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Sample records for hemispherical roughness element

  1. Global stability and sensitivity analysis of boundary-layer flows past a hemispherical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citro, V.; Giannetti, F.; Luchini, P.; Auteri, F.

    2015-08-01

    We study the full three-dimensional instability mechanism past a hemispherical roughness element immersed in a laminar Blasius boundary layer. The inherent three-dimensional flow pattern beyond the Hopf bifurcation is characterized by coherent vortical structures usually called hairpin vortices. Direct numerical simulation results are used to analyze the formation and the shedding of hairpin vortices inside the shear layer. The first bifurcation is investigated by global-stability tools. We show the spatial structure of the linear direct and adjoint global eigenmodes of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations and use the structural-sensitivity field to locate the region where the instability mechanism acts. The core of this instability is found to be symmetric and spatially localized in the region immediately downstream of the roughness element. The effect of the variation of the ratio between the obstacle height k and the boundary layer thickness δk ∗ is also considered. The resulting bifurcation scenario is found to agree well with previous experimental investigations. A limit regime for k / δk ∗ < 1 . 5 is attained where the critical Reynolds number is almost constant, Rek ≈ 580. This result indicates that, in these conditions, the only important parameter identifying the bifurcation is the unperturbed (i.e., without the roughness element) velocity slope at the wall.

  2. NO PLIF Study of Hypersonic Transition Over a Discrete Hemispherical Roughness Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Ivey, Christopher; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) has been use to investigate the hypersonic flow over a flat plate with and without a 2-mm (0.08-in) radius hemispherical trip. In the absence of the trip, for all angles of attack and two different Reynolds numbers, the flow was observed to be laminar and mostly steady. Boundary layer thicknesses based on the observed PLIF intensity were measured and compared with a CFD computation, showing agreement. The PLIF boundary layer thickness remained constant while the NO flowrate was varied by a factor of 3, indicating non-perturbative seeding of NO. With the hemispherical trip in place, the flow was observed to be laminar but unsteady at the shallowest angle of attack and lowest Reynolds number and appeared vigorously turbulent at the steepest angle of attack and highest Reynolds number. Laminar corkscrew-shaped vortices oriented in the streamwise direction were frequently observed to transition the flow to more turbulent structures.

  3. Heat Transfer Variation on Protuberances and Surface Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of surface irregularities on local convective heat transfer, the variation in heat transfer coefficients on small (2-6 mm diam) hemispherical roughness elements on a flat plate has been studied in a wind funnel using IR techniques. Heat transfer enhancement was observed to vary over the roughness elements with the maximum heat transfer on the upstream face. This heat transfer enhancement increased strongly with roughness size and velocity when there was a laminar boundary layer on the plate. For a turbulent boundary layer, the heat transfer enhancement was relatively constant with velocity, but did increase with element size. When multiple roughness elements were studied, no influence of adjacent roughness elements on heat transfer was observed if the roughness separation was greater than approximately one roughness element radius. As roughness separation was reduced, less variation in heat transfer was observed on the downstream elements. Implications of the observed roughness enhanced heat transfer on ice accretion modeling are discussed.

  4. Elastoplastic deformation of a roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, M. V.; Kornev, Yu. V.

    2014-03-01

    The problem of using the mechanical properties determined in a macroexperiment in contact models for micron-sized roughness elements is considered. For a sample of commercial-purity AD1 aluminum, the penetration depths of an indenter into a rough surface element that are determined in a physical experiment and in a three-dimensional finite element simulation are compared. It is found that, with allowance for certain assumptions, the application of the properties determined in a macroexperiment requires their correction to take into account the cold work hardening of the surface layer in the sample material and the size effect.

  5. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  6. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  7. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 1 20-Inch Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA simulations of water landing impacts. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 1 of the EWIT series featured water impact tests of a 20-inch hemisphere dropped from heights of 5 feet and 10 feet. The hemisphere was outfitted with an accelerometer and three pressure gages. The focus of this report is the correlation of analytical models against test data.

  8. Transition Experiments on Blunt Bodies with Isolated Roughness Elements in Hypersonic Free Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reda, Daniel C.; Wilder, Michael C.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2010-01-01

    Smooth titanium hemispheres with isolated three-dimensional (3D) surface roughness elements were flown in the NASA Ames hypersonic ballistic range through quiescent CO2 and air environments. Global surface intensity (temperature) distributions were optically measured and thermal wakes behind individual roughness elements were analyzed to define tripping effectiveness. Real-gas Navier-Stokes calculations of model flowfields, including laminar boundary layer development in these flowfields, were conducted predict key dimensionless parameters used to correlate transition on blunt bodies in hypersonic flow. For isolated roughness elements totally immersed within the laminar boundary layer, critical roughness Reynolds numbers for flights in air were found to be higher than those measured for flights in CO2, i.e., it was easier to trip the CO2 boundary layer to turbulence. Tripping effectiveness was found to be dependent on trip location within the subsonic region of the blunt body flowfield, with effective tripping being most difficult to achieve for elements positioned closest to the stagnation point. Direct comparisons of critical roughness Reynolds numbers for 3D isolated versus 3D distributed roughness elements for flights in air showed that distributed roughness patterns were significantly more effective at tripping the blunt body laminar boundary layer to turbulence.

  9. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  10. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  11. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  12. Connections Between the Spring Breakup of the Southern Hemisphere Polar Vortex, Stationary Waves, and Air-sea Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim I.; Oman, Luke David; Barnes, Elizabeth A.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Hurwitz, Margaret H.; Molod, Andrea M.

    2013-01-01

    A robust connection between the drag on surface-layer winds and the stratospheric circulation is demonstrated in NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model (GEOSCCM). Specifically, an updated parameterization of roughness at the air-sea interface, in which surface roughness is increased for moderate wind speeds (4ms to 20ms), leads to a decrease in model biases in Southern Hemispheric ozone, polar cap temperature, stationary wave heat flux, and springtime vortex breakup. A dynamical mechanism is proposed whereby increased surface roughness leads to improved stationary waves. Increased surface roughness leads to anomalous eddy momentum flux convergence primarily in the Indian Ocean sector (where eddies are strongest climatologically) in September and October. The localization of the eddy momentum flux convergence anomaly in the Indian Ocean sector leads to a zonally asymmetric reduction in zonal wind and, by geostrophy, to a wavenumber-1 stationary wave pattern. This tropospheric stationary wave pattern leads to enhanced upwards wave activity entering the stratosphere. The net effect is an improved Southern Hemisphere vortex: the vortex breaks up earlier in spring (i.e., the spring late-breakup bias is partially ameliorated) yet is no weaker in mid-winter. More than half of the stratospheric biases appear to be related to the surface wind speed biases. As many other chemistry climate models use a similar scheme for their surface layer momentum exchange and have similar biases in the stratosphere, we expect that results from GEOSCCM may be relevant for other climate models.

  13. Flow formed by spanwise gaps between roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, E.; Lin, S. H.; Islam, O.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the three mean velocity components and the three Reynolds shear stresses were made in the region downstream of gaps between wall-mounted roughness elements of square cross section and high aspect ratio in a thick turbulent boundary layer. The effect of small and large gaps was studied in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 3600, based on obstacle height and free-stream velocity. The small gap produces retardation of the gap flow as with a two-dimensional roughness element, but a definite interaction between gap and wake flows is observed. The interaction is more intense for the large gap than for the small. Both gaps generate a secondary crossflow which moves fluid away from the centerline in the wall region and toward the centerline in the outer (y greater than 1.5H) region.

  14. The Effect of Volumetric Porosity on Roughness Element Drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; Nickling, William; Nikolich, George; Etyemezian, Vicken

    2016-04-01

    Much attention has been given to understanding how the porosity of two dimensional structures affects the drag force exerted by boundary-layer flow on these flow obstructions. Porous structures such as wind breaks and fences are typically used to control the sedimentation of sand and snow particles or create micro-habitats in their lee. Vegetation in drylands also exerts control on sediment transport by wind due to aerodynamic effects and interaction with particles in transport. Recent research has also demonstrated that large spatial arrays of solid three dimensional roughness elements can be used to reduce sand transport to specified targets for control of wind erosion through the effect of drag partitioning and interaction of the moving sand with the large (>0.3 m high) roughness elements, but porous elements may improve the effectiveness of this approach. A thorough understanding of the role porosity plays in affecting the drag force on three-dimensional forms is lacking. To provide basic understanding of the relationship between the porosity of roughness elements and the force of drag exerted on them by fluid flow, we undertook a wind tunnel study that systematically altered the porosity of roughness elements of defined geometry (cubes, rectangular cylinders, and round cylinders) and measured the associated change in the drag force on the elements under similar Reynolds number conditions. The elements tested were of four basic forms: 1) same sized cubes with tubes of known diameter milled through them creating three volumetric porosity values and increasing connectivity between the tubes, 2) cubes and rectangular cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other, and 3) round cylinders constructed of brass screen that nested within each other. The two-dimensional porosity, defined as the ratio of total surface area of the empty space to the solid surface area of the side of the element presented to the fluid flow was conserved at 0.519 for

  15. Observations on the Growth of Roughness Elements Into Icing Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen, Ching

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experiment conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center to understand the process by which icing feathers are formed in the initial stages of ice accretion formation on swept wings. Close-up photographic data were taken on an aluminum NACA 0012 swept wing tip airfoil. Two types of photographic data were obtained: time sequence close-up photographic data during the run and close-up photographic data of the ice accretion at the end of each run. Icing runs were conducted for short ice accretion times from 10 to 180 sec. The time sequence close-up photographic data was used to study the process frame by frame and to create movies of how the process developed. The movies confirmed that at glaze icing conditions in the attachment line area icing feathers develop from roughness elements. The close-up photographic data at the end of each run showed that roughness elements change into a pointed shape with an upstream facet and join on the side with other elements having the same change to form ridges with pointed shape and upstream facet. The ridges develop into feathers when the upstream facet grows away to form the stem of the feather. The ridges and their growth into feathers were observed to form the initial scallop tips present in complete scallops.

  16. The effect of roughness elements on wind erosion: The importance of surface shear stress distribution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Representation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Drag partitioning schemes are used to account for roughness by scaling the soil entrainment threshold by the ratio of shear stress on roughness elements to that on the veg...

  17. Elements of cognitive rehabilitation after right hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Calvanio, R; Levine, D; Petrone, P

    1993-02-01

    There are two basic approaches to cognitive training: (1) impairment training and (2) task specific training. Impairment training addresses impairments common to a number of tasks and attempts to offer a general benefit to all of the tasks at once. Task specific training focuses on the impairments that arise in a single task and attempts to improve performance on that task. Impairment training of spatial disorders following right hemisphere stroke has shown some success when curricula are properly designed. The success, however, is quite limited because of normal cognitive constraints and those occurring after brain damage. Task specific training in conjunction with the combined application of various cognitive principles appears more promising, but as yet, only a few studies exist. The neurologic factors are likely to be the same factors that influence recovery. The factors that influence trainability are lesion topography (size and location of the focus plus premorbid atrophy), lesion chronicity, and the presence of additional cognitive impairments (anosognosia, confusion, and abulia). Other interventions that may be beneficial, even for training resistant patients, include behavior modification, cognitive prostheses, and drugs. PMID:8441373

  18. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  19. Wake Instabilities Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in High Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Norris, Andrew; Edwards, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated, spanwise symmetric roughness element in zero pressure gradient boundary layers at Mach 3.5 and 5.9, with an emphasis on roughness heights of less than 55 percent of the local boundary layer thickness. The Mach 5.9 cases include flow conditions that are relevant to both ground facility experiments and high altitude flight ("cold wall" case). Regardless of the Mach number, the mean flow distortion due to the roughness element is characterized by long-lived streamwise streaks in the roughness wake, which can support instability modes that did not exist in the absence of the roughness element. The higher Mach number cases reveal a variety of instability mode shapes with velocity fluctuations concentrated in different localized regions of high base flow shear. The high shear regions vary from the top of a mushroom shaped structure characterizing the centerline streak to regions that are concentrated on the sides of the mushroom. Unlike the Mach 3.5 case with nearly same values of scaled roughness height k/delta and roughness height Reynolds number Re(sub kk), the odd wake modes in both Mach 5.9 cases are significantly more unstable than the even modes of instability. Additional computations for a Mach 3.5 boundary layer indicate that the presence of a roughness element can also enhance the amplification of first mode instabilities incident from upstream. Interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also explored.

  20. The Long Range Persistence of Wakes Behind a Row of Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Sescu, Adrian; Duck, Peter W.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2010-01-01

    We consider a periodic array of relatively small roughness elements whose spanwise separation is of the order of the local boundary-layer thickness and construct a local asymptotic high-Reynolds-number solution that is valid in the vicinity of the roughness. The resulting flow decays on the very short streamwise length scale of the roughness, but the solution eventually becomes invalid at large downstream distances and a new solution has to be constructed in the downstream region. This latter result shows that the roughness-generated wakes can persist over very long streamwise distances, which are much longer than the distance between the roughness elements and the leading edge. Detailed numerical results are given for the far wake structure.

  1. Computations of Disturbance Amplification Behind Isolated Roughness Elements and Comparison with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Bynum, Michael; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2015-01-01

    Computations are performed to study laminar-turbulent transition due to isolated roughness elements in boundary layers at Mach 3.5 and 5.95, with an emphasis on flow configurations for which experimental measurements from low disturbance wind tunnels are available. The Mach 3.5 case corresponds to a roughness element with right-triangle planform with hypotenuse that is inclined at 45 degrees with respect to the oncoming stream, presenting an obstacle with spanwise asymmetry. The Mach 5.95 case corresponds to a circular roughness element along the nozzle wall of the Purdue BAMQT wind tunnel facility. In both cases, the mean flow distortion due to the roughness element is characterized by long-lived streamwise streaks in the roughness wake, which can support instability modes that did not exist in the absence of the roughness element. The linear amplification characteristics of the wake flow are examined towards the eventual goal of developing linear growth correlations for the onset of transition.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of instabilities in parallel flow with spherical roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deanna, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Results from a direct numerical simulation of laminar flow over a flat surface with spherical roughness elements using a spectral-element method are given. The numerical simulation approximates roughness as a cellular pattern of identical spheres protruding from a smooth wall. Periodic boundary conditions on the domain's horizontal faces simulate an infinite array of roughness elements extending in the streamwise and spanwise directions, which implies the parallel-flow assumption, and results in a closed domain. A body force, designed to yield the horizontal Blasius velocity in the absence of roughness, sustains the flow. Instabilities above a critical Reynolds number reveal negligible oscillations in the recirculation regions behind each sphere and in the free stream, high-amplitude oscillations in the layer directly above the spheres, and a mean profile with an inflection point near the sphere's crest. The inflection point yields an unstable layer above the roughness (where U''(y) is less than 0) and a stable region within the roughness (where U''(y) is greater than 0). Evidently, the instability begins when the low-momentum or wake region behind an element, being the region most affected by disturbances (purely numerical in this case), goes unstable and moves. In compressible flow with periodic boundaries, this motion sends disturbances to all regions of the domain. In the unstable layer just above the inflection point, the disturbances grow while being carried downstream with a propagation speed equal to the local mean velocity; they do not grow amid the low energy region near the roughness patch. The most amplified disturbance eventually arrives at the next roughness element downstream, perturbing its wake and inducing a global response at a frequency governed by the streamwise spacing between spheres and the mean velocity of the most amplified layer.

  3. Optimization of dynamic roughness elements for reducing drag in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Sayadi, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Roughness elements can serve as controllers in both laminar and turbulent regimes to, for example, reduce the skin friction or drag. In this study, adjoint-based optimization is employed to extract the optimal shape of roughness elements for reducing drag, in a laminar setting, given an initial condition. The roughness elements considered here are of the ``dynamic'' type, varying both in space and time, which allows control over the spatial distribution of the roughness but also the inherent timescales of the flow. Dynamic roughness is modeled here using the linearized boundary conditions previously introduced by McKeon (2008), where the no-slip and impermeability boundary conditions are replaced by stream-wise and wall-normal distributions at the wall. The adjoint equation is then implemented using the discretized approach by Fosas et al. (2012). This approach is particularly efficient, since the linearized operators are computed simply by using the local differentiation technique, without explicitly forming the resulting matrices for both forward and adjoint operators. Using the described framework we investigate the effect of the initial condition on the spatial distribution of the roughness elements and their variation in time as the drag coefficient is minimized.

  4. Application research of rough sets in the multi-elemental cooperative spatial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjing; Wang, Qiao; Lin, Zhiyong

    2009-10-01

    Multi-elemental cooperative analysis can not only brings a large number of relevant information but fuzz up key elements, so valid data excavating tools are needed to find element information which influences entities the most. Based on the sample of bus site setting in a city, this paper employs Rough Sets method to analyze multi-elemental cooperation which influence bus site grade and calculate importance of each element. Thus, multi-elemental cooperative analysis can be realized. Compared with conventional multi-parameter analysis, this method based on data self-adapting is intelligent, high-efficiency and have no use for manual intervention.

  5. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-14

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100x100x80 mm{sup 3} with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  6. A 1372-element Large Scale Hemispherical Ultrasound Phased Array Transducer for Noninvasive Transcranial Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Junho; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2009-04-01

    Noninvasive transcranial therapy using high intensity focused ultrasound transducers has attracted high interest as a promising new modality for the treatments of brain related diseases. We describe the development of a 1372 element large scale hemispherical ultrasound phased array transducer operating at a resonant frequency of 306 kHz. The hemispherical array has a diameter of 31 cm and a 15.5 cm radius of curvature. It is constructed with piezoelectric (PZT-4) tube elements of a 10 mm in diameter, 6 mm in length and 1.4 mm wall thickness. Each element is quasi-air backed by attaching a cork-rubber membrane on the back of the element. The acoustic efficiency of the element is determined to be approximately 50%. The large number of the elements delivers high power ultrasound and offers better beam steering and focusing capability. Comparisons of sound pressure-squared field measurements with theoretical calculations in water show that the array provides good beam steering and tight focusing capability over an efficient volume of approximately 100×100×80 mm3 with nominal focal spot size of approximately 2.3 mm in diameter at -6 dB. We also present its beam steering and focusing capability through an ex vivo human skull by measuring pressure-squared amplitude after phase corrections. These measurements show the same efficient volume range and focal spot sizes at -6 dB as the ones in water without the skull present. These results indicate that the array is sufficient for use in noninvasive transcranial ultrasound therapy.

  7. Transitional flow in the wake of a moderate to large height cylindrical roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plogmann, B.; Würz, W.; Krämer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The effect of an isolated, cylindrical roughness on the stability of an airfoil boundary layer has been studied based on particle image velocimetry and hot-wire anemometry. The investigated roughness elements range from a sub-critical to a super-critical behavior with regard to the critical roughness Reynolds number. For the sub-critical case, the nonlinear disturbance growth in the near wake is governed by oblique Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) type modes. Further downstream, these disturbance modes are, however, damped with the mean flow stabilization and no dominant modes persist in the far wake. By contrast, in the transitional configuration the disturbance growth is increased, but still associated with a TS-type instability in the near-wake centerline region of the low-aspect (height-to-diameter) ratio element. That is, the disturbances in the centerline region show a similar behavior as known for 2D elements, whereas in the outer spanwise domain a Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) type, shear-layer instability is found, as previously reported for larger aspect ratio isolated elements. With increasing height and, thereby, aspect ratio of the roughness, the KH-type instability domain extends toward the centerline and, accordingly, the TS-type instability domain decreases. For high super-critical cases, transition is already triggered in the wall-normal and spanwise shear layers upstream and around the roughness. In the immediate wake, periodic shear-layer disturbances roll up into a—for isolated elements characteristic—shedding of vortices, which was not present at the lower roughness Reynolds number cases due to the decreased aspect ratio and, thereby, different instability mechanism.

  8. Flow transition with 2-D roughness elements in a 3-D channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhining; Liu, Chaoquin; Mccormick, Stephen F.

    1993-01-01

    We develop a new numerical approach to study the spatially evolving instability of the streamwise dominant flow in the presence of roughness elements. The difficulty in handling the flow over the boundary surface with general geometry is removed by using a new conservative form of the governing equations and an analytical mapping. The numerical scheme uses second-order backward Euler in time, fourth-order central differences in all three spatial directions, and boundary-fitted staggered grids. A three-dimensional channel with multiple two-dimensional-type roughness elements is employed as the test case. Fourier analysis is used to decompose different Fourier modes of the disturbance. The results show that surface roughness leads to transition at lower Reynolds number than for smooth channels.

  9. High-Speed Boundary-Layer Transition Induced by an Isolated Roughness Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Owens, Lewis R.; King, Rudolph A.

    2010-01-01

    Progress on an experimental effort to quantify the instability mechanisms associated with roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer is reported in this paper. To simulate the low-disturbance environment encountered during high-altitude flight, the experimental study was performed in the NASA-Langley Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low-Disturbance Tunnel. A flat plate trip sizing study was performed first to identify the roughness height required to force transition. That study, which included transition onset measurements under both quiet and noisy freestream conditions, confirmed the sensitivity of roughness-induced transition to freestream disturbance levels. Surveys of the laminar boundary layer on a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped cone were performed via hot-wire anemometry and pitot-pressure measurements. The measured mean mass-flux and Mach-number profiles agreed very well with computed mean-flow profiles. Finally, surveys of the boundary layer developing downstream of an isolated roughness element on the cone were performed. The measurements revealed an instability in the far wake of the roughness element that grows exponentially and has peak frequencies in the 150 to 250 kHz range.

  10. An Investigation of the Effect of a Highly Favorable Pressure Gradient on Boundary-Layer Transition as Caused by Various Types of Roughnesses on a 10-foot-Diameter Hemisphere at Subsonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.; Horton, Elmer A.

    1959-01-01

    Tests were made on a 10-foot-diameter hemispherical nose at Reynolds numbers up to 10 x 10(exp 6) and at a maximum Mach number of about 0.1 to determine the effects of a highly favorable pressure gradient on boundary-layer transition caused by roughness. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional roughness particles were used, and the transition of the boundary layer was determined by hot-wire anemometers. The roughness Reynolds number for transition R(sub k,t) caused by three-dimensional particles such as Carborundum grains, spherical particles, and rimmed craters was found. The results show that for particles immersed in the boundary layer, R(sub k,t) is independent of the particle size or position on the hemispherical nose and depends mainly on the height-to-width ratio of the particle. The values of R(sub k,t) found on the hemispherical nose compare closely with those previously found on a flat plate and on airfoils with roughness. For two-dimensional roughness, the ratio of roughness height to boundary-layer displacement thickness necessary to cause transition was found to increase appreciably as the roughness was moved forward on the nose. Also included in the investigation were studies of the spread of turbulence behind a single particle of roughness and the effect of holes such as pressure orifices.

  11. Trace element analysis of rough diamond by LA-ICP-MS: a case of source discrimination?

    PubMed

    Dalpé, Claude; Hudon, Pierre; Ballantyne, David J; Williams, Darrell; Marcotte, Denis

    2010-11-01

    Current profiling of rough diamond source is performed using different physical and/or morphological techniques that require strong knowledge and experience in the field. More recently, chemical impurities have been used to discriminate diamond source and with the advance of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) empirical profiling of rough diamonds is possible to some extent. In this study, we present a LA-ICP-MS methodology that we developed for analyzing ultra-trace element impurities in rough diamond for origin determination ("profiling"). Diamonds from two sources were analyzed by LA-ICP-MS and were statistically classified by accepted methods. For the two diamond populations analyzed in this study, binomial logistic regression produced a better overall correct classification than linear discriminant analysis. The results suggest that an anticipated matrix match reference material would improve the robustness of our methodology for forensic applications. PMID:20681965

  12. Electrochemical machining process for forming surface roughness elements on a gas turbine shroud

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Johnson, Robert Alan; Wei, Bin; Wang, Hsin-Pang

    2002-01-01

    The back side recessed cooling surface of a shroud defining in part the hot gas path of a turbine is electrochemically machined to provide surface roughness elements and spaces therebetween to increase the heat transfer coefficient. To accomplish this, an electrode with insulating dielectric portions and non-insulating portions is disposed in opposition to the cooling surface. By passing an electrolyte between the cooling surface and electrode and applying an electrical current between the electrode and a shroud, roughness elements and spaces therebetween are formed in the cooling surface in opposition to the insulating and non-insulating portions of the electrode, hence increasing the surface area and heat transfer coefficient of the shroud.

  13. Infrared thermography of transition due to isolated roughness elements in hypersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, F.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; Cardone, G.

