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Sample records for hemodynamic purposes oxymetry

  1. Hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Secomb, Timothy W

    2016-04-01

    A review is presented of the physical principles governing the distribution of blood flow and blood pressure in the vascular system. The main factors involved are the pulsatile driving pressure generated by the heart, the flow characteristics of blood, and the geometric structure and mechanical properties of the vessels. The relationship between driving pressure and flow in a given vessel can be understood by considering the viscous and inertial forces acting on the blood. Depending on the vessel diameter and other physical parameters, a wide variety of flow phenomena can occur. In large arteries, the propagation of the pressure pulse depends on the elastic properties of the artery walls. In the microcirculation, the fact that blood is a suspension of cells strongly influences its flow properties and leads to a nonuniform distribution of hematocrit among microvessels. The forces acting on vessel walls include shear stress resulting from blood flow and circumferential stress resulting from blood pressure. Biological responses to these forces are important in the control of blood flow and the structural remodeling of vessels, and also play a role in major disease processes including hypertension and atherosclerosis. Consideration of hemodynamics is essential for a comprehensive understanding of the functioning of the circulatory system. PMID:27065172

  2. Portable instrument for in-vivo infrared oxymetry using spread-spectrum modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisan, S.; Bavera, M.; Giardini, M. E.

    2007-04-01

    Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) can be employed to monitor noninvasively and continuously local changes in hemodynamics and oxygenation of human tissues. A portable NIRS research-grade acquisition system, dedicated to measurements during muscular exercise, is presented. The instrument is able to control up to eight LED sources and two detectors. A digital correlation technique, implemented on a single-chip RISC microcontroller, performs source-to-detector multiplexing. Such algorithm is highly optimized for computational efficiency and ambient noise rejection. Software-configurable input stages allow for flexibility in instrument setup. As a result of the specific correlation technique employed, the instrument is compact, lightweight and efficient. Clinical tests on oxygen consumption show excellent performance.

  3. Noninvasive estimation of oxygen consumption in human calf muscle through combined NMR measurements of ASL perfusion and T₂ oxymetry.

    PubMed

    Decorte, Nicolas; Buehler, Tania; Caldas de Almeida Araujo, Ericky; Vignaud, Alexandre; Carlier, Pierre G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring muscle O2 consumption (V˙O2) noninvasively with a combination of functional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging methods, and to verify that changes in muscle V˙O2 can be detected with a temporal resolution compatible with physiological investigation and patient ease. T2-based oxymetry of arterial and venous blood was combined with the arterial-spin labeling (ASL)-based determination of muscle perfusion. These measurements were performed on 8 healthy volunteers under normoxic and hypoxic conditions in order to assess the sensitivity of measurements over a range of saturation values. Blood samples were drawn simultaneously and used to titrate blood T2 measurements versus hemoglobin O2 saturation (%HbO2) in vitro. The in vitro calibration curve of blood T2 fitted very well with the %HbO2 (r(2): 0.95). The in vivo venous T2 measurements agreed well with the in vitro measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.61-0.91). Oxygen extraction at rest decreased in the calf muscles subjected to hypoxia (p = 0.031). The combination of unaltered muscle perfusion and pinched arteriovenous O2 difference (p = 0.038) pointed towards a reduced calf muscle V˙O2 during transient hypoxia (p = 0.018). The results of this pilot study confirmed that muscle O2 extraction and V˙O2 can be estimated noninvasively using a combination of functional NMR techniques. Further studies are needed to confirm the usefulness in a larger sample of volunteers and patients. PMID:25531648

  4. Invasive hemodynamics of constrictive pericarditis

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Shrenik; Ramakrishnan, Sivasubramanian; Gupta, Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac catheterization and hemodynamic study is the gold standard for the diagnosis of pericardial constriction. Careful interpretation of the hemodynamic data is essential to differentiate it from other diseases with restrictive physiology. In this hemodynamic review we shall briefly discuss the physiologic basis of various hemodynamic changes seen in a patient with constrictive pericarditis. PMID:26071303

  5. Functional hemodynamic monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R; Payen, Didier

    2005-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a central component of intensive care. Patterns of hemodynamic variables often suggest cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, or distributive (septic) etiologies to cardiovascular insufficiency, thus defining the specific treatments required. Monitoring increases in invasiveness, as required, as the risk for cardiovascular instability-induced morbidity increases because of the need to define more accurately the diagnosis and monitor the response to therapy. Monitoring is also context specific: requirements during cardiac surgery will be different from those in the intensive care unit or emergency department. Solitary hemodynamic values are useful as threshold monitors (e.g. hypotension is always pathological, central venous pressure is only elevated in disease). Some hemodynamic values can only be interpreted relative to metabolic demand, whereas others have multiple meanings. Functional hemodynamic monitoring implies a therapeutic application, independent of diagnosis such as a therapeutic trial of fluid challenge to assess preload responsiveness. Newer methods for assessing preload responsiveness include monitoring changes in central venous pressure during spontaneous inspiration, and variations in arterial pulse pressure, systolic pressure, and aortic flow variation in response to vena caval collapse during positive pressure ventilation or passive leg raising. Defining preload responsiveness using these functional measures, coupled to treatment protocols, can improve outcome from critical illness. Potentially, as these and newer, less invasive hemodynamic measures are validated, they could be incorporated into such protocolized care in a cost-effective manner. PMID:16356240

  6. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan Raul

    2009-01-01

    The initiation and progression of cerebral aneurysms are degenerative processes of the arterial wall driven by a complex interaction of biological and hemodynamic factors. Endothelial cells on the artery wall respond physiologically to blood-flow patterns. In normal conditions, these responses are associated with nonpathological tissue remodeling and adaptation. The combination of abnormal blood patterns and genetics predisposition could lead to the pathological formation of aneurysms. Here, we review recent progress on the basic mechanisms of aneurysm formation and evolution, with a focus on the role of hemodynamic patterns. PMID:19784385

  7. Hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations.

    PubMed

    Soma, Ryoko; Moriyama, Muka; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamics of focal choroidal excavations (FCEs). Four eyes of four patients with a FCE were studied. Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG), optical coherence tomography (OCT), and multi-focal electroretinography (mfERG) were performed to investigate the choroidal hemodynamics and the morphological and functional changes. The mean depth of the FCE determined by OCT was 222.5 ± 49.5 μm with a range of 164-272 μm. In one case, subretinal fluid was observed in the excavation, and in three cases, subretinal fluid was not observed. ICGA showed hypofluorescence, and laser flowgraphy (LSFG) showed decreased choroidal blood flow at the excavation in all cases. Three cases were symptomatic, and the amplitudes of the mfERGs were reduced. FCEs cause a decrease of choroidal blood flow. In three of four cases, the mfERGs were depressed over the FCEs leading to symptoms. PMID:25626897

  8. Hemodynamics in fetal arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Acharya, Ganesh

    2016-06-01

    Fetal arrhythmias are among the few conditions that can be managed in utero. However, accurate diagnosis is essential for appropriate management. Ultrasound-based imaging methods can be used to study fetal heart structure and function noninvasively and help to understand fetal cardiovascular pathophysiology, and they remain the mainstay of evaluating fetuses with arrhythmias in clinical settings. Hemodynamic evaluation using Doppler echocardiography allows the elucidation of the electrophysiological mechanism and helps to make an accurate diagnosis. It can also be used as a tool to understand fetal cardiac pathophysiology, for assessing fetal condition and monitoring the effect of antiarrhythmic treatment. This narrative review describes Doppler techniques that are useful for evaluating fetal cardiac rhythms to refine diagnosis and provides an overview of hemodynamic changes observed in different types of fetal arrhythmia. PMID:26660845

  9. Functional Hemodynamic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic monitoring is the assessment of the dynamic interactions of hemodynamic variables in response to a defined perturbation. Dynamic tissue O2 saturation (StO2) responses to complete stop flow conditions (vascular occlusion test), which can be created by measuring hand StO2 and occluding flow with a blood pressure cuff, assesses cardiovascular sufficiency and microcirculatory blood flow distribution. Recent interest in functional hemodynamic monitoring for the bedside assessment of cardiovascular insufficiency has heightened with the documentation of its accuracy in predicting volume responsiveness using a wide variety of monitoring devices both invasive and non-invasive and across multiple patient groups and clinical conditions. Accordingly, fluid responsiveness can be predicted in a quantities fashion by measuring as arterial pulse pressure variation, left ventricular stroke volume variation or their surrogates during positive pressure breathing or the change in cardiac output response to a passive leg raising maneuver. However, volume responsiveness, though important, reflects only part of the overall spectrum of functional physiological variables that can be measured to define physiologic state and monitor response to therapy. PMID:25435480

  10. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Magder, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Although invasive hemodynamic monitoring requires considerable skill, studies have shown a striking lack of knowledge of the measurements obtained with the pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). This article reviews monitoring using a PAC. Issues addressed include basic physiology that determines cardiac output and blood pressure; methodology in the measurement of data obtained from a PAC; use of the PAC in making a diagnosis and for patient management, with emphasis on a responsive approach to management; and uses of the PAC that are not indications by themselves for placing the catheter, but can provide useful information when a PAC is in place. PMID:25435479

  11. Influence of Parent Artery Segmentation and Boundary Conditions on Hemodynamic Characteristics of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yufeng; Oh, Je Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of segmentation of the upstream and downstream parent artery and hemodynamic boundary conditions (BCs) on the evaluated hemodynamic factors for the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of intracranial aneurysms. Materials and Methods Three dimensional patient-specific aneurysm models were analyzed by applying various combinations of inlet and outlet BCs. Hemodynamic factors such as velocity pattern, streamline, wall shear stress, and oscillatory shear index at the systolic time were visualized and compared among the different cases. Results Hemodynamic factors were significantly affected by the inlet BCs while there was little influence of the outlet BCs. When the inlet length was relatively short, different inlet BCs showed different hemodynamic factors and the calculated hemodynamic factors were also dependent on the inlet length. However, when the inlet length (L) was long enough (L>20D, where D is the diameter of inlet section), the hemodynamic factors became similar regardless of the inlet BCs and lengths. The error due to different inlet BCs was negligible. The effect of the outlet length on the hemodynamic factors was similar to that of the inlet length. Conclusion Simulated hemodynamic factors are highly sensitive to inlet BCs and upstream parent artery segmentation. The results of this work can provide an insight into how to build models and to apply BCs for more accurate estimation of hemodynamic factors from CFD simulations of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:26256976

  12. Hemodynamic monitoring devices: putting it all together.

    PubMed

    Naik, Bhiken I; Durieux, Marcel E

    2014-12-01

    Perioperative hemodynamic optimization of the high-risk surgical patient is associated with reduced postoperative morbidity and mortality. The hemodynamic parameters to be optimized (using goal-directed algorithms) encompass preload, contractility, afterload, volume responsiveness, and end-organ perfusion. Current hemodynamic monitors facilitate multi-modal monitoring of these macro-hemodynamic targets. This review focuses on the variety of invasive, minimally invasive, and noninvasive hemodynamic monitors available to the clinician. PMID:25480776

  13. Intensity of daily physical activity is associated with central hemodynamic and leg muscle oxygen availability in COPD.

    PubMed

    Louvaris, Zafeiris; Kortianou, Eleni A; Spetsioti, Stavroula; Vasilopoulou, Maroula; Nasis, Ioannis; Asimakos, Andreas; Zakynthinos, Spyros; Vogiatzis, Ioannis

    2013-09-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), daily physical activity is reported to be adversely associated with the magnitude of exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation and peripheral muscle weakness. There is limited evidence whether central hemodynamic, oxygen transport, and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities also contribute to reduced daily physical activity. Nineteen patients with COPD (FEV1, 48 ± 14% predicted) underwent a treadmill walking test at a speed corresponding to the individual patient's mean walking intensity, captured by a triaxial accelerometer during a preceding 7-day period. During the indoor treadmill test, the individual patient mean walking intensity (range, 1.5 to 2.3 m/s2) was significantly correlated with changes from baseline in cardiac output recorded by impedance cardiography (range, 1.2 to 4.2 L/min; r = 0.73), systemic vascular conductance (range, 7.9 to 33.7 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1); r = 0.77), systemic oxygen delivery estimated from cardiac output and arterial pulse-oxymetry saturation (range, 0.15 to 0.99 L/min; r = 0.70), arterio-venous oxygen content difference calculated from oxygen uptake and cardiac output (range, 3.7 to 11.8 mlO2/100 ml; r = -0.73), and quadriceps muscle fractional oxygen saturation assessed by near-infrared spectrometry (range, -6 to 23%; r = 0.77). In addition, mean walking intensity significantly correlated with the quadriceps muscle force adjusted for body weight (range, 0.28 to 0.60; r = 0.74) and the ratio of minute ventilation over maximal voluntary ventilation (range, 38 to 89%, r = -0.58). In COPD, in addition to ventilatory limitations and peripheral muscle weakness, intensity of daily physical activity is associated with both central hemodynamic and peripheral muscle oxygenation capacities regulating the adequacy of matching peripheral muscle oxygen availability by systemic oxygen transport. PMID:23845982

  14. Upper extremity hemodynamics and sensation with backpack loads.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Neuschwander, Timothy B; Macias, Brandon R; Bachman, Larry; Hargens, Alan R

    2014-05-01

    Heavy backpacks are often used in extreme environments, for example by military during combat, therefore completion of tasks quickly and efficiently is of operational relevance. The purpose of this study was to quantify hemodynamic parameters (brachial artery Doppler and microvascular flow by photoplethysmography; tissue oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy; arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter) and sensation in upper extremities and hands (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and 2-point discrimination test) while wearing a loaded backpack (12 kg) in healthy adults for 10 min. All values were compared to baseline before wearing a backpack. Moderate weight loaded backpack loads significantly decreased upper extremity sensation as well as all macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamic values. Decreased macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamics may produce neurological dysfunction and consequently, probably affect fine motor control of the hands. PMID:24075289

  15. Lagrangian postprocessing of computational hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Arzani, Amirhossein

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in imaging, modeling and computing have rapidly expanded our capabilities to model hemodynamics in the large vessels (heart, arteries and veins). This data encodes a wealth of information that is often under-utilized. Modeling (and measuring) blood flow in the large vessels typically amounts to solving for the time-varying velocity field in a region of interest. Flow in the heart and larger arteries is often complex, and velocity field data provides a starting point for investigating the hemodynamics. This data can be used to perform Lagrangian particle tracking, and other Lagrangian-based postprocessing. As described herein, Lagrangian methods are necessary to understand inherently transient hemodynamic conditions from the fluid mechanics perspective, and to properly understand the biomechanical factors that lead to acute and gradual changes of vascular function and health. The goal of the present paper is to review Lagrangian methods that have been used in post-processing velocity data of cardiovascular flows. PMID:25059889

  16. Hemodynamics of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    PubMed

    Burkhoff, Daniel; Sayer, Gabriel; Doshi, Darshan; Uriel, Nir

    2015-12-15

    An increasing number of devices can provide mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to patients with acute hemodynamic compromise and chronic end-stage heart failure. These devices work by different pumping mechanisms, have various flow capacities, are inserted by different techniques, and have different sites from which blood is withdrawn and returned to the body. These factors result in different primary hemodynamic effects and secondary responses of the body. However, these are not generally taken into account when choosing a device for a particular patient or while managing a patient undergoing MCS. In this review, we discuss fundamental principles of cardiac, vascular, and pump mechanics and illustrate how they provide a broad foundation for understanding the complex interactions between the heart, vasculature, and device, and how they may help guide future research to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26670067

  17. Hemodynamic Intervention of Cerebral Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui

    2005-11-01

    Cerebral aneurysm is a pathological vascular response to hemodynamic stimuli. Endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms essentially alters the blood flow to stop them from continued growth and eventual rupture. Compared to surgical clipping, endovascular methods are minimally invasive and hence rapidly gaining popularity. However, they are not always effective with risks of aneurysm regrowth and various complications. We aim at developing a Virtual Intervention (VI) platform that allows: patient-specific flow calculation and risk prediction as well as recommendation of tailored intervention based on quantitative analysis. This is a lofty goal requiring advancement in three areas of research: (1). Advancement of image-based CFD; (2) Understanding the biological/pathological responses of tissue to hemodynamic factors in the context of cerebral aneurysms; and (3) Capability of designing and testing patient-specific endovascular devices. We have established CFD methodologies based on anatomical geometry obtained from 3D angiographic or CT images. To study the effect of hemodynamics on aneurysm development, we have created a canine model of a vascular bifurcation anastomosis to provide the hemodynamic environment similar to those in CA. Vascular remodeling was studied using histology and compared against the flow fields obtained from CFD. It was found that an intimal pad, similar to those frequently seen clinically, developed at the flow impingement site, bordering with an area of `groove' characteristic of an early stage of aneurysm, where the micro environment exhibits an elevated wall shear stresses. To further address the molecular mechanisms of the flow-mediated aneurysm pathology, we are also developing in vitro cell culture systems to complement the in vivo study. Our current effort in endovascular device development focuses on novel stents that alters the aneurysmal flow to promote thrombotic occlusion as well as favorable remodeling. Realization of an

  18. Spatiotemporal hemodynamic response functions derived from physiology.

    PubMed

    Aquino, K M; Robinson, P A; Drysdale, P M

    2014-04-21

    Probing neural activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) relies upon understanding the hemodynamic response to changes in neural activity. Although existing studies have extensively characterized the temporal hemodynamic response, less is understood about the spatial and spatiotemporal hemodynamic responses. This study systematically characterizes the spatiotemporal response by deriving the hemodynamic response due to a short localized neural drive, i.e., the spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function (stHRF) from a physiological model of hemodynamics based on a poroelastic model of cortical tissue. In this study, the model's boundary conditions are clarified and a resulting nonlinear hemodynamic wave equation is derived. From this wave equation, damped linear hemodynamic waves are predicted from the stHRF. The main features of these waves depend on two physiological parameters: wave propagation speed, which depends on mean cortical stiffness, and damping which depends on effective viscosity. Some of these predictions were applied and validated in a companion study (Aquino et al., 2012). The advantages of having such a theory for the stHRF include improving the interpretation of spatiotemporal dynamics in fMRI data; improving estimates of neural activity with fMRI spatiotemporal deconvolution; and enabling wave interactions between hemodynamic waves to be predicted and exploited to improve the signal to noise ratio of fMRI. PMID:24398024

  19. Comparing hemodynamic models with DCM

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Klaas Enno; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Drysdale, Peter M.; Robinson, Peter A.; Friston, Karl J.

    2007-01-01

    The classical model of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses by Buxton et al. [Buxton, R.B., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., 1998. Dynamics of blood flow and oxygenation changes during brain activation: the Balloon model. Magn. Reson. Med. 39, 855–864] has been very important in providing a biophysically plausible framework for explaining different aspects of hemodynamic responses. It also plays an important role in the hemodynamic forward model for dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of fMRI data. A recent study by Obata et al. [Obata, T., Liu, T.T., Miller, K.L., Luh, W.M., Wong, E.C., Frank, L.R., Buxton, R.B., 2004. Discrepancies between BOLD and flow dynamics in primary and supplementary motor areas: application of the Balloon model to the interpretation of BOLD transients. NeuroImage 21, 144–153] linearized the BOLD signal equation and suggested a revised form for the model coefficients. In this paper, we show that the classical and revised models are special cases of a generalized model. The BOLD signal equation of this generalized model can be reduced to that of the classical Buxton model by simplifying the coefficients or can be linearized to give the Obata model. Given the importance of hemodynamic models for investigating BOLD responses and analyses of effective connectivity with DCM, the question arises which formulation is the best model for empirically measured BOLD responses. In this article, we address this question by embedding different variants of the BOLD signal equation in a well-established DCM of functional interactions among visual areas. This allows us to compare the ensuing models using Bayesian model selection. Our model comparison approach had a factorial structure, comparing eight different hemodynamic models based on (i) classical vs. revised forms for the coefficients, (ii) linear vs. non-linear output equations, and (iii) fixed vs. free parameters, ε, for region-specific ratios of intra- and extravascular signals. Using fMRI data

  20. Hemodynamic instability following intentional nadolol overdose.

    PubMed

    Ehgartner, G R; Zelinka, M A

    1988-04-01

    Hemodynamic compromise developed following intentional overdose with nadolol in a 57-year-old woman. Nadolol is a nonselective beta-adrenergic blocking agent. Intravenous infusion of glucagon hydrochloride was effective in restoring hemodynamic stability after intravenous fluid loading and catecholamine infusions had failed. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of nadolol overdose. PMID:3355299

  1. Morphological and Hemodynamic Analysis of Mirror Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Wu, Yongfa; Jiang, Che; Wang, Shengzhang; Huang, Qinghai; Liu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hemodynamic factors are commonly believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis, progression, and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. In this study, we aimed to identify significant hemodynamic and morphological parameters that discriminate intracranial aneurysm rupture status using 3-dimensional-angiography and computational fluid dynamics technology. Materials and Methods 3D-DSA was performed in 8 patients with mirror posterior communicating artery aneurysms (Pcom-MANs). Each pair was divided into ruptured and unruptured groups. Five morphological and three hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for significance with respect to rupture. Results The normalized mean wall shear stress (WSS) of the aneurysm sac in the ruptured group was significantly lower than that in the unruptured group (0.52±0.20 versus 0.81±0.21, P = .012). The percentage of the low WSS area in the ruptured group was higher than that in the unruptured group (4.11±4.66% versus 0.02±0.06%, P = .018). The AR was 1.04±0.21 in the ruptured group, which was significantly higher than 0.70±0.17 in the unruptured group (P = .012). By contrast, parameters that had no significant differences between the two groups were OSI (P = .674), aneurysm size (P = .327), size ratio (P = .779), vessel angle (P = 1.000) and aneurysm inclination angle (P = 1.000). Conclusions Pcom-MANs may be a useful disease model to investigate possible causes of aneurysm rupture. The ruptured aneurysms manifested lower WSS, higher percentage of low WSS area, and higher AR, compared with the unruptured one. And hemodynamics is as important as morphology in discriminating aneurysm rupture status. PMID:23383184

  2. Hemodynamics of a hydrodynamic injection

    PubMed Central

    Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Yokoo, Takeshi; Suda, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Kamimura, Kenya; Liu, Dexi

    2014-01-01

    The hemodynamics during a hydrodynamic injection were evaluated using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and fluoroscopic imaging. The impacts of hydrodynamic (5 seconds) and slow (60 seconds) injections into the tail veins of mice were compared using 9% body weight of a phase-contrast medium. Hydrodynamically injected solution traveled to the heart and drew back to the hepatic veins (HV), which led to liver expansion and a trace amount of spillover into the portal vein (PV). The liver volumes peaked at 165.6 ± 13.3% and 165.5 ± 11.9% of the original liver volumes in the hydrodynamic and slow injections, respectively. Judging by the intensity of the CBCT images at the PV, HV, right atrium, liver parenchyma (LP), and the inferior vena cava (IVC) distal to the HV conjunction, the slow injection resulted in the higher intensity at PV than at LP. In contrast, a significantly higher intensity was observed in LP after hydrodynamic injection in comparison with that of PV, suggesting that the liver took up the iodine from the blood flow. These results suggest that the enlargement speed of the liver, rather than the expanded volume, primarily determines the efficiency of hydrodynamic delivery to the liver. PMID:26015971

  3. Hemodynamics driven cardiac valve morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Steed, Emily; Boselli, Francesco; Vermot, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical forces are instrumental to cardiovascular development and physiology. The heart beats approximately 2.6 billion times in a human lifetime and heart valves ensure that these contractions result in an efficient, unidirectional flow of the blood. Composed of endocardial cells (EdCs) and extracellular matrix (ECM), cardiac valves are among the most mechanically challenged structures of the body both during and after their development. Understanding how hemodynamic forces modulate cardiovascular function and morphogenesis is key to unraveling the relationship between normal and pathological cardiovascular development and physiology. Most valve diseases have their origins in embryogenesis, either as signs of abnormal developmental processes or the aberrant re-expression of fetal gene programs normally quiescent in adulthood. Here we review recent discoveries in the mechanobiology of cardiac valve development and introduce the latest technologies being developed in the zebrafish, including live cell imaging and optical technologies, as well as modeling approaches that are currently transforming this field. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26608609

  4. Hemodynamic Responses Associated with Post-exercise Hypotension in Normotensive Black Males.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Samuel A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the hemodynamic responses during recovery from moderate intensity exercise in young Black normotensive males. Nineteen normotensive men (age 24-26 years) walked continuously on a treadmill for 40 minutes at 50-60 percent heart rate reserve. Following exercise, blood pressure (by auscultation) and…

  5. Hormones and Hemodynamics in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Tkachenko, Oleksandra; Shchekochikhin, Dmitry; Schrier, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Normal pregnancy is associated with sodium and water retention, which results in plasma volume expansion prior to placental implantation. The explanation offered for these events is that pregnancy ‘resets’ both volume and osmoreceptors. Evidence Acquisition: The mechanisms for such an enigmatic ‘resetting’ in pregnancy have not previously been explained. However, recent human pregnancy studies have demonstrated that the earliest hemodynamic change in pregnancy is primary systemic arterial vasodilation. This arterial underfilling is associated with a secondary increase in cardiac output and activation of the neurohumoral axis, including stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone, sympathetic, and non-osmotic vasopressin systems. Resistance to the pressor effects of angiotensin and sympathetic stimulation in pregnancy is compatible with an increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. Results: In contrast to the sodium and water retention which occur secondary to the primary arterial vasodilation in cirrhosis, glomerular filtration and renal blood flow are significantly increased in normal pregnancy. A possible explanation for this difference in arterial vasodilation states is that relaxin, an arterial vasodilator which increases during pregnancy, has a potent effect on both systemic and renal circulation. Endothelial damage in pregnancy is pivotal in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia in pregnancy. Conclusions: Against a background of the primary arterial vasodilation hypothesis, it is obvious that reversal of the systemic vasodilatation in pregnancy, without subsequent activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (78), will evoke a reversal of all the links in the chain of events in normal pregnancy adaptation, thus, it may cause preeclampsia. Namely, a decrease of renal vasodilation will decrease glomerular filtration rate. PMID:24803942

  6. Hemodynamics in stented vertebral artery ostial stenosis based on computational fluid dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Aike; Dai, Xuan; Niu, Jing; Jiao, Liqun

    2016-08-01

    Hemodynamic factors may affect the potential occurrence of in-stent restenosis (ISR) after intervention procedure of vertebral artery ostial stenosis (VAOS). The purpose of the present study is to investigate the influence of stent protrusion length in implantation strategy on the local hemodynamics of the VAOS. CTA images of a 58-year-old female patient with posterior circulation transient ischemic attack were used to perform a 3D reconstruction of the vertebral artery. Five models of the vertebral artery before and after the stent implantation were established. Model 1 was without stent implantation, Model 2-5 was with stent protruding into the subclavian artery for 0, 1, 2, 3 mm, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics simulations based on finite element analysis were employed to mimic the blood flow in arteries and to assess hemodynamic conditions, particularly the blood flow velocity and wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS and the blood flow velocity at the vertebral artery ostium were reduced by 85.33 and 35.36% respectively after stents implantation. The phenomenon of helical flow disappeared. Hemodynamics comparison showed that stent struts that protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery induced the least decrease in blood speed and WSS. The results suggest that stent implantation can improve the hemodynamics of VAOS, while stent struts that had protruded 1 mm into the subclavian artery would result in less thrombogenesis and neointimal hyperplasia and most likely decrease the risk of ISR. PMID:26691981

  7. Hemodynamic studies of the legs under weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Significant among the medical findings following prolonged space flight are reduced orthostatic tolerance and ergometric work capacity. Changes in hemodynamics of the legs with increased blood pooling and reduction in cardiac output must be considered one of the most probable causes of these effects. Concern for the above plus the observed marked tissue changes occurring in the legs during flight prompted the addition of several procedures to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the leg; resting arterial blood flow, venous compliance and muscle pumping were investigated. In so far as possible, the initial reaction to pressure in the smallest possible vein segment was examined.

  8. Computational study of anterior communicating artery hemodynamics before aneurysm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2012-03-01

    It is widely accepted that complexity in the flow pattern at the anterior communicating artery (AComA) is associated with the high rate of aneurysm formation in that location observed in large studies. A previous computational hemodynamic study showed a possible association between high maximum intraaneurysmal wall shear stress (WSS) at the systolic peak with rupture in a cohort of AComA aneurysms. In another study it was observed a connection between location of aneurysm blebs and regions of high WSS in models where blebs were virtually removed. However, others reported associations between low WSS and either rupture or blister formation. The purpose of this work is to study associations between hemodynamic patterns and AComA aneurysm initiation by comparing hemodynamics in the aneurysm and the normal model where the aneurysm was computationally removed. Vascular models of both right and left circulation were independently reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography images using deformable models, and fused using a surface merging algorithm. The geometric models were then used to generate high-quality volumetric finite element grids of tetrahedra with an advancing front technique. For each patient, the second anatomical model was created by digitally removing the aneurysm. It was iteratively achieved by applying a Laplacian smoothing filter and remeshing the surface. Finite element blood flow numerical simulations were performed. It was observed that aneurysms initiated in regions of high and moderate WSS in the counterpart normal models. Adjacent or close to those regions, low WSS portions of the arterial wall were not affected by the disease.

  9. Current and Potential Therapeutic Strategies for Hemodynamic Cardiorenal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Obi, Yoshitsugu; Kim, Taehee; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Amin, Alpesh N.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) encompasses conditions in which cardiac and renal disorders co-exist and are pathophysiologically related. The newest classification of CRS into seven etiologically and clinically distinct types for direct patient management purposes includes hemodynamic, uremic, vascular, neurohumoral, anemia- and/or iron metabolism-related, mineral metabolism-related and protein-energy wasting-related CRS. This classification also emphasizes the pathophysiologic pathways. The leading CRS category remains hemodynamic CRS, which is the most commonly encountered type in patient care settings and in which acute or chronic heart failure leads to renal impairment. Summary This review focuses on selected therapeutic strategies for the clinical management of hemodynamic CRS. This is often characterized by an exceptionally high ratio of serum urea to creatinine concentrations. Loop diuretics, positive inotropic agents including dopamine and dobutamine, vasopressin antagonists including vasopressin receptor antagonists such as tolvaptan, nesiritide and angiotensin-neprilysin inhibitors are among the pharmacologic agents used. Additional therapies include ultrafiltration (UF) via hemofiltration or dialysis. The beneficial versus unfavorable effects of these therapies on cardiac decongestion versus renal blood flow may act in opposite directions. Some of the most interesting options for the outpatient setting that deserve revisiting include portable continuous dobutamine infusion, peritoneal dialysis and outpatient UF via hemodialysis or hemofiltration. Key Messages The new clinically oriented CRS classification system is helpful in identifying therapeutic targets and offers a systematic approach to an optimal management algorithm with better understanding of etiologies. Most interventions including UF have not shown a favorable impact on outcomes. Outpatient portable dobutamine infusion is underutilized and not well studied. Revisiting traditional and

  10. Wall Mechanical Properties and Hemodynamics of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Duan, Xinjie; Chung, Bong Jae; Putman, Christopher; Aziz, Khaled; Robertson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamic conditions and the mechanical properties of the wall in human aneurysms. Methods A total of eight unruptured aneurysms were analyzed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed from pre-operative 3D rotational angiography images. The aneurysms were clipped and the domes were resected and mechanically tested to failure with a uniaxial testing system under multi-photon microscopy. Linear regression analysis was performed to explore possible correlations between hemodynamic quantities and the failure characteristics and stiffness of the wall. Results The ultimate strain was negatively correlated to aneurysm inflow rate (p=0.021), mean velocity (p=0.025), and mean wall shear stress (p=0.039). It was also negatively correlated to inflow concentration, oscillatory shear index and measures of the complexity and instability of the flow; however these trends did not reach statistical significance. The wall stiffness at high strains was positively correlated to inflow rate (p=0.014), mean velocity (p=0.008), inflow concentration (p=0.04), flow instability (p=0.006), flow complexity (p=0.019), wall shear stress (p=0.002) and oscillatory shear index (p=0.004). Conclusions In a study of 8 unruptured intracranial aneurysms, ultimate strain is negatively correlated with aneurysm inflow rate, mean velocity and mean wall shear stress. Wall stiffness is positively correlated with aneurysm inflow rate, mean velocity, wall shear stress, flow complexity and stability, and oscillatory shear index. These trends and the impact of hemodynamics on wall structure and mechanical properties should be further investigated in larger studies. PMID:26228891

  11. Human bulbar conjunctival hemodynamics in hemoglobin SS and SC disease

    PubMed Central

    Wanek, Justin; Gaynes, Bruce; Lim, Jennifer I.; Molokie, Robert; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2014-01-01

    The known biophysical variations of hemoglobin (Hb) S and Hb C may result in hemodynamic differences between subjects with SS and SC disease. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare conjunctival hemodynamics between subjects with Hb SS and SC hemoglobinopathies. Image sequences of the conjunctival microcirculation were acquired in 9 healthy control subjects (Hb AA), 24 subjects with SC disease, and 18 subjects with SS disease, using a prototype imaging system. Diameter (D) and blood velocity (V) measurements were obtained in multiple venules of each subject. Data were categorized according to venule caliber by averaging V and D for venules with diameters less than (vessel size 1) or greater than (vessel size 2) 15 µm. V in vessel size 2 was significantly greater than V in vessel size 1 in the AA and SS groups (P ≥ 0.009), but not in the SC group (P = 0.1). V was significantly lower in the SC group as compared to the SS group (P = 0.03). In AA and SS groups, V correlated with D (P ≥ 0.005), but the correlation was not statistically significant in the SC group (P = 0.08). V was inversely correlated with hematocrit in the SS group for large vessels (P = 0.03); however, no significant correlation was found in the SC group (P ≥ 0.2). Quantitative assessment of conjunctival microvascular hemodynamics in SS and SC disease may advance understanding of sickle cell disease pathophysiology and thereby improve therapeutic interventions. PMID:23657867

  12. Basic Perforator Flap Hemodynamic Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Youlun; Ding, Maochao; Wang, Aiguo; Zhuang, Yuehong; Chang, Shi-Min; Mei, Jin; Hallock, Geoffrey G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A mathematical model to help explain the hemodynamic characteristics of perforator flaps based on blood flow resistance systems within the flap will serve as a theoretical guide for the future study and clinical applications of these flaps. Methods: There are 3 major blood flow resistance network systems of a perforator flap. These were defined as the blood flow resistance of an anastomosis between artery and artery of adjacent perforasomes, between artery and vein within a perforasome, and then between vein and vein corresponding to the outflow of that perforasome. From this, a calculation could be made of the number of such blood flow resistance network systems that must be crossed for all perforasomes within a perforator flap to predict whether that arrangement would be viable. Results: The summation of blood flow resistance networks from each perforasome in a given perforator flap could predict which portions would likely survive. This mathematical model shows how this is directly dependent on the location of the vascular pedicle to the flap and whether supercharging or superdrainage maneuvers have been added. These configurations will give an estimate of the hemodynamic characteristics for the given flap design. Conclusions: This basic mathematical model can (1) conveniently determine the degree of difficulty for each perforasome within a perforator flap to survive; (2) semiquantitatively allow the calculation of basic hemodynamic parameters; and (3) allow the assessment of the pros and cons expected for each pattern of perforasomes encountered clinically based on predictable hemodynamic observations.

  13. [Minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring with esophageal echoDoppler].

