Jin; Yin, Jin-Qiu; Wu, Shuo; Ge, Miao; Sun, Wen-Fang; Zhao, Jiang-Yu; Aisa, Haji Akber; Li, Yu-Huan; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-07-01

    Given the limitation of available antiviral drugs and vaccines, there remains to be a pressing need for novel anti-influenza drugs. Rupestonic acid derivatives were reported to have an anti-influenza virus activity, but their mechanism remains to be elucidated. Herein, we aim to evaluate the antiviral activity of YZH-106, a rupestonic acid derivative, against a broad-spectrum of influenza viruses and to dissect its antiviral mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that YZH-106 exhibited a broad-spectrum antiviral activity against influenza viruses, including drug-resistant strains in vitro. Furthermore, YZH-106 provided partial protection of the mice to Influenza A virus (IAV) infection, as judged by decreased viral load in lungs, improved lung pathology, reduced body weight loss and partial survival benefits. Mechanistically, YZH-106 induced p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, which led to the activation of erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) that up-regulated heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in addition to other genes. HO-1 inhibited IAV replication by activation of type I IFN expression and subsequent induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), possibly in a HO-1 enzymatic activity-independent manner. These results suggest that YZH-106 inhibits IAV by up-regulating HO-1-mediated IFN response. HO-1 is thus a promising host target for antiviral therapeutics against influenza and other viral infectious diseases. PMID:27107768

  6. Expression of Heme Oxygenase-1 in Thick Ascending Loop of Henle Attenuates Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Heather A.; Gousette, Monette U.; Storm, Megan V.; Abraham, Nader G.; Csongradi, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Kidney-specific induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) attenuates the development of angiotensin II (Ang II) -dependent hypertension, but the relative contribution of vascular versus tubular induction of HO-1 is unknown. To determine the specific contribution of thick ascending loop of Henle (TALH) -derived HO-1, we generated a transgenic mouse in which the uromodulin promoter controlled expression of human HO-1. Quantitative RT-PCR and confocal microscopy confirmed successful localization of the HO-1 transgene to TALH tubule segments. Medullary HO activity, but not cortical HO activity, was significantly higher in transgenic mice than control mice. Enhanced TALH HO-1 attenuated the hypertension induced by Ang II delivered by an osmotic minipump for 10 days (139±3 versus 153±2 mmHg in the transgenic and control mice, respectively; P<0.05). The lower blood pressure in transgenic mice associated with a 60% decrease in medullary NKCC2 transporter expression determined by Western blot. Transgenic mice also exhibited a 36% decrease in ouabain-sensitive sodium reabsorption and a significantly attenuated response to furosemide in isolated TALH segments,. In summary, these results show that increased levels of HO-1 in the TALH can lower blood pressure by a mechanism that may include alterations in NKCC2-dependent sodium reabsorption. PMID:22323644

  7. An improved method for purification of recombinant truncated heme oxygenase-1 by expanded bed adsorption and gel filtration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong-Bo; Wang, Wei; Han, Ling; Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant truncated human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) expressed in Escherichia coli was efficiently separated and purified from feedstock by DEAE-ion exchange expanded bed adsorption. Protocol optimization of hHO-1 on DEAE adsorbent resulted in adsorption in 0 M NaCl and elution in 150 mM NaCl at a pH of 8.5. The active enzyme fractions separated from the expanded bed column were further purified by a Superdex 75 gel filtration step. The specific hHO-1 activity increased from 0.82 +/- 0.05 to 24.8 +/- 1.8 U/mg during the whole purification steps. The recovery and purification factor of truncated hHO-1 of the whole purification were 72.7 +/- 4.7 and 30.2 +/- 2.3%, respectively. This purification process can decrease the demand on the preparation of feedstock and simplify the purification process. PMID:17160582

  8. PECAM-1-dependent heme oxygenase-1 regulation via an Nrf2-mediated pathway in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Saragih, Hendry; Zilian, Eva; Jaimes, Yarúa; Paine, Ananta; Figueiredo, Constanca; Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer; Larmann, Jan; Theilmeier, Gregor; Burg-Roderfeld, Monika; Andrei-Selmer, Luminita-Cornelia; Becker, Jan Ulrich; Santoso, Sentot; Immenschuh, Stephan

    2014-06-01

    The antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1, which catalyses the first and rate-limiting step of heme degradation, has major anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects via its cell-type-specific functions in the endothelium. In the current study, we investigated whether the key endothelial adhesion and signalling receptor PECAM-1 (CD31) might be involved in the regulation of HO-1 gene expression in human endothelial cells (ECs). To this end PECAM-1 expression was down-regulated in human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) by an adenoviral vector-based knockdown approach. PECAM-1 knockdown markedly induced HO-1, but not the constitutive HO isoform HO-2. Nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which is a master regulator of the inducible antioxidant cell response, and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased in PECAM-1-deficient HUVECs, respectively. PECAM-1-dependent HO-1 regulation was also examined in PECAM-1 over-expressing Chinese hamster ovary and murine L-cells. Endogenous HO-1 gene expression and reporter gene activity of transiently transfected luciferase HO-1 promoter constructs with Nrf2 target sequences were decreased in PECAM-1 over-expressing cells. Moreover, a regulatory role of ROS for HO-1 regulation in these cells is demonstrated by studies with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and exogenous hydrogenperoxide. Finally, direct interaction of PECAM-1 with a native complex of its binding partner NB1 (CD177) and serine proteinase 3 (PR3) from human neutrophils, markedly induced HO-1 expression in HUVECs. Taken together, we demonstrate a functional link between HO-1 gene expression and PECAM-1 in human ECs, which might play a critical role in the regulation of inflammation. PMID:24500083

  9. Renal Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction with Hemin Augments Renal Hemodynamics, Renal Autoregulation, and Excretory Function

    PubMed Central

    Botros, Fady T.; Dobrowolski, Leszek; Navar, L. Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO-1; HO-2) catalyze conversion of heme to free iron, carbon monoxide, and biliverdin/bilirubin. To determine the effects of renal HO-1 induction on blood pressure and renal function, normal control rats (n = 7) and hemin-treated rats (n = 6) were studied. Renal clearance studies were performed on anesthetized rats to assess renal function; renal blood flow (RBF) was measured using a transonic flow probe placed around the left renal artery. Hemin treatment significantly induced renal HO-1. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were not different (115 ± 5 mmHg versus 112 ± 4 mmHg and 331 ± 16 versus 346 ± 10 bpm). However, RBF was significantly higher (9.1 ± 0.8 versus 7.0 ± 0.5 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and renal vascular resistance was significantly lower (13.0 ± 0.9 versus 16.6 ± 1.4 [mmHg/(mL/min/g)], P < 0.05). Likewise, glomerular filtration rate was significantly elevated (1.4 ± 0.2 versus 1.0 ± 0.1 mL/min/g, P < 0.05), and urine flow and sodium excretion were also higher (18.9 ± 3.9 versus 8.2 ± 1.0 μL/min/g, P < 0.05 and 1.9 ± 0.6 versus 0.2 ± 0.1 μmol/min/g, P < 0.05, resp.). The plateau of the autoregulation relationship was elevated, and renal vascular responses to acute angiotensin II infusion were attenuated in hemin-treated rats reflecting the vasodilatory effect of HO-1 induction. We conclude that renal HO-1 induction augments renal function which may contribute to the antihypertensive effects of HO-1 induction observed in hypertension models. PMID:22518281

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 induction prevents neuronal damage triggered during mitochondrial inhibition: role of CO and bilirubin.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Ibarra, Marisol; Estrada-Sánchez, Ana María; Massieu, Lourdes; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-06-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the breakdown of heme to iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, the latter being further reduced to bilirubin (BR). A protective role of the inducible isoform, HO-1, has been described in pathological conditions associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HO-1 in the neurotoxicity induced by the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) in primary cultures of cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Toxicity of 3-NP is associated with ROS production, and this metabolic toxin has been used to mimic pathological conditions such as Huntington's disease. We found that cell death caused by 3-NP exposure was exacerbated by inhibition of HO with tin mesoporphyrin (SnMP). In addition, HO-1 up-regulation induced by the exposure to cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) before the incubation with 3-NP, prevented the cell death and the increase in ROS induced by 3-NP. Interestingly, addition of SnMP to CoPP-pretreated CGNs exposed to 3-NP, abolished the protective effect of CoPP suggesting that HO activity was responsible for this protective effect. This was additionally supported by the fact that CORM-2, a CO-releasing molecule, and BR, were able to protect against cell death and the increase in ROS induced by 3-NP. Our data clearly show that HO-1 elicits in CGNs a neuroprotective action against the neurotoxicity of 3-NP and that CO and BR may be involved, at least in part, in this protective effect. The present results increase our knowledge about the role of HO-1 in neuropathological conditions. PMID:19063990