    2016-02-01

    Boundary layer transition in high-speed flows is a phenomenon that despite extensive research over the years is still extremely hard to predict. The presence of protrusions or gaps can lead to an accelerated laminar-to-turbulent transition enhancing the thermal loads and the skin friction coefficient. In the current investigation, inverse heat transfer measurements using infrared thermography are performed on the flow past different roughness geometries in the form of cylinders and diamond at free stream Mach number equal to 7.5, h/δ ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 (where h is the roughness height and δ is the boundary layer thickness), and Reθ ranging between 1305 and 2450. The roughness elements are positioned on a 5° ramp placed at zero angle of attack. The measurements indicate that the roughness geometry influences the transitional pattern while the frontal area influences both the transition location and the maximum value of the Stanton number along the centreline. Moreover, there is a strong connection between the streamwise centreline Stanton number and the spreading of the wake width. In particular, the transition process is characterized by an approximately constant wake width. Differently, the wake width spreads at the location where the streamwise centreline Stanton number reaches the turbulent level. This point corresponds to a local maximum of the wake amplitude defined as one half of the maximum spanwise variation of the Stanton number.

  14. Bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception on an isolated roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rijsbergen, Martijn; Slot, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The nucleation process on an isolated roughness element, located at the point of minimum pressure of a NACA 0015 hydrofoil was studied experimentally and computationally. The objective of this study was to investigate the working mechanism of bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception. High-speed micro-scale observations show the generation of a streak of cavitation—attached to the roughness element—in the wake of the bubble. Below its critical diameter, the bubble can detach from the streak cavity and travel on while the streak cavity remains. The solutions of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation along a streamline extracted from a RANS calculation show strong similarities with the experimental observations, but a factor 5 to 10 higher frame rate is needed to validate the calculations.

  15. Computational Study of Laminar Flow Control on a Subsonic Swept Wing Using Discrete Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Streett, Craig L.; Carpenter, Mark H.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of parabolized stability equations and secondary instability theory has been applied to a low-speed swept airfoil model with a chord Reynolds number of 7.15 million, with the goals of (i) evaluating this methodology in the context of transition prediction for a known configuration for which roughness based crossflow transition control has been demonstrated under flight conditions and (ii) of analyzing the mechanism of transition delay via the introduction of discrete roughness elements (DRE). Roughness based transition control involves controlled seeding of suitable, subdominant crossflow modes, so as to weaken the growth of naturally occurring, linearly more unstable crossflow modes. Therefore, a synthesis of receptivity, linear and nonlinear growth of stationary crossflow disturbances, and the ensuing development of high frequency secondary instabilities is desirable to understand the experimentally observed transition behavior. With further validation, such higher fidelity prediction methodology could be utilized to assess the potential for crossflow transition control at even higher Reynolds numbers, where experimental data is currently unavailable.

  16. The effect of a small isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere in uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, A. K.; McKeon, B. J.

    2011-10-01

    The effect of an isolated roughness element on the forces on a sphere was examined for a Reynolds number range of 5 × 104 < Re < 5 × 105 using a novel sting-mounted sphere apparatus. The roughness element was a circular cylinder, and its width and height was varied to be 1, 2, and 4% of the sphere diameter. At subcritical Re, a lateral force is produced in the direction of the roughness, while at supercritical Re, the force is in the opposite direction. This is caused by asymmetric boundary layer separation, as shown using particle image velocimetry. At supercritical Re, a roughness element that is only 1% the sphere diameter produces a lift to drag ratio of almost one. It was found that the isolated roughness element has the largest effect on the lateral forces when it is located between a streamwise angle of about 40° and 80°. In addition to the mean forces, the unsteady forces were also measured. It was found that at subcritical Re, vortex shedding is aligned to the plane of the roughness element. In addition, the probability distribution of the forces was nearly Gaussian for subcritical Re, but for supercritical Re, the skewness and kurtosis deviate from Gaussian, and the details are dependent on the roughness size. A simple model developed for the vortical structure formed behind the roughness element can be extended to explain aspects of nominally smooth sphere flow, in which external disturbances perturb the sphere boundary layer in an azimuthally local sense. These results also form the basis of comparison for an investigation into the effectiveness of a moving isolated roughness element for manipulating sphere flow.

  17. Using Large-Scale Roughness Elements to Control Sand and Dust Flux at the Keeler Dunes, Keeler, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, John; McCarley-Holder, Grace

    2014-05-01

    Controlling dust emission from areas that subsequently degrade air quality and threaten human and animal health and reduce the quality of life for people residing in proximity to such sources is necessary, but also challenging. Recent research has indicated that arrays of large roughness elements (height >0.3 m) can be used effectively to modulate sand transport and the associated dust emissions. Prediction of the rate of sand flux reduction as a function of downwind distance upon entering an array of roughness elements, and the equilibrium flux reduction in the interior of the array is possible using the known geometric properties of the roughness elements, their number, and published relationships. Air quality in the town of Keeler, CA (36 deg 29' 17.92" N, 117 deg 52' 24.62" W) is degraded by levels of particulate matter <10 µm aerodynamic diameter (PM10) during periods of elevated wind speeds due to sand transport and dust emissions in the nearby Keeler Dunes. A demonstration project was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of an array of roughness elements composed of solid elements and managed vegetation to meet sand and dust flux reduction criteria. This project has two major goals: 1) to demonstrate that solid roughness elements placed on areas of the Keeler Dunes immediately arrest sand movement to specified levels (target of 85% reduction), and 2) to assess whether native plant species, planted in the sheltered area of the solid roughness elements can effectively thrive and subsequently replace the solid roughness to achieve the desired sand flux reduction control efficiency. This poster describes the results related mostly to objective one, as considerable time has to pass before sufficient data will be obtained to evaluate the success of the planted and managed vegetation to achieve a control level provided by the solid element roughness array.

  18. Stability of the laminar boundary-layer flow behind a roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Yong-su; Rist, Ulrich; Krämer, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    Roughness elements in laminar boundary layers generate both high shear layers and streaky structures. Because these phenomena interact, it is difficult to precisely ascertain the dominant instability mechanisms. With the goal of explicating such interactions, we study the stability of a laminar boundary layer subject to a single roughness element at a Reynolds number subcritical of bypass transition. Our work involves two parts: bi-global linear stability theory (LST) analysis and corroborating experimental measurements. Linear stability analysis of a flat-plate boundary layer perturbed by streamwise streaks reveals the presence of several unstable modes. Of the dominant two modes, one exhibits spanwise symmetry and the other is antisymmetric. These modes are termed `varicose' and `sinuous,' respectively. Corroborating experiments were conducted in the laminar water channel of the University of Stuttgart. By simultaneously traversing two hot-film probes, we are able to confirm the presence of both eigenmodes predicted by LST and to extract relevant data for each: eigenvalues, eigenfunctions, growth rates and phase distributions. The main part of the experiments has been performed under `natural' conditions, i.e., in the absence of external forcing. As the amplitude of the sinuous part of the results is much smaller than the varicose one and hence affected by measurement noise, a case with asymmetric external forcing is presented as well. Despite some deficiencies of the setup, it is possible to enhance the sinuous mode with respect to the unforced case and to confirm its existence as an eigenmode of the flow.

  19. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  20. Validated heat-transfer and pressure-drop prediction methods based on the discrete-element method: Phase 2, two-dimensional rib roughness

    SciTech Connect

    James, C.A.; Hodge, B.K.; Taylor, R.P.

    1993-05-01

    Surface roughness is a commonly used approach for enhancing the rate of heat transfer of surfaces, such as in heat-exchanger tubes. Because the improved thermal performance of roughened surfaces is at the expense of increased flow resistance (increased pressure drop or friction factor), accurate prediction techniques for determining the friction factors and Nusselt numbers for roughened surfaces are required if such features are to be considered as design options. This report presents the results of the second phase of a research program sponsored by Argonne National Laboratory to validate models for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for fully developed turbulent flow in enhanced heat-exchanger tubes. The first phase was concerned with validating a roughness model for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with three-dimensional distributed roughness elements, such as sandgrains, spheres, hemispheres, and cones. The second phase is concerned with devising and validating methods for the prediction of friction factors and Nusselt numbers for turbulent flow in tubes internally roughened with repeated, two-dimensional ribs aligned perpendicular to the flow. The ribs are spaced sufficiently far apart that the leeward-side separated flow reattaches to the wall before again separating in order to negotiate the next rib. This heat-transfer enhancement mechanism is called the separation and reattachment mechanism, after Rabas (1989). This work is limited to rectangular rib shapes.

  1. Investigations of Effects of Surface Temperature and Single Roughness Elements on Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, Hans W; Fila, Gertrude H

    1947-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer and the position of the transition point were investigated on a heated flat plate. It was found that the Reynolds number of transition decreased as the temperature of the plate is increased. It is shown from simple qualitative analytical considerations that the effect of variable viscosity in the boundary layer due to the temperature difference produces a velocity profile with an inflection point if the wall temperature is higher than the free-stream temperature. This profile is confirmed by measurements. The instability of inflection-point profiles is discussed. Studies of the flow in the wake of large, two-dimensional roughness elements are presented. It is shown that a boundary-layer can separate and reattach itself to the wall without having transition take place.

  2. The Effects of Surface Roughness on the NEAR XRS Elemental Results: Monte-Carlo Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Lucy F.; Nittler, Larry R.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the NEAR-Shoemaker X-ray Gamma-Ray Spec1roscopy ("XGRS") investigation was to determine the elemental composition of the near-Earth asteroid 433 Eros. The X-ray Spectrometer (XRS) system measured the characteristic fluorescence of six major elements (Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Fe) in the 1-10 keV energy range excited by the interaction of solar X-rays with the upper 100 microns of the surface of 433 Eros. Various investigators, using both laboratory experiments and computer simulations have established that X-ray fluorescent line ratios can be influenced by small-scale surface roughness at high incidence or emission angles. The effect on the line ratio is specific to the geometry, excitation spectrum, and composition involved, In general, however, the effect is only substantial for ratios of lines with a significant energy difference between them: Fe/Si and Ca/Si are much more likely to be affected than AI/Si or Mg/Si. We apply a Monte-Carlo code to the specific geometry and spectrum of a major NEAR XRS solar flare observation, using an H chondrite composition as the substrate. The seventeen most abundant elements were included in the composition model, from oxygen to titanium.

  3. Structure of two-dimensional and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers with sparsely distributed roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jacob

    The present study deals with the effects of sparsely distributed three-dimensional elements on two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent boundary layers (TBL) such as those that occur on submarines, ship hulls, etc. This study was achieved in three parts: Part 1 dealt with the cylinders when placed individually in the turbulent boundary layers, thereby considering the effect of a single perturbation on the TBL; Part 2 considered the effects when the same individual elements were placed in a sparse and regular distribution, thus studying the response of the flow to a sequence of perturbations; and in Part 3, the distributions were subjected to 3-D turbulent boundary layers, thus examining the effects of streamwise and spanwise pressure gradients on the same perturbed flows as considered in Part 2. The 3-D turbulent boundary layers were generated by an idealized wing-body junction flow. Detailed 3-velocity-component Laser-Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and other measurements were carried out to understand and describe the rough-wall flow structure. The measurements include mean velocities, turbulence quantities (Reynolds stresses and triple products), skin friction, surface pressure and oil flow visualizations in 2-D and 3-D rough-wall flows for Reynolds numbers, based on momentum thickness, greater than 7000. Very uniform circular cylindrical roughness elements of 0.38mm, 0.76mm and 1.52mm height (k) were used in square and diagonal patterns, yielding six different roughness geometries of rough-wall surface. For the 2-D rough-wall flows, the roughness Reynolds numbers, k +, based on the element height (k) and the friction velocity (Utau), range from 26 to 131. Results for the 2-D rough-wall flows reveal that the velocity-defect law is similar for both smooth and rough surfaces, and the semi-logarithmic velocity-distribution curve is shifted by an amount DeltaU/U, depending on the height of the roughness element, showing that Delta U/Utau is a function

  4. A hybrid computational approach for the interactions between river flow and porous sediment bed covered with large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.

    2013-12-01

    In many natural and human-impacted rivers, the porous sediment beds are either fully or partially covered by large roughness elements, such as gravels and boulders. The existence of these large roughness elements, which are in direct contact with the turbulent river flow, changes the dynamics of mass and momentum transfer across the river bed. It also impacts the overall hydraulics in the river channel and over time, indirectly influences the geomorphological evolution of the system. Ideally, one should resolve each of these large roughness elements in a computational fluid model. This approach is apparently not feasible due to the prohibitive computational cost. Considering a typical river bed with armoring, the distribution of sediment sizes usually shows significant vertical variations. Computationally, it poses great challenge to resolve all the size scales. Similar multiscale problem exists in the much broader porous media flow field. To cope with this, we propose a hybrid computational approach where the large surface roughness elements are resolved using immersed boundary method and sediment layers below (usually finer) are modeled by adding extra drag terms in momentum equations. Large roughness elements are digitized using a 3D laser scanner. They are put into the computational domain using the collision detection and rigid body dynamics algorithms which guarantees realistic and physically-correct spatial arrangement of the surface elements. Simulation examples have shown the effectiveness of the hybrid approach which captures the effect of the surface roughness on the turbulent flow as well as the hyporheic flow pattern in and out of the bed.

  5. How do macro-roughness elements affect bed-load sediment motion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radice, Alessio; Campagnol, Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Experimental results are here presented for bed-load particle motion in the presence of macro-roughness elements (MREs). Experiments were performed at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Politecnico di Milano using plastic particles (size of 3 mm) as bed-load sediment that was fed into a rectangular-section, pressurized duct. The bottom of the duct was covered with a number of MREs, represented by concrete semi-spheres (diameter of 35 mm) that were not mobilized by the hydrodynamic conditions used. The experiments thus mimicked the transport of fine sediment in the presence of immobile boulders, that is one possible idealized representation of the granulometric variability found in natural water courses. The work is part of a project devoted to the characterization of particle kinematics for different roughness of the bed, undertaken within a long-term cooperation with the Environmental and Industrial Fluid Mechanics group at the University of Aberdeen (UK). Different flow conditions were tested. For each, MREs were placed in two different arrangements, corresponding to triangular grids with variable side length (130 mm and 100 mm). Colour of sediment was appropriately chosen (white grains over black background) to enable bed-load particles to be tracked by an image processing software (Streams, developed by the University of Canterbury, New Zealand). Particle kinematics was described using typical quantities: path length and tortuosity, path-averaged and instantaneous velocity components in the stream-wise and transverse directions, duration of motion events. The collected database was considerably wide, in terms of both measured particle paths and instantaneous velocity values. Results are discussed in terms of the measured kinematic properties and also comparing the sediment motion to that obtained for the same hydrodynamic conditions and in the absence of MREs. A discussion is made about comparability of the different scenarios, as the presence/absence of the MREs

  6. Turbulence analysis of rough wall channel flows based on direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, A. V.; Bolotnov, I. A.

    2012-07-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of rough wall channel flows was performed for various surface roughnesses. The goal of the presented research is to investigate the effect of nucleating bubbles in subcooled boiling conditions on the turbulence. The nucleating bubbles are represented by hemispherical roughness elements at the wall. The stabilized finite element based code, PHASTA, is used to perform the simulations. Validation against theoretical, experimental and numerical data is performed for smooth channel flow and rectangular rod type of roughness. The presence of roughness elements affects the flow structure within the roughness sublayer, which is estimated to be 5 times the height of roughness elements. DNS observations are consistent with this result and demonstrate the flow homogeneity above 50 viscous units. The influence of roughness elements layout and density on the turbulence parameters is also demonstrated and analyzed. (authors)

  7. Using trace elements in skin to discriminate the populations of minke whales in southern hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Kunito, Takashi; Watanabe, Izumi; Yasunaga, Genta; Fujise, Yoshihiro; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2002-03-01

    Concentrations of 12 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Cd, Cs, Ba, and Hg) were determined in liver and skin tissues of minke whales from various regions within the Antarctic Ocean. Cd concentrations in livers of southern minke whale were apparently higher than those in cetaceans from other regions, while Hg concentrations were lower. There were significant positive correlations between body length and concentrations of Cd and Hg in the liver. The concentrations of all trace elements in the skin were lower than those in other cetaceans reported previously. Significant positive correlations between liver and skin were found for Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Rb, Cd, and Cs, implying that the concentrations of these trace elements in the skin reflect those of internal organs. Large interannual variation of the accumulation pattern of trace elements in the skin was observed for the southern minke whales from Area V. There were significant differences in the skin element concentrations among Areas III, IV, and V, especially for males. Also, discriminant analysis between geographically two different groups collected during 1995/1996 austral summer season, based on the concentrations of trace elements in the skin, allowed for a correct classification of 90% of these minke whales. These results suggest that measurement of trace elements in skin samples could provide valuable information on the status of contamination and possible geographic differences in the accumulation levels in southern minke whales. PMID:11824827

  8. Application of Plenoptic PIV for 3D Velocity Measurements Over Roughness Elements in a Refractive Index Matched Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurow, Brian; Johnson, Kyle; Kim, Taehoon; Blois, Gianluca; Best, Jim; Christensen, Ken

    2014-11-01

    The application of Plenoptic PIV in a Refractive Index Matched (RIM) facility housed at Illinois is presented. Plenoptic PIV is an emerging 3D diagnostic that exploits the light-field imaging capabilities of a plenoptic camera. Plenoptic cameras utilize a microlens array to measure the position and angle of light rays captured by the camera. 3D/3C velocity fields are determined through application of the MART algorithm for volume reconstruction and a conventional 3D cross-correlation PIV algorithm. The RIM facility is a recirculating tunnel with a 62.5% aqueous solution of sodium iodide used as the working fluid. Its resulting index of 1.49 is equal to that of acrylic. Plenoptic PIV was used to measure the 3D velocity field of a turbulent boundary layer flow over a smooth wall, a single wall-mounted hemisphere and a full array of hemispheres (i.e. a rough wall) with a k/ δ ~ 4.6. Preliminary time averaged and instantaneous 3D velocity fields will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1235726.

  9. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettit, J. R.; Walker, A. E.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2015-03-01

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  10. Improved detection of rough defects for ultrasonic NDE inspections based on finite element modeling of elastic wave scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, J. R.; Walker, A.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2014-02-18

    Defects which posses rough surfaces greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour, often reducing the magnitude of reflected signals. Ultrasonic inspections rely upon this response for detecting and sizing flaws. For safety critical components reliable characterisation is crucial. Therefore, providing an accurate means to predict reductions in signal amplitude is essential. An extension of Kirchhoff theory has formed the basis for the UK power industry inspection justifications. However, it is widely recognised that these predictions are pessimistic owing to analytical approximations. A numerical full field modelling approach does not fall victim to such limitations. Here, a Finite Element model is used to aid in setting a non-conservative reporting threshold during the inspection of a large pressure vessel forging that might contain embedded rough defects. The ultrasonic response from multiple rough surfaces defined by the same statistical class is calculated for normal incident compression waves. The approach is validated by comparing coherent scattering with predictions made by Kirchhoff theory. At lower levels of roughness excellent agreement is observed, whilst higher values confirm the pessimism of Kirchhoff theory. Furthermore, the mean amplitude in the specular direction is calculated. This represents the information obtained during an inspection, indicating that reductions due to increasing roughness are significantly less than the coherent component currently being used.

  11. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    SciTech Connect

    Pettit, J. R.; Lowe, M. J. S.; Walker, A. E.

    2015-03-31

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  12. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number (Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  13. Heat Transfer Enhancement in a Solar Air Heater with Roughened Duct Having Arc-Shaped Elements as Roughness Element on the Absorber Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil Prakash; Goel, Varun; Vashishtha, Siddhartha; Kumar, Amit

    2016-07-01

    An experimental study has been carried out for the heat transfer and friction characteristics for arc shaped roughness element used in solar air heaters. Duct has an aspect ratio (W/H) of 11, relative roughness pitch (p/e) range of 4-16, relative roughness height (e/D) range of 0.027-0.045, Reynolds number ( Re) range of 2200-22,000 and arc angle (α) was kept constant at 60°. The effects of Re, relative roughness pitch (p/e) and relative roughness height (e/D) on heat transfer and friction factor have been discussed. The results obtained for Nusselt number and friction factor has been compared with smooth solar air heater to see the enhancement in heat transfer and friction factor and it is found out that considerable enhancement takes place in case of heat transfer as well as in friction factor. Correlations were also developed for Nusselt number and friction factor. Thermo-hydraulic performance parameter is also calculated for the same.

  14. Towards transition modelling for supersonic laminar flow control based on spanwise periodic roughness elements.

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Jiang, Li

    2005-05-15

    Laminar flow control (LFC) is one of the key enabling technologies for quiet and efficient supersonic aircraft. Recent work at Arizona State University (ASU) has led to a novel concept for passive LFC, which employs distributed leading edge roughness to limit the growth of naturally dominant crossflow instabilities in a swept-wing boundary layer. Predicated on nonlinear modification of the mean boundary-layer flow via controlled receptivity, the ASU concept requires a holistic prediction approach that accounts for all major stages within transition in an integrated manner. As a first step in developing an engineering methodology for the design and optimization of roughness-based supersonic LFC, this paper reports on canonical findings related to receptivity plus linear and nonlinear development of stationary crossflow instabilities on a Mach 2.4, 73 degrees swept airfoil with a chord Reynolds number of 16.3 million. PMID:16105770

  15. Finite element modeling of the surface roughness of 5052 Al alloy subjected to a surface severe plastic deformation process

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, K.; Villegas, J.; Stone, Z.; Shaw, L. . E-mail: lshaw@mail.ims.uconn.edu

    2004-12-01

    The surface of 5052 Al alloy plates is severely plastically deformed via multiple impacts by high-velocity tungsten carbide/cobalt (Wc/Co) balls in a surface nanocrystallization and hardening (SNH) process. The surface roughness of 5052 Al alloy plates as a function of the impacting ball size and processing time has been evaluated via non-contact 3D profilometry. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model has been developed to simulate the formation of peaks and valleys during the SNH process. The peak-to-valley distance predicted from the FEM matches the maximum PV value measured experimentally quite well, indicating that surface roughening of 5052 Al alloy plates during the SNH process using WC/Co balls is mainly dictated by the indentation process of the impacting balls. The implications of this surface roughening mechanism in the final surface roughness, processing time, related microstructure change, and property alteration are discussed.

  16. Wall-drag measurements of smooth- and rough-wall turbulent boundary layers using a floating element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, W. J.; Squire, D. T.; Talluru, K. M.; Abbassi, M. R.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2016-05-01

    The mean wall shear stress, overline{τ }_w, is a fundamental variable for characterizing turbulent boundary layers. Ideally, overline{τ }_w is measured by a direct means and the use of floating elements has long been proposed. However, previous such devices have proven to be problematic due to low signal-to-noise ratios. In this paper, we present new direct measurements of overline{τ }_w where high signal-to-noise ratios are achieved using a new design of a large-scale floating element with a surface area of 3 m (streamwise) × 1 m (spanwise). These dimensions ensure a strong measurement signal, while any error associated with an integral measurement of overline{τ }_w is negligible in Melbourne's large-scale turbulent boundary layer facility. Wall-drag induced by both smooth- and rough-wall zero-pressure-gradient flows are considered. Results for the smooth-wall friction coefficient, C_f ≡ overline{τ }_w/q_{∞}, follow a Coles-Fernholz relation C_f = [ 1/κ ln ( Re_{θ }) + C] ^{-2} to within 3 % (κ = 0.38 and C = 3.7) for a momentum thickness-based Reynolds number, Re_{θ } > 15{,}000. The agreement improves for higher Reynolds numbers to <1 % deviation for Re_{θ } > 38{,}000. This smooth-wall benchmark verification of the experimental apparatus is critical before attempting any rough-wall studies. For a rough-wall configuration with P36 grit sandpaper, measurements were performed for 10{,}500< Re_{θ } < 88{,}500, for which the wall-drag indicates the anticipated trend from the transitionally to the fully rough regime.

  17. Experimental investigation of the modification of the flow field, past instream vegetation elements, for distinct bedsurface roughness.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Yagci, Oral; Kitsikoudis, Vasileios; Koursari, Eftychia

    2015-04-01

    The presence of vegetation in rivers and estuaries has important implications for the modification of the flow field and sediment transport. In-stream vegetation has the potential to regulate the morphology and ecological health of a surface water body, and as such it finds a wide range of applications. Even though a number of controls influencing the local flow field past aquatic vegetation elements or patches of instream vegetation have been identified (such as shape, areal density, size and flexibility), conclusive evidence is lacking, particularly on how sediment transport processes are affected. Here, an experimental study is designed to identify how the flow field past different types of elements simulating in-stream emergent vegetation is modified. Two sets of experiments are conducted, each with a distinct value of high and low hydraulic roughness for the bed surface. In both experiments a rigid cylindrical element, a patch of rigid tubes and a plant shaped element (Cupressus Macrocarpa), simulating instream emergent vegetation are utilized. The flow field is measured at various locations downstream the element and average and turbulent flow statistics are obtained at near bed, mid-flow depth and near the water surface regions. It is found that different structural aspects of the elements, particularly the geometry, can significantly affect the flow field downstream the elements. Specifically, the average flow profiles are practically restored to near ambient flow conditions at about 5 diameters downstream the rigid element, while this happens at longer distances for the other elements. The flow structures shed past the elements are also very distinct, as confirmed via appropriately designed fluorescent dye flow visualizations. Potential ecosystem feedbacks and implications for formation of geospatial patterns are also discussed.

