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  1. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... more blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  2. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia - hemolytic ... Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow is unable to replace the red blood cells that are being destroyed. Immune hemolytic anemia occurs when the immune system mistakenly sees your ...

  3. [Hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26245867

  4. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  5. Postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to inverted teflon felt strip after emergency repair for type A dissection.

    PubMed

    Hata, M; Yoshitake, I; Wakui, S; Unosawa, S; Hata, H; Shiono, M

    2012-10-01

    A 39-year-old man underwent emergency surgery for type A acute aortic dissection complicated by paraplegia. However, hemolytic anemia increased significantly due to severe stenosis of the proximal anastomosis one month after surgery. He finally underwent a redo procedure 4 months after the initial operation whereupon it was verified that half of the inner felt strip used for proximal stump fixation had turned up and was protruding into the inner lumen. We report here on a rare case of survival of postoperative early hemolytic anemia due to severe graft stenosis caused by an inverted inner Teflon felt strip without any extra vascular compression. PMID:21766281

  6. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dacie, J V

    1975-10-01

    Warm-type autoantibodies of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) are usually IgG but may be IgM or IgA. They are usual Rh specific. Cold-type antibodies are IgM or IgG (Donath-Landsteiner [DL] antibody). IgM antibodies are usually anit-l (occasionally anti-i) and DL antibodies anti-P. The warm IgG antibodies do not fix complement (C); they cause red blood cell (RBC) destruction predominantly in the spleen as the result of interaction between fixing; they cause RBC destruction either by intravascular lysis (complement sequence completed) or by interaction between C3-coated RBCs and phagocytes in liver and spleen. Gentic factors, immunoglobulin deficiency, somatic mutation, viral infections and drugs, and failure of T-lymphocyte function, all probably play a part in breaking immunological tolerance and the development of AIHA. PMID:1164110

  7. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia - hemolytic - caused by chemicals or toxins ... Possible substances that can cause hemolytic anemia include: Anti-malaria drugs (quinine compounds) Arsenic Dapsone Intravenous water infusion (not half-normal saline or normal saline) Metals (chromium/chromates, ...

  8. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  9. Phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Millar, John; Ploquin, Robert; de Leeuw, Nannie K. M.

    1972-01-01

    The hematological features of phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia are presented in order to make the physician aware of the abnormalities which suggest the use of an oxidant drug. The presence of bitten out red cells is the commonest initial clue to the existence of drug-induced hemolytic anemia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the demonstration of Heinz bodies and sulfhemoglobinemia. Early recognition of this form of drug-abuse may avert the development or progression of analgesic nephropathy. ImagesFIG. 2 PMID:5016923

  10. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link ... can occur during pregnancy if a woman has Rh-negative blood and her baby has Rh-positive ...

  11. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  12. Recombinant Human Erythropoietin Therapy for a Jehovah's Witness Child With Severe Anemia due to Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Woo, Da Eun; Lee, Jae Min; Kim, Yu Kyung; Park, Yong Hoon

    2016-02-01

    Patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) can rapidly develop profound anemia as the disease progresses, as a consequence of red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis and inadequate erythropoietin synthesis. Therefore, RBC transfusion should be considered in HUS patients with severe anemia to avoid cardiac or pulmonary complications. Most patients who are Jehovah's Witnesses refuse blood transfusion, even in the face of life-threatening medical conditions due to their religious convictions. These patients require management alternatives to blood transfusions. Erythropoietin is a glycopeptide that enhances endogenous erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. With the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), several authors have reported its successful use in patients refusing blood transfusion. However, the optimal dose and duration of treatment with rHuEPO are not established. We report a case of a 2-year-old boy with diarrhea-associated HUS whose family members are Jehovah's Witnesses. He had severe anemia with acute kidney injury. His lowest hemoglobin level was 3.6 g/dL, but his parents refused treatment with packed RBC transfusion due to their religious beliefs. Therefore, we treated him with high-dose rHuEPO (300 IU/kg/day) as well as folic acid, vitamin B12, and intravenous iron. The hemoglobin level increased steadily to 7.4 g/dL after 10 days of treatment and his renal function improved without any complications. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful rHuEPO treatment in a Jehovah's Witness child with severe anemia due to HUS. PMID:26958070

  13. Anti-M Antibody Induced Prolonged Anemia Following Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Erythropoietic Suppression in 2 Siblings.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsushi; Ohto, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Negishi, Yutaka; Tsuiki, Hideki; Arakawa, Takeshi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Uchimura, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Toru; Ohashi, Wataru; Takamoto, Shigeru

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) arising from MNSs incompatibility is rare, with few reports of prolonged anemia and reticulocytopenia following HDN. We report the younger of 2 male siblings, both of whom had anti-M-induced HDN and anemia persisting for over a month. Peripheral reticulocytes remained inappropriately low for the degree of anemia, and they needed multiple red cell transfusions. Viral infections were ruled out. Corticosteroids were given for suspected pure red cell aplasia. Anemia and reticulocytopenia subsequently improved. Colony-forming unit erythroid assay revealed erythropoietic suppression of M antigen-positive erythroid precursor cells cultured with maternal or infant sera containing anti-M. In conclusion, maternal anti-M caused HDN and prolonged anemia by erythropoietic suppression in 2 siblings. PMID:25929611

  14. [Hemolytic anemia under erlotinib treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Quoix, A

    2013-12-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor widely prescribed of which the most common sides effects are grade I or II rash and diarrhea. We report two cases of hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by erlotinib. Our two patients were treated with erlotinib after a prior line of systemic platinum-doublet therapy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Both patients presented, shortly after starting treatment with erlotinib, an HA which was fatal for one of them. To our knowledge, this major side effect of erlotinib has not been reported in the literature. We will try through this article to make a literature review of the most important side effects of erlotinib and we will also focus on the HA induced by other molecules used in oncology. PMID:24183296

  15. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  16. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  17. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  18. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  19. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Packman, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs. PMID:26696800

  20. Concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Clifford D

    2009-01-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia is due to the presence of warm agglutinins that react with protein antigens on the surface of red blood cells causing premature destruction of circulating red blood cells. We report the first case of concurrent reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. A 40-year-old man with reactive arthritis, Graves’ disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, mitral valve prolapse, and Gilbert’s disease presented with a one month history of jaundice, fatigue, and black stools. After diagnosis of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the patient was started on prednisone 1 mg/kg with rapid improvement in his anemia and jaundice. Our subject’s mother and possibly his maternal grandmother also had autoimmune hemolytic anemia, which raises the possibility of hereditary autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a rarely reported condition. PMID:19918501

  1. A Case of Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia after Myxoma Excision and Mitral Valve Repair Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young Joo; Kim, Sang Pil; Shin, Ho-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia occurs in a diverse group of disorders, including thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and prosthetic cardiac valves. Hemolytic anemia also occurs as a rare complication after mitral valve repair. In this report, we describe a case of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia following myxoma excision and mitral valve repair, which was presented as hemolytic uremic syndrome. PMID:27081450

  2. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... article? What Is Anemia? Blood Loss Iron Deficiency Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Why Teens Get Anemia Symptoms of Anemia ... an infection, chronic illness, or treatments like chemotherapy. Hemolytic Anemia In a person with hemolytic (pronounced: hee-muh- ...

  4. An unusual presentation of hemolytic anemia in a patient with prosthetic mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Vinales, Karyne L; Paripati, Harshita R; Kundranda, Madappa N; Valdez, Riccardo; Rihal, Charanjit S; Chaliki, Hari P

    2011-07-01

    Although rare, periprosthetic valvular regurgitation can cause hemolytic anemia. We present the case of a 63-year-old man who had an unusual presentation of hemolytic anemia due to periprosthetic mitral valve regurgitation (PMVR) in the presence of cold agglutinins. Due to high surgical risk, PMVR was percutaneously closed with three Amplatzer devices under the guidance of three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:21453302

  5. Infantile cytomegalovirus-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Murray, J C; Bernini, J C; Bijou, H L; Rossmann, S N; Mahoney, D H; Morad, A B

    2001-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a hematologic disorder that is rarely seen in infants and young children. Most cases are associated with viral or bacterial infection, but the immunologic events leading to hemolysis are poorly understood. We describe two infants with severe cytomegalovirus (CMV)-associated warm antibody AIHA. One case was immunohematologically analyzed and showed suggestive evidence that endogenous anti-CMV IgG antibodies were the pathogenic antibodies leading to hemolysis, implicating a possible causal relationship between AIHA and CMV infection. Both patients were ultimately treated with intravenous CMV immune globulin, with subsequent improvement. These cases suggest that investigation for the presence of CMV in infantile AIHA is warranted and that CMV immune globulin should be considered as a therapeutic option. PMID:11464992

  6. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia caused by cold agglutinins in a young pregnant woman.

    PubMed

    Batalias, Labros; Trakakis, Eftihios; Loghis, Costas; Salabasis, Costas; Simeonidis, George; Karanikolopoulos, Panagiotis; Kassanos, Demetrios; Salamalekis, Emmanuel

    2006-04-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder. A 34-year old woman presented with thrombophlebitis after her first delivery, during puerperium. A high titer of cold agglutinins was found. Lymphomas, systemic lupus erythematosus, and tumors were excluded. She conceived again. Due to the anemia she had frequent blood transfusions and she delivered at 38 weeks of gestation. PMID:16854701

  7. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  8. Elderly female with Autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of around 17/100,000. It is often difficult to diagnose and treat AIHA, especially in elderly. A 60-year-old female was admitted with the complaints of low grade fever, on-off for 6 months, progressive fatigue and dyspnea on exertion. She was transfused with three units of blood within these 6 months. Examination revealed pallor, edema, hemic murmur, and palpable liver. Hb was 2.9 gm%, T Bil 5.2 mg/dl, ESR 160 mm, and reticulocyte count 44.05%. Direct Coombs test was positive, anti-nuclear antibody (ANA) and Anti ds DNA were positive. A diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with AIHA was considered and patient was transfused with two units of packed red cells and put on steroid (prednisolone) at 1 mg/kg body weight daily. After 3 weeks, her Hb had increased to 10.4 gm% with gross clinical improvement. PMID:26538992

  9. Hemolytic anemia produced by regurgitation through transposed chordae tendineae.

    PubMed

    Birkbeck, James P; Gorton, Michael E; Vacek, James L

    2005-11-01

    Hemolytic anemia after mitral repair and annuloplasty ring placement is very uncommon, and rarely described. The case is presented of a 53-year-old woman who developed severe mitral regurgitation and transfusion-dependent hemolytic anemia following mitral valve repair with a Carpentier-Edwards annuloplasty ring, which included transposition of chordae tendineae from the posterior leaflet to the anterior leaflet. Transesophageal echocardiography suggested that the transposed chordae tethered the anterior leaflet, causing malcoaptation of the leaflets. This resulted in central regurgitation divided by the chordae tendineae, producing two turbulent flow jets causing hemolysis. At reoperation, these chordae were removed and two longer Gortex neochordae to the anterior leaflet were placed with subsequent resolution of the anemia. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of hemolytic anemia caused by transposed mitral valve chordae tendineae from the posterior to the anterior leaflet. PMID:16359054

  10. [Hemolytic anemia and dysenteric syndrome: a case of ulcerative colitis].

    PubMed

    Claes, G; Colard, M; Benghiat, F S; Maerevoet, M; Bailly, B; De Wilde, V

    2015-01-01

    A 53-years-old man has a dysentery since two weeks. The blood test shows Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and inflammation. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is treated with corticosteroid. A colonoscopy reveals an ulcerative colitis. The evolution of the patient is complicated by a spontaneous digestive perforation treated by total proctocolectomy. After this intervention, there is a resolution of the AIHA and the patient is gradually weaned from corticosteroids. AIHA is a rare extra-intestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease essentially ulcerative colitis. Identification of this cause of secondary AIHA is important for the therapeutic strategy. However treatment is nonspecific and based on low levels of evidence. PMID:26749635

  11. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  12. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  13. Hemolytic anemia associated with heterograft replacement of the mitral valve.

    PubMed

    Myers, T J; Hild, D H; Rinaldi, M J

    1978-08-01

    The first case of overt hemolytic anemia following mitral valve replacement with a porcine heterograft is reported. Cardiac catheterization failed to reveal a paravalvular leak or valvular incompetence to account for the hemolysis. Red cell traumatization by the Dacron-covered Stellite ring and stent is suggested as the cause of hemolysis with the porcine heterograft. PMID:567264

  14. [The polybrene test in the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodeĭ, S V; Zavadenko, M A; Kulagin, M N

    1991-01-01

    The efficacies of Coombs' test and the polybrene test, heretofore not used in this country, for the diagnosis of autoimmune hemolytic anemias are compared in examinations of 27 donors and 62 patients with this condition. The results evidence a high efficacy of the polybrene test. The test is simple and available for wide use at clinical laboratories. PMID:1724488

  15. Evaluating treatment of hepatitis C for hemolytic anemia management.

    PubMed

    DebRoy, Swati; Kribs-Zaleta, Christopher; Mubayi, Anuj; Cardona-Melndez, Gloriell M; Medina-Rios, Liana; Kang, MinJun; Diaz, Edgar

    2010-06-01

    The combination therapy of antiviral peg-interferon and ribavirin has evolved as one of the better treatments for hepatitis C. In spite of its success in controlling hepatitis C infection, it has also been associated with treatment-related adverse side effects. The most common and life threatening among them is hemolytic anemia, necessitating dose reduction or therapy cessation. The presence of this side effect leads to a trade-off between continuing the treatment and exacerbating the side effects versus decreasing dosage to relieve severe side effects while allowing the disease to progress. The drug epoietin (epoetin) is often administered to stimulate the production of red blood cells (RBC) in the bone marrow, in order to allow treatment without anemia. This paper uses mathematical models to study the effect of combination therapy in light of anemia. In order to achieve this we introduce RBC concentration and amount of drug in the body as state variables in the usual immunological virus infection model. Analysis of this model provides a quantification of the amount of drug a body can tolerate without succumbing to hemolytic anemia. Indirect estimation of parameters allow us to calculate the necessary increment in RBC production to be > or =2.3 times the patient's original RBC production rate to sustain the entire course of treatment without encountering anemia in a sensitive patient. PMID:20303990

  16. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  17. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Disease: An Unusual Pediatric Association.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Maria Miguel; Oliva, Tereza; Pinto, Armando

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a recognized complication of lymphoproliferative disorders. AIHA associated with Hodgkin's disease (HD) is uncommon especially in the pediatric population. The diagnosis of AIHA is usually associated with HD at the time of initial presentation or during the course of disease, but it could precede it by years to months. In adults the association of AIHA and HD is more frequent in advanced stages and in the nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity type HD. Warm immune hemolytic anemia is mainly controlled with steroids and chemotherapy. We report a case of a pediatric patient with direct antiglobulin positive test at the diagnosis of a late relapse of stage III B mixed cellularity type HD. PMID:26904342

  18. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia: 70 cases (1988-1996).

    PubMed

    Reimer, M E; Troy, G C; Warnick, L D

    1999-01-01

    Survival times and mortality rates in dogs with idiopathic immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) have been infrequently reported in the literature. This study evaluates survival and mortality in a large group of dogs with IMHA. The association of age, sex, and breed with IMHA was evaluated by comparing affected dogs to control dogs admitted to the hospital during the same time period. Treatment regimens were reviewed to determine the effects of different agents upon survival of dogs with IMHA during hospitalization and after discharge. Median survival times for each treatment group were 57 days (prednisone), 28 days (prednisone, cyclophosphamide), 974 days (prednisone, azathioprine), 15 days (prednisone, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine), and one day (no treatment). Overall mortality rate in the population of dogs studied was 70%. Twenty-nine (41.4%) dogs either died or were euthanized while hospitalized. Forty-one (59%) dogs were discharged from the hospital. Of the dogs discharged, 10 died within the first month, another five died within three months, and another five died within a year of discharge due to assumed complications of therapy or relapses of IMHA. PMID:10493413

  19. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, W.; Fattizzo, B.

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20–40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions. PMID:26819490

  20. Clinical Applications of Hemolytic Markers in the Differential Diagnosis and Management of Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, W; Fattizzo, B

    2015-01-01

    Several hemolytic markers are available to guide the differential diagnosis and to monitor treatment of hemolytic conditions. They include increased reticulocytes, an indicator of marrow compensatory response, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, a marker of intravascular hemolysis, reduced haptoglobin, and unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. The direct antiglobulin test is the cornerstone of autoimmune forms, and blood smear examination is fundamental in the diagnosis of congenital membrane defects and thrombotic microangiopathies. Marked increase of lactate dehydrogenase and hemosiderinuria are typical of intravascular hemolysis, as observed in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hyperferritinemia is associated with chronic hemolysis. Prosthetic valve replacement and stenting are also associated with intravascular and chronic hemolysis. Compensatory reticulocytosis may be inadequate/absent in case of marrow involvement, iron/vitamin deficiency, infections, or autoimmune reaction against bone marrow-precursors. Reticulocytopenia occurs in 20-40% of autoimmune hemolytic anemia cases and is a poor prognostic factor. Increased reticulocytes, lactate dehydrogenase, and bilirubin, as well as reduced haptoglobin, are observed in conditions other than hemolysis that may confound the clinical picture. Hemoglobin defines the clinical severity of hemolysis, and thrombocytopenia suggests a possible thrombotic microangiopathy or Evans' syndrome. A comprehensive clinical and laboratory evaluation is advisable for a correct diagnostic and therapeutic workup of the different hemolytic conditions. PMID:26819490

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia during adalimumab treatment for plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Midori; Kodaira, Mutsuki; Kono, Tsunesuke

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab is commonly used to treat autoimmune diseases with few reported hematological adverse reactions. We herein describe the case of an 85-year-old Japanese man with plaque psoriasis who developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) after 3 years of adalimumab treatment. The patient suddenly developed hematuria and dyspnea on exertion while receiving adalimumab treatment. Laboratory data showed low hemoglobin levels and slightly increased reticulocyte counts, while direct and indirect antiglobulin tests were positive. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA which resolved after replacing the adalimumab treatment with prednisolone therapy. The findings from this case indicate that AIHA may be caused by long-term adalimumab treatment. PMID:25948357

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Yang, YaLi; Sang, Junjun; Pan, Weihua; Du, Lin; Liao, Wanqing; Chen, Jianghan; Zhu, Yuanjie

    2014-08-01

    To summarize the epidemiology, clinical features, treatment, and outcome of cryptococcal meningitis (CM) in autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients and to provide a reference for the prevention and control of AIHA complicated with CM, we evaluated five cases of CM in patients with AIHA treated in our hospital from 2003 to 2013 and eight related foreign cases. All of the clinical isolates were Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii and grouped into the VNI genotype and serotype A. The clinical features exhibit significant features. Headache, nausea, and fever are common symptoms of AIHA complicated with CM. The early clinical manifestations lack specificity, which may lead to delayed diagnosis and treatment. Long-term use of prednisone (≥15 mg day(-1)), poor control of anemia, and splenectomy are risk factors for AIHA complicated with cryptococcal infection. The combination of intravenous amphotericin B and oral 5-fluorocytosine remains the preferred treatment for AIHA complicated with CM. PMID:24952011

  3. An imported case of severe falciparum malaria with prolonged hemolytic anemia clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-12-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  4. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. PMID:24576944

  5. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Children: Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, Janani; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Jacob, Eapen K; Kreuter, Justin D; Go, Ronald S

    2016-04-01

    We studied 35 pediatric patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia seen at Mayo Clinic from 1994 to 2014. The median age was 10.0 years and 65.7% were males. Most had warm antibodies (80.0%) and some secondary to viral (14.3%) or autoimmune disorders (31.4%). Seven (20.0%) patients presented with Evans syndrome, 3 of whom also had common variable immunodeficiency. The median hemoglobin at diagnosis was 6.1 g/dL and 62.8% patients required red cell transfusions. The severity of anemia was worse among children below 10 years (median 5.5 vs. 7.0 g/dL, P=0.01). Steroid was the initial treatment for 88.5% patients, with overall response rate of 82.7% (68.5% complete, 14.2% partial) and median response duration of 10.7 months (range, 0.2 to 129.7+ mo). After median follow-up of 26.6 months, 8 (22.8%) patients relapsed. Salvage treatments included splenectomy, intravenous immunoglobulin, rituximab, and mycophenolate mofetil. Infectious complications occurred in 9 (25.7%) patients and 1 patient died of cytomegalovirus infection. Four patients had cold agglutinin disease and 3 (75.0%) responded to steroids. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder in pediatric population and most respond well to steroids regardless of the type of antibody. Infectious complications are common and screening for immunodeficiency is recommended among those with Evans syndrome. PMID:26925716

  6. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia with normal serum lactate dehydrogenase level].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Hideaki; Hangaishi, Akira; Saika, Makoto; Morioka, Takehiko; Ando, Yayoi; Kida, Michiko; Usuki, Kensuke

    2015-11-01

    We herein report two cases of AIHA (autoimmune hemolytic anemia), a 25-year-old woman and a 77-year-old man, who presented with normal serum LDH values. Though in these two cases, low hemoglobin and haptoglobin, high total bilirubin and positive direct Coombs' test results led to the diagnosis of AIHA, both patients had normal LDH levels (218 and 187 IU/l). Both cases were successfully treated with prednisone. In the diagnosis of AIHA, elevated LDH is usually used as a marker of hemolysis. However, medical records of 24 AIHA patients collected in our institute from January 2001 to August 2012 revealed LDH levels to have been normal in 25% of these cases. This report indicates the importance of obtaining complete information about the blood testing of patients and taking these data into account when considering the diagnosis of AIHA. PMID:26666722

  7. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with TAFRO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Edahiro, Yoko; Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Koike, Michiaki; Komatsu, Norio

    2015-11-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by low platelet counts, anasarca, fever, reticulin fibrosis, renal dysfunction, and organomegaly. Patients with TAFRO syndrome occasionally have courses complicated by immunological diseases. Herein, we describe a case of TAFRO syndrome associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). The patient was admitted because of menorrhagia. She had thrombocytopenia, pleural effusion and ascites, hepatomegaly, and multiple lymphadenopathies. Her symptoms worsened, especially fever, pleural effusion and ascites, and she developed AIHA. Steroid pulse therapy followed by 45 mg of prednisolone (PSL) improved not only the symptoms of TAFRO syndrome but also those of AIHA. There have been no reports, to our knowledge, of AIHA associated with TAFRO syndrome, and detailed studies on this syndrome are needed. PMID:26666723

  8. The first report of cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia in an adolescent with prolactinoma.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Fatih; Yağcı-Küpeli, Begül; Kör, Yılmaz; Yüksel, Bilgin; Zorludemir, Suzan; Gürbüz, Berrak Bilginer; Küpeli, Serhan

    2014-01-01

    Prolactinomas are common pituitary tumors that can cause gonadal dysfunction and infertility related to hyperprolactinemia. Dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment in these patients. Cabergoline leads to significant reduction in serum prolactin levels and tumor size in patients with prolactinoma. Dopamine agonists have been associated with adverse effects such as nausea, vomiting and psychosis. We report here a case with cabergoline-induced immune hemolytic anemia. The patient had cabergoline treatment history for prolactinoma and presented with weakness, fatigue, nausea, and paleness. Laboratory findings revealed severe anemia-related immune hemolysis. There were no causes identified to explain hemolytic anemia except cabergoline. Therefore, cabergoline therapy was stopped and subsequently hemolytic anemia resolved and did not occur again. This is the first reported pediatric case with prolactinoma and cabergoline-induced hemolytic anemia. Clinicians should be watchful for this rare side effect induced by cabergoline. PMID:23945126

  9. Auto immune hemolytic anemia in a child precipitated by chicken pox.

    PubMed

    Billoo, Samina Shamim; Jamalvi, Syed Waseem

    2008-05-01

    Auto Immune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) is a rare entity in children. We report a case of an adolescent girl with AIHA, which was precipitated by chicken pox. Clinical course over 3 years, till remission is described. PMID:18541094

  10. Detection of stages of autoimmune hemolytic anemia by evaluating erythrocyte deformability and density.

    PubMed

    Shurkhina, E S; Nesterenko, V M; Lisovskaya, I L; Tsvetaeva, N V; Kolodei, S V; Nikulina, O F; Ataullakhanov, F I

    2004-09-01

    Study of erythrocyte density and deformability in patients with hemolytic anemia, including long-term monitoring of 5 patients, helped us to characterize the pathological processes leading to changes in the erythrocyte population at different terms of the disease and to detect its main stages (agglutination, pathological dehydration, combination of pathological dehydration and microvesiculation, hemolytic crisis, and remission). PMID:15665924

  11. Graft failure due to hemolytic uremic syndrome recurrence.

    PubMed

    Iaria, G; Iorio, B; Anselmo, A; De Luca, L; Tariciotti, L; Ielpo, B; Muzi, F; Lucchesi, C; D'Andria, D; Orlando, G; Del Poeta, G; Poggi, E; Piazza, A; Tisone, G

    2006-05-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a severe disease characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. We herein report our experience with a 43-year-old female patient who underwent a second cadaveric kidney transplantation in February 2005, for adult-onset HUS. The first renal transplantation, which was performed in 1996, required removal after 3 weeks for probable recurrence of HUS. The immunosuppressive regimen for the second transplant included basiliximab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. On postoperative day (POD) 7, she received steroid treatment for an acute rejection episode with improved renal function. On POD 19 due to worsening renal function, a graft biopsy showed HUS recurrence, thus we instituted hemodialysis and then plasmapheresis treatments. At two months after transplantation, the patient continued under plasmapheresis treatment due to clinical evidence of HUS. On POD 80, cytomegalovirus infection was diagnosed and intravenous gancyclovir treatment started for 3 weeks. After 110 days from transplant, a deterioration in renal function was evident: the graft was swollen and painful with Doppler ultrasound showing patency of both the renal artery and vein but, low blood flow. After 2 weeks of hemodialysis, the patient underwent transplantectomy. In adult-onset HUS the recurrence rate reduces graft survival, particularly among patients undergoing second transplantation. PMID:16757250

  12. Expansion of CD8+ cells in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, S Ju; Sidorova, Ju V; Tsvetaeva, N V; Nikulina, O F; Biderman, B V; Nikulina, E E; Kulikov, S M; Sudarikov, A B

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare blood disease associated with the production of auto-antibodies and autoimmune hemolysis. A critical role of B-cells in the development of AIHA has been demonstrated before. Here, we present the analysis of the clonal T-cell populations in patients with AIHA. Thirty-three patients with AIHA were included in this study. Thirteen patients with other anemias, 14 patients with other autoimmune conditions (SLE - 6, RA - 8) and 20 healthy donors were included in the study as a control group. The clonality of T-cell was evaluated by the assessment of the T-cell receptor gamma and beta chain gene rearrangements (TCRG and TCRB). The incidence of T-cell monoclonality detected in patients with AIHA was significantly higher compared to the control group. The persistence of T-cell clones did not correlate with the level of hemoglobin and other signs of remission or relapse and did not disappear after the therapy and clinical improvement (observation period was between 1 and 10 years). There was no correlation between the T-cell clonality and the gender, age, splenectomy, duration or severity of the disease. Fractionation of T-lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, CD4+25+) revealed that the monoclonal T-cells belonged to the CD8+ sub-population. We assume that besides a possible causative role of the T-cell clones in AIHA to autoimmune process, these clones do not directly participate in the development and maintenance of hemolysis. Most of the AIHA patients (48.5%) demonstrated a T-cell monoclonality, which requires monitoring and should be distinguished from T-cell tumors. PMID:26829107

  13. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient’s blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2nd day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4th day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  14. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with Malaria.