  11. Resveratrol Partially Prevents Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity in Dopaminergic SH-SY5Y Cells through Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Dependent Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Shang-Der; Chuang, Yao-Chung; Lin, Hung-Yu; Huang, Chi-Ren; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Liou, Chia-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress or protein misfolding and aggregation may underlie this process. Autophagy is an intracellular catabolic mechanism responsible for protein degradation and recycling of damaged proteins and cytoplasmic organelles. Autophagic dysfunction may hasten the progression of neuronal degeneration. In this study, resveratrol promoted autophagic flux and protected dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced apoptosis. In an in vivo PD model, rotenone induced loss of dopaminergic neurons, increased oxidation of mitochondrial proteins and promoted autophagic vesicle development in brain tissue. The natural phytoalexin resveratrol prevented rotenone-induced neuronal apoptosis in vitro, and this pro-survival effect was abolished by an autophagic inhibitor. Although both rotenone and resveratrol promoted LC3-II accumulation, autophagic flux was inhibited by rotenone and augmented by resveratrol. Further, rotenone reduced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, whereas resveratrol increased HO-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HO-1 abolished resveratrol-mediated autophagy and neuroprotection. Notably, the effects of a pharmacological inducer of HO-1 were similar to those of resveratrol, and protected against rotenone-induced cell death in an autophagy-dependent manner, validating the hypothesis of HO-1 dependent autophagy in preventing neuronal death in the in vitro PD model. Collectively, our findings suggest that resveratrol induces HO-1 expression and prevents dopaminergic cell death by regulating autophagic flux; thus protecting against rotenone-induced neuronal apoptosis. PMID:24451142

  12. Physical exercise-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and heme oxygenase-1 in human leukocytes: effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation.

    PubMed

    Niess, A M; Sommer, M; Schneider, M; Angres, C; Tschositsch, K; Golly, I C; Battenfeld, N; Northoff, H; Biesalski, H K; Dickhuth, H H; Fehrenbach, E

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of RRR-alpha-tocopherol (500 IU/day, 8 days) on in vivo cytokine response and cytoplasmic expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and the antioxidant stress protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in human leukocytes after exhaustive exercise. Thirteen men were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study with a wash-out period of 28 days. The exercise procedure consisted of an incremental treadmill test followed by a continuous run until exhaustion at 110% of the individual anaerobic threshold (total duration 28.5 +/- 0.8 min). HO-1 and iNOS protein were assessed in mono- (M), lympho-, and granulocytes (G) using flow cytometry. Plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 were measured by ELISA. IL-6 rose significantly whereas IL-8 did not exhibit significant changes after exercise. Changes of IL-6 were not affected by RRR-alpha-tocopherol. Exercise induced an increase of iNOS protein primarily in M and G. A small, but significant, increase of HO-1 protein was measured in M and G. RRR-alpha-Tocopherol did not show any significant effects on cytoplasmic expression of iNOS and HO-1 at rest and after exercise. In conclusion, exhaustive exercise induces expression of iNOS and HO-1 in human leukocytes by a mechanism that is not sensitive to RRR-alpha-tocopherol supplementation. PMID:11232592

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Agúndez, José A. G.; García-Martín, Elena; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Millán-Pascual, Jorge; Díaz-Sánchez, María; Calleja, Patricia; Pisa, Diana; Turpín-Fenoll , Laura; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Pastor, Pau; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Ayuso-Peralta, Lucía; Torrecillas, Dolores; García-Albea, Esteban; Plaza-Nieto, José Francisco; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix Javier

    2016-01-01

    Several neurochemical, neuropathological, and experimental data suggest a possible role of oxidative stress in the ethiopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis(MS). Heme-oxygenases(HMOX) are an important defensive mechanism against oxidative stress, and HMOX1 is overexpressed in the brain and spinal cord of MS patients and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis(EAE). We analyzed whether common polymorphisms affecting the HMOX1 and HMOX2 genes are related with the risk to develop MS. We analyzed the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 SNPs, as well as the presence of Copy number variations(CNVs) of these genes in 292 subjects MS and 533 healthy controls, using TaqMan assays. The frequencies of HMOX2 rs1051308AA genotype and HMOX2 rs1051308A and HMOX1 rs2071746A alleles were higher in MS patients than in controls, although only that of the SNP HMOX2 rs1051308 in men remained as significant after correction for multiple comparisons. None of the studied polymorphisms was related to the age at disease onset or with the MS phenotype. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphism and the risk to develop MS in Spanish Caucasian men and a trend towards association between the HMOX1 rs2071746A and MS risk. PMID:26868429

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Inflammation and Mycobacterial Survival in Human Macrophages during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Scharn, Caitlyn R; Collins, Angela C; Nair, Vidhya R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Marciano, Denise K; Graviss, Edward A; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. We previously showed that M. tuberculosis infection in mice induces expression of the CO-producing enzyme heme oxygenase (HO1) and that CO is sensed by M. tuberculosis to initiate a dormancy program. Further, mice deficient in HO1 succumb to M. tuberculosis infection more readily than do wild-type mice. Although mouse macrophages control intracellular M. tuberculosis infection through several mechanisms, such as NO synthase, the respiratory burst, acidification, and autophagy, how human macrophages control M. tuberculosis infection remains less well understood. In this article, we show that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 in both mouse and human tuberculosis lesions in vivo, and that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 during primary human macrophage infection in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that chemical inhibition of HO1 both reduces inflammatory cytokine production by human macrophages and restricts intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Thus, induction of HO1 by M. tuberculosis infection may be a mycobacterial virulence mechanism to enhance inflammation and bacterial growth. PMID:27183573

  15. Artesunate Protects Against Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury Via Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Hui; Jin, Song-Gen; Fei, Dong-Sheng; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Lian, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Shang-Ha; Zhao, Ming-Ran; Zhao, Ming-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin, has anti-inflammatory properties and exerts protective roles in sepsis. Heme oxygense-1 (HO-1) inhibits the inflammatory response through reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte influx into tissues. The present study investigated the effects of artesunate on HO-1 and septic lung injury. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was employed to induce septic lung injury. Mice pretreated with artesunate (AS) (15 mg/kg) exhibited decreased sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury and alleviated lung pathological changes and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, AS lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissue. In addition, AS enhanced NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression and enzymatic activity in lung tissue. However, the protective effects of AS on sepsis-induced lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Therefore, AS plays protective roles in septic lung injury related to the upregulation of HO-1. These findings suggest an effective and applicable treatment to sepsis-induced lung injury and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and actions of AS. PMID:26627481

  16. Heme Oxygenase 1 and 2 Common Genetic Variants and Risk for Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Pedro; Agúndez, José A.G.; Alonso-Navarro, Hortensia; Martínez, Carmen; Benito-León, Julián; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Pastor, Pau; López-Alburquerque, Tomás; García-Martín, Elena; Jiménez-Jiménez, Félix J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several reports suggested a role of heme oxygenase genes 1 and 2 (HMOX1 and HMOX2) in modifying the risk to develop Parkinson disease (PD). Because essential tremor (ET) and PD share phenotypical and, probably, etiologic factors of the similarities, we analyzed whether such genes are related with the risk to develop ET. We analyzed the distribution of allelic and genotype frequencies of the HMOX1 rs2071746, HMOX1 rs2071747, HMOX2 rs2270363, and HMOX2 rs1051308 single nucleotide polymorphisms, as well as the presence of copy number variations of these genes in 202 subjects with familial ET and 747 healthy controls. Allelic frequencies of rs2071746T and rs1051308G were significantly lower in ET patients than in controls. None of the studied polymorphisms influenced the disease onset. The present study suggests a weak association between HMOX1 rs2071746 and HMOX2 rs1051308 polymorphisms and the risk to develop ET in the Spanish population.