  18. Brain Hemispheric Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeper Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Four articles consider brain hemisphere functioning of gifted students as it relates to gifted programs; alternation of education methodologies; spatial ability as an element of intellectual gifted functioning; and the interaction between hemisphere specialization, imagery, creative imagination, and sex differentiation. (SB)

  19. Mechanics of hemispherical electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuodao; Xiao, Jianliang; Jung, Inhwa; Song, Jizhou; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark P.; Huang, Yonggang; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A.

    2009-11-01

    A simple analytical model is established for the development of hemisphere electronics, which has many important applications in electronic-eye cameras and related curvilinear systems. The photodetector arrays, made in planar mesh layouts with conventional techniques, are deformed and transferred onto a hemisphere. The model gives accurately the positions of photodetectors on the hemisphere, and has been validated by experiments and finite element analysis. The results also indicate very small residual strains in the photodetectors. The model provides a tool to define a pattern of photodetectors in the planar, as-fabricated layout to yield any desired spatial configuration on the hemisphere.

  20. Wind Tunnel Measurements of Turbulent Boundary Layer over Hypothetical Urban Roughness Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Y. K.; Liu, C. H.

    2012-04-01

    Urban morphology affects the near-ground atmospheric boundary layer that in turn modifies the wind flows and pollutant dispersion over urban areas. A number of numerical models (large-eddy simulation, LES and k-ɛ turbulence models) have been developed to elucidate the transport processes in and above urban street canyons. To complement the modelling results, we initiated a wind tunnel study to examine the influence of idealized urban roughness on the flow characteristics and pollutant dispersion mechanism over 2D idealized street canyons placed in cross flows. Hot-wire anemometry (HWA) was employed in this study to measure the flows over 2D street canyons in the wind tunnel in our university. Particular focus in the beginning stage was on the fabrication of hot-wire probes, data acquisition system, and signal processing technique. Employing the commonly adopted hot-wire universal function, we investigated the relationship in between and developed a scaling factor which could generalize the output of our hot-wire probes to the standardized one as each hot-wire probes has its unique behaviour. Preliminary experiments were performed to measure the wind flows over street canyons of unity aspect ratio. Vertical profiles of the ensemble average velocity and fluctuations at three different segments over the street canyons were collected. The results were then compared with our LES that show a good argument with each other. Additional experiments are undertaken to collect more data in order to formulate the pollutant dispersion mechanism of street canyons and urban areas.

  1. An experimental study of the flow through and over two dimensional rectangular roughness elements: Deductions for urban boundary layer parameterizations and exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neophytou, M. K.-A.; Markides, C. N.; Fokaides, P. A.

    2014-08-01

    This paper investigates the flow through and over two-dimensional rectangular roughness elements, arranged in a building-street canyon geometry through a series of experiments. Geometries of different packing densities of the roughness elements (λp) were examined and the packing density values ranged from λp = 0.30 to 0.67. The purpose of the work is: (i) to investigate the flow physics observed both at the boundary layer scale as well as at the scale within the roughness elements for a range of packing densities, (ii) to deduce parameterizations of the adjusted rough boundary layer and their variation with a change in the packing density, and (iii) given a particular interest in and application to the urban atmosphere, a final aim at the roughness-element scale is to deduce the variation of the breathability with the packing density variation. Particle image velocimetery measurements of the velocity flow field as well as the turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds Stress (within and up to well-above the street canyons) were conducted. The results reveal qualitative flow features as well as features of the adjusted boundary layer structure—in particular the roughness and inertial sublayers, which can be associated with the surface roughness length, zero-plane displacement thickness, and the friction velocity. The lowest friction velocities are exhibited in the geometries with the highest- and lowest packing densities while the maximum friction velocities are observed in the medium-packed geometries. The exchange processes and breathability at the level of the roughness elements top were characterized and quantified by a mean exchange velocity. The results show that unlike friction velocity, the normalized exchange velocity (over the mean bulk velocity) for the most dense and sparse geometries differ by more than 80%, with the denser-packed geometries exhibiting lower exchange velocities; this is shown to be related with the thickness of the developed

  2. Multigrid methods and high order finite difference for flow in transition - Effects of isolated and distributed roughness elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1993-01-01

    The high order finite difference and multigrid methods have been successfully applied to direct numerical simulation (DNS) for flow transition in 3D channels and 3D boundary layers with 2D and 3D isolated and distributed roughness in a curvilinear coordinate system. A fourth-order finite difference technique on stretched and staggered grids, a fully-implicit time marching scheme, a semicoarsening multigrid method associated with line distributive relaxation scheme, and a new treatment of the outflow boundary condition, which needs only a very short buffer domain to damp all wave reflection, are developed. These approaches make the multigrid DNS code very accurate and efficient. This makes us not only able to do spatial DNS for the 3D channel and flat plate at low computational costs, but also able to do spatial DNS for transition in the 3D boundary layer with 3D single and multiple roughness elements. Numerical results show good agreement with the linear stability theory, the secondary instability theory, and a number of laboratory experiments.

  3. Bursting process of large- and small-scale structures in turbulent boundary layer perturbed by a cylinder roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhanqi; Jiang, Nan; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wu, Yanhua

    2016-05-01

    Hot-wire measurements on a turbulent boundary layer flow perturbed by a wall-mounted cylinder roughness element (CRE) are carried out in this study. The cylindrical element protrudes into the logarithmic layer, which is similar to those employed in turbulent boundary layers by Ryan et al. (AIAA J 49:2210-2220, 2011. doi: 10.2514/1.j051012) and Zheng and Longmire (J Fluid Mech 748:368-398, 2014. doi: 10.1017/jfm.2014.185) and in turbulent channel flow by Pathikonda and Christensen (AIAA J 53:1-10, 2014. doi: 10.2514/1.j053407). The similar effects on both the mean velocity and Reynolds stress are observed downstream of the CRE perturbation. The series of hot-wire data are decomposed into large- and small-scale fluctuations, and the characteristics of large- and small-scale bursting process are observed, by comparing the bursting duration, period and frequency between CRE-perturbed case and unperturbed case. It is indicated that the CRE perturbation performs the significant impact on the large- and small-scale structures, but within the different impact scenario. Moreover, the large-scale bursting process imposes a modulation on the bursting events of small-scale fluctuations and the overall trend of modulation is not essentially sensitive to the present CRE perturbation, even the modulation extent is modified. The conditionally averaging fluctuations are also plotted, which further confirms the robustness of the bursting modulation in the present experiments.

  4. Receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to the interaction of a three-dimensional roughness element with time-harmonic free-stream disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadjfar, M.; Bodonyi, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to the interaction of time-harmonic free-stream disturbances with a 3D roughness element is studied. The 3D nonlinear triple-deck equations are solved numerically to provide the basic steady-state motion. At high Reynolds numbers, the governing equations for the unsteady motion are the unsteady linearized 3D triple-deck equations. These equations can only be solved numerically. In the absence of any roughness element, the free-stream disturbances, to the first order, produce the classical Stokes flow, in the thin Stokes layer near the wall (on the order of our lower deck). However, with the introduction of a small 3D roughness element, the interaction between the hump and the Stokes flow introduces a spectrum of all spatial disturbances inside the boundary layer.

  5. Transverse Crack Modeling of Continuously Casted Slabs through Finite Element Method in Roughing Rolling at Wide Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, A.; Salganik, V.; Pustovoytov, D.

    2010-06-01

    In the pipe billet production at the wide strip mills of hot rolling big metal losses are caused by surface defects that affect most parts of the finished strips. The rolling surface defects are referred to the breach of steelmaking technology. Specialists mostly face defects of metal surface such as "scab" and "crack". The only area suffered from these defects is a slab edge. This area has the least surface temperature at the unbending of the continuous-casting machine, and together with deep buckles made by reciprocating motion of the crystallizer it is mostly subjected to transverse cracks that can be up to several millimeters. Each surface defect of the continuously casted slab will further turn into the surface defect of the strip bar. For some grade sets, mostly made of pipe steel grades the amount of strips with these defects can reach up to 60-70%. The area that is mostly prone to these defects is the edge of the strip. The work reveals investigation of the form change peculiarities in the transverse cracks of the continuously casted slab in roughing rolling in the horizontal rollers. The finite element method with software DEFORM 3D V6.1 has been applied in modeling. The work gives a form change mechanism of transverse cracks of slabs in deformation. Further crack growth in rolling is assessed due to Cockroft-Latham criteria.

  6. Finite Element Method Simulations of the Near-Field Enhancement at the Vicinity of Fractal Rough Metallic Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Micic, Miodrag; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Lu, H PETER.

    2004-03-04

    Near-field optical enhancement at metal surfaces and methods such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), fluorescent quenching and enhancement, and various near-field scanning microscopies (NSOM) all depend on a metals surface properties, mainly on its morphology and SPR resonant frequency. We report on simulations of the influence of different surface morphologies on electromagnetic field enhancements at the rough surfaces of noble metals and also evaluate the optimal conditions for the generation of a surface-enhanced Raman signal of absorbed species on a metallic substrate. All simulations were performed with a classical electrodynamics approach using the full set of Maxwells equations, which were solved with the three-dimensional finite element method (FEM). Two different classes of surfaces where modeled using fractals, representing diffusion limited aggregation growth dendritic structures, such as one on the surface of electrodes, and second one representing the sponge-like structure used to model surfaces of particles with high porosity, such as metal coated catalyst supports. The simulations depict the high inhomogeneity of an enhanced electromagnetic field as both a field enhancement and field attenuation near the surface. While the diffusion limited aggregation dendritical fractals enhanced the near-field electromagnetic field, the sponge fractals significantly reduced the local electromagnetic field intensity. Moreover, the fractal orders of the fractal objects did not significantly alter the total enhancement, and the distribution of a near-field enhancement was essentially invariant to the changes in the angle of an incoming laser beam.

  7. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ. PMID:26555324

  8. Right Hemisphere and Left Hemisphere: Pedagogical Implications for CSL Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mickel, Stanley L.

    Students can be taught to read Chinese more efficiently and accurately by using the specific capabilities of the right and left hemispheres of the brain. The right hemisphere is the site of image and pattern recognition, and students can be taught to use those capacities to process individual characters efficiently by watching for the element of…

  9. The 3D flow structures generated by a pair of cubic roughness elements in a turbulent channel flow resolved using holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jian; Katz, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    In studies of turbulent flows over rough walls, considerable efforts have been put on the overall effects of roughness parameters such as roughness height and spatial arrangement on the mean profiles and turbulence statistics. However there is very little experimental data on the generation, evolution, and interaction among roughness-initiated turbulent structures, which are essential for elucidating the near-wall turbulence production. As a first step, we approach this problem experimentally by applying digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to measure the flow and turbulence around a pair of cubic roughness elements embedded in the inner part of a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow (Reτ = 2000 - 5000). The ratio of half-channel height (h) to cube height (a) is 25, and the cubes are aligned in the spanwise direction, and separated by 1.5 a. DHM provides high-resolution three-dimensional (3D) three-component (3C) velocity distributions. The presentation discusses methods to improve the data accuracy, both during the hologram acquisition and particle tracking phases. First, we compare and mutually validate velocity fields obtained from a two-view DHM system. Subsequently, during data processing, the seven criteria used for particle tracking is validated and augmented by planar tracking of particle image projections. Sample results reveal instantaneous 3D velocity fields and vortical structures resolved in fine details of several wall units. Funded by NSF and ONR.

  10. Right Hemisphere Brain Damage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Right Hemisphere Brain Damage [ en Español ] What is right hemisphere brain ... right hemisphere brain damage ? What is right hemisphere brain damage? Right hemisphere brain damage (RHD) is damage ...

  11. Measurement and calculation of fluid dynamic characteristics of rough-wall turbulent boundary-layer flows

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, M.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Coleman, H.W. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.); Taylor, R.P. . Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Dept.)

    1993-09-01

    Experimental measurements of profiles of mean velocity and distributions of boundary-layer thickness and skin friction coefficient from aerodynamically smooth, transitionally rough, and fully rough turbulent boundary-layer flows are presented for four surfaces-three rough and one smooth. The rough surfaces are composed of 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced in staggered arrays 2, 4, and 10 base diameters apart, respectively, on otherwise smooth walls. The current incompressible turbulent boundary-layer rough-wall air flow data are compared with previously published results on another, similar rough surface. It is shown that fully rough mean velocity profiles collapse together when scaled as a function of momentum thickness, as was reported previously. However, this similarity cannot be used to distinguish roughness flow regimes, since a similar degree of collapse is observed in the transitionally rough regimes, since a similar degree of collapse is observed in the transitionally rough data. Observation of the new data shows that scaling on the momentum thickness alone is not sufficient to produce similar velocity profiles for flows over surfaces of different roughness character. The skin friction coefficient data versus the ratio of the momentum thickness to roughness height collapse within the data uncertainty, irrespective of roughness flow regime, with the data for each rough surface collapsing to a different curve. Calculations made using the previously published discrete element prediction method are compared with data from the rough surfaces with well-defined roughness elements, and it is shown that the calculations are in good agreement with the data.

  12. Experimental study of noise emitted by circular cylinders with large roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomar, Antoni; Angland, David; Zhang, Xin; Molin, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    The aerodynamic noise generated by high Reynolds number flow around a bluff body with large surface roughness was investigated. This is a relevant problem in many applications, in particular aircraft landing gear noise. A circular cylinder in cross-flow and a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with various types of roughness was tested in a series of wind tunnel experiments. It has been shown that distributed roughness covering a circular cylinder affects the spectra over the entire frequency range. Roughness noise is dominant at high frequencies, and the peak frequency is well described by Howe's roughness noise model when scaled with the maximum outer velocity. There are differences between hemispherical and cylindrical roughness elements for both the circular cylinder and the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer cases, indicating a dependence on roughness shape, not described by the considered roughness noise models. Cylindrical roughness generates higher noise levels at the highest frequencies, especially for the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer case. Cable-type roughness aligned with the mean flow does not generate roughness noise, and its spectrum has been found to collapse with the smooth cylinder at medium and high frequencies. At low and medium frequencies the noise spectra have the same features as the smooth cylinder, but with higher shedding peak levels and fall-off levels, despite the decrease in spanwise correlation length. Roughness induces early separation, and thus a shift of the spectra to lower frequencies.

  13. Effects of Alloying Elements on Microstructure, Hardness, Wear Resistance, and Surface Roughness of Centrifugally Cast High-Speed Steel Rolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Dae Jin; Sung, Hyo Kyung; Park, Joon Wook; Lee, Sunghak

    2009-11-01

    A study was made of the effects of carbon, tungsten, molybdenum, and vanadium on the wear resistance and surface roughness of five high-speed steel (HSS) rolls manufactured by the centrifugal casting method. High-temperature wear tests were conducted on these rolls to experimentally simulate the wear process during hot rolling. The HSS rolls contained a large amount (up to 25 vol pct) of carbides, such as MC, M2C, and M7C3 carbides formed in the tempered martensite matrix. The matrix consisted mainly of tempered lath martensite when the carbon content in the matrix was small, and contained a considerable amount of tempered plate martensite when the carbon content increased. The high-temperature wear test results indicated that the wear resistance and surface roughness of the rolls were enhanced when the amount of hard MC carbides formed inside solidification cells increased and their distribution was homogeneous. The best wear resistance and surface roughness were obtained from a roll in which a large amount of MC carbides were homogeneously distributed in the tempered lath martensite matrix. The appropriate contents of the carbon equivalent, tungsten equivalent, and vanadium were 2.0 to 2.3, 9 to 10, and 5 to 6 pct, respectively.

  14. Full Wave Analysis of RF Signal Attenuation in a Lossy Rough Surface Cave using a High Order Time Domain Vector Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Rieben, R; White, D; Dudley, D

    2005-10-31

    We present a computational study of signal propagation and attenuation of a 200 MHz planar loop antenna in a cave environment. The cave is modeled as a straight and lossy random rough wall. To simulate a broad frequency band, the full wave Maxwell equations are solved directly in the time domain via a high order vector finite element discretization using the massively parallel CEM code EMSolve. The numerical technique is first verified against theoretical results for a planar loop antenna in a smooth lossy cave. The simulation is then performed for a series of random rough surface meshes in order to generate statistical data for the propagation and attenuation properties of the antenna in a cave environment. Results for the mean and variance of the power spectral density of the electric field are presented and discussed.

  15. Critical assessment of finite element analysis applied to metal-oxide interface roughness in oxidising zirconium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, P.; Frankel, P.; Gass, M.; Preuss, M.

    2015-09-01

    As a nuclear fuel cladding material, zirconium alloys act as a barrier between the fuel and pressurised steam or lithiated water environment. Controlling degradation mechanisms such as oxidation is essential to extending the in-service lifetime of the fuel. At temperatures of ∼360 °C zirconium alloys are known to exhibit cyclical, approximately cubic corrosion kinetics. With acceleration in the oxidation kinetics occurring every ∼2 μm of oxide growth, and being associated with the formation of a network of lateral cracks. Finite element analysis has been used previously to explain the lateral crack formation by the development of localised out-of-plane tensile stresses at the metal-oxide interface. This work uses the Abaqus finite element code to assess critically current approaches to representing the oxidation of zirconium alloys, with relation to undulations at the metal-oxide interface and localised stress generation. This includes comparison of axisymmetric and 3D quartered modelling approaches, and investigates the effect of interface geometry and plasticity in the metal substrate. Particular focus is placed on the application of the anisotropic strain tensor used to represent the oxidation mechanism, which is typically applied with a fixed coordinate system. Assessment of the impact of the tensor showed that 99% of the localised tensile stresses originated from the out-of-plane component of the strain tensor, rather than the in-plane expansion as was previously thought. Discussion is given to the difficulties associated with this modelling approach and the requirements for future simulations of the oxidation of zirconium alloys.

  16. [Hemispheric specialisation versus inter-hemispheric communication].

    PubMed

    Belin, C; Faure, S; Mayer, E

    2008-05-01

    The first part of this article covers the main discoveries that led to the concept of hemispheric specialisation, from Egyptian antiquity to present times, through the pivotal XIXth century period that saw the attribution of specific cognitive functions to the left and right hemispheres. Next, this dichotomous conception of cerebral function, attributing a given process to a hemisphere and hypothesising callosal transmission, is discussed in the light of recent studies on language comprehension. Present day knowledge suggesting an alternative to the structuralist view of hemispheric specialisation in the form of dynamic, complementary sharing of labour, and of cooperation through transcortical neural networks, is then considered. Finally, the role of the corpus callosum in interhemispheric communication is briefly covered. An emphasis is placed on the diversity of this structure that is at the origin of highly different functions (fibre size, homotopic vs heterotopic connections). Ultimately, we contrast the view of a corpus callosum serving as an information transmitting channel with that of a fibre tract co-activating the non-engaged hemisphere and preparing it for potential stimulation. In this manner, the corpus callosum minimises disparities in the distribution of attention between the two hemispheres. PMID:18675041

  17. Investigation of the influence of a step change in surface roughness on turbulent heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Taylor, J. Keith; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    The use is studied of smooth heat flux gages on the otherwise very rough SSME fuel pump turbine blades. To gain insights into behavior of such installations, fluid mechanics and heat transfer data were collected and are reported for a turbulent boundary layer over a surface with a step change from a rough surface to a smooth surface. The first 0.9 m length of the flat plate test surface was roughened with 1.27 mm hemispheres in a staggered, uniform array spaced 2 base diameters apart. The remaining 1.5 m length was smooth. The effect of the alignment of the smooth surface with respect to the rough surface was also studied by conducting experiments with the smooth surface aligned with the bases or alternatively with the crests of the roughness elements. Stanton number distributions, skin friction distributions, and boundary layer profiles of temperature and velocity are reported and are compared to previous data for both all rough and all smooth wall cases. The experiments show that the step change from rough to smooth has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. It is concluded that use of smooth heat flux gages on otherwise rough surfaces could cause large errors.

  18. Hemispheric Asymmetries in Substorm Recovery Time Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Chua, D H.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Previous statistical observations have shown that the recovery time scales of substorms occurring in the winter and near equinox (when the nighttime auroral zone was in darkness) are roughly twice as long as the recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the summer (when the nighttime auroral region was sunlit). This suggests that auroral substorms in the northern and southern hemispheres develop asymmetrically during solstice conditions with substorms lasting longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere than in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. Additionally, this implies that more energy is deposited by electron precipitation in the winter hemisphere than in the summer one during substorms. This result, coupled with previous observations that have shown that auroral activity is more common when the ionosphere is in darkness and is suppressed when the ionosphere is in daylight, strongly suggests that the ionospheric conductivity plays an important role governing how magnetospheric energy is transferred to the ionosphere during substorms. Therefore, the ionosphere itself may dictate how much energy it will accept from the magnetosphere during substorms rather than this being an externally imposed quantity. Here, we extend our earlier work by statistically analyzing the recovery time scales for a large number of substorms observed in the conjugate hemispheres simultaneously by two orbiting global auroral imagers: Polar UVI and IMAGE FUV. Our current results are consistent with previous observations. The recovery time scales are observed to be longer in the winter (dark) hemisphere while the auroral activity has a shorter duration in the summer (sunlit) hemisphere. This leads to an asymmetric energy input from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere with more energy being deposited in the winter hemisphere than in the summer hemisphere.

  19. Roughness of stable, armored gravel beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Basil

    1993-11-01

    The grain roughness of stable armored beds that formed in a laboratory flume under a range of steady flow conditions on rounded, flat and angular gravel is analyzed. Gravel roughness geometry is determined from bed surface profiles and vertical photographs. These techniques have been employed in field situations. Thus the methodology is potentially applicable to the analysis of grain roughness in natural gravel bed channels. The description of representative roughness geometry is also analogous to that used to characterize artificial roughness arrays. Armor roughness increases with increasing flow. Armored surfaces composed of angular gravel are roughest, and surfaces formed of flat gravel offer least resistance to the flow. Stable armored beds may exhibit a tendency to maximize the ratio of the shear due to drag on representative roughness elements to total shear. Roughness concentration is strongly correlated with the energy slope, and there is a linear increase in equivalent roughness height with increasing roughness concentration. The friction factor for an armored surface varies in a linear manner with representative roughness geometry. The equation defining this relation is probably similar to that used to characterize variations in the friction factor with artificial roughness geometry at low roughness concentrations. However, to reconcile the relations for artificial and natural roughness completely, it may be necessary to explicitly consider the contribution to flow resistance made by roughness shape, background roughness, and blocking in shallow flows.

  20. Heat transfer in the turbulent boundary layer with a step change in surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Robert P.; Taylor, J. K.; Coleman, Hugh W.; Hosni, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of Stanton numbers, velocity profiles, temperature profiles, and turbulence intensity profiles are reported for turbulent flat plate boundary layer flows with a step change in surface roughness. The first 0.9 m length of the test surface is roughened with 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced 2 base diameters apart in a staggered array. The remaining 1.5 m length is smooth. The experiments show that the step change from a rough to a smooth surface has a dramatic effect on the convective heat transfer. In many cases, the Stanton number drops below the smooth-wall correlation immediately downstream of the change in roughness. The Stanton number measurements are compared with predictions using the discrete element method with excellent results.

  1. Analysis and testing for rotordynamic coefficients of turbulent annular seals with different, directionally homogeneous surface-roughness treatment for rotor and stator elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, D. W.; Kim, C. H.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is presented, based on a simple modification of Hirs' turbulent lubrication equations, to account for different but directionally-homogeneous surface roughness treatments for the rotor and stator of annular seals. The theoretical results agree with von Pragenau's predictions that a damper seal which uses a smooth rotor and a rough stator yields more net damping than a conventional seal which has the same roughness for both the rotor and stator. Experimental results for four stators confirm that properly-designed roughened stators yield higher net damping values and substantially less leakage than seals with smooth surfaces. The best seal from both damping and leakage viewpoints uses a round-hole-pattern stator. Initial results for this stator suggest that, within limits, seals can be designed to yield specified ratios of stiffness to damping.

  2. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  3. Io's Kanehekili Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color composite of Io, acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter, shows the hemisphere of Io which is centered at longitude 52 degrees. The dark feature just to the lower right of the center of the disk is called Kanehekili. Named after an Hawaiian thunder god, Kanehekili contains two persistent high temperature hot spots and a 'new' active volcanic plume. NASA's Voyager spacecraft returned images of nine active plumes during its 1979 flyby of this dynamic satellite. To date, Galileo's plume monitoring observations have shown continued activity at four of those nine plume locations as well as new activity at six other locations.

    North is to the top of the picture which combines images acquired using violet, green, and near-infrared (756 micrometers) filters. The resolution is 21 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 1,033,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  4. Hemispherical micro-resonators from atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jason M.; Houlton, John P.; Gertsch, Jonas C.; Brown, Joseph J.; Rogers, Charles T.; George, Steven M.; Bright, Victor M.