    PubMed

    Monge, M I; Estella, A; Díaz, J C; Gil, A

    2008-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a key element in the care of the critical patients, providing an unquestionable aid in the attendance to diagnosis and the choice of the adequate treatment. Minimally invasive devices have been emerging over the past few years as an effective alternative to classic monitoring tools. The esophageal echoDoppler is among these. It makes it possible to obtain continuous and minimally invasive monitoring of the cardiac output in addition to other useful parameters by measuring the blood flow rate and the diameter of the thoracic descending aorta, which provides a sufficiently extensive view of the hemodynamic state of the patient and facilitates early detection of the changes produced by a sudden clinical derangement. Although several studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the esophageal Doppler in the surgical scene, there is scarce and dispersed evidence in the literature on its benefits in critical patients. Nevertheless, its advantages make it an attractive element to take into account within the diagnostic arsenal in the intensive care. The purpose of the following article is to describe how it works, its degree of validation with other monitoring methods and the role of esophageal echoDoppler as a minimally invasive monitoring tool for measuring cardiac output in the daily clinical practice, contributing with our own experience in the critical patient. PMID:18221711

  14. Quantitative Characterization of the Hemodynamic Environment in Ruptured and Unruptured Brain Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Weir, Jane; Putman, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Hemodynamics is thought to play an important role in the mechanisms of aneurysm pathogenesis, progression and rupture. The purpose of this study was to define quantitative measures related to qualitative flow characteristics previously analyzed and to investigate their relationship to aneurysm rupture. Methods The hemodynamic environments in 210 cerebral aneurysms were analyzed using image-based CFD under different flow conditions. Quantitative hemodynamic variables were defined and extracted from the simulation results. A statistical analysis of the relationship to the previous history of aneurysm rupture was performed, and the variability with flow conditions was assessed. Results Ruptured aneurysms were more likely to have larger inflow concentrations, larger maximum wall shear stress (WSS), larger shear concentrations and lower viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Areas under low WSS and measures of abnormally low shear force distributions of ruptured and unruptured aneurysms were not statistically different. Although the values of hemodynamic quantities changed with different flow conditions, the statistical differences or ratios between their mean values over the ruptured and unruptured groups were maintained, for both pulsatile and steady flows. Conclusions Concentrated inflow streams and WSS distributions with elevated levels of maximal WSS and low aneurysmal viscous dissipation are statistically associated with a clinical history of prior aneurysm rupture. In contrast, the area and total viscous shear force applied in the aneurysm region subjected to abnormally low WSS levels are not. This study highlights the potential for image-based CFD for investigating aneurysm evolution mechanisms and for clinical assessment of aneurysm risks. PMID:21127144

  15. Multi-scale modeling of hemodynamics in the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Liang, Fuyou; Wong, Jasmin; Fujiwara, Takashi; Ye, Wenjing; Tsubota, Ken-iti; Sugawara, Michiko

    2015-08-01

    The human cardiovascular system is a closed-loop and complex vascular network with multi-scaled heterogeneous hemodynamic phenomena. Here, we give a selective review of recent progress in macro-hemodynamic modeling, with a focus on geometrical multi-scale modeling of the vascular network, micro-hemodynamic modeling of microcirculation, as well as blood cellular, subcellular, endothelial biomechanics, and their interaction with arterial vessel mechanics. We describe in detail the methodology of hemodynamic modeling and its potential applications in cardiovascular research and clinical practice. In addition, we present major topics for future study: recent progress of patient-specific hemodynamic modeling in clinical applications, micro-hemodynamic modeling in capillaries and blood cells, and the importance and potential of the multi-scale hemodynamic modeling.

  16. Simultaneous hemodynamic and echocardiographic changes during abdominal gas insufflation.

    PubMed

    Myre, K; Buanes, T; Smith, G; Stokland, O

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate cardiovascular changes during CO2 pneumoperitoneum. We performed simultaneous hemodynamic recordings and transesophageal echocardiographic measurements of possible alterations in cardiac dimensions. Seven patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy were investigated. With an intraabdominal pressure of 15 mm Hg, mean arterial pressure increased from 75 to 93 mm Hg (p < 0.05). Despite the increase in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) from 10 (9.5-12) to 17 (16-19.9) mm Hg (p < 0.05), left ventricular end-diastolic area index (EDAI) did not change significantly. The cardiac index remained unchanged. Thus abdominal gas insufflation substantially alters the PCWP/EDAI relation. During pneumoperitoneum, left ventricular filling pressure, estimated by PCWP, cannot be used as an indicator of left ventricular dilation. PMID:9348623

  17. CHIVA: hemodynamic concept, strategy and results.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Claude; Cappelli, Massimo; Ermini, Stefano; Gianesini, Sergio; Mendoza, Erika; Passariello, Fausto; Zamboni, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    The first part of this review article provides the physiologic background that sustained the CHIVA principles development. Then the venous networks anatomy and flow patterns are described with pertinent sonographic interpretations, leading to the shunt concept description and to the consequent CHIVA strategy application. An in depth explanation into the hemodynamic conservative cure approach follows, together with pertinent review of the relevant literature. PMID:26044838

  18. Hemodynamic Characteristics Regarding Recanalization of Completely Coiled Aneurysms: Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis Using Virtual Models Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wonhyoung; Song, Yunsun; Park, Kye Jin; Koo, Hae-Won; Yang, Kuhyun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hemodynamic factors are considered to play an important role in initiation and progression of the recurrence after endosaccular coiling of the intracranial aneurysms. We made paired virtual models of completely coiled aneurysms which were subsequently recanalized and compared to identify hemodynamic characteristics related to the recurred aneurysmal sac. Materials and Methods We created paired virtual models of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in five aneurysms which were initially regarded as having achieved complete occlusion and then recurred during follow-up. Paired virtual models consisted of the CFD model of 3D rotational angiography obtained in the recurred aneurysm and the control model of the initial, parent artery after artificial removal of the coiled and recanalized aneurysm. Using the CFD analysis of the virtual model, we analyzed the hemodynamic characteristics on the neck of each aneurysm before and after its recurrence. Results High wall shear stress (WSS) was identified at the cross-sectionally identified aneurysm neck at which recurrence developed in all cases. A small vortex formation with relatively low velocity in front of the neck was also identified in four cases. The aneurysm recurrence locations corresponded to the location of high WSS and/or small vortex formation. Conclusion Recanalized aneurysms revealed increased WSS and small vortex formation at the cross-sectional neck of the aneurysm. This observation may partially explain the hemodynamic causes of future recanalization after coil embolization. PMID:26958410

  19. Analysis of Hemodynamics and Aneurysm Occlusion after Flow Diverting Treatment in Rabbit Models

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Raschi, Marcelo; Hodis, Simona; Ding, Yong-Hong; Erickson, Bradley J.; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Kallmes, David F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to investigate the relationship between hemodynamic conditions created immediately after flow diversion and subsequent occlusion of experimental aneurysms in rabbits. Methods The hemodynamic environment before and after flow diversion treatment of elastase induced aneurysms in 20 rabbits was modeled using image-based computational fluid dynamics. Local aneurysm occlusion was quantified using a voxelization technique on 3D images acquired 8 weeks after treatment. Global and local voxel-by-voxel hemodynamic variables were used to statistically compare aneurysm regions that later thrombosed to regions that remained patent. Results Six aneurysms remained patent at 8 weeks while 14 were completely or nearly completely occluded. Patent aneurysms had statistically larger neck sizes (p=0.0015) and smaller mean transit times (p=0.02). The velocity, vorticity and shear rate were about 2.8 times (p<0.0001) larger in patent regions, i.e. had larger “flow activity”, than regions that progressed to occlusion. Statistical models based on local hemodynamic variables were capable of predicting local occlusion with good precision (84% accuracy), especially away from the neck (92–94%). Predictions near the neck were poorer (73% accuracy). Conclusion These results suggests that the dominant healing mechanism of occlusion within the aneurysm dome are related to slow flow induced thrombosis while near the neck other processes could be at play simultaneously. PMID:24729467

  20. Analysis of Hemodynamics and Aneurysm Occlusion after Flow Diverting Treatment in Rabbit Models

    PubMed Central

    Cebral, Juan R.; Mut, Fernando; Raschi, Marcelo; Hodis, Simona; Ding, Yong-Hong; Erickson, Bradley J.; Kadirvel, Ramanathan; Kallmes, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose to investigate the relationship between hemodynamic conditions created immediately after flow diversion and subsequent occlusion of experimental aneurysms in rabbits. Methods The hemodynamic environment before and after flow diversion treatment of elastase induced aneurysms in 20 rabbits was modeled using image-based computational fluid dynamics. Local aneurysm occlusion was quantified using a voxelization technique on 3D images acquired 8 weeks after treatment. Global and local voxel-by-voxel hemodynamic variables were used to statistically compare aneurysm regions that later thrombosed to regions that remained patent. Results Six aneurysms remained patent at 8 weeks while 14 were completely or nearly completely occluded. Patent aneurysms had statistically larger neck sizes (p=0.0015) and smaller mean transit times (p=0.02). The velocity, vorticity and shear rate were about 2.8 times (p<0.0001) larger in patent regions, i.e. had larger “flow activity”, than regions that progressed to occlusion. Statistical models based on local hemodynamic variables were capable of predicting local occlusion with good precision (84% accuracy), especially away from the neck (92–94%). Predictions near the neck were poorer (73% accuracy). Conclusion These results suggests that the dominant healing mechanism of occlusion within the aneurysm dome are related to slow flow induced thrombosis while near the neck other processes could be at play simultaneously. PMID:24722302

  1. Hemodynamic Patterning of the Avian Atrioventricular Valve

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Shekhar, Akshay; McQuinn, Tim C.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we develop an innovative approach to rigorously quantify the evolving hemodynamic environment of the atrioventricular (AV) canal of avian embryos. Ultrasound generated velocity profiles were imported into Micro-Computed Tomography generated anatomically precise cardiac geometries between Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stages 17 and 30. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were then conducted and iterated until results mimicked in vivo observations. Blood flow in tubular hearts (HH17) was laminar with parallel streamlines, but strong vortices developed simultaneous with expansion of the cushions and septal walls. For all investigated stages, highest wall shear stresses (WSS) are localized to AV canal valve forming regions. Peak WSS increased from 19.34 dynes/cm2 at HH17 to 287.18 dynes/cm2 at HH30, but spatiotemporally averaged WSS became 3.62 dynes/cm2 for HH17 to 9.11 dynes/cm2 for HH30. Hemodynamic changes often preceded and correlated with morphological changes. These results establish a quantitative baseline supporting future hemodynamic analyses and interpretations. PMID:21181939

  2. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine and Remifentanil on Airway Reflex and Hemodynamic Changes during Recovery after Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunzu; Min, Kyeong Tae; Lee, Jeong Rim; Ha, Sang Hee; Lee, Woo Kyung; Seo, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose During emergence from anesthesia for a craniotomy, maintenance of hemodynamic stability and prompt evaluation of neurological status is mandatory. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on airway reflex and hemodynamic change in patients undergoing craniotomy. Materials and Methods Seventy-four patients undergoing clipping of unruptured cerebral aneurysm were recruited. In the dexmedetomidine group, patients were administered dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) for 5 minutes, while the patients of the remifentanil group were administered remifentanil with an effect site concentration of 1.5 ng/mL until endotracheal extubation. The incidence and severity of cough and hemodynamic variables were measured during the recovery period. Hemodynamic variables, respiration rate, and sedation scale were measured after extubation and in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Results The incidence of grade 2 and 3 cough at the point of extubation was 62.5% in the dexmedetomidine group and 53.1% in the remifentanil group (p=0.39). Mean arterial pressure (p=0.01) at admission to the PACU and heart rate (p=0.04 and 0.01, respectively) at admission and at 10 minutes in the PACU were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group. Respiration rate was significantly lower in the remifentanil group at 2 minutes (p<0.01) and 5 minutes (p<0.01) after extubation. Conclusion We concluded that a single bolus of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) and remifentanil infusion have equal effectiveness in attenuating coughing and hemodynamic changes in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm clipping; however, dexmedetomidine leads to better preservation of respiration. PMID:27189295

  3. Role and Effectiveness of Percutaneous Arterial Embolization in Hemodynamically Unstable Patients with Ruptured Splanchnic Artery Pseudoaneurysms

    SciTech Connect

    Dohan, Anthony; Eveno, Clarisse; Dautry, Raphael Guerrache, Youcef; Camus, Marine; Boudiaf, Mourad; Gayat, Etienne; Dref, Olivier Le Sirol, Marc Soyer, Philippe

    2015-08-15

    PurposeTo assess the role and effectiveness of percutaneous arterial embolization (TAE) in patients with hemodynamic instability due to hypovolemic shock secondary to ruptured splanchnic artery pseudoaneurysms (SAPA).Materials and MethodsSeventeen patients (11 men, 6 women; mean age, 53 years) with hemodynamic instability (systolic blood pressure <90 mmHg) due to hypovolemic shock secondary to ruptured SAPA were treated by TAE. Clinical files, multidetector row computed tomography angiography, and angiographic examinations along with procedure details were reviewed.ResultsSeventeen SAPAs were present, predominantly located on gastroduodenal or pancreatic arteries (9/17; 53 %). Angiography showed extravasation of contrast medium from SAPA in 15/17 patients (88 %). Technical success rate of TAE was 100 %. TAE was performed using metallic coils in all patients (100 %), in association with gelatin sponge in 5/17 patients (29 %). TAE allowed controlling the bleeding and returning to normal hemodynamic status in 16/17 patients (94 %). In 1/17 patient (6 %), surgery was needed to definitively control the bleeding. The mortality and morbidity rate of TAE at 30 days were 0 and 12 %, respectively. Morbidity consisted in coil migration in 1/17 patient (6 %) and transient serum liver enzyme elevation in 1/17 patient (6 %).ConclusionTAE is an effective and safe treatment option for ruptured SAPA in hemodynamically unstable patients, with a success rate of 94 %. Our results suggest that TAE should be the favored option in patients with hemodynamic instability due to ruptured SAPA.

  4. Combined Effects of Flow Diverting Strategies and Parent Artery Curvature on Aneurysmal Hemodynamics: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lv, Nan; Wang, Shengzhang; Karmonik, Christof; Liu, Jian-Min; Huang, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Flow diverters (FD) are increasingly being considered for treating large or giant wide-neck aneurysms. Clinical outcome is highly variable and depends on the type of aneurysm, the flow diverting device and treatment strategies. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of different flow diverting strategies together with parent artery curvature variations on altering intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics. Methods Four ideal intracranial aneurysm models with different parent artery curvature were constructed. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the hemodynamics before and after applying five types of flow diverting strategies (single FD, single FD with 5% and 10% packing density of coils, two FDs with 25% and 50% overlapping rate) were performed. Changes in pressure, wall shear stress (WSS), relative residence time (RRT), inflow velocity and inflow volume rate were calculated and compared. Results Each flow diverting strategy resulted in enhancement of RRT and reduction of normalized mean WSS, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity in various levels. Among them, 50% overlapped FD induced most effective hemodynamic changes in RRT and inflow volume rate. The mean pressure only slightly decreased after treatment. Regardless of the kind of implantation of FD, the mean pressure, inflow volume rate and inflow velocity increased and the RRT decreased as the curvature of the parent artery increased. Conclusions Of all flow diverting strategies, overlapping FDs induced most favorable hemodynamic changes. Hemodynamics alterations post treatment were substantially influenced by parent artery curvature. Our results indicate the need of an individualized flow diverting strategy that is tailored for a specific aneurysm. PMID:26398847

  5. Hemodynamic and metabolic effects of cerebral revascularization.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, R; Tyler, J L; Mohr, G; Meyer, E; Diksic, M; Yamamoto, L; Taylor, L; Gauthier, S; Hakim, A

    1987-04-01

    Pre- and postoperative positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in six patients undergoing extracranial to intracranial bypass procedures for the treatment of symptomatic extracranial carotid occlusion. The six patients were all men, aged 52 to 68 years. Their symptoms included transient ischemic attacks (five cases), amaurosis fugax (two cases), and completed stroke with good recovery (one case). Positron emission tomography was performed within 4 weeks prior to surgery and between 3 to 6 months postoperatively, using oxygen-15-labeled CO, O2, and CO2 and fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rates for oxygen and glucose (CMRO2 and CMRGlu), and the oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured in both hemispheres. Preoperatively, compared to five elderly control subjects, patients had increased CBV, a decreased CBF/CBV ratio, and decreased CMRO2, indicating reduced cerebral perfusion pressure and depressed oxygen metabolism. The CBF was decreased in only one patient who had bilateral carotid occlusions; the OEF, CMRGlu, and CMRO2/CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratios were not significantly different from control measurements. All bypasses were patent and all patients were asymptomatic following surgery. Postoperative PET revealed decreased CBV and an increased CBF/CBV ratio, indicating improved hemodynamic function and oxygen hypometabolism. This was associated with increased CMRO2 in two patients in whom the postoperative OEF was also increased. The CMRGlu and CMRGlu/CBF ratio were increased in five patients. Changes in CBF and the CMRO2/CMRGlu ratio were variable. One patient with preoperative progressive mental deterioration, documented by serial neuropsychological testing and decreasing CBF and CMRO2, had improved postoperative CBF and CMRO2 concomitant with improved neuropsychological functioning. It is concluded that symptomatic carotid occlusion is associated with altered

  6. Empirical Evaluation of Visual Fatigue from Display Alignment Errors Using Cerebral Hemodynamic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wiyor, Hanniebey D.; Ntuen, Celestine A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of stereoscopic display alignment errors on visual fatigue and prefrontal cortical tissue hemodynamic responses. We collected hemodynamic data and perceptual ratings of visual fatigue while participants performed visual display tasks on 8 ft × 6 ft NEC LT silver screen with NEC LT 245 DLP projectors. There was statistical significant difference between subjective measures of visual fatigue before air traffic control task (BATC) and after air traffic control task (ATC 3), (P < 0.05). Statistical significance was observed between left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex oxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-HbO2), left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (l DLPFC-Hbb), and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex deoxygenated hemoglobin (r DLPFC-Hbb) on stereoscopic alignment errors (P < 0.05). Thus, cortical tissue oxygenation requirement in the left hemisphere indicates that the effect of visual fatigue is more pronounced in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. PMID:27006917

  7. A hemodynamic model for layered BOLD signals.

    PubMed

    Heinzle, Jakob; Koopmans, Peter J; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Raman, Sudhir; Stephan, Klaas Enno

    2016-01-15

    High-resolution blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at the sub-millimeter scale has become feasible with recent advances in MR technology. In principle, this would enable the study of layered cortical circuits, one of the fundaments of cortical computation. However, the spatial layout of cortical blood supply may become an important confound at such high resolution. In particular, venous blood draining back to the cortical surface perpendicularly to the layered structure is expected to influence the measured responses in different layers. Here, we present an extension of a hemodynamic model commonly used for analyzing fMRI data (in dynamic causal models or biophysical network models) that accounts for such blood draining effects by coupling local hemodynamics across layers. We illustrate the properties of the model and its inversion by a series of simulations and show that it successfully captures layered fMRI data obtained during a simple visual experiment. We conclude that for future studies of the dynamics of layered neuronal circuits with high-resolution fMRI, it will be pivotal to include effects of blood draining, particularly when trying to infer on the layer-specific connections in cortex--a theme of key relevance for brain disorders like schizophrenia and for theories of brain function such as predictive coding. PMID:26484827

  8. Hemodynamic Simulations in Dialysis Access Fistulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Riley, James; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease. It has long been hypothesized that the hemodynamic and mechanical forces (such as wall shear stress, wall stretch, or flow- induced wall vibrations) constitute the primary external influence on the remodeling process. Given that nearly 50% of fistulae fail after one year, understanding fistulae hemodynamics is an important step toward improving patency in the clinic. We perform numerical simulations of the flow in patient-specific models of AV fistulae reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans with physiologically-realistic boundary conditions also obtained from Doppler ultrasound. Comparison of the flow features in different geometries and configurations e.g. end-to-side vs. side-to-side, with the in vivo longitudinal outcomes will allow us to hypothesize which flow conditions are conducive to fistulae success or failure. The flow inertia and pulsatility in the simulations (mean Re 700, max Re 2000, Wo 4) give rise to complex secondary flows and coherent vortices, further complicating the spatio- temporal variability of the wall pressure and shear stresses. Even in mature fistulae, the anastomotic regions are subjected to non-physiological shear stresses (>10.12pcPa) which may potentially lead to complications.

  9. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  10. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pisauro, M. Andrea; Benucci, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  11. Local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity in mouse cortex.

    PubMed

    Pisauro, M Andrea; Benucci, Andrea; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    Imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging seek to estimate neural signals in local brain regions through measurements of hemodynamic activity. However, hemodynamic activity is accompanied by large vascular fluctuations of unclear significance. To characterize these fluctuations and their impact on estimates of neural signals, we used optical imaging in visual cortex of awake mice. We found that hemodynamic activity can be expressed as the sum of two components, one local and one global. The local component reflected presumed neural signals driven by visual stimuli in the appropriate retinotopic region. The global component constituted large fluctuations shared by larger cortical regions, which extend beyond visual cortex. These fluctuations varied from trial to trial, but they did not constitute noise; they correlated with pupil diameter, suggesting that they reflect variations in arousal or alertness. Distinguishing local and global contributions to hemodynamic activity may help understand neurovascular coupling and interpret measurements of hemodynamic responses. PMID:26984421

  12. Nonlinear extension of a hemodynamic linear model for coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we are proposing an extension of a recent hemodynamic model (Fantini, 2014a), which was developed within the framework of a novel approach to the study of tissue hemodynamics, named coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS). The previous hemodynamic model, from a signal processing viewpoint, treats the tissue microvasculature as a linear time-invariant system, and considers changes of blood volume, capillary blood flow velocity and the rate of oxygen diffusion as inputs, and the changes of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations (measured in near infrared spectroscopy) as outputs. The model has been used also as a forward solver in an inversion procedure to retrieve quantitative parameters that assess physiological and biological processes such as microcirculation, cerebral autoregulation, tissue metabolic rate of oxygen, and oxygen extraction fraction. Within the assumption of "small" capillary blood flow velocity oscillations the model showed that the capillary and venous compartments "respond" to this input as low pass filters, characterized by two distinct impulse response functions. In this work, we do not make the assumption of "small" perturbations of capillary blood flow velocity by solving without approximations the partial differential equation that governs the spatio-temporal behavior of hemoglobin saturation in capillary and venous blood. Preliminary comparison between the linear time-invariant model and the extended model (here identified as nonlinear model) are shown for the relevant parameters measured in CHS as a function of the oscillation frequency (CHS spectra). We have found that for capillary blood flow velocity oscillations with amplitudes up to 10% of the baseline value (which reflect typical scenarios in CHS), the discrepancies between CHS spectra obtained with the linear and nonlinear models are negligible. For larger oscillations (~50%) the linear and nonlinear models yield CHS spectra with differences within typical

  13. Monitoring changes in hemodynamics following optogenetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frye, Seth

    The brain is composed of billions of neurons, all of which connected through a vast network. After years of study and applications of different technologies and techniques, there are still more questions than answers when it comes to the fundamental functions of the brain. This project aims to provide a new tool which can be used to gain a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that govern neurological processes inside the brain. In order for neural networks to operate, blood has to be supplied through neighboring blood vessels. As such, the increase or decrease in the blood supply has been used as an indicator of neural activity. The neural activity and blood supply relationship is known as neural vasculature coupling. Monitoring the hemodynamics is used as an indicator of neurological activity, but the causal relationship is an area of current research. Gaining a better understanding of the coupling of neural activity and the surrounding vasculature provides a more accurate methodology to evaluate regional neural activity. The new optical technology applied in this project provides a set of tools to both stimulate and monitor this coupling relationship. Optogenetics provides the capability of stimulating neural activity using specific wavelengths of light. Essentially this tool allows for the direct stimulation of networks of neurons by simply shining one color of light onto the brain. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), another new optical technology applied in this project, can record volumetric images of blood vessels and flow using only infrared light. The combination of the two optical technologies is then capable of stimulating neural activity and monitoring the hemodynamic response inside the brain using only light. As a result of this project we have successfully demonstrated the capability of both stimulating and imaging the brain using new optical technologies. The optical stimulation of neural activity has evoked a direct hemodynamic effect

  14. Hemodynamic physiology and thermoregulation in liposuction.

    PubMed

    Kenkel, Jeffrey M; Lipschitz, Avron H; Luby, Maureen; Kallmeyer, Ian; Sorokin, Evan; Appelt, Eric; Rohrich, Rod J; Brown, Spencer A

    2004-08-01

    Little is known about the physiology of large-volume liposuction. Patients are exposed to prolonged procedures, general anesthesia, fluid shifts, and infusion of high doses of epinephrine and lidocaine. Consequently, the authors examined the thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses to liposuction by assessing multiple physiologic factors. The aims of their study were to serially determine hemodynamic parameters perioperatively, to quantify perioperative and postoperative plasma epinephrine levels, and to chronologically document fluctuations in core body temperature. Five female volunteers with American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status I and II underwent moderate- to large-volume liposuction. Heart rate, blood pressure, mean pulmonary arterial pressure, cardiac index, and central venous pressure were monitored. Serum epinephrine levels and core body temperature were assessed perioperatively. The hemodynamic responses to liposuction were characterized by an increase in cardiac index (57 percent), heart rate (47 percent), and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (44 percent) (p < 0.05). Central venous pressure was not significantly altered. Maximum epinephrine levels were observed 5 to 6 hours after induction. Significant correlations between cardiac index and epinephrine concentrations were shown intraoperatively (r = 0.75). All patients developed intraoperative low body temperatures (mean 35.5 degrees C). An overall enhanced cardiac function was observed in patients subsequent to large-volume liposuction. The etiology of the altered cardiac parameters was multifactorial but may have been attributable in part to the administration of epinephrine, which counters the effects of general anesthesia and operative hypothermia. Additional explanations for raised cardiac output may be hemodilution or emergence from general anesthesia. Elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure may be a result of subclinical fat embolism demonstrated in previous porcine studies

  15. Stroke volume optimization: the new hemodynamic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alexander; Ahrens, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    Critical care practices have evolved to rely more on physical assessments for monitoring cardiac output and evaluating fluid volume status because these assessments are less invasive and more convenient to use than is a pulmonary artery catheter. Despite this trend, level of consciousness, central venous pressure, urine output, heart rate, and blood pressure remain assessments that are slow to be changed, potentially misleading, and often manifested as late indications of decreased cardiac output. The hemodynamic optimization strategy called stroke volume optimization might provide a proactive guide for clinicians to optimize a patient's status before late indications of a worsening condition occur. The evidence supporting use of the stroke volume optimization algorithm to treat hypovolemia is increasing. Many of the cardiac output monitor technologies today measure stroke volume, as well as the parameters that comprise stroke volume: preload, afterload, and contractility. PMID:25639574

  16. Hemodynamic Correlates of Cognition in Human Infants

    PubMed Central

    Aslin, Richard N.; Shukla, Mohinish; Emberson, Lauren L.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the field of cognitive neuroscience has relied heavily on hemodynamic measures of blood oxygenation in local regions of the brain to make inferences about underlying cognitive processes. These same functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) techniques have recently been adapted for use with human infants. We review the advantages and disadvantages of these two neuroimaging methods for studies of infant cognition, with a particular emphasis on their technical limitations and the linking hypotheses that are used to draw conclusions from correlational data. In addition to summarizing key findings in several domains of infant cognition, we highlight the prospects of improving the quality of fNIRS data from infants to address in a more sophisticated way how cognitive development is mediated by changes in underlying neural mechanisms. PMID:25251480

  17. Hemodynamic studies of the legs under weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W. E.; Hoffler, G. W.

    1974-01-01

    Following exposure to weightlessness, alterations in the return of blood from the legs play a crucial role in orthostatic tolerance and may be an important factor in work tolerance. To investigate some of the hemodynamic mechansism involved, an experiment was performed on the Skylab 3 and Skylab 4 missions to study arterial blood flow, venous compliance, and muscle pumping of blood. Skylab 4 results indicated that the most likely cause of increased blood flow was an increase in cardiac output secondary to increased central venous pressure caused by blood redistribution. Changes in venous compliance are thought to be primarily changes in somatic musculature which is postulated to primarily determine venous compliance of the legs. This was also thought to be demonstrated by the changes in muscle pumping. It is thought that these compliance changes, when taken with the decreased blood volume; provide a basis for the changes seen in orthostatic tolerance, work capacity and lower body negative pressure response.

  18. Large eddy simulation of powered Fontan hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Y; Anupindi, K; Kerlo, A E; Shetty, D; Rodefeld, M; Chen, J; Frankel, S

    2013-01-18

    Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2-3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3-5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a "biventricular Fontan" circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemo(TM)) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data. PMID:23177085

  19. Effects of phacoemulsification surgery on ocular hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Adem; Mollamehmetoglu, Suleyman; Imamoglu, Halil Ibrahim; Kola, Mehmet; Erdol, Hidayet; Akyol, Nurettin

    2013-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the possible effects of phacoemulsification cataract surgery on ocular hemodynamics. METHODS In this prospective study, intraocular pressure (IOP), pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF), and ocular pulse amplitude (OPA) were measured pre-operatively (baseline) and at 1 week and 3 weeks postoperation in 52 eyes of 26 patients (mean age 63.15±10.25 years) scheduled for unilateral phacoemulsification cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. In all of the eyes, a blood flow analyzer (Paradigm DICON; Paradigm Medical Industries Inc.; USA) was used to obtain measurements of IOP, POBF, and OPA. The data obtained from operated eyes were compared statistically to untreated fellow phakic eyes of the patients. RESULTS For operated eyes, the mean baseline IOP, POBF, and OPA values were 15.9±4.64mmHg, 17.41±4.84µL/s, and 2.91±1.12mmHg, respectively. The IOP, POBF, and OPA values were 17.19±4.34mmHg, 17.56±6.46µL/s, and 3.12±1.1mmHg, respectively, in the nonoperated control eyes. Statistically significant differences from baseline measurements were not observed 1 week and 3 weeks postoperation for the operated or nonoperated eyes. There were also no statistically significant differences in any measurements between the operated and nonoperated eyes in all the examination periods (P>0.05 for all). CONCLUSION Uncomplicated phacoemulsification surgery does not affect ocular hemodynamics in normotensive eyes with cataracts. PMID:23991393

  20. Time evolution and hemodynamics of cerebral aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sforza, Daniel M.; Putman, Christopher; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Cebral, Juan

    2011-03-01

    Cerebral aneurysm rupture is a leading cause of hemorrhagic strokes. Because they are being more frequently diagnosed before rupture and the prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is poor, clinicians are often required to judge which aneurysms are prone to progression and rupture. Unfortunately, the processes of aneurysm initiation, growth and rupture are not well understood. Multiple factors associated to these processes have been identified. Our goal is to investigate two of them, arterial hemodynamics (using computational fluid dynamics) and the peri-aneurysmal environment, by studying a group of growing cerebral aneurysms that are followed longitudinally in time. Six patients with unruptured untreated brain aneurysms which exhibited growth during the observation period were selected for the study. Vascular models of each aneurysm at each observation time were constructed from the corresponding computed tomography angiography (CTA) images. Subsequently, models were aligned, and geometrical differences quantified. Blood flow was modeled with the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equation for a Newtonian fluid, and wall shear stress distribution and flow patterns were calculated and visualized. Analysis of the simulations and changes in geometry revealed asymmetric growth patterns and suggests that areas subject to vigorous flows, i.e. relative high wall shear stress and concentrated streamlines patterns; correspond to regions of aneurysm growth. Furthermore, in some cases the geometrical evolution of aneurysms is clearly affected by contacts with bone structures and calcifications in the wall, and as a consequence the hemodynamics is greatly modified. Thus, in these cases the peri-aneurysmal environment must be considered when analyzing aneurysm evolution.

  1. Large Eddy Simulation of Powered Fontan Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Y.; Anupindi, K.; Kerlo, A.E.; Shetty, D.; Rodefeld, M.; Chen, J.; Frankel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Children born with univentricular heart disease typically must undergo three open heart surgeries within the first 2–3 years of life to eventually establish the Fontan circulation. In that case the single working ventricle pumps oxygenated blood to the body and blood returns to the lungs flowing passively through the Total Cavopulmonary Connection (TCPC) rather than being actively pumped by a subpulmonary ventricle. The TCPC is a direct surgical connection between the superior and inferior vena cava and the left and right pulmonary arteries. We have postulated that a mechanical pump inserted into this circulation providing a 3–5 mmHg pressure augmentation will reestablish bi-ventricular physiology serving as a bridge-to-recovery, bridge-to-transplant or destination therapy as a “biventricular Fontan” circulation. The Viscous Impeller Pump (VIP) has been proposed by our group as such an assist device. It is situated in the center of the 4-way TCPC intersection and spins pulling blood from the vena cavae and pushing it into the pulmonary arteries. We hypothesized that Large Eddy Simulation (LES) using high-order numerical methods are needed to capture unsteady powered and unpowered Fontan hemodynamics. Inclusion of a mechanical pump into the CFD further complicates matters due to the need to account for rotating machinery. In this study, we focus on predictions from an in-house high-order LES code (WenoHemo™) for unpowered and VIP-powered idealized TCPC hemodynamics with quantitative comparisons to Stereoscopic Particle Imaging Velocimetry (SPIV) measurements. Results are presented for both instantaneous flow structures and statistical data. Simulations show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with measured data. PMID:23177085

  2. Congenital heart malformations induced by hemodynamic altering surgical interventions

    PubMed Central

    Midgett, Madeline; Rugonyi, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic heart formation results from a dynamic interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Blood flow during early embryonic stages plays a critical role in heart development, as interactions between flow and cardiac tissues generate biomechanical forces that modulate cardiac growth and remodeling. Normal hemodynamic conditions are essential for proper cardiac development, while altered blood flow induced by surgical manipulations in animal models result in heart defects similar to those seen in humans with congenital heart disease. This review compares the altered hemodynamics, changes in tissue properties, and cardiac defects reported after common surgical interventions that alter hemodynamics in the early chick embryo, and shows that interventions produce a wide spectrum of cardiac defects. Vitelline vein ligation and left atrial ligation decrease blood pressure and flow; and outflow tract banding increases blood pressure and flow velocities. These three surgical interventions result in many of the same cardiac defects, which indicate that the altered hemodynamics interfere with common looping, septation and valve formation processes that occur after intervention and that shape the four-chambered heart. While many similar defects develop after the interventions, the varying degrees of hemodynamic load alteration among the three interventions also result in varying incidence and severity of cardiac defects, indicating that the hemodynamic modulation of cardiac developmental processes is strongly dependent on hemodynamic load. PMID:25136319

  3. Spontaneous Low-Frequency Cerebral Hemodynamics Oscillations in Restless Legs Syndrome with Periodic Limb Movements During Sleep: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Gwan-Taek; Kim, Choong-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Periodic limb movements (PLM) during sleep (PLMS) are associated with cortical and cardiovascular activation. Changes in cerebral hemodynamics caused by cortical activity can be measured using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We investigated oscillatory components of cerebral hemodynamics during PLM and different sleep stages in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients with PLMS. Methods Four female RLS patients with PLMS, and four age- and sex-matched normal controls were included. PLM and sleep stages were scored using polysomnography, while the spontaneous cerebral hemodynamics was measured by NIRS. The phase and amplitude of the cerebral oxyhemoglobin concentration [HbO] and the deoxyhemoglobin concentration [Hb] low-frequency oscillations (LFOs) were evaluated during each sleep stage [waking, light sleep (LS; stages N1 and N2), slow-wave sleep (stage N3), and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep]. In RLS patients with PLMS, the cerebral hemodynamics during LS was divided into LS with and without PLM. Results The cerebral hemodynamics activity varied among the different sleep stages. There were changes in phase differences between [HbO] and [Hb] LFOs during the different sleep stages in the normal controls but not in the RLS patients with PLMS. The [HbO] and [Hb] LFO amplitudes were higher in the patient group than in controls during both LS with PLM and REM sleep. Conclusions The present study has demonstrated the presence of cerebral hemodynamics disturbances in RLS patients with PLMS, which may contribute to an increased risk of cerebrovascular events. PMID:26754783

  4. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes

    PubMed Central

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension–flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation. PMID:27390450

  5. Morphological and Hemodynamic Discriminators for Rupture Status in Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Karmonik, Christof; Fang, Yibin; Xu, Jinyu; Yu, Ying; Cao, Wei; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose The conflicting findings of previous morphological and hemodynamic studies on intracranial aneurysm rupture may be caused by the relatively small sample sizes and the variation in location of the patient-specific aneurysm models. We aimed to determine the discriminators for aneurysm rupture status by focusing on only posterior communicating artery (PCoA) aneurysms. Materials and Methods In 129 PCoA aneurysms (85 ruptured, 44 unruptured), clinical, morphological and hemodynamic characteristics were compared between the ruptured and unruptured cases. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the discriminators for rupture status of PCoA aneurysms. Results While univariate analyses showed that the size of aneurysm dome, aspect ratio (AR), size ratio (SR), dome-to-neck ratio (DN), inflow angle (IA), normalized wall shear stress (NWSS) and percentage of low wall shear stress area (LSA) were significantly associated with PCoA aneurysm rupture status. With multivariate analyses, significance was only retained for higher IA (OR = 1.539, p < 0.001) and LSA (OR = 1.393, p = 0.041). Conclusions Hemodynamics and morphology were related to rupture status of intracranial aneurysms. Higher IA and LSA were identified as discriminators for rupture status of PCoA aneurysms. PMID:26910518

  6. Two hemodynamic problems commonly associated with the microsphere technique for measuring regional blood flow in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Stanek, K.A.; Coleman, T.G.; Smith, T.L.; Murphy, W.R.