    PubMed

    Sonani, Rajesh; Bhatnagar, Nidhi; Maitrey, Gajjar

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA), a very infrequent condition which represents a group of disorders in which presence of autoantibodies directed against self-antigens leads to shortened red cell survival. Till date, a very few cases of AIHA in Malaria patients are reported worldwide but still AIHA should be considered a relatively rare cause of anemia in malaria. A 20 year male presented with intermittent fever since seven days and yellowish discoloration of urine and sclera since 5 days. He was transfused three units of blood at a private clinic before one month. On examination, pallor, icterus and spelnomegaly were present. Hemoglobin (Hb) was 3.2 gm% and peripheral smear revealed ring forms of both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum. Serum LDH and Serum billirubin (Indirect and Direct) were high. This patient's blood group was B +ve with positive autocontrol. Indirect Antiglobulin Test (IAT), antibody screening and antibody identification were pan-positive with reaction strength of +4 against each cell. Direct Antiglobulin Test was +4 positive anti IgG and negative with anti C3. He was treated with Artesunate and methylprednisone. Least incompatible, saline washed O Neg and B neg red cells were transfused on the 2(nd) day of starting treatment. Hb was raised to 6.1 gm% on 4(th) day. Patient was discharged on 9th day with Hb 7.0 gm% with oral tapering dose of steroids. In the above case, patient was suffering from high grade malarial parasitemia with co-existing autoimmune RBC destruction by IgG auto-antibodies which led to sudden drop in Hb and rise in serum LDH and indirect billirubin. Least incompatible packed red cells along with antimalarials and steroids led to clinical improvement. So far, one case report each from India, Korea, Canada and Germany and one case series report of three cases from India have been reported. Under-reporting or rarity of this phenomenon may be accountable for this. PMID:24014948

  15. Chronic autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children: a report of four patients.

    PubMed

    Duru, F; Grgey, A; Cetin, M; Kanra, T; Altay, C

    1994-01-01

    Four children, ages seven to ten years, with direct antiglobulin test (DAT)-positive chronic hemolytic anemia are presented. The patients were followed for 3 to 10 years. Autoantibody against red cell antigens was nonspecific IgG type in all of the patients. In one of the four patients, anemia was associated with splenomegaly and jaundice. In this patient, the third component of the complement was also detected on the red cell surface. In one patient, serum IgA deficiency and frequent pulmonary infections were associated with the disease. This patient developed rheumatoid arthritis five years after diagnosis of hemolytic anemia. The third patient initially had thrombocytopenia subsequently developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia, vitiligo and alopecia without any evidence of serologic changes suggestive of collagen vascular disorders. In these three patients, partial response was obtained with steroid therapy. The fourth patient developed DAT-positive hemolytic anemia twice during the five year follow-up period. Anemia resolved completely with steroid therapy in two months during the first episode, and in five months in the second. Generalized and peripheral lymphadenopathies which developed at the time of the second hemolytic anemia episode have persisted for the last three years. Administration of cyclosporine in two of the four patients did not result in any amelioration of the symptoms. PMID:7996066

  16. When pure is not so pure: chloramine-related hemolytic anemia in home hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Junglee, Naushad A; Rahman, Saeed U; Wild, Mike; Wilms, Anke; Hirst, Sarah; Jibani, Mahdi; Seale, Jim R C

    2010-07-01

    Worldwide, chloramines are used as the preferred disinfectant for city water supplies. Although they have distinct advantages compared with chlorine and are deemed harmless to the general population, hemodialysis (HD) patients are at risk from chloramine-induced hemolytic anemia. In recent years, this has been highlighted in regional dialysis units but not as frequently in the home HD group. We report on 2 home HD patients who succumbed to severe oxidative hemolysis due to high mains water chloramine concentrations. Both patients were extensively investigated for other cause of anemia before a definitive diagnosis was reached. Delays in diagnosing this uncommon condition can be costly in terms of significant morbidity and excessive usage of recombinant erythropoietin and blood transfusion. Prevention primarily involves enforcing strict water quality control and establishing regular communication with water supply boards and home HD patients. Double (inline) carbon filters should be installed in patient's homes as an effective means for removing high incoming chloramine concentrations. PMID:20618875

  17. Neonatal Sulfhemoglobinemia and Hemolytic Anemia Associated With Intestinal Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kiera; Ryan, Clodagh; Dempsey, Eugene M; O'Toole, Paul W; Ross, R Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Ryan, C Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Sulfhemoglobinemia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sulfhemoglobin in the blood. It is typically drug-induced and may cause hypoxia, end-organ damage, and death through oxygen deprivation. We present here a case of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia in a 7-day-old preterm infant complicated by hemolytic anemia. Microbiota compositional analysis of fecal samples to investigate the origin of hydrogen sulphide revealed the presence of Morganella morganii at a relative abundance of 38% of the total fecal microbiota at the time of diagnosis. M morganii was not detected in the fecal samples of 40 age-matched control preterm infants. M morganii is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infection, particularly in immunocompromised hosts such as neonates. Strains of M morganii are capable of producing hydrogen sulphide, and virulence factors include the production of a diffusible α-hemolysin. The infant in this case survived intact through empirical oral and intravenous antibiotic therapy, probiotic administration, and red blood cell transfusions. This coincided with a reduction in the relative abundance of M morganii to 3%. Neonatologists should have a high index of suspicion for intestinal pathogens in cases of non-drug-induced sulfhemoglobinemia and consider empirical treatment of the intestinal microbiota in this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26553186

  18. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  19. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins.

    PubMed

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  20. Maternal anti-M induced hemolytic disease of newborn followed by prolonged anemia in newborn twins

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Satyam; Doda, Veena; Maria, Arti; Kotwal, Urvershi; Goyal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Allo-anti-M often has an immunoglobulin G (IgG) component but is rarely clinically significant. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn along with prolonged anemia in newborn twins that persisted for up to 70 days postbirth. The aim was to diagnose and successfully manage hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) due to maternal alloimmunization. Direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antigen typing, irregular antibody screening and identification were done by polyspecific antihuman globulin cards and standard tube method. At presentation, the newborn twins (T1, T2) had HDN with resultant low reticulocyte count and prolonged anemia, which continued for up to 70 days of life. Blood group of the twins and the mother was O RhD positive. DAT of the both newborns at birth was negative. Anti-M was detected in mothers as well as newborns. Type of antibody in mother was IgG and IgM type whereas in twins it was IgG type only. M antigen negative blood was transfused thrice to twin-1 and twice to twin-2. Recurring reduction of the hematocrit along with low reticulocyte count and normal other cell line indicated a pure red cell aplastic state. Anti-M is capable of causing HDN as well as prolonged anemia (red cell aplasia) due to its ability to destroy the erythroid precursor cells. Newborns with anemia should be evaluated for all the possible causes to establish a diagnosis and its efficient management. Mother should be closely monitored for future pregnancies as well. PMID:25722586

  1. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  2. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-01-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  3. Hemolytic anemia after kidney transplantation: case report and differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Frohn, C; Jabs, W J; Fricke, L; Goerg, S

    2002-03-01

    A 58-year-old woman presented with hemolysis and thrombocytopenia 2 weeks after receiving a kidney graft. Hemolytic uremic syndrome was initially suspected, because in addition to hematological changes the graft function was missing. Unexpectedly, the results of the direct antiglobulin test became positive (4+), which is not normally observed in the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Differentiation of the eluted antibodies revealed anti-rhesus D specificity, which had to be interpreted either as an autoantibody of patient's origin or, hypothetically, as a "graft versus host" antibody of donor origin. Gm- and Km allotyping of these antibodies demonstrated a pattern which differed from the patient's but was identical to that of the kidney donor. Therefore hemolysis could be explained unambiguously by "graft versus host" antibodies. Whether the thrombocytopenia was also due to an immune process was not clear, although some evidence favors this hypothesis. Immunosuppressive treatment remained unchanged and several red blood cell transfusions were necessary before reactivity of the direct antiglobulin test diminished and became negative 7 weeks after kidney transplantation. The occurrence of hemolysis in the early posttransplantation period should thus draw attention to the possibility of "graft versus host" antibodies directed against red cells. Concomitant thrombocytopenia may occur. Donor screening for irregular erythrocyte antibodies should be performed whenever solid organ transplantation is intended. PMID:11904742

  4. The Lbw2 Locus Promotes Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Scatizzi, John C.; Haraldsson, Maria K.; Pollard, K. Michael; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.; Kono, Dwight H.

    2012-01-01

    The lupus-prone NZB strain uniquely develops a genetically imposed severe spontaneous autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) that is very similar to the corresponding human disease. Previous studies have mapped anti-erythrocyte Ab (AEA)-promoting NZB loci to several chromosomal locations, including chromosome 4, however, none of these have been analyzed with interval congenics. Here, we used NZB.NZW-Lbw2 congenic (designated Lbw2 congenic) mice containing an introgressed fragment of NZW on chromosome 4 encompassing Lbw2, a locus previously linked to survival, glomerulonephritis, and splenomegaly, to investigate the role in AIHA. Lbw2 congenic mice exhibited marked reductions in AEAs and splenomegaly, but not in anti-nuclear Abs. Furthermore, Lbw2 congenics had greater numbers of marginal zone B cells and reduced expansion of peritoneal cells, particularly the B-1a cell subset at early ages, but no reduction in B cell response to LPS. Analysis of a panel of subinterval congenic mice showed that the full effect of Lbw2 on AEA production was dependent on three subloci, with splenomegaly mapping to two of the subloci, and expansions of peritoneal cell populations, including B-1a cells to one. These results directly demonstrated the presence of AEA-specific promoting genes on NZB chromosome 4, documented a marked influence of background genes on autoimmune phenotypes related to Lbw2, and further refined the locations of the underlying genetic variants. Delineation of the Lbw2 genes should yield new insights into both the pathogenesis of AIHA and the nature of epistatic interactions of lupus-modifying genetic variants. PMID:22371393

  5. Ranitidine-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a health maintenance organization population.

    PubMed

    Choo, P W; Goldberg, J H; Platt, R

    1994-10-01

    Reversible hematologic abnormalities including hemolytic anemia [1] with a positive direct Coombs' test have been associated with ranitidine. In addition to the case report cited above, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had received five other cases of hemolysis associated with recent intake of ranitidine as of February 1991. To investigate the possible association of ranitidine with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a study was conducted to determine how often diagnoses of hemolytic anemia or abnormal Coombs' test results followed dispensing of ranitidine using the automated medical and pharmacy records of a large health maintenance organization. No occurrences of hemolytic anemia were identified among 12,054 individuals following 38,686 prescriptions for this medication. The 95% upper confidence bound was 3.1 cases/10,000 exposed persons. One abnormal direct Coombs' test with mild anemia was discovered during routine prenatal testing of an asymptomatic patient who was dispensed ranitidine two and a half months previously. Hemolysis, however, was not demonstrated and an association with prior ranitidine use could not be confirmed. Additional analyses indicate that in only 30% of ranitidine courses was a blood count obtained. In those courses with hematocrits below 40%, less than 1% had a Coombs' test performed. Chart review suggests that the majority of individuals with severe anemia have alternative explanations other than autoimmune hemolysis for their anemia. This analysis indicates that ranitidine is unlikely to be a common cause of clinically recognized autoimmune hemolytic anemia and demonstrates the utility of large automated medical and pharmacy data bases to conduct post-marketing studies of spontaneously reported drug effects. PMID:7722551

  6. Cases of Hemolytic Anemia with Periprosthetic Leaks Evaluated by Real-Time 3-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Eui-Jong; Kim, Tae-Yop; Hwang, Jong Min; Kim, Sang-Phil

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia is recognized as a rare complication of mitral valve replacement or repair. We report on a 44-year-old man with shortness of breath and hemolytic anemia, 23 years after mitral valve replacement (Hall-Kaster), and a 63-year-old woman diagnosed of hemolytic anemia, 4 years after mitral and tricuspid annuloplasty (Tailor ring, An-core ring). Routine 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography revealed paravalvular leakage around the prosthesis. Subsequent real-time 3-dimensional (3D)transesophageal echocardiography helped the perceptional appreciation of the leakage and the measuring of the regurgitant orifice area using the anatomically correct plane. Surgical findings of each case fit those of 3D volumetric images. PMID:22509440

  7. Incompatible blood transfusion: Challenging yet lifesaving in the management of acute severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipta Sekhar; Zaman, Rafiq Uz; Safi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by the production of autoantibodies directed against red cell antigens. Most patients of AIHA arrive in the emergency or out-patient department (OPD) with severe anemia requiring urgent blood transfusion. Here we share our experience of managing these patients with incompatible blood transfusions and suggest the minimal test required to assure patient safety. Materials and Methods: A total of 14 patients admitted with severe anemia, diagnosed with AIHA and requiring blood transfusion urgently were included in the study. A series of immunohematological investigations were performed to confirm the diagnosis and issue best match packed red blood cells (PRBC) to these patients. Results: A total of 167 PRBC units were crossmatched for 14 patients of which 46 units (28%) were found to be best match ones and 26 (56.5%) of these units were transfused. A mean turn around time of 222 min was observed in issuing the “best match” blood. Severe hemolysis was observed in all patients with a median hemoglobin increment of 0.88 g/dl after each unit PRBC transfusion. Conclusion: Decision to transfuse in AIHA should be based on the clinical condition of the patient. No critical patient should be denied blood transfusion due to serological incompatibility. Minimum investigations such as direct antiglobulin test (DAT), antibody screening and autocontrol should be performed to ensure transfusion safety in patients. All transfusion services should be capable of issuing “best match” PRBCs in AIHA. PMID:25161349

  8. Case of cytomegalovirus-associated direct anti-globulin test-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Saeko; Sato, Masanori; Sasaki, Goro; Eguchi, Hiroyuki; Oishi, Tsutomu; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Kawaguchi, Hiroyuki

    2013-12-01

    A 1-year-old boy developed autoimmune hemolytic anemia after a negative direct anti-globulin test. The concentration of erythrocyte membrane-associated immunoglobulin G, determined using an immunoradiometric assay, correlated with disease activity. He was positive for cytomegalovirus (CMV) both serologically and by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, indicating that his autoimmune hemolytic anemia was directly caused by CMV infection. Since anti-CMV immunoglobulin G was not absorbed by the patient's erythrocytes, cross-reaction between erythrocyte antigens and CMV was not likely a causative factor for hemolysis. PMID:24330288

  9. Hemolytic anemia and progressive neurologic impairment: think about triosephosphate isomerase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Aissa, Khaoula; Kamoun, Fatma; Sfaihi, Lamia; Ghedira, Elyes Slim; Aloulou, Hajer; Kamoun, Thouraya; Pissard, Serge; Hachicha, Mongia

    2014-08-01

    We have reported the first Tunisian case of triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) deficiency in a 2-year-old girl. She was the first child of a nonconsanguineous couple. The disease included a neonatal onset of chronic hemolytic anemia, recurrent low-respiratory infections then progressive neurological involvement. The diagnosis was made after her death from the TPI values of her parents who exhibited intermediate enzyme deficiency. Molecular study of TPI genes showed that the father and the mother are heterozygous for Glu105Asp mutation. Pediatricians must be alert to the differential diagnosis in patients having hemolytic anemia and other concomitant manifestations. PMID:24840153

  10. Favism and hemolytic anemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects in North Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Meloni, T; Forteleoni, G; Dore, A; Cutillo, S

    1983-01-01

    The present paper reports the incidence from 1965 to 1979 of acute hemolytic anemia for a total of 948 cases in G-6-PD-deficient subjects due to the ingestion of fresh or dried fava beans or certain drugs and to viral infections. The highest percentage of hemolytic crises was due to fresh fava beans (94.4%). No cases of favism were observed in breast-fed babies whose mothers had eaten fava beans or from pollen inhalation. The male sex proved to be the hardest hit. Hemoglobin values were lower than or equal to 7 g/dl in about 75% of males and 50% of females. Total bilirubin values were lower than 103 mumol/l (6 mg/dl) in about 75% of males and 85% of females. Both the hemoglobin and bilirubin values were statistically significant. Mean transaminase values (SGPT) were significantly higher than those of normal controls. No correlation between favism and blood groups was found. PMID:6408883

  11. Chronic hemolytic anemia is associated with a new glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in-frame deletion in an older woman.

    PubMed

    Manco, Licnio; Pereira, Janet; Relvas, Lus; Rebelo, Umbelina; Crisstomo, Ana Isabel; Bento, Celeste; Ribeiro, M Letcia

    2011-04-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, an X-linked disorder, is usually observed in hemizygote males and very rarely in females. The G6PD class 1 variants, very uncommon, are associated with chronic hemolytic anemia. Here we report a Portuguese woman who suffered in her sixties from a chronic hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency. Molecular studies revealed heterozygosity for an in-frame 18-bp deletion, mapping to exon 10 leading to a deletion of 6 residues, 362-367 (LNERKA), which is a novel G6PD class 1 variant, G6PD Tondela. Two of her three daughters, asymptomatic, with G6PD activity within the normal range, are heterozygous for the same deletion. The patient's leukocyte and reticulocyte mRNA studies revealed an almost exclusive expression of the mutant allele, explaining the chronic hemolytic anemia. Patient whole blood genomic DNA HUMARA assay showed a balanced pattern of X chromosome inactivation (XCI), but granulocyte DNA showed extensive skewing, harboring the mutated allele, implying that in whole blood, lymphocyte DNA, with a very long lifetime, may cover up the current high XCI skewing. This observation indicates that HUMARA assay in women should be assessed in granulocytes and not in total leukocytes. PMID:21397531

  12. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle ... them and some neurodevelopmental abnormalities in children. These abnormalities include cognitive, motor, social, and language impairments. ... Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ...

  13. Brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa) envenomation leading to acute hemolytic anemia in six adolescents.

    PubMed

    McDade, Jenny; Aygun, Banu; Ware, Russell E

    2010-01-01

    Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse spider) bites often cause local envenomation reactions; however, acute hemolysis from systemic loxoscelism is rare. To highlight this important diagnostic consideration for unexplained hemolysis in areas endemic for brown recluse spiders, we report on 6 adolescents with acute hemolytic anemia from presumed L reclusa bites. PMID:20006769

  14. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  15. EPO-dependent induction of erythroferrone drives hepcidin suppression and systematic iron absorption under phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xingkang; Gao, Ming; Chen, Yue; Liu, Jing; Qi, Shiyong; Ma, Juan; Zhang, Zhihong; Xu, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Hemolytic anemia is a common form of anemia due to hemolysis, resulting in disordered iron homeostasis. In this study, a dose of 40mg/kg phenylhydrazine (PHZ) was injected into mice to successfully establish a pronounced anemia animal model, which resulted in stress erythropoiesis and iron absorption. We found that serum erythropoietin (EPO) concentration was dramatically elevated by nearly 5000-fold for the first 2days, and then drop to the basal level on day 6 after PHZ injection. Mirrored with serum EPO concentration, the mRNA expression of erythroferrone (ERFE) was rapidly increased in the bone marrow and spleen 3days after injection of PHZ, and then gradually decreased but was still higher than baseline on day 6. In addition, we also found that the hepcidin mRNA levels were gradually reduced almost up to 8-fold on day 5, and then was ameliorated compared to the untreated control. Mechanistic investigation manifested that the increase of serum EPO essentially determined the induction of ERFE expression particular at the first 3days after PHZ treatment. Lentiviral mediated ERFE knockdown significantly restrained hepcidin suppression under PHZ treatment. Thus, our data unearthed EPO-dependent ERFE expression acts as an erythropoiesis-driven regulator of iron metabolism under PHZ-induced hemolytic anemia. PMID:27067488

  16. [Pancytopenia, Hemolytic Anemia and Schizocytes: a Pragmatic Approach].

    PubMed

    Gökok, Nil; Stalder, Grégoire; Alberio, Lorenzo; Lamy, Olivier; Schwotzer, Nora

    2015-07-01

    A 58 year old woman presents with a progressive fatigue and dyspnea associated with paresthesia. Laboratory tests show pancytopenia with hypersegmented neutrophiles, macrocytic hyporegenerative anemia and arguments for hemolysis, in particular highly increased LDH. This constellation strongly suggests vitamin B12 deficiency, which was confirmed with an undetectable cobalamine concentration in the blood of our patient. The etiologic work up shows the presence of anti-parietal cells antibodies at a titer of 1/640, diagnostic of Biermer anemia. PMID:26135726

  17. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  18. Intravascular hemolytic anemia in a patient with antibodies related to meropenem.

    PubMed

    Oka, Satoko; Shiragami, Hiroshi; Nohgawa, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman treated with meropenem developed intravascular hemolytic attacks. A direct antiglobulin test was positive for C3d and IgG, and drug-dependent antibody testing indicated that the antibodies were indeed drug-dependent and reacted with drug-treated RBCs and RBCs in the presence of the drug. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the causative antibodies related to meropenem were identified. This case highlights the importance of maintaining a high level of suspicion for drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia in patients with explained hemolysis as well as conducting specialized serologic testing. PMID:25986273

  19. Hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in a preterm baby as a complication of antenatal intraamnial injection of toluidine blue.

    PubMed

    Mehler, K; Oberthuer, A; Weisshaar, G; Valter, M; Vierzig, A; Eifinger, F

    2013-09-01

    A late preterm infant was born 4.5 h after intraamniotic injection of 90 mg of Toluidine blue to confirm premature rupture of membranes. Due to the fetal exposition to the dye, the entire body of the patient was blue stained and the baby suffered from methemoglobinemia, Heinz' body positive hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinaemia requiring exchange transfusion. These complications underline that antenatal exposition of toluidine blue may result in considerable postnatal infant morbidity. Therefore intraamniotic application of toluidine blue should be discouraged. PMID:23519748

  20. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valrie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  1. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Benjamin Y; Micklethwaite, Kenneth P; Swaminathan, Sanjay; Kefford, Richard F; Carlino, Matteo S

    2016-04-01

    We report the occurrence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient receiving the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab, for metastatic melanoma in the presence of known red cell alloantibodies, despite having received prior ipilimumab without evidence of hemolysis. The patient had a history of multiple red cell alloantibodies and a positive direct antiglobulin test, identified at the time of a prior transfusion, which occurred before treatment with ipilimumab. The patient developed symptomatic warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia after four cycles of treatment with nivolumab. Clinical improvement was noted following cessation of the drug and treatment with corticosteroids. Given that there was no prior history of hemolysis, even during treatment with ipilimumab, we hypothesize that anti-PD-1 therapy disrupted peripheral tolerance, unmasking an underlying autoimmune predisposition. PMID:26795275

  2. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  3. Oxaliplatin-induced immune hemolytic anemia: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Francesc; De Celis, Guillem; Pereira, Arturo; Latorre, Xavier; Pujadas, Jaume; Albiol, Santiago

    2007-09-01

    We report a 59-year-old woman diagnosed with metastasic colorectal cancer who developed immune hemolytic anemia during FOLFOX chemotherapy (oxaliplatin/leucovorin/5-fluorouracil). Immunohematologic studies demonstrated that immune hemolysis was oxaliplatin-mediated. On the basis of this case and in a review of the literature in which 13 cases of previously reported oxaliplatin-induced immune cytopenia have been identified, we suggest some clinical clues regarding the use of oxaliplatin in cancer patients. PMID:17667605

  4. Metformin-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Patient With Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Nicole A; Kish, Troy D; Lee, Mikyung L

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, an oral antidiabetic agent, is considered the preferred first-line therapy for patients with type II diabetes. Between 2010 and 2012, it has been estimated that 14 million Americans were administered an oral antidiabetic agent, suggesting the extensive use of metformin among the diabetic population. There have been few case reports implicating metformin in causing hemolytic anemia. We present a case of a 53-year-old white male who developed hemolytic anemia after the initiation of treatment with metformin 500 mg twice daily. The patient experienced a 1.5 g/dL decrease in hemoglobin from baseline and a 2.8 mg/dL increase in total bilirubin within 1 day of treatment. Laboratory results confirmed that the patient was also glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient. The hemolytic anemia resolved on discontinuation of metformin. Although this adverse effect seems to be rare, it is important to consider its seriousness. Clinicians should be advised to closely monitor patients newly started on metformin. PMID:25756470

  5. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    PubMed

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level. PMID:26563723

  6. Production of the effector cytokine interleukin-17, rather than interferon-γ, is more strongly associated with autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Andrew M.; Zamzami, Omar M.; Whibley, Natasha; Hampsey, Daniel P.; Haggart, Anne M.; Vickers, Mark A.; Barker, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Interleukin-17A is the signature cytokine of the Th17 subset and drives inflammatory pathology, but its relevance to autoantibody-mediated diseases is unclear. Th1 cells secreting interferon-γ have been implicated in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, so the aim was to determine which cytokine is more closely associated with disease severity. Design and Methods Interferon-γ and interleukin-17A were measured in the sera of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and healthy donors, and in peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures stimulated with autologous red blood cells, or a panel of peptides spanning red blood cell autoantigen. Results Serum interleukin-17A, but not interferon-γ, was significantly raised in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (P <0.001), and correlated with the degree of anemia. Interleukin-17A was also more prominent in the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia to red blood cells, and, again unlike interferon-γ, significantly associated with more severe anemia (P <0.005). There were no interleukin-17A responses to red blood cells by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. Specific autoantigenic peptides were identified that elicit patients' interleukin-17A responses. Conclusions Interleukin-17A makes a previously unrecognized contribution to the autoimmune response in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, challenging the model that the disease is driven primarily by Th1 cells. This raises the possibility that Th17, rather than Th1, cells should be the target for therapy. PMID:22419580

  7. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Triggered by Infection with Human Parvovirus B19 after Total Abdominal Colectomy for Ulcerative Colitis.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomoya; Satoh, Shuji; Nakagaki, Suguru; Shimizu, Haruo; Kaneto, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for an adhesive ileus 14 years after total abdominal colectomy for ulcerative colitis (UC). The ileus decreased with conservative treatment, however, autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) was diagnosed due to worsening anemia, a positive direct Coombs test, low haptoglobin, high lactase dehydrogenase, reticulocytosis, and an increase in the erythroblastic series in a bone-marrow examination. Human parvovirus B19 (PV-B19) IgM and PV-B19 DNA were present, indicating the development of AIHA triggered by an infection with PV-B19. The patient is currently being monitored after spontaneous remission. This is the first report of UC after total abdominal colectomy complicated by AIHA triggered by PV-B19 infection. PMID:26984090

  8. [Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia complicated with relapsed myelodysplastic syndrome after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Okamura, Hiroshi; Nakane, Takahiko; Fujino, Keizo; Koh, Shiro; Yoshimura, Takuro; Nishimoto, Mitsutaka; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Koh, Hideo; Nakao, Yoshitaka; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Hino, Masayuki

    2015-04-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is known to often be complicated by a range of autoimmune diseases. We herein present a case with MDS complicated by cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia (cold AIHA). The patient was a 51-year-old woman. She was diagnosed with MDS (refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia) in May 2009. In January 2010, she underwent unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation but was re-admitted in October 2010 for treatment of relapsed MDS. Despite daily transfusions of red blood cells, her anemia failed to improve. Her laboratory examinations showed a low haptoglobin level and elevation of indirect bilirubin and LDH. The direct Coombs test was positive at a low and at room temperature and cold agglutinin was negative. After confirming the diagnosis of cold AIHA, all transfusion fluids were warmed but her anemia still failed to improve. In addition to the warmed transfusion fluids, we administered corticosteroids, immunosuppressive agents and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin infusions. This management strategy ameliorated the patient's hemolytic anemia. To our knowledge, MDS cases complicated by cold AIHA are rare. Our patient thus provides a valuable contribution to medical knowledge. PMID:25971272

  9. Exacerbation of Autoantibody-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia by Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meite, Mory; Léonard, Sabine; Idrissi, Mohammed El Azami El; Izui, Shozo; Masson, Pierre L.; Coutelier, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    Strong enhancement of the pathogenicity of an antierythrocyte monoclonal antibody was observed after infection of mice with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus. While injection of the antierythrocyte antibody alone induced only moderate anemia, concomitant infection with this virus, which is harmless in most normal mice, led to a dramatic drop in the hematocrit and to death of infected animals. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed a dramatic increase in the ability of macrophages from infected mice to phagocytose antibody-coated erythrocytes. These results indicate that viruses can trigger the onset of autoimmune disease by enhancing the pathogenicity of autoantibodies. They may explain how unrelated viruses could be implicated in the etiology of autoantibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:10846087

  10. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia associated with ingestion of methylene blue in a river otter.