  17. Renal Inhibition of Heme Oxygenase-1 Increases Blood Pressure in Angiotensin II-Dependent Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Csongradi, Eva; Storm, Megan V; Stec, David E

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that renal medullary heme oxygenase (HO) acts as a buffer against Ang-II dependent hypertension. To test this hypothesis, renal medullary HO activity was blocked using QC-13, an imidazole-dioxolane HO-1 inhibitor, or SnMP, a classical porphyrin based HO inhibitor. HO inhibitors were infused via IRMI catheters throughout the study starting 3 days prior to implantation of an osmotic minipump which delivered Ang II or saline vehicle. MAP was increased by Ang II infusion and further increased by IRMI infusion of QC-13 or SnMP. MAP averaged 113 ± 3, 120 ± 7, 141 ± 2, 153 ± 2, and 154 ± 3 mmHg in vehicle, vehicle + IRMI QC-13, Ang II, Ang II + IRMI QC-13, and Ang II + IRMI SnMP treated mice, respectively (n = 6). Inhibition of renal medullary HO activity with QC-13 in Ang II infused mice was also associated with a significant increase in superoxide production as well as significant decreases in antioxidant enzymes catalase and MnSOD. These results demonstrate that renal inhibition of HO exacerbates Ang II dependent hypertension through a mechanism which is associated with increases in superoxide production and decreases in antioxidant enzymes. PMID:22164328

  18. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-02-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA(-) CD62L(-)) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. T(reg) depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  19. Modulation of heme oxygenase-1 by metalloporphyrins increases anti-viral T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Bunse, C E; Fortmeier, V; Tischer, S; Zilian, E; Figueiredo, C; Witte, T; Blasczyk, R; Immenschuh, S; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO)-1, the inducible isoform of HO, has immunomodulatory functions and is considered a target for therapeutic interventions. In the present study, we investigated whether modulation of HO-1 might have regulatory effects on in-vitro T cell activation. The study examined whether: (i) HO-1 induction by cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) or inhibition by tin-mesoporphyrin (SnMP) can affect expansion and function of virus-specific T cells, (ii) HO-1 modulation might have a functional effect on other cell populations mediating effects on proliferating T cells [e.g. dendritic cells (DCs), regulatory T cells (Tregs) and natural killer cells] and (iii) HO-1-modulated anti-viral T cells might be suitable for adoptive immunotherapy. Inhibition of HO-1 via SnMP in cytomegalovirus (CMV)pp65-peptide-pulsed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) led to increased anti-viral T cell activation and the generation of a higher proportion of effector memory T cells (CD45RA− CD62L−) with increased capability to secrete interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B. Treg depletion and SnMP exposure increased the number of anti-viral T cells 15-fold. To test the possibility that HO-1 modulation might be clinically applicable in conformity with good manufacturing practice (GMP), SnMP was tested in isolated anti-viral T cells using the cytokine secretion assay. Compared to control, SnMP treatment resulted in higher cell counts and purity without negative impact on quality and effector function [CD107a, IFN-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were stable]. These results suggest an important role of HO-1 in the modulation of adaptive immune responses. HO-1 inhibition resulted in markedly more effective generation of functionally active T cells suitable for adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:25196646

  20. Omega-3 fatty acids protect the brain against ischemic injury by activating Nrf2 and upregulating heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meijuan; Wang, Suping; Mao, Leilei; Leak, Rehana K; Shi, Yejie; Zhang, Wenting; Hu, Xiaoming; Sun, Baoliang; Cao, Guodong; Gao, Yanqin; Xu, Yun; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2014-01-29

    Ischemic stroke is a debilitating clinical disorder that affects millions of people, yet lacks effective neuroprotective treatments. Fish oil is known to exert beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying protective mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study tests the hypothesis that omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) attenuate ischemic neuronal injury by activating nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and upregulating heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in both in vitro and in vivo models. We observed that pretreatment of rat primary neurons with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) significantly reduced neuronal death following oxygen-glucose deprivation. This protection was associated with increased Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation. Inhibition of HO-1 activity with tin protoporphyrin IX attenuated the protective effects of DHA. Further studies showed that 4-hydroxy-2E-hexenal (4-HHE), an end-product of peroxidation of n-3 PUFAs, was a more potent Nrf2 inducer than 4-hydroxy-2E-nonenal derived from n-6 PUFAs. In an in vivo setting, transgenic mice overexpressing fatty acid metabolism-1, an enzyme that converts n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs, were remarkably resistant to focal cerebral ischemia compared with their wild-type littermates. Regular mice fed with a fish oil-enhanced diet also demonstrated significant resistance to ischemia compared with mice fed with a regular diet. As expected, the protection was associated with HO-1 upregulation, Nrf2 activation, and 4-HHE generation. Together, our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFAs are highly effective in protecting the brain, and that the protective mechanisms involve Nrf2 activation and HO-1 upregulation by 4-HHE. Further investigation of n-3 PUFA neuroprotective mechanisms may accelerate the development of stroke therapies. PMID:24478369

  1. Sequential Upregulation of Superoxide Dismutase 2 and Heme Oxygenase 1 by tert-Butylhydroquinone Protects Mitochondria during Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiahong; Ren, Xuefang; Simpkins, James W

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in aging and neurodegenerative conditions. The transcription factor nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) regulates intracellular antioxidative capacity to combat oxidative stress. We examined the effect of tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), an Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway inducer, on mitochondrial function during oxidative challenge in neurons. tBHQ prevented glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in an HT-22 neuronal cell line even with an 8-hour exposure delay. tBHQ blocked glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial superoxide accumulation. It also protected mitochondrial function under glutamate toxicity, including maintaining mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial Ca(2+) hemostasis, and mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate-activated, mitochondria-mediated apoptosis was inhibited by tBHQ as well. In rat primary cortical neurons, tBHQ protected cells from both glutamate and buthionine sulfoximine toxicity. We found that tBHQ scavenged ROS and induced a rapid upregulation of superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) expression and a delayed upregulation of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) expression. In HT-22 cells with a knockdown of SOD2 expression, delayed treatment with tBHQ failed to prevent glutamate-induced cell death. Briefly, tBHQ rescues mitochondrial function by sequentially increasing SOD2 and HO-1 expression during glutamate-mediated oxidative stress. This study is the first to demonstrate the role of tBHQ in preserving mitochondrial function during oxidative challenge and provides a clinically relevant argument for using tBHQ against acute neuron-compromising conditions. PMID:26082377

  2. Treatment of Chronic Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis with Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and Glatiramer Acetate Alters Expression of Heme-Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Antonia; Fiebiger, Sebastian; Bros, Helena; Hertwig, Laura; Romero-Suarez, Silvina; Hamann, Isabell; Chanvillard, Coralie; Bellmann-Strobl, Judith; Paul, Friedemann; Millward, Jason M.; Infante-Duarte, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) synergizes with the immunomodulatory agent glatiramer acetate (GA) in eliciting anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in the relapsing-remitting EAE model. Thus, we hypothesized that mice with chronic EAE may also benefit from this combination therapy. We first assessed how a treatment with a single dose of GA together with daily application of EGCG may modulate EAE. Although single therapies with a suboptimal dose of GA or EGCG led to disease amelioration and reduced CNS inflammation, the combination therapy had no effects. While EGCG appeared to preserve axons and myelin, the single GA dose did not improve axonal damage or demyelination. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of EGCG was abolished when GA was applied in combination. To elucidate how a single dose of GA may interfere with EGCG, we focused on the anti-inflammatory, iron chelating and anti-oxidant properties of EGCG. Surprisingly, we observed that while EGCG induced a downregulation of the gene expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in affected CNS areas, the combined therapy of GA+EGCG seems to promote an increased HO-1 expression. These data suggest that upregulation of HO-1 may contribute to diminish the neuroprotective benefits of EGCG alone in this EAE model. Altogether, our data indicate that neuroprotection by EGCG in chronic EAE may involve regulation of oxidative processes, including downmodulation of HO-1. Further investigation of the re-dox balance in chronic neuroinflammation and in particular functional studies on HO-1 are warranted to understand its role in disease progression. PMID:26114502

  3. Upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 by Epigallocatechin-3-gallate via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and ERK pathways.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Hsu, M C; Hsieh, C W; Lin, J B; Lai, P H; Wung, B S

    2006-05-15

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme activated by various phytochemicals and we examined the ability of Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), the major constituent of green tea, to upregulate HO-1 expression in endothelial cells (ECs). We demonstrate that EGCG induces HO-1 expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, EGCG-mediated HO-1 induction was abrogated in the presence of actinomycin D and cycloheximide, indicating that this upregulation of HO-1 occurred at the transcriptional level. EGCG also upregulates Nrf2 levels in nuclear extracts and increases ARE-luciferase activity. Furthermore, EGCG is the most potent inducer of HO-1 expression of the different green tea constituents that we analyzed, but had no detectable cytotoxic effects over the 25-100 microM dosage range. The inhibition of intracellular ROS production by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase and the mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, rotenone, results in a decrease in EGCG-dependent HO-1 expression. In addition, we determined that tyrosine kinase is involved in EGCG induction of HO-1 as this is abrogated by genistein. ECs treated with EGCG exhibit activation of Akt and ERK1/2. In addition, pharmacological inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and MEK1/2, which are upstream of Akt and ERK1/2, respectively, attenuate EGCG-induced HO-1 expression. On the other hand, pretreatment of these cells with EGCG exerts significant cytoprotective effects against H2O2, suggesting that the induction of HO-1 is an important component in the protection against oxidative stress. Hence, EGCG is a novel phytochemical inducer of HO-1 expression and we further identify the principal underlying mechanisms involved in this process. PMID:16378625