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to reevaluate two major steps associated with the radioactive microsphere technique in rats; the hemodynamic effects of the solutions used to inject the microspheres, and the hemodynamic effects of repeated blood withdrawals. With regard to the first, Flaim et al. have shown that 1.0 ml of 10% dextran injected into the rat may result in a severe pressure drop. The present study showed that even 0.1 ml of 10% dextran caused significant hypotension 46% of the time. Six other mediums were also tested as possible suspending media. It was concluded that a dextrose solution (sp gr 1.3) was the best microsphere injection medium based on the length of time the microspheres stayed mixed in the solution and the minimal hemodynamic alterations caused during injection. With regard to the second concern, cardiac output decreased approximately 7% with each reference sample withdrawal. When volume was replaced with a Ficoll-70 solution, cardiac output decreased less than 3%. These data show that repeated blood withdrawals are possible as long as the volume of blood is replaced. Thus, several isotopes can be injected in the same rat to allow measurement of regional blood flow under different experimental conditions.

  7. Effect of Lower Body Compression Garments on Hemodynamics in Response to Running Session

    PubMed Central

    Venckūnas, Tomas; Trinkūnas, Eugenijus; Kamandulis, Sigitas; Poderys, Jonas; Grūnovas, Albinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Compression garments are often worn during exercise and allegedly have ergogenic and/or physiological effects. In this study, we compared hemodynamics and running performance while wearing compression and loose-fit breeches. We hypothesized that in neutral-warm environment compression breeches impair performance by diminishing body cooling via evaporative sweat loss and redistributing blood from active musculature to skin leading to a larger rise in body temperature and prolonging recovery of hemodynamics after exercise. Methods. Changes in hemodynamics (leg blood flow, heart rate, and blood pressure during orthoclinostatic test), calf muscle tissue oxygenation, and skin and core temperatures were measured in response to 30 min running (simulation of aerobic training session) followed by maximal 400 m sprint (evaluation of running performance) in recreationally active females (25.1 ± 4.2 yrs; 63.0 ± 8.6 kg) wearing compression or loose-fit breeches in randomized fashion. Results. Wearing compression breeches resulted in larger skin temperature rise under the garment during exercise and recovery (by about 1°C, P < 0.05; statistical power > 85%), while core temperature dynamics and other measured parameters including circulation, running performance, and sensations were similar compared to wearing loose-fit breeches (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Compared with loose-fit breeches, compression breeches have neither positive nor negative physiological and performance effects for females running in thermoneutral environment. PMID:25202721

  8. Effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Tsuneo; Seko, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Yui

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of movement from a postural maintenance position on lumbar hemodynamic changes, in order to prevent lower back pain and develop exercise therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five healthy adults (mean age: 23.2 years) participated in the study. During flexion-extension exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually to a flexed position from an upright posture while sitting and standing, and then returned to and maintained an upright (re-upright) position. In the extension-flexion exercise, the subjects moved their trunks gradually from an upright posture to an extended position, and back while maintaining an upright (re-upright) position. Lumbar spinal muscle activity and hemodynamic changes were evaluated during both exercises. [Results] During the flexion and extension exercises, increased trunk-flexion angle caused increased muscle activity, decreased oxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus muscle, and increased deoxygenated hemoglobin in the multifidus and lumbar erector spinae muscles. Moreover, the muscle activities were nearly the same in the re-upright and upright positions, and total hemoglobin also increased. [Conclusion] In both standing and sitting positions, holding the trunk in a flexed position causes ischemic hemodynamic changes in the multifidus muscle; however, the hyperemic response when returning the trunk to an extended position may improve circulation. PMID:27390450

  9. Photoacoustic Imaging of Vascular Hemodynamics: Validation with Blood Oxygenation Level–Dependent MR Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Laurie J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To noninvasively assess vascular hemodynamics with photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in phantoms and in an animal model. Materials and Methods In vivo studies were performed with institutional animal care and use committee approval. In vitro experiments were performed by using a tissue-mimicking phantom in multiple oxygenation conditions (n = 6) to compare PAI measurements and BOLD MR imaging measurements. PAI and T2-weighted spin-echo–based BOLD MR imaging were performed to assess tumor response to carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2) in mice with head and neck tumors before (n = 11) and after (n = 9) treatment with a vascular disrupting agent (VDA). Two-tailed Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the parameters measured with PAI and BOLD MR imaging in vitro. Two-tailed paired t tests were used to compare change in tumor hemoglobin oxygen saturation (sO2) levels and BOLD signal in response to carbogen. Changes in PAI and BOLD signal intensity before and after VDA treatment were analyzed for significance by using analysis of variance with repeated measures. Results Phantom measurements yielded good correlation between photoacoustically derived sO2 levels and BOLD signal intensity (r = 0.937, P = .005) and partial pressure of oxygen (r = 0.981, P = .005). In vivo hemodynamic response to carbogen was characterized by a significant increase in tumor sO2 levels (P = .003) and BOLD signal (P = .001). When compared with pretreatment estimates, treatment with VDA resulted in a significant reduction in the tumor hemodynamic response to carbogen at PAI (P = .030). Conclusion Carbogen-based functional imaging with PAI and BOLD MR imaging enables monitoring of early changes in tumor hemodynamics after vascular targeted therapy. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:25423146

  10. Evaluation of Hemodynamic Parameters as Predictors of Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Janulevičiene, Ingrida; Ehrlich, Rita; Siesky, Brent; Nedzelskienė, Irena; Harris, Alon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate hemodynamic parameters as possible predictors for glaucoma progression. Methods. An 18-month randomized double-masked cohort study including 30 open-angle glaucoma patients receiving fixed-combination treatment with Dorzolamide/Timolol (DTFC) or Latanoprost/Timolol (LTFC) (n = 15 per group) was performed. Intraocular pressure (IOP), arterial blood pressure (BP), ocular and diastolic perfusion pressures (OPP, DPP), color Doppler imaging, pulsatile ocular blood flow analysis, scanning laser polarimetry, and Humphrey visual field evaluations were included. Results. Both treatments showed statistically similar IOP reduction. Six patients in DTFC and 7 in LTFC group met glaucoma progression criteria. DTFC group had higher OPP, DPP, and lower vascular resistivity indices as compared to the LTFC. Progressing patients had higher nerve fiber index, lower systolic BP, OPP, DPP, higher ophthalmic and central retinal artery vascular resistance, and lower pulse volume (P < .05; t-test). Conclusions. Structural changes consistent with glaucoma progression correlate with non-IOP-dependent risk factors. PMID:21577269

  11. [Impact of aortic stiffness on central hemodynamics and cardiovascular system].

    PubMed

    Bulas, J; Potočárová, M; Filková, M; Simková, A; Murín, J

    2013-06-01

    Arterial stiffness increases as a result of degenerative processes accelerated by aging and many risk factors, namely arterial hypertension. Basic clinical examination reveals increased pulse pressure as its hemodynamic manifestation. The most serious consequence of increased vascular stiffness, which cannot be revealed by clinical examination, is a change of central hemodynamics leading to increased load of left ventricle, left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction and to overall increase of cardiovascular risk. This review aimed to point at some patophysiological mechanisms taking part in the development of vascular stiffness, vascular remodeling and hemodynamic consequences of these changes. This work also gives an overview of noninvasive examination methods and their characteristics enabling to evaluate the local, regional and systemic arterial stiffness and central pulse wave analysis and their meaning for central hemodynamics and heart workload. PMID:23808736

  12. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  13. Computational Hemodynamics Framework for the Analysis of Cerebral Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Mut, Fernando; Löhner, Rainald; Chien, Aichi; Tateshima, Satoshi; Viñuela, Fernando; Putman, Christopher; Cebral, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Assessing the risk of rupture of intracranial aneurysms is important for clinicians because the natural rupture risk can be exceeded by the small but significant risk carried by current treatments. To this end numerous investigators have used image-based computational fluid dynamics models to extract patient-specific hemodynamics information, but there is no consensus on which variables or hemodynamic characteristics are the most important. This paper describes a computational framework to study and characterize the hemodynamic environment of cerebral aneurysms in order to relate it to clinical events such as growth or rupture. In particular, a number of hemodynamic quantities are proposed to describe the most salient features of these hemodynamic environments. Application to a patient population indicates that ruptured aneurysms tend to have concentrated inflows, concentrated wall shear stress distributions, high maximal wall shear stress and smaller viscous dissipation ratios than unruptured aneurysms. Furthermore, these statistical associations are largely unaffected by the choice of physiologic flow conditions. This confirms the notion that hemodynamic information derived from image-based computational models can be used to assess aneurysm rupture risk, to test hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for aneurysm formation, progression and rupture, and to answer specific clinical questions. PMID:21643491

  14. Hemodynamics in coronary arteries with overlapping stents.

    PubMed

    Rikhtegar, Farhad; Wyss, Christophe; Stok, Kathryn S; Poulikakos, Dimos; Müller, Ralph; Kurtcuoglu, Vartan

    2014-01-22

    Coronary artery stenosis is commonly treated by stent placement via percutaneous intervention, at times requiring multiple stents that may overlap. Stent overlap is associated with increased risk of adverse clinical outcome. While changes in local blood flow are suspected to play a role therein, hemodynamics in arteries with overlapping stents remain poorly understood. In this study we analyzed six cases of partially overlapping stents, placed ex vivo in porcine left coronary arteries and compared them to five cases with two non-overlapping stents. The stented vessel geometries were obtained by micro-computed tomography of corrosion casts. Flow and shear stress distribution were calculated using computational fluid dynamics. We observed a significant increase in the relative area exposed to low wall shear stress (WSS<0.5 Pa) in the overlapping stent segments compared both to areas without overlap in the same samples, as well as to non-overlapping stents. We further observed that the configuration of the overlapping stent struts relative to each other influenced the size of the low WSS area: positioning of the struts in the same axial location led to larger areas of low WSS compared to alternating struts. Our results indicate that the overlap geometry is by itself sufficient to cause unfavorable flow conditions that may worsen clinical outcome. While stent overlap cannot always be avoided, improved deployment strategies or stent designs could reduce the low WSS burden. PMID:24275438

  15. Wireless Monitoring of Liver Hemodynamics In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics.

  16. Effects of spaceflight on human calf hemodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, D. E.; Buckey, J. C.; Lane, L. D.; Gaffney, F. A.; Levine, B. D.; Moore, W. E.; Wright, S. J.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    Chronic microgravity may modify adaptations of the leg circulation to gravitational pressures. We measured resting calf compliance and blood flow with venous occlusion plethysmography, and arterial blood pressure with sphygmomanometry, in seven subjects before, during, and after spaceflight. Calf vascular resistance equaled mean arterial pressure divided by calf flow. Compliance equaled the slope of the calf volume change and venous occlusion pressure relationship for thigh cuff pressures of 20, 40, 60, and 80 mmHg held for 1, 2, 3, and 4 min, respectively, with 1-min breaks between occlusions. Calf blood flow decreased 41% in microgravity (to 1.15 +/- 0.16 ml x 100 ml(-1) x min(-1)) relative to 1-G supine conditions (1.94 +/- 0.19 ml x 100 ml(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.01), and arterial pressure tended to increase (P = 0.05), such that calf vascular resistance doubled in microgravity (preflight: 43 +/- 4 units; in-flight: 83 +/- 13 units; P < 0.001) yet returned to preflight levels after flight. Calf compliance remained unchanged in microgravity but tended to increase during the first week postflight (P > 0.2). Calf vasoconstriction in microgravity qualitatively agrees with the "upright set-point" hypothesis: the circulation seeks conditions approximating upright posture on Earth. No calf hemodynamic result exhibited obvious mechanistic implications for postflight orthostatic intolerance.

  17. Hemodynamics of Curved Vessels with Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, Michael E.; Cassel, Kevin W.

    2007-11-01

    In hemodialysis access, the brachiocephalic or upper-arm fistula has less than optimal functional rates. The cause of this reduced patency is stenosis due to intimal hyperplasia in the cephalic vein. Stenosis typically leads to thrombosis and ultimately failure of the fistula. To increase our understanding of this process, numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved for the flow in an infinite channel having curvature and stenosis. Physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers ranging from 300 to 1500 and stenosis percentages of 0, 25, 50, and 75 are modeled. The post-stenotic flow is characterized by strong shear layers and recirculation regions. The largest shear stresses are found just upstream of the stenosis apex. The maximum shear stress increases with increasing Reynolds number and percent stenosis. The results indicate that hemodynamic conditions in the vein after fistula creation combined with curvature of the cephalic arch lead to shear stresses that exceed normal physiological values (both minimum and maximum). In some cases, the shear stresses are sufficiently large to cause damage to the endothelium and possibly denudation.

  18. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  19. Magnetic Particle Imaging for High Temporal Resolution Assessment of Aneurysm Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Andreas; Spallek, Johanna; Forkert, Nils D.; Faizy, Tobias D.; Werner, Franziska; Knopp, Tobias; Krause, Dieter; Fiehler, Jens; Buhk, Jan-Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the capability of magnetic particle imaging (MPI) to assess the hemodynamics in a realistic 3D aneurysm model obtained by additive manufacturing. MPI was compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Materials and Methods The aneurysm model was of saccular morphology (7 mm dome height, 5 mm cross-section, 3–4 mm neck, 3.5 mm parent artery diameter) and connected to a peristaltic pump delivering a physiological flow (250 mL/min) and pulsation rate (70/min). High-resolution (4 h long) 4D phase contrast flow quantification (4D pc-fq) MRI was used to directly assess the hemodynamics of the model. Dynamic MPI, MRI, and DSA were performed with contrast agent injections (3 mL volume in 3 s) through a proximally placed catheter. Results and Discussion 4D pc-fq measurements showed distinct pulsatile flow velocities (20–80 cm/s) as well as lower flow velocities and a vortex inside the aneurysm. All three dynamic methods (MPI, MRI, and DSA) also showed a clear pulsation pattern as well as delayed contrast agent dynamics within the aneurysm, which is most likely caused by the vortex within the aneurysm. Due to the high temporal resolution of MPI and DSA, it was possible to track the contrast agent bolus through the model and to estimate the average flow velocity (about 60 cm/s), which is in accordance with the 4D pc-fq measurements. Conclusions The ionizing radiation free, 4D high resolution MPI method is a very promising tool for imaging and characterization of hemodynamics in human. It carries the possibility of overcoming certain disadvantages of other modalities like considerably lower temporal resolution of dynamic MRI and limited 2D characteristics of DSA. Furthermore, additive manufacturing is the key for translating powerful pre-clinical techniques into the clinic. PMID:27494610

  20. Effects of radiation on tumor hemodynamics and NF-kappaB in breast tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantz, Keith M.; Cao, Ning; Liu, Bo; Cao, Minsong; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Mendonca, Marc; Li, Jian Jian

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to monitor in vivo the IR dose dependent response of NF-κB and tumor hemodynamics as a function of time. Material and Methods: An MDA-231 breast cancer cell line was stably transfected with a firefly luciferase gene within the NF-kappaB promoter. Tumors on the right flank irradiated with a single fractionated dose of 5Gy or 10Gy. Over two weeks, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PCT-S), bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and dynamic contrast enhanced CT (DCE-CT) was used to monitor hemoglobin status, NF-kappaB expression, and physiology, respectively. Results: From the BLI, an increase in NF-kappaB expression was observed in both the right (irradiation) and left (nonirradiated) tumors, which peaked at 8-12 hours, returned to basal levels after 24 hours, and increased a second time from 3 to 7 days. This data identifies both a radiation-induced bystander effect and a bimodal longitudinal response associated with NF-κB-controlled luciferase promoter. The physiological results from DCE-CT measured an increase in perfusion (26%) two days after radiation and both a decrease in perfusion and an increase in fp by week 1 (10Gy cohort). PCT-S measured increased levels of oxygen saturation two days post IR, which did not change after 1 week. Initially, NF-κB would modify hemodynamics to increase oxygen delivery after IR insult. The secondary response appears to modulate tumor angiogenesis. Conclusions: A bimodal response to radiation was detected with NF-kappaB-controlled luciferase reporter with a concomitant hemodynamic response associated with tumor hypoxia. Experiments are being performed to increase statistics.

  1. Hemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a Brazilian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Fernando Suparregui; Rezende, Ederlon Alves de Carvalho; Mendes, Ciro Leite; Silva Jr., João Manoel; Sanches, Joel Lyra

    2014-01-01

    Objective In Brazil, there are no data on the preferences of intensivists regarding hemodynamic monitoring methods. The present study aimed to identify the methods used by national intensivists, the hemodynamic variables they consider important, the regional differences, the reasons for choosing a particular method, and the use of protocols and continued training. Methods National intensivists were invited to answer an electronic questionnaire during three intensive care events and later, through the Associação de Medicina Intensiva Brasileira portal, between March and October 2009. Demographic data and aspects related to the respondent preferences regarding hemodynamic monitoring were researched. Results In total, 211 professionals answered the questionnaire. Private hospitals showed higher availability of resources for hemodynamic monitoring than did public institutions. The pulmonary artery catheter was considered the most trusted by 56.9% of the respondents, followed by echocardiograms, at 22.3%. Cardiac output was considered the most important variable. Other variables also considered relevant were mixed/central venous oxygen saturation, pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, and right ventricular end-diastolic volume. Echocardiography was the most used method (64.5%), followed by pulmonary artery catheter (49.3%). Only half of respondents used treatment protocols, and 25% worked in continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring. Conclusion Hemodynamic monitoring has a greater availability in intensive care units of private institutions in Brazil. Echocardiography was the most used monitoring method, but the pulmonary artery catheter remains the most reliable. The implementation of treatment protocols and continuing education programs in hemodynamic monitoring in Brazil is still insufficient. PMID:25607264

  2. Comparison of the hemodynamic effects of gasless abdominal distention and CO2 pneumoperitoneum during incremental positive end-expiratory pressure.

    PubMed

    Woolley, D S; Puglisi, R N; Bilgrami, S; Quinn, J V; Slotman, G J

    1995-01-01

    Laparoscopy is used increasingly in managing critically ill patients. Carbon dioxide (CO2) pneumoperitoneum is used during these procedures. The increased intra-abdominal pressure of CO2 pneumoperitoneum, however, can affect cardiopulmonary performance adversely. Recently, gasless abdominal wall distention has been introduced as an alternative to CO2 pneumoperitoneum. The purpose of this study was to compare the hemodynamic effects of gasless abdominal distention (GAD) with those of CO2 pneumoperitoneum during mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Six anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated adult swine were monitored with pulmonary artery and arterial catheters at incremental values of PEEP (0-20 cm H2O, by 5, Control) and then allowed to return to baseline hemodynamic status at 0 cm H2O PEEP. The animals were then randomly assigned to receive either CO2 pneumoperitoneum at 15 mm Hg intra-abdominal pressure (PNEUMO) or GAD (equal to anterior abdominal wall displacement of CO2) and PEEP was reapplied. The animals were allowed to return to hemodynamic baseline and PEEP was reapplied with the alternate method of abdominal wall distention. A complete hemodynamic profile and arterial/mixed venous blood gas measurements were monitored at each value of PEEP. With GAD, central venous pressure (CVP), pulmonary artery pressure (PAP), pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), and PaCO2 were significantly reduced, compared to PNEUMO, and PaO2 was increased. Cardiac index was higher in GAD versus PNEUMO at baseline, but was lower for GAD at PEEP levels above 10 cm H2O. These results indicate that in its net effect, GAD does not exacerbate the adverse hemodynamic effects of PEEP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7830409

  3. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  4. Evaluation of the Hemodynamic Response to Endotracheal Intubation Comparing the Airtraq® with Macintosh Laryngoscopes in Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilovska-Brzanov, Aleksandra; Jarallah, Mohhamed Al; Cogliati, Andrea; Mojsova-Mijovska, Maja; Mijuskovic, Dragan; Slaveski, Dimce

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac patients are more prone to develop hemodynamic instability on induction of anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. The Airtraq® optical laryngoscope is a single-use rigid video laryngoscope that has been developed to facilitate tracheal intubation. There are limited studies comparing differences in the circulatory responses to Airtraq® and direct Macintosh larynngoscopy in cardiac patients. Aim: The purpose of our study was to evaluate whether there was clinically significant difference between the hemodynamic response to orotracheal intubation guided by either of the two devices (Airtraq® and Macintosh laryngoscopes) in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. Material and methods: In this clinical study we analyzed the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation performed with Airtraq® or Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients who underwent elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery under general anesthesia. Results: We analyzed: blood pressure (systolic, diastolic, mean), heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation (all notified before induction in anesthesia, immediately after induction, at the time of intubation and thereafter one and five minutes after intubation). We also recorded the maximal values of blood pressure and heart rate, as well as calculated the product of heart rate and systolic blood pressure. There were statistically significant differences in the hemodynamic response between the groups. At the time of intubation, there was significant inter-group difference in heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure. Endotracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope was accompanied by significant increase in blood pressure and heart rate compared to Airtraq® group. Conclusion: The Airtraq® laryngoscope performed better than the Macintosh laryngoscope in terms of hemodynamic to the patient undergoing routine coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:26635435

  5. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans.

    PubMed

    Lathers, C M; Charles, J B; Elton, K F; Holt, T A; Mukai, C; Bennett, B S; Bungo, M W

    1989-07-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours. PMID:2760255

  6. Wireless Monitoring of Liver Hemodynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Akl, Tony J.; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, M. Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Coté, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics. PMID:25019160

  7. Cerebral hemodynamics during graded Valsalva maneuvers

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Blake G.; Cotter, James D.; Mejuto, Gaizka; Mündel, Toby; Lucas, Samuel J. E.

    2014-01-01

    The Valsalva maneuver (VM) produces large and abrupt changes in mean arterial pressure (MAP) that challenge cerebral blood flow and oxygenation. We examined the effect of VM intensity on middle cerebral artery blood velocity (MCAv) and cortical oxygenation responses during (phases I–III) and following (phase IV) a VM. Healthy participants (n = 20 mean ± SD: 27 ± 7 years) completed 30 and 90% of their maximal VM mouth pressure for 10 s (order randomized) whilst standing. Beat-to-beat MCAv, cerebral oxygenation (NIRS) and MAP across the different phases of the VM are reported as the difference from standing baseline. There were significant interaction (phase * intensity) effects for MCAv, total oxygenation index (TOI) and MAP (all P < 0.01). MCAv decreased during phases II and III (P < 0.01), with the greatest decrease during phase III (−5 ± 8 and −19 ± 15 cm·s−1 for 30 and 90% VM, respectively). This pattern was also evident in TOI (phase III: −1 ± 1 and −5 ± 4%, both P < 0.05). Phase IV increased MCAv (22 ± 15 and 34 ± 23 cm·s−1), MAP (15 ± 14 and 24 ± 17 mm Hg) and TOI (5 ± 6 and 7 ± 5%) relative to baseline (all P < 0.05). Cerebral autoregulation, indexed, as the %MCAv/%MAP ratio, showed a phase effect only (P < 0.001), with the least regulation during phase IV (2.4 ± 3.0 and 3.2 ± 2.9). These data illustrate that an intense VM profoundly affects cerebral hemodynamics, with a reactive hyperemia occurring during phase IV following modest ischemia during phases II and III. PMID:25309449

  8. Wireless monitoring of liver hemodynamics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Akl, Tony J; Wilson, Mark A; Ericson, M Nance; Farquhar, Ethan; Coté, Gerard L

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplants have their highest technical failure rate in the first two weeks following surgery. Currently, there are limited devices for continuous, real-time monitoring of the graft. In this work, a three wavelengths system is presented that combines near-infrared spectroscopy and photoplethysmography with a processing method that can uniquely measure and separate the venous and arterial oxygen contributions. This strategy allows for the quantification of tissue oxygen consumption used to study hepatic metabolic activity and to relate it to tissue stress. The sensor is battery operated and communicates wirelessly with a data acquisition computer which provides the possibility of implantation provided sufficient miniaturization. In two in vivo porcine studies, the sensor tracked perfusion changes in hepatic tissue during vascular occlusions with a root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.135 mL/min/g of tissue. We show the possibility of using the pulsatile wave to measure the arterial oxygen saturation similar to pulse oximetry. The signal is also used to extract the venous oxygen saturation from the direct current (DC) levels. Arterial and venous oxygen saturation changes were measured with an RMSE of 2.19% and 1.39% respectively when no vascular occlusions were induced. This error increased to 2.82% and 3.83% when vascular occlusions were induced during hypoxia. These errors are similar to the resolution of a commercial oximetry catheter used as a reference. This work is the first realization of a wireless optical sensor for continuous monitoring of hepatic hemodynamics. PMID:25019160

  9. Acute hemodynamic responses to weightlessness in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.; Elton, K. F.; Holt, T. A.; Mukai, C.; Bennett, B. S.; Bungo, M. W.

    1989-01-01

    As NASA designs space flights requiring prolonged periods of weightlessness for a broader segment of the population, it will be important to know the acute and sustained effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular system since this information will contribute to understanding of the clinical pharmacology of drugs administered in space. Due to operational constraints on space flights, earliest effects of weightlessness have not been documented. We examined hemodynamic responses of humans to transitions from acceleration to weightlessness during parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Impedance cardiography data were collected over four sets of 8-10 parabolas, with a brief rest period between sets. Each parabola included a period of 1.8 Gz, then approximately 20 seconds of weightlessness, and finally a period of 1.6 Gz; the cycle repeated almost immediately for the remainder of the set. Subjects were semi-supine (Shuttle launch posture) for the first set, then randomly supine, sitting and standing for each subsequent set. Transition to weightlessness while standing produced decreased heart rate, increased thoracic fluid content, and increased stroke index. Surprisingly, the onset of weightlessness in the semi-supine posture produced little evidence of a headward fluid shift. Heart rate, stroke index, and cardiac index are virtually unchanged after 20 seconds of weightlessness, and thoracic fluid content is slightly decreased. Semi-supine responses run counter to Shuttle crewmember reports of noticeable fluid shift after minutes to hours in orbit. Apparently, the headward fluid shift commences in the semi-supine posture before launch. is augmented by launch acceleration, but briefly interrupted immediately in orbit, then resumes and is completed over the next hours.

  10. Prediction of Prolonged Hemodynamic Instability During Carotid Angioplasty and Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Jong Kook; Park, Jeong Jin; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Cho, Young Dae; Sheen, Seung Hun; Jang, Kyung-Sool

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the risk factors of prolonged hemodynamic instability (HDI) after carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS). Herein, a simplified predictive scoring system for prolonged HDI is proposed. Materials and Methods Sixty-six patients who had CAS from 2011 to 2016 at a single institution were evaluated. Prolonged HDI was defined as systolic blood pressure >160 mm Hg or <90 mm Hg or heart rate <50 beats/min, lasting over 30 minutes despite medical treatments. For the study, clinical data and radiologic data, including plaque morphology and stenosis were analyzed. Results Prolonged HDI was observed in 21 patients (31.8%). Multivariable analysis revealed that calcification (OR, 6.726; p=0.006), eccentric stenosis (OR, 3.645; p=0.047) and extensive plaque distribution (OR, 7.169; p=0.006) were related to prolonged HDI. According to these results, a simplified scoring scale was proposed based on the summation of points: 2 points for calcified plaque, 2 points for extensive plaque distribution, and 1 point for eccentric stenosis. The percentages of prolonged HDI according to the total score were as follows: score 0, 8.7%; score 1, 20.0%; score 2, 38.5%; score 3, 72.7%; score 4, 66.7%; score 5, 100%. From the analysis, the total score in patients with prolonged HDI was significantly higher than those without prolonged HDI (p<0.001). Conclusion Prolonged HDI can be associated with calcification of plaque, eccentric stenosis and extensive plaque distribution, and a simplified scoring system enables prediction of prolonged HDI according to our cohort. PMID:27621949

  11. Pulmonary hemodynamics in children living at high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, Dante; Sime, Francisco; Ruiz, Luis

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous publications on altitude-related diseases in adults. In addition, an International Consensus Statement published in 2001 deals with altitude-related illnesses occurring in lowland children who travel to high altitudes. However, despite the millions of children living permanently at high altitudes around the world, there are few publications on altitude-related diseases and pulmonary hemodynamics in this pediatric population. In this paper, we review the published literature on this subject. First, the pulmonary hemodynamics of healthy children (newborns, infants, children, and adolescents) residing at altitudes above 4000 m are summarized. Asymptomatic pulmonary hypertension, which slowly declines with increasing age, is found in these children. This is followed by a discussion of the functional closure of ductus arteriosus, which is delayed at high altitude. Then, the high prevalence of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in highland children and the pulmonary hemodynamics in these patients are described. Next, the pulmonary hemodynamics in highland children who suffer high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) after a short stay at lower levels is discussed, and the possible reasons for susceptibility to reentry HAPE in this pediatric population are postulated. The pulmonary hemodynamics in children with subacute mountain sickness (SMS) are then described. Moderate to severe pulmonary hypertension is a common finding in all these altitude-related diseases. Finally, the management of these clinical conditions is outlined. PMID:18800956

  12. Hemodynamic monitoring and outcome-a physiological appraisal.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yoo-Kuen; Khan, Zahid Hussain

    2011-12-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring provides us with refined details about the cardiovascular system. In spite of increased availability of the monitoring process and monitoring equipment, hemodynamic monitoring has not significantly improved survival outcome. Care providers should be cognizant of the role of the cardiovascular system and its importance in oxygen delivery to the cells in order to sustain life. Effective hemodynamic monitoring should be able to delineate how well the system is performing in carrying out this role. Different hemodynamic monitors serve in this role to a different extent; some provide very little information on this. The cardiovascular system is only one of the many systems that need to function optimally for survival; others of equal importance include the integrity of the airway, the breathing process, the adequacy of hemoglobin level, and the health of the tissue bed, especially in the brain and the heart. Advances in hemodynamic monitoring with focus on oxygen delivery at the cellular level may ultimately provide the edge to effective monitoring that can impact outcome. PMID:22221689

  13. A Revised Hemodynamic Theory of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Gelfand, Bradley D; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-08-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) afflicts one out of every 40 individuals worldwide, causing irreversible central blindness in millions. The transformation of various tissue layers within the macula in the retina has led to competing conceptual models of the molecular pathways, cell types, and tissues responsible for the onset and progression of AMD. A model that has persisted for over 6 decades is the hemodynamic, or vascular theory of AMD progression, which states that vascular dysfunction of the choroid underlies AMD pathogenesis. Here, we re-evaluate this hypothesis in light of recent advances on molecular, anatomic, and hemodynamic changes underlying choroidal dysfunction in AMD. We propose an updated, detailed model of hemodynamic dysfunction as a mechanism of AMD development and progression. PMID:27423265

  14. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  15. Image-Based Evaluation of Vascular Function and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongmin

    2013-01-01

    The noticeable characteristics of the blood vascular structure are the inconsistent viscosity of blood and the stiffness of the vascular wall. If we can control these two factors, we can solve more problems related to hemodynamics and vascular wall function. Understanding the properties of hemodynamics and vascular wall function may provide more information applicable to clinical practice for cardiovascular disease. The bedside techniques evaluating vascular function usually measure indirect parameters. In contrast, some medical imaging techniques provide clear and direct depictions of functional cardiovascular characteristics. In this review, image-based evaluation of hemodynamic and vascular wall functions is discussed from the perspective of blood flow velocity, flow volume, flow pattern, peripheral vascular resistance, intraluminal pressure, vascular wall stress, and wall stiffness. PMID:26587430

  16. Are Hemodynamics Surrogate Endpoints in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension?

    PubMed Central

    Ventetuolo, Corey E.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Fritz, Jason S.; Smith, K. Akaya; Palevsky, Harold I.; Klinger, James R.; Halpern, Scott D.; Kawut, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Background While frequently assessed in trials and clinical practice, hemodynamic response to therapy has never been validated as a surrogate endpoint for clinical events in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of four randomized placebo-controlled trials to determine if treatment-induced changes in hemodynamic values at 12 weeks accounted for the relationship between treatment assignment and the probability of early clinical events (death, lung transplantation, atrial septostomy, PAH hospitalization, withdrawal for clinical worsening, escalation in PAH therapy). We included 1119 subjects with PAH. The median (interquartile range) age was 48 (37 – 59), and 23% were men. 656 (59%) received active therapy (101 [15%] iloprost, 118 [18%] sitaxsentan, 204 [31%] sildenafil, and 233 [36%] subcutaneous treprostinil). Active treatment significantly lowered right atrial pressure (RAP), mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP), and pulmonary vascular resistance and increased cardiac output and index (p < 0.01 for all). Changes in hemodynamic values (except for RAP and mPAP) were significantly associated with the risk of a clinical event (p ≤ 0.01 for all). While active treatment approximately halved the odds of a clinical event compared to placebo (p < 0.001), changes in hemodynamics accounted for only 1.2 – 13.9% of the overall treatment effect. Conclusions Treatment-induced changes in hemodynamics at 12 weeks only partially explain the impact of therapy on the probability of early clinical events in PAH. These findings suggest that resting hemodynamics are not valid surrogate endpoints for short-term events in PAH clinical trials. PMID:24951771

  17. Physical Activity and Hemodynamic Reactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Light, Robert P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an elevated cardiovascular risk. This study was designed to understand better the presence and strength of the relationship between physical activity and BP and to explore determinants of hemodynamic reactivity. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Twenty-four patients with CKD (mean age 69.5 yr; 3.1 antihypertensive drugs; estimated GFR 47 ml/min per 1.73 m2, albumin/creatinine ratio 403 mg/g) were studied on three occasions during a 6-wk period with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring and simultaneous activity monitoring with wrist actigraphy. Results: Nondippers were found have a greater level of sleep activity compared with dippers, although the awake activity level was similar (7.06 versus 6.73) between groups (P = 0.042 for interaction). In 3587 BP activity pairs, hemodynamic reactivity was variable between individuals (systolic BP reactivity 1.06 [SD 10.50]; diastolic BP reactivity 0.89 [SD 7.80] heart rate reactivity 1.18 [SD 11.00]); those who were more sedentary had a greater increment in systolic BP compared with those who were less sedentary. Antihypertensive drugs blunted hemodynamic reactivity. Hemodynamic reactivity was greatest between 12 a.m. and 8 a.m., making this a vulnerable period for cardiovascular events. Conclusions: Greater hemodynamic reactivity in sedentary people with CKD offers a possible and thus far unrecognized mechanism of cardiovascular damage. Besides reducing BP, antihypertensive drugs reduce hemodynamic reactivity, which offers another plausible mechanism of cardiovascular protection with their use. PMID:18922983

  18. Evaluation of bioimpedance for the measurement of physiologic variables as related to hemodynamic studies in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Bruce C.