    PubMed

    Narurkar, Neelesh S; Thomas, Jennifer S; Phalen, David N

    2002-02-01

    Heinz-body hemolytic anemia and nephrosis associated with hemoglobinuria were diagnosed in a North American river otter. Fluids were administered, and the signs of renal failure improved immediately. Severe anemia developed, and the otter received a semisynthetic hemoglobin product to maintain the oxygen-carrying capacity of the blood until a blood transfusion could be given. Immediate clinical improvement was observed following hemoglobin administration, and adverse effects were not seen. Six days after admission, the otter began to produce its own RBC and recovered without complications. The Heinz-body anemia was determined to be caused by methylene blue that was in the water of minnows consumed by the otter the night before it became ill. Methylene blue is a common ingredient in products used to extend the life of bait fish. Bait fish kept in water treated with methylene blue should not be used as food for fish-eating animals. PMID:11829270

  11. Systemic neosporosis in a dog treated for immune-mediated thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Magaña, Angie; Sánchez, Félix; Villa, Karina; Rivera, Liliana; Morales, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    A 4-year-old male Toy Poodle was presented to the Small Animal Veterinary Hospital of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the Autonomous University of Mexico (FMVZ, UNAM) because of depression, lethargy, and hemorrhages involving several areas of the skin and around the eyes. Hematology data and a bone marrow analysis suggested hemolytic anemia and immune-mediated thrombocytopenia. The dog was treated with prednisone, and after one month the hematology variables improved. However, the dog's clinical condition inexplicably worsened and it was euthanized. On necropsy, there were no relevant findings. However, in histology, multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and histiocytic meningoencephalitis and necrosis, and a protozoan cyst in the cerebellum were identified. In addition, moderate multifocal lymphoplasmacytic and necrotizing pancreatitis, hepatitis, myocarditis, and diffuse lymphoplasmacytic enteritis were observed. Immunohistochemistry of the cerebellum, liver, pancreas, and intestine with a specific antibody against Neospora caninum confirmed the diagnosis of systemic neosporosis. The systemic neosporosis in this dog was most likely caused by reactivation of latent parasites due to prednisone administration during the one month of treatment. It should be kept in mind that in dogs being treated with immunosuppressants for immune-mediated conditions, opportunistic parasites, such as Toxoplasma gondii and N caninum, can be reactivated from a latent state, as it probably happened in the present case. PMID:26345698

  12. The role of N-hydroxyphenetidine in phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C B; Jollow, D J

    1991-10-01

    Phenacetin is well known to cause hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia in humans. Early mechanistic studies clearly established a causal role for active/reactive drug metabolites in the process but did not unequivocally identify these metabolite(s) or resolve the question of whether these two hemotoxicities are mechanistically linked. As part of ongoing studies on the mechanism underlying arylamine-induced hemotoxicities, we have recently shown that the arylhydroxylamine metabolites of aniline and dapsone mediate the hemolytic activity of aniline and dapsone, respectively. The present study was undertaken to determine if N-hydroxyphenetidine (PNOH), the known arylhydroxylamine metabolite of phenacetin, is responsible for phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia. As measured by decreased survival of 51Cr-labeled erythrocytes in rats, phenacetin, p-phenetidine, and PNOH were all hemolytic in vivo, with PNOH being significantly the most potent of the three. In vitro exposure of 51Cr-tagged erythrocytes to PNOH, followed by transfusion into isologous rats, resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction in erythrocyte survival, indicating that PNOH is a direct-acting hemolytic agent. Phenacetin and p-phenetidine were inactive. Phenacetin, p-phenetidine, and PNOH all produced dose-dependent methemoglobinemia in rats. In parallel in vitro studies, PNOH elevated methemoglobin levels, p-phenetidine and phenacetin did not. However, attempts to identify PNOH in the blood of phenacetin- and p-phenetidine-treated rats were unsuccessful, despite the use of a highly sensitive analytical method. Hemotoxic concentrations of PNOH were found to be highly unstable in the presence of red cells, though relatively stable in the buffer vehicle alone. Inhibitors of acetylation (p-aminobenzoic acid [PABA]) and deacetylation (bis-[p-nitrophenyl]phosphate [BNPP]), used to alter the cyclic interconversion of phenacetin and p-phenetidine, caused changes in phenacetin hemotoxicity that indicated the hemotoxin was a deacetylated metabolite distal to p-phenetidine. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that PNOH, formed during the metabolic clearance of phenacetin, mediates phenacetin-induced hemolytic anemia and methemoglobinemia through direct toxic actions in the erythrocyte. PMID:1949026

  13. Hemolytic crisis

    MedlinePLUS

    Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 163. Gallagher PG. Hemolytic ...

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase Durham: a de novo mutation associated with chronic hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, S A; Ware, R E; Forman, L; Westwood, B; Beutler, E

    1997-08-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common X-linked enzyme defect. We report a new variant, G6PD Durham713G, that is associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. The G6PD Durham713G variant has a unique biochemical and enzymatic profile and a novel A-->G substitution mutation at nucleotide 713, changing lysine to arginine at amino acid 238. This mutation was not found in the mother of our patient, indicating that G6PD Durham713G resulted from a de novo mutation. PMID:9290617

  15. [A case of light chain deposition disease involving kidney and bone marrow with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia].

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Uk; Chi, Hyun Sook; Park, Chan Jeoung; Jang, Seongsoo; Cho, Yong Mee; Park, Jung Sik

    2009-10-01

    We report a case of light chain deposition disease in a 59-yr-old female showing deposition of monoclonal light chain in the kidney and bone marrow accompanied with a schistocytosis, the morphologic finding of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. The immunofluorescence examination of the kidney revealed strongly stained kappa-light chain deposits on the glomerular mesangium and capillary wall, tubules, and vessel wall. The electron microscopy demonstrated electron-dense deposits on the glomerular basement membrane and mesangium. Anemia was observed with schistocytosis and Howell-Jolly body in the peripheral blood smears. The immunohistochemical examination of the bone marrow showed the presence of kappa-light chain deposits in scattered plasma cells and thickened vessel wall in the absence of a prominent plasma cell proliferation. Although an immunofixation electrophoresis failed to detect a monoclonal gammopathy, the presence of monoclonal protein could be identified by an abnormal kappa/lambda ratio on the serum free light chain analysis. PMID:19893345

  16. Vitamin B12 and vitamin d deficiencies: an unusual cause of Fever, severe hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vikas A; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  17. Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D Deficiencies: An Unusual Cause of Fever, Severe Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas A.; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  18. Molecular abnormality of phosphoglycerate kinase-Uppsala associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, H; Yoshida, A

    1980-01-01

    Inherited deficiency of phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; ATP:3-phosphoglycerate 1-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.2.3) is associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia and mental disorders in man. One such variant, PGK-Uppsala, was purified to homogeneity. PGK-Uppsala had a lower-than-normal specific activity (30% of normal in the backward reaction and about 20% of normal in the forward reaction) and higher-than-normal Michaelis constants for ATP, ADP, 3-phosphoglycerate and 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. Peptide mapping analysis revealed that the structural abnormality of PGK-Uppsala is a single amino acid substitution from arginine to proline at the 206th position. Based on the known complete amino acid sequence of the normal human PGK and the three-dimensional model deduced from horse PGK, correlations between the structural and functional abnormalities of PGK-Uppsala are discussed. Structural abnormalities of PGK-II, which is an electrophoretic variant not associated with enzyme deficiency, and PGK-München, which is associated with enzyme deficiency and heat instability but not associated with hemolytic anemia, are also discussed. Images PMID:6933565

  19. Prevention of garlic-induced hemolytic anemia using some tropical green leafy vegetables.

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu

    2004-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) is popularly consumed in Nigeria because of its health benefit in treatment and management of several disease conditions. However, excessive intake of garlic may cause hemolytic anemia. This project sought to investigate the ability of some commonly consumed tropical green leafy vegetables-namely, Amaranthus cruentus, Baselia alba, Solanum macrocarpon, Ocimum gratissimum, and Corchorus olitorius-to prevent garlic-induced hemolytic anemia. Wister strain albino rats were fed diet containing 4% garlic with or without 40% vegetable supplement. The study showed that there was a decrease in daily feed intake (6.7-7.2 g/rat/day), daily weight gain (0.7-1.5 g/rat/day), and digestibility (70.4-91.5%) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%), with or without vegetable (40%) supplement, compared with those rats fed the basal diet without garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplement (digestibility, 95.5%; daily feed intake, 7.5 g/rat/day; and daily weight gain, 2.0 g/rat/day). However, there was a significant decrease (P < .05) in the packed cell volume (PCV) (31.0%), hemoglobin (Hb) (10.2 g/dL), red blood cells (RBCs) (4.3 x 10(6)/microL), and white blood cells (WBCs) (3.5 x 10(6)/microL) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%) but without vegetable compared with those rats fed diet without garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplements (PCV, 38.2%; Hb, 13.0 g/dL; RBCs, 5.5 x 10(6)/microL; and WBCs, 4.0 x 10(6)/microL). Conversely, there was a significant increase in the PCV (33.5-35.6%), Hb (12.0-12.5 g/dL), and RBCs (4.9-5.3 x 10(6)/microL) of rats fed diet with garlic (4%) and vegetable (40%) supplement compared with rats fed diet with 4% garlic supplement (except S. macrocarpon and C. olitorius). Furthermore, there was a significant decrease (P < .05) in mean corpuscular volume (69.2-72.0 fL) of rats fed the basal and those fed diet with garlic and vegetable (except C. olitorus and S. macrocarpon) supplement compared with the rats fed diet with garlic but without vegetable supplement (74.5 fL). This therefore implies that garlic could induce hemolytic anemia in rats. However, such anemia could be prevented by some tropical green leafy vegetables such as A. cruentus, B. alba, and O. gratissimum. PMID:15671698

  20. Heinz-body hemolytic anemia from the ingestion of crude oil: a primary toxic effect in marine birds

    SciTech Connect

    Leighton, F.A.; Peakall, D.B.; Butler, R.G.

    1983-05-20

    Hemolytic anemia developed in young herring gulls and Atlantic puffins given daily oral doses of a Prudhoe Bay crude oil. Anemia developed 4 to 5 days after the initiation of oil ingestion and was accompainied by Heinz-body formation and a strong regenerative response. The data evince a toxic effect on circulating red blood cells involving an oxidative biochemical mechanism and the first clear evidence of a primary mechanism of toxicity from the ingestion of crude oil by birds.

  1. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  2. T cell deficiency in patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia ('warm type').

    PubMed

    Krüger, J; Rahman, A; Mogk, K U; Mueller-Eckhardt, C

    1976-01-01

    19 patients with chronic 'warm type' autoimmune hemolytic anemia were studied for abnormalities of cellular immune reactions. Evidence was obtained for a reduction of rosette-forming cells (RFC). Lymphocytotoxic antibodies were present in only 8 patients and correlated, with only one exception, with a reduced number of RFC. No significant deviation from normal ranges of the three major immunoglobulin classes in the patients' sera were found. C3 and C4 complement components were also, with one exception, within normal limits. In 18 of 19 patients no apparent association existed between the type or the amount of autoantibodies and/or complement components fixed on red cells and the levels of the respective immunoglobulins or complement in the sera. PMID:1084624

  3. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. CASE REPORT We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. CONCLUSIONS C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  4. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease ... to die faster than healthy red blood cells. Hemolytic anemia is another example of a condition in which ...

  5. Erythrocytic Pyruvate Kinase Mutations Causing Hemolytic Anemia, Osteosclerosis, and Secondary Hemochromatosis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, G. Inal; Raj, K.; Foureman, P.; Lehman, S.; Manhart, K.; Abdulmalik, O.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythrocytic pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, first documented in Basenjis, is the most common inherited erythroenzymopathy in dogs. Objectives To report 3 new breed-specific PK-LR gene mutations and a retrospective survey of PK mutations in a small and selected group of Beagles and West Highland White Terriers (WHWT). Animals Labrador Retrievers (2 siblings, 5 unrelated), Pugs (2 siblings, 1 unrelated), Beagles (39 anemic, 29 other), WHWTs (22 anemic, 226 nonanemic), Cairn Terrier (n = 1). Methods Exons of the PK-LR gene were sequenced from genomic DNA of young dogs (<2 years) with persistent highly regenerative hemolytic anemia. Results A nonsense mutation (c.799C>T) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in anemic Labrador Retriever siblings that had osteosclerosis, high serum ferritin concentrations, and severe hepatic secondary hemochromatosis. Anemic Pug and Beagle revealed 2 different missense mutations (c.848T>C, c.994G>A, respectively) resulting in intolerable amino acid changes to protein structure and enzyme function. Breed-specific mutation tests were developed. Among the biased group of 248 WHWTs, 9% and 35% were homozygous (affected) and heterozygous, respectively, for the previously described mutation (mutant allele frequency 0.26). A PK-deficient Cairn Terrier had the same insertion mutation as the affected WHWTs. Of the selected group of 68 Beagles, 35% were PK-deficient and 3% were carriers (0.37). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Erythrocytic PK deficiency is caused by different mutations in different dog breeds and causes chronic severe hemolytic anemia, hemosiderosis, and secondary hemochromatosis because of chronic hemolysis and, an as yet unexplained osteosclerosis. The newly developed breed-specific mutation assays simplify the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:22805166

  6. Cardiac hypertrophy in anion exchanger 1-null mutant mice with severe hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Bernardo V; Kieller, Dawn M; Quon, Anita L; Robertson, Murray; Casey, Joseph R

    2007-03-01

    Anion exchanger 1 (AE1; SLC4A1), the plasma membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger of erythrocytes, is also expressed in heart. The aim of this study was to assess the role of AE1 in heart function through study of AE1-null (AE1(-/-)) mice, which manifest severe hemolytic anemia resulting from erythrocyte fragility. Heart weight-to-body weight ratios were significantly higher in the AE1(-/-) mice than in wild-type (AE1(+/+)) littermates at both 1-3 days postnatal (3.01 +/- 0.38 vs. 1.45 +/- 0.04) and at 7 days postnatal (9.45 +/- 0.53 vs. 4.13 +/- 0.41), indicating that loss of AE1 led to cardiac hypertrophy. Heterozygous (AE1(+/-)) mice had no signs of cardiac hypertrophy. Morphology of the adult AE1(-/-) mutant heart revealed an increased left ventricular mass, accompanied by increased collagen deposition and fibrosis. M-mode echocardiography revealed dysfunction of the AE1(-/-) hearts, including dilated left ventricle end diastole and systole and expanded left ventricular mass compared with AE1(+/+) hearts. Expression of intracellular pH-regulatory mechanisms in the hypertrophic myocardium of neonate AE1(-/-) mutant mice was indistinguishable from AE1(+/-) and AE1(+/+) mice, as assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed that, in normal mouse myocardium, AE1 is sarcolemmal, whereas AE3 and slc26a6 are found both at the sarcolemma and in internal membranes (T tubules and sarcoplasmic reticulum). These results indicate that AE1(-/-) mice, which suffer from severe hemolytic anemia and spherocytosis, display cardiac hypertrophy and impaired cardiac function, reminiscent of findings in patients with hereditary abnormalities of red blood cells. No essential role for AE1 in heart function was found. PMID:17056673

  7. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... system changes Laboratory tests will show signs of hemolytic anemia and acute renal failure . Tests may include: Blood ... Blood clotting problems Hemolytic anemia Kidney failure Nervous system problems Too few platelets ( thrombocytopenia ) Uremia

  8. Primary bone marrow lymphoma presenting with cold-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shigeki; Watanabe, Mai; Hoshikawa, Masahiro

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of primary bone marrow lymphoma with cold-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). A 70-year-old Japanese woman with suspected liver disorder presented to our hospital with palpitation. On physical examination, she had jaundice and signs of anemia. No lymphadenopathy or hepatosplenomegaly was noted. A direct antiglobulin test was positive for complement C3b and C3d. Anti-IgG testing was negative. Cold agglutinin was positive with a titer of 1:≥8,192, and haptoglobin was absent. A diagnosis of cold-type AIHA was made. Bone marrow biopsy revealed involvement with a population of lymphocytes that were positive for CD20 (L-26), CD79a, and Bcl-2. No lymphoma lesion was detected on computerized tomography or on upper and lower endoscopy. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) presenting with cold-type AIHA. She was treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone, resulting in complete remission after six cycles. As of 22 months after presentation, no signs of cold-type AIHA or lymphoma were present. PMID:25332595

  9. Marrow transplantation in the treatment of a murine heritable hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, J.E.; McFarland-Starr, E.C.

    1989-05-15

    Mice with hemolytic anemia, sphha/sphha, have extremely fragile RBCs with a lifespan of approximately one day. Neither splenectomy nor simple transplantation of normal marrow after lethal irradiation cures the anemia but instead causes rapid deterioration and death of the mutant unless additional prophylactic procedures are used. In this report, we show that normal marrow transplantation preceded by sublethal irradiation increases but does not normalize RBC count. The mutant RBCs but not all the WBCs are replaced by donor cells. Splenectomy of the improved recipient causes a dramatic decrease in RBC count, indicating that the mutant spleen is a site of donor-origin erythropoiesis as well as of RBC destruction. Injections of iron dextran did not improve RBC counts. Transplantation of primary recipient marrow cells into a secondary host with a heritable stem cell deficiency (W/Wv) corrects the defect caused by residence of the normal cells in the sphha/sphha host. The original +/+ donor cells replace the RBCs of the secondary host, and the RBC count is normalized. Results indicate that the environment in the sphha/sphha host is detrimental to normal (as well as mutant) erythroid cells but the restriction is not transmitted.

  10. Clostridium Perfringens Infection in a Febrile Patient with Severe Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hashiba, Masamitsu; Tomino, Atsutoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyoshi; Hattori, Tomonori; Kano, Hideki; Tsuda, Masanobu; Takeyama, Naoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 82 Final Diagnosis: Clostridium perfringens infection Symptoms: Anemia • fever • shock Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Antimicrobial chemotherapy Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) can cause various infections, including gas gangrene, crepitant cellulitis, and fasciitis. While C. perfringens sepsis is uncommon, it is often rapidly fatal because the alpha toxin of this bacterium induces massive intravascular hemolysis by disrupting red blood cell membranes. Case Report: We present the case of a male patient with diabetes who developed a fatal liver abscess with massive intravascular hemolysis and septic shock caused by toxigenic C. perfringens. The peripheral blood smear showed loss of central pallor, with numerous spherocytes. Multiplex PCR only detected expression of the cpa gene, indicating that the pathogen was C. perfringens type A. Conclusions: C. perfringens infection should be considered in a febrile patient who has severe hemolytic anemia with a very low MCV, hemolyzed blood sample, and negative Coombs test. The characteristic peripheral blood smear findings may facilitate rapid diagnosis. PMID:27049736

  11. Hemolytic uremic syndrome with mild renal involvement due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Lucía; Apezteguía, Lucía; Piñeyrúa, Cecilia; Dabezies, Agustín; Bianco, María N; Schelotto, Felipe; Varela, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disorder characterized by the presence of the classic triad: microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. HUS without acute renal failure can be confused with other hematologic diseases. An infantile HUS caused by a Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 strain carrying genotype stx2, ehxA, eae subtype β1 is herein reported. The infant did not require dialysis during the acute stage of HUS, evolved favorably, maintained normal blood pressure and normal renal function and had no recurrence until the last control. This could be due to several factors, such as the characteristics of infecting STEC strain and a reduction in host susceptibility to renal injury. This report highlights the regional participation of non-O157 STEC in childhood diseases and the importance of performing active surveillance for all forms of HUS. PMID:25011592

  12. The simultaneous incidence of acute pancreatitis and autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a rare duo in a patient with SLE

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    A young female presented with acute abdominal pain of two days duration consistent with acute pancreatitis. During her stay in the hospital she had a sudden drop in hemoglobin to 6 g/dl without any overt blood loss. On evaluation, it was evident that she had acute pancreatitis, in addition to displaying features of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. She had been a known case of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and had discontinued her treatment. She was managed with methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Her clinical condition improved, and she has been regularly attending our clinic for the last 2 years. According to a literature search in Medline, it would appear that this is the first report of a case in which SLE with autoimmune hemolytic anemia has been associated with acute pancreatitis in a single case. PMID:25276114

  13. An Unusual Case of Hepatosplenic αβ T-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Coombs’-Negative Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Feryal A.; Shanmugam, Vignesh; Amer, Aliaa; El-Omri, Halima; Al-Sabbagh, Ahmad; Taha, Ruba Y.; Soliman, Dina S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal T-cell lymphoma that comprises <5% of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. The majority of cases harbor the γδ T-cell receptor (TCR), but recently, a few cases have been shown to express the αβ TCR. Comparison of these two subtypes (αβ and γδ) shows similar clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features; however, due to the paucity of reported cases, it is not clear whether they are prognostically distinct entities. We report a case of αβ HSTCL with a rather unusual presentation of Coombs’-negative hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis proved challenging due to an unusual blastoid morphology with the absence of typical intrasinusoidal distribution of tumor cells in the bone marrow. This unique case adds to the growing list of this rare subtype of T-cell lymphomas, which warrant urgent attention due to the lack of effective treatment options and dismal prognosis. PMID:26688667

  14. Co-infection with Nocardia asteroides complex and Strongyloides stercoralis in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Praharaj, I; Sujatha, S; Ashwini, M A; Parija, S C

    2014-02-01

    We describe an unusual case of pulmonary nocardiosis co-existing with Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection syndrome in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia who was being treated with corticosteroids. This case highlights the importance of being aware of the possibility that infections can co-exist in immunosuppressed patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of co-infection with Nocardia asteroides and S. stercoralis. PMID:23925638

  15. Complement deposition in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a footprint for difficult-to-detect IgM autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Meulenbroek, Elisabeth M.; de Haas, Masja; Brouwer, Conny; Folman, Claudia; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; Wouters, Diana

    2015-01-01

    In autoimmune hemolytic anemia autoantibodies against erythrocytes lead to increased clearance of the erythrocytes, which in turn results in a potentially fatal hemolytic anemia. Depending on whether IgG or IgM antibodies are involved, response to therapy is different. Proper identification of the isotype of the anti-erythrocyte autoantibodies is, therefore, crucial. However, detection of IgM autoantibodies can be challenging. We, therefore, set out to improve the detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Direct detection using a flow cytometry-based approach did not yield satisfactory improvements. Next, we analyzed whether the presence of complement C3 on a patient’s erythrocytes could be used for indirect detection of anti-erythrocyte IgM. To this end, we fractionated patients’ sera by size exclusion chromatography and tested which fractions yielded complement deposition on erythrocytes. Strikingly, we found that all patients with C3 on their erythrocytes according to standard diagnostic tests had an IgM anti-erythrocyte component that could activate complement, even if no such autoantibody had been detected with any other test. This also included all tested patients with only IgG and C3 on their erythrocytes, who would previously have been classified as having an IgG-only mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Depleting patients’ sera of either IgG or IgM and testing the remaining complement activation confirmed this result. In conclusion, complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia is mostly IgM-mediated and the presence of covalent C3 on patients’ erythrocytes can be taken as a footprint of the presence of anti-erythrocyte IgM. Based on this finding, we propose a diagnostic workflow that will aid in choosing the optimal treatment strategy. PMID:26354757

  16. Association of adenylyl cyclase 6 rs3730070 polymorphism and hemolytic level in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Ferdinand, Séverine; Connes, Philippe; Brudey, Laura; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Lemonne, Nathalie; Tarer, Vanessa; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-05-01

    A recent study suggested that adenosine signaling pathway could promote hemolysis in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). This signaling pathway involves several gene coding enzymes for which variants have been described. In this study, we analyzed the genotype-phenotype relationships between functional polymorphisms or polymorphisms associated with altered expression of adenosine pathway genes, namely adenosine deaminase (ada; rs73598374), adenosine A2b receptor (adora2b; rs7208480), adenylyl cyclase6 (adcy6; rs3730071, rs3730070, rs7300155), and hemolytic rate in SCA patients. One hundred and fifty SCA patients were genotyped for adcy6, ada, and adora2b variants as well as alpha-globin gene, a genetic factor known to modulate hemolytic rate. Hematological and biochemical data were obtained at steady-state. Lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, reticulocytes and total bilirubin were used to calculate a hemolytic index. Genotype-phenotype relationships were investigated using parametric tests and multivariate analysis. SCA patients carrying at least one allele of adcy6 rs3730070-G exhibited lower hemolytic rate than non-carriers in univariate analysis (p=0.006). The presence of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant was associated with a decreased hemolytic rate in adjusted model for age and alpha-thalassemia (p=0.032). Our results support a protective effect of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant on hemolysis in SCA patients. PMID:27067484

  17. [Blood matching and transfusion for 12 acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients by extracorporal hemolysis test].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Min; Tang, Cong-Hai; Wu, A-Yang; Yang, Hui-Cong; Gan, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Tian-Xin; Huang, Yan-Xue; Xu, Wei-Ping

    2014-12-01

    In order to screen the compatible red cells by using extracorporal hemolysis test for acute autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) patients who were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test. Twenty-six cases of AIHA were chosen as control group, to whom the same type of donor red blood cells were infused with the weakest blood agglutination; 12 cases of acute AIHA patients were chosen as test group, these patients were difficult to be matched by automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test, and the donor red cells without hemolysis by extracoral hemolysis test were transfused for them. The results showed that compared with the control group,the effect of transfusion was better in test group (P < 0.01), with 2.26 U leukocyte-depleted erythrocyte suspension in average, whose hemoglobin, reticulocyte and total bilirubin levels were changed significantly compared with those before blood transfusion (P < 0.01) . It is concluded that the compatible red blood cells for the acute AIHA patients can be screened by the extracorporal hemolysis test, when it is difficult to screen by the automatic microcolumn gel indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:25543503

  18. Life-Threatening Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Idhiopatic Thrombocytopenic Purpura. Successful Selective Splenic Artery Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Molica, Matteo; Massaro, Fulvio; Annechini, Giorgia; Baldacci, Erminia; D’Elia, Gianna Maria; Rosati, Riccardo; Trisolini, Silvia Maria; Volpicelli, Paola; Foà, Robin; Capria, Saveria