  4. MiR-196a regulates heme oxygenase-1 by silencing Bach1 in the neonatal mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Go, Hayato; La, Ping; Namba, Fumihiko; Ito, Masato; Yang, Guang; Brydun, Andrey; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2016-08-01

    In the lung, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is developmentally regulated, with its highest expression in the first days of life. In addition, neonatal mice have limited HO-1 induction in hyperoxia compared with adults. However, few reports have addressed the functional effect of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of HO-1 in vivo. The aims of the present study were to characterize changes in lung miRNA expression during postnatal development and in response to hyperoxic exposure, and to identify miRNAs that target lung HO-1 gene expression. Neonatal (<12 h old) and adult (2 mo old) mice were exposed to room air or hyperoxia (95% oxygen) for 72 h. TaqMan low-density array rodent miRNA assays were used to calculate miRNA expression changes between control and hyperoxia groups in neonatal and adult lungs. In neonates, we identified miR-196a, which binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the transcriptional repressor BTB and CNC homology 1 (Bach1) and regulates its expression, and subsequently leads to higher levels of lung HO-1 mRNA compared with levels in adults. Despite the increase at baseline, miR-196a was degraded in hyperoxia resulting in limited HO-1 induction in neonatal mice lungs. Furthermore, the developmental differences in lung HO-1 gene expression can be explained in part by the variation in miRNA-196a and its effect on Bach1. This report is the first to show developmental differences in lung miR-196a and its effect on Bach1 and HO-1 expression at baseline and in hyperoxia. PMID:27343195

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1) Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells Modulates the Oxidative Response in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferrando, Mercedes; Wan, Xinhai; Meiss, Roberto; Yang, Jun; De Siervi, Adriana; Navone, Nora; Vazquez, Elba

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of death among males. It is currently estimated that inflammatory responses are linked to 15-20% of all deaths from cancer worldwide. PCa is dominated by complications arising from metastasis to the bone where the tumor cells interact with the bone microenvironment impairing the balance between bone formation and degradation. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is not completely understood. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) counteracts oxidative damage and inflammation. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that HO-1 is implicated in PCa, demonstrating that endogenous HO-1 inhibits bone derived-prostate cancer cells proliferation, invasion and migration and decreases tumor growth and angiogenesis in vivo. The aim of this work was to analyze the impact of HO-1 modulated PCa cells on osteoblasts proliferation in vitro and on bone remodeling in vivo. Using a co-culture system of PC3 cells with primary mice osteoblasts (PMOs), we demonstrated that HO-1 pharmacological induction (hemin treatment) abrogated the diminution of PMOs proliferation induced by PCa cells and decreased the expression of osteoclast-modulating factors in osteoblasts. No changes were detected in the expression of genes involved in osteoblasts differentiation. However, co-culture of hemin pre-treated PC3 cells (PC3 Hem) with PMOs provoked an oxidative status and activated FoxO signaling in osteoblasts. The percentage of active osteoblasts positive for HO-1 increased in calvarias explants co-cultured with PC3 Hem cells. Nuclear HO-1 expression was detected in tumors generated by in vivo bone injection of HO-1 stable transfected PC3 (PC3HO-1) cells in the femur of SCID mice. These results suggest that HO-1 has the potential to modify the bone microenvironment impacting on PCa bone metastasis. PMID:24224047

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates acute pulmonary inflammation by decreasing the release of segmented neutrophils from the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Franziska M; Braun, Stefan; Ngamsri, Kristian-Christos; Vollmer, Irene; Reutershan, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Recruiting polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs) from circulation and bone marrow to the site of inflammation is one of the pivotal mechanisms of the innate immune system. During inflammation, the enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) has been shown to reduce PMN migration. Although these effects have been described in various models, underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Recent studies revealed an influence of HO-1 on different cells of the bone marrow. We investigated the particular role of the bone marrow in terms of HO-1-dependent pulmonary inflammation. In a murine model of LPS inhalation, stimulation of HO-1 by cobalt (III) protoporphyrin-IX-chloride (CoPP) resulted in reduced segmented PMN migration into the alveolar space. In the CoPP group, segmented PMNs were also decreased intravascularly, and concordantly, mature and immature PMN populations were higher in the bone marrow. Inhibition of the enzyme by tin protoporphyrin-IX increased segmented and banded PMN migration into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with enhanced PMN release from the bone marrow and aggravated parameters of tissue inflammation. Oxidative burst activity was significantly higher in immature compared with mature PMNs. The chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which mediates homing of leukocytes into the bone marrow and is decreased in inflammation, was increased by CoPP. When SDF-1 was blocked by the specific antagonist AMD3100, HO-1 activation was no longer effective in curbing PMN trafficking to the inflamed lungs. In conclusion, we show evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of HO-1 are largely mediated by inhibiting the release of segmented PMNs from the bone marrow rather than direct effects within the lung. PMID:25172914

  7. Iron depletion in HCT116 cells diminishes the upregulatory effect of phenethyl isothiocyanate on heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Bolloskis, Michael P; Carvalho, Fabiana P; Loo, George

    2016-04-15

    Some of the health-promoting properties of cruciferous vegetables are thought to be partly attributed to isothiocyanates. These phytochemicals can upregulate the expression of certain cytoprotective stress genes, but it is unknown if a particular nutrient is involved. Herein, the objective was to ascertain if adequate iron is needed for enabling HCT116 cells to optimally express heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) when induced by phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC). PEITC increased HO-1 expression and also nuclear translocation of Nrf2, which is a transcription factor known to activate the HO-1 gene. However, in HCT116 cells that were made iron-deficient by depleting intracellular iron with deferoxamine (DFO), PEITC was less able to increase HO-1 expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2. These suppressive effects of DFO were overcome by replenishing the iron-deficient cells with the missing iron. To elucidate these findings, it was found that PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation can be inhibited with thiol antioxidants (glutathione and N-acetylcysteine). Furthermore, NADPH oxidase inhibitors (diphenyleneiodonium and apocynin) and a superoxide scavenger (Tiron) each inhibited PEITC-induced HO-1 upregulation. In doing so, diphenyleneiodonium was the most potent and also inhibited nuclear translocation of redox-sensitive Nrf2. Collectively, the results imply that the HO-1 upregulation by PEITC involves an iron-dependent, oxidant signaling pathway. Therefore, it is concluded that ample iron is required to enable PEITC to fully upregulate HO-1 expression in HCT116 cells. As such, it is conceivable that iron-deficient individuals may not reap the full health benefits of eating PEITC-containing cruciferous vegetables that via HO-1 may help protect against multiple chronic diseases. PMID:26945724

  8. Heme Oxygenase-1 Is Required for Angiogenic Function of Bone Marrow-Derived Progenitor Cells: Role in Therapeutic Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Grochot-Przeczek, Anna; Kotlinowski, Jerzy; Kozakowska, Magdalena; Starowicz, Katarzyna; Jagodzinska, Jolanta; Stachurska, Anna; Volger, Oscar L.; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Florczyk, Urszula; Tertil, Magdalena; Jazwa, Agnieszka; Szade, Krzysztof; Stepniewski, Jacek; Loboda, Agnieszka; Horrevoets, Anton J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme that can be down-regulated in diabetes. Its importance for mature endothelium has been described, but its role in proangiogenic progenitors is not well known. We investigated the effect of HO-1 on the angiogenic potential of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) and on blood flow recovery in ischemic muscle of diabetic mice. Results: Lack of HO-1 decreased the number of endothelial progenitor cells (Lin−CD45−cKit-Sca-1+VEGFR-2+) in murine bone marrow, and inhibited the angiogenic potential of cultured BMDCs, affecting their survival under oxidative stress, proliferation, migration, formation of capillaries, and paracrine proangiogenic potential. Transcriptome analysis of HO-1−/− BMDCs revealed the attenuated up-regulation of proangiogenic genes in response to hypoxia. Heterozygous HO-1+/− diabetic mice subjected to hind limb ischemia exhibited reduced local expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), placental growth factor (PlGF), stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), VEGFR-1, VEGFR-2, and CXCR-4. This was accompanied by impaired revascularization of ischemic muscle, despite a strong mobilization of bone marrow-derived proangiogenic progenitors (Sca-1+CXCR-4+) into peripheral blood. Blood flow recovery could be rescued by local injections of conditioned media harvested from BMDCs, but not by an injection of cultured BMDCs. Innovation: This is the first report showing that HO-1 haploinsufficiency impairs tissue revascularization in diabetes and that proangiogenic in situ response, not progenitor cell mobilization, is important for blood flow recovery. Conclusions: HO-1 is necessary for a proper proangiogenic function of BMDCs. A low level of HO-1 in hyperglycemic mice decreases restoration of perfusion in ischemic muscle, which can be rescued by a local injection of conditioned media from cultured BMDCs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1677–1692. PMID:24206054