    1993-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance, following space flight, has received substantial attention because of the possibility that it compromises astronaut safety and reduces the ability of astronauts to function at peak performance levels upon return to a one-g environment. Many pre- and post-flight studies are performed to evaluate changes in hemodynamic responses to orthostatic challenges after shuttle missions. The purpose of this present project is to validate bioimpedance as a means to acquire stroke volume and other hemodynamic information in these studies. In this study, ten male and ten female subjects were subjected to simultaneous measurements of thoracic bioimpedance and Doppler ultrasonic velocimetry under supine, 10 degree head down and 30 degree head up conditions. Paired measurements were made during six periods of five seconds breath holding, over a two minute period, for each of the three positions. Stroke volume was calculated by three bioimpedance techniques and ultrasonic Doppler.

  19. Comprehensive cognitive and cerebral hemodynamic evaluation after cranioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Fernanda; Oliveira, Arthur Maynart; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Freire, Fabio Rios; Calado, Vanessa Tome; Amorim, Robson Luis; Neville, Iuri Santana; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Anghinah, Renato; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2014-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is an established procedure to lower intracranial pressure and can save patients’ lives. However, this procedure is associated with delayed cognitive decline and cerebral hemodynamics complications. Studies show the benefits of cranioplasty beyond cosmetic aspects, including brain protection, and functional and cerebrovascular aspects, but a detailed description of the concrete changes following this procedure are lacking. In this paper, the authors report a patient with trephine syndrome who underwent cranioplasty; comprehensive cognitive and cerebral hemodynamic evaluations were performed prior to and following the cranioplasty. The discussion was based on a critical literature review. PMID:24833902

  20. Hemodynamic monitoring in the era of digital health.

    PubMed

    Michard, Frederic

    2016-12-01

    Digital innovations are changing medicine, and hemodynamic monitoring will not be an exception. Five to ten years from now, we can envision a world where clinicians will learn hemodynamics with simulators and serious games, will monitor patients with wearable or implantable sensors in the hospital and after discharge, will use medical devices able to communicate and integrate the historical, clinical, physiologic and biological information necessary to predict adverse events, propose the most rationale therapy and ensure it is delivered properly. Considerable intellectual and financial investments are currently made to ensure some of these new ideas and products soon become a reality. PMID:26885656

  1. Morphometric and hemodynamic analysis of atherosclerotic progression in human carotid artery bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xu; Yin, Xiaoping; Xu, Yingjin; Jia, Xinwei; Li, Jianhui; Niu, Pei; Shen, Wenzeng; Kassab, Ghassan S; Tan, Wenchang; Huo, Yunlong

    2016-03-01

    Although atherosclerosis has been widely investigated at carotid artery bifurcation, there is a lack of morphometric and hemodynamic data at different stages of the disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the lesion difference in patients with carotid artery disease compared with healthy control subjects. The three-dimensional (3D) geometry of carotid artery bifurcation was reconstructed from computed tomography angiography (CTA) images of Chinese control subjects (n = 30) and patients with carotid artery disease (n = 30). We defined two novel vector angles (i.e., angles 1 and 2) that were tangential to the reconstructed contour of the 3D vessel. The best-fit diameter was computed along the internal carotid artery (ICA) center line. Hemodynamic analysis was performed at various bifurcations. Patients with stenotic vessels have larger angles 1 and 2 (151 ± 11° and 42 ± 20°) and smaller diameters of the external carotid artery (ECA) (4.6 ± 0.85 mm) compared with control subjects (144 ± 13° and 36 ± 16°, 5.2 ± 0.57 mm) although there is no significant difference in the common carotid artery (CCA) (7.1 ± 1.2 vs. 7.5 ± 1.0 mm, P = 0.18). In particular, all patients with carotid artery disease have a stenosis at the proximal ICA (including both sinus and carina regions), while 20% of patients have stenosis at the middle ICA and 20% have stenosis expansion to the entire cervical ICA. Morphometric and hemodynamic analyses suggest that atherosclerotic plaques initiate at both sinus and carina regions of ICA and progress downstream. PMID:26747497

  2. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, Uwe; Burke, Edward J.; Butler, Bruce D.; Davis, Karen L.; Katz, Jeffrey; Melamed, Evan; Morris, William P.; Allen, Steven J.

    1993-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 years ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 deg down (LLR-10 deg; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  3. Body position does not affect the hemodynamic response to venous air embolism in dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlhorn, U.; Burke, E. J.; Butler, B. D.; Davis, K. L.; Katz, J.; Melamed, E.; Morris, W. P.; Allen, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    Current therapy for massive venous air embolism (VAE) includes the use of the left lateral recumbent (LLR) position. This recommendation is based on animal studies, conducted 50 yr ago, which looked primarily at survival. Little is known, however, about the concomitant hemodynamic response after VAE in various body positions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the hemodynamic and cardiovascular changes in various body positions after VAE. Twenty-two mechanically ventilated supine mongrel dogs received a venous air infusion of 2.5 mL/kg at a rate of 5 mL/s. One minute after the infusion, 100% oxygen ventilation was commenced and the body position of the dogs was changed to either the LLR (n = 6), the LLR with the head 10 degrees down (LLR-10 degrees; n = 6) or the right lateral recumbent (RLR; n = 5) position. Five dogs were maintained in the supine position (SUP; n = 5). One dog died in every group except in the SUP group, where all the dogs recovered. There were no significant differences among the various body positions in terms of heart rate, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, central venous pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, or cardiac output. The acute hemodynamic changes occurring during the first 5-15 min after VAE recovered to 80% of control within 60 min. Our data suggest that body repositioning does not influence the cardiovascular response to VAE. Specifically, our data do not support the recommendation of repositioning into the LLR position for the treatment of VAE.

  4. Measuring cerebral hemodynamic changes during action observation with functional transcranial doppler

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Sik; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of action observation training (AOT) on cerebral hemodynamic changes including cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) and cerebral blood flow volume (CBFvol) in healthy subjects. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy subjects participated in this study. [Methods] All subjects were educated regarding AOT, and systolic peak velocity (Vs) as well as mean flow velocity (Vm) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), anterior cerebral artery (ACA), and posterior cerebral artery (PCA) were evaluated using functional transcranial doppler with a 2-MHz probe, before and after performing AOT. [Results] Healthy subjects showed significant differences in Vs and Vm in the MCA, ACA, and PCA after AOT compared with those before AOT. [Conclusion] Our findings indicate that AOT has a positive effect in terms of an increase in CBFV and CBFvol in healthy subjects, since the brain requires more blood to meet the metabolic demand during AOT. PMID:26157224

  5. Less invasive methods of advanced hemodynamic monitoring: principles, devices, and their role in the perioperative hemodynamic optimization

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of the cardiac output (CO) and other hemodynamic parameters, traditionally performed with the thermodilution method via a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC), is now increasingly done with the aid of less invasive and much easier to use devices. When used within the context of a hemodynamic optimization protocol, they can positively influence the outcome in both surgical and non-surgical patient populations. While these monitoring tools have simplified the hemodynamic calculations, they are subject to limitations and can lead to erroneous results if not used properly. In this article we will review the commercially available minimally invasive CO monitoring devices, explore their technical characteristics and describe the limitations that should be taken into consideration when clinical decisions are made. PMID:24472443

  6. Dietary melatonin alters uterine artery hemodynamics in pregnant holstein heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to examine uterine artery hemodynamics and maternal serum profiles in pregnant heifers supplemented with dietary melatonin (MEL) or no supplementation (CON). In addition, melatonin receptor–mediated responses in steroid metabolism were examined using a bovine endometrial epithelial...

  7. Hemodynamic alterations in chronically conscious unrestrained diabetic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, L.F.; Salmon, M.G.; Garcia-Estan, J.; Salazar, F.J.; Ubeda, M.; Quesada, T.

    1987-05-01

    Important cardiovascular dysfunctions have been described in streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats. To determine the influence of these changes on the hemodynamic state and whether insulin treatment can avoid them, different hemodynamic parameters, obtained by the thermodilution method, were studied in STZ-induced (65 mg/kg) diabetic male Wistar rats, as well as in age-control, weight-control, and insulin-treated diabetic ones. Plasma volume was measured by dilution of radioiodinated (/sup 125/I) human serum albumin. All rats were examined in the conscious, unrestrained state 12 wk after induction of diabetes or acidified saline (pH 4.5) injection. At 12 wk of diabetic state most important findings were normotension, high blood volume, bradycardia, increase in stroke volume, cardiac output, and cardiosomatic ratio, and decrease in total peripheral resistance and cardiac contractility and relaxation (dP/dt/sub max/ and dP/dt/sub min/ of left ventricular pressure curves). The insulin-treated diabetic rats did not show any hemodynamic differences when compared with the control animals. These results suggest that important hemodynamic alterations are present in the chronic diabetic states, possibly conditioning congestive heart failure. These alterations can be prevented by insulin treatment.

  8. Numerical analysis of hemodynamics in spastic middle cerebral arteries.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Wang, Qingfeng; Wang, Qingyuan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Zheng, Tinghui

    2016-11-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CVS) is the most common serious complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the many factors that are associated with the pathogenesis of CVS, hemodynamics plays an important role in the initiation and development of CVS. Numerical simulation was carried out to obtain the flow patterns and wall shear stress (WSS) distribution in spastic middle cerebral arteries. The blood was assumed to be incompressible, laminar, homogenous, Newtonian, and steady. Our simulations reveal that flow velocity and WSS level increase at the stenosis segment of the spastic vessels, but further downstream of stenosis, the WSS significantly decreases along the inner wall, and flow circulation and stagnation are observed. The hydrodynamic resistance increases with the increase of vessel spasm. Moreover, the change of flow field and hydrodynamic forces are not linearly proportional to the spasm level, and the rapid change of hemodynamic parameters is observed as the spasm is more than 50%. Accordingly, in the view of hemodynamic physiology, vessels with less than 30% stenosis are capable of self-restoration towards normal conditions. However, vessels with more than 50% stenosis may eventually lose their capacity to adapt to differing physiologic conditions due to the extreme non-physilogic hemodynamic environment, and the immediate expansion of the vessel lumen might be needed to minimize serious and non-reversible effects. PMID:26942314

  9. Transmediastinal and Transcardiac Gunshot Wound with Hemodynamic Stability

    PubMed Central

    Al-Lal, Yusef Mohamed; de Tomás Palacios, Jorge; Amunategui Prats, Iñaki; Turégano Fuentes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac injuries caused by knives and firearms are slightly increasing in our environment. We report the case of a 43-year-old male patient with a transmediastinal gunshot wound (TGSW) and a through-and-through cardiac wound who was hemodynamically stable upon his admission. He had an entrance wound below the left clavicle, with no exit wound, and decreased breath sounds in the right hemithorax. Chest X-ray showed the bullet in the right hemithorax and large right hemothorax. The ultrasound revealed pericardial effusion, and a chest tube produced 1500 cc. of blood, but he remained hemodynamically stable. Considering these findings, a median sternotomy was carried out, the through-and-through cardiac wounds were suture-repaired, lung laceration was sutured, and a pacemaker was placed in the right ventricle. The patient had uneventful recovery and was discharged home on the twelfth postoperative day. The management and prognosis of these patients are determined by the hemodynamic situation upon arrival to the Emergency Department (ED), as well as a prompt surgical repair if needed. Patients with a TGSW have been divided into three groups according to the SBP: group I, with SBP >100 mmHg; group II, with SBP 60–100 mmHg; and group III, with SBP <60 mmHg. The diagnostic workup and management should be tailored accordingly, and several series have confirmed high chances of success with conservative management when these patients are hemodynamically stable. PMID:25197606

  10. [Introduction of Hemodynamic Monitoring in Critical Care Units].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Wei; Wang, Shiao-Pei

    2016-02-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a very important treatment in intensive care units. Measurements taken during monitoring include pulmonary artery catheter (PAC), pulse-induced contour output (PiCCO), and non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring. PAC measures cardiopulmonary parameters using the thermodilution principle. PiCCO uses transpulmonary thermodilution and pulse contour analysis to measure cardiopulmonary parameters and extra-vascular lung water, to predict lung edema, and to differentiate between cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic respiratory failure. Non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring uses the thoracic electrical bioimpedance principle to measure electrical conductivity and then calculates stroke volume and cardiopulmonary parameters using the arrangement of red blood cells. The author is a nurse in an intensive care unit who is familiar with the various methods used in hemodynamic monitoring, with preparing the related devices, with briefing patients and family members prior to procedures, with related aseptic skills, with preventing complications during the insertion procedure, and with analyzing and interpreting those parameters accurately. The issues addressed in this paper are provided as a reference for nurses and other medical personnel to choose appropriate treatments when caring for critical patients. PMID:26813070

  11. [Mathematical model of baroreflex regulation of hemodynamics in the dog].

    PubMed

    Palets, B L

    1983-11-01

    A non-linear mathematical model of dog hemodynamics regulation was developed including descriptions of the cardiovascular system, the arterial baroreflex and the Beinbridge reflex. Model calculated arterial and venous pressure, blood flow, and heart rate are in good agreement with experimental data. PMID:6653829

  12. Central circulatory hemodynamics as a function of gravitational stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, Rick D.; White, C. D.; Fanton, J. W.; Owens, R. W.; Barber, J. F.; Lewkowski, B. E.; Goff, O. T.

    1991-01-01

    This study focuses on an evaluation of the central hemodynamics in a nonhuman primate model to variations in gravitational states. The baboon, phylogenectically close to man, was chosen as the human surrogate. The study environments selected are head-down and head-up tilt in the physiology laboratory, centrifugation to test hypergravic stress, and parabolic flights to test transient acute responses to microgravity.

  13. Segmental hemodynamics during partial liquid ventilation in isolated rat lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Angela C.; Hirsh, Emily; Wong, Andrew C.; Moore, Timothy M.; Taylor, Aubrey E.; Hirschl, Ronald B.; Younger, John G.

    2011-01-01

    Partial liquid ventilation (PLV) is a means of ventilatory support in which gas ventilation is carried out in a lung partially filled with a perfluorocarbon liquid capable of supporting gas exchange. Recently, this technique has been proposed as an adjunctive therapy for cardiac arrest, during which PLV with cold perfluorocarbons might rapidly cool the intrathoracic contents and promote cerebral protective hypothermia while not interfering with gas exchange. A concern during such therapy will be the effect of PLV on pulmonary hemodynamics during very low blood flow conditions. In the current study, segmental (i.e. precapillary, capillary, and postcapillary) hemodynamics were studied in the rat lung using a standard isolated lung perfusion system at a flow rate of 6 ml/min ( ~5% normal cardiac output). Lungs received either gas ventilation or 5 or 10 ml/kg PLV. Segmental pressures and vascular resistances were determined, as was transcapillary fluid flux. The relationship between individual hemodynamic parameters and PLV dose was examined using linear regression, with n = 5 in each study group. PLV at both the 5 and 10 ml/kg dose produced no detectable changes in pulmonary blood flow or in transcapillary fluid flux (all R2 values < 0.20). Conclusion: In an isolated perfused lung model of low flow conditions, normal segmental hemodynamic behavior was preserved during liquid ventilation. These data support further investigation of this technique as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:12668304

  14. Elementary Hemodynamic Principles Based on Modified Bernoulli's Equation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badeer, Henry S.

    1985-01-01

    Develops and expands basic concepts of Bernoulli's equation as it applies to vascular hemodynamics. Simple models are used to illustrate gravitational potential energy, steady nonturbulent flow, pump-driven streamline flow, and other areas. Relationships to the circulatory system are also discussed. (DH)

  15. Telemetric Catheter-Based Pressure Sensor for Hemodynamic Monitoring: Experimental Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Urban, Ute; Fassbender, Holger; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Schoth, Felix; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical and animal experimental feasibility of a percutaneously implantable pulmonary arterial implant for permanent hemodynamic monitoring. Two systems for measuring pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) as well as pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) were developed by modifying a commercially available pulmonary artery catheter (PAC). First, a cable-bound catheter-based system was designed by implementation of a capacitive absolute-pressure sensor in the catheter tip. This system was developed further into a completely implantable telemetric system. The devices were tested in an acute setting in a total of 10 sheep. The implant was placed with its tip in the descending pulmonary artery via the right jugular approach. Results were compared with conventional PAC positioned in the contralateral pulmonary artery using Pearson's correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots. Implantation of the monitoring systems was uneventful in 10 animals. Data from two fully functional cable-bound and telemetric pressure monitoring systems were available, with a total of 18,506 measurements. There was an excellent correlation between reference data and the data obtained with the implants (r = 0.9944). Bland-Altman plots indicated a very good agreement between the techniques. We report the development and successful initial test of an implantable catheter-based device for long-term measurement of PAP and PAOP. Both devices may be applicable for hemodynamic monitoring. Further long-term studies for assessing reliability and durability of the device are warranted.

  16. Ischemia and reperfusion injury in renal transplantation: hemodynamic and immunological paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Requião-Moura, Lúcio Roberto; Durão, Marcelino de Souza; de Matos, Ana Cristina Carvalho; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion injury is an inevitable event in renal transplantation. The most important consequences are delayed graft function, longer length of stay, higher hospital costs, high risk of acute rejection, and negative impact of long-term follow-up. Currently, many factors are involved in their pathophysiology and could be classified into two different paradigms for education purposes: hemodynamic and immune. The hemodynamic paradigm is described as the reduction of oxygen delivery due to blood flow interruption, involving many hormone systems, and oxygen-free radicals produced after reperfusion. The immune paradigm has been recently described and involves immune system cells, especially T cells, with a central role in this injury. According to these concepts, new strategies to prevent ischemia and reperfusion injury have been studied, particularly the more physiological forms of storing the kidney, such as the pump machine and the use of antilymphocyte antibody therapy before reperfusion. Pump machine perfusion reduces delayed graft function prevalence and length of stay at hospital, and increases long-term graft survival. The use of antilymphocyte antibody therapy before reperfusion, such as Thymoglobulin™, can reduce the prevalence of delayed graft function and chronic graft dysfunction. PMID:25993079

  17. Computational hemodynamic study of intracranial aneurysms coexistent with proximal artery stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Peloc, Nora L.; Putman, Christopher M.; Cebral, Juan R.

    2012-03-01

    Intracranial aneurysms and artery stenosis are vascular diseases with different pathophysiological characteristics. However, although unusual, aneurysms may coexist in up to 5% of patients with stenotic plaque, according to a previous study. Another study showed that incidental detection of cerebral aneurysm in the same cerebral circulation as the stenotic plaque was less than 2%. Patients with concomitant carotid artery stenosis and unruptured intracranial aneurysms pose a difficult management decision for the physician. Case reports showed patients who died due to aneurysm rupture months after endarterectomy but before aneurysm clipping, while others did not show any change in the aneurysm after plaque removal, having optimum outcome after aneurysm coiling. The purpose of this study is to investigate the intraaneurysmal hemodynamic changes before and after treatment of stenotic plaque. Idealized models were constructed with different stenotic grade, distance and relative position to the aneurysm. Digital removal of the stenotic plaque was performed in the reconstructed model of a patient with both pathologies. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were performed using a finite element method approach. Blood velocity field and hemodynamic forces were recorded and analyzed. Changes in the flow patterns and wall shear stress values and distributions were observed in both ideal and image-based models. Detailed investigation of wall shear stress distributions in patients with both pathologies is required to make the best management decision.

  18. [Effects of phenibut on parameters of cerebral hemodynamics in swimmers with dysadaptation syndrome and various types of systemic hemodynamics].

    PubMed

    Likhodeeva, V A; Spasov, A A; Isupov, I B; Mandrikov, V B

    2010-08-01

    Administration of phenibut (0.25 g) during 4 weeks as a means of rehabilitation promoted optimization of the biochemical status and cerebral blood circulation in swimmers with various types of systemic hemodynamics, which were examined 20 minutes after warm-up. PMID:20919550

  19. Patient-specific analysis of post-operative aortic hemodynamics: a focus on thoracic endovascular repair (TEVAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, F.; Conti, M.; Lefieux, A.; Morganti, S.; Reali, A.; Sardanelli, F.; Secchi, F.; Trimarchi, S.; Veneziani, A.

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the impact of endovascular repair on aortic hemodynamics. The study addresses the assessment of post-operative hemodynamic conditions of a real clinical case through patient-specific analysis, combining accurate medical image analysis and advanced computational fluid-dynamics (CFD). Although the main clinical concern was firstly directed to the endoluminal protrusion of the prosthesis, the CFD simulations have demonstrated that there are two other important areas where the local hemodynamics is impaired and a disturbed blood flow is present: the first one is the ostium of the subclavian artery, which is partially closed by the graft; the second one is the stenosis of the distal thoracic aorta. Besides the clinical relevance of these specific findings, this study highlights how CFD analyses allow to observe important flow effects resulting from the specific features of patient vessel geometries. Consequently, our results demonstrate the potential impact of computational biomechanics not only on the basic knowledge of physiopathology, but also on the clinical practice, thanks to a quantitative extraction of knowledge made possible by merging medical data and mathematical models.

  20. Comparison of Difference in Hematologic and Hemodynamic Outcomes between Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty and Revision of Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Shon, Oog-Jin; Lee, Dong-Chul; Ryu, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study is to identify preoperative cautions for revision of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) by understanding the differences in hematologic and hemodynamic changes between primary TKA and revision of infected TKA. Materials and Methods The study included 40 patients in each of the two groups: one group with patients who underwent TKA and the other group with patients who underwent revision of infected TKA. All patients matched for age and body mass index. The following data were compared between the groups: changes in blood pressure, variations in hemoglobin level, amount of postoperative blood loss and transfused blood, incidence of blood transfusion, white blood cell (WBC) count, albumin level, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and liver enzyme level. Results The hemoglobin levels, transfusion rate, and the amount of blood loss were significantly higher in the revision group (p=0.012). In both groups, CRP reached the highest level on the 3rd postoperative day but it was normalized 2 weeks postoperatively; however, the revision TKA group showed a greater tendency to normalization (p=0.029). There were significant differences between the groups in ESR, WBC, blood pressure, and changes in liver enzyme levels. Conclusions Revision of infected TKA results in greater hemodynamic variations than primary TKA. Therefore, more efforts should be made to identify pre- and postoperative hemodynamic changes and hematologic status. PMID:27274469

  1. Evidence for Cerebral Hemodynamic Measurement-based Therapy in Symptomatic Major Cerebral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    YAMAUCHI, Hiroshi

    In patients with atherosclerotic internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery occlusive disease, chronic reduction in cerebral perfusion pressure (chronic hemodynamic compromise) increases the risk of ischemic stroke and can be detected by directly measuring hemodynamic parameters. However, strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements have not been clearly established. Bypass surgery has been proven to improve hemodynamic compromise. However, the benefit of bypass surgery for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is controversial. The results of the two randomized controlled trials were inconsistent. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, and antihypertensive therapy provides general benefit to patients with symptomatic atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. However, the benefit of strict control of blood pressure for reducing the stroke risk in patients with hemodynamic compromise is a matter of debate. The results of the two observational studies were different. We must establish strategies for selecting treatments based on hemodynamic measurements in atherosclerotic major cerebral artery disease. PMID:26041631

  2. Engineering analysis of the effects of bulging sinuses in a newly designed pediatric pulmonary heart valve on hemodynamic function.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ichiro; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Yabe, Shota; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Sugai, Telma Keiko; Matsue, Ken; Kameyama, Takeyoshi; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Takashi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Feng, Zhonggang; Miyazaki, Takako; Yamagishi, Masaaki; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Umezu, Mitsuo; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hemodynamic characteristics of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) pulmonary valves with bulging sinuses quantitatively in a pediatric pulmonary mechanical circulatory system designed by us, in order to propose the optimal design for clinical applications. In this study, we developed a pediatric pulmonary mock circulation system, which consisted of a pneumatic right ventricular model, a pulmonary heart valve chamber, and a pulmonary elastic compliance tubing with resistive units. The hemodynamic characteristics of four different types of ePTFE valves and a monoleaflet mechanical heart valve were examined. Relationships between the leaflet movements and fluid characteristics were evaluated based on engineering analyses using echocardiography and a high-speed video camera under the pediatric circulatory conditions of the mock system. We successfully performed hemodynamic simulations in our pediatric pulmonary circulatory system that could be useful for quantitatively evaluating the pediatric heart valves. In the simulation study, the ePTFE valve with bulging sinuses exhibited a large eddy in the vicinity of the leaflets, whereas the straight tubing exhibited turbulent flow. The Reynolds number obtained in the valve with bulging sinuses was calculated to be 1667, which was smaller than that in the straight tubing (R (e) = 2454).The hemodynamic characteristics of ePTFE pediatric pulmonary heart valves were examined in our mock circulatory system. The presence of the bulging sinuses in the pulmonary heart valve decreased the hydrodynamic energy loss and increased the systolic opening area. Based on an in vitro experiment, we were able to propose an optimal selection of pulmonary valve design parameters that could yield a more sophisticated pediatric ePTFE valve shape. PMID:21956206

  3. Transient AV Block as a Hemodynamic Complication of the Influenza A Virus: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Guzmán, Norwin; Del Olmo-Arroyo, Francisco; Robles-Arías, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Cintrón, William

    2016-09-01

    Influenza virus causes annual epidemics of respiratory illness characterized by sudden onset of fever, malaise, myalgias, headache, cough, and other respiratory complains. Each year in the United States, it is estimated that this debilitating respiratory illness accounts for 294,000 excess hospitalizations and 36,000 attributable deaths. Epidemiological studies describe increased cardiovascular mortality during influenza seasons. Cardiovascular involvement in acute influenza infection can occur through direct effects of the virus on the myocardium or through exacerbation of existing cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this report is to document a transient atrioventricular (AV) block with hemodynamic compromise after infection with the influenza virus in a patient with underlying cardiac disease without myocarditis. PMID:27623145

  4. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  5. Cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities in episodic and chronic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Petolicchio, Barbara; Viganò, Alessandro; di Biase, Lazzaro; Tatulli, Doriana; Toscano, Massimiliano; Vicenzini, Edoardo; Passarelli, Francesco; Di Piero, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Summary Alterations of cerebral venous drainage have been demonstrated in chronic migraine (CM), suggesting that cerebral venous hemodynamic abnormalities (CVHAs) play a role in this condition. The aim of the present study was to look for a correlation between CM and CVHAs. We recruited 33 subjects suffering from CM with or without analgesic overuse, 29 episodic migraine (EM) patients with or without aura, and 21 healthy subjects as controls (HCs). CVHAs were evaluated by transcranial and extracranial echo-color Doppler evaluation of five venous hemodynamic parameters. CVHAs were significantly more frequent in the CM and EM patients than in the HCs. In the migraine patients, CVHAs were not correlated with clinical features. The significantly greater frequency of CVHAs observed in the migraineurs may reflect a possible relationship between migraine and these abnormalities. Prospective longitudinal studies are needed to investigate whether CVHAs have a role in the processes of migraine chronification. PMID:27358220

  6. Biosimulation and visualization: effect of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Marie; Kobayashi, Toshio; Takagi, Kiyoshi

    2002-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an important role in cardiovascular disorders, and the authors are applying numerical and experimental studies of cerebrovascular blood flow to the creation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, this study aims to investigate the effects of cerebrovascular geometry on hemodynamics, such as flow pattern, wall shear stress distribution, and pressure. This report consists mainly of two parts: numerical study of blood flow in the artery extracted from computer tomography data, and numerical and experimental studies of a curved pipe model. The simulation was conducted by using a finite element method; the experiment was conducted by particle imaging velocimetry. Numerical and experimental results are compared and both show similar secondary flow behavior. PMID:12496038

  7. Hemodynamic-impact-based prioritization of ventricular tachycardia alarms.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kalpit; Lexa, Michael; Matthews, Brett; Genc, Sahika

    2014-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (V-tach) is a very serious condition that occurs when the ventricles are driven at high rates. The abnormal excitation pathways make ventricular contraction less synchronous resulting in less effective filling and emptying of the left ventricles. However, almost half of the V-tach alarms declared through processing of patterns observed in electrocardiography are not clinically actionable. The focus of this study is to provide guidance on determining whether a technically-correct V-tach alarm is clinically-actionable by determining its "hemodynamic impact". A supervisory learning approach based on conditional inference trees to determine the hemodynamic impact of a V-tach alarm based on extracted features is described. According to preliminary results on a subset of Multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care II (MIMIC-II) database, true positive rate of more than 90% can be achieved. PMID:25570734

  8. Arterial Stiffness, Central Pulsatile Hemodynamic Load, and Orthostatic Hypotension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Wang, Si; Wan, Shixi; Zhou, Yufei; Pan, Pei; Wen, Bo; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Hang; Shi, Di; Shi, Rufeng; Chen, Xiaoping; Jangala, Tulasiram

    2016-07-01

    The association between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and orthostatic hypotension (OH) is unclear. The authors recruited 1099 participants from the community. Questionnaire, physical examination, and laboratory tests were performed. To assess the correlation between central pulsatile hemodynamic load, arterial stiffness, and OH, multiple logistic regression analysis was performed, and the discriminatory power was assessed by the area under the receiver operating curve. The prevalence of OH in this population was 5.6%. After adjusting for potential confounders, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (BaPWV) was significantly and positively correlated with OH in both the hypertension and nonhypertension groups (all P<.05), while central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) was only significantly associated with OH in the hypertension subgroup. In addition, BaPWV seemed to have a better discriminatory power than CSBP in both subgroups. BaPWV appears to be a better indicator of OH than CSBP in routine clinical practice. PMID:26543017

  9. Remote hemodynamic monitoring for ambulatory left ventricular assist device patients

    PubMed Central

    Emani, Sitaramesh

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have been shown to markedly improve survival and quality of life in patients with end-stage heart failure. However, despite ongoing improvements in survival and quality of life, significant challenges still exist in the management of these patients, including a high rate of recurrent heart failure and rehospitalizations. Similar challenges exist in the non-LVAD heart failure population as well, and recent efforts to utilize remote hemodynamic monitoring techniques to improve outcomes have shown promise. No data currently exist demonstrating extension of this benefit into the LVAD population, although a theoretical benefit can be extrapolated. Herein we review current remote hemodynamic methods and potential applications towards LVAD patients. PMID:26793337

  10. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal, G.J. )

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-{mu}m radioactive microspheres. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed an nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions.

  11. Simulating Prosthetic Heart Valve Hemodynamics: Numerical Model Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Liang

    2005-11-01

    Since the first successful implantation of a prosthetic heart valve four decades ago, over 50 different designs have been developed including both mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves. Valve implants, however, are associated with increased risk of blood clotting, a trend which is believed to be linked to the complex hemodynamics induced by the prosthesis. To understand prosthetic valve hemodynamics under physiological conditions, we develop a numerical method capable of simulating flows in realistic prosthetic heart valves in anatomical geometries. The method employs a newly developed hybrid numerical technique that integrates the chimera overset grid approach with a Cartesian, sharp-interface immersed boundary methodology. The capabilities of the method are demonstrated by applying it to simulate pulsatile flow in both bileaflet and tri-leaflet valves moving with prescribed leaflet kinematics.

  12. Optimal control of CPR procedure using hemodynamic circulation model

    DOEpatents

    Lenhart, Suzanne M.; Protopopescu, Vladimir A.; Jung, Eunok

    2007-12-25

    A method for determining a chest pressure profile for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) includes the steps of representing a hemodynamic circulation model based on a plurality of difference equations for a patient, applying an optimal control (OC) algorithm to the circulation model, and determining a chest pressure profile. The chest pressure profile defines a timing pattern of externally applied pressure to a chest of the patient to maximize blood flow through the patient. A CPR device includes a chest compressor, a controller communicably connected to the chest compressor, and a computer communicably connected to the controller. The computer determines the chest pressure profile by applying an OC algorithm to a hemodynamic circulation model based on the plurality of difference equations.

  13. Pharmacological Modulation of Hemodynamics in Adult Zebrafish In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Daniel; Dellenbach, Christian; Saveljic, Igor; Rieger, Michael; Rohr, Stephan; Filipovic, Nenad; Djonov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemodynamic parameters in zebrafish receive increasing attention because of their important role in cardiovascular processes such as atherosclerosis, hematopoiesis, sprouting and intussusceptive angiogenesis. To study underlying mechanisms, the precise modulation of parameters like blood flow velocity or shear stress is centrally important. Questions related to blood flow have been addressed in the past in either embryonic or ex vivo-zebrafish models but little information is available for adult animals. Here we describe a pharmacological approach to modulate cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish in vivo. Materials and Methods Adult zebrafish were paralyzed and orally perfused with salt water. The drugs isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside were directly applied with the perfusate, thus closely resembling the preferred method for drug delivery in zebrafish, namely within the water. Drug effects on the heart and on blood flow in the submental vein were studied using electrocardiograms, in vivo-microscopy and mathematical flow simulations. Results Under control conditions, heart rate, blood flow velocity and shear stress varied less than ± 5%. Maximal chronotropic effects of isoprenaline were achieved at a concentration of 50 μmol/L, where it increased the heart rate by 22.6 ± 1.3% (n = 4; p < 0.0001). Blood flow velocity and shear stress in the submental vein were not significantly increased. Sodium nitroprusside at 1 mmol/L did not alter the heart rate but increased blood flow velocity by 110.46 ± 19.64% (p = 0.01) and shear stress by 117.96 ± 23.65% (n = 9; p = 0.03). Discussion In this study, we demonstrate that cardiac and hemodynamic parameters in adult zebrafish can be efficiently modulated by isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside. Together with the suitability of the zebrafish for in vivo-microscopy and genetic modifications, the methodology described permits studying biological processes that are dependent on hemodynamic

  14. Altering hemodynamics leads to congenital heart defects (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Stephanie M.; McPheeters, Matthew T.; Wang, Yves T.; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Strainic, James P.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko; Jenkins, Michael W.