    2014-12-01

    Hemispherical shell micro-resonators may be used as gyroscopes to potentially enable precision inertial navigation and guidance at low cost and size. Such devices require a high degree of symmetry and large quality factors (Q). Fabricating the devices from atomic layer deposition (ALD) facilitates symmetry through ALD’s high conformality and low surface roughness. To maximize Q, the shells’ geometry is optimized using finite element method (FEM) studies to reduce thermoelastic dissipation and anchor loss. The shells are fabricated by etching hemispherical molds in Si (1 1 1) substrates with a 2:7:1 volumetric ratio of hydrofluoric:nitric:acetic acids, and conformally coating and patterning the molds with ALD Al2O3. The Al2O3 shells are then released from the surrounding Si substrate with an SF6 plasma. The resulting shells typically have radii around 50 µm and thicknesses close to 50 nm. The shells are highly symmetric, with radial deviations between 0.22 and 0.49%, and robust enough to be driven on resonance at amplitudes 10 × their thickness, sufficient to visualize the resonance mode shapes in an SEM. Resonance frequencies are around 60 kHz, with Q values between 1000 and 2000. This Q is lower than the 106 predicted by FEM, implying that Q is being limited by unmodeled sources of energy loss, most likely from surface effects or material defects.

  5. Southern hemisphere observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orchiston, Wayne

    Because of insurmountable problems associated with absolute dating, the non-literate cultures of the Southern Hemisphere can contribute little to Applied Historical Astronomy, although Maori traditions document a possible supernova dating to the period 1000-1770 AD. In contrast, the abundant nineteenth century solar, planetary, cometary and stellar observational data provided by Southern Hemisphere professional and amateur observatories can serve as an invaluable mine of information for present-day astronomers seeking to incorporate historical data in their investigations.

  6. Hemispherical Laue camera

    DOEpatents

    Li, James C. M.; Chu, Sungnee G.

    1980-01-01

    A hemispherical Laue camera comprises a crystal sample mount for positioning a sample to be analyzed at the center of sphere of a hemispherical, X-radiation sensitive film cassette, a collimator, a stationary or rotating sample mount and a set of standard spherical projection spheres. X-radiation generated from an external source is directed through the collimator to impinge onto the single crystal sample on the stationary mount. The diffracted beam is recorded on the hemispherical X-radiation sensitive film mounted inside the hemispherical film cassette in either transmission or back-reflection geometry. The distances travelled by X-radiation diffracted from the crystal to the hemispherical film are the same for all crystal planes which satisfy Bragg's Law. The recorded diffraction spots or Laue spots on the film thereby preserve both the symmetry information of the crystal structure and the relative intensities which are directly related to the relative structure factors of the crystal orientations. The diffraction pattern on the exposed film is compared with the known diffraction pattern on one of the standard spherical projection spheres for a specific crystal structure to determine the orientation of the crystal sample. By replacing the stationary sample support with a rotating sample mount, the hemispherical Laue camera can be used for crystal structure determination in a manner previously provided in conventional Debye-Scherrer cameras.

  7. Use of a liquid-crystal, heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil, including turbulence and surface roughness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, Steven A.; Russell, Louis M.; Torres, Felix J.

    1987-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at roon temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  8. Measurement and calculation of surface roughness effects on turbulent flow and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosni, Mohammad Hosein

    Fluid dynamics and heat transfer data for turbulent boundary layer flow of air over a smooth surface and three well-defined rough surfaces were taken in the Turbulent Heat Transfer Test Facility (THTTF) for x-Reynolds numbers ranging up to 10,000,000. The smooth wall data provided base line data for comparison with the data from rough surfaces. The three rough surfaces were composed of 1.27 mm diameter hemispheres spaced 2, 4, and 10 diameters apart, respectively, in staggered arrays on otherwise smooth flat plates. Skin friction coefficient distributions and boundary layer profiles of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were obtained using hot-wire anemometry. The THTTF heat transfer data taken in aerodynamically smooth, transitionally rough, and fully rough flow regimes over the three well-defined rough surfaces for freestream velocities of 6, 12, 28, 43, 58, and 67 m/s were compared with the data sets taken at Stanford University using a single well-defined rough surface. It was observed that the Stanton numbers for a given surface collapse together in x-Reynolds number coordinates as the freestream velocity increases, with the Stanton number level being larger for rougher surfaces. The THTTF heat transfer data and the Stanford data were used to modify the roughness energy transport model in the discrete element prediction method. This method was used in calculation of the fluid dynamics and heat transfer for the THTTF and Stanford surfaces. The predictions were in excellent agreement with all data sets within the data uncertainty.

  9. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Moran; Kang, Qinjun

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  10. Transition Experiments on Blunt Bodies with Distributed Roughness in Hypersonic Free Flight in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Blunt-body geometries were flown through carbon dioxide in the NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility to investigate the influence of distributed surface roughness on transition to turbulence in CO2-dominated atmospheres, such as those of Mars and Venus. Tests were also performed in air for direct comparison with archival results. Models of hemispherical and spherically-blunted large-angle conical geometries were flown at speeds between 2.8 km/s and 5.1 km/s and freestream pressures between 50 Torr and 228 Torr. Transition fronts were determined from global surface heat flux distributions measured using thermal imaging techniques. Distributed surface roughness was produced by grit-blasting the model surfaces. Real-gas Navier-Stokes solutions were used to calculate non-dimensional correlating parameters at the measured transition onset locations. Transition-onset locations correlated well with a constant roughness Reynolds number based on the mean roughness element height. The critical roughness Reynolds number for transition onset determined for flight in CO2 was 223 +/- 25%. This mean value is lower than the critical value of 250 +/- 20% previously-established from tests conducted in air, but within the bounds of the expected measurement uncertainty.

  11. Rough-wall turbulent boundary layers in the transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers over two-dimensional spanwise groove and three-dimensional sandgrain roughnesses in the transition regime between hydraulically smooth and fully rough conditions is presented. It is found that a self-preserving state can be reached in boundary layers developing over both d-type groove and sandgrain roughnesses, and that the drag of a k-type rough wall can be reduced by lowering the spanwise aspect ratio of the roughness elements. The two roughness Reynolds numbers defining the boundaries of the transition regime of the k-type roughnesses are shown to decrease with increasing roughness-element spanwise aspect ratio, and the upper critical transition Reynolds number is shown to determine the roughness behavior in both the transition and fully rough regime.

  12. Hemispheric lateralization in reasoning.

    PubMed

    Turner, Benjamin O; Marinsek, Nicole; Ryhal, Emily; Miller, Michael B

    2015-11-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that reasoning in humans relies on a number of related processes whose neural loci are largely lateralized to one hemisphere or the other. A recent review of this evidence concluded that the patterns of lateralization observed are organized according to two complementary tendencies. The left hemisphere attempts to reduce uncertainty by drawing inferences or creating explanations, even at the cost of ignoring conflicting evidence or generating implausible explanations. Conversely, the right hemisphere aims to reduce conflict by rejecting or refining explanations that are no longer tenable in the face of new evidence. In healthy adults, the hemispheres work together to achieve a balance between certainty and consistency, and a wealth of neuropsychological research supports the notion that upsetting this balance results in various failures in reasoning, including delusions. However, support for this model from the neuroimaging literature is mixed. Here, we examine the evidence for this framework from multiple research domains, including an activation likelihood estimation analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of reasoning. Our results suggest a need to either revise this model as it applies to healthy adults or to develop better tools for assessing lateralization in these individuals. PMID:26426534

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Problem of Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H

    1937-01-01

    Based on the universal laws of turbulent velocity distribution at rough and smooth walls, there is in the present work presented a method that allows surface roughness tests and in particular, measurements on the roughness of ship surfaces to be carried out in a much simpler manner. The types of roughness investigated were in the form of flat, rough plates installed in a square-section rectangular channel, the other three walls always being smooth. Twenty-one plates of various roughness were investigated, the roughness elements being the following: spheres of diameter 0.41 and 0.21, respectively, spherical segments, cones, and "short" and "long" angles.

  14. Extensive wetting due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Michael, J.R.; Eisenmann, E.T. . Center for Solder Science and Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Typically, a small mass of eutectic Sn-Pb solder wets a copper surface and flows radially outward to form a hemispherical shape with a contact angle of approx. 15--20 deg. When a similar mass of solder wets and thick electroless copper coated substrate, rapid radial flow commences and surprising new effects occur. Thick coats of electroless copper have a nodular surface structure and spreading on it does not subside until all solder is consumed. When the nodular structure is wetted by solder a coastline'' with many nearby islands'' are defined. Photos of regions at the wetting front were taken in the backscatter imaging mode of an SEM. These images show that solder wets the valleys between the surface nodules forming a delicate, lacy arrangement. The geometry of this coastal'' solder structure is described as fractal-like having a dimension D = 1.38 making it similar to drying fronts and cloud configurations. The importance of surface roughness in wetting phenomena is discussed in the light of an extensive history on the subject. It is shown that for spontaneous flow, assisted by roughness, the surface geometry must consist of local angles that are larger than the equilibrium contact angle. Kinetics of the wetting process are demonstrated by image analysis of wetted area taken from videotaped experiments. These experimental kinetics are shown to be similar in form to flow in open channel capillaries.

  15. Hemispherical Stokes polarimeter for early cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaillet, Paul; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2011-03-01

    Optimal treatment of skin cancer before it reaches metastasis depends critically on early diagnosis of the melanoma. Valuable information for this diagnosis can be obtained from the analysis of skin roughness. This information can aid in determining the necessity for skin removal. For this purpose, we developed a hemispherical imaging Stokes polarimeter designed to monitor skin cancer based on a roughness assessment of the epidermis. Our setup is composed of 16 out-of-plane polarized light illuminations tubes that contain a three color LED and a vertical polarizer, a Stokes polarimeter that contains 2 liquid crystal retarders, a reference vertical polarizer and a fast acquisition camera. The Stokes polarimeter was calibrated using a set of well-known input polarization states. Each illumination polarizer was positioned using a roughness gold standard and a facet model describing the principal angle of polarization of the analyzed light as a function of the angle of incidence. A set of phantoms mimicking the optical properties of skin at 633 nm as well as skin roughness was built using wax as the bulk material, titanium dioxide as the scatterer and a black dye as the absorber. Images of these phantoms are presented and they are analyzed using a facet model.

  16. Brain Hemisphericity and Developmental Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlachos, Filippos; Andreou, Eleni; Delliou, Afroditi

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the link between brain hemisphericity and dyslexia in secondary school students, using the Preference Test (PT), a widely used self-report index of preferred hemisphere thinking styles. The hypothesis was that differences would be revealed between the dyslexic group and their peers in hemispheric preference. A total of…

  17. Music, Hemisphere Preference and Imagery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stratton, Valerie N.; Zalanowski, Annette H.

    Two experiments were conducted to determine a possible relationship between the right hemisphere, music perception, and mental imagery. The first experiment compared two groups of college students, one of which showed a preference for left hemisphere thinking (n=22) and the other a preference for right hemisphere thinking (n=20), in order to test…

  18. Comparing Experiment and Computation of Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layers with Isolated Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Iyer, Prahladh S.; Mahesh, Krishnan; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise velocity profile behavior in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer in the presence of an isolated roughness element is presented for an edge Mach number of 8.2. Two different roughness element types are considered: a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylinder, and a 2-mm radius hemisphere. Measurements of the streamwise velocity behavior using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) have been performed on a 20-degree wedge model. The top surface of this model acts as a flat-plate and is oriented at 5 degrees with respect to the freestream flow. Computations using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of these flows have been performed and are compared to the measured velocity profiles. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of velocity profiles immediately upstream and downstream of the roughness elements. In these regions, the streamwise flow can experience strong deceleration or acceleration. An analysis in which experimentally measured MTV profile displacements are compared with DNS particle displacements is performed to determine if the assumption of constant velocity over the duration of the MTV measurement is valid. This assumption is typically made when reporting MTV-measured velocity profiles, and may result in significant errors when comparing MTV measurements to computations in regions with strong deceleration or acceleration. The DNS computations with the cylindrical roughness element presented in this paper were performed with and without air injection from a rectangular slot upstream of the cylinder. This was done to determine the extent to which gas seeding in the MTV measurements perturbs the boundary layer flowfield.

  19. Triton's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This polar projection of Triton's southern hemisphere provides a view of the southern polar cap and bright equatorial fringe. The margin of the cap is scalloped and ranges in latitude from +10 degrees to -30 degrees. The bright fringe is closely associated with the cap's margin; from it, diffuse bright rays extend north-northeast for hundreds of kilometers. The bright fringe probably consists of very fresh nitrogen frost or snow, and the rays consist of bright-fringe materials that were redistributed by north-moving Coriolis-deflected winds.

  20. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  1. MOLA Global roughness map of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The median of slopes in 35-km windows indicate the typical roughness on 300-meter baselines. The rougher nature of the heavily cratered terrain in the Southern Hemisphere is apparent, as well as that of Valles Marineris (12S, 289E) canyon walls and the Olympus Mons (18N, 227E) aureole deposits. The Northern Lowlands are smooth, especially Amazonis Planitia (16N, 202E), a region to the west of Olympus Mons, were typical median slopes on these baselines are often smaller than 0.1 degree. A shaded relief map of the topography is overlaid is monochrome.

  2. Neptune's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    This photograph of Neptune's southern hemisphere was taken by the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Voyager 2 when the spacecraft was 4.2 million km (2.6 million miles) from the planet. The smallest features that can be seen are 38 km (24 miles) across. The almond-shaped structure at the left is a large cloud system that has been seen for several weeks. Internal details in the feature have become increasingly apparent as Voyager 2 has approached. Systems with similar shapes in Jupiter's atmosphere rotate about their centers, rolling in the local winds that increase toward the south. However, the wispy nature of the white central clouds in this Neptunian feature make confirmation of the system's rotation difficult. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  3. A Left-Hemisphere Model for Right-Hemisphere Programmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krantz, Gordon C.

    The paper presents an action-and-decision (left-hemisphere) algorithm as a model for planning by holistic, intuitive (right-hemisphere) managers of service programs, including programs for exceptional children. Because the model is not based upon an established literature in the field of service to exceptional individuals, and because it appears…

  4. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  5. Rough Fresnel zone plates over metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Remacha, Francisco Javier; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Rios, Francisco Javier; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2010-04-01

    We analyze the focusing properties of Fresnel zone plates fabricated over steel tapes using laser ablation. Our intention is to implement the use of micro-optical elements when the use of conventional chrome-glass elements is not indicated. Because of the manufacture process, the surface presents a certain anisotropic roughness, which reduces the focusing properties. First, we develop numerical simulations by means of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld approach, showing how roughness in both levels of the Fresnel zone plate affects the focalization of the lens. We also manufacture Fresnel zone plates over steel tape, and perform experimental verification that corroborates the numerical results. PMID:20357856

  6. Callisto Hemispherical Globes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from the best image quality and moderate resolution coverage supplied by Galileo SSI and Voyager 1 and 2 (Batson, 1987; Becker and others, 1998; Becker and others, 1999; Becker and others, 2001). The digital map was produced using Integrated Software for Imagers and Spectrometers (ISIS) (Eliason, 1997; Gaddis and others, 1997; Torson and Becker, 1997). The individual images were radiometrically calibrated and photometrically normalized using a Lunar-Lambert function with empirically derived values (McEwen, 1991; Kirk and others, 2000). A linear correction based on the statistics of all overlapping areas was then applied to minimize image brightness variations. The image data were selected on the basis of overall image quality, reasonable original input resolution (from 20 km/pixel for gap fill to as much as 150 m/pixel), and availability of moderate emission/incidence angles for topography. Although consistency was achieved where possible, different filters were included for global image coverage as necessary: clear for Voyager 1 and 2; clear and green (559 nm) for Galileo SSI. Individual images were projected to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area projection at an image resolution of 1.0 kilometer/pixel, and a final global mosaic was constructed in this same projection. The final mosaic was enhanced using commercial software. The global mosaic was then reprojected so that the entire surface of Callisto is portrayed in a manner suitable for the production of a globe. A specialized program was used to create the 'flower petal' appearance of the images; the area of each petal from 0 to 75 degrees latitude is in the Transverse Mercator projection, and the area from 75 to 90 degrees latitude is in the Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area projection. The projections for adjacent petals overlap by 2 degrees of longitude, so that some features are shown twice. The northern hemisphere is shown on the left, and the southern hemisphere is

  7. Europa Hemispherical Globes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The images used for the base of this globe were chosen from coverage supplied by the Galileo solid-state imaging (SSI) camera and Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft. The individual images were radiometrically calibrated and photometrically normalized using a Lunar-Lambert function with empirically derived values. A linear correction based on the statistics of all overlapping areas was then applied to minimize image brightness variations. The image data were selected on the basis of overall image quality, reasonable original input resolution (from 20 km/pixel for gap fill to as much as 200 m/pixel), and availability of moderate emission/incidence angles for topography. Although consistency was achieved where possible, different filters were included for global image coverage as necessary: clear/blue for Voyager 1 and 2, and clear, near-IR (757 nm), and green (559 nm) for Galileo SSI. Individual images were projected to a Sinusoidal Equal-Area projection at an image resolution of 500 m/pixel, and a final global mosaic was constructed in this same Sinusoidal projection.

    The global mosaic was then reprojected so that the entire surface of Europa is portrayed in a manner suitable for the production of a globe. A specialized program was used to create the 'flower petal' appearance of the images; the area of each petal from 0 to 75 degrees latitude is in the Transverse Mercator projection, and the area from 75 to 90 degrees latitude is in the Lambert Azimuthal Equal-Area projection. The projections for adjacent petals overlap by 2 degrees of longitude, so that some features are shown twice.

    Names shown on the globe are approved by the International Astronomical Union. The number, size, and placement of text were chosen for a 9-inch globe. A complete list of Europa nomenclature can be found at the Gazetteer of Planetary Nomenclature at http://planetarynames.wr.usgs.gov. The northern hemisphere is shown on the left, and the southern hemisphere is shown on the right.

  8. Europa's Leading Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Europa's leading hemisphere was obtained by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on board NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit of Jupiter. In the upper left part of the image is Tyre, a multi-ringed structure that may have formed as a result of an ancient impact. Also visible are numerous lineaments that extend for over 1000 kilometers. The limb, or edge, of Europa in this image can be used by scientists to constrain the radius and shape of the satellite. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the right. The image, centered at -40 latitude and 180 longitude, covers an area approximately 2000 by 1300 kilometers. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 6.6 kilometers across. The images were taken on April 3, 1997 at 17 hours, 42 minutes, 19 seconds Universal Time when the spacecraft was at a range of 31,8628 kilometers.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  9. Callisto's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These views of Callisto's southern hemisphere were taken by the Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer just after closest approach in orbit G8 on May 6, 1997. These false color images show surface compositional differences, red = more ice, blue = less ice.

    The upper left view contains Buri, a crater with a diameter of about 60 km. In the infrared spectrum, Buri and the rays that extend from the crater have high abundance of water ice compared to the surrounding region. The center view, a large (200 km or 120 mile diameter) unnamed impact crater with a distinct ring or circle around it reveals a complex mix of ice and non-ice materials. This is possibly due to impact excavation of the ice-rich subsurface which suggests that the darker material is just a thin surface covering caused by impact debris or a lag deposit from which the ice has evaporated away. The infrared data shows spectral signatures for both sulfur and carbon as two potential materials which could play a part in the complicated make-up of Callisto's surface.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  10. Detonation in TATB Hemispheres

    SciTech Connect

    Druce, B; Souers, P C; Chow, C; Roeske, F; Vitello, P; Hrousis, C

    2004-03-17

    Streak camera breakout and Fabry-Perot interferometer data have been taken on the outer surface of 1.80 g/cm{sup 3} TATB hemispherical boosters initiated by slapper detonators at three temperatures. The slapper causes breakout to occur at 54{sup o} at ambient temperatures and 42{sup o} at -54 C, where the axis of rotation is 0{sup o}. The Fabry velocities may be associated with pressures, and these decrease for large timing delays in breakout seen at the colder temperatures. At room temperature, the Fabry pressures appear constant at all angles. Both fresh and decade-old explosive are tested and no difference is seen. The problem has been modeled with reactive flow. Adjustment of the JWL for temperature makes little difference, but cooling to -54 C decreases the rate constant by 1/6th. The problem was run both at constant density and with density differences using two different codes. The ambient code results show that a density difference is probably there but it cannot be quantified.

  11. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  12. Shear Stress Partitioning in Airflow over Rough Surfaces: Roughness Form Effects and Influence on the Distribution of Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. A.; Nickling, W. G.; King, J.

    2004-12-01

    Roughness elements distributed across a surface can significantly decrease the entrainment and transport of underlying fine-grained sediments by wind. The parameterization of roughness effects on wind erosion thresholds and sediment transport is critical to the development of models that can provide realistic predictions of sediment thresholds and fluxes due to wind erosion. Raupach et al. (1993) present a model for predicting the protective role of roughness elements in terms of a threshold friction velocity ratio as a function of the roughness geometry and the aerodynamic properties of the surface and roughness elements. The predictive capacity of this model remains uncertain and the work presented here represents part of an on-going effort of our group to improve the parameterization of the Raupach et al. (1993) model. To gain additional understanding of how roughness elements influence the magnitude and nature of the shear stress acting on the surface among the elements and evaluate strength and weaknesses of the roughness density parameter to characterize these effects, a wind tunnel study using model roughness arrays of similar roughness density composed of cube-shaped elements of different length dimensions was undertaken. Roughness density is defined as the total frontal area of all the elements to the total surface area that they occupy. Shear stress in the above element air flow was determined from vertical wind speed profile measurements. Point measurements of near surface shear stresses within the roughness array were made with simple omni-directional skin friction meters in order to investigate the partitioning of shear stress to the intervening surface. The results suggest that the roughness density parameter has severe limitations in describing the shear stress partitioning for these regularly arrayed rough surfaces. For surfaces with identical roughness densities, the surface composed of more and smaller elements was observed to have average and

  13. Mesoscale roughness of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Frawley, James J.

    1994-01-01

    The global distribution of multi-kilometer (approx. 9 km) length scale 'roughness' (hereafter mesoscale roughness or MR) on Venus can be estimated from the Magellan global altimetry dataset (GxDR) and then compared with MR data derived for Earth from 5' ETOP5 data and for Mars (from USGS Mars DTM dataset). The mesoscale roughness parameter (MR) represents the RMS variance in meters of the actual planetary surface topography relative to the best fitting tangent plane defined on the basis of a 3x3 pixel sliding window. The best-fit plane was computed using a least-squares solution which minimizes delta H, the sum of the squares of the differences between the 9 local elevation values (H(sub i)), and the elevation of best-fit plane at the same grid location. Using the best-fit plane and delta H, we have computed the RMS 'roughness' var(delta R), where this parameter is always minimized on the basis of its calculation using least squares. We have called this 'ruggedness' parameter the Mesoscale Roughness (MR) because it is directly related to the high-frequency variance of topography after mesoscale slopes and tilts (i.e., for Venus, the baseline over which MR is computed (dx) is approx. 8.8 km and dx for Earth is approx. 9.3 km) are removed. As such, MR represents the degree to which a planetary surface is more rugged than approximately 10 km scale facets or tilts. It should not be confused with the radar 'RMS Roughness' parameter computed at 0.1 to 10 m length scales on the basis of the Magellan radar altimeter echo. We will use our MR parameter to investigate the global ruggedness properties of Venus as they relate to geological provinces and in comparison with the spatial pattern of MR for Earth and Mars.

  14. The Southern Hemisphere VLBI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, R.A.; Meier, D.L.; Louie, A.P.; Morabito, D.D.; Skjerve, L.; Slade, M.A.; Niell, A.E.; Wehrle, A.E.; Jauncey, D.L.; Tzioumis, A.K.; Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA; California Univ., Los Angeles; CSIRO, Div. of Radiophysics, Epping; Sydney Univ.; Manchester Victoria Univ., Jodrell Bank )

    1989-07-01

    Six radio telescopes were operated as the first Southern Hemisphere VLBI array in April and May 1982. Observations were made at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. This array provided VLBI modeling and hybrid imaging of celestial radio sources in the Southern Hemisphere, high-accuracy VLBI geodesy between Southern Hemisphere sites, and subarcsecond radio astrometry of celestial sources south of declination -45 deg. The goals and implementation of the array are discussed, the methods of modeling and hybrid image production are explained, and the VLBI structure of the sources that were observed is summarized. 36 refs.