  9. Serum Heme Oxygenase-1 and BMP-7 Are Potential Biomarkers for Bone Metabolism in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Tong-ling; Chen, Jin; Tong, Yan-li; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Liu, Yi; Herrmann, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been reported to play a regulatory role in osteoclastogenesis. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways induce osteoblastic differentiation and bone remodeling. Aims. To identify serum levels of HO-1, BMP-7, and Runt related-transcription factor 2 (Runx2) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and to investigate the relationships between HO-1, BMP-7, Runx2, and other common biomarkers for bone metabolism. Results. Serum levels of HO-1 and BMP-7 were revealed to be significantly higher in patients with RA or AS than in healthy controls (p < 0.01). In RA group, HO-1 was positively correlated with BMP-7, Runx2, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b (TRAP-5b) (p < 0.05, resp.), BMP-7 was positively correlated with Runx2 and TRAP-5b (p < 0.05, resp.), and Runx2 was negatively correlated with N-terminal midfragment of osteocalcin (NMID) (p < 0.05). In AS group, we observed identical correlation between HO-1 and BMP-7, but opposite correlations between BMP-7 and TRAP-5b and between Runx2 and NMID, when comparing with the RA cohort. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that HO-1 and BMP-7 are potential biomarkers for bone metabolism in patients with RA and AS. The different correlations between the bone markers point to distinct differences in bone remodeling pathways in the two types of arthritis. PMID:27314037

  10. Preconditioning with hyperbaric oxygen induces tolerance against oxidative injury via increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 in primary cultured spinal cord neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingbo; Li, Jinsheng; Zhang, Lifan; Wang, Bairen; Xiong, Lize

    2007-02-27

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) preconditioning can induce ischemic tolerance in the spinal cord. The effect can be attenuated by the administration of an oxygen free radical scavenger or by inhibition of antioxidant enzymes. However, the mechanism underlying HBO preconditioning of neurons against ischemic injury remains enigmatic. Therefore, in the present study primary cultured spinal cord neurons were treated with HBO and then subjected to a hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) insult. The results show that H(2)O(2) stimulation of the cultured spinal neurons caused severe DNA damage and decreased cell viability, and that these neurons were well protected against damage after a single exposure to HBO preconditioning (0.35 MPa, 98% O(2), 37 degrees C, 2 h). The protective effect started 4 h after pretreatment and lasted for at least 24 h. The cultured neurons after HBO treatment also exhibited increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression at both the protein and mRNA levels, which paralleled the protective effect of HBO. Treatment with tin-mesoporphyrin IX (SnMP), a specific HO-1 inhibitor, before HBO pretreatment abolished the HBO-induced adaptive protection noted in the cultured spinal neurons. In conclusion, HBO preconditioning can protect primary cultured spinal cord neurons against oxidative stress, and the upregulation of HO-1 expression plays an essential role in HBO induced preconditioning effect. PMID:17291539

  11. Identification of cyclins A1, E1 and vimentin as downstream targets of heme oxygenase-1 in vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Andrea; Mylroie, Hayley; Thornton, C. Clare; Calay, Damien; Birdsey, Graeme M.; Kiprianos, Allan P.; Wilson, Garrick K.; Soares, Miguel P.; Yin, Xiaoke; Mayr, Manuel; Randi, Anna M.; Mason, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential physiological process and an important factor in disease pathogenesis. However, its exploitation as a clinical target has achieved limited success and novel molecular targets are required. Although heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) acts downstream of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to modulate angiogenesis, knowledge of the mechanisms involved remains limited. We set out identify novel HO-1 targets involved in angiogenesis. HO-1 depletion attenuated VEGF-induced human endothelial cell (EC) proliferation and tube formation. The latter response suggested a role for HO-1 in EC migration, and indeed HO-1 siRNA negatively affected directional migration of EC towards VEGF; a phenotype reversed by HO-1 over-expression. EC from Hmox1−/− mice behaved similarly. Microarray analysis of HO-1-depleted and control EC exposed to VEGF identified cyclins A1 and E1 as HO-1 targets. Migrating HO-1-deficient EC showed increased p27, reduced cyclin A1 and attenuated cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity. In vivo, cyclin A1 siRNA inhibited VEGF-driven angiogenesis, a response reversed by Ad-HO-1. Proteomics identified structural protein vimentin as an additional VEGF-HO-1 target. HO-1 depletion inhibited VEGF-induced calpain activity and vimentin cleavage, while vimentin silencing attenuated HO-1-driven proliferation. Thus, vimentin and cyclins A1 and E1 represent VEGF-activated HO-1-dependent targets important for VEGF-driven angiogenesis. PMID:27388959

  12. Biliverdin reductase, a novel regulator for induction of activating transcription factor-2 and heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Kravets, Anatoliy; Hu, Zhenbo; Miralem, Tihomir; Torno, Michael D; Maines, Mahin D

    2004-05-01

    Biliverdin IXalpha reductase (BVR) catalyzes reduction of the HO activity product, biliverdin, to bilirubin. hBVR is a serine/threonine kinase that contains a bZip domain. Presently, regulation of gene expression by hBVR was examined. 293A cells were infected with adenovirus-doxycycline (Ad-Dox)-inducible hBVR cDNA. High level expression of hBVR was determined at mRNA, protein, and activity levels 8 h after induction. Cell signal transduction microarray analysis of cells infected with expression or with the control Ad-inverted (INV)-hBVR vector identified ATF-2 among several up-regulated genes. ATF-2 is a bZip transcription factor for activation of cAMP response element (CRE) and a dimeric partner to c-jun in MAPK pathway that regulates the stress protein, HO-1, expression. Northern and Western blot analyses showed increases of approximately 10-fold in ATF-2 mRNA and protein at 16 and 24 h after Dox addition. Ad-INV-hBVR did not effect ATF-2 expression. In hBVR-infected cells, levels of HO-1 mRNA and protein were increased. In vitro translated hBVR and nuclear extract containing hBVR in gel mobility-shift assay bound to AP-1 sites in the ATF-2 promoter region and to an oligonucleotide containing the CRE site. Both bindings could be competed out by excess unlabeled probe; in the presence of hBVR antibody, they displayed shifted bands. Co-transfection of hBVR with ATF-2 or c-jun promoters caused a severalfold increase in luciferase activity. hBVR modulation of ATF-2 and HO-1 expression suggests it has a potential role in regulation of AP-1 and cAMP-regulated genes and a role in cell signaling. We propose that increased expression of the protein can be used to alter the gene expression profile in the cell. PMID:14988408

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 regulates matrix metalloproteinase MMP-1 secretion and chondrocyte cell death via Nox4 NADPH oxidase activity in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22(phox) heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  14. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Matrix Metalloproteinase MMP-1 Secretion and Chondrocyte Cell Death via Nox4 NADPH Oxidase Activity in Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rousset, Francis; Nguyen, Minh Vu Chuong; Grange, Laurent; Morel, Françoise; Lardy, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) activates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and secretion of MMPs as well as chondrocyte apoptosis. Those events lead to matrix breakdown and are key features of osteoarthritis (OA). We confirmed that in human C-20/A4 chondrocytes the NADPH oxidase Nox4 is the main source of ROS upon IL-1β stimulation. Since heme molecules are essential for the NADPH oxidase maturation and activity, we therefore investigated the consequences of the modulation of Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the limiting enzyme in heme catabolism, on the IL-1β signaling pathway and more specifically on Nox4 activity. Induction of HO-1 expression decreased dramatically Nox4 activity in C-20/A4 and HEK293 T-REx™ Nox4 cell lines. Unexpectedly, this decrease was not accompanied by any change in the expression, the subcellular localization or the maturation of Nox4. In fact, the inhibition of the heme synthesis by succinylacetone rather than heme catabolism by HO-1, led to a confinement of the Nox4/p22phox heterodimer in the endoplasmic reticulum with an absence of redox differential spectrum highlighting an incomplete maturation. Therefore, the downregulation of Nox4 activity by HO-1 induction appeared to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO) generated from the heme degradation process. Interestingly, either HO-1 or CO caused a significant decrease in the expression of MMP-1 and DNA fragmentation of chondrocytes stimulated by IL-1β. These results all together suggest that a modulation of Nox4 activity via heme oxygenase-1 may represent a promising therapeutic tool in osteoarthritis. PMID:23840483

  15. Effects of tanshinone IIA on fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis through heme oxygenase-1, inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    SHU, MING; HU, XIAO-RONG; HUNG, ZUO-AN; HUANG, DAM-DAN; ZHANG, SHUN