    2016-03-01

    The role of hemodynamics in early heart development is poorly understood. In order to successfully assess the impact of hemodynamics on development, we need to monitor and perturb blood flow, and quantify the resultant effects on morphology. Here, we have utilized cardiac optical pacing to create regurgitant flow in embryonic hearts and OCT to quantify regurgitation percentage and resultant morphology. Embryonic quail in a shell-less culture were optically paced at 3 Hz (well above the intrinsic rate or 1.33-1.67 Hz) on day 2 of development (3-4 weeks human) for 5 minutes. The pacing fatigued the heart and led to a prolonged period (> 1 hour) of increased regurgitant flow. Embryos were kept alive until day 3 (cardiac looping - 4-5 weeks human) or day 8 (4 chambered heart - 8 weeks human) to quantify resultant morphologic changes with OCT. All paced embryos imaged at day 3 displayed cardiac defects. The extent of regurgitant flow immediately after pacing was correlated with cardiac cushion size 24-hours post pacing (p-value < 0.01) with higher regurgitation leading to smaller cushions. Almost all embryos (16/18) surviving to day 8 exhibited congenital heart defects (CHDs) including 11/18 with valve defects, 5/18 with ventricular septal defects and 5/18 with hypoplastic right ventricles. Our data suggests that regurgitant flow leads to smaller cushions, which develop into abnormal valves and septa. Our model produces similar phenotypes as found in our fetal alcohol syndrome and velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome models suggesting that hemodynamics plays a role in these syndromes as well. Utilizing OCT and optical pacing to understand hemodynamics in development is an important step towards determining CHD mechanisms and ultimately developing earlier treatments.

  15. Applicability of Pulse Pressure Variation during Unstable Hemodynamic Events in the Intensive Care Unit: A Five-Day Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Bertrand; Wallet, Florent; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Page, Mathieu; Kaaki, Mahmoud; Schoeffler, Mathieu; Alexander, Brenton; Desebbe, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in strict applicability conditions. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical applicability of pulse pressure variation during episodes of patient hemodynamic instability in the intensive care unit. We conducted a five-day, seven-center prospective study that included patients presenting with an unstable hemodynamic event. The six predefined inclusion criteria for pulse pressure variation applicability were as follows: mechanical ventilation, tidal volume >7 mL/kg, sinus rhythm, no spontaneous breath, heart rate/respiratory rate ratio >3.6, absence of right ventricular dysfunction, or severe valvulopathy. Seventy-three patients presented at least one unstable hemodynamic event, with a total of 163 unstable hemodynamic events. The six predefined criteria for the applicability of pulse pressure variation were completely present in only 7% of these. This data indicates that PPV should only be used alongside a strong understanding of the relevant physiology and applicability criteria. Although these exclusion criteria appear to be profound, they likely represent an absolute contraindication of use for only a minority of critical care patients. PMID:27127648

  16. Applicability of Pulse Pressure Variation during Unstable Hemodynamic Events in the Intensive Care Unit: A Five-Day Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Delannoy, Bertrand; Wallet, Florent; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Page, Mathieu; Kaaki, Mahmoud; Schoeffler, Mathieu; Alexander, Brenton; Desebbe, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Pulse pressure variation can predict fluid responsiveness in strict applicability conditions. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical applicability of pulse pressure variation during episodes of patient hemodynamic instability in the intensive care unit. We conducted a five-day, seven-center prospective study that included patients presenting with an unstable hemodynamic event. The six predefined inclusion criteria for pulse pressure variation applicability were as follows: mechanical ventilation, tidal volume >7 mL/kg, sinus rhythm, no spontaneous breath, heart rate/respiratory rate ratio >3.6, absence of right ventricular dysfunction, or severe valvulopathy. Seventy-three patients presented at least one unstable hemodynamic event, with a total of 163 unstable hemodynamic events. The six predefined criteria for the applicability of pulse pressure variation were completely present in only 7% of these. This data indicates that PPV should only be used alongside a strong understanding of the relevant physiology and applicability criteria. Although these exclusion criteria appear to be profound, they likely represent an absolute contraindication of use for only a minority of critical care patients. PMID:27127648

  17. Hemodynamics in an Aorta with Bicuspid and Trileaflet Valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital heart defect that has been associated with serious aortopathies, such as ascending aortic aneurysm, aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, infective endocarditis, aortic dissection, calcific aortic valve and dilatation of ascending aorta. Two main hypotheses - the genetic and the hemodynamic are discussed in literature to explain the development and progression of aortopathies in patients with BAV. In this study we seek to investigate the possible role of hemodynamic factors as causes of BAV-associated aortopathy. We employ the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method coupled with an efficient thin-shell finite element (TS-FE) formulation for tissues to carry out fluid-structure interaction simulations of a healthy tri-leaflet aortic valve (TAV) and a BAV placed in the same anatomic aorta. The computed results reveal major differences between the TAV and BAV flow patterns. These include: the dynamics of the aortic valve vortex ring formation and break up; the large scale flow patterns in the ascending aorta; and the shear stress magnitude on the aortic wall. The computed results are in qualitative agreement with in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and suggest that the linkages between BAV aortopathy and hemodynamics deserve further investigation. This work is supported by the Lillehei Heart Institute at the University of Minnesota and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  18. Hemodynamic patterns in shock and critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Villazón, S A; Sierra, U A; López, S F; Rolando, M A

    1975-01-01

    Nine variables were studied in 56 patients to analyze hemodynamic patterns of critically ill and shock patients. The variables were central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac index, left ventricular stroke work, strok index, total peripheral resistance, arteriovenous oxygen difference, and oxygen consumption. We observed six patterns; three with low cardiac index (hypodynamic) and three with high cardiac index (hyperdynamic). Group IA: Low cardiac index with increased central venous pressure and arteriovenous oxygen differences associated with myocardial infarction, cardiac insufficiency, and postoperative cardiac surgery: Group IB: Low cardiac index with normal arteriovenous oxygen difference associated with myocardial infarction or hypovolemia. Group IC: Low cardiac index and decreased arteriovenous oxygen difference in patients with hypodynamic septic shock. Group IID: High cardiac index and increased arteriovenous oxygen difference in patients with sepsis and stable hemodynamic conditions. Groups IIE and IIF: Increased cardiac index and normal or increased arteriovenous oxygen difference in septic patients, who were hemodymamically unstable or in shock. These hemodynamic observations were found to be useful for understanding physiological compensations, for deciding on therapy, and in evaluating the effectiveness of therapy. PMID:1201657

  19. Quantifying the abnormal hemodynamics of sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-02-01

    Sickle red blood cells (SS-RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphologies and abnormal hemodynamics in deoxygenated states. A multi-scale model for SS-RBC is developed based on the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. Different cell morphologies (sickle, granular, elongated shapes) typically observed in deoxygenated states are constructed and quantified by the Asphericity and Elliptical shape factors. The hemodynamics of SS-RBC suspensions is studied in both shear and pipe flow systems. The flow resistance obtained from both systems exhibits a larger value than the healthy blood flow due to the abnormal cell properties. Moreover, SS-RBCs exhibit abnormal adhesive interactions with both the vessel endothelium cells and the leukocytes. The effect of the abnormal adhesive interactions on the hemodynamics of sickle blood is investigated using the current model. It is found that both the SS-RBC - endothelium and the SS-RBC - leukocytes interactions, can potentially trigger the vicious ``sickling and entrapment'' cycles, resulting in vaso-occlusion phenomena widely observed in micro-circulation experiments.

  20. Coronary hemodynamic responses during local hemodilution in canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Crystal, G J

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of hemodilution per se on coronary hemodynamics, experiments were performed in 36 anesthetized, open-chest dogs whose left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) was perfused selectively with either normal arterial blood or arterial blood diluted with lactated Ringer solution. LAD blood flow (CBF) was measured with an electromagnetic flowmeter and its transmural distribution assessed with 15-microns radioactive microspheres. LAD perfusion pressure was set at the normal level (approximately 100 mmHg) or at 50% of that level to simulate coronary insufficiency. Dilator reserve capacity was calculated from ratio of reactive hyperemic peak flow following release of 90-s occlusion to control (preocclusion) flow. Systemic hemodynamic parameters were maintained near control values during coronary hemodilution. With perfusion pressure normal, graded hemodilution caused progressive, transmurally uniform increases in CBF that showed a nonlinear relationship to inflow hematocrit. Increased peak reactive hyperemic flow and decreased dilator reserve ratio indicated that both reduced viscosity and vasodilation contributed to increased CBF during hemodilution. Hypotension alone reduced CBF, with greater effect in the subendocardium. Additional hemodilution returned CBF to normotensive value, but relative subendocardial hypoperfusion persisted. The present study provides fundamental information on effects of hemodilution on coronary hemodynamics without the systemic responses that complicated previous studies utilizing whole body exchange transfusions. PMID:3348430

  1. Calf pump activity influencing venous hemodynamics in the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Recek, Cestmir

    2013-03-01

    Calf muscle pump is the motive force enhancing return of venous blood from the lower extremity to the heart. It causes displacement of venous blood in both vertical and horizontal directions, generates ambulatory pressure gradient between thigh and lower leg veins, and bidirectional streaming within calf perforators. Ambulatory pressure gradient triggers venous reflux in incompetent veins, which induces ambulatory venous hypertension in the lower leg and foot. Bidirectional flow in calf perforators enables quick pressure equalization between deep and superficial veins of the lower leg; the outward (into the superficial veins) oriented component of the bidirectional flow taking place during calf muscle contraction is no pathological reflux but a physiological centripetal flow streaming via great saphenous vein into the femoral vein. Calf perforators are communicating channels between both systems making them conjoined vessels; they are not involved in the generation of pathological hemodynamic situations, nor do they cause ambulatory venous hypertension. The real cause why recurrences develop has not as yet been cleared. Pressure gradient arising during calf pump activity between the femoral vein and the saphenous remnant after abolition of saphenous reflux triggers biophysical and biochemical events, which might induce recurrence. Thus, abolition of saphenous reflux removes the hemodynamic disturbance, but at the same time it generates precondition for reflux recurrence and for the comeback of the previous pathological situation; this chain of events has been called hemodynamic paradox. PMID:24436580

  2. A study of the hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Castro, Marcelo A.; Putman, Christopher M.

    2006-03-01

    In this study, the effects of unequal physiologic flow conditions in the internal carotid arteries on the intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics of anterior communicating artery aneurysms were investigated. Patient-specific vascular computational fluid dynamics models of five cerebral aneurysms were constructed from bilateral 3D rotational angiography images. The aneurysmal hemodynamics was analyzed under a range of physiologic flow conditions including the effects of unequal mean flows and phase shifts between the flow waveforms of the left and right internal carotid arteries. A total of five simulations were performed for each patient, and unsteady wall shear stress (WSS) maps were created for each flow condition. Time dependent curves of average WSS magnitude over selected regions on the aneurysms were constructed and used to analyze the influence of the inflow conditions. It was found that mean flow imbalances in the feeding vessels tend to shift the regions of elevated WSS (flow impingement region) towards the dominating inflow jet and to change the magnitude of the WSS peaks. However, the overall qualitative appearance of the WSS distribution and velocity simulations is not substantially affected. In contrast, phase differences tend to increase the temporal complexity of the hemodynamic patterns and to destabilize the intra-aneurysmal flow pattern. However, these effects are less important when the A1 confluence is less symmetric, i.e. dominated by one of the A1 segments. Conditions affecting the flow characteristics in the parent arteries of cerebral aneurysms with more than one avenue of inflow should be incorporated into flow models.

  3. Comparative hemodynamics in an aorta with bicuspid and trileaflet valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmanov, Anvar; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-04-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital heart defect that has been associated with serious aortopathies, such as aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation, infective endocarditis, aortic dissection, calcific aortic valve and dilatation of ascending aorta. There are two main hypotheses to explain the increase prevalence of aortopathies in patients with BAV: the genetic and the hemodynamic. In this study, we seek to investigate the possible role of hemodynamic factors as causes of BAV-associated aortopathy. We employ the curvilinear immersed boundary method coupled with an efficient thin-shell finite-element formulation for tissues to carry out fluid-structure interaction simulations of a healthy trileaflet aortic valve (TAV) and a BAV placed in the same anatomic aorta. The computed results reveal major differences between the TAV and BAV flow patterns. These include: the dynamics of the aortic valve vortex ring formation and break up; the large-scale flow patterns in the ascending aorta; the shear stress magnitude, directions, and dynamics on the heart valve surfaces. The computed results are in qualitative agreement with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging data and suggest that the linkages between BAV aortopathy and hemodynamics deserve further investigation.

  4. Hemodynamic and Tubular Changes Induced by Contrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI. PMID:24678510

  5. Hemodynamic stroke: A rare pitfall in cranio cervical junction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Jan Frederick; Slotty, Philipp; El Khatib, Mustafa; Bostelmann, Richard; Hänggi, Daniel; Steiger, Hans Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Surgical C1C2-stabilization may be complicated by arterial-arterial embolism or arterial injury. Another potential complication is hemodynamic stroke. The latter might be induced in patients with poor posterior fossa collateralization (risk factor 1) when the vertebral artery (VA) is compressed during reduction (risk factor 2). We report a clinical case where this rare situation occurred: A 72-year old patient was undergoing C1C2-stabilization for subluxation due to rheumatoid arthritis. Preoperative computed tomography angiography (CTA) had shown poor collaterals in the posterior fossa. Furthermore, intraoperative Doppler ultrasound (US) detected unilateral VA occlusion during reduction. It appeared to be a high-risk situation for hemodynamic stroke. Surgical inspection of the VA found osteofibrous compressing elements. Arterial decompression was performed resulting in the normal flow as detected by US. Subsequently, C1C2-stabilization could be realized. The clinical and radiological outcome was very favorable. In C1C2-stabilization precise analysis of preoperative CTA and intraoperative US are important to detect risk factors of hemodynamic stroke. Using these data may prevent this rare, but potentially life-threatening complication. PMID:25336834

  6. Hemodynamic responses to speech and music in preverbal infants.

    PubMed

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high-responder group showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low-responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases in activation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high- versus low-responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory-processing sensitivity. PMID:23777481

  7. Hemodynamic and tubular changes induced by contrast media.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Sabbatini, Massimo; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI. PMID:24678510

  8. Hemodynamic Characterization of Rodent Models of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhiyuan; Mao, Lan; Rajagopal, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by endothelial cell apoptosis, smooth muscle proliferation and obliteration of pulmonary arterioles. This in turn results in right ventricular (RV) failure, with significant morbidity and mortality. Rodent models of PAH, in the mouse and the rat, are important for understanding the pathophysiology underlying this rare disease. Notably, different models of PAH may be associated with different degrees of pulmonary hypertension, RV hypertrophy and RV failure. Therefore, a complete hemodynamic characterization of mice and rats with PAH is critical in determining the effects of drugs or genetic modifications on the disease. Here we demonstrate standard procedures for assessment of right ventricular function and hemodynamics in both rat and mouse PAH models. Echocardiography is useful in determining RV function in rats, although obtaining standard views of the right ventricle is challenging in the awake mouse. Access for right heart catheterization is obtained by the internal jugular vein in closed-chest mice and rats. Pressures can be measured using polyethylene tubing with a fluid pressure transducer or a miniature micromanometer pressure catheter. Pressure-volume loop analysis can be performed in the open chest. After obtaining hemodynamics, the rodent is euthanized. The heart can be dissected to separate the RV free wall from the left ventricle (LV) and septum, allowing an assessment of RV hypertrophy using the Fulton index (RV/(LV+S)). Then samples can be harvested from the heart, lungs and other tissues as needed. PMID:27167679

  9. Hemodynamic Responses to Speech and Music in Preverbal Infants

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Eswen; Hull, Rachel; Baumbauer, Kyle; Bortfeld, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have provided clues about the ontogeny of lateralization of auditory processing in humans, but most have employed specific subtypes of stimuli and/or have assessed responses in discrete temporal windows. The present study used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to establish changes in hemodynamic activity in the neocortex of preverbal infants (aged 4-11 months) while they were exposed to two distinct types of complex auditory stimuli (full sentences and musical phrases). Measurements were taken from bilateral temporal regions, including both anterior and posterior superior temporal gyri. When the infant sample was treated as a homogenous group, no significant effects emerged for stimulus type. However, when infants' hemodynamic responses were categorized according to their overall changes in volume, two very clear neurophysiological patterns emerged. A high responder group, showed a pattern of early and increasing activation, primarily in the left hemisphere, similar to that observed in comparable studies with adults. In contrast, a low responder group showed a pattern of gradual decreases inactivation over time. Although age did track with responder type, no significant differences between these groups emerged for stimulus type, suggesting that the high versus low responder characterization generalizes across classes of auditory stimuli. These results highlight a new way to conceptualize the variable cortical blood flow patterns that are frequently observed across infants and stimuli, with hemodynamic response volumes potentially serving as an early indicator of developmental changes in auditory processing sensitivity. PMID:23777481

  10. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation measured with coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T.; Fantini, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Coherent Hemodynamics Spectroscopy (CHS) is a novel technique for non-invasive measurements of local microcirculation quantities such as the capillary blood transit times and dynamic autoregulation. The basis of CHS is to measure, for instance with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), peripheral coherent hemodynamic changes that are induced by controlled perturbations in the systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP). In this study, the MAP perturbation was induced by the fast release of two pneumatic cuffs placed around the subject's thighs after they were kept inflated (at 200 mmHg) for two minutes. The resulting transient changes in cerebral oxy- (O) and deoxy- (D) hemoglobin concentrations measured with NIRS on the prefrontal cortex are then described by a novel hemodynamic model, from which quantifiable parameters such as the capillary blood transit time and a cutoff frequency for cerebral autoregulation are obtained. We present results on eleven healthy volunteers in a protocol involving measurements during normal breathing and during hyperventilation, which is known to cause a hypocapnia-induced increase in cerebral autoregulation. The measured capillary transit time was unaffected by hyperventilation (normal breathing: 1.1±0.1 s; hyperventilation: 1.1±0.1 s), whereas the cutoff frequency of autoregulation, which increases for higher autoregulation efficiency, was indeed found to be significantly greater during hyperventilation (normal breathing: 0.017±0.002 Hz; hyperventilation: 0.034±0.005 Hz). These results provide a validation of local cerebral autoregulation measurements with the new technique of CHS.

  11. Hemodynamic evaluation of transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation.

    PubMed

    Breslau, P J; van Soest, M; Janevski, B; Jörning, P J

    1985-10-01

    In order to document the hemodynamic results of transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation, 23 aortoiliac segments were evaluated before and after treatment. Hemodynamic parameters were: intra-arterial common femoral pressure measurements, indirect ankle pressure measurements and femoral velocity waveform analysis. The segments were divided into group (a) aortoiliac segments with an open superficial femoral artery (n = 8), and group (b) aortoiliac segments with an occluded superficial femoral artery (n = 15). In group (a) all patients were free of symptoms and ankle pressure improved significantly six months after dilatation. Velocity waveform analysis of the common femoral artery did not correlate with this improvement. In group (b) intra-arterial pressure measurements showed improvement in 60% (9/15) after six months. Ankle pressure measurements and velocity waveform analysis did not correlate with the intra-arterial pressure changes. Transluminal iliac artery balloon dilatation of iliac stenosis in patients with an open superficial femoral artery can be evaluated by indirect ankle pressure measurements. In patients with iliac stenosis in combination with occluded superficial femoral arteries intra-arterial pressure measurements are needed to demonstrate hemodynamic improvement. PMID:2932658

  12. Monitoring of hemodynamic changes induced in the healthy breast through inspired gas stimuli with MR-guided diffuse optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, C. M.; Rakow-Penner, R.; Jiang, S.; Pogue, B. W.; Glover, G. H.; Paulsen, K. D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The modulation of tissue hemodynamics has important clinical value in medicine for both tumor diagnosis and therapy. As an oncological tool, increasing tissue oxygenation via modulation of inspired gas has been proposed as a method to improve cancer therapy and determine radiation sensitivity. As a radiological tool, inducing changes in tissue total hemoglobin may provide a means to detect and characterize malignant tumors by providing information about tissue vascular function. The ability to change and measure tissue hemoglobin and oxygenation concentrations in the healthy breast during administration of three different types of modulated gas stimuli (oxygen∕carbogen, air∕carbogen, and air∕oxygen) was investigated. Methods: Subjects breathed combinations of gases which were modulated in time. MR-guided diffuse optical tomography measured total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation in the breast every 30 s during the 16 min breathing stimulus. Metrics of maximum correlation and phase lag were calculated by cross correlating the measured hemodynamics with the stimulus. These results were compared to an air∕air control to determine the hemodynamic changes compared to the baseline physiology. Results: This study demonstrated that a gas stimulus consisting of alternating oxygen∕carbogen induced the largest and most robust hemodynamic response in healthy breast parenchyma relative to the changes that occurred during the breathing of room air. This stimulus caused increases in total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation during the carbogen phase of gas inhalation, and decreases during the oxygen phase. These findings are consistent with the theory that oxygen acts as a vasoconstrictor, while carbogen acts as a vasodilator. However, difficulties in inducing a consistent change in tissue hemoglobin and oxygenation were observed because of variability in intersubject physiology, especially during the air∕oxygen or air∕carbogen modulated breathing protocols

  13. Hemodynamics in the mouse aortic arch as assessed by MRI, ultrasound, and numerical modeling.

    PubMed

    Feintuch, Akiva; Ruengsakulrach, Permyos; Lin, Amy; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Bishop, Jonathon; Davidson, Lorinda; Courtman, David; Foster, F Stuart; Steinman, David A; Henkelman, R Mark; Ethier, C Ross

    2007-02-01

    Mice are widely used to study arterial disease in humans, and the pathogenesis of arterial diseases is known to be strongly influenced by hemodynamic factors. It is, therefore, of interest to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse arterial tree. Previous measurements have suggested that many relevant hemodynamic variables are similar between the mouse and the human. Here we use a combination of Doppler ultrasound and MRI measurements, coupled with numerical modeling techniques, to characterize the hemodynamic environment in the mouse aortic arch at high spatial resolution. We find that the hemodynamically induced stresses on arterial endothelial cells are much larger in magnitude and more spatially uniform in the mouse than in the human, an effect that can be explained by fluid mechanical scaling principles. This surprising finding seems to be at variance with currently accepted models of the role of hemodynamics in atherogenesis and the known distribution of atheromatous lesions in mice. PMID:17012350

  14. Physiological responses to environmental factors related to space flight. [hemodynamic and metabolic responses to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.

    1973-01-01

    Physiological base line data are established, and physiological procedures and instrumentation necessary for the automatic measurement of hemodynamic and metabolic parameters during prolonged periods of weightlessness are developed.

  15. Hemodynamic Significance of Internal Carotid or Middle Cerebral Artery Stenosis Detected on Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Pagsisihan, Jefferson R.; Choi, Seung Hong; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated hemodynamic significance of stenosis on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using acetazolamide perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Materials and Methods Of 171 patients, stenosis in internal carotid artery (ICA) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) (ICA-MCA) on MRA and cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) of MCA territory on SPECT was measured using quantification and a 3-grade system. Stenosis and CVR grades were compared with each other, and their prognostic value for subsequent stroke was evaluated. Results Of 342 ICA-MCA, 151 (44%) presented stenosis on MRA; grade 1 in 69 (20%) and grade 2 in 82 (24%) cases. Decreased CVR was observed in 9% of grade 0 stenosis, 25% of grade 1, and 35% of grade 2. The average CVR of grade 0 was significantly different from grade 1 (p<0.001) and grade 2 stenosis (p=0.007). In quantitative analysis, average CVR index was -0.56±7.91 in grade 0, -1.81±6.66 in grade 1 and -1.18±5.88 in grade 2 stenosis. Agreement between stenosis and CVR grades was fair in patients with lateralizing and non-lateralizing symptoms (κ=0.230 and 0.346). Of the factors tested, both MRA and CVR were not significant prognostic factors (p=0.104 and 0.988, respectively), whereas hypertension and renal disease were significant factors (p<0.05, respectively). Conclusion A considerable proportion of ICA-MCA stenosis detected on MRA does not cause CVR impairment despite a fair correlation between them. Thus, hemodynamic state needs to be assessed for evaluating significance of stenosis, particularly in asymptomatic patients. PMID:26446655

  16. Flexible multivariate hemodynamics fMRI data analyses and simulations with PyHRF

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Thomas; Badillo, Solveig; Risser, Laurent; Chaari, Lotfi; Bakhous, Christine; Forbes, Florence; Ciuciu, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    As part of fMRI data analysis, the pyhrf package provides a set of tools for addressing the two main issues involved in intra-subject fMRI data analysis: (1) the localization of cerebral regions that elicit evoked activity and (2) the estimation of activation dynamics also known as Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF) recovery. To tackle these two problems, pyhrf implements the Joint Detection-Estimation framework (JDE) which recovers parcel-level HRFs and embeds an adaptive spatio-temporal regularization scheme of activation maps. With respect to the sole detection issue (1), the classical voxelwise GLM procedure is also available through nipy, whereas Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and temporally regularized FIR models are concerned with HRF estimation (2) and are specifically implemented in pyhrf. Several parcellation tools are also integrated such as spatial and functional clustering. Parcellations may be used for spatial averaging prior to FIR/RFIR analysis or to specify the spatial support of the HRF estimates in the JDE approach. These analysis procedures can be applied either to volume-based data sets or to data projected onto the cortical surface. For validation purpose, this package is shipped with artificial and real fMRI data sets, which are used in this paper to compare the outcome of the different available approaches. The artificial fMRI data generator is also described to illustrate how to simulate different activation configurations, HRF shapes or nuisance components. To cope with the high computational needs for inference, pyhrf handles distributing computing by exploiting cluster units as well as multi-core machines. Finally, a dedicated viewer is presented, which handles n-dimensional images and provides suitable features to explore whole brain hemodynamics (time series, maps, ROI mask overlay). PMID:24782699

  17. Calibrated MRI to evaluate cerebral hemodynamics in patients with an internal carotid artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    De Vis, Jill B; Petersen, Esben T; Bhogal, Alex; Hartkamp, Nolan S; Klijn, Catharina JM; Kappelle, L J; Hendrikse, J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether calibrated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can identify regional variances in cerebral hemodynamics caused by vascular disease. For this, arterial spin labeling (ASL)/blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI was performed in 11 patients (65±7 years) and 14 controls (66±4 years). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), ASL cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), BOLD CVR, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) were evaluated. The CBF was 34±5 and 36±11 mL/100 g per minute in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory of the patients and the controls. Arterial spin labeling CVR was 44±20 and 53±10% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2 in patients and controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the patients compared with the controls (1.3±0.8 versus 2.2±0.4% per 10 mm Hg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). The OEF was 41±8% and 38±6%, and the CMRO2 was 116±39 and 111±40 μmol/100 g per minute in the patients and the controls. The BOLD CVR was lower in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral MCA territory of the patients (1.2±0.6 versus 1.6±0.5% per 10 mmHg ▵EtCO2, P<0.01). Analysis was hampered in three patients due to delayed arrival time. Thus, regional hemodynamic impairment was identified with calibrated MRI. Delayed arrival artifacts limited the interpretation of the images in some patients. PMID:25712500

  18. [Experimental evaluation of respiratory assist and hemodynamic changes by veno-venous bypass].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, A

    1989-06-01

    The veno-venous bypass (VVB) with a membrane lung is one of the effective procedures to provide respiratory assistance even in patients with a high mortality rate when assisted only with mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this experimental study was to reveal the efficacy of respiratory assistance and the hemodynamic changes by VVB in acute respiratory failure. VVB was carried out in 22 mongrel dogs with acute respiratory failure induced by intratracheal seawater infusion. The ventilation-perfusion ratio (V/Q) of a membrane lung was changed to 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 for each of the bypass flow rates of 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of pre-perfusion cardiac output. For each condition variables indicating blood gas status and hemodynamic parameters were measured. As the indicator evaluating the efficiency of CO2 removal by VVB, the index of VVBCO2R was used, indicating the blood CO2 tension differences between IVC and the pulmonary artery. Arterial oxygen saturation was increased with bypass flow rates greater than 60% compared with pre-VVB, but the change was not marked. VVB was considered to be inadequate as a method of oxygenation. Besides, oxygenation was not able to be controlled by changing V/Q. However, significant reduction of arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) could be obtained even with a bypass flow rate of 20%. As the blood flow rate increased, PaCO2 was lowered. But no more significant reductions of PaCO2 were obtained even with the flow rate of 60% and 80%. VVBCO2R was increased by changing the bypass flow rate from 20% to 40%, while no further increases were observed even with changes from 40% to 60% and 80%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2509600

  19. Endothelial Functioning and Hemodynamic Parameters in Rats with Subclinical Hypothyroid and the Effects of Thyroxine Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Qian; Tian, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) and its associations with atherosclerosis (AS) and cardiovascular disease remain controversial. The purpose of our study was to observe changes in endothelial functioning and hemodynamics in rats with SCH and to determine whether L-thyroxine (L-T4) administration affects these changes. Methods In total, sixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the following three groups with 20 rats each: control euthyroid rats, SCH rats and SCH rats that had been treated with thyroxine (SCH+T4). The SCH rats were induced by administration of 10 mg.kg-1.d-1 methimazole (MMI) once daily by gavage for 3 months. The SCH+T4 rats were administered the same dose of MMI for three months in addition to 2 μg.kg-1.d-1 L-T4 once daily by gavage after 45 days of MMI administration. The control rats received physiological saline via gavage. Results The SCH group had significantly higher thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and endothelin (ET) levels and a lower nitric oxide (NO) level than the control and SCH+T4 groups. The tail and carotid artery blood pressures, left ventricular systolic pressure, heart rate and aorta ventralis blood flow were significantly lower in the SCH group than in the control and SCH+T4 groups. ACH treatment caused concentration-dependent relaxation, which was reduced in the SCH arteries compared with the control and SCH+T4 arteries. Histopathological examination revealed the absence of pathological changes in the SCH rat arteries. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that L-T4 treatment ameliorates endothelial dysfunction and hemodynamic changes in SCH rats. PMID:26158620

  20. Post-Treatment Hemodynamics of a Basilar Aneurysm and Bifurcation

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J; Hartman, J; Rodriguez, J; Maitland, D

    2008-01-16

    Aneurysm re-growth and rupture can sometimes unexpectedly occur following treatment procedures that were initially considered to be successful at the time of treatment and post-operative angiography. In some cases, this can be attributed to surgical clip slippage or endovascular coil compaction. However, there are other cases in which the treatment devices function properly. In these instances, the subsequent complications are due to other factors, perhaps one of which is the post-treatment hemodynamic stress. To investigate whether or not a treatment procedure can subject the parent artery to harmful hemodynamic stresses, computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed on a patient-specific basilar aneurysm and bifurcation before and after a virtual endovascular treatment. The simulations demonstrate that the treatment procedure produces a substantial increase in the wall shear stress. Analysis of the post-treatment flow field indicates that the increase in wall shear stress is due to the impingement of the basilar artery flow upon the aneurysm filling material and to the close proximity of a vortex tube to the artery wall. Calculation of the time-averaged wall shear stress shows that there is a region of the artery exposed to a level of wall shear stress that can cause severe damage to endothelial cells. The results of this study demonstrate that it is possible for a treatment procedure, which successfully excludes the aneurysm from the vascular system and leaves no aneurysm neck remnant, to elevate the hemodynamic stresses to levels that are injurious to the immediately adjacent vessel wall.

  1. Ischemic preconditioning reduces hemodynamic response during metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Mulliri, Gabriele; Sainas, Gianmarco; Magnani, Sara; Palazzolo, Girolamo; Milia, Nicola; Orrù, Andrea; Roberto, Silvana; Marongiu, Elisabetta; Milia, Raffaele; Crisafulli, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IP) has been shown to improve exercise performance and to delay fatigue. However, the precise mechanisms through which IP operates remain elusive. It has been hypothesized that IP lowers the sensation of fatigue by reducing the discharge of group III and IV nerve endings, which also regulate hemodynamics during the metaboreflex. We hypothesized that IP reduces the blood pressure response during the metaboreflex. Fourteen healthy males (age between 25 and 48 yr) participated in this study. They underwent the following randomly assigned protocol: postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) test, during which the metaboreflex was elicited after dynamic handgrip; control exercise recovery session (CER) test; and PEMI after IP (IP-PEMI) test. IP was obtained by occluding forearm circulation for three cycles of 5 min spaced by 5 min of reperfusion. Hemodynamics were evaluated by echocardiography and impedance cardiography. The main results were that after IP the mean arterial pressure response was reduced compared with the PEMI test (means ± SD +3.37 ± 6.41 vs. +9.16 ± 7.09 mmHg, respectively). This was the consequence of an impaired venous return that impaired the stroke volume during the IP-PEMI more than during the PEMI test (-1.43 ± 15.35 vs. +10.28 ± 10.479 ml, respectively). It was concluded that during the metaboreflex, IP affects hemodynamics mainly because it impairs the capacity to augment venous return and to recruit the cardiac preload reserve. It was hypothesized that this is the consequence of an increased nitric oxide production, which reduces the possibility to constrict venous capacity vessels. PMID:26936782

  2. Hemodynamic Shear Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Hemodialysis Access

    PubMed Central

    Fitts, Michelle K.; Pike, Daniel B.; Anderson, Kasey; Shiu, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Surgically-created blood conduits used for chronic hemodialysis, including native arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and synthetic AV grafts (AVGs), are the lifeline for kidney failure patients. Unfortunately, each has its own limitations: AVFs often fail to mature to become useful for dialysis and AVGs often fail due to stenosis as a result of neointimal hyperplasia, which preferentially forms at the graft-venous anastomosis. No clinical therapies are currently available to significantly promote AVF maturation or prevent neointimal hyperplasia in AVGs. Central to devising strategies to solve these problems is a complete mechanistic understanding of the pathophysiological processes. The pathology of arteriovenous access problems is likely multi-factorial. This review focuses on the roles of fluid-wall shear stress (WSS) and endothelial cells (ECs). In arteriovenous access, shunting of arterial blood flow directly into the vein drastically alters the hemodynamics in the vein. These hemodynamic changes are likely major contributors to non-maturation of an AVF vein and/or formation of neointimal hyperplasia at the venous anastomosis of an AVG. ECs separate blood from other vascular wall cells and also influence the phenotype of these other cells. In arteriovenous access, the responses of ECs to aberrant WSS may subsequently lead to AVF non-maturation and/or AVG stenosis. This review provides an overview of the methods for characterizing blood flow and calculating WSS in arteriovenous access and discusses EC responses to arteriovenous hemodynamics. This review also discusses the role of WSS in the pathology of arteriovenous access, as well as confounding factors that modulate the impact of WSS. PMID:25309636

  3. Echocardiographic and Hemodynamic Predictors of Mortality in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Lebron, Belinda N.; Forfia, Paul R.; Kreider, Maryl; Lee, James C.; Holmes, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) can lead to the development of pulmonary hypertension, which is associated with an increased risk of death. In pulmonary arterial hypertension, survival is directly related to the capacity of the right ventricle to adapt to elevated pulmonary vascular load. The relative importance of right ventricular function in IPF is not well understood. Our objective was to evaluate right ventricular echocardiographic and hemodynamic predictors of mortality in a cohort of patients with IPF referred for lung transplant evaluation. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 135 patients who met 2011 American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria for IPF and who were evaluated for lung transplantation at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Results: Right ventricle:left ventricle diameter ratio (hazard ratio [HR], 4.5; 95% CI, 1.7-11.9), moderate to severe right atrial and right ventricular dilation (HR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.4-5.9; and HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-5.4, respectively) and right ventricular dysfunction (HR, 5.5; 95% CI, 2.6-11.5) were associated with an increased risk of death. Higher pulmonary vascular resistance was also associated with increased mortality (HR per 1 Wood unit, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5). These risk factors were independent of age, sex, race, height, weight, FVC, and lung transplantation status. Other hemodynamic indices, such as mean pulmonary artery pressure and cardiac index, were not associated with outcome. Conclusions: Right-sided heart size and right ventricular dysfunction measured by echocardiography and higher pulmonary vascular resistance by invasive hemodynamic assessment predict mortality in patients with IPF evaluated for lung transplantation. PMID:23450321

  4. Central and regional hemodynamics in prolonged space flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazenko, O. G.; Shulzhenko, E. B.; Turchaninova, V. F.; Egorov, A. D.