  15. Bio-inspired hemispherical compound eye camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jianliang; Song, Young Min; Xie, Yizhu; Malyarchuk, Viktor; Jung, Inhwa; Choi, Ki-Joong; Liu, Zhuangjian; Park, Hyunsung; Lu, Chaofeng; Kim, Rak-Hwan; Li, Rui; Crozier, Kenneth B.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2014-03-01

    Compound eyes in arthropods demonstrate distinct imaging characteristics from human eyes, with wide angle field of view, low aberrations, high acuity to motion and infinite depth of field. Artificial imaging systems with similar geometries and properties are of great interest for many applications. However, the challenges in building such systems with hemispherical, compound apposition layouts cannot be met through established planar sensor technologies and conventional optics. We present our recent progress in combining optics, materials, mechanics and integration schemes to build fully functional artificial compound eye cameras. Nearly full hemispherical shapes (about 160 degrees) with densely packed artificial ommatidia were realized. The number of ommatidia (180) is comparable to those of the eyes of fire ants and bark beetles. The devices combine elastomeric compound optical elements with deformable arrays of thin silicon photodetectors, which were fabricated in the planar geometries and then integrated and elastically transformed to hemispherical shapes. Imaging results and quantitative ray-tracing-based simulations illustrate key features of operation. These general strategies seem to be applicable to other compound eye devices, such as those inspired by moths and lacewings (refracting superposition eyes), lobster and shrimp (reflecting superposition eyes), and houseflies (neural superposition eyes).

  16. Brain Hemispheres and Thinking Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Esther Cappon

    1980-01-01

    The author reviews some research, particularly that of Roger Sperry, substantiating the existence of different thinking styles in the two brain hemispheres and the development of this differentiation in infancy and childhood. She draws some implications for elementary teaching. (SJL)

  17. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, L.C. Jr.

    1996-06-04

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved. 8 figs.

  18. Free form hemispherical shaped charge

    DOEpatents

    Haselman, Jr., Leonard C.

    1996-01-01

    A hemispherical shaped charge has been modified such that one side of the hemisphere is spherical and the other is aspherical allowing a wall thickness variation in the liner. A further modification is to use an elongated hemispherical shape. The liner has a thick wall at its pole and a thin wall at the equator with a continually decreasing wall thickness from the pole to the equator. The ratio of the wall thickness from the pole to the equator varies depending on liner material and HE shape. Hemispherical shaped charges have previously been limited to spherical shapes with no variations in wall thicknesses. By redesign of the basic liner thicknesses, the jet properties of coherence, stability, and mass distribution have been significantly improved.

  19. Archimedes and the Magdeburg Hemispheres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayn, Carl H.

    1975-01-01

    Weights suspended from a lever arm separate evacuated hemispheres allowing estimation of atmospheric pressure to within five percent of the barometric reading. An illustration and a reference to von Guericke's demonstration are provided. (GH)

  20. Northern Hemisphere Slopes from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonson, O.; Zuber, M. T.

    1998-12-01

    Slopes, slope distributions, and macroscale surface roughness in the northern hemisphere of Mars have been measured from topographic profiles collected by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) in the capture orbit, aerobraking hiatus and Science Phasing Orbit phases of the Mars Global Surveyor mission. The distribution function of slopes indicates that portions of the Martian surface fall into statistically distinct categories, distinguished by the histograms of both point-to-point slopes and of longer wavelength (10 and 100 km) slopes. Roughness correlates with elevation such that low regions tend to exhibit low roughness. Areas such as southern hemisphere highlands, dichotomy boundary terrains, and northern hemisphere lowlands all posses unique slope distribution signatures. The slope distribution within the Amazonis Planitia region, particularly member 3 of the Arcadia formation, displays an unusually smooth character. This region of anomalously low thermal inertia and low radar backscatter cross-section exhibits an rms variation in topography of <2 m over a 100-km baseline. Previous interpretations have suggested that this area is composed of accumulation of fine dust. Statistical comparison with other planetary surfaces of varying origin indicates that Amazonis most closely resembles in its smoothness the heavily sedimented surfaces on the Earth, i.e. oceanic abyssal plains and basins characterized by fluvial deposition. The smoothest measured volcanic surfaces as measured by altimetry on the Moon, Venus, and Mars are all significantly rougher than Amazonis. Saharan sand sheets are rougher by a factor of about three. Other regions in the Martian northern hemisphere that exhibit clear evidence of aeolian deposition are rougher than Amazonis as well.

  1. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  2. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  3. Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, T. F.

    2001-05-01

    , and application of knowledge concerning the nature of -- and interaction among -- matter, living organisms, energy, information, and human behavior. This strategy calls for innovative partnerships among the physical, biological, health, and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. New kinds of partnership must also be forged among academia, business and industry, governments, and nongovernmental organizations. Geophysicists can play an important role in these partnerships. A focus for these partnerships is to manage the individual economic productivity that drives both human development and global change. As world population approaches stability during the twenty-first century, individual economic productivity will be the critical link between the human and the natural systems on planet Earth. AGU is among a core group of individuals and institutions proposing Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships (WHKP) to test the hypothesis that knowledge, broadly construed, is an important organizing principle in choosing a path into the future. The WHKP agenda includes: (1) life-long learning, (2) the health and resilience of natural ecosystems, (3) eco-efficiency in economic production and consumption, (4) extension of national income accounts, (5) environmentally benign sources of energy, (6) delivery of health care, (7) intellectual property rights, and (8) networks for action by local communities.Collaboratories and distance education technologies will be major tools. A panel of experts will explore this proposal.

  4. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  5. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  6. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  7. Investigation of wall-bounded turbulence over sparsely distributed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharath

    2011-11-01

    The effects of sparsely distributed roughness elements on the structure of a turbulent boundary layer are examined by performing a series of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments in a wind tunnel. From the literature, the best way to characterise a rough wall, especially one where the density of roughness elements is sparse, is unclear. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of sparsely and uniformly distributed LEGO® blocks are used. Five different patterns are adopted in order to examine the effects of frontal solidity (λf, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), plan solidity (λp, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and the geometry of the roughness element (square and cylindrical elements), on the turbulence structure. The Karman number, Reτ , has been matched, at the value of approximately 2300, in order to compare across the different cases. In the talk, we will present detailed analysis of mean and rms velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses and quadrant decomposition.

  8. Estimating aerodynamic resistance of rough surfaces from angular reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current wind erosion and dust emission models neglect the heterogeneous nature of surface roughness and its geometric anisotropic effect on aerodynamic resistance, and over-estimate the erodible area by assuming it is not covered by roughness elements. We address these shortfalls with a new model wh...

  9. Computational Analysis for Roughness-Based Transition Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    Suitably placed discrete roughness elements are known to delay or hasten the onset of transition, depending on requirements. In this paper, 2D eigenvalue analysis is used to study the effects of surface roughness in the context of transition delay over subsonic and supersonic swept wing configurations, as well as boundarylayer tripping on the forebody of a hypersonic air breathing vehicle.

  10. Characteristics of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon

    1994-01-01

    Detailed size measurements of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretions are presented to provide information on characteristics of roughness and trends of roughness development with various icing parameters. Data was obtained from icing tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) using a NACA 0012 airfoil. Measurements include diameters, heights, and spacing of roughness elements along with chordwise icing limits. Results confirm the existence of smooth and rough ice zones and that the boundary between the two zones (surface roughness transition region) moves upstream towards stagnation region with time. The height of roughness grows as the air temperature and the liquid water content increase, however, the airspeed has little effect on the roughness height. Results also show that the roughness in the surface roughness transition region grows during a very early stage of accretion but reaches a critical height and then remains fairly constant. Results also indicate that a uniformly distributed roughness model is only valid at a very initial stage of the ice accretion process.

  11. Surface roughness effects on equilibrium temperature.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houchens, A. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis is presented for evaluation of equilibrium temperature distribution on radiatively adiabatic, adjoint planes which are uniformly irradiated by a collimated solar flux. The analysis employs a semigrey spectral model. Radiation properties for surface emitted radiation are obtained from the expressions of electromagnetic theory for smooth surfaces. Rough surface properties for solar radiation are given by the Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model. Numerical solutions to the governing equations yield equilibrium temperature distributions for a range of the influencing parameters. Surface roughness has little influence on equilibrium temperature for materials with high values for solar absorptance. However, for low or intermediate values of solar absorptance, roughness effects on the spatial distribution of reflected solar radiation can significantly alter equilibrium temperature particularly at surface elements where radiant interaction is small.

  12. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.; Lambert, J.

    1999-04-06

    A capsule is disclosed containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispherical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor. 3 figs.

  13. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  14. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  16. Seasonal hemispherical SWIR airglow imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jeffrey; Dayton, David C.; Gonglewski, John D.; Myers, Michael M.; Nolasco, Rudolph

    2011-09-01

    Airglow luminescence in the SWIR region due to upper atmospheric recombination of solar excited molecules is a well accepted phenomenon. While the intensity appears broadly uniform over the whole sky hemisphere, we are interested in variations in four areas: 1) fine periodic features known as gravity waves, 2) broad patterns across the whole sky, 3) temporal variations in the hemispheric mean irradiance over the course of the night, and 4) long term seasonal variations in the mean irradiance. An experiment is described and results presented covering a full year of high resolution hemispheric SWIR irradiance images. An automated gimbal views 45 hemispheric positions, using 30 second durations, and repeats approximately every half hour through out the night. The gimbal holds co-mounted and bore-sighted visible and SWIR cameras. Measuring airglow with respect to spatial, temporal, and seasonal variations will facilitate understanding its behavior and possible benefits, such as night vision and predicting upper atmosphere turbulence. The measurements were performed in a tropical marine location on the island of Kauai Hi.

  17. Characteristics of density currents over regular and irregular rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used as a tool to understand the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of density currents. Simulations have been performed for lock-exchange flow with gate separating the dense and the lighter fluid. As the lock is released the dense fluid collapses with the lighter fluid on the top, resulting in formation of horizontally evolving density current. The talk will focus on the fundamental differences between the propagation of the density current over regular and irregular rough surfaces. The flow statistics and the flow structures are discussed. The results have revealed the spacing between the roughness elements is an important factor in classifying the density currents. The empirical relations of the front velocity and location for the dense and sparse roughness have been evaluated in terms of the roughness height, spacing between the elements and the initial amount of lock fluid. DNS results for a dense current flowing over a (a) smooth and (b) rough bottom with egg-carton roughness elements in a regular configuration. In these simulations the lock-exchange box is located in the middle of the channel and has two gates which allow two dense currents to be generated, one moving to the right and one to the left side of the channel. Note how the dense current interface presents smaller structures when over a rough bottom (right).

  18. Thermal Stability of Ice on Ceres with Rough Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, Oded

    2015-11-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. The “bright spots” recently discovered by the Dawn mission on the illuminated surface of Ceres have prompted speculation regarding their possible icy composition and the youthful age this might imply. Furthermore, sublimation of ice at the surface or in the interior of Ceres could explain water vapor observed on more than one occasion in the exosphere. We investigated the possible distribution and lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles on Ceres using detailed thermal models, including realistic thermophysical properties and surface roughness.Topographic shadowing creates polar cold traps where a small, but non-negligible fraction (~0.4%) of Ceres' surface is perennially below the ~110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of H2O ice stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, CO2) may be cold-trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. At latitudes 0° - 30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (~10-100 yr), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 yr are possible.Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ~50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (> 0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science

  19. On the Mean Flow Behaviour in the Presence of Regional-Scale Surface Roughness Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiang I. A.

    2016-05-01

    A suite of large-eddy simulations of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer is conducted to study the mean flow response to the presence of surface roughness heterogeneity at regional scales (surface roughness heterogeneity on the scale of several boundary-layer heights). The roughness heterogeneity is imposed using alternating rough wall patches with numerically resolved rectangular roughness elements of different packing densities. The flow near the surface is found to adjust rapidly, reaching equilibrium conditions at distances on the order of a single inter-roughness element spacing. Despite the regional heterogeneity in surface roughness, it is often desirable to parametrize the entire rough wall using one single effective roughness height. To develop such a parametrization the model of Bou-Zeid et al. [Water Resources Research 40(2):1, 2004] is extended to incorporate the displacement height, d. Predictions from this parametrization are compared with the simulations, with reasonably good agreement.

  20. Optical roughness measurements on specially designed roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzl, R.; Helmli, F.; Rubert, P.; Prantl, M.

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of surface texture is one of the most common and important ways to judge the quality of a technical surface. In order to verify whether a metrology device is able to measure certain types of roughness accurately, various roughness standards with calibrated roughness values are available. While almost all roughness standards produced so far have been designed for tactile systems we demonstrate how the optical metrology device InfiniteFocus can be applied to special roughness standards that have been artificially roughened. Experiments are performed on standards with periodic structure and the results of the optical system are compared to the calibrated values obtained by tactile systems with different tip radius. Additionally the profile-based measurements are compared to area-based measurements conform to a recently developed ISO standard draft. Finally roughness measurements on real surfaces are presented.

  1. Hemispheric ultra-wideband antenna.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-04-01

    This report begins with a review of reduced size ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas and the peculiar problems that arise when building a UWB antenna. It then gives a description of a new type of UWB antenna that resolves these problems. This antenna, dubbed the hemispheric conical antenna, is similar to a conventional conical antenna in that it uses the same inverted conical conductor over a ground plane, but it also uses a hemispheric dielectric fill in between the conductive cone and the ground plane. The dielectric material creates a fundamentally new antenna which is reduced in size and much more rugged than a standard UWB conical antenna. The creation of finite-difference time domain (FDTD) software tools in spherical coordinates, as described in SAND2004-6577, enabled this technological advance.

  2. Focal hemisphere and visuoperceptual categorization.

    PubMed Central

    Bisiach, E; Capitani, E; Spinnler, H

    1975-01-01

    Visuoperceptual categorization was investigated in patients with unilateral brain damage by a task in which meaningless shapes had to be classified with reference to a number of prototype patterns. Right brain-damaged subjects with visual field defect turned out to have a narrower categorization span. As this outcome seems to be scarcely consonant with a lower level disorder of visual processing, a major competence of the right hemisphere is suggested for visuoperceptual categorization. PMID:1206421

  3. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  4. Classifying Southern Hemisphere extratropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catto, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    There is a wide variety of flavours of extratropical cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere, with differing structures and lifecycles. Previous studies have classified these manually using upper level flow features or satellite data. In order to be able to evaluate climate models and understand how extratropical cyclones might change in the future, we need to be able to use an automated method to classify cyclones. Extratropical cyclones have been identified in the Southern Hemisphere from the ERA-Interim reanalysis dataset with a commonly used identification and tracking algorithm that employs 850hPa relative vorticity. A clustering method applied to large-scale fields from ERA-Interim at the time of cyclone genesis (when the cyclone is first identified), has been used to objectively classify these cyclones in the Southern Hemisphere. This simple method is able to separate the cyclones into classes with quite different development mechanisms and lifecycle characteristics. Some of the classes seem to coincide with previous manual classifications on shorter timescales, showing their utility for climate model evaluation and climate change studies.

  5. Awake right hemisphere brain surgery.

    PubMed

    Hulou, M Maher; Cote, David J; Olubiyi, Olutayo I; Smith, Timothy R; Chiocca, E Antonio; Johnson, Mark D

    2015-12-01

    We report the indications and outcomes of awake right hemispheric brain surgery, as well as a rare patient with crossed aphasia. Awake craniotomies are often performed to protect eloquent cortex. We reviewed the medical records for 35 of 96 patients, in detail, who had awake right hemisphere brain operations. Intraoperative cortical mapping of motor and/or language function was performed in 29 of the 35 patients. A preoperative speech impairment and left hand dominance were the main indicators for awake right-sided craniotomies in patients with right hemisphere lesions. Four patients with lesion proximity to eloquent areas underwent awake craniotomies without cortical mapping. In addition, one patient had a broncho-pulmonary fistula, and another had a recent major cardiac procedure that precluded awake surgery. An eloquent cortex representation was identified in 14 patients (48.3%). Postoperatively, seven of 17 patients (41.1%) who presented with weakness, experienced improvements in their motor functions, 11 of 16 (68.7%) with seizures became seizure-free, and seven of nine (77.7%) with moderate to severe headaches and one of two with a visual field deficit improved significantly. There were also improvements in speech and language functions in all patients who presented with speech difficulties. A right sided awake craniotomy is an excellent option for left handed patients, or those with right sided cortical lesions that result in preoperative speech impairments. When combined with intraoperative cortical mapping, both speech and motor function can be well preserved. PMID:26279501

  6. Hemispheric Assymeries in Auroral Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mende, S. B.

    2014-12-01

    It is widely accepted that the space weather related electrodynamic forcing of the geospace environment acts through the high geomagnetic latitude regions. At high latitudes inter-hemispheric asymmetries are largely due to the differences in solar illumination, the direction of the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field components and to a lesser extent, due to differences between the two hemispheric internal fields. So far most research regarding interhemispheric differences concentrated on learning about the basic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling mechanisms. It has been well established that sunlit conditions affect the energy flux of auroral precipitation resulting from the reduction in the mean energy of the auroral electrons in the sunlit summer hemisphere. This can be explained by the partial shorting out of the particle accelerating fields by the sunlight induced conductivity. It has also been found that sunlit conditions reduce the particle fluxes and therefore the associated field aligned currents. Unless the precipitation-induced conductivities overwhelm the sunlit component of conductivity, this would imply that the magnetospheric current generator responds to the ionospheric load in a highly non-linear manner. Interhemispheric currents may also play an important role that has not been fully explored. Interhemispheric asymmetries in substorm morphology have been explored critically because conjugacy implies that substorms have a common source at equatorial latitudes. In some cases the lack of conjugacy of substorms could be explained by considering the magnitude and direction of the IMF.

  7. Hemispheric Laterality in Music and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szirony, Gary Michael; Burgin, John S.; Pearson, L. Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Hemispheric laterality may be a useful concept in teaching, learning, training, and in understanding more about human development. To address this issue, a measure of hemispheric laterality was compared to musical and mathematical ability. The Human Information Processing Survey (HIPS) instrument, designed to measure hemispheric laterality, was…

  8. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  9. Right Hemisphere Dominance in Visual Statistical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roser, Matthew E.; Fiser, Jozsef; Aslin, Richard N.; Gazzaniga, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Several studies report a right hemisphere advantage for visuospatial integration and a left hemisphere advantage for inferring conceptual knowledge from patterns of covariation. The present study examined hemispheric asymmetry in the implicit learning of new visual feature combinations. A split-brain patient and normal control participants viewed…

  10. Solvation forces between rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Frink, L.J.; van Swol, F.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the role of surface roughness on solvation forces and solvation free energies. Roughness is introduced by dividing a surface into an array of square tiles that are then randomly displaced in the direction perpendicular to the wall. The integrated wall strength of these tiled surfaces is independent of the surface roughness and hence this class of rough walls is ideally suited for isolating roughness effects. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a slit pore with rough walls to generate the solvation interactions as a function of roughness, tile size, and surface area. The simulation data are compared to a simple superposition approximation of smooth wall solvation interactions (obtained from simulation or density functional theory), based on a distribution of wall separations. We find that this approximation provides a surprisingly accurate route to the solvation interaction of rough surfaces. In general, increased roughness leads to a reduction of oscillations in the solvation forces and surface free energies. However, nonmonotonic behavior of the oscillation amplitude with roughness can be observed for finite surfaces. The washing out of the oscillations found for large surface roughness produces a solvation force that exhibits a broad repulsive peak with separation. The broad repulsion is a consequence of the resistance to squeezing out fluid from the smallest gaps between two opposing rough surfaces. It is as much a reflection of packing effects as are the solvation oscillations for perfectly smooth pores. In addition, we present results for patterned and undulating surfaces produced by an analogous modification of the one-body external field for smooth walls. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for a number of experimental systems including self-assembled monolayers, microporous materials, protein solutions, and DNA crystals. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  12. Use of a liquid-crystal and heater-element composite for quantitative, high-resolution heat-transfer coefficients on a turbine airfoil including turbulence and surface-roughness effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hippensteele, S. A.; Russell, L. M.; Torres, F. J.

    1987-01-01

    Local heat transfer coefficients were measured along the midchord of a three-times-size turbine vane airfoil in a static cascade operated at room temperature over a range of Reynolds numbers. The test surface consisted of a composite of commercially available materials: a Mylar sheet with a layer of cholestric liquid crystals, which change color with temperature, and a heater made of a polyester sheet coated with vapor-deposited gold, which produces uniform heat flux. After the initial selection and calibration of the composite sheet, accurate, quantitative, and continuous heat transfer coefficients were mapped over the airfoil surface. Tests were conducted at two free-stream turbulence intensities: 0.6 percent, which is typical of wind tunnels; and 10 percent, which is typical of real engine conditions. In addition to a smooth airfoil, the effects of local leading-edge sand roughness were also examined for a value greater than the critical roughness. The local heat transfer coefficients are presented for both free-stream turbulence intensities for inlet Reynolds numbers from 1.20 to 5.55 x 10 to the 5th power. Comparisons are also made with analytical values of heat transfer coefficients obtained from the STAN5 boundary layer code.

  13. Investigation of wall-bounded turbulence over regularly distributed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2012-11-01

    The effects of regularly distributed roughness elements on the structure of a turbulent boundary layer are examined by performing a series of Planar (high resolution l+ ~ 30) and Stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiments in a wind tunnel. An adequate description of how to best characterise a rough wall, especially one where the density of roughness elements is sparse, is yet to be developed. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO® blocks are used. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to systematically examine the effects of frontal solidity (λf, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λp, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on the turbulence structure. The Karman number, Reτ , is approximately 4000 across the different cases. Spanwise 3D vector fields at two different wall-normal locations (top of the canopy and within the log-region) are also compared to examine the spanwise homogeneity of the flow across different surfaces. In the talk, a detailed analysis of mean and rms velocity profiles, Reynolds stresses, and quadrant decomposition for the different patterns will be presented.

  14. How surface roughness affects chemical transfer from soil to surface runoff?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness affects transport processes, e.g., runoff generation, infiltration, sediment detachment, etc., occurring on the surface. Nevertheless, how soil roughness affects chemical transport is less known. In this study, we partitioned roughness elements into mounds which diverge water ...

  15. Detailed Cloud Patterns in Martian Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Cold and cloudy mornings; cool, hazy afternoons. High winds aloft and weather fronts moving slowly to the east. It is winter in the Martian northern hemisphere. One of the many reasons to study Mars is that, at times, its weather is very 'Earth-like.' At this time of the Martian year, clouds are abundant, especially in the morning and especially in the high northern latitudes. Clouds and fogs are also observed in low-lying areas farther to the south, in some lowlands they are as far south as the equator.

    The above color composite images, obtained by Mars Global Surveyor's camera on June 4, 1998, illustrate this Martian 'weather report.' Most of the thick, white clouds seen here occur north of latitude 35oN (roughly equivalent to Albuquerque NM, Memphis TN, and Charlotte, NC). Fog (seen as bright orange because it is lighter than the ground but some of the ground is still visible) occupies the lowest portions of the Kasei Valles outflow channel around 30oN and at 25oN.

    Several different types of cloud features are seen. The repetitious, wash-board pattern of parallel lines are 'gravity wave clouds'. These commonly form, in the lee--downwind side-- of topographic features such as mountain ranges (on Earth) or crater rims (on Mars), under very specific atmospheric conditions (low temperatures, high humidity, and high wind speeds). In this area, the wave clouds are lower in the atmosphere than some of the other clouds. These other clouds show attributes reflecting more the regional weather pattern, occasionally showing the characteristic 'slash' shape (southwest to northeast) of a weather front. These clouds probably contain mostly crystals of water ice but, depending on the temperature at high altitude (and more likely closer to the pole), some could also contain frozen carbon dioxide ('dry ice').

    MOC images 34501 (the red wide angle image) and 34502 (the blue wide angle image) were obtained on Mars Global Surveyor's 345th orbit about the planet

  16. Electric analysis of a conducting hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mimi X.; Yang, Fuqian

    2016-05-01

    Using Legendre polynomials, the boundary value problem of a charged, conducting hemisphere in an infinite space was reduced to the solution of an infinite system of linear, algebraic equations. Analytical solutions of electric charge and electric stress on the surface of the hemisphere were obtained. The numerical analysis revealed non-uniform distributions of the electric charge and electric stress over the surface of the hemisphere with local singularities at the edge of the hemisphere. Both the electric charge and electric stress distributions were expressed in terms of the power function with respect to the distance to the nearest hemisphere edge. The power index for the flat surface is larger than that corresponding to the spherical surface. Numerical result of the capacitance of the conducting hemisphere is the same as the result reported in the literature. There is no net force acting on the hemisphere.

  17. Effect of surface roughness pattern on transient mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi, Amir; Akbarzadeh, Saleh; Salimpour, Mohammad Reza; Taei, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    Besides the surface roughness of two contacting surfaces, the surface roughness pattern i.e. longitudinal, transverse and isotropic significantly influences the tribological performance of the mechanical element. Their impression is more pronounced under the mixed elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication condition. The cam and flat follower mechanism is a typical sample in which adverse tribological conditions, including direct boundary interactions occurs. In this paper, the effect of surface roughness pattern on the film thickness and friction coefficient in a cam follower mechanism is investigated. Asperity interaction and friction coefficient analysis is conducted based on a novel elasto-plastic model. The lubrication model is qualitatively compared with the experimental results obtained from the pin on disk experiments for various surface roughness orientations. The results of transient lubrication analysis for a cam and follower lubrication problem are presented. It is shown that the longitudinal surface roughness pattern has a more desirable tribological performance than transverse surface pattern.