    2016-01-01

    Tanshinone IIA is extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza and used in traditional Chinese medicine for its anti-inflammatory activity and antioxidant effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential protective effects of tanshinone IIA against fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Male Sprague Dawley rats were used as the model of cirrhosis in the present study. In the cirrhotic rats, the extent of fibrosis, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, serum levels of nuclear factor (NF)-κB, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), and the protein expression levels of phosphorylated-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) were all significantly increased. However, the serum malondialdehyde (MDA) activity and protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression were suppressed in cirrhotic rats compared with the sham (control) group. Compared with the cirrhotic group, administration of tanshinone IIA reduced the extent of fibrosis, levels of ALT and AST, HO-1 protein expression, serum NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels, and the activity of SOD, CAT and GSH-PX. Furthermore, administration of tanshinone IIA significantly increased the inhibition of the serum MDA activity and the Akt protein expression in cirrhotic rats compared with those in the cirrhotic group. The protective effect of tanshinone IIA suppresses fibrosis in a rat model of cirrhosis, and reduces inflammation and oxidative stress, via the HO-1, Akt and p38 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:26936326

  16. Hepatic expression of heme oxygenase-1 and antioxidant response element-mediated genes following administration of ethinyl estradiol to rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morio, Lisa A.; Leone, Angelique; Sawant, Sharmilee P.; Nie, Alex Y.; Brandon Parker, J.; Taggart, Peter; Barron, Alfred M.; McMillian, Michael K. . E-mail: mmcmilli@prdus.jnj.com; Lord, Peter

    2006-11-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is one of several enzymes induced by hepatotoxicants, and is thought to have an important protective role against cellular stress during liver inflammation and injury. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the role of HO-1 in estradiol-induced liver injury. A single dose of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg, po) resulted in mild liver injury. Repeated administration of ethinyl estradiol (500 mg/kg/day for 4 days, po) resulted in no detectable liver injury or dysfunction. Using RT-PCR analysis, we demonstrate that HO-1 gene expression in whole liver tissue is elevated (> 20-fold) after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. The number and intensity of HO-1 immunoreactive macrophages were increased after the single dose of ethinyl estradiol. HO-1 expression was undetectable in hepatic parenchymal cells from rats receiving Methocel control or a single dose of ethinyl estradiol, however cytosolic HO-1 immunoreactivity in these cells after repeated dosing of ethinyl estradiol was pronounced. The increases in HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 immunoreactivity following administration of a single dose of ethinyl estradiol suggested that this enzyme might be responsible for the observed protection of the liver during repeated dosing. To investigate the effect of HO-1 expression on ethinyl estradiol-induced hepatotoxicity, rats were pretreated with hemin (50 {mu}mol/kg, ip, a substrate and inducer of HO-1), with tin protoporphyrin IX (60 {mu}mol/kg, ip, an HO-1 inhibitor), or with gadolinium chloride (10 mg/kg, iv, an inhibitor/toxin of Kupffer cells) 24 h before ethinyl estradiol treatment. Pretreatment with modulators of HO-1 expression and activity had generally minimal effects on ethinyl estradiol-induced liver injury. These data suggest that HO-1 plays a limited role in antioxidant defense against ethinyl estradiol-induced oxidative stress and hepatotoxicity, and suggests that other coordinately induced enzymes are responsible for protection observed

  17. Lipoxin A4-Induced Heme Oxygenase-1 Protects Cardiomyocytes against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury via p38 MAPK Activation and Nrf2/ARE Complex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Zhou, Yu; Tang, Yan-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether lipoxin A4 (LXA4) increases expression of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) in cardiomyocytes, whether LXA4-induced HO-1 protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury, and what are the mechanisms involved in the LXA4-induced HO-1 induction. Methods Rat cardiomyocytes were exposed to H/R injury with or without preincubation with LXA4 or HO-1 inhibitor ZnPP-IX or various signal molecule inhibitors. Expressions of HO-1 protein and mRNA were analyzed by using Western blot and RT-PCR respectively. Activity of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binding to the HO-1 E1 enhancer was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 antioxidant responsive element (ARE) were measured by using electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Results Pretreatment of the cells undergoing H/R lesion with LXA4 significantly reduced the lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase productions, increased the cell viability, and increased the expressions of HO-1 protein and mRNA and HO-1 promoter activity. HO-1 inhibition abolished the protective role of LXA4 on the cells undergoing H/R lesion. LXA4 increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) activation, nuclear translocation of Nrf2, Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 ARE and E1 enhancer in cardiomyocytes with or without H/R exposure. Conclusion The protection role of LXA4 against H/R injury of cardiomyocytes is related to upregulation of HO-1, via activation of p38 MAPK pathway and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and Nrf2 binding to the HO-1 ARE and E1 enhancer, but not via activation of phosphatidyinositol-3-kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. PMID:23826208

  18. Transition between Acute and Chronic Hepatotoxicity in Mice Is Associated with Impaired Energy Metabolism and Induction of Mitochondrial Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Nikam, Aniket; Patankar, Jay V.; Lackner, Carolin; Schöck, Elisabeth; Kratky, Dagmar; Zatloukal, Kurt; Abuja, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The formation of protein inclusions is frequently associated with chronic metabolic diseases. In mice, short-term intoxication with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) leads to hepatocellular damage indicated by elevated serum liver enzyme activities, whereas only minor morphological changes are observed. Conversely, chronic administration of DDC for several weeks results in severe morphological damage, characterized by hepatocellular ballooning, disruption of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton, and formation of Mallory-Denk bodies consisting predominantly of misfolded keratins, Sqstm1/p62, and heat shock proteins. To evaluate the mechanistic underpinnings for this dichotomy we dissected the time-course of DDC intoxication for up to 10 weeks. We determined body weight change, serum liver enzyme activities, morphologic alterations, induction of antioxidant response (heme oxygenase-1, HO-1), oxidative damage and ATP content in livers as well as respiration, oxidative damage and the presence and activity of HO-1 in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria (mtHO-1). Elevated serum liver enzyme activity and oxidative liver damage were already present at early intoxication stages without further subsequent increase. After 2 weeks of intoxication, mice had transiently lost 9% of their body weight, liver ATP-content was reduced to 58% of controls, succinate-driven respiration was uncoupled from ATP-production and antioxidant response was associated with the appearance of catalytically active mtHO-1. Oxidative damage was associated with both acute and chronic DDC toxicity whereas the onset of chronic intoxication was specifically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction which was maximal after 2 weeks of intoxication. At this transition stage, adaptive responses involving mtHO-1 were induced, indirectly leading to improved respiration and preventing further drop of ATP levels. Our observations clearly demonstrate principally different mechanisms for acute and

  19. Quercetin Attenuates Inflammatory Responses in BV-2 Microglial Cells: Role of MAPKs on the Nrf2 Pathway and Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Grace Y.; Chen, Zihong; Jasmer, Kimberly J.; Chuang, Dennis Y.; Gu, Zezong; Hannink, Mark; Simonyi, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    A large group of flavonoids found in fruits and vegetables have been suggested to elicit health benefits due mainly to their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Recent studies with immune cells have demonstrated inhibition of these inflammatory responses through down-regulation of the pro-inflammatory pathway involving NF-κB and up-regulation of the anti-oxidative pathway involving Nrf2. In the present study, the murine BV-2 microglial cells were used to compare anti-inflammatory activity of quercetin and cyanidin, two flavonoids differing by their alpha, beta keto carbonyl group. Quercetin was 10 folds more potent than cyanidin in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced NO production as well as stimulation of Nrf2-induced heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression. In addition, quercetin demonstrated enhanced ability to stimulate HO-1 protein expression when cells were treated with LPS. In an attempt to unveil mechanism(s) for quercetin to enhance Nrf2/HO-1 activity under endotoxic stress, results pointed to an increase in phospho-p38MAPK expression upon addition of quercetin to LPS. In addition, pharmacological inhibitors for phospho-p38MAPK and MEK1/2 for ERK1/2 further showed that these MAPKs target different sites of the Nrf2 pathway that regulates HO-1 expression. However, inhibition of LPS-induced NO by quercetin was not fully reversed by TinPPIX, a specific inhibitor for HO-1 activity. Taken together, results suggest an important role of quercetin to regulate inflammatory responses in microglial cells and its ability to upregulate HO-1 against endotoxic stress through involvement of MAPKs. PMID:26505893