    This paper presents the results of measuring central and regional (head, forearm, calf) hemodynamics at rest and during provocative tests by the method of tetrapolar rheography in the course of Salyut-6-Soyuz and Salyut-7-Soyuz missions. The measurements were carried out during short-term (19 man-flights of 7 days in duration) and long-term (21 man-flights of 65-237 days in duration) manned missions. At rest, stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) as well as heart rate (HR) decreased insignificantly (in short-term flights) or remained essentially unchanged (in long-term flights). In prolonged flights CO increased significantly in response to exercise tests due to an increase in HR and the lack of changes in SV. After exercise tests SV and CO decreased as compared to the preflight level. During lower body negative pressure (LBNP) tests HR and CO were slightly higher than preflight. Changes in regional hemodynamics included a distinct decrease of pulse blood filling (PBF) of the calf, a reduction of the tone of large vessels of the calf and small vessels of the forearm. Head examination (in the region of the internal carotid artery) showed a decrease of PBF of the left hemisphere (during flight months 2-8) and a distinct decline of the tone of small vessels, mainly, in the right hemisphere. During LBNP tests the tone of pre- and postcapillary vessels of the brain returned to normal while PBF of the right and left hemisphere vessels declined. It has been shown that regional circulation variations depend on the area examined and are induced by a rearrangement of total hemodynamics of the human body in microgravity. This paper reviews the data concerning changes in central and regional circulation of men in space flights of different duration.

  5. Inappropriate intracranial hemodynamics in the natural course of MELAS.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Junko; Akita, Yukihiro; Yatsuga, Shuichi; Katayama, Koujyu; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Koga, Yasutoshi

    2008-02-01

    The abnormalities of intracranial hemodynamics associated with strokelike episodes in MELAS are variable depend on the time phase from the onset of strokelike episodes and on the progression of the dementia state. To clarify the regional cerebral blood flows (rCBF) in the natural course of MELAS is very important to understand the pathogenic mechanism of this disorder, either cytopathy, angiopathy or both. We analyzed the serial studies of brain statistical parametric mapping (SPM) 99 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in 5 MELAS patients in maximum 10 years interval, who fulfilled the clinical, pathological and genetic criteria of MELAS, and have an A3243G mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene. SPM is a proven and effective method for the voxel-by-voxel analysis of functional images which show the advantage in its promise of fully automated neurophysiological imaging analysis throughout the whole brain using various statistical analyses. SPECT acquisition was initiated and was reconstructed by iterative algorithm and were processed and analyzed with SPM 99 for Windows software. Statistics were displayed as Z scores (threshold: P < 0.01). The inappropriate intracranial hemodynamics was found not only at the acute but at the interictal phase, and was getting worse as the disease progress. Hypoperfusion in the posterior cingulate cortex was always observed (corrected P < 0.01) in MELAS patients, which is the typical finding reported in Alzheimer's disease. The inappropriate intracranial hemodynamics is a common feature and may be related with mitochondrial angiopathy in the natural course of MELAS. PMID:17664050

  6. Phonocardiographic Assessment of Hemodynamic Response to Balloon Aortic Valvuloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Howard S.; Ferguson, James J.

    1990-01-01

    The time to systolic murmur peak is a clinical index that is useful in assessing the severity of valvular aortic stenosis. To determine whether phonocardiography could be used to detect a change in the timing of the murmur and thus to measure hemodynamic improvements in elderly balloon aortic valvuloplasty patients, we retrospectively reviewed phonocardiographic tracings of 18 patients taken before and after the procedure. Ten men and 8 women were included in the study; the mean age was 80.7 ± 11.2 years (range, 64 to 90). Phonocardiographic signals were digitized, and the R-wave to murmur peak interval (R-MP) was measured. In 11 patients, the R-MP decreased (mean decrease, 16% ± 11%): of these, 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in mean gradient; 10 had a significant (> 25%) decrease in peak-to-peak gradient; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 38%. Seven patients had an increase in R-MP (mean increase, 10% ± 9%): of these, 6 had a decrease in mean gradient of less than 25%; 6 had a decrease in peak-to-peak gradient of less than 25%; and the average increase in aortic valve area was 21%. Pre- and post-balloon aortic valvuloplasty heart rates were not significantly different (71 ± 8 beats/min versus 73 ± 5 beats/min). In this study, hemodynamic improvements after valvuloplasty were manifested by a reduction in the R-MP interval. We conclude that phonocardiography may be a practical, noninvasive method of assessing the hemodynamic response to balloon aortic valvuloplasty. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:42-7) PMID:15227188

  7. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  8. Retrobulbar Hemodynamics and Visual Field Progression in Normal Tension Glaucoma: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuerten, D.; Fuest, M.; Koch, E. C.; Koutsonas, A.; Plange, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Vascular risk factors are important factors in the pathogenesis of glaucoma. The purpose of this research was to investigate retrobulbar hemodynamics and visual field progression in patients with normal tension glaucoma (NTG). Patients and Methods. 31 eyes of 16 patients with NTG were included in a retrospective long-term follow-up study. Colour Doppler imaging was performed at baseline to determine various CDI parameters in the different retrobulbar vessels. The rate of visual field progression was determined using the Visual Field Index (VFI) progression rate per year (in %). To be included in the analysis, patients had at least 4 visual field examinations with a follow-up of at least 2 years. Results. Mean follow-up was 7.6 ± 4.1 years with an average of 10 ± 5 visual field tests. The mean MD (mean defect) at baseline was −7.61 ± 7.49 dB. The overall VFI progression was −1.14 ± 1.40% per year. A statistical significant correlation between VFI progression and the RI of the NPCA and PSV of the CRA was found. Conclusion. Long-term visual field progression may be linked to impaired retrobulbar hemodynamics in patients with NTG only to a limited degree. Interpretation of the data for an individual patient seems to be limited due to the variability of parameters. PMID:26557652

  9. [Hemodynamic response to cotton allergen exposure in the industrial environment].

    PubMed

    Bakuleva, N S; Usol'tsev, B G; Orlova, O A

    1983-03-01

    The methods of functional diagnosis (mechanocardiography, rheoencephalography) were used to examine the responses of the central and craniocerebral hemodynamics to inhalations of specific cotton allergens in female workers of a textile factory with different grades of sensitization. It was discovered that both the initial level and response pattern on the part of the cardiovascular system and craniocerebral circulation depend to a certain measure on the level of background reactivity. The data obtained enable prognosing the status of the cardiovascular system and taking measures aimed at its correction in subjects sensitized to cotton dust, who continue working in cotton industry. PMID:6830989

  10. Hemodynamic support with percutaneous devices in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Navin K; Esposito, Michele

    2015-04-01

    The use of surgically implanted durable mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in high-risk patients with heart failure is declining and short-term, nondurable MCS device use is growing. Percutaneously delivered MCS options for advanced heart failure include the intra-aortic balloon pump, Impella axial flow catheter, TandemHeart centrifugal pump, and venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Nondurable MCS devices have unique implantation characteristics and hemodynamic effects. Algorithms and guidelines for optimal nondurable MCS device selection do not exist. Emerging technologies and applications will address the need for improved left ventricular unloading using lower-profile devices, longer-term ambulatory support, and the potential for myocardial recovery. PMID:25834971

  11. From hemodynamic towards cardiomechanic sensors in implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferek-Petric, Bozidar

    2013-06-01

    Sensor could significantly improve the cardiac electrotherapy. It has to provide long-term stabile signal not impeding the device longevity and lead reliability. It may not introduce special implantation and adjustment procedures. Hemodynamic sensors based on the blood flow velocity and cardiomechanic sensors based on the lead bending measurement are disclosed. These sensors have a broad clinical utility. Triboelectric and high-frequency lead bending sensors yield accurate and stable signals whereby functioning with every cardiac lead. Moreover, high frequency measurement avoids use of any kind of special hardware mounted on the cardiac lead.

  12. Relationships between hemodynamic, hemorheological and metabolic responses during exercise.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Tripette, Julien; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Baskurt, Oguz K; Toth, Kalman; Meiselman, Herbert J; Hue, Olivier; Antoine-Jonville, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Aerobic performance is dependent on both cardio-respiratory and peripheral factors with hemodynamic parameters playing a major role. However, whether blood rheology might affect aerobic performance through an effect on hemodynamic factors is not known. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationships between hemodynamic, hemorheological and metabolic parameters in response to a sub-maximal cycling exercise protocol consisting of three successive levels of nine min duration (50, 100 and 150 W). Ten young sportsmen participated in the present study. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was measured manually, with thoracic impedance used to monitor cardiac output (Qc): systemic vascular resistance (SVR) was then calculated. Whole blood viscosity (etab) was measured and used to calculate systemic vascular hindrance. Hematocrit (Hct) was determined by micro-centrifugation and red blood cell (RBC) deformability (EI) was determined by ecktacytometry. A breath-by-breath gas analyzer was used to measure oxygen uptake (VO2); the Fick equation was used to calculate arterio-venous oxygen difference [(a-v)O(2)] from VO(2) and Qc. All measurements were performed at rest, during exercise and during recovery. Compared to baseline, Qc, MAP, Hct, EI, VO(2), and (a-v)O(2) increased during exercise. etab increased above baseline only at 150 W and remained elevated during recovery; the increase in etab during the last level of exercise was associated with a decrease of SVR and systemic vascular hindrance. There was a significant negative correlation between EI and SVR (r=-0.35, p<0.01) and a significant positive relationship between EI and (a-v)O(2) (r=0.35, p<0.01) and between EI and VO(2) (r=0.37, p<0.01) across all exercise workloads, thus suggesting a potential role for RBC deformability as a factor affecting aerobic performance via oxygen delivery to tissues. These data lend support to the concept that hemorheological parameters may contribute to hemodynamic and cardio

  13. Effects of Dietary Nitrates on Systemic and Cerebrovascular Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Curry, Bryan H.; Adams, Richard G.; Asadi, M. Sadegh; Millis, Richard M.; Haddad, Georges E.

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood flow dysregulation is often associated with hypertension. We hypothesized that a beetroot juice (BRJ) treatment could decrease blood pressure and cerebrovascular resistance (CVR). We subjected 12 healthy females to control and BRJ treatments. Cerebrovascular resistance index (CVRI), systolic blood pressure (SBP), total vascular resistance (TVR), and the heart rate-systolic pressure product (RPP) measured at rest and at two exercise workloads were lower after the BRJ treatment. CVRI, SBP, and RPP were lower without a lower TVR at the highest exercise level. These findings suggest improved systemic and cerebral hemodynamics that could translate into a dietary treatment for hypertension. PMID:24455404

  14. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  15. Hemodynamic Measurement Using Four-Dimensional Phase-Contrast MRI: Quantification of Hemodynamic Parameters and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Kim, Guk Bae; Kweon, Jihoon; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Young-Hak; Lee, Deok Hee; Yang, Dong Hyun; Kim, Namkug

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made to the use of time-resolved, three-dimensional phase-contrast (PC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is also named four-dimensional (4D) PC-MRI or 4D flow MRI, in the investigation of spatial and temporal variations in hemodynamic features in cardiovascular blood flow. The present article reviews the principle and analytical procedures of 4D PC-MRI. Various fluid dynamic biomarkers for possible clinical usage are also described, including wall shear stress, turbulent kinetic energy, and relative pressure. Lastly, this article provides an overview of the clinical applications of 4D PC-MRI in various cardiovascular regions. PMID:27390537

  16. Encephalic hemodynamic phases in subarachnoid hemorrhage: how to improve the protective effect in patient prognoses

    PubMed Central

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; de Azevedo, Daniel Silva; de Azevedo, Milena Krajnyk; de Carvalho Nogueira, Ricardo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is frequently associated with poor prognoses. Three different hemodynamic phases were identified during subarachnoid hemorrhage: oligemia, hyperemia, and vasospasm. Each phase is associated with brain metabolic changes. In this review, we correlated the hemodynamic phases with brain metabolism and potential treatment options in the hopes of improving patient prognoses. PMID:26109948

  17. A novel periodic boundary condition for computational hemodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Bahramian, Fereshteh; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2014-07-01

    In computational fluid dynamics models for hemodynamics applications, boundary conditions remain one of the major issues in obtaining accurate fluid flow predictions. For major cardiovascular models, the realistic boundary conditions are not available. In order to address this issue, the whole computational domain needs to be modeled, which is practically impossible. For simulating fully developed turbulent flows using the large eddy simulation and dynamic numerical solution methods, which are very popular in hemodynamics studies, periodic boundary conditions are suitable. This is mainly because the computational domain can be reduced considerably. In this study, a novel periodic boundary condition is proposed, which is based on mass flow condition. The proposed boundary condition is applied on a square duct for the sake of validation. The mass-based condition was shown to obtain the solution in 15% less time. As such, the mass-based condition has two decisive advantages: first, the solution for a given Reynolds number can be obtained in a single simulation because of the direct specification of the mass flow, and second, simulations can be made more quickly. PMID:25015666

  18. Hemodynamic aspects of normal human feto-placental (umbilical) circulation.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Ganesh; Sonesson, Sven-Erik; Flo, Kari; Räsänen, Juha; Odibo, Anthony

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the changes in normal circulatory dynamics that occur during the course of pregnancy is essential for improving our knowledge of pathophysiological mechanisms associated with feto-placental diseases. The umbilical circulation is the lifeline of the fetus, and it is accessible for noninvasive assessment. However, not all hemodynamic parameters can be reliably measured in utero using currently available technology. Experimental animal studies have been crucial in validating major concepts related to feto-placental circulatory physiology, but caution is required in directly translating the findings of such studies into humans due to species differences. Furthermore, it is important to establish normal reference ranges and take into account gestational age associated changes while interpreting the results of clinical investigation. Therefore, it is necessary to critically evaluate, synthesize and summarize the knowledge available from the studies performed on human pregnancies to be able to appropriately apply them in clinical practice. This narrative review is an attempt to present contemporary concepts on hemodynamics of feto-placental circulation based on human studies. PMID:27130575

  19. Impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics are associated with cerebral white matter damage

    PubMed Central

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Fadar, Otite; Mehregan, Aujan; Salat, David H; Moscufo, Nicola; Meier, Dominik S; Guttmann, Charles RG; Fisher, Naomi DL; Lipsitz, Lewis A; Sorond, Farzaneh A

    2014-01-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMH) in elderly individuals with vascular diseases are presumed to be due to ischemic small vessel diseases; however, their etiology is unknown. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between cerebrovascular hemodynamics and white matter structural integrity in elderly individuals with vascular risk factors. White matter hyperintensity volumes, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity (MD) were obtained from MRI in 48 subjects (75±7years). Pulsatility index (PI) and dynamic cerebral autoregulation (dCA) was assessed using transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the middle cerebral artery. Dynamic cerebral autoregulation was calculated from transfer function analysis (phase and gain) of spontaneous blood pressure and flow velocity oscillations in the low (LF, 0.03 to 0.15 Hz) and high (HF, 0.16 to 0.5 Hz) frequency ranges. Higher PI was associated with greater WMH (P<0.005). Higher phase across all frequency ranges was associated with greater FA and lower MD (P<0.005). Lower gain was associated with higher FA in the LF range (P=0.001). These relationships between phase and FA were significant in the territories limited to the middle cerebral artery as well as across the entire brain. Our results show a strong relationship between impaired cerebrovascular hemodynamics (PI and dCA) and loss of cerebral white matter structural integrity (WMH and DTI metrics) in elderly individuals. PMID:24129749

  20. Coronary Flow Impacts Aortic Leaflet Mechanics and Aortic Sinus Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Brandon L.; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stresses on aortic valve leaflets are well-known mediators for initiating processes leading to calcific aortic valve disease. Given that non-coronary leaflets calcify first, it may be hypothesized that coronary flow originating from the ostia significantly influences aortic leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics. High resolution time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of aortic sinus blood flow and leaflet motion with and without physiological coronary flow in a well-controlled in vitro setup. The in vitro setup consists of a porcine aortic valve mounted in a physiological aorta sinus chamber with dynamically controlled coronary resistance to emulate physiological coronary flow. Results were analyzed using qualitative streak plots illustrating the spatiotemporal complexity of blood flow patterns, and quantitative velocity vector and shear stress contour plots to show differences in the mechanical environments between the coronary and non-coronary sinuses. It is shown that the presence of coronary flow pulls the classical sinus vorticity deeper into the sinus and increases flow velocity near the leaflet base. This creates a beneficial increase in shear stress and washout near the leaflet that is not seen in the non-coronary sinus. Further, leaflet opens approximately 10% farther into the sinus with coronary flow case indicating superior valve opening area. The presence of coronary flow significantly improves leaflet mechanics and sinus hemodynamics in a manner that would reduce low wall shear stress conditions while improving washout at the base of the leaflet. PMID:25636598

  1. Bicuspid aortic valve hemodynamics: a fluid-structure interaction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Santanu; Seaman, Clara; Sucosky, Philippe

    2011-11-01

    The bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a congenital defect in which the aortic valve forms with two leaflets instead of three. While calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) also develops in the normal tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), its progression in the BAV is more rapid. Although studies have suggested a mechano-potential root for the disease, the native BAV hemodynamics remains largely unknown. This study aimed at characterizing BAV hemodynamics and quantifying the degree of wall-shear stress (WSS) abnormality on BAV leaflets. Fluid-structure interaction models validated with particle-image velocimetry were designed to predict the flow and leaflet dynamics in idealized TAV and BAV anatomies. Valvular function was quantified in terms of the effective orifice area. The regional leaflet WSS was characterized in terms of oscillatory shear index, temporal shear magnitude and temporal shear gradient. The predictions indicate the intrinsic degree of stenosis of the BAV anatomy, reveal drastic differences in shear stress magnitude and pulsatility on BAV and TAV leaflets and confirm the side- and site-specificity of the leaflet WSS. Given the ability of abnormal fluid shear stress to trigger valvular inflammation, these results support the existence of a mechano-etiology of CAVD in the BAV.

  2. Nonparametric hemodynamic deconvolution of FMRI using homomorphic filtering.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasan, Karthik Ramakrishnan; Havlicek, Martin; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2015-05-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an indirect measure of neural activity which is modeled as a convolution of the latent neuronal response and the hemodynamic response function (HRF). Since the sources of HRF variability can be nonneural in nature, the measured fMRI signal does not faithfully represent underlying neural activity. Therefore, it is advantageous to deconvolve the HRF from the fMRI signal. However, since both latent neural activity and the voxel-specific HRF is unknown, the deconvolution must be blind. Existing blind deconvolution approaches employ highly parameterized models, and it is unclear whether these models have an over fitting problem. In order to address these issues, we 1) present a nonparametric deconvolution method based on homomorphic filtering to obtain the latent neuronal response from the fMRI signal and, 2) compare our approach to the best performing existing parametric model based on the estimation of the biophysical hemodynamic model using the Cubature Kalman Filter/Smoother. We hypothesized that if the results from nonparametric deconvolution closely resembled that obtained from parametric deconvolution, then the problem of over fitting during estimation in highly parameterized deconvolution models of fMRI could possibly be over stated. Both simulations and experimental results demonstrate support for our hypothesis since the estimated latent neural response from both parametric and nonparametric methods were highly correlated in the visual cortex. Further, simulations showed that both methods were effective in recovering the simulated ground truth of the latent neural response. PMID:25531878

  3. Four-dimensional coronary morphology and computational hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Andreas; Mitchell, Steven C.; Ramaswamy, Sharan D.; Chandran, Krishnan B.; Sonka, Milan

    2001-07-01

    Conventional reconstructions from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) stack the frames as acquired during the pullback of the catheter to form a straight three-dimensional volume, thus neglecting the vessel curvature and merging images from different heart phases. We are developing a comprehensive system for fusion of the IVUS data with the pullback path as determined from x-ray angiography, to create a geometrically accurate 4-D (3-D plus time) model of the coronary vasculature as basis for computational hemodynamics. The overall goal of our work is to correlate shear stress with plaque thickness. The IVUS data are obtained in a single pullback using an automated pullback device; the frames are afterwards assigned to their respective heart phases based upon the ECG signal. A set of 3-D models is reconstructed by fusion of IVUS and angiographic data corresponding to the same ECG-gated heart phase; methods of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are applied to obtain important hemodynamic data. Combining these models yields the final 4-D reconstruction. Visualization is performed using the platform-independent VRML standard for a user-friendly manipulation of the scene. An extension for virtual angioscopy allows an easy assessment of the vessel features within their local context. Validation was successfully performed both in-vitro and in-vivo.

  4. Bioimpedance Measurement of Segmental Fluid Volumes and Hemodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Leslie D.; Wu, Yi-Chang; Ku, Yu-Tsuan E.; Gerth, Wayne A.; DeVincenzi, D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Bioimpedance has become a useful tool to measure changes in body fluid compartment volumes. An Electrical Impedance Spectroscopic (EIS) system is described that extends the capabilities of conventional fixed frequency impedance plethysmographic (IPG) methods to allow examination of the redistribution of fluids between the intracellular and extracellular compartments of body segments. The combination of EIS and IPG techniques was evaluated in the human calf, thigh, and torso segments of eight healthy men during 90 minutes of six degree head-down tilt (HDT). After 90 minutes HDT the calf and thigh segments significantly (P < 0.05) lost conductive volume (eight and four percent, respectively) while the torso significantly (P < 0.05) gained volume (approximately three percent). Hemodynamic responses calculated from pulsatile IPG data also showed a segmental pattern consistent with vascular fluid loss from the lower extremities and vascular engorgement in the torso. Lumped-parameter equivalent circuit analyses of EIS data for the calf and thigh indicated that the overall volume decreases in these segments arose from reduced extracellular volume that was not completely balanced by increased intracellular volume. The combined use of IPG and EIS techniques enables noninvasive tracking of multi-segment volumetric and hemodynamic responses to environmental and physiological stresses.

  5. The Effect of Hemodynamics on Cerebral Aneurysm Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metcalfe, Ralph; Mantha, Aishwarya; Karmonik, Christof; Strother, Charles

    2004-11-01

    One of the difficulties in applying principles of hemodynamics to the study of blood flow in aneurysms are the drastic variations in possible shape of both the aneurysms and the parent arteries in the region of interest. We have taken data from three para-opthalmic internal carotid artery aneurysms using 3D-digital subtraction angiography (3D-DSA) and performed CFD simulations of steady and unsteady flows through the three different cases using the same pressure gradients and pulsatile flow waveforms (based on the Ku model for flow through the Carotid bifurcation). We have found that the total pressure differential within the aneurysms is consistent with the direction of flow, and that the dynamic pressure gradient within the aneurysm is very small compared with the static pressure variations. Wall shear stresses were highest near regions of sharp arterial curvature, but always remained low inside the aneurysm. These results suggest a more complex role for hemodynamics in aneurysm generation, growth and rupture.

  6. Development of BOLD signal hemodynamic responses in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Arichi, Tomoki; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Varela, Marta; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; Allievi, Alessandro; Merchant, Nazakat; Tusor, Nora; Counsell, Serena J.; Burdet, Etienne; Beckmann, Christian F.; Edwards, A. David

    2012-01-01

    In the rodent brain the hemodynamic response to a brief external stimulus changes significantly during development. Analogous changes in human infants would complicate the determination and use of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in developing populations. We aimed to characterize HRF in human infants before and after the normal time of birth using rapid sampling of the Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. A somatosensory stimulus and an event related experimental design were used to collect data from 10 healthy adults, 15 sedated infants at term corrected post menstrual age (PMA) (median 41 + 1 weeks), and 10 preterm infants (median PMA 34 + 4 weeks). A positive amplitude HRF waveform was identified across all subject groups, with a systematic maturational trend in terms of decreasing time-to-peak and increasing positive peak amplitude associated with increasing age. Application of the age-appropriate HRF models to fMRI data significantly improved the precision of the fMRI analysis. These findings support the notion of a structured development in the brain's response to stimuli across the last trimester of gestation and beyond. PMID:22776460

  7. Comparison of two stents in modifying cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsuok; Taulbee, Dale B; Tremmel, Markus; Meng, Hui

    2008-05-01

    There is a general lack of quantitative understanding about how specific design features of endovascular stents (struts and mesh design, porosity) affect the hemodynamics in intracranial aneurysms. To shed light on this issue, we studied two commercial high-porosity stents (Tristar stent and Wallstent) in aneurysm models of varying vessel curvature as well as in a patient-specific model using Computational Fluid Dynamics. We investigated how these stents modify hemodynamic parameters such as aneurysmal inflow rate, stasis, and wall shear stress, and how such changes are related to the specific designs. We found that the flow damping effect of stents and resulting aneurysmal stasis and wall shear stress are strongly influenced by stent porosity, strut design, and mesh hole shape. We also confirmed that the damping effect is significantly reduced at higher vessel curvatures, which indicates limited usefulness of high-porosity stents as a stand-alone treatment. Finally, we showed that the stasis-inducing performance of stents in 3D geometries can be predicted from the hydraulic resistance of their flat mesh screens. From this, we propose a methodology to cost-effectively compare different stent designs before running a full 3D simulation. PMID:18264766

  8. Hemodynamic simulations in coronary aneurysms of children with Kawasaki disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Dibyendu; Burns, Jane; Marsden, Alison

    2009-11-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a serious pediatric illness affecting the cardiovascular system. One of the most serious complications of KD, occurring in about 25% of untreated cases, is the formation of large aneurysms in the coronary arteries, which put patients at risk for myocardial infarction. In this project we performed patient specific computational simulations of blood flow in aneurysmal left and right coronary arteries of a KD patient to gain an understanding about their hemodynamics. Models were constructed from CT data using custom software. Typical pulsatile flow waveforms were applied at the model inlets, while resistance and RCR lumped models were applied and compared at the outlets. Simulated pressure waveforms compared well with typical physiologic data. High wall shear stress values are found in the narrow region at the base of the aneurysm and low shear values occur in regions of recirculation. A Lagrangian approach has been adopted to perform particle tracking and compute particle residence time in the recirculation. Our long-term goal will be to develop links between hemodynamics and the risk for thrombus formation in order to assist in clinical decision-making.

  9. Neuronal or Hemodynamic? Grappling with the Functional MRI Signal

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI (fMRI) continue to advance because creative physicists, engineers, neuroscientists, clinicians, and physiologists find new ways for extracting more information from the signal. Innovations in pulse sequence design, paradigm design, and processing methods have advanced the field and firmly established fMRI as a cornerstone for understanding the human brain. In this article, the field of fMRI is described through consideration of the central problem of separating hemodynamic from neuronal information. Discussed here are examples of how pulse sequences, activation paradigms, and processing methods are integrated such that novel, high-quality information can be obtained. Examples include the extraction of information such as activation onset latency, metabolic rate, neuronal adaptation, vascular patency, vessel diameter, vigilance, and subvoxel activation. Experimental measures include time series latency, hemodynamic shape, MR phase, multivoxel patterns, ratios of activation-related R2* to R2, metabolic rate changes, fluctuation correlations and frequencies, changes in fluctuation correlations and frequencies over time, resting correlation states, echo time dependence, and more. PMID:25093397

  10. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  11. Comparison of Two Stents in Modifying Cerebral Aneurysm Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minsuok; Taulbee, Dale B.; Tremmel, Markus; Meng, Hui

    2009-01-01

    There is a general lack of quantitative understanding about how specific design features of endovascular stents (struts and mesh design, porosity) affect the hemodynamics in intracranial aneurysms. To shed light on this issue, we studied two commercial high-porosity stents (Tristar stent™ and Wallstent®) in aneurysm models of varying vessel curvature as well as in a patient-specific model using Computational Fluid Dynamics. We investigated how these stents modify hemodynamic parameters such as aneurysmal inflow rate, stasis, and wall shear stress, and how such changes are related to the specific designs. We found that the flow damping effect of stents and resulting aneurysmal stasis and wall shear stress are strongly influenced by stent porosity, strut design, and mesh hole shape. We also confirmed that the damping effect is significantly reduced at higher vessel curvatures, which indicates limited usefulness of high-porosity stents as a stand-alone treatment. Finally, we showed that the stasis-inducing performance of stents in 3D geometries can be predicted from the hydraulic resistance of their flat mesh screens. From this, we propose a methodology to cost-effectively compare different stent designs before running a full 3D simulation. PMID:18264766

  12. Bayesian hemodynamic parameter estimation by bolus tracking perfusion weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Boutelier, Timothé; Kudo, Koshuke; Pautot, Fabrice; Sasaki, Makoto

    2012-07-01

    A delay-insensitive probabilistic method for estimating hemodynamic parameters, delays, theoretical residue functions, and concentration time curves by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion weighted imaging is presented. Only a mild stationarity hypothesis is made beyond the standard perfusion model. New microvascular parameters with simple hemodynamic interpretation are naturally introduced. Simulations on standard digital phantoms show that the method outperforms the oscillating singular value decomposition (oSVD) method in terms of goodness-of-fit, linearity, statistical and systematic errors on all parameters, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Delay is always estimated sharply with user-supplied resolution and is purely arterial, by contrast to oSVD time-to-maximum TMAX that is very noisy and biased by mean transit time (MTT), blood volume, and SNR. Residue functions and signals estimates do not suffer overfitting anymore. One CT acute stroke case confirms simulation results and highlights the ability of the method to reliably estimate MTT when SNR is low. Delays look promising for delineating the arterial occlusion territory and collateral circulation. PMID:22410325

  13. Endovascular Treatment of Thoracic Aortic Dissection: Hemodynamic Shear Stress Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik Sau; Lai, Siu Kai; Cheng, Stephen Wing Keung; Chow, Kwok Wing

    2012-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD), a life threatening cardiovascular disease, occurs when blood intrudes into the layers of the aortic wall, creating a new artificial channel (the false lumen) beside the original true lumen. The weakened false lumen wall may expand, enhancing the risk of rupture and resulting in high mortality. Endovascular treatment involves the deployment of a stent graft into the aorta, thus blocking blood from entering the false lumen. Due to the irregular geometry of the aorta, the stent graft, however, may fail to conform to the vessel curvature, and would create a ``bird-beak'' configuration, a wedge-shaped domain between the graft and the vessel wall. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is employed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. With the `beaking' configuration, the local hemodynamic shear stress will drop below the threshold of safety reported earlier in the literature. The oscillating behavior of the shear stress might lead to local inflammation, atherosclerosis and other undesirable consequences. Supported by the Innovation and Technology Fund of the Hong Kong Government.

  14. Renal Hemodynamics in AKI: In Search of New Treatment Targets.

    PubMed

    Matejovic, Martin; Ince, Can; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Blantz, Roland; Molitoris, Bruce A; Rosner, Mitchell H; Okusa, Mark D; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic interventions are required to prevent or treat AKI. To expedite progress in this regard, a consensus conference held by the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative was convened in April of 2014 to develop recommendations for research priorities and future directions. Here, we highlight the concepts related to renal hemodynamics in AKI that are likely to reveal new treatment targets on investigation. Overall, we must better understand the interactions between systemic, total renal, and glomerular hemodynamics, including the role of tubuloglomerular feedback. Furthermore, the net consequences of therapeutic maneuvers aimed at restoring glomerular filtration need to be examined in relation to the nature, magnitude, and duration of the insult. Additionally, microvascular blood flow heterogeneity in AKI is now recognized as a common occurrence; timely interventions to preserve the renal microcirculatory flow may interrupt the downward spiral of injury toward progressive kidney failure and should, therefore, be investigated. Finally, development of techniques that permit an integrative physiologic approach, including direct visualization of renal microvasculature and measurement of oxygen kinetics and mitochondrial function in intact tissue in all nephron segments, may provide new insights into how the kidney responds to various injurious stimuli and allow evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26510884

  15. Hemodynamic response patterns to mental stress: diagnostic and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Rüddel, H; Langewitz, W; Schächinger, H; Schmieder, R; Schulte, W

    1988-08-01

    Stress has been identified as contributing to the development of cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiologic link between stress and disease still remains unclear. Because experimental stress testing in the laboratory permits the examination of the underlying mechanism for stress-induced blood pressure, analyses of cardiovascular reactivity during emotional stress could be of particular clinical importance. The analyses of pooled data during the past 6 years (n = 298, age from 20 to 60 years, normotensive subjects as well as patients with borderline and mild essential hypertension) reveal that stress-induced changes in stroke volume and especially in total peripheral resistance are crucial parameters to analyze the hemodynamic stress response. However, neither those simple nor complex response patterns such as "hot reactor" describe clinically distinct subgroups of persons. When physiologic testing was repeated in hypertensive patients after effective long-term antihypertensive therapy with clonidine, oxprenolol, nitrendipine, or enalapril, no attenuation of the stress-induced increase in blood pressure was found in any of these groups. However, heart rate reactivity and stress-induced changes in total peripheral resistance were altered significantly by oxprenolol and nitrendipine. The beta-adrenoceptor blocker decreased heart rate reactivity and increased reactivity of peripheral resistance; the calcium antagonist decreased stress-induced changes in peripheral resistance and increased the heart rate response. The centrally acting sympatholytic regimen and the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor had no impact on the hemodynamic response pattern during emotional challenge. PMID:3394640

  16. Effect of Maturation on Hemodynamic and Autonomic Control Recovery Following Maximal Running Exercise in Highly Trained Young Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Buchheit, Martin; Al Haddad, Hani; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Quod, Marc J.; Bourdon, Pitre C.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of maturation on post-exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses. Fifty-five highly trained young male soccer players (12–18 years) classified as pre-, circum-, or post-peak height velocity (PHV) performed a graded running test to exhaustion on a treadmill. Before (Pre) and after (5th–10th min, Post) exercise, heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), arterial pressure (AP), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were monitored. Parasympathetic (high frequency [HFRR] of HR variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity [Ln BRS]) and sympathetic activity (low frequency [LFSAP] of systolic AP variability) were estimated. Post-exercise blood lactate [La]b, the HR recovery (HRR) time constant, and parasympathetic reactivation (time-varying HRV analysis) were assessed. In all three groups, exercise resulted in increased HR, CO, AP, and LFSAP (P < 0.001), decreased SV, HFRR, and Ln BRS (all P < 0.001), and no change in TPR (P = 0.98). There was no “maturation × time” interaction for any of the hemodynamic or autonomic variables (all P > 0.22). After exercise, pre-PHV players displayed lower SV, CO, and [La]b, faster HRR and greater parasympathetic reactivation compared with circum- and post-PHV players. Multiple regression analysis showed that lean muscle mass, [La]b, and Pre parasympathetic activity were the strongest predictors of HRR (r2 = 0.62, P < 0.001). While pre-PHV players displayed a faster HRR and greater post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, maturation had little influence on the hemodynamic and autonomic responses following maximal running exercise. HRR relates to lean muscle mass, blood acidosis, and intrinsic parasympathetic function, with less evident impact of post-exercise autonomic function. PMID:22013423

  17. Hemodynamic effects of colloid concentration in experimental hemorrhage: a comparison of Ringer's acetate, 3% dextran-60, and 6% dextran-70.