  18. Generalizing roughness: experiments with flow-oriented roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to High Resolution Digital Terrain Models (HRDTMs) improves the capability to characterize fine-scale morphology and permits the derivation of useful morphometric indexes. An important indicator to be taken into account in surface texture analysis is surface roughness, which can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. The evaluation of surface roughness is generally performed considering it as an isotropic surface parameter (e.g., Cavalli, 2008; Grohmann, 2011). However, surface texture has often an anisotropic character, which means that surface roughness could change according to the considered direction. In some applications, for example involving surface flow processes, the anisotropy of roughness should be taken into account (e.g., Trevisani, 2012; Smith, 2014). Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness, computed considering surface gravity-driven flow. For the calculation of flow-oriented roughness we use both classical variogram-based roughness (e.g., Herzfeld,1996; Atkinson, 2000) as well as an ad-hoc developed robust modification of variogram (i.e. MAD, Trevisani, 2014). The presented approach, based on a D8 algorithm, shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indexes. The use of flow-oriented roughness could improve the definition of effective proxies of impedance to flow. Preliminary results on the integration of directional roughness operators with morphometric-based models, are promising and can be extended to more complex approaches. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Cavalli, M. & Marchi, L. 2008, "Characterization of the surface morphology of an alpine alluvial fan using airborne LiDAR", Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 323-333. Grohmann, C

  19. Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer with Localized Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2010-01-01

    A localized 3-D roughness causes boundary-layer separation and (weak) shocks. Most importantly, streamwise vortices occur which induce streamwise (low U, high T) streaks. Immersed boundary method (volume force) suitable to represent roughness element in DNS. Favorable comparison between bi-global stability theory and DNS for a "y-mode" Outlook: Understand the flow physics (investigate "z-modes" in DNS through sinuous spanwise forcing, study origin of the beat in DNS).

  20. Remote Control Southern Hemisphere SSA Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, I.; Pearson, M.; Sang, J.

    2013-09-01

    EOS Space Systems (EOSSS) is a research and development company which has developed custom observatories, camera and telescope systems for space surveillance since 1996, as well as creating several evolutions of systems control software for control of observatories and laser tracking systems. Our primary reserach observatory is the Space Reserach Centre (SRC) at Mount Stromlo Asutralia. The current SRC control systems are designed such that remote control can be offered for real time data collection, noise filtering and flexible session management. Several imaging fields of view are available simultaneously for tracking orbiting objects, with real time imaging to Mag 18. Orbiting objects can have the centroids post processed into orbital determination/ orbital projection (OD/OP) elements. With or without laser tracking of orbiting objects, they can be tracked in terminator conditions and their OD/OP data created, then enhanced by proprietary methods involving ballistic coefficient estimation and OD convergence pinning, using a priori radar elements. Sensors in development include a thermal imager for satellite thermal signature detection. Extending laser tracking range by use of adaptive optics beam control is also in development now. This Southern Hemisphere observatory is in a unique position to facilitate the study of space debris, either stand-alone or as part of a network such as Falcon. Current national and international contracts will enhance the remote control capabilities further, creating a resource ready to go for a wide variety of SSA missions.

  1. Boundary-layer receptivity of sound with roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Hoos, Jon A.; Radeztsky, Ronald H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of receptivity was carried out using an acoustical disturbance in the freestream. The receptivity was enhanced by using a uniform two-dimensional roughness strip (tape). The roughness strip generated the local adjustment in the flow needed to couple the long-wavelength sound wave with the short-wavelength T-S wave. The method proved to be highly sensitive, with slight changes in the forcing frequency or in the height of the 2D roughness element having a strong effect on the amplitude of the observed T-S wave.

  2. Ice Roughness in Short Duration SLD Icing Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Reed, Dana; Vargas, Mario; Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Ice accretion codes depend on models of roughness parameters to account for the enhanced heat transfer during the ice accretion process. While mitigating supercooled large droplet (SLD or Appendix O) icing is a significant concern for manufacturers seeking future vehicle certification due to the pending regulation, historical ice roughness studies have been performed using Appendix C icing clouds which exhibit mean volumetric diameters (MVD) much smaller than SLD clouds. Further, the historical studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness using multiple images of roughness elements. In this study, the ice roughness developed on a 21-in. NACA 0012 at 0deg angle of attack exposed to short duration SLD icing events was measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The MVD's used in the study ranged from 100 micrometer to 200 micrometers, in a 67 m/s flow, with liquid water contents of either 0.6 gm/cubic meters or 0.75 gm/cubic meters. The ice surfaces were measured using a Romer Absolute Arm laser scanning system. The roughness associated with each surface point cloud was measured using the two-dimensional self-organizing map approach developed by McClain and Kreeger (2013) resulting in statistical descriptions of the ice roughness.

  3. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  4. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  5. Audiotactile interactions in roughness perception.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steve; Catmur, Caroline; Lloyd, Donna; Spence, Charles

    2002-09-01

    The sounds produced when we touch textured surfaces frequently provide information regarding the structure of those surfaces. It has recently been demonstrated that the perception of the texture of the hands can be modified simply by manipulating the frequency content of such touch-related sounds. We investigated whether similar auditory manipulations change people's perception of the roughness of abrasive surfaces (experiment 1). Participants were required to make speeded, forced-choice discrimination responses regarding the roughness of a series of abrasive samples which they touched briefly. Analysis of discrimination errors verified that tactile roughness perception was modulated by the frequency content of the auditory feedback. Specifically, attenuating high frequencies led to a bias towards an increased perception of tactile smoothness. In experiment 2, we replicated the rubbing-hands manipulation of previous experimenters while participants rated either the perceived roughness or wetness of their hands. The wetness scale data replicated the results in the literature, while the roughness scale data replicated the result from experiment 1. A final experiment showed that delaying the auditory feedback from the hand-rubbing reduced the magnitude of this parchment-skin illusion. These experiments demonstrate the dramatic effect that auditory frequency manipulations can have on the perceived tactile roughness and moistness of surfaces, and are consistent with the proposal that different auditory perceptual dimensions may have varying salience for different surfaces. PMID:12195518

  6. Roughness reduction on aspheric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiontke, S.; Kokot, Sebastian

    2015-02-01

    For a lot of applications like spectrometer and high power laser roughness as an important parameter has been discussed over and over again. Especially for high power systems the surface quality is crucial for determining the damage threshold and therefore the field of application. Above that, it has often been difficult to compare roughness measurements because of different measurement methods and the usage of filters and surface fits. Measurement results differ significantly depending on filters and especially on the measured surface size. Insights will be given how values behave depending on the quality of surface and the size of measured area. Many applications require a high quality of roughness in order to reduce scattering. Some of them in order to prevent from damage like high power laser applications. Others like spectrometers seek to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Most of them have already been built with spherical surfaces. With higher demands on efficiency and more sophisticated versions aspherical surfaces need to be employed. Therefore, the high requirement in roughness known from spherical surfaces is also needed on aspherical surfaces. For one thing, the constant change of curvature of an aspherical surface accounts for the superior performance, for another thing, it prevents from using classical polishing technics, which guarantied this low roughness. New methods need to be qualified. In addition, also results of a new manufacturing process will be shown allowing low roughness on aspheric even with remarkable departure from the best fit sphere.

  7. Electroformation of uranium hemispherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.L.; Redey, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Vissers, D.R.

    1989-11-01

    This effort was directed at developing an electrochemical process for forming uniform and dendrite-free deposits of uranium from molten salts. This process is to be used for the electroformation of free-standing hemispherical shells of uranium for nuclear applications. Electrodeposition of uranium onto a substrate was accomplished with a fused chloride mixture containing 42 wt% UCl{sub 3} and a fused chloride-fluoride mixture containing 4 wt % UF{sub 4}. Under pulsed potential control at 504{degree}C, the chloride-fluoride mixture yielded the widest range of plating conditions for which dendrites could be avoided. Bipolar current pulse plating with both electrolytes gave good results, and successful application of this technique to a large tubular cathode has been demonstrated. 24 refs., 10 figs.

  8. Hemispheric Asymmetries: The Comparative View

    PubMed Central

    Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Güntürkün, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetries play an important role in almost all cognitive functions. For more than a century, they were considered to be uniquely human but now an increasing number of findings in all vertebrate classes make it likely that we inherited our asymmetries from common ancestors. Thus, studying animal models could provide unique insights into the mechanisms of lateralization. We outline three such avenues of research by providing an overview of experiments on left–right differences in the connectivity of sensory systems, the embryonic determinants of brain asymmetries, and the genetics of lateralization. All these lines of studies could provide a wealth of insights into our own asymmetries that should and will be exploited by future analyses. PMID:22303295

  9. Determining Surface Roughness in Urban Areas Using Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An automated procedure has been developed to derive relevant factors, which can increase the ability to produce objective, repeatable methods for determining aerodynamic surface roughness. Aerodynamic surface roughness is used for many applications, like atmospheric dispersive models and wind-damage models. For this technique, existing lidar data was used that was originally collected for terrain analysis, and demonstrated that surface roughness values can be automatically derived, and then subsequently utilized in disaster-management and homeland security models. The developed lidar-processing algorithm effectively distinguishes buildings from trees and characterizes their size, density, orientation, and spacing (see figure); all of these variables are parameters that are required to calculate the estimated surface roughness for a specified area. By using this algorithm, aerodynamic surface roughness values in urban areas can then be extracted automatically. The user can also adjust the algorithm for local conditions and lidar characteristics, like summer/winter vegetation and dense/sparse lidar point spacing. Additionally, the user can also survey variations in surface roughness that occurs due to wind direction; for example, during a hurricane, when wind direction can change dramatically, this variable can be extremely significant. In its current state, the algorithm calculates an estimated surface roughness for a square kilometer area; techniques using the lidar data to calculate the surface roughness for a point, whereby only roughness elements that are upstream from the point of interest are used and the wind direction is a vital concern, are being investigated. This technological advancement will improve the reliability and accuracy of models that use and incorporate surface roughness.

  10. Shape of the northern hemisphere of Mars from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, Maria T.; Smith, David E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Solomon, Sean C.; Banerdt, W. Bruce; Neumann, Gregory A.; Aharonson, Oded

    1998-12-01

    Eighteen profiles of ˜N-S-trending topography from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) are used to analyze the shape of Mars' northern hemisphere. MOLA observations show smaller northern hemisphere flattening than previously thought. The hypsometric distribution is narrowly peaked with >20% of the surface lying within 200 m of the mean elevation. Low elevation correlates with low surface roughness, but the elevation and roughness may reflect different mechanisms. Bouguer gravity indicates less variability in crustal thickness and/or lateral density structure than previously expected. The 3.1-km offset between centers of mass and figure along the polar axis results in a pole-to-equator slope at all longitudes. The N-S slope distribution also shows a subtle longitude-dependent variation that may represent the antipodal effect of the formation of Tharsis.

  11. The left hemisphere and the selection of learned actions.

    PubMed

    Rushworth, M F; Nixon, P D; Wade, D T; Renowden, S; Passingham, R E

    1998-01-01

    The left hemisphere's dominance for movement is well known. The basis of its dominance is less clear. We have tested 16 left hemisphere (LH) patients, 17 right hemisphere (RH) patients and 12 neurologically normal controls on a battery of five tasks. The tasks were based on animal lesion and recording studies, and human imaging and magnetic stimulation studies that identified two distributed systems that are important for the selection of motor responses and object-oriented responses. The LH patients were impaired on three response selection tasks: learning to select between joystick movement responses instructed by visual cues; learning to select between analogous object-oriented responses instructed by visual cues; learning to select movements in a sequence. Although we replicated the finding that LH damage impairs sequencing, some of the impaired tasks had no sequencing element. We therefore argue that the LH deficits are best explained as an impairment of response selection. This was confirmed by showing that LH subjects were unimpaired on a more demanding task-object discrimination learning-which imposed a greater memory load but had no response selection element. Moreover, the LH deficits could not be attributed to disorganization of movement kinematics. The lesions of the impaired LH group were widespread but always included the distributed systems known to be important for response selection-the dorsolateral frontal and parietal cortices, striatum, thalamus and white matter fascicles. PMID:9533383

  12. Homotopic Language Reorganization in the Right Hemisphere after Early Left Hemisphere Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tivarus, Madalina E.; Starling, Sarah J.; Newport, Elissa L.; Langfitt, John T.

    2012-01-01

    To determine the areas involved in reorganization of language to the right hemisphere after early left hemisphere injury, we compared fMRI activation patterns during four production and comprehension tasks in post-surgical epilepsy patients with either left (LH) or right hemisphere (RH) speech dominance (determined by Wada testing) and healthy…

  13. On the Effects of Surface Roughness on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Surface roughness can influence laminar-turbulent transition in many different ways. This paper outlines selected analyses performed at the NASA Langley Research Center, ranging in speed from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and highlighting the beneficial as well as adverse roles of the surface roughness in technological applications. The first theme pertains to boundary-layer tripping on the forebody of a hypersonic airbreathing configuration via a spanwise periodic array of trip elements, with the goal of understanding the physical mechanisms underlying roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer. The effect of an isolated, finite amplitude roughness element on a supersonic boundary layer is considered next. The other set of flow configurations examined herein corresponds to roughness based laminar flow control in subsonic and supersonic swept wing boundary layers. A common theme to all of the above configurations is the need to apply higher fidelity, physics based techniques to develop reliable predictions of roughness effects on laminar-turbulent transition.

  14. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Drew F. Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  15. Fantasy and the Brain's Right Hemisphere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuman, R. Baird

    While the left hemisphere of the brain is responsible for logical and verbal activity, the right brain is the center of much of human feeling and emotion. Its vision is holistic rather than segmented or compartmentalized. Although schools today are geared almost exclusively to training the brain's left hemisphere, fantasy literature can provide…

  16. The Cost of Action Miscues: Hemispheric Asymmetries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenal, Brian V.; Hinze, Stephan; Heilman, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive behaviors require preparation and when necessary inhibition or alteration of actions. The right hemisphere has been posited to be dominant for preparatory motor activation. This experiment was designed to learn if there are hemispheric asymmetries in the control of altered plans of actions. Cues, both valid and invalid, which indicate the…

  17. A combined experimental and numerical investigation of roughness induced supersonic boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Liu, Wei; Xu, Dan; Gang, Dundian; Yi, Shihe

    2016-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on boundary layer transition is of great importance to hypersonic vehicles. In this paper, both experimental and numerical methods are used to investigate the laminar-turbulent transition of a Mach 3 flat-plate boundary layer induced by isolated roughness element. Good agreements are achieved between experimental data and high-order numerical simulations. It is observed that, with increasing height of roughness, the transition tends to move forward. Two different types of transition mechanisms are found according to the height of the roughness elements. For the smallest roughness height of h=1 mm, the shear layer instability in the wake region appears to be the leading mechanism for transition to turbulence. For two larger roughness elements of h=2 mm and h=4 mm, strong unsteadiness is developed from the upstream separation zone and transition is immediately accomplished, which indicates that the absolute instability in upstream separation zone dominates the transition.

  18. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  19. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian; Potapczuk, M.

    1989-01-01

    The cause and effects of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were studied with microvideo observations. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed, including a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film, a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads, and a zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes. In addition, a zone where surface water ran back as rivulets and a dry zone where rime feathers formed were observed. The locations and behaviors of these zones are discussed. A simple multizone modification to the glaze ice accretion model is proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness. Two test cases using the multizone model showed significant improvements for the prediction of glaze ice shapes.

  20. UV Observations of Hemispheric Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Paxton, L. J.; Wolven, B. C.; Zhang, Y.; Romeo, G.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetry in the auroral patterns can be an important diagnostic for understanding the dynamics of solar wind interaction with the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere system (e.g., Newel and Meng, 1998; Fillingrim et al., 2005). Molecular nitrogen emission in the UV Lyman-Birge-Hopfield bands can be used to determine energy flux and electron mean energy (Sotirelis, et al, 2013) and thereby Hall and Pederson integrated conductances (Gjerloev, et al., 2014). UV imagery provided by the 4 SSUSI instruments on the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) F16-F19 spacecraft provide two dimensional maps of this emission at different local times. Often there are near simultaneous observations of both poles by some combination of the satellites. (see figure 1) The SSUSI auroral data products are well suited to this study, as they have the following features.: - dayglow has been subtracted on dayside aurora - electron energy flux and mean energy are pre-calculated - individual arcs have been identified through image processing. In order to intercompare data from multiple satellites, we must first ensure that the instrument calibrations are consistent. In this work we show that the instruments are consistently calibrated, and that results generated from the SSUSI data products can be trusted. Several examples of storm time asymmetries captured by the SSUSI instruments will be discussed. Fillingim, M. O., G. K. Parks, H. U. Frey, T. J. Immel, and S. B. Mende (2005), Hemispheric asymmetry of the afternoon electron aurora, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L03113, doi:10.1029/2004GL021635. Gjerloev, J., Schaefer, R., Paxton, L, and Zhang, Y. (2014), A comprehensive empirical model of the ionospheric conductivity derived from SSUSI/GUVI, SuperMAG and SuperDARN data, SM51G-4339, Fall 2014 AGU meeting, San Francisco. Newell, P. T., and C.-I. Meng (1988), Hemispherical asymmetry in cusp precipitation near solstices, J. Geophys. Res., 93(A4), 2643-2648, doi:10.1029/JA093iA04p02643

  1. Reciprocal organization of the cerebral hemispheres

    PubMed Central

    McGilchrist, Iain

    2010-01-01

    The cerebral hemispheres are anatomically and neurophysiologically asymmetrical. The evolutionary basis for these differences remains uncertain. There are, however, highly consistent differences between the hemispheres, evident in reptiles, birds, and mammals, as well as in humans, in the nature of the attention each applies to the environment. This permits the simultaneous application of precisely focused, but narrow, attention, needed for grasping food or prey, with broad, open, and uncommitted attention, needed to watch out for predators and to interpret the intentions of conspecifics. These different modes of attention can account for a very wide range of repeated observations relating to hemisphere specialization, and suggest that hemisphere differences lie not in discrete functional domains as such, but distinct modes of functioning within any one domain. These modes of attention are mutually incompatible, and their application depends on inhibitory transmission in the corpus callosum. There is also an asymmetry of interaction between the hemispheres at the phenomenological level. PMID:21319495

  2. Mola's First Observations of the Southern Hemisphere Topography of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David E.; Zuber, M. T.

    1999-01-01

    Towards the end of February 1999, the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft is expected to enter a near-circular polar orbit around Mars at an altitude of about 400 km. At this time the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) will begin near-continuous operation and acquire topography of the full planet. The initial areas of study will be concentrated in the southern hemisphere with particular interest in the polar region near the targeted landing site of the Mars Polar Lander. In addition to topography, MOLA matched filter pulse width data will be used to assess foot-print-scale surface roughness in the region. Such observations will also be applied in future studies for assessment of the Mars '01 landing site in the latitude range 15 degrees south to 5 degrees north.

  3. Temporal variation of hemispheric solar rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jing-Lan; Shi, Xiang-Jun; Xu, Jing-Chen

    2012-02-01

    The daily sunspot numbers of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres from 1945 January 1 to 2010 December 31 are used to investigate the temporal variation of rotational cycle length through the continuous wavelet transformation analysis method. Auto-correlation function analysis of daily hemispheric sunspot numbers shows that the southern hemisphere rotates faster than the northern hemisphere. The results obtained from the wavelet transformation analysis are that no direct relationship exists between the variation trend of the rotational cycle length and the solar activity in the two hemispheres and that the rotational cycle length of both hemispheres has no significant period appearing at 11yr, but has a significant period of about 7.6 yr. Analysis concerning the solar cycle dependence of the rotational cycle length shows that acceleration seems to appear before the minimum time of solar activity in the whole disk and the northern hemisphere, respectively. Furthermore, the cross-correlation study indicates that the rotational cycle length of the two hemispheres has different phases, and that the rotational cycle length of the whole disk as well as the northern and southern hemispheres, also has phase shifts with corresponding solar activity. In addition, the temporal variation of the north-south (N-S) asymmetry of the rotational cycle length is also studied. This displays the same variation trend as the N-S asymmetry of solar activity in a solar cycle, as well as in the considered time interval, and has two significant periods of 7.7 and 17.5 yr. Moreover, the rotational cycle length and the N-S asymmetry of solar activity are highly correlated. It is inferred that the northern hemisphere should rotate faster at the beginning of solar cycle 24.

  4. Wetting phenomena on rough substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Kardar, Mehran

    1990-10-01

    We consider wetting phenomena in the vicinity of rough substrates. The quenched random geometry of the substrate is assumed to be a self-affine fractal with a roughness exponent of ζS. Asymptotic critical properties on approaching complete and critical wetting transitions are studied by combining the replica method with scaling and renormalization-group arguments. We find new critical behavior, controlled by a zero-temperature fixed point, when ζS exceeds the thermal roughness exponent of the emerging wetting layer. The possibility of an effective dimensional reduction due to randomness is considered. In two dimensions a number of exact results are obtained by using a many-body transfer-matrix technique.

  5. Recent Studies of Runway Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    Recent studies of NASA research related to aircraft operating problems on rough runways are presented. Some of these investigations were conducted cooperatively with the airport operators, with the Federal Aviation Agency, and with the U.S. Air Force. The studies show that criteria based on power spectral levels of runway-profile data are not sufficient to define acceptable levels of runway roughness from the piloting viewpoint. Because of the large variation in response characteristics between various types of aircraft, a runway may be acceptable for some aircraft and unacceptable for others. A criterion for roughness, therefore, should be expressed in terms of aircraft response - preferably, cockpit acceleration. A criterion suggested is that the maximum vertical acceleration in the cockpit should not exceed +/- 0.4 g for sections of the runway where precise aircraft control is required.

  6. Ontogenesis of hemispheric specialization: apraxia associated with congenital left hemisphere lesions.

    PubMed

    Nass, R

    1983-12-01

    In adults apraxia is more common after left-hemisphere damage. The engram for control of skilled motor movements has therefore been considered a specialized function of the left hemisphere. The ontogenesis of motor control was studied in a group of prepubertal children with congenital unilateral hemispheric lesions. Left-hemisphere lesions caused greater impairment of rapid independent finger movements, suggesting that specialization for motor control is innately programmed in the left hemisphere. No subject evidenced apraxia to verbal command, but adult-like performance is not yet expected at the age the group was tested, and effects of side of lesion could appear later. PMID:6664762

  7. On the effect of surface roughness on the vapor flow under Leidenfrost-levitated droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Prat, M.; Schmitz, P.; Poulikakos, D.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a theoretical investigation is reported on the effect of surface roughness on the phenomenon of Leidenfrost-levitation of droplets above a hot surface. The problem is solved first approximately using a macroscopic approach in which the roughness is replaced by a semi-empirical slip conditions of the Beavers-Joseph type. Next, a microscopic model which determines the vapor flow in the close vicinity of the rough surface is solved numerically. Three basic periodic roughnesses are examined: triangular, rectangular, and semi-cylindrical. The effect of the relative size of the droplet and the roughness elements on the vapor flow is investigated in the course of the study.

  8. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  9. The Asgard Hemisphere of Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    False color view of a portion of the leading hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Callisto as seen through the infrared filters of the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the east. More recent impacts have excavated bright, relatively clean ice from beneath Callisto's battered surface. Callisto's dark mottled appearance may be due to contamination by non-ice components contributed by impactors or concentrated in a residue as ice is removed. This color composite image is centered on longitude 139 West and encompasses an area about 1000 miles (1600 kilometers) by 2470 miles (4000 kilometers). The images were obtained on November 3rd, 1996.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. Effect of surface roughness on characteristics of spherical shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W; Mcfarland, Donald R

    1955-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a small-scale test layout in which direct observation of the shock wave movement with time could be made in order to determine the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of spherical shock waves. Data were obtained with 15-gram pentolite charges at four heights of burst, both for a smooth surface and for a surface completely covered with pyramid-shaped roughness elements. The observations resulted in determinations of shock peak overpressure and Mach stem height as a function of distance for each test. Comparison of the smooth-surface data with those obtained for the extremely rough condition showed a small net effort of roughness on the shock peak overpressures at the surface for all burst heights, the effect being to lower the overpressures. The effect of surface roughness on the Mach stem formation and growth was to delay the formation at the greatest charge height and to lower the height of the Mach stem for all heights.Comparison of the free-air shock peak overpressures with larger scale data showed good similarity of the overpressure-distance relationships. The data did not fit a geometrical similarity parameter for the path of the triple point at different heights of burst suggested by other investigators. A simple similarity parameter (relating the horizontal distance to the theoretical point of Mach formation) was found which showed only a small influence of burst height on the path of the triple point. While the data presented provide knowledge of the effect of many surface-roughness elements on the overall shock characteristics, the data do not provide insight into the details of the air-flow characteristics along the surface, nor the relative contribution of individual roughness elements to the results obtained.