  20. Analysis of Nitric Oxide-Stabilized mRNAs in Human Fibroblasts Reveals HuR-Dependent Heme Oxygenase 1 Upregulation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Yuki; Rabinovic, Ariel; Srikantan, Subramanya; Gorospe, Myriam; Demple, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We previously observed that nitric oxide (NO) exposure increases the stability of mRNAs encoding heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and TIEG-1 in human and mouse fibroblasts. Here, we have used microarrays to look broadly for changes in mRNA stability in response to NO treatment. Using human IMR-90 and mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts treated with actinomycin D to block de novo transcription, microarray analysis suggested that the stability of the majority of mRNAs was unaffected. Among the mRNAs that were stabilized by NO treatment, seven transcripts were found in both IMR-90 and NIH 3T3 cells (CHIC2, GADD45B, HO-1, PTGS2, RGS2, TIEG, and ID3) and were chosen for further analysis. All seven mRNAs showed at least one hit of a signature motif for the stabilizing RNA-binding protein (RBP) HuR; accordingly, ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that all seven mRNAs associated with HuR. In keeping with a functional role of HuR in the response to NO, a measurable fraction of HuR increased in the cytoplasm following NO treatment. However, among the seven transcripts, only HO-1 mRNA showed a robust increase in the level of its association with HuR following NO treatment. In turn, HO-1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced when HuR levels were silenced in IMR-90 cells, and they were elevated when HuR was overexpressed. In sum, our results indicate that NO stabilizes mRNA subsets in fibroblasts, identify HuR as an RBP implicated in the NO response, reveal that HuR alone is insufficient for stabilizing several mRNAs by NO, and show that HO-1 induction by NO is regulated by HuR. PMID:19289500

  1. Carbon Monoxide Induces Heme Oxygenase-1 to Modulate STAT3 Activation in Endothelial Cells via S-Glutathionylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yan-Chang; Huang, Yu-Ting; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Yang, Po-Min; Wung, Being-Sun

    2014-01-01

    IL-6/STAT3 pathway is involved in a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. In our present study, we found that CO releasing molecules (CORMs) suppress IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and transactivity in endothelial cells (ECs). CO is a byproduct of heme degradation mediated by heme oxygenase (HO-1). However, CORMs can induce HO-1 expression and then inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation. CO has been found to increase a low level ROS and which may induce protein glutathionylation. We hypothesized that CORMs increases protein glutathionylation and inhibits STAT3 activation. We found that CORMs increase the intracellular GSSG level and induce the glutathionylation of multiple proteins including STAT3. GSSG can inhibit STAT3 phosphorylation and increase STAT3 glutathionylation whereas the antioxidant enzyme catalase can suppress the glutathionylation. Furthermore, catalase blocks the inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation by CORMs treatment. The inhibition of glutathione synthesis by BSO was also found to attenuate STAT3 glutathionylation and its inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation. We further found that HO-1 increases STAT3 glutathionylation and that HO-1 siRNA attenuates CORM-induced STAT3 glutathionylation. Hence, the inhibition of STAT3 activation is likely to occur via a CO-mediated increase in the GSSG level, which augments protein glutathionylation, and CO-induced HO-1 expression, which may enhance and maintain its effects in IL-6-treated ECs. PMID:25072782

  2. Heme oxygenase-1-mediated anti-inflammatory effects of tussilagonone on macrophages and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced skin inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohee; Kang, Unwoo; Seo, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Yeong Shik

    2016-05-01

    The dried flower buds of Tussilago farfara L. have been used in traditional medicine, mainly as an antitussive in the treatment of cough and other respiratory problems. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory signaling pathway via the upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in response to tussilagonone (TGN), a sesquiterpene compound isolated from T. farfara. TGN induced HO-1 expression and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activation in RAW 264.7 cells. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 by TGN also increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that TGN induced HO-1 via the Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, TGN suppressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and reduced the mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. TGN inhibited the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitory κB-α (IκB-α) and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. However, a specific inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the TGN-mediated suppression of NO production and knockdown of HO-1 by small interfering RNA abrogated inhibitory effects of TGN on iNOS and COX-2 protein expression and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Furthermore, TGN reduced iNOS and COX-2 expression in a 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin inflammation mouse model. Taken together, these findings suggest an important role for TGN-induced HO-1 activation in regulating inflammatory responses. Moreover, TGN is a potent therapeutic candidate for targeting the crosstalk between Nrf2/HO-1 and the NF-κB signaling pathway in the prevention or treatment of inflammation-associated diseases. PMID:26950613

  3. Impact of immunosuppressive agents on the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, heme oxygenase-1 and interleukin-7 in mesangial cells

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, GUO-BIAO; LUO, GUANG-HENG; BAO, DING-SU; CHEN, AN-JIAN; ZHUANG, YONG-XIANG; GUO, YA-NAN; WANG, XIN; WANG, YUAN-LIANG; CHEN, ZONG-PING; LU, YI-PING; LI, YOU-PING

    2015-01-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is a major cause of graft loss following kidney transplantation and may result from the interactions of various immune and non-immune factors. The aim of the present study was to establish an in vitro model of glomerular mesangial cell injury in order to examine the gene expression levels of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and interleukin-7 (IL-7) in mesangial cells during the healing process as well as to investigate the effects of various immunosuppressants on the expression of these genes. The HBZY-1 glomerular mesangial cell line was pre-treated in vitro with cytochalasin B for 2 h to induce reversible damage. Following the pre-treatment, the HBZY-1 cells were divided into five groups: Blank control group, cyclosporine A (CsA) group, tacrolimus (Tac) group, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) group and rapamycin (RAPA) group. After treating the mesangial cells with each immunosuppressive drug for 6, 12 or 24 h, the mRNA and protein expression levels of IDO, HO-1 and IL-7 were examined using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. The results showed that expression levels of HO-1 were significantly upregulated in response to treatment with CsA, FK506, RAPA and MMF, whereas the expression levels of IL-7 were markedly downregulated by treatment with the above immunosuppressants. CsA, FK506 and MMF significantly enhanced the expression levels of IDO, whereas RAPA exhibited no apparent effect on IDO. The present study may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of CAN and provide novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of CAN. PMID:25936769

  4. Coordinated regulation of Nrf2 and histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation in arsenite-activated transcription of the human heme oxygenase-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ray, Paul D; Huang, Bo-Wen; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-01

    Expression of the antioxidant gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is primarily induced through NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). Gene transcription is coordinately regulated by transcription factor activity at enhancer elements and epigenetic alterations such as the posttranslational modification of histone proteins. However, the role of histone modifications in the Nrf2-ARE axis remains largely uncharacterized. The environmental contaminant arsenite is a potent inducer of both HO-1 expression and phosphorylation of histone H3 serine 10 (H3S10); therefore, we investigated the relationships between Nrf2 and H3S10 phosphorylation in arsenite-induced, ARE-dependent, transcriptional activation of the human HO-1 gene. Arsenite increased phosphorylation of H3S10 both globally and at the HO-1 promoter concomitantly with HO-1 transcription in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Conversely, arsenite-induced H3S10 phosphorylation and HO-1 expression were blocked by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125, and JNK knockdown (siJNK). Interestingly, ablation of arsenite-induced H3S10 phosphorylation by SP600125 or siJNK did not inhibit Nrf2 nuclear accumulation nor ARE binding, despite inhibiting HO-1 expression. In response to arsenite, binding of Nrf2 to the HO-1 ARE preceded phosphorylation of H3S10 at the HO-1 ARE. Furthermore, arsenite-mediated occupancy of phosphorylated H3S10 at the HO-1 ARE was decreased in Nrf2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These results suggest the involvement of H3S10 phosphorylation in the Nrf2-ARE axis by proposing that Nrf2 may influence H3S10 phosphorylation at the HO-1 ARE and additional promoter regions. Our data highlights the complex interplay between Nrf2 and H3S10 phosphorylation in arsenite-activated HO-1 transcription. PMID:26291278

  5. Sofalcone, a gastric mucosa protective agent, increases vascular endothelial growth factor via the Nrf2-heme-oxygenase-1 dependent pathway in gastric epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shibuya, Akiko; Onda, Kenji; Kawahara, Hirofumi; Uchiyama, Yuka; Nakayama, Hiroko; Omi, Takamasa; Nagaoka, Masayoshi; Matsui, Hirofumi; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Sofalcone increases HO-1 in gastric epithelial cells. {yields} The induction of HO-1 by sofalcone treatment follows the activation of Nrf2. {yields} The production of VEGF by sofalcone treatment is mediated by HO-1 induction. -- Abstract: Sofalcone, 2'-carboxymethoxy-4,4-bis(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)chalcone, is an anti-ulcer agent that is classified as a gastric mucosa protective agent. Recent studies indicate heat shock proteins such as HSP32, also known as heme-oxygenase-1(HO-1), play important roles in protecting gastrointestinal tissues from several stresses. We have previously reported that sofalcone increases the expression of HO-1 in adipocytes and pre-adipocytes, although the effect of sofalcone on HO-1 induction in gastrointestinal tissues is not clear. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sofalcone on the expression of HO-1 and its functional role in rat gastric epithelial (RGM-1) cells. We found that sofalcone increased HO-1 expression in RGM-1 cells in both time- and concentration-dependent manners. The HO-1 induction was associated with the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) in RGM-1 cells. We also observed that sofalcone increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in the culture medium. Treatment of RGM-1 cells with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin-protoporphyrin), or HO-1 siRNA inhibited sofalcone-induced VEGF production, suggesting that the effect of sofalcone on VEGF expression is mediated by the HO-1 pathway. These results suggest that the gastroprotective effects of sofalcone are partly exerted via Nrf2-HO-1 activation followed by VEGF production.