    2016-01-01

    Selective splenic artery embolization (SSAE) is a nonsurgical intervention characterized by the transcatheter occlusion of the splenic artery and/or its branch vessels using metallic coils or other embolic devices. It has been applied for the management of splenic trauma, hypersplenism with portal hypertension, hereditary spherocytosis, thalassemia and splenic hemangioma. We hereby describe a case of a patient affected by idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) both resistant to immunosuppressive and biological therapies, not eligible for a surgical intervention because of her critical conditions. She underwent SSAE and achieved a hematologic complete response within a few days without complications. SSAE is a minimally invasive procedure to date not considered a standard option in the management of AIHA and ITP. However, following the progressive improvement of the techniques, its indications have been extended, with a reduction in morbidity and mortality compared to splenectomy in patients with critical clinical conditions. SSAE was a lifesaving therapeutic approach for our patient and it may represent a real alternative for the treatment of resistant AIHA and ITP patients not eligible for splenectomy. PMID:27158433

  19. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia attributed to an intrauterine contraceptive device

    PubMed Central

    Khawandanah, Mohamad O.; Weiss, Susan M.; Cherry, Mohamad A.; Maymani, Hossein; Selby, George B.; Aster, Richard H.; George, James N.; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Evans syndrome is a rare condition manifested by combined autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and thrombocytopenia or neutropenia. It is often associated with other autoimmune disorders, immunodeficiencies, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. CASE REPORT We describe a patient with Evans syndrome that may have been related to exposure to a polyethylene-based intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD). A 26-year-old white female presented with severe, symptomatic AIHA and subsequently developed severe thrombocytopenia. She had a refractory course resistant to multiple treatments including corticosteroids, intravenous immune globulin, rituximab, splenectomy, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, eculizumab, and plasma exchange. It was then noticed that her serum autoantibody agglutinated red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) but not in the absence of PEG nor when an alternative agglutination enhancing technique, low-ionic-strength solution, was used. Therefore, her polyethylene-containing IUD, which was a polyethylene frame with a levonorgestrel-releasing device, was removed. Norgestrel-dependent, platelet (PLT)-reactive antibodies were not identified by either flow cytometry or in vivo in a NOD/SCID mouse. Testing for PEG-dependent antibodies was not possible. Remission, with no requirement for RBC or PLT transfusions and return of her hemoglobin and PLT counts to normal, followed removal of the IUD. CONCLUSION The patient’s recovery after removal of the IUD and the PEG dependence of RBC agglutination suggested a possibility that the IUD may have been a contributing factor to the etiology of Evans syndrome in this patient. PMID:25208591

  20. Early-Onset Neutropenia Induced by Rituximab in a Patient with Lupus Nephritis and Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Ávila, Mariangelí; Fred-Jiménez, Ruth M.; Vilá, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been used to treat several complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) including nephritis, cerebritis, and hematological disorders. Neutropenia is among the adverse events associated with rituximab; this usually occurs several weeks after therapy. However, early-onset neutropenia has been reported only in a few cases. Herein, we describe a 36-year-old Hispanic SLE woman who developed severe early-onset neutropenia (0.3 × 109/L) after the second weekly rituximab infusion (375 mg/m2 weekly × 4) given for nephritis and hemolytic anemia. She also had early-onset thrombocytopenia after rituximab therapy. Both hematological disorders resolved 12 days after the fourth and final dose. This case, together with few others, suggests that early-onset neutropenia may occur during rituximab therapy. Even though rituximab-induced neutropenia seems to be transient, it may predispose SLE patients to severe complications such as infections. PMID:25767732

  1. GLUT1 mutations are a cause of paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesias and induce hemolytic anemia by a cation leak

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Yvonne G.; Storch, Alexander; Wuttke, Thomas V.; Brockmann, Knut; Kempfle, Judith; Maljevic, Snezana; Margari, Lucia; Kamm, Christoph; Schneider, Susanne A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Pekrun, Arnulf; Roebling, Robert; Seebohm, Guiscard; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Kraft, Eduard; Blazevic, Dragica; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Fauler, Michael; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Münchau, Alexander; Edwards, Mark J.; Presicci, Anna; Margari, Francesco; Gasser, Thomas; Lang, Florian; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Lerche, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders that can be inherited or are sporadic in nature. The pathophysiology underlying these disorders remains largely unknown but may involve disrupted ion homeostasis due to defects in cell-surface channels or nutrient transporters. In this study, we describe a family with paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia (PED) over 3 generations. Their PED was accompanied by epilepsy, mild developmental delay, reduced CSF glucose levels, hemolytic anemia with echinocytosis, and altered erythrocyte ion concentrations. Using a candidate gene approach, we identified a causative deletion of 4 highly conserved amino acids (Q282_S285del) in the pore region of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes and human erythrocytes revealed that this mutation decreased glucose transport and caused a cation leak that alters intracellular concentrations of sodium, potassium, and calcium. We screened 4 additional families, in which PED is combined with epilepsy, developmental delay, or migraine, but not with hemolysis or echinocytosis, and identified 2 additional GLUT1 mutations (A275T, G314S) that decreased glucose transport but did not affect cation permeability. Combining these data with brain imaging studies, we propose that the dyskinesias result from an exertion-induced energy deficit that may cause episodic dysfunction of the basal ganglia, and that the hemolysis with echinocytosis may result from alterations in intracellular electrolytes caused by a cation leak through mutant GLUT1. PMID:18451999

  2. GLUT1 mutations are a cause of paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesias and induce hemolytic anemia by a cation leak.

    PubMed

    Weber, Yvonne G; Storch, Alexander; Wuttke, Thomas V; Brockmann, Knut; Kempfle, Judith; Maljevic, Snezana; Margari, Lucia; Kamm, Christoph; Schneider, Susanne A; Huber, Stephan M; Pekrun, Arnulf; Roebling, Robert; Seebohm, Guiscard; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Kraft, Eduard; Blazevic, Dragica; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Fauler, Michael; Mottaghy, Felix M; Münchau, Alexander; Edwards, Mark J; Presicci, Anna; Margari, Francesco; Gasser, Thomas; Lang, Florian; Bhatia, Kailash P; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Lerche, Holger

    2008-06-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders that can be inherited or are sporadic in nature. The pathophysiology underlying these disorders remains largely unknown but may involve disrupted ion homeostasis due to defects in cell-surface channels or nutrient transporters. In this study, we describe a family with paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia (PED) over 3 generations. Their PED was accompanied by epilepsy, mild developmental delay, reduced CSF glucose levels, hemolytic anemia with echinocytosis, and altered erythrocyte ion concentrations. Using a candidate gene approach, we identified a causative deletion of 4 highly conserved amino acids (Q282_S285del) in the pore region of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes and human erythrocytes revealed that this mutation decreased glucose transport and caused a cation leak that alters intracellular concentrations of sodium, potassium, and calcium. We screened 4 additional families, in which PED is combined with epilepsy, developmental delay, or migraine, but not with hemolysis or echinocytosis, and identified 2 additional GLUT1 mutations (A275T, G314S) that decreased glucose transport but did not affect cation permeability. Combining these data with brain imaging studies, we propose that the dyskinesias result from an exertion-induced energy deficit that may cause episodic dysfunction of the basal ganglia, and that the hemolysis with echinocytosis may result from alterations in intracellular electrolytes caused by a cation leak through mutant GLUT1. PMID:18451999

  3. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis and Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia in a child following Loxosceles reclusa envenomation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Leanna; McCoppin, Holly H; Dyer, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Previously reported cases of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis secondary to brown recluse spider bite have been questioned due to lack of identification of the spider or because of the concomitant administration of antibiotics. We report a 9-year-old boy who arrived at the emergency department with a confirmed Loxosceles reclusa bite to the neck. On the third day of hospitalization, he developed hundreds of monomorphous, sterile pustules, initially in intertriginous areas. The eruption disseminated and was followed by pinpoint desquamation typical for acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. During this he also developed late onset Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia and systemic loxoscelism. Sphingomyelinase in Loxosceles venom induces the production of interleukin-8 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis, providing a mechanism by which Loxosceles reclusa bite may trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. We suggest that this case adds Loxosceles envenomation to the spectrum of agents that can trigger acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis. PMID:22082464

  4. Treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs with cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, K; Moore, A; Rand, W; Cotter, S M

    2000-01-01

    A review of 60 cases of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) in the dog was performed in order to characterize the disease and to identify potential prognostic indicators. Dogs ranged in age from 1 to 13 years, with a mean age of 6.5 years. The 2 most commonly affected breeds were Cocker Spaniels and Labrador Retrievers. Fifty-two of the 60 dogs tested (87%) were autoagglutination positive and spherocytes were present in 45 (75%). Forty-one (89%) of 46 patients tested positive for the presence of immunoglobulin on the red blood cell surface (Coombs assay). The most common clinical signs at presentation were lethargy, weakness, pale mucous membranes, icterus, hemoglobinuria, and anorexia. PCV less than 25% was present in 59 (98%) dogs. At the time of presentation, 35 dogs (58%) had a nonregenerative anemia, whereas 25 patients (42%) had a regenerative response. Thrombocytopenia was seen in 41 (68%) dogs. Nine of 34 dogs (26%) had a prolonged prothrombin time, 19 of 34 (56%) had a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin clotting time, and 12 of 34 (35%) had abnormal fibrinogen concentrations. All dogs received prednisone at immunosuppressive doses (2.2-4.4 mg/kg PO as a single or divided dose every 24 hours) and cyclophosphamide as primary therapy. Forty-one dogs (63%) received cyclophosphamide at 50 mg/m2 q24h for 4 days, whereas 9 dogs (15%) received an initial high dose (200 mg/m2) followed by 3 days of a lower dose (50 mg/m2 q24h). No statistical difference in survival times was found for either protocol. Thirteen dogs were treated with azathioprine in addition to cyclophosphamide and prednisone. The median survival time of dogs that received all 3 drugs was 370 days as compared to 9 days for those dogs that were treated with cyclophosphamide and prednisone alone. Thirty-one (52%) dogs died from the disease, 13 (22%) dogs were alive, and 15 (25%) dogs were lost to follow-up. The median length of survival for all dogs was 21 days. Eight dogs that were discharged from the hospital suffered a relapse (PCV < 25%). PMID:10935898

  5. Expression of activated molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongli; Xu, Wenyan; Liu, Hong; Wang, Huaquan; Fu, Rong; Wu, Yuhong; Qu, Wen; Wang, Guojin; Guan, Jing; Song, Jia; Xing, Limin; Shao, Zonghong

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the expression of activation molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA)/Evans patients. The expression of CD80, CD86, and CD69 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was detected using flow cytometry in 30 AIHA/Evans patients, 18 normal controls (NC) and nine chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in untreated patients was higher than that in remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01) and CLL patients (P < 0.01). CD80 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was higher than that on CD5(-)B lymphocytes in untreated patients (P > 0.05), but lower than those of CD5(-)B lymphocytes in remission patients and NC (P < 0.05). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of untreated patients was higher than that of remission patients (P < 0.05), NC (P < 0.01). CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than that of NC, remission (P < 0.05), and untreated patients (P > 0.05). CD80 and CD86 on CD5(+)B lymphocytes was negatively correlated with hemoglobin (HB), C3, C4 (P < 0.05) and positively correlated with reticulocyte (Ret) (P < 0.05). CD69 on CD5(+) and CD5(-)B lymphocytes of CLL was higher than those of AIHA/Evans patients and NC (P < 0.05). The active molecules on CD5(+)B lymphocytes in peripheral blood of AIHA/Evans patients differ from those on CD5(-) and clonal CD5(+)B lymphocytes. PMID:26968550

  6. Management of Thrombotic Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemias with Therapeutic Plasma Exchange: When It Works and When It Does Not.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Tahir; Taylor, Michelle; Winters, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders sharing a common clinical presentation of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and organ damage. These disorders have been treated with plasma exchange (TPE) based on randomized controlled trials, which found this therapy to be effective in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). For the remaining disorders, low- to very low-quality evidence exists for the use of TPE. When TPE is applied, the treatment regimen used for TTP is usually applied. There is a need for further evaluation of the role of TPE in the treatment of thrombotic microangiopathies other than TTP. PMID:27113004

  7. B-lymphocyte reconstitution after repeated rituximab treatment in a child with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    van der Linde, Annelieke A.A.; Schatorjé, Ellen J.H.; van der Weij, Annemieke M.; Gemen, Eugenie F.A.; de Vries, Esther

    2011-01-01

    We report the detailed long-term reconstitution of B-lymphocyte subpopulations, immunoglobulins, and specific antibody production after two courses of rituximab in a young, previously healthy girl with steroid-dependent autoimmune hemolytic anemia. B-lymphocyte subpopulations were surprisingly normal directly after reconstitution. However, there was a slower reconstitution after the second rituximab course, especially of non-switched and switched memory B-lymphocytes, and a temporary decline in IgM below age-matched reference values. PMID:22355513

  8. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kim; Caplan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  9. A Puzzle of Hemolytic Anemia, Iron and Vitamin B12 Deficiencies in a 52-Year-Old Male

    PubMed Central

    Liana, Palacci; Ali, Alaa M.; Gilman, Alan D.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old male with no significant past medical history reports increasing generalized fatigue and weakness for the past 2 weeks. Physical examination reveals jaundice and pallor without organomegaly or lymphadenopathy. His hemoglobin was 5.9 g/dL with a mean corpuscular volume of 87.1 fL and elevated red blood cell distribution width of 30.7%. His liver function test was normal except for elevated total bilirubin of 3.7 mg/dL. Serum LDH was 701 IU/L, and serum haptoglobin was undetectable. Further investigation revealed serum vitamin B12 of <30 pg/mL with elevated methylmalonic acid and homocysteine level. In addition, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were low. The patient was diagnosed with hemolytic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency with concomitant iron deficiency anemia. PMID:24083040

  10. Alterations in Bone and Erythropoiesis in Hemolytic Anemia: Comparative Study in Bled, Phenylhydrazine-Treated and Plasmodium-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Robert; Tshikudi Malu, Diane; Dumais, Mathieu; Dalko, Esther; Gaudreault, Véronique; Roméro, Hugo; Martineau, Corine; Kevorkova, Olha; Dardon, Jaime Sanchez; Dodd, Erin Lynn; Bohle, David Scott; Scorza, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    Sustained erythropoiesis and concurrent bone marrow hyperplasia are proposed to be responsible for low bone mass density (BMD) in chronic hemolytic pathologies. As impaired erythropoiesis is also frequent in these conditions, we hypothesized that free heme may alter marrow and bone physiology in these disorders. Bone status and bone marrow erythropoiesis were studied in mice with hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ) or Plasmodium infection and in bled mice. All treatments resulted in lower hemoglobin concentrations, enhanced erythropoiesis in the spleen and reticulocytosis. The anemia was severe in mice with acute hemolysis, which also had elevated levels of free heme and ROS. No major changes in cellularity and erythroid cell numbers occurred in the bone marrow of bled mice, which generated higher numbers of erythroid blast forming units (BFU-E) in response to erythropoietin. In contrast, low numbers of bone marrow erythroid precursors and BFU-E and low concentrations of bone remodelling markers were measured in mice with HA, which also had blunted osteoclastogenesis, in opposition to its enhancement in bled mice. The alterations in bone metabolism were accompanied by reduced trabecular bone volume, enhanced trabecular spacing and lower trabecular numbers in mice with HA. Taken together our data suggests that hemolysis exerts distinct effects to bleeding in the marrow and bone and may contribute to osteoporosis through a mechanism independent of the erythropoietic stress. PMID:23029401

  11. Delayed-onset hemolytic anemia in patients with travel-associated severe malaria treated with artesunate, France, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate. PMID:25898007

  12. Delayed-Onset Hemolytic Anemia in Patients with Travel-Associated Severe Malaria Treated with Artesunate, France, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate. PMID:25898007

  13. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500 mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10 mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  14. Coombs-negative Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Followed by Anti-erythropoetin Receptor Antibody-associated Pure Red Cell Aplasia: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, Mayumi; Kadowaki, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of anemia. The laboratory findings revealed hemolysis. Although a direct Coombs test was negative, a high titer of RBC-bound IgG was detected, and a diagnosis of Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia was made. She was successfully treated with prednisolone. One year and five months later, she again presented anemia and was diagnosed with pure red cell aplasia. Anti-erythropoietin receptor antibody was detected in the serum. She was treated with cyclosporine and obtained prompt recovery. We herein report this rare case and review the pertinent literature. PMID:26935373

  15. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kim; Caplan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60-80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA. PMID:27092282

  16. Effect of a single plasma transfusion on thromboembolism in 13 dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Mary F; Scott-Moncrieff, J Catharine; Brooks, Marjory B

    2004-01-01

    Thirteen dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia received fresh-frozen plasma within 12 hours of admission, in addition to unfractionated heparin and other therapies, such as prednisone, azathioprine, and packed red blood cell transfusion. Antithrombin activity was quantified prior to transfusion and at 30 minutes and 48 hours after transfusion. Plasma antithrombin activity did not change significantly after a single plasma transfusion. There were no deaths in the first 48 hours of treatment. Thromboembolism was identified at necropsy in six of 10 dogs that died within 12 months of admission. There was no significant difference in the incidence of thromboembolism between the current treatment group and a historical control group. PMID:15533964

  17. Myeloid glycosylation defects lead to a spontaneous common variable immunodeficiency-like condition with associated hemolytic anemia and antilymphocyte autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Sean O; Abbott, Derek W; Cobb, Brian A

    2014-06-15

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID), the most frequent symptomatic primary immune deficiency in humans, is a heterogeneous group of immunologic disorders estimated to affect 1:10,000-1:50,000. Although a clear disease etiology remains elusive, a common characteristic of CVID is deficient IgG Ab production in response to infection or vaccination. Patients often also exhibit autoimmune cytopenias with symptoms of abnormal T cell function, including reductions in naive T cells, which correlate with clinical severity. In this study, we discovered that targeted alterations in the glycome of the myeloid lineage lead to spontaneous immunodeficiency characteristic of both humoral and T cell dysfunction regularly found in human CVID. Mice carrying a myeloid-specific knockout of the Mgat2 gene encoding UDP-GlcNAc:α-6-d-mannoside β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase II enzyme exhibit deficiencies in IgG responses to both protein and polysaccharide conjugate vaccines. Interestingly, the immunodeficiency is associated with decreased T cell activity because of a persistent autoimmune-mediated depletion of naive T cells, which is induced by changes in erythrocyte surface glycosylation. The N-glycosylation dependent autoepitopes that emerge on erythrocytes lead to autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and the causative auto-IgM cross-reacts with naive T cells despite the lack of glycan change on T cells. These findings demonstrate that alterations in erythrocyte glycosylation trigger the development of autoantibodies directed at both erythrocytes and naive T cells, revealing a possible mechanistic link between the induction of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, the reduction in naive T cells, and poor Ab responses to vaccine in severe CVID patients. PMID:24795453

  18. Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Due to Anti-c Isoimmunization: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sheeladevi, C S; Suchitha, S; Manjunath, G V; Murthy, Srinivas

    2013-09-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group is one of the most complex blood groups known in humans. It has remained of primary importance in obstetrics, being the main cause of hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Anti-D causes the most severe form of HDN. Other Rh allo antibodies that are capable of causing severe HDN include anti-c, which clinically is the most important Rh antigen after the D antigen. We report a case of hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh anti-c in an infant of an Rh positive mother. PMID:24426362

  19. Retrospective study of reticulocyte indices as indicators of iron-restricted erythropoiesis in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Deanna M W; Stokol, Tracy

    2016-05-01

    Iron-restricted erythropoiesis can occur as a result of an absolute deficiency of iron stores, inflammation-mediated iron sequestration, or functional iron deficiency (in which release of stored iron is slower than the iron uptake by erythroid precursors during intense erythropoiesis). Reticulocyte indices are used to identify iron-restricted erythropoiesis, with the reticulocyte hemoglobin content (CHr) being the most commonly used index in human patients. Dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) may have iron-restricted erythropoiesis caused by inflammation-mediated iron sequestration and/or functional iron deficiency, which could contribute to anemia severity and blunt the regenerative response in some dogs. To investigate this possibility, reticulocyte indices were examined retrospectively in 14 dogs (2-15 years of age; 9 spayed females, 1 intact female, 4 neutered males) with IMHA, and no clinical evidence of blood loss was found to suggest absolute iron deficiency. Five dogs (34%) had CHr below the preestablished lower reference limit (24.5 pg), and hematocrit was significantly lower in these dogs (p = 0.042, nonpaired t-test). Our results suggest that some dogs with IMHA may have iron-restricted erythropoiesis as a result of functional iron deficiency, inflammation-mediated iron sequestration, or (less likely) absolute iron deficiency. Further study is warranted to evaluate if dogs with IMHA may benefit from parenteral iron therapy. PMID:27034340

  20. Concurrent Infections with Vector-Borne Pathogens Associated with Fatal Hemolytic Anemia in a Cattle Herd in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Meli, Marina L.; Dreher, Ute M.; Gönczi, Enikö; Deplazes, Peter; Braun, Ueli; Engels, Monika; Schüpbach, Jörg; Jörger, Kaspar; Thoma, Rudolf; Griot, Christian; Stärk, Katharina D. C.; Willi, Barbara; Schmidt, Joseph; Kocan, Katherine M.; Lutz, Hans

    2004-01-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a vector-borne disease that results in substantial economic losses in other parts of the world but so far not in northern Europe. In August 2002, a fatal disease outbreak was reported in a large dairy herd in the Swiss canton of Grisons. Diseased animals experienced fever, anorexia, agalactia, and depression. Anemia, ectoparasite infestation, and, occasionally, hemoglobinuria were observed. To determine the roles of vector-borne pathogens and to characterize the disease, blood samples were collected from all 286 animals: 50% of the cows were anemic. Upon microscopic examination of red blood cells, Anaplasma marginale inclusion bodies were found in 47% of the cows. The infection was confirmed serologically and by molecular methods. Interestingly, we also found evidence of infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, large Babesia and Theileria spp., and Mycoplasma wenyonii. The last two species had not previously been described in Switzerland. Anemia was significantly associated with the presence of the infectious agents detected, with the exception of A. phagocytophilum. Remarkably, concurrent infections with up to five infectious vector-borne agents were detected in 90% of the ill animals tested by PCR. We concluded that A. marginale was the major cause of the hemolytic anemia, while coinfections with other agents exacerbated the disease. This was the first severe disease outbreak associated with concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens in alpine Switzerland; it was presumably curtailed by culling of the entire herd. It remains to be seen whether similar disease outbreaks will have to be anticipated in northern Europe in the future. PMID:15297529

  1. Concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens associated with fatal hemolytic anemia in a cattle herd in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Meli, Marina L; Dreher, Ute M; Gönczi, Enikö; Deplazes, Peter; Braun, Ueli; Engels, Monika; Schüpbach, Jörg; Jörger, Kaspar; Thoma, Rudolf; Griot, Christian; Stärk, Katharina D C; Willi, Barbara; Schmidt, Joseph; Kocan, Katherine M; Lutz, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a vector-borne disease that results in substantial economic losses in other parts of the world but so far not in northern Europe. In August 2002, a fatal disease outbreak was reported in a large dairy herd in the Swiss canton of Grisons. Diseased animals experienced fever, anorexia, agalactia, and depression. Anemia, ectoparasite infestation, and, occasionally, hemoglobinuria were observed. To determine the roles of vector-borne pathogens and to characterize the disease, blood samples were collected from all 286 animals: 50% of the cows were anemic. Upon microscopic examination of red blood cells, Anaplasma marginale inclusion bodies were found in 47% of the cows. The infection was confirmed serologically and by molecular methods. Interestingly, we also found evidence of infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, large Babesia and Theileria spp., and Mycoplasma wenyonii. The last two species had not previously been described in Switzerland. Anemia was significantly associated with the presence of the infectious agents detected, with the exception of A. phagocytophilum. Remarkably, concurrent infections with up to five infectious vector-borne agents were detected in 90% of the ill animals tested by PCR. We concluded that A. marginale was the major cause of the hemolytic anemia, while coinfections with other agents exacerbated the disease. This was the first severe disease outbreak associated with concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens in alpine Switzerland; it was presumably curtailed by culling of the entire herd. It remains to be seen whether similar disease outbreaks will have to be anticipated in northern Europe in the future. PMID:15297529

  2. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations. PMID:26740874

  3. Several mutations including two novel mutations of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in Polish G6PD deficient subjects with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia, acute hemolytic anemia, and favism.

    PubMed

    Jablonska-Skwiecinska, E; Lewandowska, I; Plochocka, D; Topczewski, J; Zimowski, J G; Klopocka, J; Burzynska, B

    1999-01-01

    DNA sequencing revealed seven different glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations in G6PD deficient subjects from 10 Polish families. Among them we found two novel mutations: 679C-->T (G6PD Radlowo, class 2) and a 1006A-->G (G6PD Torun, class 1). Variant G6PD Radlowo was characterized biochemically. Both novel mutations were analyzed using a model of the tertiary structure of the human enzyme. The main chain of G6PD Torun is different from the wild-type G6PD. The remaining mutations identified by us in deficient Polish patients were: 542A-->T (G6PD Malaga), 1160G-->A (G6PD Beverly Hills), 1178G-->A (G6PD Nashville), 1192G-->A (G6PD Puerto Limon), and 1246G-->A (G6PD Tokyo). Variant Tokyo was found in four families. In one of them favism was the first clinical sign of G6PD deficiency and chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) was diagnosed later. Variants G6PD Nashville and G6PD Puerto Limon were accompanied by the silent mutation 1311C-->T of the G6PD gene. PMID:10571945

  4. Congenital spherocytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... spheres, and premature breakdown of red blood cells ( hemolytic anemia ). ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 163.