  11. Hemispheric sunspot unit area: comparison with hemispheric sunspot number and sunspot area

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K. J.; Xiang, N. B.; Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    The monthly mean northern and southern hemispheric sunspot numbers (SNs) and sunspot areas (SAs) in the time interval of 1945 January to 2012 December are utilized to construct the monthly northern and southern hemispheric sunspot unit areas (SUAs), which are defined as the ratio of hemispheric SA to SN. Hemispheric SUAs are usually found to rise at the beginning and to fall at the ending time of a solar cycle more rapidly, forming a more irregular cycle profile than hemispheric SNs and SAs, although it also presents Schwabe-cycle-like hemispheric SNs and SAs. Sunspot activity (SN, SA, and SUA) is found asynchronously and is asymmetrically distributed in the northern and southern hemispheres, and hemispheric SNs, SAs, and SUAs are not in phase in the two hemispheres. The similarity of hemispheric SNs and SAs is found to be much more obvious than that of hemispheric SUAs and SNs (or SAs), and also for their north-south asymmetry. A notable feature is found for the behavior of the SUA around the minimum time of cycle 24: the SUA rapidly decreases from the cycle maximum value to the cycle minimum value of sunspot cycles 19-24 within just 22 months.

  12. Large Craters in Callisto's Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Galileo spacecraft provides a new view of this heavily cratered region in the southern hemisphere of the icy Jovian satellite Callisto. The region was not observed by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. Craters ranging in diameter from the 1.85 kilometer (1.13 mile) limit of resolution up to more than 70 kilometers (43 miles) can be observed in this image. Although all craters are generally round in outline, details in their structures vary with both size and relative age. Bright spots in the center of smaller craters (up to approximately 20 kilometers (12 miles)) are central peaks. Larger craters (up to the 51 kilometer (31 mile) wide crater in the east central part of the image) exhibit central pits or depressions. The largest crater, called Thrainn, has a diameter of 74 kilometers (45 miles) and is located in the southernmost corner of the image. This crater contains a broad central uplift, or dome, and has a highly eroded rim. In contrast, the 70 kilometer (43 mile) crater Audr, located along the northern margin of the image, is flat-bottomed, and has a less degraded and generally rounder rim. If erosional or degradational forces have been roughly constant with time on Callisto, scientists viewing this image can assume that Audr is relatively younger than Thrainn by noting the less degraded or fresher appearance of its rim. The differences in crater floor features between these two similarly sized craters could have been produced by differences in the impacting bodies that produced them, differences in the crustal materials in which the craters formed, or simply by a gradual evolution of crater floor shape with time.

    North is to the top of the image which was taken by the Galileo spacecraft's solid state imaging (CCD) system during its eighth orbit around Jupiter on May 6th, 1997. The center of the image is located at 34 degrees south latitude, 84 degrees west longitude, and was taken when the spacecraft was approximately 48,430 kilometers (29,542 miles) from

  13. Shock/shock interference on a transpiration cooled hemispherical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nowak, Robert J.; Wieting, Allan R.; Holden, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which show the effectiveness of transpiration cooling in reducing the peak heat flux caused by an impinging shock on a bow shock of a hemispherical model. The 12-inch diameter hemispherical transpiration model with helium coolant was tested in the Calspan 48-inch Hypersonic Shock Tunnel at nominal Mach 12.1 and freestream unit Reynolds number of 0.33 x 10 to the 6th/ft. An incident shock wave, generated by a blunt flat-plate shock generator inclined at 10 deg to the freestream, intersected the bow shock of the model to produce shock/shock interference. The stagnation heat flux without coolant or shock/shock interference was about 1.6 times a smooth surface laminar prediction due to effective roughness of the coolant ejection slots. A coolant mass flux 31 percent of the freestream mass flux reduced the stagnation heat flux to zero without shock/shock interference. However, for the same coolant mass flux and with shock/shock interference the peak heat flux was only reduced 8.3 percent, even though the total integrated heat load was reduced.

  14. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at the North Pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered on the North Pole. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  15. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 270 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 270 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  16. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 90 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 90 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  17. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 180 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 180 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  18. Hemispheric View of Venus Centered at 0 Degrees East Longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The hemispheric view of Venus, as revealed by more than a decade of radar investigations culminating in the 1990-1994 Magellan mission, is centered at 0 degrees east longitude. The Magellan spacecraft imaged more than 98% of Venus at a resolution of about 100 meters; the effective resolution of this image is about 3 km. A mosaic of the Magellan images (most with illumination from the west) forms the image base. Gaps in the Magellan coverage were filled with images from the Earth-based Arecibo radar in a region centered roughly on 0 degree latitude and longitude, and with a neutral tone elsewhere (primarily near the south pole). The composite image was processed to improve contrast and to emphasize small features, and was color-coded to represent elevation. Gaps in the elevation data from the Magellan radar altimeter were filled with altimetry from the Venera spacecraft and the U.S. Pioneer Venus missions. An orthographic projection was used, simulating a distant view of one hemisphere of the planet. The Magellan mission was managed for NASA by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, CA. Data processed by JPL, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, and the U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ.

  19. Northern hemisphere dust storms on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Dust storms in the northern hemisphere of Mars appear to be less common than the more familiar southern hemisphere storms, and essentially, no activity north of about 30 latittude has been documented. The data are, however, subject to an observational bias because Mars is near aphelion during oppositions, which occur during the most likely seasons for dust activity in the north. The amount of dust activity in the northern hemisphere is clearly very relevant to the role of atmospheric transport in the dust cycle. The classic global storms that occur during spring in the southern hemisphere are observed to transport dust from sources in the southern hemisphere to sinks or temporary depositories in the north. The question of whether atmospheric transport can close the dust cycle, i.e., return the dust to the southern hemisphere sources on some timescale, is clearly relevant to the solution of the puzzle of how the dust storm cycle is modulated, i.e., why storms occur in some years but not in others. There are data that suggest that the spring/early summer season in the northern hemisphere of Mars during the year following the major 1977 storms observed by Viking was very dusty. A number of observations of the vicinity of the receding north polar cap showed clear evidence of substantial dust activity in the sub-Arctic region.

  20. Nanowetting of rough superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Lamb, R. N.; Cookson, D. J.

    2007-12-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering has been used to investigate the in situ immersive wetting of ultrarough surfaces which exhibit superhydrophobicity with extreme water contact angle (θA=169°). Reduced scattering contrast observed from rough surfaces when partially or totally wetted reveals significant physical differences between superhydrophobic surfaces not otherwise apparent from conventional contact angle measurements.

  1. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  2. Estimating surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, V.; Krasa, J.

    2009-04-01

    At the Department of Drainage, Irrigation and Landscape Engineering (CTU Prague) we use several mathematical models for soil erosion, sediment transport and surface runoff assessment. Here we continuously struggle for successful models parameterizations. One of the typical coefficients usually taken from literature instead of measurements is surface roughness, eg. Manning roughness (Maidment, 1993). Roughness is a key to surface runoff velocity and surface runoff depth estimation but often it is very roughly estimated. Within the COST 22 Action research we focused on estimating actual surface roughness using stereophotogrammetry. Our aim was to set up a simple low cost system useful for roughness measurements in nature conditions - mainly on agricultural fields. Our system consists of Canon EOS 400 digital camera with angle viewfinder, two robust tripods and a horizontal bar with sliding 3D tripod head. We tested different camera heights and focal distances as well as various parallaxes to obtain reasonable results. Finally we shot the surfaces from 1600 millimeters with 24 and 35 mm lens and parallaxes close to 100 mm. For 3D scene development we use Geomatica 10 GIS and its OrthoEngine module. Testing the proper system and many variables of the 3D scene modelling was an important part of the first year of the project. For these purposes we first prepared a calibrated and known 3D surface consisting of 70 by 70 cm grid and several geometrical objects of different sizes and shapes. Preparing the correct lighting conditions, finding the resolving power of the system and solving the problems with low contrast areas of measured surfaces was a time consuming but interesting task. After the system calibration we started with the actual terrain measurements. Our setup, system testing and preliminary results of the roughness computations are presented on the poster. Acknowledgement This research was acomplished within national COST project OC189 „Flood risk and its

  3. Compact Autonomous Hemispheric Vision System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pingree, Paula J.; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Werne, Thomas A.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Walch, Marc J.; Staehle, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Solar System Exploration camera implementations to date have involved either single cameras with wide field-of-view (FOV) and consequently coarser spatial resolution, cameras on a movable mast, or single cameras necessitating rotation of the host vehicle to afford visibility outside a relatively narrow FOV. These cameras require detailed commanding from the ground or separate onboard computers to operate properly, and are incapable of making decisions based on image content that control pointing and downlink strategy. For color, a filter wheel having selectable positions was often added, which added moving parts, size, mass, power, and reduced reliability. A system was developed based on a general-purpose miniature visible-light camera using advanced CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) imager technology. The baseline camera has a 92 FOV and six cameras are arranged in an angled-up carousel fashion, with FOV overlaps such that the system has a 360 FOV (azimuth). A seventh camera, also with a FOV of 92 , is installed normal to the plane of the other 6 cameras giving the system a > 90 FOV in elevation and completing the hemispheric vision system. A central unit houses the common electronics box (CEB) controlling the system (power conversion, data processing, memory, and control software). Stereo is achieved by adding a second system on a baseline, and color is achieved by stacking two more systems (for a total of three, each system equipped with its own filter.) Two connectors on the bottom of the CEB provide a connection to a carrier (rover, spacecraft, balloon, etc.) for telemetry, commands, and power. This system has no moving parts. The system's onboard software (SW) supports autonomous operations such as pattern recognition and tracking.

  4. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  5. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  6. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  7. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  8. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  9. Amplitude modulation of streamwise velocity fluctuations in the roughness sublayer: evidence from large-eddy simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Ankit; Anderson, William

    2015-11-01

    Large-scale motions in the logarithmic region of turbulent boundary layers amplitude modulate the viscous sublayer (Marusic et al., 2010: Science; Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech.). This finding has promising implications for large-eddy simulation of wall-bounded turbulence at high Reynolds number (wherein the turbulence integral length exhibits linear proportionality with wall-normal elevation). Existing amplitude modulation studies have addressed smooth wall flows, though high Reynolds number rough wall flows are ubiquitous. Under such conditions, roughness-scale vortices ablate the viscous sublayer and result in the roughness sublayer. The roughness sublayer depth scales with aggregate element height, k, and is typically 2k ~ 3k. Above this, Townsend's Hypothesis dictates that the logarithmic layer is unaffected by the roughness sublayer. Here, we present large-eddy simulation results of turbulent channel flow over rough walls. We follow the decoupling procedure of Mathis et al., 2009: J. Fluid Mech., and present evidence that outer-layer dynamics amplitude modulate the roughness sublayer. Below the roughness element height, we report enormous sensitivity to element proximity. Above the elements, but within the roughness sublayer, topography dependence rapidly declines. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Turbulence and Transition Program (PM: Dr. R. Ponnoppan) under Grant # FA9550-14-1-0101. Computational resources were provided by the Texas Adv. Comp. Center at the Univ. of Texas.

  10. Parametric Flow Visualization of Dynamic Roughness Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkali, Vinay

    The ever growing need in the aircraft industry to enhance the performance of a flight vehicle has led to active areas of research which focus on the control of the local boundary layer by both passive and active methods. An effective flow control mechanism can improve the performance of a flight vehicle in various ways, one of which is eliminating boundary layer separation. To be effective the mechanism not only needs to control the boundary layer as desired, but also use less energy than the resulting energy savings. In this study, the effectiveness of an active flow control technique known as dynamic roughness (DR) has been explored to eliminate the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and also to eliminate the stall on a NACA 0012 airfoil wing. As opposed to static roughness, dynamic roughness utilizes small time-dependent deforming elements or humps with displacement amplitudes that are on the order of the local boundary layer height to energize the local boundary layer. DR is primarily characterized by the maximum amplitude and operating frequency. A flow visualization study was conducted on a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil model at different angles of attack, and also varying the Reynolds number and DR actuation frequency with fixed maximum DR amplitude. The experimental results from this study suggests that DR is an effective method of reattaching a totally separated boundary layer. In addition, this study discusses some of the fundamental physics behind the working of DR and proposes some non-dimensional terms that may help to explain the driving force behind the mechanism.

  11. Hemispherical total emissivity of Hastelloy N with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Andrew J.; Walton, Kyle L.; Ghosh, Tushar K.; Loyalka, Sudarshan K.; Viswanath, Dabir S.; Tompson, Robert V.

    2012-07-01

    The hemispherical total emissivity of Hastelloy N (a candidate structural material for Next Generation Nuclear Plants (NGNPs), particularly for the molten fluoride cooled reactors) was measured using an experimental set-up that was constructed in accordance with the standard ASTM C835-06. The material surface conditions included: (i) 'as received' (original) sample from the supplier; (ii) samples with increased surface roughness through sand blasting; (iii) oxidized surface, and (iv) samples coated with graphite powder. The emissivity of the as received samples varied from around 0.22 to 0.28 in the temperature range of 473 K to 1498 K. The emissivity increased when the roughness of the surface increased compared to an as received sample. When Hastelloy N was oxidized in air at 1153 K or coated with graphite powder, its emissivity increased substantially. The sample sand blasted with 60 grit beads and sprinkled with graphite powder showed an increase of emissivity from 0.2 to 0.60 at 473 K and from 0.25 to 0.67 at 1473 K. The oxidized surface showed a similar behavior: an increase in emissivity compared to an unoxidized sample. This increase in emissivity has strong favorable safety implications in terms of decay heat removal in post-accident environments. The data were compared with another Hastelloy family member, Hastelloy X.

  12. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  13. Simulation of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flow with Large Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Erika; Subramanian, Chelakara

    2006-11-01

    Several studies indicate that in situations where surface roughness is very strong, the friction velocity scaling for the mean and turbulent velocities are not satisfactory. Subramanian et al showed a dramatic effect of a strong irregular roughened surface on the turbulent properties. The log-law relation in the overlap region was distorted. A significant pressure gradient normal to the surface was observed with a concomitant increase in normal turbulent stress, v^'2 . The pressure gradient velocity scale, uP, was suggested as a better alternative for capturing the effects of this roughness induced pressure gradient. Here, we performed a numerical simulation of a roughened boundary layer to gain more insight on the correlation between the wall normal pressure gradient and normal turbulent stress, v^'2 and further validate this new pressure gradient velocity scale, uP for different types of roughness. A two-dimensional flat plate computational model with strong regular (k-type) roughness, was constructed in GAMBIT and a CFD analysis performed using FLUENT, version 6.2. The roughness elements cause the pressure near the wall to increase suddenly at the first element and then decrease gradually similar to experiments. The variation of this normal pressure gradient is well correlated with the normal turbulent stress v^'2 variation. Application of the uP as scaling parameter for other non-equilibrium flows such as with suction and blowing is also investigated.

  14. Structure of rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; Watson, Ralph D.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that, in rough-wall turbulent boundary layers, drag varies systematically with the spanwise aspect ratio lambda(z) (span/height) of roughness elements. In this paper, the effect of lambda(z) on turbulence structure has been examined. Based on lambda(z), the roughness in a transversely grooved surface with lambda(z) much greater than 1 is the opposite extreme of model plant canopies with lambda(z) much less than 1, studied in wind tunnels, whereas sandgrain is an intermediate type. Second-, third-, and fourth-order turbulence moments have been measured in turbulent boundary layers over transversely grooved and smooth surfaces and compared with available turbulence structure measurements over other types of surfaces. The near-wall turbulence structure is found to vary with lambda(z). The instantaneous motions involved in the flux of shear stress near the wall in smooth and transversely grooved surfaces are opposite in sign to those in three-dimensional roughness. The former is explained in terms of hairpin vortices alone, while the latter group is modeled to have an additional vortex (the so-called necklace vortex which straddles a three-dimensional roughness element near its base).

  15. Electromagnetic scattering and depolarization across rough surfaces: Full wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Ezekiel; Huang, Guorong; Lee, Bom Son

    1995-05-01

    Full wave solutions are derived for vertically and horizontally polarized waves diffusely scattered across an interface that is two-dimensionally rough separating two different propagating media. Since the normal to the rough surface is not restricted to the reference plane of incidence, the waves are depolarized upon scattering; and the single scattered radiation fields are expressed as integrals of a surface element transmission scattering matrix that also accounts for coupling between the vertically and horizontally polarized waves. The integrations are over the rough surface area as well as the complete two-dimensional wave spectra of the radiation fields. The full wave solutions satisfy the duality and reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory, and the surface element scattering matrix is invariant to coordinate transformations. It is shown that in the high-frequency limit the full wave solutions reduce to the physical optics solutions, while in the low-frequency limit (for small mean square heights and slopes) the full wave solutions reduce to Rice's (1951) small perturbation solutions. Thus, the full wave solution accounts for specular point scattering as well as diffuse, Bragg-type scattering in a unified, self-consistent manner. It is therefore not necessary to use hybrid, perturbation and physical optics approaches (based on two-scale models of composite surfaces with large and small roughness scales) to determine the like- and cross-polarized fields scattered across the rough surface.

  16. Huge Filament Rises From Sun's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 1, 2010 following a C3-class solar flare from sunspot 1092, an enormous magnetic filament stretching across the sun's northern hemisphere erupted. This 304 angstrom video shows that filam...

  17. Hemispherical color differences on Pluto and Charon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, Richard P.

    1988-01-01

    Time-resolved multicolor photometric observations of Pluto-Charon mutual events have been used to derive individual colors for these two bodies and to investigate the degree of color differences between their synchronous facing and opposite hemispheres. Pluto is significantly redder than Charon, where direct measurements of the anti-Charon hemisphere of Pluto and the Pluto-facing hemisphere of Charon yield B-V magnitudes of 0.867 + or - 0.008 and 0.700 + or - 0.010, respectively. Both Pluto and Charon are found to have relatively uniform longitudinal color distributions with 1-sigma upper limits of 2 percent and 5 percent, respectively, for any large-scale hemispherical color asymmetries. Thus, a previous suspicion of a significant color asymmetry on Charon is not confirmed. Instead the data may be attributed to a direct detection of polar caps on Pluto.

  18. Recovering two languages with the right hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Marini, Andrea; Galetto, Valentina; Tatu, Karina; Duca, Sergio; Geminiani, Giuliano; Sacco, Katiuscia; Zettin, Marina

    2016-08-01

    Converging evidence suggests that the right hemisphere (RH) plays an important role in language recovery from aphasia after a left hemisphere (LH) lesion. In this longitudinal study we describe the neurological, cognitive, and linguistic profile of A.C., a bilingual who, after a severe traumatic brain injury, developed a form of fluent aphasia that affected his two languages (i.e., Romanian and Italian). The trauma-induced parenchymal atrophy led to an exceptional ventricular dilation that, gradually, affected the whole left hemisphere. A.C. is now recovering both languages relying only on his right hemisphere. An fMRI experiment employing a bilingual covert verb generation task documented the involvement of the right middle temporal gyrus in processes of lexical selection and access. This case supports the hypothesis that the RH plays a role in language recovery from aphasia when the LH has suffered massive lesions. PMID:27289209

  19. Southern Hemisphere Polygonal Patterned Ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On Earth, periglacial is a term that refers to regions and processes where cold climate contributes to the evolution of landforms and landscapes. Common in periglacial environments on Earth, such as the arctic of northern Canada,Siberia, and Alaska, is a phenomenon called patterned ground. The 'patterns' in patterned ground often take the form of large polygons, each bounded by either troughs or ridges made up of rock particles different in size from those seen in the interior of the polygon. On Earth, many polygons in periglacial environments are directly linked to water: they typically form from stresses induced by repeated freezing and thawing of water, contraction from stress induced by changing temperatures, and sorting of rocks brought to the surface along polygon boundaries by the freeze-thaw processes. Although not exclusively formed by freezing and thawing of water, that is often the dominant mechanism on Earth.

    Polygons similar to those found in Earth's arctic and antarctic regions are also found in the polar regions of Mars. Typically, they occur on crater floors, or on intercrater plains, between about 60o and 80o latitude. The polygons are best seen when bright frost or dark sand has been trapped in the troughs that form the polygon boundaries. Three examples of martian polygons seen by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are shown here. Each is located in the southern hemisphere:(left) Polygon troughs highlighted by frost as the south polar cap retreats during spring. The circular features are the locations of buried craters that were originally formed by meteor impact. This image, E09-00029, is located at 75.1oS, 331.3oW, and was acquired on 1 October 2001.(center) Summertime view of polygons, highlighted by dark, windblown sand, on the floor of a crater at 71.2oS, 282.6oW. The image, E12-02319, was obtained on 21January 2002.(right) Polygon troughs highlighted by the retreating south polar frost cap during southern summer

  20. A Giant Storm in Saturn's Northern Hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, W. S.; Fischer, G.; Gurnett, D. A.; Zarka, P. M.; Dyudina, U. A.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Ewald, S. P.; Porco, C.; Wesley, A.; Go, C.; Delcroix, M.

    2011-12-01

    Beginning on December 5, 2010, an extraordinary thunderstorm developed as observed via the radio signatures of lightning using the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument and the appearance of a convective cloud in Cassini's Imaging Science System (ISS) images. These instruments as well as amateur astronomers across the globe have continued to track this storm to the present. The storm is extraordinary in that it is the first observed by Cassini in the northern hemisphere near 35 degrees planetocentric north latitude and is, by far, the largest storm observed by Cassini during its mission at Saturn and is comparable to the Great White Spot (GWS) storms observed approximately once per Saturn year. The development from the barely visible indications on December 5 to a storm of GWS status occurred over about 3 weeks. Expansion of the storm in latitude within a latitudinal gradient in the wind system of the planet resulted in an elongated eastward tail which entirely circled the planet by February 2011. The primary active cell lies in a relatively localized area around the main plume of high altitude clouds that overshoot the ammonia cloud layer due to strong vertical convection, although other, weaker cells occasionally develop within the tail. The lightning flash rate of this storm peaked at an order of magnitude higher than previously recorded storms with strokes occurring at the rate of 10 per second and the total power estimated for the storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power, making it a significant element of the planet's energy budget. That this storm occurred a year or so after northern vernal equinox suggests a seasonal change in the location of Saturn's thunderstorms. We will summarize observations of this extraordinary storm and update its progress as it is ongoing at the time of this writing.

  1. The estimation of surface roughness with the utilization of Mueller matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei; Gu, Guohua; Zhou, Xiaojun; Xu, Fuyuan; Ren, Kan

    2016-05-01

    Roughness is an important parameter to describe the microtopography of target surface. In the field of roughness detection, constraints on traditional methods are significant. Meanwhile, polarization imaging technology is gradually mature in recent years. In this paper, a method of roughness estimation with Mueller matrix is presented. Battery of lenses with fixed orientation have been introduced to produce a facula on the measured surface. Polarized information of each pixel can be obtained with the lenses of known position. According to the polarized information and Lambertian model, Stocks vector, Mueller matrix, and reflected Mueller matrix of each pixel can be acquired. Therefore, the roughness information of target surface can be obtained according to the relationship between roughness information and elements of matrix. Experimental results show that with the proposed method, efficiency of roughness detection can be improved without precision deducing. It can lay a foundation for extending the application of roughness into the field of object identification.

  2. Polymer Transport Near Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, Moses; Whitmer, Jonathan; Luijten, Erik

    2011-03-01

    The rheology of dilute polymer solutions under confinement is important in biology, medicine, microfluidic device design, synthetic polymer processing, and even geologic porous media. However, the solution's specific interactions with the confining surface are poorly understood. This situation is exacerbated for composite nanoparticles, such as polymer/metallic hybrids. Using multi-particle collision dynamics, we find a rich array of transport regimes depending on small-scale surface roughness and the specific surface/solute interactions. These factors couple to hydrodynamic conditions, including flow strength and confinement geometry in unexpected ways. Our findings may be relevant to transport phenomena in certain rough-walled capillaries, such as the distribution of various nanoconjugates in vivo.