    PubMed

    Schött, U; Lindbom, L O; Sjöstrand, U

    1988-04-01

    Hemodynamic effects of iso-oncotic 3% dextran-60, 6% dextran-70, and Ringer's acetate were compared in 28 male pigs (25 to 30 kg) subjected to experimental trauma and hemorrhage. The animals were kept anesthetized with 75% N2O/25% O2, 0.8% halothane. Hemodynamic and respiratory conditions were allowed to stabilize for one hour preoperatively (baseline data). After surgical trauma (arthroplasty), three 0.5 L of arterial blood samples were withdrawn and replaced with autologous red cells mixed with one liter of 3% dextran-60 in one group 1 (n = 9), one liter of 6% dextran-70 in group 2 (n = 10), and 3 L of Ringer's acetate in group 3 (n = 9). Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (WP) was kept at baseline level for a further 10 h with infusion of the respective fluid; for this purpose, groups 1 through 3 needed additional infusions of 0.8 +/- 0.3, 0.5 +/- 0.4, and 5.3 +/- 3 (SD) L, respectively. Group 1 showed the highest jejunal capillary blood flow at 10 h and the lowest intragroup variations in hemodynamic and respiratory data. Group 2 had the highest pulmonary arterial pressures and group 3 had the lowest colloid oncotic and arterial BP and left ventricular volume indices. In group 3, the Hct and serum albumin indicated insufficient plasma volume replacement. This group had a significantly larger (p less than .05) amount of tissue water in skin, skeletal muscle, and jejunum than the other groups; no significant difference in lung or heart muscle water was found between the groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2450720

  18. Effect of maturation on hemodynamic and autonomic control recovery following maximal running exercise in highly trained young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Martin; Al Haddad, Hani; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Quod, Marc J; Bourdon, Pitre C

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of maturation on post-exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses. Fifty-five highly trained young male soccer players (12-18 years) classified as pre-, circum-, or post-peak height velocity (PHV) performed a graded running test to exhaustion on a treadmill. Before (Pre) and after (5th-10th min, Post) exercise, heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), arterial pressure (AP), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were monitored. Parasympathetic (high frequency [HF(RR)] of HR variability (HRV) and baroreflex sensitivity [Ln BRS]) and sympathetic activity (low frequency [LF(SAP)] of systolic AP variability) were estimated. Post-exercise blood lactate [La](b), the HR recovery (HRR) time constant, and parasympathetic reactivation (time-varying HRV analysis) were assessed. In all three groups, exercise resulted in increased HR, CO, AP, and LF(SAP) (P < 0.001), decreased SV, HF(RR), and Ln BRS (all P < 0.001), and no change in TPR (P = 0.98). There was no "maturation × time" interaction for any of the hemodynamic or autonomic variables (all P > 0.22). After exercise, pre-PHV players displayed lower SV, CO, and [La](b), faster HRR and greater parasympathetic reactivation compared with circum- and post-PHV players. Multiple regression analysis showed that lean muscle mass, [La](b), and Pre parasympathetic activity were the strongest predictors of HRR (r(2) = 0.62, P < 0.001). While pre-PHV players displayed a faster HRR and greater post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, maturation had little influence on the hemodynamic and autonomic responses following maximal running exercise. HRR relates to lean muscle mass, blood acidosis, and intrinsic parasympathetic function, with less evident impact of post-exercise autonomic function. PMID:22013423

  19. Hemodynamic Follow-Up in Adult Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Atrial Septal Defect after Partial Closure

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jinyoung; Lee, Sang-Yun; Kang, I-Seok; Lee, Chang Ha; Lee, Cheul; Yang, Ji-Hyuk; Jun, Tae-Gook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the hemodynamic statuses of patients after partial closure of atrial septal defects with fenestration due to pulmonary hypertension. Materials and Methods Seventeen adult patients underwent partial atrial septal defect closure and follow-up cardiac catheterization. We analyzed hemodynamic data and clinical parameters before and after closure. Results The median age at closure was 29 years old. The baseline Qp/Qs was 1.9±0.6. The median interval from the operation to the cardiac catheterization was 27 months. The CT ratio decreased from 0.55±0.07 to 0.48±0.06 (p<0.05). The mean pulmonary arterial pressure decreased from 50.0±11.5 mm Hg to 32.5±14.4 mm Hg (p<0.05), and the pulmonary resistance index decreased from 9.2±3.6 Wood units*m2 to 6.3±3.8 Wood units*m2 (p<0.05). Eleven patients (64.7%) continued to exhibit high pulmonary resistance (over 3.0 Wood units*m2) after closure. These patients had significantly higher pulmonary resistance indices and mean pulmonary arterial pressures based on oxygen testing before the partial closures (p<0.05). However, no significant predictors of post-closure pulmonary hypertension were identified. Conclusion Despite improvement in symptoms and hemodynamics after partial closure of an atrial septal defect, pulmonary hypertension should be monitored carefully. PMID:26847280

  20. Effects of Intravenous Magnesium Sulfate and Lidocaine on Hemodynamic Variables Following Direct Laryngoscopy and Intubation in Elective Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dehkordi, Masih Ebrahimi; Radpay, Badiozaman; Teimoorian, Hooman; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir

    2013-01-01

    Background Laryngoscopy and intubation incur hemodynamic changes like increase in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, pulmonary artery pressure, wedge capillary pressure and arrhythmias. Anesthesiologists are continually in search of ways to alleviate such complications. Several medicinal methods have been suggested that serve the purpose including the administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate to minimize these unfavorable responses. This study compares the effects of intravenous administration of lidocaine and magnesium sulfate on unwanted hemodynamic responses following laryngoscopy and intubation in elective surgery candidates. Materials and Methods This randomized double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 60 ASA-I and ASA-II candidates who received 60 mg/kg (based on Lean Body Mass) magnesium sulfate or lidocaine randomly before intubation. Values of systolic and diastolic blood pressures, mean arterial pressure, and heart rate were recorded for both groups during the 5 minutes following administration, and compared with baseline values. Results In both groups, systolic blood pressure increased compared to the baseline value. However, there was a significant difference between the two groups as this increase occurred within the first 3 minutes in the lidocaine group, while within the first minute in the magnesium sulfate group. The increase in diastolic blood pressure was not significant. But there was a significant difference in the mean arterial pressure increase between the two groups since in the magnesium sulfate group this increase occurred in the first minute whereas in the lidocaine group it occurred during the first two minutes. There was no significant difference in the heart rates after intubation between the two groups. Conclusion Magnesium sulfate is more effective than lidocaine in controlling hemodynamics, although it may increase the heart rate. PMID:25191450

  1. Pulmonary Hypertension an Independent Risk Factor for Death in Intensive Care Unit: Correlation of Hemodynamic Factors with Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Saydain, Ghulam; Awan, Aamir; Manickam, Palaniappan; Kleinow, Paul; Badr, Safwan

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Critically ill patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) pose additional challenges due to the existence of right ventricular (RV) dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of hemodynamic factors on the outcome. METHODS We reviewed the records of patients with a diagnosis of PH admitted to the intensive care unit. In addition to evaluating traditional hemodynamic parameters, we defined severe PH as right atrial pressure >20 mmHg, mean pulmonary artery pressure >55 mmHg, or cardiac index (CI) <2 L/min/m2. We also defined the RV functional index (RFI) as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) adjusted for CI as PASP/CI; increasing values reflect RV dysfunction. RESULTS Fifty-three patients (mean age 60 years, 72% women, 79% Blacks), were included in the study. Severe PH was present in 68% of patients who had higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (6.8 ± 3.3 vs 3.8 ± 1.6; P = 0.001) and overall in-hospital mortality (36% vs 6%; P = 0.02) compared to nonsevere patients, although Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores (19.9 ± 7.5 vs 18.5 ± 6.04; P = 0.52) were similar and sepsis was more frequent among nonsevere PH patients (31 vs 64%; P = 0.02). Severe PH (P = 0.04), lower mean arterial pressure (P = 0.04), and CI (P = 0.01); need for invasive ventilation (P = 0.02) and vasopressors (P = 0.03); and higher SOFA (P = 0.001), APACHE II (P = 0.03), pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) (P = 0.01), and RFI (P = 0.004) were associated with increased mortality. In a multivariate model, SOFA [OR = 1.45, 95% confidence interval (C.I.) = 1.09–1.93; P = 0.01], PVRI (OR = 1.12, 95% C.I. = 1.02–1.24; P = 0.02), and increasing RFI (OR = 1.06, 95% C.I. = 1.01–1.11; P = 0.01) were independently associated with mortality. CONCLUSION PH is an independent risk factor for mortality in critically ill patients. Composite factors rather than individual hemodynamic parameters are better predictors of

  2. Growth and hemodynamics after early embryonic aortic arch occlusion*

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephanie E.; Menon, Prahlad G.; Kowalski, William J.; Shekhar, Akshay; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Nishimura, Nozomi; Schaffer, Chris B.; Butcher, Jonathan T.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-01-01

    The majority of severe clinically significant forms of congenital heart disease (CHD) is associated with great artery lesions, including hypoplastic, double, right or interrupted aortic arch morphologies. While fetal and neonatal interventions are advancing, their potential ability to restore cardiac function, optimal timing, location, and intensity required for intervention remain largely unknown. We here combine computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations with in vivo experiments to test how individual pharyngeal arch artery hemodynamics alters as a result of local interventions to obstruct individual arch artery flow. Simulated isolated occlusions within each pharyngeal arch artery were created with image derived three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of normal chick pharyngeal arch anatomy at Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) developmental stages HH18 and HH24. Acute flow redistributions were then computed using in vivo measured subject-specific aortic sinus inflow velocity profiles. A kinematic vascular growth-rendering algorithm was then developed and implemented to test the role of changing local wall shear stress patterns in downstream 3D morphogenesis of arch arteries. CFD simulations predicted that altered pressure gradients and flow redistributions were most sensitive to occlusion of the IVth arches. To evaluate these simulations experimentally, a novel in vivo experimental model of pharyngeal arch occlusion was developed and implemented using two-photon microscopy guided femtosecond laser based photodisruption surgery. The right IVth arch was occluded at HH18, and resulting diameter changes were followed for up to 24 hours. Pharyngeal arch diameter responses to acute hemodynamic changes were predicted qualitatively but poorly quantitatively. Chronic growth and adaptation to hemodynamic changes however were predicted in a subset of arches. Our findings suggest that this complex biodynamic process is governed through more complex forms of mechanobiological

  3. Sildenafil Exposure and Hemodynamic Effect after Fontan Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tunks, Robert D.; Barker, Piers C. A.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Fleming, Gregory A.; Laughon, Matthew; Li, Jennifer S.; Hill, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determine sildenafil exposure and hemodynamic effect in children after Fontan single-ventricle surgery. Design Prospective, dose-escalation trial. Setting Single-center, pediatric catheterization laboratory. Patients 9 children post Fontan single-ventricle surgical palliation and undergoing elective cardiac catheterization: Median (range) age and weight: 5.2 years (2.5–9.4) and 16.3 kg (9.5–28.1). Five children (55%) were male, and 6/9 (67%) had a systemic right ventricle. Interventions Catheterization and echocardiography performed before and immediately after single-dose intravenous sildenafil (0.25, 0.35, or 0.45 mg/kg over 20 minutes). Measurements Peak sildenafil and des-methyl sildenafil concentration, change in hemodynamic parameters measured by cardiac catheterization and echocardiography. Main Results Maximum sildenafil concentrations ranged from 124–646 ng/ml and were above the in vitro threshold needed for 77% phosphodiesterase type-5 (PDE-5) inhibition in 8/9 children and 90% inhibition in 7/7 of children with doses ≥0.35 mg/kg. Sildenafil improved stroke volume (+22%, p=0.05) and cardiac output (+10%, p=0.01) with no significant change in heart rate in 8/9 children. Sildenafil also lowered systemic (-16%, p=0.01) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) in all 9 children (median baseline PVRI 2.4 [range: 1.3, 3.7]; decreased to 1.9 [0.8, 2.7] WU x m2; p=0.01) with no dose-response effect. Pulmonary arterial pressures decreased (−10%, p=0.02) and pulmonary blood flow increased (9%, p=0.02). There was no change in myocardial performance index and no adverse events. Conclusions After Fontan surgery, sildenafil infusion acutely improves cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, increasing cardiac index. For the range of doses studied, exposure was within the acute safety range reported in adult subjects. PMID:24201857

  4. Estimating Hemodynamic Responses to the Wingate Test Using Thoracic Impedance

    PubMed Central

    Astorino, Todd A.; Bovee, Curtis; DeBoe, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Techniques including direct Fick and Doppler echocardiography are frequently used to assess hemodynamic responses to exercise. Thoracic impedance has been shown to be a noninvasive alternative to these methods for assessing these responses during graded exercise to exhaustion, yet its feasibility during supramaximal bouts of exercise is relatively unknown. We used thoracic impedance to estimate stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) during the Wingate test (WAnT) and compared these values to those from graded exercise testing (GXT). Active men (n = 9) and women (n = 7) (mean age = 24.8 ± 5.9 yr) completed two Wingate tests and two graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. During exercise, heart rate (HR), SV, and CO were continuously estimated using thoracic impedance. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to identify potential differences in hemodynamic responses across protocols. Results: Maximal SV (138.6 ± 37.4 mL vs. 135.6 ± 26.9 mL) and CO (24.5 ± 6.1 L·min-1 vs. 23.7 ± 5.1 L·min-1) were similar (p > 0.05) between repeated Wingate tests. Mean maximal HR was higher (p < 0.01) for GXT (185 ± 7 b·min-1) versus WAnT (177 ± 11 b·min-1), and mean SV was higher in response to WAnT (137.1 ± 32.1 mL) versus GXT (123.0 ± 32.0 mL), leading to similar maximal cardiac output between WAnT and GXT (23.9 ± 5.6 L·min-1 vs. 22.5 ± 6.0 L·min-1). Our data show no difference in hemodynamic responses in response to repeated administrations of the Wingate test. In addition, the Wingate test elicits similar cardiac output compared to progressive cycling to VO2max. Key points Measurement of cardiac output (CO), the rate of oxygen transport delivered by the heart to skeletal muscle, is not widely-employed in Exercise Physiology due to the level of difficulty and invasiveness characteristic of most techniques used to measure this variable. Nevertheless, thoracic impedance has been shown to provide a noninvasive and simpler approach to continuously

  5. Lung effect on the hemodynamics in pulmonary artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, S. F.; Sheu, Tony W. H.; Chang, T. M.

    2001-06-01

    The present study investigates blood flow in a pulmonary artery. The aim is to gain a better understanding of offset value in vascular circulation through a two-dimensional analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the hemodynamics in a blood vessel with truncated outlets at which constant pressure is specified is examined. To simplify the analysis, the vessel walls are regarded as being rigid. In quadratic elements, the streamline upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element model is employed to simulate the incompressible Newtonian blood flow. The adopted finite element model introduces artificial damping terms solely in the streamline direction. With these terms added to the formulation, the discrete system is enhanced while solution accuracy is maintained without deterioration due to numerical diffusion errors. Copyright

  6. Vascular tracers alter hemodynamics and airway pressure in anesthetized sheep

    SciTech Connect

    Albertine, K.H.; Staub, N.C.

    1986-11-01

    The technique of vascular labeling was developed to mark sites of increased microvascular permeability. We used the vascular labeling technique in anesthetized sheep and found that hemodynamics and airway pressure were adversely affected by intraarterial infusions of two vascular tracers. Monastral blue (nine sheep) immediately caused systemic arterial hypotension, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and bronchoconstriction. All three physiological responses were partially blocked by a cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin) but not by an H1-antihistamine (chlorpheniramine). Colloidal gold (nine sheep) caused immediate, but less dramatic, pulmonary arterial hypertension which was not attenuated by the blocking agents. We conclude that these two vascular tracers caused detrimental physiological side effects in sheep at the usual doses used to label injured microvessels in other species.

  7. CFD modeling of pulsatile hemodynamics in the total cavopulmonary connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zobaer, S. M. Tareq; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique

    2016-07-01

    Total cavopulmonary connection is a blood flow pathway which is created surgically by an operation known as Fontan procedure, performed on children with single ventricle heart defects. Recent studies have shown that the hemodynamics in the connection can be strongly influenced by the presence of pulsatile flow. The aim of this paper is model the pulsatile flow patterns, and to calculate the vorticity field and power losses in an idealized 1.5D offset model of Total Cavopulmonary Connection. A three-dimensional polyhedral mesh was constructed for the numerical simulation. The rheological properties of blood were considered as Newtonian, and flow in the connection was assumed to be laminar. The results demonstrated complex flow patterns in the connection. The outcomes of the simulation showed reasonable agreement with the results available in the literature for a similar model.

  8. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  9. Echocardiographic Hemodynamic Monitoring in the Critically Ill Patient

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailén, Manuel; Guerrero-De-Mier, Manuel; López-Álvaro, Julián

    2011-01-01

    Echocardiography has shown to be an essential diagnostic tool in the critically ill patient's assessment. In this scenario the initial fluid therapy, such as it is recommended in the actual clinical guidelines, not always provides the desired results and maintains a considerable incidence of cardiorrespiratory insufficiency. Echocardiography can council us on these patients' clinical handling, not only the initial fluid therapy but also on the best-suited election of the vasoactive/inotropic treatment and the early detection of complications. It contributes as well to improving the etiological diagnosis, allowing one to know the heart performance with more precision. The objective of this manuscript is to review the more important parameters that can assist the intensivist in theragnosis of hemodynamically unstable patients. PMID:22758613

  10. Efficient hemodynamic event detection utilizing relational databases and wavelet analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saeed, M.; Mark, R. G.

    2001-01-01

    Development of a temporal query framework for time-oriented medical databases has hitherto been a challenging problem. We describe a novel method for the detection of hemodynamic events in multiparameter trends utilizing wavelet coefficients in a MySQL relational database. Storage of the wavelet coefficients allowed for a compact representation of the trends, and provided robust descriptors for the dynamics of the parameter time series. A data model was developed to allow for simplified queries along several dimensions and time scales. Of particular importance, the data model and wavelet framework allowed for queries to be processed with minimal table-join operations. A web-based search engine was developed to allow for user-defined queries. Typical queries required between 0.01 and 0.02 seconds, with at least two orders of magnitude improvement in speed over conventional queries. This powerful and innovative structure will facilitate research on large-scale time-oriented medical databases.

  11. Genes influence the amplitude and timing of brain hemodynamic responses.

    PubMed

    Shan, Zuyao Y; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Thompson, Paul M; McMahon, Katie L; Blokland, Gabriëlla A M; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Calhoun, Vince; Martin, Nicholas G; Visscher, Peter M; Wright, Margaret J; Reutens, David C

    2016-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the hemodynamic response function (HRF) reflects regulation of regional cerebral blood flow in response to neuronal activation. The HRF varies significantly between individuals. This study investigated the genetic contribution to individual variation in HRF using fMRI data from 125 monozygotic (MZ) and 149 dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. The resemblance in amplitude, latency, and duration of the HRF in six regions in the frontal and parietal lobes was compared between MZ and DZ twin pairs. Heritability was estimated using an ACE (Additive genetic, Common environmental, and unique Environmental factors) model. The genetic influence on the temporal profile and amplitude of HRF was moderate to strong (24%-51%). The HRF may be used in the genetic analysis of diseases with a cerebrovascular etiology. PMID:26375212

  12. Hemodynamic response in a geographical word naming verbal fluency test.

    PubMed

    Marino, Julian; Redondo, Santiago; Luna, Fernando G; Sanchez, Luis M; Torres, Gustavo Foa

    2014-01-01

    Functional hemodynamic response was studied in a new Verbal Fluency Task (VFT) that demanded the production of geographical words while fMRI data was obtained. Participants completed 7 trials with a total duration of 2 min. 20 s. Four simple arithmetic subtraction trials were alternated with 3 geographical naming trials. Each trial had a duration of 20 s. Brain activity was contrasted between both conditions and significant differences (p < .05, Family Wise Error correction) were observed in the prefrontal medial gyrus, typically associated with word retrieval and phonological awareness, and in the parahippocampal gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex and lingual gyrus, areas related to spatial cognition. These results indicate that geographic VFT could be incorporated into a browser of cognitive processes using VFT considering its specific relationship with spatial cognition. Further investigations are proposed, taking special interest in the gender variable and eliminating phonological restrictions, because the evoked Argentinean cities and towns ended in a consonant letter. PMID:25012096

  13. Effect of Hemoglobin Transfusion Threshold on Cerebral Hemodynamics and Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Rubin, M Laura; Benoit, Julia S; Tilley, Barbara C; Gopinath, Shankar; Hannay, H Julia; Doshi, Pratik; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Robertson, Claudia S

    2015-08-15

    Cerebral dysfunction caused by traumatic brain injury may adversely affect cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation leading to worse outcomes if oxygen capacity is decreased due to anemia. In a randomized clinical trial of 200 patients comparing transfusion thresholds <7 g/dl versus 10 g/dl, where transfusion of leukoreduced packed red blood cells was used to maintain the assigned hemoglobin threshold, no long-term neurological difference was detected. The current study examines secondary outcome measures of intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) in patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. We observed a lower hazard for death (hazard ratio [HR]=0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.02-0.99) during the first 3 days post-injury, and a higher hazard for death after three days (HR=2.55, 95% CI=1.00-6.53) in the 10 g/dl threshold group as compared to the 7 g/dL threshold group. No significant differences were observed for ICP and CPP but MAP was slightly lower in the 7 g/dL group, although the decreased MAP did not result in increased hypotension. Overall brain tissue hypoxia events were not significantly different in the two transfusion threshold groups. When the PbtO2 catheter was placed in normal brain, however, tissue hypoxia occurred in 25% of patients in the 7 g/dL threshold group, compared to 10.2% of patients in the 10 g/dL threshold group (p=0.04). Although we observed a few differences in hemodynamic outcomes between the transfusion threshold groups, none were of major clinical significance and did not affect long-term neurological outcome and mortality. PMID:25566694

  14. Optimal hemodynamic response model for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Muhammad A.; Jeong, Myung Yung; Mannan, Malik M. N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an emerging non-invasive brain imaging technique and measures brain activities by means of near-infrared light of 650–950 nm wavelengths. The cortical hemodynamic response (HR) differs in attributes at different brain regions and on repetition of trials, even if the experimental paradigm is kept exactly the same. Therefore, an HR model that can estimate such variations in the response is the objective of this research. The canonical hemodynamic response function (cHRF) is modeled by two Gamma functions with six unknown parameters (four of them to model the shape and other two to scale and baseline respectively). The HRF model is supposed to be a linear combination of HRF, baseline, and physiological noises (amplitudes and frequencies of physiological noises are supposed to be unknown). An objective function is developed as a square of the residuals with constraints on 12 free parameters. The formulated problem is solved by using an iterative optimization algorithm to estimate the unknown parameters in the model. Inter-subject variations in HRF and physiological noises have been estimated for better cortical functional maps. The accuracy of the algorithm has been verified using 10 real and 15 simulated data sets. Ten healthy subjects participated in the experiment and their HRF for finger-tapping tasks have been estimated and analyzed. The statistical significance of the estimated activity strength parameters has been verified by employing statistical analysis (i.e., t-value > tcritical and p-value < 0.05). PMID:26136668

  15. Critical Transitions in Early Embryonic Aortic Arch Patterning and Hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, William J.; Dur, Onur; Wang, Yajuan; Patrick, Michael J.; Tinney, Joseph P.; Keller, Bradley B.; Pekkan, Kerem

    2013-01-01

    Transformation from the bilaterally symmetric embryonic aortic arches to the mature great vessels is a complex morphogenetic process, requiring both vasculogenic and angiogenic mechanisms. Early aortic arch development occurs simultaneously with rapid changes in pulsatile blood flow, ventricular function, and downstream impedance in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. These dynamic biomechanical environmental landscapes provide critical epigenetic cues for vascular growth and remodeling. In our previous work, we examined hemodynamic loading and aortic arch growth in the chick embryo at Hamburger-Hamilton stages 18 and 24. We provided the first quantitative correlation between wall shear stress (WSS) and aortic arch diameter in the developing embryo, and observed that these two stages contained different aortic arch patterns with no inter-embryo variation. In the present study, we investigate these biomechanical events in the intermediate stage 21 to determine insights into this critical transition. We performed fluorescent dye microinjections to identify aortic arch patterns and measured diameters using both injection recordings and high-resolution optical coherence tomography. Flow and WSS were quantified with 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Dye injections revealed that the transition in aortic arch pattern is not a uniform process and multiple configurations were documented at stage 21. CFD analysis showed that WSS is substantially elevated compared to both the previous (stage 18) and subsequent (stage 24) developmental time-points. These results demonstrate that acute increases in WSS are followed by a period of vascular remodeling to restore normative hemodynamic loading. Fluctuations in blood flow are one possible mechanism that impacts the timing of events such as aortic arch regression and generation, leading to the variable configurations at stage 21. Aortic arch variations noted during normal rapid vascular remodeling at stage 21 identify a

  16. Plethyzmography in assessment of hemodynamic results of pacemaker functions programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojciechowski, Dariusz; Sionek, Piotr; Peczalski, Kazimierz; Janusek, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents potential role of plethyzmography in optimization of heart hemodynamic function during pacemaker programming. The assessment of optimal stroke volume in patients, with implanted dual chamber pacemaker (DDD), by plethyzmography was a goal of the study. The data were collected during pacing rhythm. 20 patients (8 female and 12 male, average 77.4+/-4.6 years) with dual chamber pacemaker (DDD) and with pacing rhythm during routine pacemaker control and study tests were incorporated in the study group. Hemodynamic parameters were assessed during modification of atrio-ventricular delay (AVD) for pacing rhythm of 70 bpm and 90 bpm. The time of atrioventricular was programmed with 20 ms steps within range 100-200 ms and data were recorded with two minutes delay between two consecutive measurements. Stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO) were calculated from plethyzmographic signal by using Beatscope software (TNO Holand). Highest SV calculated for given pacing rhythm was named optimal stroke volume (OSV) and consequently highest cardiac output was named maximal cardiac output (MCO). The time of atrio-ventricular delay for OSV was named optimal atrioventricular delay (OAVD). The results have showed: mean values of OAVD for 70 bpm - 152+/-33 ms and for 90 bpm -149+/-35 ms, shortening of the mean OAVD time caused by increase of pacing rate from 70 bpm to 90 bpm what resulted in statistically significant decrease of OSV with not statistically significant increase of MCO. The analysis of consecutive patients revealed three types of response to increase of pacing rhythm: 1. typical-shortening of OAVD, 2. neutral-no change of OAVD and 3.atypical-lengthening of OAVD.

  17. In-vivo optical imaging and spectroscopy of cerebral hemodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao

    Functional optical imaging techniques, such as diffuse optical imaging and spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging (LSI), were used in research and clinical settings to measure cerebral hemodynamics. In this thesis, theoretical and experimental developments of the techniques and their in-vivo applications ranging from small animals to adult humans are demonstrated. Near infrared diffuse optical techniques non-invasively measure hemoglobin concentrations, blood oxygen saturation (diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, DRS) and blood flow (diffuse correlation spectroscopy, DCS) in deep tissues, e.g. brain. A noise model was derived for DCS measurements. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DCS was validated with arterial-spin-labeling MRI. Three-dimensional CBF tomography was obtained during cortical spreading depression from a rat using the optimized diffuse correlation tomographic method. Cerebral hemodynamics in newborn piglets after traumatic brain injury were continuously monitored optically for six hours to demonstrate the feasibility of using diffuse optical techniques as bedside patient monitors. Cerebral autoregulation in piglets and human stroke patients was demonstrated to be non-invasively assessable via the continuous DCS measurement. Significant differences of CBF responses to head-of-bead maneuvers were observed between the peri- and contra-infarct hemispheres in human stroke patients. A significant portion of patient population showed paradoxical CBF responses, indicating the importance of individualized stroke management. The development of a speckle noise model revealed the source of noise for LSI. LSI was then applied to study the acute functional recovery of the rat brain following transient brain ischemia. The spatial and temporal cerebral blood flow responses to functional stimulation were statistically quantified. The area of activation, and the temporal response to stimulation were found significantly altered by the ischemic insult, while the

  18. Mathematical simulation of hemodynamical processes and medical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsitsyura, Nadiya; Novyc'kyy, Victor V.; Lushchyk, Ulyana B.

    2001-06-01

    Vascular pathologies constitute a significant part of human's diseases and their rate tends to increase. Numerous investigations of brain blood flow in a normal condition and in a pathological one has created a new branch of modern medicine -- angioneurology. It combines the information on brain angioarchitecture and on blood supply in a normal condition and in a pathological one. Investigations of a disease's development constitute an important problem of a modern medicine. Cerebrum blood supply is regulated by arterial inflow and venous outflow, but, unfortunately, in the literature available arterial and venous beds are considered separately. This causes an one-sided interpretation of atherosclerotical and discirculatory encefalopathies. As arterial inflow and venous outflow are interrelated, it seems to be expedient to perform a complex estimation of arteriovenous interactions, prove a correlation dependence connection between the beds and find a dependence in a form of mathematical function. The results will be observed clearly in the graphs. There were 139 patients aged from 2 up to 70 examined in the 'Istyna' Scientific Medical Ultrasound Center by means of a Logidop 2 apparatus manufactured by Kranzbuhler, Germany using a technique of cerebral arteries and veins ultrasound location (invented and patented by Ulyana Lushchyk, State Patent of Ukraine N10262 of 19/07/1995). A clinical interpretation of the results obtained was performed. With the help of this technique and ultrasound Dopplerography the blood flow in major head and cervical arteries was investigated. While performing a visual graphic analysis we paid attention to the changes of carotid artery (CA), internal jugular vein (IJV) and supratrochlear artery's (STA) hemodynamical parameters. Generally accepted blood flow parameters: FS -- maximal systolic frequency and FD -- minimal diastolic frequency were measured. The correlation between different combinations of parameters in the vessels mentioned

  19. Persistent vascular collagen accumulation alters hemodynamic recovery from chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, Diana M.; Roldan-Alzate, Alejandro; Wang, Zhijie; Hacker, Timothy A.; Molthen, Robert C.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is caused by narrowing and stiffening of the pulmonary arteries that increase pulmonary vascular impedance (PVZ). In particular, small arteries narrow and large arteries stiffen. Large pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness is the best current predictor of mortality from PAH. We have previously shown that collagen accumulation leads to extralobar PA stiffening at high strain (Ooi, Wang et al. 2010). We hypothesized that collagen accumulation would increase PVZ, including total pulmonary vascular resistance (Z0), characteristic impedance (ZC), pulse wave velocity (PWV), and index of global wave reflections (Pb/Pf), which contribute to increased right ventricular afterload. We tested this hypothesis by exposing mice unable to degrade type I collagen (Col1a1R/R) to 21 days of hypoxia (hypoxia), some of which were allowed to recover for 42 days (recovery). Littermate wild-type mice (Col1a1+/+) were used as controls. In response to hypoxia, mean PA pressure (mPAP) increased in both mouse genotypes with no changes in cardiac output (CO) or PA inner diameter (ID); as a consequence, Z0 (mPAP/CO) increased by ~100% in both genotypes (p<0.05). Contrary to our expectations, ZC, PWV and Pb/Pf did not change. However, with recovery, ZC and PWV decreased in the Col1a1+/+ mice and remained unchanged in the Col1a1R/R mice. Z0 decreased with recovery in both genotypes. Microcomputed tomography measurements of large PAs did not show evidence of stiffness changes as a function of hypoxia exposure or genotype. We conclude that hypoxia-induced PA collagen accumulation does not affect the pulsatile components of pulmonary hemodynamics but that excessive collagen accumulation does prevent normal hemodynamic recovery, which may have important consequences for right ventricular function. PMID:22183202

  20. Cooling and hemodynamic management in heatstroke: practical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Bouchama, Abderrezak; Dehbi, Mohammed; Chaves-Carballo, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Although rapid cooling and management of circulatory failure are crucial to the prevention of irreversible tissue damage and death in heatstroke, the evidence supporting the optimal cooling method and hemodynamic management has yet to be established. Methods A systematic review of all clinical studies published in Medline (1966 to 2006), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature) (1982 to 2006), and Cochrane Database was performed using the OVID interface without language restriction. Search terms included heatstroke, sunstroke, and heat stress disorders. Results Fourteen articles reported populations subjected to cooling treatment for classic or exertional heatstroke and included data on cooling time, neurologic morbidity, or mortality. Five additional articles described invasive monitoring with central venous or pulmonary artery catheters. The four clinical trials and 15 observational studies covered a total of 556 patients. A careful analysis of the results obtained indicated that the cooling method based on conduction, namely immersion in iced water, was effective among young people, military personnel, and athletes with exertional heatstroke. There was no evidence to support the superiority of any one cooling technique in classic heatstroke. The effects of non-invasive, evaporative, or conductive-based cooling techniques, singly or combined, appeared to be comparable. No evidence of a specific endpoint temperature for safe cessation of cooling was found. The circulatory alterations in heatstroke were due mostly to a form of distributive shock associated with relative or absolute hypovolemia. Myocardial failure was found to be rare. Conclusion A systematic review of the literature failed to identify reliable clinical data on the optimum treatment of heatstroke. Nonetheless, the findings of this study could serve as a framework for preliminary recommendations in cooling and hemodynamic management of heatstroke until more

  1. Usefulness of hemodynamic sensors for physiologic cardiac pacing in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Occhetta, Eraldo; Bortnik, Miriam; Marino, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The rate adaptive sensors applied to cardiac pacing should respond as promptly as the normal sinus node with an highly specific and sensitive detection of the need of increasing heart rate. Sensors operating alone may not provide optimal heart responsiveness: central venous pH sensing, variations in the oxygen content of mixed venous blood, QT interval, breathing rate and pulmonary minute ventilation monitored by thoracic impedance variations, activity sensors. Using sensors that have different attributes but that work in a complementary manners offers distinct advantages. However, complicated sensors interactions may occur. Hemodynamic sensors detect changes in the hemodynamic performances of the heart, which partially depends on the autonomic nervous system-induced inotropic regulation of myocardial fibers. Specific hemodynamic sensors have been designed to measure different expression of the cardiac contraction strength: Peak Endocardial Acceleration (PEA), Closed Loop Stimulation (CLS) and TransValvular Impedance (TVI), guided by intraventricular impedance variations. Rate-responsive pacing is just one of the potential applications of hemodynamic sensors in implantable pacemakers. Other issues discussed in the paper include: hemodynamic monitoring for the optimal programmation and follow up of patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy; hemodynamic deterioration impact of tachyarrhythmias; hemodynamic upper rate limit control; monitoring and prevention of vasovagal malignant syncopes. PMID:21461359

  2. Correlation between electrical and hemodynamic responses during visual stimulation with graded contrasts.

    PubMed

    Si, Juanning; Zhang, Xin; Li, Yuejun; Zhang, Yujin; Zuo, Nianming; Jiang, Tianzi

    2016-09-01

    Brain functional activity involves complex cellular, metabolic, and vascular chain reactions, making it difficult to comprehend. Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) have been combined into a multimodal neuroimaging method that captures both electrophysiological and hemodynamic information to explore the spatiotemporal characteristics of brain activity. Because of the significance of visually evoked functional activity in clinical applications, numerous studies have explored the amplitude of the visual evoked potential (VEP) to clarify its relationship with the hemodynamic response. However, relatively few studies have investigated the influence of latency, which has been frequently used to diagnose visual diseases, on the hemodynamic response. Moreover, because the latency and the amplitude of VEPs have different roles in coding visual information, investigating the relationship between latency and the hemodynamic response should be helpful. In this study, checkerboard reversal tasks with graded contrasts were used to evoke visual functional activity. Both EEG and fNIRS were employed to investigate the relationship between neuronal electrophysiological activities and the hemodynamic responses. The VEP amplitudes were linearly correlated with the hemodynamic response, but the VEP latency showed a negative linear correlation with the hemodynamic response. PMID:27494269

  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Enhancement on Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images After Carotid Artery Stenting with Neuroprotective Balloon Occlusions: Hemodynamic Instability and Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Ogami, Ryo Nakahara, Toshinori; Hamasaki, Osamu; Araki, Hayato; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: A rare complication of carotid artery stenting (CAS), prolonged reversible neurological symptoms with delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) space enhancement on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images, is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. We prospectively identified patients who showed CSF space enhancement on FLAIR images. Methods: Nineteen patients-5 acute-phase and 14 scheduled-underwent 21 CAS procedures. Balloon catheters were navigated across stenoses, angioplasty was performed using a neuroprotective balloon, and stents were placed with after dilation under distal balloon protection. CSF space hyperintensity or obscuration on FLAIR after versus before CAS indicated CSF space enhancement. Correlations with clinical factors were examined. Results: CSF space was enhanced on FLAIR in 12 (57.1%) cases. Postprocedural CSF space enhancement was significantly related to age, stenosis rate, acute-stage procedure, and total occlusion time. All acute-stage CAS patients showed delayed enhancement. Only age was associated with delayed CSF space enhancement in scheduled CAS patients. Conclusions: Ischemic intolerance for severe carotid artery stenosis and temporary neuroprotective balloon occlusion, causing reperfusion injury, seem to be the main factors that underlie BBB disruption with delayed CSF space enhancement shortly after CAS, rather than sudden poststenting hemodynamic change. Our results suggest that factors related to hemodynamic instability or ischemic intolerance seem to be associated with post-CAS BBB vulnerability. Patients at risk for hemodynamic instability or with ischemic intolerance, which decrease BBB integrity, require careful management to prevent intracranial hemorrhagic and other post-CAS complications.