  5. ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes and its defect causes congenital hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Arashiki, Nobuto; Takakuwa, Yuichi; Mohandas, Narla; Hale, John; Yoshida, Kenichi; Ogura, Hiromi; Utsugisawa, Taiju; Ohga, Shouichi; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji; Kanno, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    Phosphatidylserine is localized exclusively to the inner leaflet of the membrane lipid bilayer of most cells, including erythrocytes. This asymmetric distribution is critical for the survival of erythrocytes in circulation since externalized phosphatidylserine is a phagocytic signal for splenic macrophages. Flippases are P-IV ATPase family proteins that actively transport phosphatidylserine from the outer to inner leaflet. It has not yet been determined which of the 14 members of this family of proteins is the flippase in human erythrocytes. Herein, we report that ATP11C encodes a major flippase in human erythrocytes, and a genetic mutation identified in a male patient caused congenital hemolytic anemia inherited as an X-linked recessive trait. Phosphatidylserine internalization in erythrocytes with the mutant ATP11C was decreased 10-fold compared to that of the control, functionally establishing that ATP11C is a major flippase in human erythrocytes. Contrary to our expectations phosphatidylserine was retained in the inner leaflet of the majority of mature erythrocytes from both controls and the patient, suggesting that phosphatidylserine cannot be externalized as long as scramblase is inactive. Phosphatidylserine-exposing cells were found only in the densest senescent cells (0.1% of total) in which scramblase was activated by increased Ca(2+) concentration: the percentage of these phosphatidylserine-exposing cells was increased in the patient's senescent cells accounting for his mild anemia. Furthermore, the finding of similar extents of phosphatidylserine exposure by exogenous Ca(2+)-activated scrambling in both control erythrocytes and the patient's erythrocytes implies that suppressed scramblase activity rather than flippase activity contributes to the maintenance of phosphatidylserine in the inner leaflet of human erythrocytes. PMID:26944472

  6. Drug-induced hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia associated with alterations of cell membrane lipids and acanthocyte formation.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Frederique M; Penraat, Kelley; Collins, Nathaniel; Evans, Ellen; Thackaberry, Evan; Manfra, Denise; Engstrom, Laura; Geissler, Richard; Geraci-Erck, Maria; Frugone, Carlos; Abutarif, Malaz; Fine, Jay S; Peterson, Brianna L; Cummings, Brian S; Johnson, Robert C

    2010-10-01

    CXCR3 is a chemokine receptor, upregulated upon activation of T cells and expressed on nearly 100% of T cells in sites of inflammation. SCH 900875 is a selective CXCR3 receptor antagonist. Thrombocytopenia and severe hemolytic anemia with acanthocytosis occurred in rats at doses of 75, 100, and 150 mg/kg/day. Massively enlarged spleens corresponded histologically to extramedullary hematopoiesis, macrophages, and hemosiderin pigment and sinus congestion. Phagocytosed erythrocytes and platelets were within splenic macrophages. IgG and/or IgM were not detected on erythrocyte and platelet membranes. Ex vivo increased osmotic fragility of RBCs was observed. Lipid analysis of the RBC membrane revealed modifications in phosphatidylcholine, overall cholesterol, and/or sphingomyelin. Platelets exhibited slender filiform processes on their plasma membranes, analogous to those of acanthocytes. The presence of similar morphological abnormalities in acanthocytes and platelets suggests that possibly similar alterations in the lipid composition of the plasma membrane have taken place in both cell types. This phenotype correlated with alterations in plasma lipids (hypercholesterolemia and low triglycerides) that occurred after SCH 900875 administration, although other factors cannot be excluded. The increased cell destruction was considered triggered by alterations in the lipid profile of the plasma membranes of erythrocytes and platelets, as reflected morphologically. PMID:20805317

  7. Absence of Mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase Results in a Murine Hemolytic Anemia Responsive to Therapy with a Catalytic Antioxidant

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Jeff S.; Rebel, Vivienne I.; Derby, Ryan; Bell, Kirsten; Huang, Ting-Ting; Kuypers, Frans A.; Epstein, Charles J.; Burakoff, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) is a critical component of the mitochondrial pathway for detoxification of O2−, and targeted disruption of this locus leads to embryonic or neonatal lethality in mice. To follow the effects of SOD2 deficiency in cells over a longer time course, we created hematopoietic chimeras in which all blood cells are derived from fetal liver stem cells of Sod2 knockout, heterozygous, or wild-type littermates. Stem cells of each genotype efficiently rescued hematopoiesis and allowed long-term survival of lethally irradiated host animals. Peripheral blood analysis of leukocyte populations revealed no differences in reconstitution kinetics of T cells, B cells, or myeloid cells when comparing Sod2+/+, Sod2−/−, and Sod2+/− fetal liver recipients. However, animals receiving Sod2−/− cells were persistently anemic, with findings suggestive of a hemolytic process. Loss of SOD2 in erythroid progenitor cells results in enhanced protein oxidative damage, altered membrane deformation, and reduced survival of red cells. Treatment of anemic animals with Euk-8, a catalytic antioxidant with both SOD and catalase activities, significantly corrected this oxidative stress–induced condition. Such therapy may prove useful in treatment of human disorders such as sideroblastic anemia, which SOD2 deficiency most closely resembles. PMID:11304553

  8. Deficiency of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase 3 (Nmnat3) Causes Hemolytic Anemia by Altering the Glycolytic Flow in Mature Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Hikosaka, Keisuke; Ikutani, Masashi; Shito, Masayuki; Kazuma, Kohei; Gulshan, Maryam; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Konno, Katsuhiro; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kanno, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    NAD biosynthesis is of substantial interest because of its important roles in regulating various biological processes. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 3 (Nmnat3) is considered a mitochondria-localized NAD synthesis enzyme involved in de novo and salvage pathways. Although the biochemical properties of Nmnat3 are well documented, its physiological function in vivo remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that Nmnat3 was localized in the cytoplasm of mature erythrocytes and critically regulated their NAD pool. Deficiency of Nmnat3 in mice caused splenomegaly and hemolytic anemia, which was associated with the findings that Nmnat3-deficient erythrocytes had markedly lower ATP levels and shortened lifespans. However, the NAD level in other tissues were not apparently affected by the deficiency of Nmnat3. LC-MS/MS-based metabolomics revealed that the glycolysis pathway in Nmnat3-deficient erythrocytes was blocked at a glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) step because of the shortage of the coenzyme NAD. Stable isotope tracer analysis further demonstrated that deficiency of Nmnat3 resulted in glycolysis stall and a shift to the pentose phosphate pathway. Our findings indicate the critical roles of Nmnat3 in maintenance of the NAD pool in mature erythrocytes and the physiological impacts at its absence in mice. PMID:24739386

  9. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  10. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia in a patient with sickle cell anemia on penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, W.; Salah, H.; Khakoo, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Serious invasive bacterial infections, particularly those due to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Hemophilus influenzae, are a well-known complication in patients with sickle cell disease. Early penicillin prophylaxis has been shown to prevent these infections and also to improve survival. This article describes a child with sickle cell anemia who, while on penicillin prophylaxis, developed a group A streptococcal bacteremia, a pathogen not commonly associated with bacteremia in sickle cell disease. PMID:7783241

  11. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength

    PubMed Central

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Brureau, Laurent; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Connes, Philippe; Ferdinand, Séverine; Tressières, Benoit; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Blanchet, Pascal; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters. Materials and Methods Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years) were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group) and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group). Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC) deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry) and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time). Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), total bilirubin (BIL) levels and reticulocyte (RET) percentage) to calculate a hemolytic index. Results Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01), LDH (p = 0.03), RET (p = 0.03) levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02). Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01) and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005) were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01) and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03) were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01) than controls. Conclusion Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability. PMID:27145183

  12. Both hemolytic anemia and malaria parasite-specific factors increase susceptibility to Nontyphoidal Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Roux, Christelle M; Butler, Brian P; Chau, Jennifer Y; Paixao, Tatiane A; Cheung, Kong Wai; Santos, Renato L; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M

    2010-04-01

    Severe pediatric malaria is an important risk factor for developing disseminated infections with nontyphoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS). While recent animal studies on this subject are lacking, early work suggests that an increased risk for developing systemic NTS infection during malaria is caused by hemolytic anemia, which leads to reduced macrophage microbicidal activity. Here we established a model for oral Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium challenge in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis. Initial characterization of this model showed that 5 days after coinoculation, P. yoelii nigeriensis infection increased the recovery of S. Typhimurium from liver and spleen by approximately 1,000-fold. The increased bacterial burden could be only partially recapitulated by antibody-mediated hemolysis, which increased the recovery of S. Typhimurium from liver and spleen by 10-fold. These data suggested that both hemolysis and P. yoelii nigeriensis-specific factors contributed to the increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. The mechanism by which hemolysis impaired resistance to S. Typhimurium was further investigated. In vitro, S. Typhimurium was recovered 24 h after infection of hemophagocytic macrophages in 2-fold-higher numbers than after infection of mock-treated macrophages, making it unlikely that reduced macrophage microbicidal activity was solely responsible for hemolysis-induced immunosuppression during malaria. Infection with P. yoelii nigeriensis, but not antibody-mediated hemolysis, reduced serum levels of interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) in response to S. Typhimurium challenge. Collectively, studies establishing a mouse model for this coinfection suggest that multiple distinct malaria-induced immune defects contribute to increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. PMID:20100860

  13. A rare case of acute pancreatitis and life-threatening hemolytic anemia associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection in a young healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhchain; Khosla, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common infection that affects 95% of adults worldwide at some point during life. It is usually asymptomatic or causes a self-limiting clinical syndrome known as infectious mononucleosis. It rarely causes complications. Here, we present a case of a healthy 21-year-old female college student who suffered from severe pancreatitis and life-threatening autoimmune hemolytic anemia in association with EBV infection, and we also discuss the common presentation of EBV infection and the diagnosis and treatment of simple and complicated EBV infection. PMID:26190854

  14. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Reviewed June 4, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 552 Anemia WHAT IS ANEMIA? WHAT CAUSES ANEMIA? ... part of a complete blood count (CBC). See Fact Sheet 121 for more information on these laboratory tests. ...

  15. Hemoglobin A1 in subjects with G-6-PD deficiency during and after hemolytic crises due to favism.

    PubMed

    Baule, G M; Onorato, D; Tola, G; Forteleoni, G; Meloni, T

    1983-01-01

    HbA1 was determined in 15 G-6-PD-deficient subjects during a hemolytic crisis with hemoglobinuria due to ingestion of fresh fava beans. The same G-6-PD-deficient subjects were studied again 4 months after the crisis, when they were asymptomatic. 15 normal healthy children served as controls. A statistically significant decrease in HbA1 was observed in the favic subjects during hemolytic crises compared with their values 4 months later and those of the control group. PMID:6401888

  16. A case of successful management with splenectomy of intractable ascites due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II-induced cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliadis, Themistoklis; Garipidou, Vassilia; Perifanis, Vassilios; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giouleme, Olga; Patsiaoura, Kalliopi; Avramidis, Michalis; Nikolaidis, Nikolaos; Vakalopoulou, Sofia; Tsitouridis, Ioannis; Antoniadis, Antonios; Semertzidis, Panagiotis; Kioumi, Anna; Premetis, Evangelos; Eugenidis, Nikolaos

    2006-01-01

    The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias comprise a group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis as the predominant mechanism of anemia and by characteristic morphological aberrations of the majority of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II is the most frequent type. All types of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias distinctly share a high incidence of iron loading. Iron accumulation occurs even in untransfused patients and can result in heart failure and liver cirrhosis. We have reported about a patient who presented with liver cirrhosis and intractable ascites caused by congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II. Her clinical course was further complicated by the development of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Splenectomy was eventually performed which achieved complete resolution of ascites, increase of hemoglobin concentration and abrogation of transfusion requirements. PMID:16521204

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of fetal anemia due to placental chorioangioma.

    PubMed

    Haak, M C; Oosterhof, H; Mouw, R J; Oepkes, D; Vandenbussche, F P

    1999-07-01

    Placental chorioangiomas occur in 1% of pregnancies. Large chorioangiomas may cause serious complications such as fetal anemia, hydrops and fetal death. In this case report, a pregnancy complicated by a large placental chorioangioma is described. Severe fetal anemia without the occurrence of hydrops fetalis was suspected using ultrasound and Doppler examinations. Successful intrauterine blood transfusion was performed, with an unusually large amount of blood needed to obtain an adequate rise in fetal hematocrit. Two weeks later, at 32 weeks, the infant was born in good condition. In pregnancies with large chorioangiomas, we advise regular ultrasound and Doppler examinations, with the aim of detecting fetal anemia before hydrops develops. When anemia is suspected, fetal blood sampling is indicated and intrauterine transfusion therapy may be beneficial to preserve fetal health until maturity is reached. PMID:10461342

  18. Postpartum aplastic anemia presenting as pancytopenia due to malarial infection.

    PubMed

    Shah, Muhammad Usman; Sundhu, Murtaza Ali; Hussain, Muhammad Zahid

    2013-11-01

    Pancytopenia is a condition with decreased numbers of all cell lines. Aplastic anemia is a common cause although malarial infection causing lysis of RBCs may also partly mimic this condition. The infection may also damage the patient's bone marrow resulting in pancytopenia as well. We present the case of a post-partum female patient who reported with fever, body aches and shortness of breath one month after the delivery of her baby. All blood cell counts were decreased and peripheral blood smear showed malarial parasites. Anti-malarial treatment was initiated following which the fever subsided but, despite regular transfusions, the blood counts remained low. Bone marrow biopsy report revealed P. falciparum pigments along with hypocellularity characteristic of severe aplastic anemia. Consequently, bone marrow transplantation was advised as a therapeutic measure. This case report highlights the increased susceptibility of pregnant women to malaria in endemic areas and subsequent aplastic anemia. PMID:24169391

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    If you have anemia, your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. The most common cause of anemia is not having enough ... rich protein that gives the red color to blood. It carries oxygen from the lungs to the ...

  20. ON THE HEMOLYTIC PROPERTIES OF FATTY ACIDS AND THEIR RELATION TO THE CAUSATION OF TOXIC HEMOLYSIS AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    McPhedran, William Fletcher

    1913-01-01

    1. The smallest amount of the sodium soaps necessary for the complete hemolysis of 0.5 of a cubic centimeter of a 5 per cent. suspension of the red blood corpuscles of the sheep, ox, rabbit, dog, or of man, is about the same,—0.03 of a milligram in the case of the following acids: oleic, linoleic, dibromostearic, chloriodostearic, and two isomeric monobromostearic acids; in the case of erucic acid about twice as much of the soap was found to be necessary; in that of palmitic or of dihydroxystearic acid more than ten times as much. 2. The minimum hemolytic quantity of the sodium soaps of the highly unsaturated acids obtained from cod liver oil and from linseed oil is only very slightly less than that of sodium oleate. 3. It follows, therefore, from these results that hemolysis by unsaturated fatty acids is not more active in proportion to the degree to which these acids are unsaturated, nor is it diminished when the unsaturated carbon atoms are saturated by halogens. It is, on the other hand, greatly diminished when they are converted into the corresponding hydroxyl acids, which are hemolytic only to the same degree as the saturated acids. 4. The idea that toxic hemolysis, in disease, in poisoning by phosphorus or toluylene diamine, results from the liberation of specially hemolytic fatty acids from the fatty complexes of disintegrating cells is not well supported by evidence; none of the fatty acids, still less any of the fatty complexes from which these acids can be obtained in any of the organs examined, either in this work or in the work of others that has preceded it, show on analysis any evidence for the existence of fatty acids more toxic than the common oleic acid which is constantly being set free by hydrolysis from common fat in health. PMID:19867727

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... talk to your doctor about trying a different formula or brand. How is normocytic anemia treated? Managing ... in my child? If you use iron-fortified formula, do not give your child vitamin drops with ...

  2. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use.

    PubMed

    Markham, Kara B; Scrape, Scott R; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W

    2016-03-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  3. Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and Newborn due to Intravenous Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Markham, Kara B.; Scrape, Scott R.; Prasad, Mona; Rossi, Karen Q.; O'Shaughnessy, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective is to present a pregnancy complication associated with intravenous drug use, namely, that of red blood cell alloimmunization and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Methods An observational case series is presented including women with red blood cell alloimmunization most likely secondary to intravenous drug abuse Results Five pregnancies were identified that were complicated by red blood cell alloimmunization and significant hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, necessitating intrauterine transfusion, an indicated preterm birth, or neonatal therapy. Conclusions As opioid abuse continues to increase in the United States, clinicians should be aware of the potential for alloimmunization to red blood cell antibodies as yet another negative outcome from intravenous drug abuse. PMID:26989567

  4. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-01-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and ? thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias. PMID:19181781

  5. Aplastic anemia and red cell aplasia due to pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    Repeated exposure to commercial (technical grade) pentachlorophenol (PCP) preceded aplastic anemia in four patients and pure red cell aplasia in two. Two patients developed concomitant or subsequent Hodgkin's disease and acute leukemia. The hematologic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effect of PCP and its chemical contaminants have been documented in other clinical and experimental reports. In view of the widespread contamination of our environment by PCP, clinicians and public health investigators must seek out such exposure in these and related disorders and initiate measures to reduce it.

  6. Fulminant visceral disseminated varicella-zoster virus infection without skin involvement in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia on prednisolone therapy.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Megumi; Yoshifuji, Kota; Fukuda, Tetsuya; Tohda, Shuji; Miki, Tohru; Miura, Osamu; Yamamoto, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    An 80-year-old man with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) received immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone (1 mg/kg). One month later, his hemoglobin level had normalized, and the prednisolone dose was tapered. The next day, he complained of acute and progressive back pain. He was admitted to our hospital for further examination approximately 24 h after the pain had started. Computed tomography revealed only localized pneumonia. However, he showed signs of severe disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), liver dysfunction, and respiratory failure. Empiric broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy was started with a presumptive diagnosis of severe bacterial infection. However, his condition rapidly deteriorated, and he died 17 h after admission. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) was detected by quantitative PCR in the peripheral blood sample and by immunohistochemistry in all organs except for the brain at autopsy. Visceral VZV infection is a severe disease with a high mortality rate. Although appropriate diagnosis and treatment is crucial, in cases without the characteristic skin rash the diagnosis is difficult. The possibility of visceral VZV infection should be taken into consideration when administering prednisolone to patients with AIHA. PMID:27169452

  7. Aggressive CD5-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma showing c-myc rearrangements developed in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sonoki, T; Matsuzaki, H; Asou, N; Hata, H; Matsuno, F; Yoshida, M; Nagasaki, A; Kuribayashi, N; Kudo, H; Takatsuki, K

    1996-01-01

    A case of CD5-positive diffuse large cell lymphoma in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is reported. The patient was diagnosed with AIHA in December 1988. Three and a half years later, the patient complained of fever and left sided flank pain. Abnormal lymphocytes appeared in the peripheral blood and were positive for HLA-DR, CD5, CD19, CD20, and surface immunoglobulin (mu, lambda). The pathological diagnosis of the cervical lymphnode was non-Hodgkin lymphoma; diffuse large cell type with a starry sky-like appearance. Although the 8q24 translocation was not detected by karyotypic analysis of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC), Southern blot analysis revealed that the c-myc rearrangements had occurred. This case showed two rearranged bands with Eco RI, Bam HI, or Bgl II digestion, and a germline band with Hin dIII digestion using a second exon fragment of the c-myc gene as a probe. Despite intensive chemotherapy, this patient died 6 months after being diagnosed with malignant lymphoma. We discuss the c-myc rearrangements in this aggressive CD5-positive diffuse large B cell lymphoma. PMID:8713579

  8. Severe methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia from aniline purchased as 2C-E (4-ethyl-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine), a recreational drug, on the Internet - Oregon, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-02-10

    In August 2011, two men in Oregon drank a liquid they believed to be 2C-E (4-ethyl-2,5-dimethoxyphenethylamine), a psychoactive stimulant used as a recreational drug, after purchasing it on the Internet. Fifteen minutes after ingestion, the men became cyanotic and subsequently were treated for refractory methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia. The Oregon Poison Center, Oregon Public Health Division, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) jointly investigated to determine the cause of the poisoning and identify other cases. The Oregon Poison Center and Oregon Public Health Division promptly alerted health-care providers and public health agencies and searched for additional cases. DEA confiscated all product remaining in the men's possession, and FDA identified the substance as aniline, an industrial solvent known to cause methemoglobinemia. One patient reported purchasing the substance from the Internet site of a Chinese chemical company. No additional cases were identified by investigators. Purchase of chemicals from unregulated Internet sources poses a serious risk to purchasers from product contamination and substitution. PMID:22318470

  9. Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hyojun; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Kil, Ki-Jung; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2014-01-01

    Samul-tang (Si-Wu-Tang, SMT), a kind of herbal medicines, has been used for the hemato-deficient disease for hundreds of years. In this work, investigate the anti-anemia activity of the H2O extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang in an anemia model induced by intravenous infection of phenylhydrazine-HCL (PHZ) at 10 mg/kg for 4 days. After PHZ injection, female Sparague-Dawley rats were administrated extracts from constituent herbal medicines of SMT (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) daily for 1 week. Results showed that sever hemolysis was induced by PHZ. For Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) H2O extract treated groups, the concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cells number increased much more significantly than PHZ-treated group. Moreover, Angelica gigas (AG), Angelica. acutiloba (AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) extract administration significantly improved serum erythropoietin concentration. The activity of aminolevulinic acid dehydrates (ALDL) in liver homegenate was increased in Angelica gigas(AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) treated group. PMID:25337267

  10. [Outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta hemolytic group L streptococci (S. dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis) in an Austrian dairy herd].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Martina; Giffinger, Friederike; Hoppe, Jan Christoph; Spergser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    This study is reporting an outbreak of subclinical mastitis due to beta-hemolytic group L streptococci in an Austrian dairy herd with a history of high somatic cell count. At the first survey 16 of 33 lactating cows (28 quarters of 132) were cultured positive for beta-hemolytic, CAMP and esculin negative cocci that grew on Columbia blood agar with small grey catalase negative colonies. With the commercial API 20 Strep system (bioMerieux, F) isolates were classified as members of streptococci group L. All tested strains (eight of 28) produced acid from ribose, lactose, trehalose, amidon and glycogen; they hydrolysed hippurate and showed beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, alkaline phosphatase, leucinaminopeptidase and arginindehydrolase activity. Isolates were sensitive to bacitracin but resistant to tetracycline. Using phenotypic characterisation as well as sequence analysis of the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region of a representative strain, recovered isolates were identified as Streptococcus (S.) dysgalactiae ssp. equisimilis. Mastitis was characterized by normal milk secretions and absence of clinical abnormalities but high elevations of somatic cell count. Based on the characteristics of the strains and on the observations during the first herd survey, contagious transmission during milking as a result of poor milking hygiene was assumed. The mastitis was controlled through implementation of a strict hygiene protocol including use of single-use udder towels, post milking teat desinfection and cluster disinfection between milking cows in combination with antibiotic treatment of infected udders. PMID:22059292

  11. Hemolytic disease of newborn due to anti-Jk b in a woman with high risk pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Beenu; Malhotra, Sheetal; Saluja, Karan; Kumar, Praveen; Marwaha, Neelam

    2010-08-01

    This case illustrates the importance of blood group antibodies in antenatal serology other than Rh system as a cause of hemolytic disease of newborn (HDN). In India, antenatal antibody screening is done at majority of transfusion centers in only Rh (D) negative mothers. In this multigravida woman with high risk obstetrical history, an antenatal antibody screening by indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was not performed as she was Rh (D) positive. Postnatal work up for the pathological jaundice in the neonate revealed that red cell alloimmunization had occurred due to anti-Jk(b). We conclude that antenatal antibody screening should be done in all pregnant women irrespective of the D antigen status to detect and manage red cell alloimmunization to any other clinically significant blood group antigens. PMID:20558106

  12. Bendamustine and rituximab combination in the management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a multicentric retrospective study of the French CLL intergroup (GCFLLC/MW and GOELAMS).

    PubMed

    Quinquenel, Anne; Willekens, Christophe; Dupuis, Jehan; Royer, Bruno; Ysebaert, Loic; De Guibert, S; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Feugier, Pierre; Guieze, Romain; Levy, Vincent; Delmer, Alain

    2015-03-01

    We report our experience on bendamustine and rituximab (BR) combination in 26 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). At the time of BR initiation, 88% of the patients had already been treated for AIHA and CLL was progressive regardless of AIHA in all patients but one. Overall response rates were 81% for AIHA and 77% for CLL. Median time to next treatment was 28.3 months and 26.2 months for AIHA and CLL, respectively. BR therapy may represent a good and safe therapeutic option in this setting where adequate control of CLL seems important for long-term AIHA response. PMID:25428829

  13. Hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-jkb: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Velasco Rodríguez, Diego; Pérez-Segura, G; Jiménez-Ubieto, A; Rodríguez, M A; Montejano, L

    2014-06-01

    Although anti-Jkb is a well-defined cause of severe acute or delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions, it is rarely associated with severe Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn (HDN), even with high antibody titer. To date, only 13 cases have been reported, so the possible reasons for that still remain unclear. Most of HDN due to anti-Jkb are mild-to-moderate, and usually have a good prognosis. A 41-years-old woman, who had a positive antibody screening test in her 13th week of pregnancy, was sent to the blood bank for study before an amniocentesis. Antibody identification and red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping of the patient and his husband were performed, plus arrays study in the amniotic fluid. An anti-Jkb was identified in the patient's serum with a titer of 1:1, and her RBC phenotype was O Rh(D) positive, C(+), c(+), E(-), e(+), K(-), Jka(+), Jkb(-). The RBC genotype of the fetus was B Rh(D) positive, Jka(+), Jkb(+). Antibody titer remained stable and the pregnancy was uneventful. At birth, there was no need of phototherapy or exchange transfusion for the newborn and her Jk(b+) typing result was confirmed in a cord blood sample. Although most of HDN cases due to anti-Jkb have a good outcome, monitoring antibody titer should be done to prevent fatal complications. Furthermore, antenatal antibody screening should be performed in every pregnant woman irrespective of her Rh(D) antigen status in order to detect red cell alloimmunization to other clinically significant blood group antigens. PMID:24839369

  14. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  15. Fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, M; Wang, C L; Chen, F S; Ho, L H

    2003-01-01

    A fatal transfusion reaction due to anti-Ku in a Knull (Ko) patient is reported. The patient was transfused with 34 units of incompatible RBCs during 44 days of hospitalization. Apart from the first transfusion, all subsequent transfusions failed to raise the patient's Hb. No serum antibody was identified until he was transferred to another hospital for dialysis. A compatibility test demonstrated a weak antibody and autocontrol reacting at room temperature by a manual polybrene method. The antibody was considered to be a "cold agglutinin." A blood sample was sent to a reference laboratory where the patient was found to be Knull and the antibody was identified as anti-Ku. PMID:15373542

  16. Carbamazepine-induced hemolytic and aplastic crises associated with reduced glutathione peroxidase activity of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Kubo, Noriaki; Tachi, Nobutada; Kanno, Hitoshi; Fujii, Hisaichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2007-11-01

    Although pure red cell aplasia is a well-known side effect of carbamazepine treatment, intravascular hemolytic anemia is rare. We describe a 5-year-old boy who developed concurrent intravascular hemolytic anemia and erythroblastopenia, probably due to carbamazepine. Carbamazepine treatment was subsequently discontinued, and the patient was treated with red blood cell transfusions, haptoglobin, and methylprednisolone. His hematologic abnormalities were almost fully recovered within 2 weeks. Examination of the patient's and mother's erythrocyte enzyme activities revealed mildly decreased erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity. We speculate that patients with reduced GSH-Px activity are at a high risk of developing carbamazepine-induced hemolytic crisis and/or aplastic crisis. PMID:18055338

  17. Two Novel Missense Mutations and a 5bp Deletion in the Erythroid-Specific Promoter of the PKLR Gene in Two Unrelated Patients With Pyruvate Kinase Deficient Transfusion-Dependent Chronic Nonspherocytic Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kager, Leo; Minkov, Milen; Zeitlhofer, Petra; Fahrner, Bernhard; Ratzinger, Franz; Boztug, Kaan; Dossenbach-Glaninger, Astrid; Haas, Oskar A

    2016-05-01

    We report two children with severe chronic hemolytic anemia, the cause of which was difficult to establish because of transfusion dependency. Reduced erythrocyte pyruvate kinase activity in their asymptomatic parents provided the diagnostic clues for mutation screening of the PKLR gene and revealed that one child was a compound heterozygote of a novel paternally derived 5-bp deletion in the promoter region (c.-88_-84delTCTCT) and a maternally derived missense mutation in exon nine (c.1174G>A; p.Ala392Thr). The second child was a compound heterozygote of two novel missense mutations, namely a paternally derived exon ten c.1381G>A (p.Glu461Lys) and a maternally derived exon seven c.907-908delCC (p.Pro303GlyfsX12) variant. PMID:26728349

  18. An acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to the “anti-c” rhesus antibody: A case report emphasizing the role of transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sachan, Deepti; Jayakumar, Rajeswari; Varghese, Joy; Rela, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus (Rh) mediated hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTR) are usually immunoglobulin G mediated and delayed onset. Rh antibodies being the cause of acute HTR (AHTR) and intravascular hemolysis are still under debate. We report here a case of a 53-year-old male who developed AHTR due to “anti-c” antibodies within 3 h of blood transfusion, precipitating fatal acute liver failure in a patient with hepatitis C related chronic liver disease. This case emphasizes the need of inclusion of antibody screening in routine pretransfusion testing as well as a critical role of transfusion medicine specialists for early diagnosis and minimizing transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:26420949

  19. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) due to a lack of folate. Folate is a type ... B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body does ...