  3. Northern Hemisphere forcing of Southern Hemisphere climate during the last deglaciation.

    PubMed

    He, Feng; Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; Carlson, Anders E; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette L; Kutzbach, John E

    2013-02-01

    According to the Milankovitch theory, changes in summer insolation in the high-latitude Northern Hemisphere caused glacial cycles through their impact on ice-sheet mass balance. Statistical analyses of long climate records supported this theory, but they also posed a substantial challenge by showing that changes in Southern Hemisphere climate were in phase with or led those in the north. Although an orbitally forced Northern Hemisphere signal may have been transmitted to the Southern Hemisphere, insolation forcing can also directly influence local Southern Hemisphere climate, potentially intensified by sea-ice feedback, suggesting that the hemispheres may have responded independently to different aspects of orbital forcing. Signal processing of climate records cannot distinguish between these conditions, however, because the proposed insolation forcings share essentially identical variability. Here we use transient simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model to identify the impacts of forcing from changes in orbits, atmospheric CO(2) concentration, ice sheets and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) on hemispheric temperatures during the first half of the last deglaciation (22-14.3 kyr BP). Although based on a single model, our transient simulation with only orbital changes supports the Milankovitch theory in showing that the last deglaciation was initiated by rising insolation during spring and summer in the mid-latitude to high-latitude Northern Hemisphere and by terrestrial snow-albedo feedback. The simulation with all forcings best reproduces the timing and magnitude of surface temperature evolution in the Southern Hemisphere in deglacial proxy records. AMOC changes associated with an orbitally induced retreat of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets is the most plausible explanation for the early Southern Hemisphere deglacial warming and its lead over Northern Hemisphere temperature; the ensuing rise in atmospheric CO(2

  4. Meaningful surface roughness and quality tolerances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikens, David M.

    2010-08-01

    Most tolerances on optical elements can be derived or calculated from the application requirements using computeraided optical design programs. For surface quality and surface roughness, however, there are few guidelines or tools for calculating appropriate tolerances. Typically, we simply use a legacy specification (e.g. 60-40 and 3 A RMS) with little thought for either the cost of achieving the specification or the penalty for failing to achieve it. Often these legacy specifications are ambiguous, unnecessarily costly and in some cases completely meaningless. This paper provides some basic rules and equations for calculation of the real or perceived impact of these specifications, and some guidelines for the initiate (and for some of us veterans as well) as to how to compose a meaningful tolerance.

  5. Surface roughness of anodized titanium coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Chinn, Douglas Alan

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grade five 6Al4V titanium alloy were coated with two commercial fluoropolymer anodizations (Tiodize and Canadize) and compared. Neither coating demonstrates significant outgassing. The coatings show very similar elemental analysis, except for the presence of lead in the Canadize coating, which may account for its lower surface friction in humid environments. Surface roughness has been compared by SEM, contact profilometry, optical profilometry, power spectral density and bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The Tiodize film is slightly smoother by all measurement methods, but the Canadize film shows slightly less scatter at all angles of incidence. Both films exhibited initial friction coefficients of 0.2 to 0.4, increasing to 0.4 to 0.8 after 1000 cycles of sliding due to wear of the coating and ball. The coatings are very similar and should behave identically in most applications.

  6. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  7. Boundary Layer Receptivity due to Roughness and Freestream Sound for Supersonic Flows over Axisymmetric Cones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2008-01-01

    The receptivity of supersonic boundary layers due to the interaction of a two-dimensional acoustic wave with a three-dimensional roughness is numerically investigated over a 5-degree sharp tipped straight cone at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for spatial discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for temporal integration. The simulations are performed with different roughness heights and roughness locations. The steady computations with the roughness reveal that the perturbations induced by the roughness remain very close to the wall and do not penetrate to the outer part of the boundary layer. The effects of the roughness persist for about 10 boundary layer thicknesses downstream of each element. The unsteady simulation shows the generation of unstable three-dimensional first mode disturbances within a short distance from the roughness. However, the amplitudes of the instability waves are very small near the neutral point, on the order of 10(exp -4) compared to the free stream disturbances. The receptivity coefficients due to the roughness elements located very close to the tip are one order of magnitude smaller than those due to the roughness elements located closer to the neutral point.

  8. Direct simulation of open-channel flow in the fully rough regime: focus on fluid-roughness interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzuoli, Marco; Uhlmann, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between an incompressible open-channel flow at Reb = 6900 and rigid spheres of size k+ = 120 mounted in square arrangement on the bottom, has been investigated by means of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for the purpose of contributing to the knowledge of the basic mechanism of sediment transport. The shift generated by the roughness on mean velocity profile in the log-region is in the range of values characterizing the Fully-Rough Regime (FRR). First, average quantities (i.e. flow velocity, shear-stress distribution on the sphere surface, force and torque acting on the spheres) are analyzed exploiting the spatial periodicity of the arrangement of roughness elements. Then, spatial and temporal fluctuations of the quantities are studied. Results are compared with those obtained for a similar DNS at Reb = 2900, which is in the Transitionally-Rough Regime (TRR). Although the largest fluctuations of the velocity components are observed ~ 8 wall units below the crest of the spheres in the FRR, their effect on the drag and lift fluctuations acting on individual spheres is weaker than in the TRR. Nonetheless, the lift coefficient in the FRR case was found the 24% larger than in the TRR case. The characteristics of vortex structures in the vicinity of roughness elements are also investigated. Differences in the flow structure between the two simulations in the TRR and in the FRR reflect on the stress distribution on the surface of the spheres. Finally, the arrangement of the roughness elements might play a key role in the modulation of turbulence.

  9. Interactions between surface roughness and airflow turbulence affecting drying dynamics of rough porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Evaporative drying of porous surfaces interacting with turbulent airflows is common in various industrial and natural applications. The intrinsic relief and roughness of natural porous surfaces are likely to influence the structure of interacting turbulent airflow boundary layers, and thus affect rates and patterns of heat and vapor fluxes from the surface. These links have been formalized in new mechanistic models that consider intermittent and localized turbulence-induced boundary layers, resulting in rich surface evaporation and energy exchange dynamics. The models were evaluated experimentally by systematically varying surface roughness elements in drying experiments of wavy and bluff-body covered sand surfaces in a wind tunnel. Thermal infrared signatures of localized evaporative fluxes as well as mean evaporative mass losses were recorded. The resulting patterns were in good agreement with model predictions for local and surface averaged turbulent exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that evaporative water losses from wavy sand surfaces can be either enhanced or suppressed (relative to a flat surface), due to the complex interplay between the local boundary layer thickness and internal limitations on water flow to the evaporating surface. For sand surfaces covered by isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies), model predictions and measurements show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces compared to a flat surface under similar conditions. This enhancement is attributed to the formation of vortices that thin the boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. The implications of this study for interpreting and upscaling evapotranspiration rates from terrestrial surfaces will be discussed.

  10. Discrete Roughness Effects on Shuttle Orbiter at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    2002-01-01

    Discrete roughness boundary layer transition results on a Shuttle Orbiter model in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed with new boundary layer calculations to provide consistency for comparison to other published results. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography system to monitor the status of the boundary layer via global heat transfer images of the Orbiter windward surface. The size and location of discrete roughness elements were systematically varied along the centerline of the 0.0075-scale model at an angle of attack of 40 deg and the boundary layer response recorded. Various correlative approaches were attempted, with the roughness transition correlations based on edge properties providing the most reliable results. When a consistent computational method is used to compute edge conditions, transition datasets for different configurations at several angles of attack have been shown to collapse to a well-behaved correlation.

  11. The effect of surface roughness on Triton's volatile distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yelle, Roger V.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations of radiative equilibrium temperatures on Triton's rough surface suggest that significant condensation of N2 may be occurring in the northern equatorial regions, despite their relatively dark appearance. The bright frost is not apparent in the Voyager images because it tends to be concentrated in relatively unilluminated facets of the surface. This patchwork of bright frost-covered regions and darker bare ground may be distributed on scales smaller than that of the Voyager resolution; as a result the northern equatorial regions may appear relatively dark. This hypothesis also accounts for the observed wind direction in the Southern Hemisphere because it implies that the equatorial regions are warmer than the south polar regions.

  12. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-04-30

    The final data package has been completed for the Mississippi State University, DIAL FTP Wall Depth Removal Characterization Technology. The package has been sent to DIAL for comments. Work is progressing on completing the transfer of glove boxes and tanks from Rocky Flats to FIU-HCET for the purpose of performing size reduction technology assessments. Vendors are being identified and security measures are being put in place to meet the High Risk Property criteria required by Rocky Flats. The FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program has been included as one of 11 verification programs across the US and Canada described in the Interstate Technology Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC) document, ''Multi-state Evaluation of Elements Important to the Verification of Remediation Technologies'', dated January 1999. FIU-HCET will also participate in a panel discussion on technology verification programs at the International Environmental Technology Expo '99.

  13. A right hemisphere dominance for bimanual grasps.

    PubMed

    Le, Ada; Niemeier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    To find points on the surface of an object that ensure a stable grasp, it would be most effective to employ one area in one cortical hemisphere. But grasping the object with both hands requires control through both hemispheres. To better understand the control mechanisms underlying this "bimanual grasping", here we examined how the two hemispheres coordinate their control processes for bimanual grasping depending on visual field. We asked if bimanual grasping involves both visual fields equally or one more than the other. To test this, participants fixated either to the left or right of an object and then grasped or pushed it off a pedestal. We found that when participants grasped the object in the right visual field, maximum grip aperture (MGA) was larger and more variable, and participants were slower to react and to show MGA compared to when they grasped the object in the left visual field. In contrast, when participants pushed the object we observed no comparable visual field effects. These results suggest that grasping with both hands, specifically the computation of grasp points on the object, predominantly involves the right hemisphere. Our study provides new insights into the interactions of the two hemispheres for grasping. PMID:23109083

  14. Hemispheric lateralization of semantic feature distinctiveness

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, M.; Machado, N.; Blumstein, S. E.

    2015-01-01

    Recent models of semantic memory propose that the semantic representation of concepts is based, in part, on a network of features. In this view, a feature that is distinctive for an object (a zebra has stripes) is processed differently from a feature that is shared across many objects (a zebra has four legs). The goal of this paper is to determine whether there are hemispheric differences in such processing. In a feature verification task, participants responded ‘yes’ or ‘no’ following concepts which were presented to a single visual field (left or right) paired with a shared or distinctive feature. Both hemispheres showed faster reaction times to shared features than to distinctive features, although right hemisphere responses were significantly slower overall and particularly in the processing of distinctive features. These findings support models of semantic processing in which the dominant left hemisphere more efficiently performs highly discriminating ‘fine’ encoding, in contrast to the right hemisphere which performs less discriminating ‘coarse’ encoding. PMID:26022059

  15. Optical receivers using rough reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    This report examines the possible use of rough, or nondiffraction-limited, reflectors for collecting optical signals. It is shown that in the absence of background radiation, the reflector's surface quality has little effect on the performance of a properly designed receiver, but that the presence of even small amounts of background radiation can lead to severe performance degradation. Techniques are suggested for improving receiver performance in high-background environments, and bounds and approximations to the exact error-probability expressions are derived.

  16. Approximating the detection limit of an infrared spectroscopic imaging microscope operating in an attenuated total reflection (ATR) modality: theoretical and empirical results for an instrument using a linear array detector and a 1.5 millimeter germanium hemisphere internal reflection element.

    PubMed

    Lanzarotta, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and empirical detection limits have been estimated for aripiprazole (analyte) in alpha lactose monohydrate (matrix model pharmaceutical formulation) using a micro-attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging instrument equipped with a linear array detector and a 1.5 mm germanium hemisphere internal reflection element (IRE). The instrument yielded a theoretical detection limit of 0.0035% (35 parts per million (ppm)) when operating under diffraction-limited conditions, which was 49 times lower than what was achieved with a traditional macro-ATR instrument operating under practical conditions (0.17%, 1700 ppm). However, these results may not be achievable for most analyses because the detection limits will be particle size limited, rather than diffraction limited, for mixtures with average particle diameters greater than 8.3 μm (most pharmaceutical samples). For example, a theoretical detection limit of 0.028% (280 ppm) was calculated for an experiment operating under particle size-limited conditions where the average particle size was 23.4 μm. These conditions yielded a detection limit of 0.022% (220 ppm) when measured empirically, which was close to the theoretical value and only eight times lower than that of a faster, more simplistic macro-ATR instrument. Considering the longer data acquisition and processing times characteristic of the micro-ATR imaging approach (minutes or even hours versus seconds), the cost-benefit ratio may not often be favorable for the analysis of analytes in matrices that exhibit only a few overlapping absorptions (low-interfering matrices such as alpha lactose monohydrate) using this technique compared to what can be achieved using macro-ATR. However, the advantage was significant for detecting analytes in more complex matrices (those that exhibited several overlapping absorptions with the analyte) because the detection limit of the macro-ATR approach was highly formulation

  17. The effect of bottom roughness on scalar transport in aquatic ecosystems: implications for reproduction and recruitment in the benthos.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Noel P; Ackerman, Josef D

    2015-03-21

    Bottom roughness can influence gamete and larval transport in benthic organisms. For example the ratio of the roughness spacing (λ) and roughness height (k) determines the type of roughness flow regime created in two dimensional (2D) flows: λ/k<8 results in skimming flow; λ/k~8 results in wake interference flow; and λ/k>8 results in isolated roughness flow. Computational fluid dynamic modeling (COMSOL K-ε) was used to examine the effect of roughness geometry (e.g., a gradient in angularity provided by square, triangular and round 2D bottom roughness elements) on the prediction of roughness flow regime using biologically relevant λ/k ratios. In addition, a continuously released scalar (a proxy for gametes and larvae) in a coupled convection-diffusion model was used to determine the relationship among roughness geometry, λ/k ratios, and scalar transport (relative scalar transport, RT=ratio of scalar measured downstream in a series of roughness elements placed in tandem). The modeled roughness flow regimes fit closely with theoretical predictions using the square and triangle geometries, but the round geometry required a lower λ/k ratio than expected for skimming flow. Relative transport of the scalar was consistent with the modeled flow regimes, however significant differences in RT were found among the roughness flows for each geometry, and significantly lower RT values were observed for skimming flow in the round geometry. The λ/k ratio provides an accurate means of classifying flow in and around the roughness elements, whereas RT indicates the nature of scalar transport and retention. These results indicate that the spatial configuration of bottom roughness is an important determinant of gamete/larval transport in terms of whether the scalar will be retained among roughness elements or transported downstream. PMID:25596514

  18. One-way implodable tag capsule with hemispherical beaded end cap for LWR fuel manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny; Lambert, John

    1999-01-01

    A capsule containing a tag gas in a zircaloy body portion having a hemispical top curved toward the bottom of the body portion. The hemispherical top has a rupturable portion upon exposure to elevated gas pressure and the capsule is positioned within a fuel element in a nuclear reactor.

  19. Mapping number to space in the two hemispheres of the avian brain.

    PubMed

    Rugani, Rosa; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Regolin, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Pre-verbal infants and non-human animals associate small numbers with the left space and large numbers with the right space. Birds and primates, trained to identify a given position in a sagittal series of identical positions, whenever required to respond on a left/right oriented series, referred the given position starting from the left end. Here, we extended this evidence by selectively investigating the role of either cerebral hemisphere, using the temporary monocular occlusion technique. In birds, lacking the corpus callosum, visual input is fed mainly to the contralateral hemisphere. We trained 4-day-old chicks to identify the 4th element in a sagittal series of 10 identical elements. At test, the series was identical but left/right oriented. Test was conducted in right monocular, left monocular or binocular condition of vision. Right monocular chicks pecked at the 4th right element; left monocular and binocular chicks pecked at the 4th left element. Data on monocular chicks demonstrate that both hemispheres deal with an ordinal (sequential) task. Data on binocular chicks indicate that the left bias is linked to a right hemisphere dominance, that allocates the attention toward the left hemispace. This constitutes a first step towards understanding the neural basis of number space mapping. PMID:27246250

  20. Crosshatch roughness distortions on a hypersonic turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltier, S. J.; Humble, R. A.; Bowersox, R. D. W.

    2016-04-01

    The effects of periodic crosshatch roughness (k+ = 160) on a Mach 4.9 turbulent boundary layer (Reθ = 63 000) are examined using particle image velocimetry. The roughness elements generate a series of alternating shock and expansion waves, which span the entire boundary layer, causing significant (up to +50% and -30%) variations in the Reynolds shear stress field. Evidence of the hairpin vortex organization of incompressible flows is found in the comparative smooth-wall boundary layer case (Reθ = 47 000), and can be used to explain several observations regarding the rough-wall vortex organization. In general, the rough-wall boundary layer near-wall vortices no longer appear to be well-organized into streamwise-aligned packets that straddle relatively low-speed regions like their smooth-wall counterpart; instead, they lean farther away from the wall, become more spatially compact, and their populations become altered. In the lower half of the boundary layer, the net vortex swirling strength and outer-scaled Reynolds stresses increase relative to the smooth-wall case, and actually decrease in the outer half of the boundary layer, as ejection and entrainment processes are strengthened and weakened in these two regions, respectively. A spectral analysis of the data suggests a relative homogenizing of the most energetic scales near Λ = ˜ 0.5δ across the rough-wall boundary layer.

  1. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E. Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-05-15

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  2. Diffusion-induced line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Michael D.; Schmid, Gerard M.; Goldfarb, Dario L.; Angelopoulos, Marie; Willson, C. Grant

    2003-06-01

    As feature dimensions shrink, line edge roughness has become an increasing concern in semiconductor fabrication. There are numerous potential contributors to line edge roughness throughout the lithographic process and any measured roughness value on a printed device feature is, like the feature itself, a convolved function of every processing step. When the full lithographic process is used to study line edge roughness, it can be difficult to isolate the contribution to final roughness from any individual processing step or factor. To gain a more fundamental understanding of roughness generation that is specifically related to photoresist chemistry and formulation it is necessary to design experiments that separate out exposure related issues like mask dimension variation or local dose variation ("shot noise"). This can be accomplished using previously reported experimental protocols for bilayer film stack creation. The bilayer experimental approach has been used to study the effect of variations in such factors as post exposure bake time, photoacid generator loading, and developer concentration on roughness generation. Surface roughness of the developed film stacks is measured via atomic force microscopy. Surface roughness of developed bilayer film stacks may be considered analogous to sidewall roughness of printed features. An acrylate-based 193nm photoresist resin and an APEX-type resin are used in these experiments. In addition to experimental results, results from mesoscale lithographic simulations are used to gain further insight into diffusion induced roughness and how roughness in the latent image is modified during the development step.

  3. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  4. Single Mode Lasing from Hybrid Hemispherical Microresonators

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Van Duong Ta; Sun, Han Dong

    2012-01-01

    Enormous attention has been paid to optical microresonators which hold a great promise for microlasers as well as fundamental studies in cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we demonstrate a three-dimensional (3D) hybrid microresonator combining self-assembled hemispherical structure with a planar reflector. By incorporating dye molecules into the hemisphere, optically pumped lasing phenomenon is observed at room temperature. We have studied the lasing behaviors with different cavity sizes, and particularly single longitudinal mode lasing from hemispheres with diameter ∼15 μm is achieved. Detailed characterizations indicate that the lasing modes shift under varying pump densities, which can be well-explained by frequency shift and mode hopping. This work provides a versatile approach for 3D confined microresonators and opens an opportunity to realize tunable single mode microlasers. PMID:22540027

  5. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.; Picotto, G. B.; Matus, M.; Carcedo, L.; Hemming, B.; Ganioglu, O.; De Chiffre, L.; Saraiva, F.; Bergstrand, S.; Zelenika, S.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Tsai, C.-L.; Shihua, W.; Kruger, O.; de Souza, M. M.; Salgado, J. A.; Ramotowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisations. Five surface texture standards of different type were circulated and on each of the standards several roughness parameters according to the standard ISO 4287 had to be determined. 32 out of 395 individual results were not consistent with the reference value. After some corrective actions the number of inconsistent results could be reduced to 20, which correspond to about 5% of the total and can statistically be expected. In addition to the material standards, two softgauges were circulated, which allow to test the software of the instruments used in the comparison. The comparison results help to support the calibraton and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  6. Characterization of Ice Roughness From Simulated Icing Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Shin, Jaiwon

    1997-01-01

    Detailed measurements of the size of roughness elements on ice accreted on models in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) were made in a previous study. Only limited data from that study have been published, but included were the roughness element height, diameter and spacing. In the present study, the height and spacing data were found to correlate with the element diameter, and the diameter was found to be a function primarily of the non-dimensional parameters freezing fraction and accumulation parameter. The width of the smooth zone which forms at the leading edge of the model was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. Although preliminary, the success of these correlations suggests that it may be possible to develop simple relationships between ice roughness and icing conditions for use in ice-accretion-prediction codes. These codes now require an ice-roughness estimate to determine convective heat transfer. Studies using a 7.6-cm-diameter cylinder and a 53.3-cm-chord NACA 0012 airfoil were also performed in which a 1/2-min icing spray at an initial set of conditions was followed by a 9-1/2-min spray at a second set of conditions. The resulting ice shape was compared with that from a full 10-min spray at the second set of conditions. The initial ice accumulation appeared to have no effect on the final ice shape. From this result, it would appear the accreting ice is affected very little by the initial roughness or shape features.

  7. Right hemisphere grey matter structure and language outcomes in chronic left hemisphere stroke.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shihui; Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Jiang, Xiong; Harris-Love, Michelle L; Zeng, Jinsheng; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying recovery of language after left hemisphere stroke remain elusive. Although older evidence suggested that right hemisphere language homologues compensate for damage in left hemisphere language areas, the current prevailing theory suggests that right hemisphere engagement is ineffective or even maladaptive. Using a novel combination of support vector regression-based lesion-symptom mapping and voxel-based morphometry, we aimed to determine whether local grey matter volume in the right hemisphere independently contributes to aphasia outcomes after chronic left hemisphere stroke. Thirty-two left hemisphere stroke survivors with aphasia underwent language assessment with the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised and tests of other cognitive domains. High-resolution T1-weighted images were obtained in aphasia patients and 30 demographically matched healthy controls. Support vector regression-based multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to identify critical language areas in the left hemisphere and then to quantify each stroke survivor's lesion burden in these areas. After controlling for these direct effects of the stroke on language, voxel-based morphometry was then used to determine whether local grey matter volumes in the right hemisphere explained additional variance in language outcomes. In brain areas in which grey matter volumes related to language outcomes, we then compared grey matter volumes in patients and healthy controls to assess post-stroke plasticity. Lesion-symptom mapping showed that specific left hemisphere regions related to different language abilities. After controlling for lesion burden in these areas, lesion size, and demographic factors, grey matter volumes in parts of the right temporoparietal cortex positively related to spontaneous speech, naming, and repetition scores. Examining whether domain general cognitive functions might explain these relationships, partial correlations demonstrated that grey matter

  8. Effective lifetime of NOx produced by energetic particle precipitation in the winter hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonius Marszalek, Markus; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Hibbins, Robert; Ødegaard, Linn-Krisitine; Sandanger, Marit; Stadsnes, Johan

    2015-04-01

    Energetic particle precipitation (EPP) into the atmosphere impacts the chemical composition in the middle atmosphere. However, the EPP effects are not restrained to the area it is produced, but will be transported both horizontally and vertically by the background winds and waves. To address the aspect of horizontal transport we use the simple empirical horizontal wind model, HWM07, to trace the approximate trajectories the air parcels take around the polar region. We limit our focus to the winter hemisphere. We parameterize the NOx production based on the energy deposition estimated from particle measurements on the NOAA Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES). We estimate the evolution of the EPP-produced NOx taking into consideration sunlight exposure. The results give a rough estimate of the lifetime of NOx produced during a precipitation event and its hemispherical distribution in the aftermath of an event compared to its local production.

  9. Influence of wall roughness on the hydrodynamics in a circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Grace, J.R.; Brereton, C.H.M.; Lim, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    Many efforts have been made to explore the particle and gas behavior in circulating fluidized beds during the last decade. Glicksman et al. (1991) reported that protrusions as small as one particle diameter may cause a change in the voidage of a circulating fluidized bed. Since the walls of CFB combustors and other commercial CFB reactors can be quite rough, with roughness elements sometimes several times the mean particle diameter, the roughness could have a significant influence on the hydrodynamics, affecting mixing, gas-solid contacting, and heat and mass transfer in circulating fluidized-bed processes. It is therefore important to explore the influence of wall roughness on riser hydrodynamics. No other previous work has been reported on this topic. Here, the influence of wall roughness on CFB hydrodynamics is identified by comparing the experimental results from a riser with rough walls with those from the same riser having smooth surfaces.

  10. Effect of nanoscale patterned interfacial roughness on interfacial toughness.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mook, William M.; Kennedy, Marian S.; Bahr, David F.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2007-09-01

    The performance and the reliability of many devices are controlled by interfaces between thin films. In this study we investigated the use of patterned, nanoscale interfacial roughness as a way to increase the apparent interfacial toughness of brittle, thin-film material systems. The experimental portion of the study measured the interfacial toughness of a number of interfaces with nanoscale roughness. This included a silicon interface with a rectangular-toothed pattern of 60-nm wide by 90-nm deep channels fabricated using nanoimprint lithography techniques. Detailed finite element simulations were used to investigate the nature of interfacial crack growth when the interface is patterned. These simulations examined how geometric and material parameter choices affect the apparent toughness. Atomistic simulations were also performed with the aim of identifying possible modifications to the interfacial separation models currently used in nanoscale, finite element fracture analyses. The fundamental nature of atomistic traction separation for mixed mode loadings was investigated.