  6. Heme oxygenase-1 signals are involved in preferential inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine release by surfactin in cells activated with Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Young Hun; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Ryu, Eun Yeon; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2010-12-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered the major pathogen of periodontal disease, which leads to chronic inflammation in oral tissues. P. gingivalis-produced lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key factor in the development of periodontitis. It is established that surfactin produced by Bacillus subtilis confers anti-inflammatory properties. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for surfactin-induced anti-inflammatory actions in the context of periodontitis are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether surfactin affected P. gingivalis LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-12, and determined that it significantly inhibited their production. Surfactin-mediated inhibition was mainly due to blocked activation of P. gingivalis LPS-triggered nuclear factor-κB. We also examined whether the regulatory effect of surfactin on P. gingivalis LPS-stimulated human THP-1 macrophages was mediated by the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) signals, and determined that surfactin also induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression via activation of Nrf-2. Additionally, we found that small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of Nrf-2 significantly inhibited surfactin-induced HO-1 expression. Furthermore, inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly decreased surfactin-induced HO-1 expression, which is consistent with the suggestion that surfactin-induced HO-1 expression occurs via PI3K/Akt, ERK, and Nrf-2. Treatment with a selective inhibitor of HO-1 reversed the surfactin-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines, suggesting that surfactin induces anti-inflammatory effects by activating Nrf-2-mediated HO-1 induction via PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling. Collectively, these observations support the potential of surfactin as a candidate in strategies to prevent caries, periodontitis, or other inflammatory diseases. PMID:20833156

  7. Coordinated expression of heme oxygenase-1 and ubiquitin in the porcine heart subjected to ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H S; Maulik, N; Gho, B C; Das, D K; Verdouw, P D

    Heme oxygenase (HO) isozymes, HO-1 and HO-2 catalyze the cleavage of heme b to form the antioxidant biliverdin IXa, iron and the putative cellular messenger carbon monoxide (CO). Heat and stress have been reported to induce the expression of HO-1, in analogy to ubiquitin, a protein of 8 kDa involved in ATP dependent proteolysis. Earlier, we have shown in anesthetized pigs that brief periods of coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion produce prolonged regional cardiac dysfunction (stunning) associated with altered expression of a number of genes. In the present study, we report on a coordinated expression pattern of HO-1 and ubiquitin in the same porcine model in which the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was occluded for 10 min and reperfused for 30 min (group I) and after a second occlusion of 10 min, reperfused for either 30 min (group II) or 90 min (group III) or 210 min (group IV). Myocardial tissue from LAD (stunned) and left circumflex coronary artery (LCx, control) perfused regions were collected in liquid nitrogen and analysed by Northern and dot blot hybridization techniques. We demonstrated a basal myocardial expression of multiple mRNAs (monomer and polymers) encoding ubiquitin and a single mRNA species (1.8 kb) encoding HO-1. However, the expression of both genes was drastically enhanced in the stunned myocardium as compared to the control in groups II and III with maximum mRNAs levels in group II. These results suggest that the myocardial adaptive response to ischemia involves the coordinated induction of HO-1 and ubiquitin, which may be indicative for the existence of a pathophysiologically important defense mechanism whereby, both degradation of denatured cellular proteins and generation of biologically active products of heme metabolism are accelerated. PMID:8739236

  8. Heme oxygenase-1 induction alters chemokine regulation and ameliorates human immunodeficiency virus-type-1 infection in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhao-Hua; Kumari, Namita; Nekhai, Sergei; Clouse, Kathleen A.; Wahl, Larry M.; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •Lipopolysaccharide stimulation of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) ameliorated HIV-1 infection of primary human macrophages. •The partial protection by HO-1 against HIV infection was associated with induction of chemokines such as MIP1α and MIP1β. •This mechanism explains lipopolysaccharide-stimulated HO-1-mediated inhibition of HIV-1 infection of macrophages. -- Abstract: We have elucidated a putative mechanism for the host resistance against HIV-1 infection of primary human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We show that LPS-activated MDM both inhibited HIV-1 entry into the cells and were refractory to post-entry productive viral replication. LPS-treated cells were virtually negative for mature virions as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. LPS activation of MDM markedly enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a potent inducible cytoprotective enzyme. Increased HO-1 expression was accompanied by elevated production of macrophage inflammatory chemokines (MIP1α and MIP1β) by LPS-activated MDM, significantly decreased surface chemokine receptor-5 (CCR-5) expression, and substantially reduced virus replication. Treatment of cells with HO-1 inhibitor SnPP IX (tin protoporphyrin IX) attenuated the LPS-mediated responses, HIV-1 replication and secretion of MIP1α, MIP1β, and LD78β chemokines with little change in surface CCR-5 expression. These results identify a novel role for HO-1 in the modulation of host immune response against HIV infection of MDM.

  9. Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Deficiency and Associated Glutamate-Mediated Neurotoxicity Is a Highly Conserved HIV Phenotype of Chronic Macrophage Infection That Is Resistant to Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kovacsics, Colleen E.; Vance, Patricia J.; Collman, Ronald G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is significantly reduced in the brain prefrontal cortex of HIV-positive individuals with HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Furthermore, this HO-1 deficiency correlates with brain viral load, markers of macrophage activation, and type I interferon responses. In vitro, HIV replication in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) selectively reduces HO-1 protein and RNA expression and induces production of neurotoxic levels of glutamate; correction of this HO-1 deficiency reduces neurotoxic glutamate production without an effect on HIV replication. We now demonstrate that macrophage HO-1 deficiency, and the associated neurotoxin production, is a conserved feature of infection with macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains that correlates closely with the extent of replication, and this feature extends to HIV-2 infection. We further demonstrate that this HO-1 deficiency does not depend specifically upon the HIV-1 accessory genes nef, vpr, or vpu but rather on HIV replication, even when markedly limited. Finally, antiretroviral therapy (ART) applied to MDM after HIV infection is established does not prevent HO-1 loss or the associated neurotoxin production. This work defines a predictable relationship between HIV replication, HO-1 loss, and neurotoxin production in MDM that likely reflects processes in place in the HIV-infected brains of individuals receiving ART. It further suggests that correcting this HO-1 deficiency in HIV-infected MDM could provide neuroprotection above that provided by current ART or proposed antiviral therapies directed at limiting Nef, Vpr, or Vpu functions. The ability of HIV-2 to reduce HO-1 expression suggests that this is a conserved phenotype among macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency viruses that could contribute to neuropathogenesis. IMPORTANCE The continued prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) underscores the need for adjunctive therapy that

  10. Effect of oral N-acetylcysteine on COPD patients with microsatellite polymorphism in the heme oxygenase-1 gene promoter

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Qing; Fang, Li-Zhou; Liu, Ling; Fu, Wei-Ping; Dai, Lu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a protective role as an antioxidant in the lung, and HO-1 gene promoter polymorphism has been shown to be associated with the severity and prognosis of COPD patients. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant/mucous modifier, has shown an uncertain benefit in COPD patients. We hypothesized that this polymorphism could be associated with the effectiveness of oral NAC. Methods A total of 368 patients with COPD were recruited and the polymorphisms of their HO-1 gene promoter were classified into three subclasses according to the number of (GT)n repeats, as previously reported: class S (<27 (GT)n repeats), class M (27–32 (GT)n repeats), and class L (>32 (GT)n repeats). These subjects were then classified as L+ group (with the L allele: L/L, L/M, L/S) and L− group (without the L allele: M/M, M/S, S/S). All the patients were allocated to standard therapy plus NAC 600 mg bid over a 1-year period and were observed over that year. Results The L− group saw improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (from 1.44±0.37 to 1.58±0.38, P=0.04) and FEV1% predicted (from 56.6±19.2 to 59.7±17.2, P=0.03). No improvement was found in forced vital capacity of each group and the decline of forced vital capacity in both of the groups was not statistical significant. The number of yearly COPD exacerbations of the L− group was 1.5±0.66 which was lower than the 2.1±0.53 of the L+ group (P<0.01). For the changes of St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, only the activity score of the L− group was more significant than that of the L+ group (P=0.02). The improvement of the outcome of 6-minute walking distance test in L− group (from 290.1±44.9 meters to 309.7±46.9 m) was higher than that in the L+ group (from 289.7±46.2 m to 300.3±44.2 m) (P=0.03). Conclusion A 600 mg bid oral NAC treatment for 1-year on COPD patients without the L allele can improve the FEV1, FEV1% predicted, the SGRQ activity score, and