  20. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities.

  1. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  2. Discussion on pharmacogenetic interaction in G6PD deficiency and methods to identify potential hemolytic drugs.

    PubMed

    Manganelli, Genesia; Fico, Annalisa; Martini, Giuseppe; Filosa, Stefania

    2010-06-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common form of red blood cell enzymopathy. The disorder has reached polymorphic frequencies in different parts of the world due to the relative protection conferred against malaria. G6PD is a housekeeping X-linked gene encoding the first enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, an NADPH-producing dehydrogenase. Because erythrocytes do not generate NADPH in any other way than pentose phosphate pathway, they are more susceptible than any other cells to oxidative damages. G6PD deficiency is a prime example of a hemolytic anemia due to an interaction between an intracorpuscular cause and an extracorpuscular cause, because in the majority of cases an exogenous agent triggers hemolysis. Hemolysis, in fact, can be caused by exposure to oxidant agents. Although studies performed on epidemiology, genetics and molecular biology have broaden the information on G6pd deficiency, there are still no reliable and validated methods to test drug hemolytic potential in G6PD deficient patients. The review gives an overview of current knowledge on G6pd deficiency and on the methods that have been developed so far in order to identify drugs causing acute hemolytic anemia in G6pd deficiency. Moreover, we discuss the new potential preclinical strategies to assess, in vitro and in vivo, drug hemolytic risks. PMID:20350285

  3. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection. PMID:26135847

  4. Bilateral macular hemorrhage due to megaloblastic anemia: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vaggu, Sree Kumar; Bhogadi, Preethi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented with sudden, painless, nonprogressive diminished vision in both eyes (best corrected visual acuity in right eye - 6/60 and left eye - 6/36). An ophthalmological evaluation revealed bilateral pale tarsal conjunctiva and bilateral macular hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed the presence of megalocytic anemia (with hemoglobin - 4.9 g%). General examination showed severe pallor. On systemic examination, no abnormality was detected, confirmed by ultrasonography abdomen. Other causes. This case documents the rare occurrence of bilateral subinternal limiting membrane macular hemorrhage with megaloblastic anemia without thrombocytopenia and other retinal features of anemic retinopathy. PMID:27050355

  5. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. PMID:26637714

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  7. Understanding and exploiting hepcidin as an indicator of anemia due to chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Larson, Derek S; Coyne, Daniel W

    2013-03-01

    Hepcidin, produced by the liver, is the master regulator of iron balance. Serum hepcidin is increased by high iron stores, blocks intestinal iron absorption, and impairs storage iron release. Conversely, iron deficiency lowers hepcidin levels and enhances intestinal iron absorption and the release of storage iron. As with ferritin, hepcidin is an acute phase reactant. Consequently, inflammation increases hepcidin and leads to impaired iron absorption, lowers serum iron and transferrin saturation, and contributes to the anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We review the physiology of iron absorption, its relationship to hepcidin and the transmembrane iron transporter ferroportin, the role of hepcidin in CKD related anemia, and the possible diagnostic implications and limitations of using hepcidin as a marker of iron status. PMID:26894030

  8. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  9. Hemorrhagic risk due to platelet dysfunction in myelodysplastic patients, correlations with anemia severity and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Popov, Viola M; Vladareanu, Ana M; Bumbea, Horia; Kovacs, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Iordache, Maria M; Moisescu, Mihaela G

    2015-10-01

    Platelet function is influenced by changes in membrane fluidity that has an important role in the expression of platelet receptors and in modulating the activity of proteins like phospholipase C or proteinkinase C. In freshly prepared platelets, membrane fluidity modifies the aggregation/agglutination function. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) represent another important parameter involved in platelet receptor activation. There is a certain association of high levels of ROS and iron overload. Patients with hemochromatosis have low platelet aggregation induced by thrombin; little is known about the anemia and effects of iron overload on platelet activation in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients. Study of platelet membrane fluidity and ROS production changes in patients with MDS and possible correlations with altered platelet function as reflected in aggregation curves and platelet receptor expression. To find out possible correlations of fluidity of platelet membrane and ROS level with hematologic parameters and iron levels. The prospective study included 34 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes classified according to French-American-British cooperative group proposals and 29 healthy volunteers. Platelet membrane fluidity was quantified by fluorescence anisotropy measurements using the marker 1-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene p-toluenesulfonate. ROS production was evaluated by fluorescence measurements using 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Platelet function was analyzed by optical aggregometry using the agonists adenosine diphosphate, collagen, ristocetin and epinephrine. The expression of platelet receptors CD41/CD61, CD42a/CD42b and CD62P/CD63 was evaluated by flow cytometry. Platelet membrane fluidity in patients with MDS was similar to that of healthy volunteers and did not vary according to the risk category. Patients with MDS had increased platelet ROS production compared with the control group without statistical correlation with membrane fluidity. We found a negative correlation of ROS levels with the severity of anemia (R =? -0.587, P = 0.017). Platelet response was reduced in patients with MDS compared with volunteers, for all reagents. The response was different according to the risk category only in case of ristocetin or collagen. Patients with anemia presented a decreased platelet aggregation induced by collagen or ristocetin (collagen: R = 0.395, P = 0.003; ristocetin: R = 0.420, P = 0.002). The membrane fluidity of platelets from MDS patients appeared unmodified, but the ROS production was increased in all risk categories of MDS. The levels of ROS were correlated with the degree of anemia, which, in turn, had a negative impact on the platelet aggregation function induced by collagen or ristocetin. PMID:25811447

  10. Exchange transfusion of least incompatible blood for severe hemolytic disease of the newborn due to anti-Rh17.

    PubMed

    Li, Bi-juan; Jiang, Yuan-jun; Yuan, Fen; Ye, Hong-xing

    2010-02-01

    HDN attributed to the rare Rh variants has become more and more significant caused by anti-D, but the compatible blood is usually very difficult to obtain when exchange transfusion is required. We treated a 10-hour neonate of O, D + C + c - E - e+ blood group with severe HDN due to anti-Rh17 with least incompatible blood typed O, D + C - c + E + e-. The neonatal hemolysis was relieved obviously and bilirubin was reduced gradually after exchange transfusion. The infant was discharged in good health 13 days after birth with 135.0 g/L, 28.0 micromol/L and 10.7 micromol/L of Hb, total bilirubin and direct bilirubin, respectively. No sequelae were observed in a three-year follow-up. The result suggesting that the least incompatible blood is an alternative choice for exchange transfusion in severe HDN due to anti-Rh17 in case that Rh17 antigen-negative blood is unavailable. PMID:19725902

  11. The incidence of autoimmune hemolytic anemia in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell recipients post-first and post-second hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ibrahim; Teruya, Jun; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Krance, Robert

    2015-06-01

    The reported incidence of post-allogeneic HSCT AIHA was between 4.4% and 6% following a single transplant. Cord blood transplantation, T-cell depletion, and chronic GvHD are significantly associated with post-transplant AIHA. During an 11-yr period, data for 500 pediatric HSCT recipients were eligible for evaluation of the incidence of AIHA post-first and post-second transplants. Demographic, transplant, and post-transplant-related variables were analyzed. Twelve of 500 (2.4%) recipients at a median of 273 days and seven of 72 (9.7%) recipients at a median of 157 days developed AIHA post-first and post-second HSCT, respectively. Post-first HSCT, none of the MRD recipients developed AIHA (0/175 MRD vs. 12/325 other donors, p = 0.04). Four of 12 required a second HSCT to control the AIHA. After the second HSCT, MUD was significantly associated with the development of AIHA. No other variables were associated with the post-second transplant AIHA. The incidence of AIHA post-first and post-second HSCT was less than the reported. The increased incidence of AIHA among recipients of second HSCT is most likely due to the profound immune dysregulation. A much larger, prospective study would be needed to evaluate the incidence, complications, and management of post-transplant AIHA. PMID:25809012

  12. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  13. [Integral evaluation of redox metabolism in erythrocytes from patients with various anemias].

    PubMed

    Ermakova, T A; Tsvetaeva, N V

    2003-03-01

    The potentiometric determination method (Vmax NADP.H) was made use of to make an integral evaluation of the status of the oxidant-restorative metabolism of erythrocytes; the method facilitates essentially the diagnostics in certain hemolytic processes like G-6-PD-insufficiency, toxic hemolytic anemia and auto-immune hemlytic anemia. Essential differences of the oxidant-restorative potential of erythrocytes (Vmax NADP.H) at congenital and acquired hemolytic anemias were detected, which can be used in the hematological practice alongside with other laboratory tests in the differentiated diagnostics of hemolytic anemias of unclear etiologies. PMID:12715393

  14. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schmidt, Paul J; Campagna, Dean R; Rahimov, Fedik; Schilke, Brenda A; Cuijpers, Marloes; Rieneck, Klaus; Lausen, Birgitte; Linenberger, Michael L; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Guo, Chaoshe; Hofmann, Inga; Newburger, Peter E; Matthews, Dana; Shimamura, Akiko; Snijders, Pieter J L M; Towne, Meghan C; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Watson, Henry G; Dziegiel, Morten H; Heeney, Matthew M; May, Alison; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Swinkels, Dorine W; Markianos, Kyriacos; Craig, Elizabeth A; Fleming, Mark D

    2015-12-17

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q deletion syndrome 5q33 critical deletion interval and involved in mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, result in CSA inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In a fraction of patients with just 1 severe loss-of-function allele, expression of the clinical phenotype is associated with a common coding single nucleotide polymorphism in trans that correlates with reduced messenger RNA expression and results in a pseudodominant pattern of inheritance. PMID:26491070

  15. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  16. Optimal management of iron deficiency anemia due to poor dietary intake

    PubMed Central

    Aspuru, Kattalin; Villa, Carlos; Bermejo, Fernando; Herrero, Pilar; López, Santiago García

    2011-01-01

    Iron is necessary for the normal development of multiple vital processes. Iron deficiency (ID) may be caused by several diseases, even by physiological situations that increase requirements for this mineral. One of its possible causes is a poor dietary iron intake, which is infrequent in developed countries, but quite common in developing areas. In these countries, dietary ID is highly prevalent and comprises a real public health problem and a challenge for health authorities. ID, with or without anemia, can cause important symptoms that are not only physical, but can also include a decreased intellectual performance. All this, together with a high prevalence, can even have negative implications for a community’s economic and social development. Treatment consists of iron supplements. Prevention of ID obviously lies in increasing the dietary intake of iron, which can be difficult in developing countries. In these regions, foods with greater iron content are scarce, and attempts are made to compensate this by fortifying staple foods with iron. The effectiveness of this strategy is endorsed by multiple studies. On the other hand, in developed countries, ID with or without anemia is nearly always associated with diseases that trigger a negative balance between iron absorption and loss. Its management will be based on the treatment of underlying diseases, as well as on oral iron supplements, although these latter are limited by their tolerance and low potency, which on occasions may compel a change to intravenous administration. Iron deficiency has a series of peculiarities in pediatric patients, in the elderly, in pregnant women, and in patients with dietary restrictions, such as celiac disease. PMID:22114518

  17. Practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism or heme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Donker, Albertine E; Raymakers, Reinier A P; Vlasveld, L Thom; van Barneveld, Teus; Terink, Rieneke; Dors, Natasja; Brons, Paul P T; Knoers, Nine V A M; Swinkels, Dorine W

    2014-06-19

    During recent years, our understanding of the pathogenesis of inherited microcytic anemias has gained from the identification of several genes and proteins involved in systemic and cellular iron metabolism and heme syntheses. Numerous case reports illustrate that the implementation of these novel molecular discoveries in clinical practice has increased our understanding of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of these diseases. Integration of these insights into daily clinical practice will reduce delays in establishing a proper diagnosis, invasive and/or costly diagnostic tests, and unnecessary or even detrimental treatments. To assist the clinician, we developed evidence-based multidisciplinary guidelines on the management of rare microcytic anemias due to genetic disorders of iron metabolism and heme synthesis. These genetic disorders may present at all ages, and therefore these guidelines are relevant for pediatricians as well as clinicians who treat adults. This article summarizes these clinical practice guidelines and includes background on pathogenesis, conclusions, and recommendations and a diagnostic flowchart to facilitate using these guidelines in the clinical setting. PMID:24665134

  18. Intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemia due to red blood cell alloimmunization: 14 years experience in Leuven

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, S.A.; Claes, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Schoubroeck, D.; Debeer, A.; Emonds, M.; Geuten, E.; De Catte, L.; Devlieger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to report on the pregnancy and neonatal outcome of intrauterine transfusion (IUT) for red blood cell (RBC-)alloimmunization. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all IUT for RBC-alloimmunization in the University Hospital of Leuven, between January 2000 and January 2014. The influence of hydrops, gestational age and technique of transfusion on procedure related adverse events were examined. Results: 135 IUTs were performed in 56 fetuses. In none of the cases fetal or neonatal death occurred. Mild adverse events were noted in 10% of IUTs, whereas severe adverse events occurred in 1.5%. Hydrops and transfusion in a free loop were associated with an increased risk of adverse events whereas gestational age (GA) at transfusion after 34 weeks was not. Median GA at birth was 35.6 weeks and 9% was born before 34 weeks. Besides phototherapy 65.4% required additional neonatal treatment for alloimmune anemia. Non-hematologic complications occurred in 23.6% and were mainly related to preterm birth. Conclusion: In experienced hands, IUT for RBC-alloimmunization is a safe procedure in this era. Patients should be referred to specialist centers prior to the development of hydrops. IUT in a free loop of cord and unnecessary preterm birth are best avoided. PMID:26175890

  19. Successful (?) therapy of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with factor H abnormality.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Angela; Kirchhoff-Moradpour, Antje H; Obieglo, Silke; Brandis, Matthias; Kirschfink, Michael; Zipfel, Peter F; Goodship, Judith A; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B

    2003-09-01

    We report a patient with continuously recurring hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to factor H deficiency. First at the age of 3 months he showed signs of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency, often recurring concomitantly with respiratory tract infections, despite weekly to twice weekly plasma substitution (20 ml/kg body weight). Now at the age of 3.5 years glomerular filtration rate is approximately 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and psychomotoric development is normal. Since factor H is mainly synthesized in the liver, hepatic transplantation has been proposed as curative treatment. Before justification of liver transplantation as the ultimate treatment for these patients, an international registry should be developed to optimize and standardize therapeutic alternatives. PMID:12836093

  20. A Child With Dyserythropoietic Anemia and Megakaryocyte Dysplasia Due to a Novel 5'UTR GATA1s Splice Mutation.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Jacob; Temm, Constance; Czader, Magdalena; Nalepa, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    We describe a child with dyserythropoietic anemia, thrombocytosis, functional platelet defect, and megakaryocyte dysplasia. We show that (i) this constellation of hematopoietic abnormalities was due to a germline mutation within the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of globin transcription factor 1 (GATA1); (ii) the mutation impaired a 5'UTR GATA1 splicing site, with promoted production of the shortened GATA1 isoform lacking the N-terminus; and (iii) expression of the GATA1 N-terminus is restricted to erythroblasts and megakaryocytes in normal marrow, consistent with the patient's abnormal erythropoiesis and megakaryopoiesis. Our findings provide insights into the clinically relevant in vivo function of the N-terminal domain of GATA1 in human hematopoiesis. PMID:26713410

  1. About Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? About Anemia KidsHealth > For Kids > About Anemia Print A A ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia occurs when a person doesn't have ...

  2. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me- ... as aplastic anemia. Updated: August 22, 2012 Aplastic Anemia in the News July 1, 2015 Largest Study ...

  3. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II associated with G6PD Seattle in a Sicilian child.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, S; Romano, V; Miraglia del Giudice, E; Perrotta, S; Iolascon, A; Schiliro, G

    1995-01-01

    A 2-year-old Sicilian boy was investigated because of chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia (CNSHA) associated with hepatosplenomegaly. Appropriate studies revealed deficiency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase type Seattle (G6PD Seattle). In addition, bone marrow morphology, serological studies and analysis of red cell membrane proteins revealed congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) type II (or HEMPAS). Because G6PD Seattle on its own does not cause CNSHA, we believe that the clinical manifestations in this patient are essentially due to the CDA type II abnormality. However, the coexistence of these two different red cell abnormalities may affect the clinical picture specifically by making CDA type II more hemolytic than it would have been otherwise. PMID:7725848

  4. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camc?o?lu, Burcu; Bo?nak-Gl, Meral; Karadall?, M?errefe Nur; Ak?, ?ahika Zeynep; Trkz-Sucak, Glsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  5. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  6. Heme: Modulator of Plasma Systems in Hemolytic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Roumenina, Lubka T; Rayes, Julie; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien; Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic diseases such as sickle-cell disease, β-thalassemia, malaria, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia continue to present serious clinical hurdles. In these diseases, lysis of erythrocytes causes the release of hemoglobin and heme into plasma. Extracellular heme has strong proinflammatory potential and activates immune cells and endothelium, thus contributing to disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that heme can interfere with the function of plasma effector systems such as the coagulation and complement cascades, in addition to the activity of immunoglobulins. Any perturbation in such functions may have severe pathological consequences. In this review we analyze heme interactions with coagulation, complement, and immunoglobulins. Deciphering such interactions to better understand the complex pathogenesis of hemolytic diseases is pivotal. PMID:26875449

  7. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  8. Pregnancy-Associated Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Antonio F.; Roman, Jorge; Wyble, Aaron; Pacheco, Luis D.

    2016-01-01

    Précis Introduction Early diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome may be challenging during the puerperium period. Correct diagnosis and timely management are crucial to improve outcomes. Background Pregnancy-associated atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (p-aHUS) is a rare condition characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Triggered by pregnancy, genetically predisposed women develop the syndrome, leading to a disastrous hemolytic disease characterized by diffuse endothelial damage and platelet consumption. This disease is a life-threatening condition that requires prompt diagnosis and therapy. Case A 19-year-old G1P1 Caucasian female with suspicion of HELLP syndrome was treated at our facility for severe thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury. A diagnosis of atypical uremic–hemolytic syndrome was later confirmed. The patient's condition improved with normalization of platelets and improvement in kidney function after 14 days of plasmapheresis. She was subsequently treated with eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody against C5. The patient tolerated well the therapy and is currently in remission. Conclusion Diagnosis of p-aHUS is challenging, as it can mimic various diseases found during pregnancy and the postpartum. Plasma exchange should be promptly initiated within 24 hours of diagnosis. Eculizumab has risen to become an important tool to improve long-term comorbidities and mortality in this group population. PMID:26989566

  9. Fanconi anemia-D1 due to homozygosity for the BRCA2 gene Cypriot founder mutation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LOIZIDOU, MARIA A.; HADJISAVVAS, ANDREAS; TANTELES, GEORGE A.; SPANOU-ARISTIDOU, ELENA; KYRIACOU, KYRIACOS; CHRISTOPHIDOU-ANASTASIADOU, VIOLETTA

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare disorder characterized by multiple congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and susceptibility to malignancies. Biallelic mutations in the breast cancer 2, early onset (BRCA2) gene are responsible for the FA-D1 subgroup, which accounts for ~3% of all the FA cases. Patients with biallelic BRCA2 mutations generally display a more severe phenotype, with earlier onset and increased incidence of leukaemia and other solid tumors, than other patients with FA. In the present report, the first Cypriot patient with FA-D1 is described, which is the fifth case of a homozygote for the same null allele reported thus far, and the third known case of neuroblastoma in association with FA-D1. PMID:26834852

  10. Haptoglobin blood test

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anemia due to G6PD deficiency Idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia Immune hemolytic anemia Liver disease Transfusion reaction ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias In: Goldman L, ... Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 163. Sheehan AM, Yee ...

  11. Assays of hemolytic toxins.

    PubMed

    Rowe, G E; Welch, R A

    1994-01-01

    The ability to produce a cytolytic toxin contributes to the success of many organisms in a particular niche by such diverse means as lysis of a phagolysosomal membrane of the macrophage by hemolysin from the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, disruption of leukocyte activity by the Escherichia coli hemolysin, and destruction of invading bacteria by hemolysin from the annelid Glycera dibranchiata. The relative contribution of erythrocyte lysis to survival of the cytolysin producer is still under investigation. Nevertheless, the hemolytic phenotype is both a powerful tool for identifying novel cytolysins and a convenient marker for studying cytolytic activity in established toxins. PMID:7520121

  12. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions. PMID:26696804

  13. Refractory atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy responsive to bortezomib-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Leung, Nelson; Sethi, Sanjeev; Gertz, Morie A; Fervenza, Fernando C

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a relatively rare disorder described by the triad of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Atypical HUS could be genetic, acquired, or idiopathic (without known genetic changes or environmental triggers). Monoclonal protein has uncommonly been reported as a cause of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA). We report a 59-year-old white man who presented with acute kidney injury (AKI) with MAHA and was given a diagnosis of aHUS with monoclonal gammopathy. His kidney function and proteinuria worsened with persistent hemolysis despite eculizumab and later cyclophosphamide and prednisone treatment. He responded well to VRD (bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone) regimen. Renal function, proteinuria, and hemolysis all improved, and he was been in remission for more than 15 months. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment with bortezomib-based regimen for a patient with aHUS and monoclonal protein refractory to eculizumab therapy. PMID:25345382

  14. Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    de Montalembert, Mariane; Dumont, Marie-Dominique; Heilbronner, Claire; Brousse, Valentine; Charrara, Oussama; Pellegrino, Béatrice; Piguet, Christophe; Soussan, Valérie; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2011-01-01

    Background Transfusion is a cornerstone of the management of sickle cell disease but carries a high risk of hemolytic transfusion reaction, probably because of differences in erythrocyte antigens between blood donors of European descent and patients of African descent. Patients may experience hemolytic transfusion reactions that are delayed by from a few days to two weeks and manifest as acute hemolysis (hemoglobinuria, jaundice, and pallor), symptoms suggesting severe vaso-occlusive crisis (pain, fever, and acute chest syndrome), and profound anemia, often with reticulocytopenia. This case-series study aims to describe the main characteristics of this syndrome, to discuss its pathophysiology, and to propose a management strategy. Design and Methods We identified 8 pediatric cases of delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions between 2006 and 2009 in the database of the Necker Hospital, France. All patients had received cross-matched red cell units compatible in the ABO, RH, and KEL systems. We reviewed the medical charts in the computerized blood transfusion databases. All patients were admitted to the intensive care unit. We progressively adopted the following strategy: intravenous immunoglobulins, and darbopoietin alpha when the reticulocyte count was below 150×109/L, without further blood transfusion during the acute episode unless absolutely necessary. Results The median time between the transfusion and the diagnosis of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction was six days. All patients had severe bone pain; all but one had a high-grade fever. Five patients had hemoglobin levels less than than 4g/dL and 3 had reticulocytopenia. In 5 patients, no new antibody was found; one patient had weakly reactive antibodies. Only 2 patients had new allo-antibodies possibly responsible for the delayed hemolytic reaction. Conclusions The initial symptoms of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction were complex and mimicked other complications of sickle cell disease. In most of our cases, no new antibody was identified, which underlines the complexity of the pathophysiology of this syndrome. PMID:21330322

  15. Comparison of two recombinant erythropoietin formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis: A parallel, randomized, double blind study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Oliva, Jorge F; Casanova-González, Martha; García-García, Idrian; Porrero-Martín, Pedro J; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen M; Hernández-Montero, Tairí; Lagarde-Ampudia, Marcia; Casanova-Kutsareva, Yuri; Ávila-Albuerne, Yisel; Vargas-Batista, Alicia; Bobillo-López, Hailen; Herrera-Valdés, Raúl; López-Saura, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Background Recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO) is used for the treatment of last stage renal anemia. A new EPO preparation was obtained in Cuba in order to make this treatment fully nationally available. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety properties of two recombinant EPO formulations in patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis. Methods A parallel, randomized, double blind study was performed. A single 100 IU/Kg EPO dose was administered subcutaneously. Heberitro (Heber Biotec, Havana, formulation A), a newly developed product and Eprex (CILAG AG, Switzerland, formulation B), as reference treatment were compared. Thirty-four patients with anemia due to end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis were included. Patients had not received EPO previously. Serum EPO level was measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) during 120 hours after administration. Clinical and laboratory variables were determined as pharmacodynamic and safety criteria until 216 hours. Results Both groups of patients were similar regarding all demographic and baseline characteristics. EPO kinetics profiles were similar for both formulations; the pharmacokinetic parameters were very close (i.e., AUC: 4667 vs. 4918 mIU.h/mL; Cmax: 119.1 vs. 119.7 mIU/mL; Tmax: 13.9 vs. 18.1 h; half-life, 20.0 vs. 22.5 h for formulations A and B, respectively). The 90% confidence intervals for the ratio between both products regarding these metrics were close to the 0.8 – 1.25 range, considered necessary for bioequivalence. Differences did not reach 20% in any case and were not determined by a formulation effect, but probably by a patients' variability effect. Concerning pharmacodynamic features, a high similitude in reticulocyte counts increments until 216 hours and the percentage decrease in serum iron until 120 hours was observed. There were no differences between formulations regarding the adverse events and their intensity. The more frequent events were pain at injection site (35.3%) and hypertension (29%). Additionally, further treatment of the patients with the study product yielded satisfactory increases in hemoglobin and hematocrit values. Conclusion The formulations are comparable. The newly developed product should be acceptable for long-term application. PMID:15910687

  16. Analysis of a Viridans Group Strain Reveals a Case of Bacteremia Due to Lancefield Group G Alpha-Hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in a Patient with Pyomyositis and Reactive Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Teng, Jade L. L.; Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lum, Peggy N. L.; Leung, Kit-Wah; Wong, Kee-Lam; Li, Kin-Wah; Lam, Kui-Chun; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2003-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae is classified by a combination of phenotypic and genotypic characteristics into Lancefield group C alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae and Lancefield group C, group G, and group L beta-hemolytic Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. In this study, we report the isolation of a catalase-negative, alpha-hemolytic, optochin- and bacitracin-resistant viridans group strain, which does not grow in 10 or 40% bile, on MacConkey agar or bile esculin agar, or in 6% NaCl, from the blood culture of a 73-year-old woman with pyomyositis and poststreptococcal reactive arthritis. Lancefield grouping revealed that the strain was a group G streptococcus. The Vitek system (GPI) showed that it was unidentified, and the API system (20 STREP) showed that it was 95.7% S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. 16S rRNA gene sequencing showed that it was a strain of S. dysgalactiae. Based on phylogenetic affiliation with 16S rRNA gene or GroEL amino acid (another bacterial gene, in addition to 16S rRNA gene, that is highly conserved) sequences, the strain is most closely related to Lancefield group C beta-hemolytic S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. PCR amplification and sequencing of the streptolysin S structural gene (sagA) and M protein gene (emm) hypervariable region showed the presence of these suspected primary virulence factors. Further studies would delineate whether the isolate is just a hemolysin-deficient variant of group G beta-hemolytic S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis or a novel type of S. dysgalactiae. The present case showed that group G alpha-hemolytic S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis can be associated with serious invasive infection and poststreptococcal sequelae. PMID:12574255

  17. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... PA: Churchill Livingston; 2008:chap 45. Golan DER. Hemolytic anemias: red cell membrane and metabolic defects. In: Goldman ...