  4. Hemodynamic analysis of patients in intensive care unit based on diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Wang, Chun-Yang; Ling, Yo-Wei; Chuang, Ming-Lung; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lu, Chih-Wei; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2010-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) is a technique to assess the spatial variation in absorption and scattering properties of the biological tissues and provides the monitoring of changes in concentrations of oxy-hemoglobin and deoxy-hemoglobin. In our preliminary study, the temporal tracings of hemodynamic oxygenation are measured with DOSI and venous occlusion test (VOT) from normal subjects, patients with heart failure and patients with sepsis in intensive care unit (ICU). In experiments, the obvious differences of hemodynamic signals can be observed among the three groups. The physiological relevance of VOT hemodynamics with respect to diseases is also discussed in this paper.

  5. Endovascular management of renal transplant dysfunction secondary to hemodynamic effects related to ipsilateral femoral arteriovenous graft.

    PubMed

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Quintana, David; Bleicher, Drew; Tabbara, Marwan; Goldstein, Michael; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2016-01-01

    Hemodialysis access options become complex in long-term treatment for patients with renal disease, while awaiting renal transplantation (RT). Once upper extremity sites are exhausted, lower extremities are used. RT is preferably in the contralateral iliac fossa, rarely ipsilateral. In current literature, RT dysfunction secondary to the hemodynamic effects of an ipsilateral femoral arteriovenous graft (AVG) has been rarely described. To our knowledge, AVG ligation is the only published technique for hemodynamic correction of an ipsilateral AVG. We present a simple, potentially reversible endovascular approach to manage the hemodynamic effects of an AVG, without potentially permanently losing future AVG access. PMID:26899147

  6. Intersystem relationships of respiration and hemodynamics in the initial period of postural effects.

    PubMed

    Donina, Zh A; Lavrova, I N; Baranov, V M

    2013-07-01

    We studied the dependence of parameters of lung volumes and the elastic properties of the lungs on changes in the central hemodynamics occurring in the initial period of passive postural changes in cats. It was found that transition from the horizontal to head-up and head-down tilting was accompanied by opposite hemodynamic changes in the cranial and caudal parts of the body. Changes in lung compliance and functional residual capacity of the lungs were opposite and linearly depended on the intensity of hemodynamic shifts, which indicates passive character of the primary disorders primarily determined by a physical factor, gravity-dependent redistribution of body fluids. PMID:24137587

  7. Hemodynamic Influences on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Disease: Application of Biomechanics to Aneurysm Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Monica M.; Dalman, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    “Atherosclerotic” abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) occur with the greatest frequency in the distal aorta. The unique hemodynamic environment of this area predisposes it to site-specific degenerative changes. In this review, we summarize the differential hemodynamic influences present along the length of the abdominal aorta, and demonstrate how alterations in aortic flow and wall shear stress modify AAA progression in experimental models. Improved understanding of aortic hemodynamic risk profiles provides an opportunity to modify patient activity patterns to minimize risk of aneurysmal degeneration. PMID:20347049

  8. Emerging Techniques for Evaluation of the Hemodynamics of Intracranial Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Melissa; Chien, Aichi

    2015-01-01

    Advances in imaging modalities have improved the assessment of intracranial hemodynamics using non-invasive techniques. This review examines new imaging modalities and clinical applications of currently available techniques, describes pathophysiology and future directions in hemodynamic analysis of intracranial stenoses, aneurysms and arteriovenous malformations and explores how hemodynamic analysis may have prognostic value in predicting clinical outcomes and assist in risk stratification. The advent of new technologies such as pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling, accelerated magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) techniques, 4D digital subtraction angiography, and improvements in clinically available techniques such as phase-contrast MRA may change the landscape of vascular imaging and modify current clinical practice guidelines. PMID:25924168

  9. [Peculiarities of hemodynamics in junior students with a hereditary history of arterial hypertension during examination stresses].

    PubMed

    Pershina, T A; Spitsin, A P

    2013-01-01

    The functional state ofthe students was investigated on the basis ofchanges in central hemodynamic indices immediately during exams, in dependence on family history of hypertension. The significant variation in the character of the response of systemic hemodynamics, as depending on the stage of examination (preparation, answering the ticket, and after the exam), the dominance of the type of the autonomic nervous system, and the family history of hypertension has been revealed These changes in hemodynamics in students with family history of hypertension were established to be more pronounced and prolonged. PMID:24340589

  10. Attenuation of Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Endotracheal Intubation with Pre Induction IV Fentanyl Versus Combination of IV Fentanyl and Sub Lingual Nitroglycerin Spray

    PubMed Central

    Channaiah, Vijayalakshmi B.; Kurek, Nicholas S.; Moses, Ryder; Chandra, Sathees B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Endotracheal intubation is one of the most invasive stimuli in anesthesia and it's often accompanied by a hemodynamic pressor response. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a single pre-induction 2 µg/kg bolus injection of fentanyl followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray (400 µg /spray) with a thiopentone/suxamethonium sequence in the attenuation of the hemodynamic response to endotracheal intubation in normotensive patients. Material and methods: The study consisted of 80 randomly selected ASA physical status I/II male/female adults who were aged between 18 through 60 years and scheduled for elective surgery. Group I received a single 2 µg/kg IV bolus of fentanyl diluted to 5 ml with normal saline 5 min prior to laryngoscopy followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray (400 µg/spray) 2 minutes prior to intubation (n=40). Group II received a single 2 µg/kg IV bolus of fentanyl diluted to 5 ml with normal saline 5 min prior to laryngoscopy (n=40). Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and rate pressure product were compared to basal values at pre-induction, induction, intubation and post-intubation as well as at time increments of 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 min. Results: Fentanyl combined with nitroglycerin did not attenuate hemodynamic pressor responses more than fentanyl alone. Increases of HR (7.9%), DBP (4.0%), MAP (3.6%) and RPP (6.0%) along with attenuation of SBP (2.7%) were observed in the fentanyl-nitroglycerin group as compared to the equivalent control measured values. Conclusions: A single pre-induction bolus injection of fentanyl followed by two puffs of nitroglycerin sub lingual spray in a thiopentone/suxamethonium anesthetic sequence neither successfully attenuates nor successfully suppresses the hemodynamic pressor response more effectively than fentanyl alone in normotensive patients resulting from endotracheal intubation. PMID

  11. Validation of a novel hemodynamic model for coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS) and functional brain studies with fNIRS and fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Pierro, Michele L.; Hallacoglu, Bertan; Sassaroli, Angelo; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Fantini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental validation and applications of the new hemodynamic model presented in the companion article (Fantini, 2013, this issue) both in the frequency domain and in the time domain. In the frequency domain, we have performed diffuse optical measurements for coherent hemodynamics spectroscopy (CHS) on the brain and calf muscle of human subjects, showing that the hemodynamic model predictions (both in terms of spectral shapes and absolute spectral values) are confirmed experimentally. We show how the quantitative analysis based on the new model allows for autoregulation measurements from brain data, and provides an analytical description of near-infrared spiroximetry from muscle data. In the time domain, we have used data from the literature to perform a comparison between brain activation signals measured with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) or with blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI, and the corresponding signals predicted by the new model. This comparison shows an excellent agreement between the model predictions and the reported fNIRS and BOLD fMRI signals. This new hemodynamic model provides a valuable tool for brain studies with hemodynamic-based techniques. PMID:23562703

  12. Computed Tomography Perfusion Assessment of Radiation Therapy Effects on Spinal Cord Hemodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Bisdas, Sotirios; Sharma, Anand K.; McDonald, Daniel; Strojan, Primoz; Rumboldt, Zoran

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: We used computed tomography (CT) perfusion to evaluate the acute and late effect of radiation therapy (RT) on spinal cord (SC) hemodynamics in patients without symptoms of myelopathy. We hypothesized that SC perfusion could be acutely altered during RT. Methods and Materials: We analyzed neck CT perfusion studies of 36 head-and-neck cancer patients (N1), 16 of whom had previously undergone RT. In a separate group of 6 patients (N2), CT perfusion studies were obtained before RT, after 40 Gy, and after treatment completion. Results: In the N1 group, SC blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and capillary permeability (CP) maps were not significantly different between RT-treated and RT-naive patients. In the N2 group, BF and CP were significantly increased during treatment compared with the baseline and post-RT studies. Conclusions: Radiation therapy of the head and neck may cause transient perturbations of SC perfusion that seem to reverse after treatment. There are no definite chronic effects of RT on SC perfusion observeable at the typical doses administered during treatment of head and neck malignancies.

  13. Effect of valsalva maneuver-induced hemodynamic changes on brain near-infrared spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Kojima, Sho; Furusawa, Adriane Akemi; Onishi, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is widely used to measure human brain activation on the basis of cerebral hemodynamic response. However, a limitation of NIRS is that systemic changes influence the measured signals. The purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between NIRS signals and blood pressure during the Valsalva maneuver. Nine healthy volunteers performed a 20-s Valsalva maneuver to change their blood pressure. Changes in oxyhemoglobin (O2Hb) concentration were measured with 34 channels with an inter-optode distance of 30 mm for deep-penetration measurements (deepO2Hb) and 9 channels with an inter-optode distance of 15 mm for shallow-penetration measurements (shallowO2Hb). The difference value (diffO2Hb) between deepO2Hb and shallowO2Hb was calculated. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was recorded by volume clamping the finger pulse, and skin blood flow changes were measured at the forehead. Pearson's correlation coefficients between deepO2Hb and MAP, shallowO2Hb and MAP, and diffO2Hb and MAP were 0.893 (P < 0.01), 0.963 (P < 0.01), and 0.831 (P < 0.01), respectively. The results suggest that regional and systemic changes in the cardiovascular state strongly influence NIRS signals. PMID:23852482

  14. Hemodynamic Surveillance of Ventricular Pacing Effectiveness with the Transvalvular Impedance Sensor.

    PubMed

    Calvi, Valeria; Pizzimenti, Giovanni; Lisi, Marco; Doria, Giuseppe; Vasquez, Ludovico; Lisi, Francesco; Felis, Salvatore; Tempio, Donatella; Virgilio, Alfredo; Barbetta, Alberto; Di Gregorio, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The Transvalvular Impedance (TVI) is derived between atrial and ventricular pacing electrodes. A sharp TVI increase in systole is an ejection marker, allowing the hemodynamic surveillance of ventricular stimulation effectiveness in pacemaker patients. At routine follow-up checks, the ventricular threshold test was managed by the stimulator with the supervision of a physician, who monitored the surface ECG. When the energy scan resulted in capture loss, the TVI system must detect the failure and increase the output voltage. A TVI signal suitable to this purpose was present in 85% of the tested patients. A total of 230 capture failures, induced in 115 patients in both supine and sitting upright positions, were all promptly recognized by real-time TVI analysis (100% sensitivity). The procedure was never interrupted by the physician, as the automatic energy regulation ensured full patient's safety. The pulse energy was then set at 4 times the threshold to test the alarm specificity during daily activity (sitting, standing up, and walking). The median prevalence of false alarms was 0.336%. The study shows that TVI-based ejection assessment is a valuable approach to the verification of pacing reliability and the autoregulation of ventricular stimulation energy. PMID:26556408

  15. Hemodynamic study of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention to aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Anqiang; Zhan, Fan; Luan, Jingyuan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the hemodynamic performance of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention treatment to thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), three simplified TAA models, representing, no stent, with a single stent and 2 overlapped stents deployed in the aneurismal sac, were studied and compared in terms of flow velocity, wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure distributions by means of computational fluid dynamics. The results showed that overlapping stents intervention induced a flow field of slow velocity near the aneurismal wall. Single stent deployment in the sac reduced the jet-like flow formed prior to the proximal neck of the aneurysm, which impinged on the internal wall of the aneurysm. This jet-like flow vanished completely in the overlapping double stents case. Overlapping stents intervention led to an evident decrease in WSS; meanwhile, the pressure acting on the wall of the aneurysm was reduced slightly and presented more uniform distribution. The results therefore indicated that overlapping stents intervention may effectively isolate the thoracic aortic aneurysm, protecting it from rupture. In conclusion, overlapping bare-metal stents may serve a purpose similar to that of the multilayer aneurysm repair system (MARS) manufactured by Cardiatis SA (Isnes, Belgium). PMID:25262876

  16. Hemodynamic Surveillance of Ventricular Pacing Effectiveness with the Transvalvular Impedance Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Calvi, Valeria; Pizzimenti, Giovanni; Lisi, Marco; Doria, Giuseppe; Vasquez, Ludovico; Lisi, Francesco; Felis, Salvatore; Tempio, Donatella; Virgilio, Alfredo; Barbetta, Alberto; Di Gregorio, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The Transvalvular Impedance (TVI) is derived between atrial and ventricular pacing electrodes. A sharp TVI increase in systole is an ejection marker, allowing the hemodynamic surveillance of ventricular stimulation effectiveness in pacemaker patients. At routine follow-up checks, the ventricular threshold test was managed by the stimulator with the supervision of a physician, who monitored the surface ECG. When the energy scan resulted in capture loss, the TVI system must detect the failure and increase the output voltage. A TVI signal suitable to this purpose was present in 85% of the tested patients. A total of 230 capture failures, induced in 115 patients in both supine and sitting upright positions, were all promptly recognized by real-time TVI analysis (100% sensitivity). The procedure was never interrupted by the physician, as the automatic energy regulation ensured full patient's safety. The pulse energy was then set at 4 times the threshold to test the alarm specificity during daily activity (sitting, standing up, and walking). The median prevalence of false alarms was 0.336%. The study shows that TVI-based ejection assessment is a valuable approach to the verification of pacing reliability and the autoregulation of ventricular stimulation energy. PMID:26556408

  17. Effect of various pneumoperitoneum pressures on femoral vein hemodynamics during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ankush; Dahiya, Divya; Kaman, Lileswar; Saini, Vikas; Behera, Arunanshu

    2016-06-01

    High intra-abdominal pressure and reverse Trendelenburg position during laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) are risk factors for venous stasis in lower extremity. Lower limb venous stasis is one of the major pathophysiological elements involved in the development of peri-operative deep vein thrombosis. Low pressure pneumoperitoneum (7-10 mmHg) has been recommended in patients with limited cardiac, pulmonary or renal reserve. The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of various pneumoperitoneum pressures on femoral vein (FV) hemodynamics during LC. A total of 50 patients undergoing elective LC were enrolled and they were prospectively randomized into two groups containing 25 patients each. In group A high pressure pneumoperitoneum (14 mmHg) and in group B low pressure pneumoperitoneum (8 mmHg) was maintained. Comparison of pre-operative and post-operative coagulation profile was done. Preoperative and intraoperative change in femoral vein diameter (FVD) (AP and LAT), cross-sectional area (CSA) and peak systolic flow (PSF) during varying pneumoperitoneum pressure was recorded in FV by ultrasound Doppler. First measurement (pre-operative) was carried out just after the induction of anesthesia before creation of pneumoperitoneum and second measurement (intra-operative) was taken just before completion of surgery with pneumoperitoneum maintained. Changes in coagulation parameters were less significant at low pressure pneumoperitoneum. There was statistical significant difference in the pre-operative and intra-operative values of FVD, CSA and PSF in both groups when analyzed independently (P = 0.00). There was no significant difference in pre-operative values of FVD, CSA and PSF (P > 0.05) among two groups but when the comparison was made between the intra-operative values, there was significant increase in FVD (AP) (P = 0.016), CSA (P = 0.00) and decrease in PSF (P = 0.00) at high pressure pneumoperitoneum. This study provides evidence of using low

  18. The utility of novel non-invasive technologies for remote hemodynamic monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Mabote, Thato; Wong, Kenneth; Cleland, John G F

    2014-08-01

    Monitoring a patient's hemodynamic status may be a revolutionary way to aid a 'health maintenance' strategy in which the physician strives to therapeutically keep the patient in an ideal hemodynamic range. Currently, home telemonitoring employs a 'crisis-prevention' approach. This strategy is still based on easily acquired measures such as heart rate, weight and blood pressure--measurements that are useful to help implement guideline-directed therapy but provide little information about impending decompensation or the risk of hospitalisation. Current systems provide limited information to personalize and adapt medication therapy for heart failure. Several innovative technologies that can remotely monitor estimates of cardiovascular hemodynamics, such as cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance, augmentation index and added heart sounds may enable earlier detection of heart failure decompensation. This editorial presents an overview of the innovative technologies that are available for non-invasive hemodynamic monitoring and maybe adapted for home telemonitoring for chronic heart failure. PMID:25026973

  19. A Model System for Mapping Vascular Responses to Complex Hemodynamics at Arterial Bifurcations In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Swartz, Daniel D.; Wang, Zhijie; Hoi, Yiemeng; Kolega, John; Metaxa, Eleni M.; Szymanski, Michael P.; Yamamoto, Junichi; Sauvageau, Eric; Levy, Elad I.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Cerebral aneurysms are preferentially located at arterial bifurcation apices with complex hemodynamics. To understand disease mechanisms associated with aneurysm initiation, we attempted to establish a causal relationship between local hemodynamics and vascular responses. Methods Arterial bifurcations were surgically created from native common carotid arteries in two dogs, angiographically imaged 2 weeks and 2 months later, and then excised. We characterized local morphological changes in response to specifically manipulated hemodynamics. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were performed on the in vivo images and results mapped onto histological images. Results Local flow conditions, such as high wall shear stress and high wall shear stress gradient, were found to be associated with vascular changes, including an intimal pad in the flow impingement region and a “groove” bearing the characteristics of an early aneurysm. Conclusion This novel method of histohemodynamic micromapping reveals a direct correlation between an altered hemodynamic microenvironment and vascular responses consistent with aneurysm development. PMID:17143243

  20. Hemodynamics of Cerebral Aneurysms: Computational Analyses of Aneurysm Progress and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woowon; Rhee, Kyehan

    2012-01-01

    The progression of a cerebral aneurysm involves degenerative arterial wall remodeling. Various hemodynamic parameters are suspected to be major mechanical factors related to the genesis and progression of vascular diseases. Flow alterations caused by the insertion of coils and stents for interventional aneurysm treatment may affect the aneurysm embolization process. Therefore, knowledge of hemodynamic parameters may provide physicians with an advanced understanding of aneurysm progression and rupture, as well as the effectiveness of endovascular treatments. Progress in medical imaging and information technology has enabled the prediction of flow fields in the patient-specific blood vessels using computational analysis. In this paper, recent computational hemodynamic studies on cerebral aneurysm initiation, progress, and rupture are reviewed. State-of-the-art computational aneurysmal flow analyses after coiling and stenting are also summarized. We expect the computational analysis of hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms to provide valuable information for planning and follow-up decisions for treatment. PMID:22454695

  1. Venous hemodynamic changes in lower limb venous disease: the UIP consensus according to scientific evidence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung B; Nicolaides, Andrew N; Myers, Kenneth; Meissner, Mark; Kalodiki, Evi; Allegra, Claudio; Antignani, Pier L; Bækgaard, Niels; Beach, Kirk; Belcaro, Giovanni; Black, Stephen; Blomgren, Lena; Bouskela, Eliete; Cappelli, Massimo; Caprini, Joseph; Carpentier, Patrick; Cavezzi, Attilio; Chastanet, Sylvain; Christenson, Jan T; Christopoulos, Demetris; Clarke, Heather; Davies, Alun; Demaeseneer, Marianne; Eklöf, Bo; Ermini, Stefano; Fernández, Fidel; Franceschi, Claude; Gasparis, Antonios; Geroulakos, George; Sergio, Gianesini; Giannoukas, Athanasios; Gloviczki, Peter; Huang, Ying; Ibegbuna, Veronica; Kakkos, Stavros K; Kistner, Robert; Kölbel, Tilo; Kurstjens, Ralph L; Labropoulos, Nicos; Laredo, James; Lattimer, Christopher R; Lugli, Marzia; Lurie, Fedor; Maleti, Oscar; Markovic, Jovan; Mendoza, Erika; Monedero, Javier L; Moneta, Gregory; Moore, Hayley; Morrison, Nick; Mosti, Giovanni; Nelzén, Olle; Obermayer, Alfred; Ogawa, Tomohiro; Parsi, Kurosh; Partsch, Hugo; Passariello, Fausto; Perrin, Michel L; Pittaluga, Paul; Raju, Seshadri; Ricci, Stefano; Rosales, Antonio; Scuderi, Angelo; Slagsvold, Carl E; Thurin, Anders; Urbanek, Tomasz; M VAN Rij, Andre; Vasquez, Michael; Wittens, Cees H; Zamboni, Paolo; Zimmet, Steven; Ezpeleta, Santiago Z

    2016-06-01

    There are excellent guidelines for clinicians to manage venous diseases but few reviews to assess their hemodynamic background. Hemodynamic concepts that evolved in the past have largely remained unchallenged in recent decades, perhaps due to their often complicated nature and in part due to emergence of new diagnostic techniques. Duplex ultrasound scanning and other imaging techniques which evolved in the latter part of the 20th century have dominated investigation. They have greatly improved our understanding of the anatomical patterns of venous reflux and obstruction. However, they do not provide the physiological basis for understanding the hemodynamics of flow, pressure, compliance and resistance. Hemodynamic investigations appear to provide a better correlation with post-treatment clinical outcome and quality of life than ultrasound findings. There is a far better prospect for understanding the complete picture of the patient's disability and response to management by combining ultrasound with hemodynamic studies. Accordingly, at the instigation of Dr Angelo Scuderi, the Union Internationale de Phlebologie (UIP) executive board commissioned a large number of experts to assess all aspects of management for venous disease by evidence-based principles. These included experts from various member societies including the European Venous Forum (EVF), American Venous Forum (AVF), American College of Phlebology (ACP) and Cardiovascular Disease Educational and Research Trust (CDERT). Their aim was to confirm or dispel long-held hemodynamic principles and to provide a comprehensive review of venous hemodynamic concepts underlying the pathophysiology of lower limb venous disorders, their usefulness for investigating patients and the relevant hemodynamic changes associated with various forms of treatment. Chapter 1 is devoted to basic hemodynamic concepts and normal venous physiology. Chapter 2 presents the mechanism and magnitude of hemodynamic changes in acute deep vein

  2. Cerebral versus systemic hemodynamics during graded orthostatic stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, B. D.; Giller, C. A.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Orthostatic syncope is usually attributed to cerebral hypoperfusion secondary to systemic hemodynamic collapse. Recent research in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope has suggested that cerebral vasoconstriction may occur during orthostatic hypotension, compromising cerebral autoregulation and possibly contributing to the loss of consciousness. However, the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in such patients may be quite different from that of healthy individuals, particularly when assessed during the rapidly changing hemodynamic conditions associated with neurocardiogenic syncope. To be able to interpret the pathophysiological significance of these observations, a clear understanding of the normal responses of the cerebral circulation to orthostatic stress must be obtained, particularly in the context of the known changes in systemic and regional distributions of blood flow and vascular resistance during orthostasis. Therefore, the specific aim of this study was to examine the changes that occur in the cerebral circulation during graded reductions in central blood volume in the absence of systemic hypotension in healthy humans. We hypothesized that cerebral vasoconstriction would occur and CBF would decrease due to activation of the sympathetic nervous system. We further hypothesized, however, that the magnitude of this change would be small compared with changes in systemic or skeletal muscle vascular resistance in healthy subjects with intact autoregulation and would be unlikely to cause syncope without concomitant hypotension. METHODS AND RESULTS: To test this hypothesis, we studied 13 healthy men (age, 27 +/- 7 years) during progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP). We measured systemic flow (Qc is cardiac output; C2H2 rebreathing), regional forearm flow (FBF; venous occlusion plethysmography), and blood pressure (BP; Finapres) and calculated systemic (SVR) and forearm (FVR) vascular resistances. Changes in brain blood flow were

  3. Large pulmonary embolus without systemic hemodynamic consequences during cemented hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Oxorn, D; Edelist, G

    1998-05-01

    A case is presented in which a large embolus was detected passing through the right side of the heart during total hip arthroplasty. Although tricuspid regurgitation and an elevated right ventricular pressure resulted, there was no perturbation in systemic hemodynamics or gas exchange. The emboli detected during total hip arthroplasty are most likely composed of fat. No specific treatment is required, although heightened vigilance for disturbances in systemic hemodynamics is important. PMID:9603596

  4. Longitudinal assessment of hemodynamic endpoints in predicting arteriovenous fistula maturation.

    PubMed

    Rajabi-Jagahrgh, Ehsan; Krishnamoorthy, Mahesh K; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Succop, Paul; Wang, Yang; Choe, Ann; Banerjee, Rupak K

    2013-01-01

    Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) nonmaturation is currently a significant clinical problem; however, the mechanisms responsible for this have remained unanswered. Previous work by our group and others has suggested that anatomical configuration and the corresponding hemodynamic endpoints could have an important role in AVF remodeling. Thus, our goal was to assess the longitudinal (temporal) effect of wall shear stress (WSS) on remodeling process of AVFs with two different configurations. The hypothesis is that early assessment of hemodynamic endpoints such as temporal gradient of WSS will predict the maturation status of AVF at later time points. Two AVFs with curved (C-AVF) and straight (S-AVF) configurations were created between the femoral artery and vein of each pig. Three pigs were considered in this study and in total six AVFs (three C-AVF and three S-AVF) were created. The CT scan and ultrasound were utilized to numerically evaluate local WSS at 20 cross-sections along the venous segment of AVFs at 2D (D: days), 7D, and 28D postsurgery. These cross-sections were located at 1.5 mm increments from the anastomosis junction. Local WSS values at these cross-sections were correlated with their corresponding luminal area over time. The WSS in C-AVF decreased from 22.3 ± 4.8 dyn/cm(2) at 2D to 4.1 ± 5.1 dyn/cm(2) at 28D, while WSS increased in S-AVF from 13.0 ± 5.0 dyn/cm(2) at 2D to 36.7 ± 5.3 dyn/cm(2) at 28D. Corresponding to these changes in WSS levels, luminal area of C-AVF dilated (0.23 ± 0.14 cm(2) at 2D to 0.87 ± 0.14 cm(2) at 28D) with attendant increase in flow rate. However, S-AVF had minimal changes in area (0.26 ± 0.02 cm(2) at 2D to 0.27 ± 0.03 cm(2) at 28D) despite some increase in flow rate. Our results suggest that the temporal changes of WSS could have significant effects on AVF maturation. Reduction in WSS over time (regardless of initial values) may result in dilation (p < 0.05), while increase in WSS may be detrimental to maturation. Thus

  5. Slow spontaneous hemodynamic oscillations during sleep measured with near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, Jaakko; Näsi, Tiina; Noponen, Tommi; Toppila, Jussi; Salmi, Tapani; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.

    2011-07-01

    Spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic oscillations below 100 mHz reflect the level of cerebral activity, modulate hemodynamic responses to tasks and stimuli, and may aid in detecting various pathologies of the brain. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is ideally suited for both measuring spontaneous hemodynamic oscillations and monitoring sleep, but little research has been performed to combine these two applications. We analyzed 30 all-night NIRS-electroencephalography (EEG) sleep recordings to investigate spontaneous hemodynamic activity relative to sleep stages determined by polysomnography. Signal power of hemodynamic oscillations in the low-frequency (LF, 40-150 mHz) and very-low-frequency (VLF, 3-40 mHz) bands decreased in slow-wave sleep (SWS) compared to light sleep (LS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. No statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences in oscillation power between LS and REM were observed. However, the period of VLF oscillations around 8 mHz increased in REM sleep in line with earlier studies with other modalities. These results increase our knowledge of the physiology of sleep, complement EEG data, and demonstrate the applicability of NIRS to studying spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations during sleep.

  6. Spatial quantitative vectorcardiography in aortic stenosis: correlation with hemodynamic findings.

    PubMed

    Talwar, K K; Mohan, J C; Narula, J; Kaul, U; Bhatia, M L

    1988-02-01

    Thirty-four patients with hemodynamically documented valvar aortic stenosis without congestive heart failure were studied by the corrected Frank lead system vectorcardiography, with special emphasis on the angular characteristics of spatial R max to define the severity of the lesion. Spatial QRS-T angle demonstrated a highly significant correlation with the peak left ventricular systolic pressure (r = 0.72, P less than 0.001) and a significant correlation with peak transvalvar aortic gradient (r = 0.49, P less than 0.01). Furthermore, all patients with a QRS-T angle of more than 90 degrees had significant aortic stenosis (TVG greater than or equal to 50 mm Hg). The peak left ventricular systolic pressure and transvalvar aortic gradient also demonstrated a significant negative correlation with azimuth angle (r = -0.36 and -0.34, respectively; P less than 0.05) and a positive correlation with spatial R max magnitude (r = 0.38 and 0.41, respectively; P less than 0.05). There was no correlation between elevation angle of spatial R max and left ventricle systolic pressure or transvalvar aortic gradient. Our study indicates that spatial quantitative vectorcardiographic angular characteristics, particularly spatial QRS-T angle, may be a useful adjunct to other noninvasive techniques to assess the severity of valvar aortic stenosis. PMID:3343071

  7. Transthoracic Ultrafast Doppler Imaging of Human Left Ventricular Hemodynamic Function

    PubMed Central

    Osmanski, Bruno-Félix; Maresca, David; Messas, Emmanuel; Tanter, Mickael; Pernot, Mathieu

    2016-01-01

    Heart diseases can affect intraventricular blood flow patterns. Real-time imaging of blood flow patterns is challenging because it requires both a high frame rate and a large field of view. To date, standard Doppler techniques can only perform blood flow estimation with high temporal resolution within small regions of interest. In this work, we used ultrafast imaging to map in 2D human left ventricular blood flow patterns during the whole cardiac cycle. Cylindrical waves were transmitted at 4800 Hz with a transthoracic phased array probe to achieve ultrafast Doppler imaging of the left ventricle. The high spatio-temporal sampling of ultrafast imaging permits to rely on a much more effective wall filtering and to increase sensitivity when mapping blood flow patterns during the pre-ejection, ejection, early diastole, diastasis and late diastole phases of the heart cycle. The superior sensitivity and temporal resolution of ultrafast Doppler imaging makes it a promising tool for the noninvasive study of intraventricular hemodynamic function. PMID:25073134

  8. Advanced clinical monitoring: considerations for real-time hemodynamic diagnostics.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, J. M.; Cordova, M. J.

    1994-01-01

    In an effort to ease staffing burdens and potentially improve patient outcome in an intensive care unit (ICU) environment, we are developing a real-time system to accurately and efficiently diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. The system is being designed to utilize all relevant routinely-monitored physiological data in order to automatically diagnose potentially fatal events. The initial stage of this project involved formulating the overall system design and appropriate methods for real-time data acquisition, data storage, data trending, waveform analysis, and implementing diagnostic rules. Initially, we defined a conceptual analysis of the minimum physiologic data set, and the monitoring time-frames (trends) which would be required to diagnose cardiopulmonary emergencies. Following that analysis, we used a fuzzy logic diagnostic engine to analyze physiological data during a simulated arrhythmic cardiac arrest (ACA) in order to assess the validity of our diagnostic methodology. We used rate, trend, and morphologic data extracted from the following signals: expired CO2 time-concentration curve (capnogram), electrocardiogram, and arterial blood pressure. The system performed well: The fuzzy logic engine effectively diagnosed the likelihood of ACA from the subtle hemodynamic trends which preceded the complete arrest. As the clinical picture worsened, the fuzzy logic-based system accurately indicated the change in patient condition. Termination of the simulated arrest was rapidly detected by the diagnostic engine. In view of the effectiveness of this fuzzy logic implementation, we plan to develop additional fuzzy logic modules to diagnose other cardiopulmonary emergencies. PMID:7950025

  9. Adrenergic metabolic and hemodynamic effects of octopamine in the liver.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; de Paula, Mariana Nascimento; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Vilela, Vanessa Rodrigues; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2013-01-01

    The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite suppressants. A component of these extracts is octopamine, which is an adrenergic agent. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of octopamine on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways and hemodynamics. Octopamine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake, gluconeogenesis and the portal perfusion pressure. Octopamine also accelerated the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids (octanoate and oleate), as revealed by the increase in ¹⁴CO₂ production derived from ¹⁴C labeled precursors. The changes in glycogenolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure were almost completely abolished by α₁-adrenergic antagonists. The same changes were partly sensitive to the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. It can be concluded that octopamine accelerates both catabolic and anabolic processes in the liver via adrenergic stimulation. Acceleration of oxygen uptake under substrate-free perfusion conditions also means acceleration of the oxidation of endogenous fatty acids, which are derived from lipolysis. All these effects are compatible with an overall stimulating effect of octopamine on metabolism, which is compatible with its reported weight-loss effects in experimental animals. PMID:24196353

  10. Right Ventricular Hemodynamics in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, James; Fenster, Brett; Hertzberg, Jean; Schroeder, Joyce

    2012-11-01

    Recent advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) have allowed for characterization of blood flow in the right ventricle (RV), including calculation of vorticity and circulation, and qualitative visual assessment of coherent flow patterns. In this study, we investigate qualitative and quantitative differences in right ventricular hemodynamics between subjects with pulmonary hypertension (PH) and normal controls. Fifteen (15) PH subjects and 10 age-matched controls underwent same day 3D time resolved CMR and echocardiography. Echocardiography was used to determine right ventricular diastolic function as well as pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP). Velocity vectors, vorticity vectors, and streamlines in the RV were visualized in Paraview and total RV Early (E) and Atrial (A) wave diastolic vorticity was quantified. Visualizations of blood flow in the RV are presented for PH and normal subjects. The hypothesis that PH subjects exhibit different RV vorticity levels than normals during diastole is tested and the relationship between RV vorticity and PASP is explored. The mechanics of RV vortex formation are discussed within the context of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular diastolic function coincident with PH.