  18. Aplastic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... cells. But the disease may return (relapse). A bone marrow transplant with an unrelated donor may be tried if ... Untreated, severe aplastic anemia leads to rapid death. Bone marrow transplant can be very successful in young people. Transplant ...

  19. Two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1 : >8,192 and 1 : 16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  20. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laužikienė, D.; Ramašauskaitė, D.; Lūža, T.; Lenkutienė, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied. PMID:26719601

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Home Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Anemia Related topics on Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic ... syndrome beta thalassemia Coats plus syndrome congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Fanconi anemia Ghosal hematodiaphyseal dysplasia ...

  2. Diamond-Blackfan anemia and nutritional deficiency-induced anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Gelbart, David

    2014-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, inherited disease that characteristically presents as a chronic, normochromic macrocytosis due to red cell lineage bone marrow failure. Although studies are elaborating on the genetic basis for its associated comorbidities, little has been published comparing this anemia to other chronic anemias that have similar laboratory results in children. This article offers a global perspective of the disease and compares it with anemia due to vitamin B12 and folate deficiency in children. PMID:24662257

  3. [Iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disorders].

    PubMed

    Metzgeroth, G; Hastka, J

    2015-09-01

    Hypochromic-microcytic anemias are characterized by a hemoglobin deficiency of the erythrocytes. The main reason for the insufficient hemoglobin synthesis is, with exception of thalassemia and a few other rare conditions, primarily a disorder of iron metabolism. Differential diagnostic considerations are focused on iron deficiency anemia, with approximately 80% the most common form of anemia worldwide. Iron deficiency anemia shows a particularly high prevalence in developing countries, but is also in industrialized Western countries the most common cause of anemia. Infants, toddlers, premenopausal or pregnant women, and elderly people are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency anemia. The most important differential diagnosis for iron deficiency anemia is the anemia of chronic disorders (ACD). This anemia is caused by a disturbance of iron utilization (functional iron deficiency), in which iron absorption and iron release, as a nonspecific defense mechanism, is blocked to restrict iron availability for the inflammatory process but also withhold iron from the erythropoiesis. ACD is not rare, but plays a significant role in hospitalized patients and in the elderly. The differentiation between ACD and iron deficiency anemia is highly important from a clinical point of view, due to different types of further management. The cause for iron deficiency should be clarified in each case, whereas the etiology for ACD is often obvious. The standard treatment of iron deficiency anemia is oral iron supplementation. Intravenous iron application is reserved for problem patients. The best treatment for ACD is the elimination of the underlying chronic disorder. In case of persistent ACD, red blood cell transfusions, erythropoietin, and intravenous iron are used therapeutically. PMID:26228317

  4. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  5. Diagnosis and management of congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    PubMed

    Gambale, Antonella; Iolascon, Achille; Andolfo, Immacolata; Russo, Roberta

    2016-03-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are inherited disorders hallmarked by chronic hyporegenerative anemia, relative reticulocytopenia, hemolytic component and iron overload. They represent a subtype of the inherited bone marrow failure syndromes, characterized by impaired differentiation and proliferation of the erythroid lineage. Three classical types were defined by marrow morphology, even if the most recent classification recognized six different genetic types. The pathomechanisms of CDAs are different, but all seem to involve the regulation of DNA replication and cell division. CDAs are often misdiagnosed, since either morphological abnormalities or clinical features can be commonly identified in other clinically-related anemias. However, differential diagnosis is essential for guiding both follow up and management of the patients. PMID:26653117

  6. Hemolytic uremic syndrome following Hemiscorpius lepturus (scorpion) sting.

    PubMed

    Valavi, E; Ansari, M J Alemzadeh

    2008-10-01

    Scorpion envenomations are a public health problem in many countries. Scorpions are second only to snakes in causing human fatalities from envenomation. Species of scorpions capable of inflicting fatal stings are living in North and South Africa, the Middle East, India, America, Trinidad, and Tobago. Hemiscorpius lepturus (from the Hemiscorpiidae family) is the most medically important scorpion in Iran which accounts for 92% of all hospitalized scorpion sting cases. The venom from H. lepturus is primarily a cytotoxic agent and has hemolytic, nephrotoxic, and to some extent, hepatotoxic activities. We found a combination of microangiopatic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure in a seven year-old female child who was referred to us with a 12 h history of bloody urine following a H. lepturus sting. Her blood smear showed fragmented erythrocytes and burr cells, leading us to a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This report highlights the importance of acceptable prophylaxis and therapeutic protocols for HUS in these patients. PMID:20142930

  7. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Patients Face Worse Outcomes: Study (News) Finding Suggests Zika Virus Can Move From Mother to Child During Pregnancy ( ... often curable... More News News HealthDay Finding Suggests Zika Virus Can Move From Mother to Child During Pregnancy ...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  9. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn in the molecular era.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M

    2016-02-01

    Maternal-fetal red cell antigen incompatibility can lead to alloimmunization, maternal immunoglobulin transplacental transfer, and hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN). The use of routine antenatal anti-D prophylaxis (RAADP) has sharply decreased the incidence of and mortality from HDFN due to RhD allosensitization. The ability to identify pregnancies/fetuses at risk of HDFN has significantly improved due to paternal molecular RHD zygosity testing, and non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics for detecting putative antigen(s) (notably RhD) in fetuses utilizing cff-DNA in maternal plasma. Fetal RHD genotyping using cff-DNA has become increasingly accurate for fetal RHD detection, prompting some countries to implement targeted RAADP through mass screening programs of RhD-negative pregnant women. Along with middle cerebral artery Doppler ultrasonography for predicting fetal anemia, non-invasive fetal molecular diagnostics have greatly decreased the need for invasive diagnostic procedures in pregnancies at risk for severe HDFN. This review highlights these molecular advancements in HDFN-related prenatal diagnostics. PMID:26589360

  10. Hematinic effect of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. on phenylhydrazine-induced anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Sanjay P.; Sheth, Navin R.; Suhagia, Bhanubhai N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. are known as prickly pear and folkloric use as hematinic, anti-inflammatory and antiasthmatic action. Previously, the fruit juice of prickly pear was evaluated in reversed anemia induced by HgCl2 in a dose dependant manner and present study revealed about its effect in acute hemolytic anemia. Aim: To evaluate the hematinic activity of fruits of Opuntia elatior Mill. Materials and Methods: The hematinic activity of an orally administered fruit juice was studied on phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced anemic rats. The hematological parameters such as hemoglobin (Hb) content, red blood cell (RBC), packed cell volume (PCV), and reticulocyte count were analyzed as indices of anemia. Results: PHZ altered the hematological parameters by hemolysis characterized by a decrease in Hb content, total RBC counts and PCV (P < 0.001) on day 3. The Hb content (g%) was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at day 7 in 10 and 15 ml/kg fruit juice treated rats, which was a good improvement compared to the standard. Conclusion: The speedy and progressive recovery of anemic rats responding to treatment of the O. elatior Mill. fruits may be due to increased erythropoiesis and/or antioxidant property of betacyanin. PMID:27011725

  11. Severe Aplastic Anemia (SAA)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Email this page Print this page Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) Severe aplastic anemia (SAA) is a disease in which the bone ... blood cells for the body. Tweet Severe aplastic anemia Symptoms of SAA How transplant can treat SAA ...

  12. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  13. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia of inflammation; AOCD; ACD ... Anemia is a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells in the blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as ...

  14. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  15. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Anemia Often, you can treat and control anemia. If ... by an inherited or chronic disease or trauma. Anemia and Children/Teens Infants and young children have ...

  16. Chickens treated with a nitric oxide inhibitor became more resistant to Plasmodium gallinaceum infection due to reduced anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is a serious infectious disease caused by parasites of the Plasmodium genus that affect different vertebrate hosts. Severe malaria leads to host death and involves different pathophysiological phenomena such as anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important effector molecule in this disease, but little is known about its role in avian malaria models. Plasmodium gallinaceum- infected chickens were treated with aminoguanidine (AG), an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase, to observe the role of NO in the pathogenesis of this avian model. AG increased the survival of chickens, but also induced higher parasitemia. Treated chickens demonstrated reduced anemia and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, erythrocytes at different stages of maturation, heterophils, monocytes and thrombocytes were infected by Plasmodium gallinaceum and animals presented a generalized leucopenia. Activated leukocytes and thrombocytes with elongated double nuclei were observed in chickens with higher parasitemia; however, eosinophils were not involved in the infection. AG reduced levels of hemozoin in the spleen and liver, indicating lower inflammation. Taken together, the results suggest that AG reduced anemia, thrombocytopenia and inflammation, explaining the greater survival rate of the treated chickens. PMID:23398940

  17. Sexuality and sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Côbo, Viviane de Almeida; Chapadeiro, Cibele Alves; Ribeiro, João Batista; Moraes-Souza, Helio; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease, the most common hereditary blood disease in the world, is the result of an atypical hemoglobin called S (Hb S) which, when homozygous (Hb SS) is the cause of sickle cell anemia. Changes of puberty, correlated with a delayed growth spurt, begin late in both male and female sickle cell anemia individuals with repercussions on sexuality and reproduction. The objectives of this exploratory and descriptive study were to characterize the development of sexuality in adults with sickle cell anemia by investigating the patient's perception of their sex life, as well as the information they had and needed on this subject. Methods Twenty male and female sickle cell anemia patients treated at the Hemocentro Regional de Uberaba (UFTM) with ages between 19 and 47 years old were enrolled. A socioeconomic questionnaire and a semi-structured interview on sexuality, reproduction and genetic counseling were applied. Results This study shows that the sickle cell anemia patients lacked information on sexuality especially about the risks of pregnancy and the possible inheritance of the disease by their children. Moreover, the sexual life of the patients was impaired due to pain as well as discrimination and negative feelings experienced in close relationships. Conclusion The health care of sickle cell anemia patients should take into account not only the clinical aspects of the disease, but also psychosocial aspects by providing counseling on sexuality, reproduction and genetics, in order to give this population the possibility of a better quality of life. PMID:23741184

  18. Anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alfred Ian; Okam, Maureen M

    2011-04-01

    Anemia in pregnancy is a global health problem affecting nearly half of all pregnant women worldwide. High fetal demands for iron render iron deficiency the most common cause of anemia of pregnancy, with other micronutrient deficiencies contributing less frequently. In certain geographical populations, human pathogens such as hookworm, malarial parasite and human immunodeficiency virus are important factors in anemia of pregnancy. The hemoglobinopathies, sickle cell disease and thalassemia, represent diverse causes of anemia of pregnancy, requiring specialized care. Aplastic anemia is a rare, morbid cause of anemia of pregnancy and is managed with transfusions until the completion of pregnancy. PMID:21444028

  19. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1982-1983)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1983-09-09

    The nature of the defects that shorten the effective lifespan of red blood cells in the circulation and which gave rise to anemia, jaundice and to spleen, liver and heart enlargement are studied because they so closely parallel inherited hemolytic anemias in man. In mice, ''hemolytic disease'' initiated by the ja, sph, sph/sup ha/, or the nb genes has been traced to abnormalities in the protein components of their red cell membranes. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of detergent solubilized membranes reveal that in the different genetic types one or more of the major high molecular weight proteins called spectrins is decreased or totally missing. It is one thing to observe a correlation between missing or defective components in selected analytical procedures, and another to establish a causal relationship between the two. To investigate the possible interrelationships, we examined the associations between spectrin or ankyrin content, the severity of the resulting anemia, red cell osmotic fragilities, and the capacity of cells from each genotype to be deformed in a continuous osmotic gradient at constant sheer stress. Our findings indicate that sensitivity to osmotic stress, cell rigidity (inadequate deformability), deficiency of spectrin or ankyrin, and the severity of the anemia, are statistically highly correlated. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Casas, Kari A; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan

    2004-03-01

    We report four new cases of mitochondrial myopathy and sideroblastic anemia (MSA). Hallmark features of MSA include progressive exercise intolerance during childhood, onset of sideroblastic anemia around adolescence, basal lactic acidemia, and mitochondrial myopathy. Autosomal recessive inheritance of MSA in the family we describe is assumed due to the presence of two affected sibling pairs, unaffected parents, an unaffected sibling, and parental consanguinity. The nuclear families we describe are paternally related and originate from the same Iranian city as a family with MSA described by [Inbal et al., 1995]. These families provide an opportunity to clarify the molecular basis of tissue specific expression of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:14981724

  1. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and whether you have family members who have anemia or a history of it. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to find out how severe your anemia is and to check for possible causes. He ...

  2. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  3. Anemia and Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 ASH Annual Meeting View all publications Home Anemia and Pregnancy Your body goes through significant changes ... becoming anemic. back to top Is Pregnancy-Related Anemia Preventable? Good nutrition is the best way to ...

  4. Early Complication in Sickle Cell Anemia Children due to A(TA)nTAA Polymorphism at the Promoter of UGT1A1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chaouch, Leila; Talbi, Emna; Moumni, Imen; Ben Chaabene, Arij; Kalai, Miniar; Chaouachi, Dorra; Mallouli, Fethi; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To determine the implication of the polymorphism, namely, A(TA)nTAA of UGT1A1 in lithogenesis for the first time in Tunisia among sickle cell anemia (SCA) children patients. Material and Methods. Our study was performed in 2010 and it involved 76 subjects chosen as control group characterized with normal hemoglobin status and presence of cholelithiasis and 102 SCA pediatric patients among whom 52 have cholelithiasis. We analyzed the polymorphism A(TA)nTAA at the UGT1A1 promoter and the relationships between the various A(TA)nTAA genotypes and alleles and bilirubin levels and occurrence of cholelithiasis. Results and Discussion. The repartition of genotypes found according to serum bilirubin level shows a significant association between genotypes carrying variant (TA)7 and hyperbilirubinemia (P < 0.05). We demonstrated the association of two genotypes with gallstones formation among SCA children patients: (TA)7/(TA)7 and (TA)7/(TA)8 with P = 8.1 × 10−8 and P = 0.01, respectively. (TA)7 and (TA)8 allele variants act as a risk factor for early gallstones formation in SCA patients with P = 5.8 × 10−9 and P = 0.01, respectively. As for the control group only the genotype (TA)7/(TA)7 presented a risk factor for gallstones formation. Conclusion. The novelty of this report is that it is the first time that a similar study was made on the Tunisian children sickle cell population and that the results show a clear association of (TA)7 variant in early gallstones formation in Tunisian SCA children. Interestingly our findings highlighted the association of (TA)8 variant as well, which was not found in previous studies. PMID:24167350

  5. Nitrite-induced anemia in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, C.S. ); Francis-Floyd, R.; Beleau, M.H. )

    1989-08-01

    Since 1983 numerous cases of anemia have been reported in populations of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque cultured in the southeastern United States. Environmental nitrite-nitrogen concentrations of 4 mg/L or more occur sporadically in channel catfish culture ponds, and the frequency of occurrence is greatest in the fall and spring. The authors have observed that some cases of anemia in populations of pond-raised channel catfish follow prolonged exposure to high concentrations of environmental nitrite. However, there was no evidence that exposure of channel catfish to environmental nitrite was the cause of the observed anemia. Hemolytic anemia following nitrite exposure has been described for sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax (L.) and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri, but not for channel catfish. In the present study the authors show that a variable, but generally mild, anemia develops in channel catfish exposed to nitrite. They also offer a management procedure for preventing the development of anemia during periods of elevated environmental nitrite concentrations.

  6. Lipid peroxidation in the hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, S; Fong, J S

    1978-01-01

    Based on recent evidence of a genetic influence on prognosis (1) and the existence of red cell membrane phospholipid depletion with low or absent serum alpha-tocopherol (2) levels in three children with the Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (H.U.S.), we wish to suggest the existence of an inborn error of antioxident capacity as the basic pathogenetic mechanism in the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (H.U.S.). PMID:713892

  7. Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection with pyomyositis due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a patient with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuichi; Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Tanabe, Takayuki; Nishikawa, Takuro; Abematsu, Takanari; Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Kurauchi, Koichiro; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Ikeda, Naohiro; Seki, Shunji; Wakiguchi, Hiroyuki; Miyazono, Akinori; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-03-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia causes pneumonia and CVC-CRBSI in HSCT. However, there are few reports of pyomyositis due to S. maltophilia. We report a patient with CRBSI and pyomyositis due to S. maltophilia after allogeneic HSCT who was successfully treated by removing the CVC and antibiotics without surgical drainage. Removing the CVC and the combined antibiotics without preventing the neutrophil engraftment could avoid surgical drainage in pyomyositis due to S. maltophilia when detected in an early stage. PMID:26918735

  8. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and acute chest syndrome revealing sickle cell anemia in a 32 years female patient.

    PubMed

    Igala, Marielle; Nsame, Daniela; Ova, Jennie Dorothée Guelongo Okouango; Cherkaoui, Siham; Oukkach, Bouchra; Quessar, Asmae

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from a single amino acid substitution in the gene encoding the β-globin subunit. Polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin leads to decreased deformability of red blood cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common thyroid disease now recognized as an auto-immune thyroid disorder, it is usually thought to be haemolytic autoimmune anemia. We report the case of a 32 years old women admitted for chest pain and haemolysis anemia in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis and sickle cell anemia were found. In our observation the patient is a young woman whose examination did not show signs of goitre but the analysis of thyroid function tests performed before an auto-immune hemolytic anemia (confirmed by a high level of unconjugated bilirubin and a Coombs test positive for IgG) has found thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and positive thyroid antibody at rates in excess of 4.5 times their normal value. In the same period, as the hemolytic anemia, and before the atypical chest pain and anguish they generated in the patient, the search for hemoglobinopathies was made despite the absence of a family history of haematological disease or painful attacks in childhood. Patient electrophoresis's led to research similar cases in the family. The mother was the first to be analyzed with ultimately diagnosed with sickle cell trait have previously been ignored. This case would be a form with few symptoms because the patient does not describe painful crises in childhood or adolescence. PMID:26327979

  9. The Global Burden of Anemia.

    PubMed

    Kassebaum, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Anemia is an important cause of health loss. We estimated levels and trends of nonfatal anemia burden for 23 distinct etiologies in 188 countries, 20 age groups, and both sexes from 1990 to 2013. All available population-level anemia data were collected and standardized. We estimated mean hemoglobin, prevalence of anemia by severity, quantitative disability owing to anemia, and underlying etiology for each population using the approach of the Global Burden of Disease, Injuries and Risk Factors 2013 Study. Anemia burden is high. Developing countries account for 89% of all anemia-related disability. Iron-deficiency anemia remains the dominant cause of anemia. PMID:27040955

  10. Cerebral infarction in acute anemia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Fen; Yip, Ping-Keung; Chen, Chao-Ching; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Chung, Shih-Tze; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2010-12-01

    There are few previous studies on the relationship between cerebral infarction and acute anemia. This study presents patients with cerebral infarction in acute anemia due to marked blood loss and aims to clarify the stroke nature and possible mechanism. Patients with acute cerebral infarction and anemia following marked blood loss without systemic hypotension were recruited from 2001 to 2009. Clinical characteristics, particularly hemoglobin level, and neuroimaging findings were reviewed in detail to analyze the stroke nature and verify the possible pathogenesis. Twelve patients (males 8; mean age 74.9 years) were included. Eleven patients had cerebral infarction after acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding, and one had cerebral infarction following postoperative extensive hematoma during hospitalization. In all patients, borderzone infarction was the most characteristic finding: six had unilateral and six had bilateral borderzone infarction. Mean hemoglobin at infarction after acute blood loss was 5.8 g/dl, with 46% reduction from baseline. Of nine patients receiving detailed extracranial and intracranial vascular studies, none had severe carotid stenosis and six had intracranial stenosis. The arterial borderzones are the most vulnerable regions to a fall in cerebral perfusion. Acute anemia may produce cerebral blood flow insufficiency, reduce oxygen-carrying capacity, and result in distal-field tissue ischemic injury when hemoglobin level decreases below a critical level, especially in patients with intracranial stenosis. PMID:20635184

  11. [Management of adults with sickle cell anemia].

    PubMed

    Bachir, D

    1999-01-01

    The management of adults with sickle cell disease should be geared to the profile of the disease in adulthood. The chronic hemolytic anemia impacts everyday activities. Paroxysmal complications include painful vasoocclusive crises, acute chest syndrome, priapism, and infections. Potentially life-threatening chronic complications should be detected and treated early; they include cardiopulmonary, renal, and hepatic involvement. Osteonecrosis of the hip can result in functional impairment. Pregnancy and anesthesia require special precautions. A multifaceted personalized management program, if possible at a sickle cell disease center working closely with other health care providers and social workers, offers the best hope for providing ever-increasing gains in quality of life for sickle cell disease patients. PMID:10081778

  12. Neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome from a factor H mutation treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sheena; Pradhan, Madhura; Meyers, Kevin E.C.; Le Palma, Krish; Laskin, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) results from an inherited dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway leading to thrombotic microangiopathy consisting of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal injury. The complement inhibitor eculizumab is an approved treatment, but its reported use in neonates – who have an inherently high risk of infection – is limited. Case diagnosis/treatment: A 28-day-old female presented with gross hematuria and hypertension. aHUS was suspected based on anemia with schistocytes, thrombocytopenia, low C3, and acute kidney injury requiring peritoneal dialysis. A septic work-up initiated on day 2 for hypothermia and respiratory failure was negative. There was no improvement after 6 days of plasma therapy. Despite being < 6 weeks old she was vaccinated with pneumococcal-13 conjugate, meningococcal (groups C and Y) polysaccharide, and Haemophilus b tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccines and started on penicillin prophylaxis. After 1 dose of eculizumab 300 mg, dialysis was discontinued and her hematological parameters improved. Genetic testing revealed a complement factor H mutation. After 11 months of follow-up, she remains on eculizumab and penicillin without recurrence of aHUS or any infectious complications. Conclusions: Eculizumab is a safe and effective treatment option for aHUS even in neonates at high risk for infection. PMID:25816809

  13. [Anemia in obstetrics and gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Gredilla Díaz, E

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is more common in women due to uterine bleeding, which affects them throughout their fertile life. Additionally, iron needs increase physiologically during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Pregnant women therefore constitute one of the risk groups for iron deficiency. During the postpartum period, iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. Longer hospital stays and greater susceptibility to infections are potential consequences of postpartum anemia. PMID:26320347

  14. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1980-1981)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1981-07-02

    The basic purpose of this study is the delineation and exploitation of inborn anemias of the laboratory mouse, carried out by utilization of genetically homogeneous stocks segregating only for anemia-producing genes; by physiological and histological descriptions of each condition at all stages in the life history; by determination of tissue sites of primary gene action through tissue culture studies, tissue transplantation and parabiosis experiments; by analysis of reactions of normal and anemic mice to a variety of stressful stimuli, including x-irradiation, hypoxia, and toxic chemicals, and by biochemical comparisons between tissues, especially erythrocytes and hemopoietic cells of normal vs each type of anemic mouse. At present 16 single-locus anemias are known in the mouse, plus one with multifactorial inheritance (the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB inbred mice). Of these, six are maintained only by the Jackson Laboratory, and two others have but one additional source. Effects of anemia-producing mutant alleles of these loci (an; f; ja; ha; Hba/sup th/; mk; nb; Sl and Sl/sup d/; sla; sph; and W, W/sup v/, W/sup J/ and 10 other putative W-alleles) are currently under investigation at the Jackson Laboratory. 15 refs.

  15. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  16. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated? Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia may need lifelong treatment. The goals of treating ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1 Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome The Merck Manual ...

  18. Case Report: Severe form of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with multiple organ failure in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Mijatovic, Dino; Blagaic, Ana; Zupan, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in infants and young children. It is traditionally defined as a triad of acute renal failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia that occur within a week after prodromal hemorrhagic enterocolitis. Severe cases can also be presented by acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), toxic megacolon with ileus, pancreatitis, central nervous system (CNS) disorders and multiple organ failure (MOF). Case presentation: A previously healthy 4-year old Caucasian girl developed acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia and hemolytic anemia following a short episode of abdominal pain and bloody diarrhea. By the end of the first week the diagnosis of the typical HUS was established. During the second week the disease progressed into MOF that included ileus, pancreatitis, hepatitis, coma and ARDS, accompanied by hemodynamic instability and extreme leukocytosis. Nonetheless, the girl made a complete recovery after one month of the disease. She was successfully treated in the intensive care unit and significant improvement was noticed after plasmapheresis and continuous veno-venous hemodialysis. Conclusions: Early start of plasmapheresis and meticulous supportive treatment in the intensive care unit, including renal placement therapy, may be the therapy of choice in severe cases of HUS presented by MOF. Monitoring of prognostic factors is important for early performance of appropriate diagnostic and therapeutical interventions. PMID:25075296

  19. Iron sequestration and anemia of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2009-01-01

    Anemia of chronic disease, also called anemia of inflammation, is characterized by hypoferremia due to iron sequestration that eventually results in iron-restricted erythropoiesis. During the last decade, the molecular mechanisms of iron sequestration have been found to center on cytokine-stimulated overproduction of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. The inflammatory cytokine IL-6 is a particularly prominent inducer of hepcidin but other cytokines are likely to contribute as well. Hepcidin excess causes the endocytosis and proteolysis of the sole known cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, trapping iron in macrophages and iron-absorbing enterocytes. The supply of iron to hemoglobin synthesis becomes limiting, eventually resulting in anemia. Depending on the details of the underlying disease, other inflammation-related mechanisms may also contribute to anemia. PMID:19786207

  20. Isolated microcytic anemia disclosing a unicentric Castleman disease: The interleukin-6/hepcidin pathway?

    PubMed

    Vinzio, Stéphane; Ciarloni, Laetitia; Schlienger, Jean-Louis; Rohr, Serge; Méchine, Agnès; Goichot, Bernard

    2008-07-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder of uncertain origin. Anemia is commonly reported and is related to an inflammatory mechanism. Occasionally an autoimmune hemolytic anemia appears as the leading clinical feature. Three histological types have been differentiated, a hyaline-vascular type (HV), a plasma cell type (PC), and a mixed type. Clinically CD is separated into unicentric (localized) or multicentric (generalized) forms. The former is most frequently of HV type (80-90%), affecting a single lymph node. The PC type is encountered in 10-20% of the unicentric CD and in almost all of the multicentric cases. Numerous systemic manifestations have been described usually associated with PC type. An isolated and markedly microcytic anemia revealing a unicentric CD has never been reported in English literature. Recent data concerning iron metabolism, interleukin-6 and hepcidin provide interesting clues to understand the particular microcytic anemia of CD. PMID:18549942

  1. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  2. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They ... last as long as normal, round red blood cells. This leads to anemia. The sickle cells also ...

  3. Heme-regulated eIF2α kinase plays a crucial role in protecting erythroid cells against Pb-induced hemolytic stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lixin; Liu, Sijin

    2015-03-16

    Lead (Pb) is a heavy metal with considerable environmental contamination. It is toxic to diverse cells and has been reported to cause a wide array of detrimental health problems including neurological disorders and anemia. In light of the mechanisms underlying Pb-induced anemia, the current understanding is still limited, in spite of efforts for years. Our previous studies recognized a protective role for the heme-regulated eIF2α kinase (Hri) in erythroid cells against oxidative stress exerted by arsenic and cadmium. Whether Hri is involved in Pb-induced hemolytic stress has not been scrutinized. In the current study, to more stringently address this question, we looked into erythropoiesis upon Pb(NO3)2 exposure by using an in vivo mouse model and ex vivo cultured E14.5 fetal liver cells. Diagnoses of hemolytic anemia, decreased red cell count, reduced hemoglobin concentration, and elevated bilirubin level were observed in Hri knockout (Ko) mice only, upon low-dose Pb administration. Significantly different from Ko mice, wild type (Wt) mice did not develop hemolytic anemia. Enforced extramedullary and medullary erythropoieses were found in Ko mice with Pb exposure. However, anemia was not compensated in Hri-deficient mice, as in vivo and ex vivo results manifested that expanded Hri-null erythroid precursors experienced blocked differentiation and enhanced apoptosis, leading to ineffective erythropoiesis under Pb exposure. Additionally, Pb treatment also promoted hepcidin expression and consequentially increased splenic iron storage, resulting in restrained iron availability for erythropoiesis. All considered, Hri-null erythroid precursors were prone to Pb-induced hemolytic stress. Hri deficiency gave rise to ineffective erythropoiesis and reduced iron availability for erythropoiesis under Pb stimulation, and these events together exacerbated Pb-induced hemolytic anemia. It is thus conceivable that this study delineated an indispensable function of Hri in maintaining red cell membrane integrity and guiding erythroid cell differentiation under Pb exposure. Our findings therefore deciphered a crucial role for Hri in protecting erythroid cells against Pb-induced toxicity. PMID:25411909

  4. Re-Examination of 30-Day Survival and Relapse Rates in Patients with Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura-Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Cassiana E.; Ha, Jennifer P.; Maitta, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) are characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia. Interestingly, markedly different survival rates have been reported despite increases in survivability. We studied TTP-HUS 30-day mortality and relapse rates of patients who received TPE at our institution and compared them to published data. Patients and Methods Retrospective study analyzed 30-day mortality and relapse rates attributed to TTP-HUS from 01/01/2008 to 12/31/2012 and compared them to comparable literature reporting mortality and survival. Studies describing other etiologies for TPE and different mortality time interval were excluded. Results Fifty-nine patients were analyzed and all were initially treated with TPE and corticosteroids. Eleven patients were classified as not having TTP-HUS due to testing or clinical reassessment which ruled in other etiologies, and 18/59 patients had ADAMTS13 activity <10%. Of remaining patients, 36/48 (75%) were diagnosed as idiopathic and 12/48 (25%) as secondary TTP-HUS. Patients received a mean of 12 TPEs (range 1-42); 42/48 (87.5%) patients had ADAMTS13 activity measured; complete response obtained in 39/48 (81.2%) patients (platelet count >100 x 109/L); partial response in 4/48 (8%); and 5/48 (10.4%) did not have increases in platelet counts (2/5 of these patients died within the study period). Forty percent of patients obtained platelet counts >150 x 109/L. Overall 30-day mortality for our patient cohort was 6.7% (4/59). Comparison of our mortality rate to combined data of five published studies of 16% (92/571) showed a significant difference, p = 0.04. Our relapse rate was 18.6% (11/59) similar to previous reports. Conclusions Wide differences in mortality may be due to grouping of two distinct pathologic entities under TTP-HUS; and presence of confounding factors in the patient populations under study such as co-morbidities, promptness of TPE initiation, delay in diagnosis and therapeutic practice. PMID:26000799

  5. Depressed eruption rate of the rat maxillary incisor in a drug-induced uncompensated hemolytic state model

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, M.J.; Sanz, A.M.; Bozzini, C.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Female rats weighing about 180 g were separated into two groups. One group (A) received phenylhydrazine (PHZ) every other day during three weeks (for induction of an uncompensated hemolytic state), while the control group (C) received saline. The evidence for the establishment of the uncompensated hemolytic state was obtained by hematocrit value, reticulocyte count, and red-cell-volume-59Fe uptake. Body-weight gain (which is a measure of overall body growth rate), body-length gain (which is a measure of longitudinal skeletal growth rate), food intake, and maxillary incisor eruption rate (ER) were significantly depressed in rats of group A during the PHZ-injection period, in relation to rats of group C. These results indicate that anemia and/or associated factors depress ER, along with body growth and skeletal growth.

  6. [Causes, diagnostics and course of disease in 194 cats with anemia].

    PubMed

    Merten, Nina; Weingart, Christiane; Kohn, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common hematological alteration in cats. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of different types of anemia and the course of disease in cats with a hematocrit (hct) < 0.26 l/l. In a period of 18 months 194 cats were included and assigned to different anemia groups based on history, physical examination and laboratory parameters. Most cats had acute blood loss anemia (BA; 75/194; 38.7%). Frequent causes were trauma (39/75), hematuria (13/75) and hemostatic disorders (9/75). Anemia of inflammatory and neoplastic disease (AID) occurred in 22.2% (43/194) and hemolytic anemia (HA) in 18% (35/194). Half of those were presumptively immune-mediated (IHA). Four cats were diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma infection. Rare causes of anemia included anemia of renal disease (ARD; 18/194; 9.3%) and intramedullary non-regenerative anemia (INR; 13/194; 6.7%). The latter either had retroviral infection (6/13) or neoplasia (6/13). In cats with HA and INR anemia was often severe and very severe (Hct < 0.14 l/l) and in cats with AID and ARD usually mild (Hct 0.20-0.25 l/l). Cats with BA had significantly lower total protein concentrations than those with INR (p = 0,001), HA, AID and CNE (p < 0,001) and those with HA most often had hyperbilirubinemia (21/27). Blood transfusions were primarily given to cats with BA (37/75) and HA (19/35), especially those with IHA (13/17). 69% of the patients survived the first 14 days after the anemia was detected for the first time. Cats with HA had the highest survival rate. PMID:26591384

  7. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  8. Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Due to Cryptococcal Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Liang, Jinqian; Shen, Jianxiong; Qiu, Guixing; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cryptococcus neoformans causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients, with vertebral osteomyelitis being a very rare involvement. This study is to present a case of thoracolumbar scoliosis occurring in the setting of cryptococcal osteomyelitis. Pharmacological intervention with anticryptococcal medicine and medical management of immune hemolytic anemia were administered. After initial acute stabilization, she underwent spinal debridement and fusion on October 29, 2008. She eventually recovered fully from this episode with no subsequent mechanical instability or neurological deficits on subsequent clinic follow-ups. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports describing the onset of spinal cryptococcal osteomyelitis along with immune hemolytic anemia. We suggest a comprehensive algorithm for the diagnosis of vertebral cryptococcal osteomyelitis. PMID:26844472

  9. Anemia awareness campaign.

    PubMed

    1999-07-01

    The National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) and model/actress Daisy Fuentes are launching a national awareness campaign to encourage people with HIV/AIDS to discuss anemia with their doctors. The "Celebrate Life" campaign includes public service announcements, a toll-free hotline, and a web site for further information. Anemia is a common complication of HIV treatment, and is easily diagnosed. Persons with anemia often suffer from symptoms including fatigue, shortness of breath, and loss of appetite and sex drive. The campaign contact information is provided. PMID:11367079

  10. Blood smear

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of RBCs due to body destroying them ( immune hemolytic anemia ) Low number of RBCs due to some red ... of Heinz bodies may indicate: Alpha thalassemia Congenital hemolytic anemia Disorder in which red blood cells break down ...

  11. Anemia in the Newborn

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hemolytic disease of the newborn may occur in Rh-positive babies born to Rh-negative mothers. It develops when the newborn’s red blood cells are destroyed by anti-Rh antibodies that were produced by the mother and ...

  12. [Clinical aspects of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy].

    PubMed

    Renner, E; Cohen, S

    1989-01-01

    Clinical syndromes as hemolytic-uremic-syndrome, thrombotic-thrombocytopenic-pupura and primary-malignant-hypertension not only present multiple clinical but also etiological and pathogenetical common characteristics. Thoenes and John developed in 1980 the unifying concept of endotheliotropic (hemolytic) nephroangiopathy for these diseases which are characterised by pathologic interaction between damaged endothelial cells and erythrocytes. This concept was increasingly discussed and accepted in the literature during the course of the last years. We describe the clinical manifestation of the subgroupes which were defined by Thoenes and John according to the vascular pattern of pathomorphologic intrarenal lesions. It can be shown that the classification based on pathomorphologic findings is very useful for the differentialdiagnostic characterisation and the prognostic evaluation in a given single case. PMID:2482603

  13. A CLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEMOLYTIC STREPTOCOCCI

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, Ralph A.; Swift, Homer F.

    1917-01-01

    1. No connection can be demonstrated between grouping of non-hemolytic streptococci based upon fermentation reactions, and grouping based upon immunological reactions. 2. A classification of non-hemolytic streptococci can be effected by studying the complement fixation reactions between the streptococci and their antisera. 3. The arrangement of the streptococci in such a classification depends on the fact that two diverse elements are present in the group. Some strains partake entirely of one of these elements, some entirely of the other, while other strains partake of both. 4. The arrangement is further determined by the fact that among the strains composed of one element there are differences in complexity, some strains being made up of many molecules or features, others having much simpler structure. This gives rise to an inverse ratio between the fixing capacity of a serum and the capacity of the corresponding antigen to be fixed. PMID:19868128

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ... 18/2011 This video—presented by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National ...

  15. Living with Fanconi Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... With Fanconi Anemia Improvements in blood and marrow stem cell transplants have increased the chances of living longer with FA. Also, researchers are studying new and promising treatments for FA. However, the disorder still presents serious ...

  16. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    Cooley's Anemia Foundation Leading the Fight against Thalassemia About Us Mission/Purpose History Medical Research Board/Staff Contact the Foundation U.S. Patients: Register for Information Learn about Thalassemia ...

  17. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Aplastic Anemia? Damage to the bone marrow's stem ... system attacks its own cells by mistake. Acquired Causes Many diseases, conditions, and factors can cause aplastic ...

  18. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to support groups that offer help with financial planning, because treatment for aplastic anemia can be ... National Institutes of Health—Dr. Neal Young talks about the importance of conducting and taking part in clinical trials. ...

  19. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the only cure for sickle cell disease is stem cell transplant , but it's a complex and risky procedure. ... About Going Away to College? Blood Blood Transfusions Stem Cell Transplants Anemia Will I Pass Sickle Cell Disease ...

  20. Eculizumab in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, David; Smith-Jackson, Kate

    2016-03-01

    Greenbaum et al. report the first prospective trial of eculizumab in pediatric atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. As in adult trials, eculizumab appears effective and no serious safety signals were reported. There is the first suggestion of a dichotomy in response to treatment with a trend toward poorer outcome in those without complement abnormalities. This group, however, had worse renal function at presentation, and it remains to be seen whether this represents true non-response or merely late presentation. PMID:26880449

  1. An etiologic profile of anemia in 405 geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Tabea; Martin, Julia; Schulze, Bettina; Schaefer, Roland; Bach, Matthias; Virgin, Garth; Stein, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine) in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1%) in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%), frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%), or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy. PMID:24707396

  2. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  3. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated? Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will depend ... may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  4. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  5. Complement Factor H Gene Mutation Associated with Autosomal Recessive Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Lihua; Katz, Yitzhak; Schlesinger, Menachem; Carmi, Rivka; Shalev, Hanna; Haider, Neena; Beck, Gretel; Sheffield, Val C.; Landau, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Summary Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with the clinical features of hypertension, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Both dominant and recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. This study describes the genetic and functional analysis of a large Bedouin kindred with autosomal recessive HUS. The kindred consists of several related nuclear families in which all parent unions of affected children are consanguineous. A previous report demonstrated that a dominant form of HUS maps to chromosome 1q and that complement factor H (CFH), a regulatory component of the complement system, lies within the region and is involved in the dominant disorder. Early-onset and persistent hypocomplementemia in this Bedouin kindred prompted us to evaluate the CFH gene. Linkage analysis was performed, demonstrating linkage between the disorder and the markers near the CFH gene. Mutation analysis of the CFH coding region revealed a single missense mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the mutant CFH is properly expressed and synthesized but that it is not transported normally from the cell. This is the first study reporting that a recessive, atypical, early-onset, and relapsing HUS is associated with the CFH protein and that a CFH mutation affects intracellular trafficking and secretion. PMID:10577907

  6. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Chronic Ulcerative Colitis Treated with Eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tennille N.; Griffiths, Heidi; Miyashita, Yosuke; Bhatt, Riha; Jaffe, Ronald; Moritz, Michael; Hofer, Johannes; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and thrombotic microangiopathy of the kidney and usually results from Shiga-toxin induced activation of the alternative complement pathway. Gastroenteritis is a common feature of the Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli HUS, referred to as STEC-HUS. An inherited or acquired complement dysregulation may lead to HUS referred to as non-STEC or atypical (a)HUS. Although gastroenteritis is not a common presentation of aHUS, some patients develop ischemic colitis and may be misdiagnosed as acute appendicitis or acute ulcerative colitis (UC). Case Diagnosis –Treatment We present a patient with low circulating complement (C) 3 levels who developed aHUS in the course of chronic active UC. Resolution of renal and gastrointestinal manifestations in response to treatment with eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against terminal C5 protein suggests the role of alternative complement in the pathogenesis of both, aHUS and UC. Conclusion This case illustrates that dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway may manifest in other organs besides the kidney and that the circulating C3 levels do not correlate with the disease activity or the clinical response to eculizumab.

  7. Chemokine receptor CCR1 disruption limits renal damage in a murine model of hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria V; Auvynet, Constance; Poupel, Lucie; Rodero, Mathieu; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Panek, Cecilia A; Vanzulli, Silvia; Combadiere, Christophe; Palermo, Marina

    2012-03-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli is the main etiological agent that causes hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a microangiopathic disease characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Although direct cytotoxic effects on endothelial cells by Stx are the primary pathogenic event, there is evidence that indicates the inflammatory response mediated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils and monocytes as the key event during HUS development. Because the chemokine receptor CCR1 participates in the pathogenesis of several renal diseases by orchestrating myeloid cell kidney infiltration, we specifically addressed the contribution of CCR1 in a murine model of HUS. We showed that Stx type 2-treated CCR1(-/-) mice have an increased survival rate associated with less functional and histological renal damage compared with control mice. Stx type 2-triggered neutrophilia and monocytosis and polymorphonuclear neutrophil and monocyte renal infiltration were significantly reduced and delayed in CCR1(-/-) mice compared with control mice. In addition, the increase of the inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-6) in plasma was delayed in CCR1(-/-) mice compared with control mice. These data demonstrate that CCR1 participates in cell recruitment to the kidney and amplification of the inflammatory response that contributes to HUS development. Blockade of CCR1 could be important to the design of future therapies to restrain the inflammatory response involved in the development of HUS. PMID:22203055

  8. Complement factor H gene mutation associated with autosomal recessive atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Katz, Y; Schlesinger, M; Carmi, R; Shalev, H; Haider, N; Beck, G; Sheffield, V C; Landau, D

    1999-12-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) presents with the clinical features of hypertension, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. Both dominant and recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. This study describes the genetic and functional analysis of a large Bedouin kindred with autosomal recessive HUS. The kindred consists of several related nuclear families in which all parent unions of affected children are consanguineous. A previous report demonstrated that a dominant form of HUS maps to chromosome 1q and that complement factor H (CFH), a regulatory component of the complement system, lies within the region and is involved in the dominant disorder. Early-onset and persistent hypocomplementemia in this Bedouin kindred prompted us to evaluate the CFH gene. Linkage analysis was performed, demonstrating linkage between the disorder and the markers near the CFH gene. Mutation analysis of the CFH coding region revealed a single missense mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the mutant CFH is properly expressed and synthesized but that it is not transported normally from the cell. This is the first study reporting that a recessive, atypical, early-onset, and relapsing HUS is associated with the CFH protein and that a CFH mutation affects intracellular trafficking and secretion. PMID:10577907

  9. Facts about Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare blood disorder ...

  10. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    N ational C ancer I nstitute Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects Anemia “I told my doctor that I was ... or exercise a little every day. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Anemia Eat and drink well. ● ● Talk with your ...

  11. [Study on hemolytic mechanism of polyphyllin II].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li-hua; Zhou, Bo; Zhang, Yao-xiang; Li, Xin-ping

    2015-09-01

    To study the hemolytic effect of polyphyllin II (PP II) mediated by anion channel protein and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), in order to initially reveal its hemolytic mechanism in vitro. In the experiment, the spectrophotometric method was adopted to detect the hemolysis of PP II in vitro and the effect of anion channel-related solution and blocker, glucose channel-related inhibitor and multi-target drugs dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and diazepam on the hemolysis of PP II. The scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope were used to observe the effect of PP II on erythrocyte (RBC) morphology. The results showed that PP II -processed blood cells were severely deformed into spherocytes, acanthocyturia and vesicae. According to the results of the PP II hemolysis experiment in vitro, the anion hypertonic solution LiCl, NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and PBS significantly inhibited the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05), while blockers NPPB and DIDS remarkably promoted it (P < 0.01). Hyperosmotic sodium chloride, fructose and glucose at specific concentrations notably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.05). The glucose channel inhibitor Cytochalasin B and verapamil remarkably antagonized the hemolysis induced by PP II (P < 0.01). The hemolysis induced by PP II could also be antagonized by 1 gmol x L(1) diazepam and 100 μmol x L(-1) DHEA pretreated for 1 min (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the hemolytic mechanism of PP II in vitro may be related to the increase in intracellular osmotic pressure and rupture of erythrocytes by changing the anion channel transport activity, with GLUT1 as the major competitive interaction site. PMID:26983211

  12. The relationship between the severity of hemolysis, clinical manifestations and risk of death in 415 patients with sickle cell anemia in the US and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Nouraie, Mehdi; Lee, Janet S.; Zhang, Yingze; Kanias, Tamir; Zhao, Xuejun; Xiong, Zeyu; Oriss, Timothy B.; Zeng, Qilu; Kato, Gregory J.; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Hildesheim, Mariana E.; Sachdev, Vandana; Barst, Robyn J.; Machado, Roberto F.; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Little, Jane A.; Schraufnagel, Dean E.; Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan; Novelli, Enrico; Girgis, Reda E.; Morris, Claudia R.; Rosenzweig, Erika Berman; Badesch, David B.; Lanzkron, Sophie; Castro, Oswaldo L.; Goldsmith, Jonathan C.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    The intensity of hemolytic anemia has been proposed as an independent risk factor for the development of certain clinical complications of sickle cell disease, such as pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia and cutaneous leg ulceration. A composite variable derived from several individual markers of hemolysis could facilitate studies of the underlying mechanisms of hemolysis. In this study, we assessed the association of hemolysis with outcomes in sickle cell anemia. A hemolytic component was calculated by principal component analysis from reticulocyte count, serum lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and total bilirubin concentrations in 415 hemoglobin SS patients. Association of this component with direct markers of hemolysis and clinical outcomes was assessed. As primary validation, both plasma red blood cell microparticles and cell-free hemoglobin concentration were higher in the highest hemolytic component quartile compared to the lowest quartile (P≤0.0001 for both analyses). The hemolytic component was lower with hydroxyurea therapy, higher hemoglobin F, and alpha-thalassemia (P≤0.0005); it was higher with higher systemic pulse pressure, lower oxygen saturation, and greater values for tricuspid regurgitation velocity, left ventricular diastolic dimension and left ventricular mass (all P<0.0001). Two-year follow-up analysis showed that a high hemolytic component was associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio, HR 3.44; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.2–9.5; P=0.02). The hemolytic component reflects direct markers of intravascular hemolysis in patients with sickle cell disease and allows for adjusted analysis of associations between hemolytic severity and clinical outcomes. These results confirm associations between hemolytic rate and pulse pressure, oxygen saturation, increases in Doppler-estimated pulmonary systolic pressures and mortality (Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00492531). PMID:22983573

  13. [Microcytic and hypochromic anemias].

    PubMed

    Chrobk, L

    2001-03-01

    In the majority of cases, microcytosis is the result of impaired hemoglobin synthesis. Disorders of iron metabolism and protoporphyrin and heme synthesis, as well as impaired globin synthesis, lead to defective hemoglobin production and to the generation of microcytosis and microcytic anemia. Iron deficiency anemie, anemia of chronic diseases, thalassemias, congenital sideroblastic anemias and homozygous HbE disease are the main representatives of microcytosis and microcytic anemias. Serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, serum transferrin receptor, transferrin receptor-ferritin index, and zinc-protoporhyrin concentration in erythrocytes are tests used for assessment of iron deficiency. The convention laboratory test for diagnosing iron deficiency is the measurement of serum ferritin. The most precise method for evaluating body iron stores is the examination for iron on aspirated bone marrow or marrow biopsy. Increased content of Hb A2 over 3.5% is diagnostic for beta-thalassemia. Presence of ringed sideroblasts is characteristic of sideroblastic anemias. Hemoglobin electrophoresis is required for the diagnosis of hemoglobinopathy E. The optimal therapeutic regimen in iron deficiency anemia used in this country is to administer 100 mg of elemental iron twice daily separately from meals. Ferrous sulphate (Ferronat Retard tbl. or Sorbifer Dulures tbl.) which are slow-releasing iron formulations are preferred because of their low cost, high bioavailability and low side-effects. Parenteral iron therapy is justified only in patients who cannot absorb iron, who have blood losses that exceed the maximal absorptive capacity of their intestinal tract or who are totally intolerant of oral iron. However, parenteral iron therapy may be associated with serious and even fatal side-effects. PMID:15635879

  14. [Atypical hemolytic and uremic syndrome associated with von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease (ADAMTS 13) deficiency in children].

    PubMed

    Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Boukedi, A; Bensalah, M; Maalej, B; Gargour, L; Turk, F; Ben Halima, N; Wolf, M; Veyradier, A; Mahfoudh, A

    2013-08-01

    Hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) is a classical form of thrombotic microangiopathies characterized by the association of hemolytic anemia with schizocytes, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Two forms of HUS have been described: the typical form that occurs after ingestion of a strain of bacteria, usually Escherichia coli types, which expresses verotoxin (also called shiga-like toxin), typically followed by bloody diarrhea, and atypical HUS, which is rare during childhood and can also be revealed by bloody diarrhea. We report a case of a 25-month-old infant who presented with hematuria and pallor after an episode of diarrhea. Biological tests revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. The diagnosis of typical HUS was made, but the causal microorganism was not identified. Progression was favorable within 5 days of plasma transfusions. Two months later, the patient presented with the same symptoms and neurological impairment without any diarrhea. Von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease activity (ADAMTS 13) was low. Therefore, the diagnosis of atypical HUS by severe deficiency of ADAMTS 13 was suggested. The treatment was based on plasma transfusions resulting in remission. Atypical HUS associated with severe ADAMTS 13 deficiency rarely occurs in childhood. The prognosis, usually threatening, has been completely transformed thanks to a better understanding of the pathogenesis and to therapeutic progress. PMID:23827373

  15. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  16. [Anemia and colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Vignot, Stphane; Spano, Jean-Philippe

    2005-05-01

    Colorectal cancers are classically revealed by a low digestive bleeding, which can be occult or exteriorized. They commonly present anemia at the diagnosis leading to particular outcomes. Perioperative blood transfusions are frequently indicated for the treatment of localized tumors and for hepatic resection of metastatic lesions but transfusions seem to have a negative impact on prognosis by increasing infections and potentially recurrence. In this context, various strategies aim at limiting the transfusional risk (autologous transfusion, preoperative use of erythropoietin...). Anemia associated with advanced colorectal cancers provides the same interest as for any metastatic tumor, as quality of life of patients is correlated to the hemoglobin's level. PMID:15932806

  17. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Diagnosed? People who have Fanconi anemia (FA) are born with the disorder. They may ... questions about: Any personal or family history of anemia Any surgeries you’ve had related to the ...

  18. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ... your primary care doctor thinks you have aplastic anemia, he or she may refer you to a ...

  19. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Fanconi Anemia Treated? Doctors decide how to treat Fanconi anemia (FA) based on a person's age and how ... Long-term treatments for FA can: Cure the anemia. Damaged bone marrow cells are replaced with healthy ...

  20. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. PMID:26404439

  1. Anemia in the Elderly: not Always what it Seems

    PubMed Central

    Cerrano, Marco; Crisà, Elena; Giai, Valentina; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Anemia in the elderly is a common but challenging clinical scenario. Here we describe the case of an older woman who presented with anemia and elevated inflammation markers. After a complete diagnostic work-up, a definite etiology of the anemia could not be found so eventually a bone marrow biopsy was performed and she was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome. She responded well to erythropoietin treatment but her inflammation markers remained elevated thus a positron emission tomography was performed. It turned out that the patient suffered from giant cell artheritis and her anemia completely resolved after steroid treatment. Our case outlines that it is necessary to pay particular attention to anemia of inflammation, which could be due to several and often masked conditions. Myelodysplatic syndromes should be considered when other causes have been ruled out, but their diagnosis can be difficult and requires expertise in the field. PMID:26977276

  2. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    PubMed

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease. PMID:22653674

  3. Preoperative Anemia: Evaluation and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Kansagra, Ankit J; Stefan, Mihaela S

    2016-03-01

    Previously undiagnosed anemia is often identified during routine assessment of surgical patients. Although studies suggest that perioperative anemia is associated with worse outcomes and a strong predictor for postoperative red cell transfusions, anemia is frequently ignored. Preoperative optimization of patients undergoing elective surgical procedures associated with significant blood loss, along with strategies to minimize intraoperative blood loss, shows promise for reducing postoperative transfusions and improving outcomes. In most situations, anemia can be corrected prior to elective surgeries and interventions. Future research should assess the timing and methods of optimization of preoperative anemia in surgery and which patients are best candidates for therapy. PMID:26927743

  4. Generation of hemolytic activity in ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Butterman, J.; Chan, P.C.; Kesner, L.

    1987-04-01

    When liposomes prepared from purified soybean phosphatidylcholine were treated with ozone, at least two types of hemolytic agents were formed. One type was stable at 0 degree C but was destroyed rapidly at 37 degrees C. A second type was evolved during storage of ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine at 37 degrees C in the absence of EDTA. This study is concerned mainly with the heat-labile type. The hemolytic activity was not associated with lipid hydroperoxides. A number of substances were shown to inhibit the hemolytic activity and these may be divided into two classes. The first included cysteine, polyamines, n-heptylamine, semicarbazide, and tryptophan. Preincubation of the ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine was necessary with a Class 1 inhibitor, presumably for the interaction of the inhibitor with a functional group of the hemolytic agents. The Class II inhibitors, including BHT and vitamin C, required no preincubation. These possibly abolished the hemolytic activity by scavenging free radicals in the process.

  5. Hepcidin and sports anemia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important mineral element used by the body in a variety of metabolic and physiologic processes. These processes are highly active when the body is undergoing physical exercises. Prevalence of exercise-induced iron deficiency anemia (also known as sports anemia) is notably high in athletic populations, particularly those with heavy training loads. The pathogenesis of sports anemia is closely related to disorders of iron metabolism, and a more comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of iron metabolism in the course of physical exercises could expand ways of treatment and prevention of sports anemia. In recent years, there have been remarkable research advances regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of iron metabolism in response to physical exercises. This review has covered these advances, including effects of exercise on duodenum iron absorption, serum iron status, iron distribution in organs, erythropoiesis, and hepcidin’s function and its regulation. New methods for the treatment of exercise-induced iron deficiency are also discussed. PMID:24731443

  6. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  8. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  9. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase aveiro: a de novo mutation associated with chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Costa, E; Cabeda, J M; Vieira, E; Pinto, R; Pereira, S A; Ferraz, L; Santos, R; Barbot, J

    2000-02-15

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a common X-linked enzyme abnormality. The clinical phenotype is variable but often predictable from the molecular lesion. Class I variants (the most severe forms of the disease) cluster within exon 10, in a region that, at the protein level, is believed to be involved in dimerization. Here we describe a de novo mutation (C269Y) of a new class I variant (G6PD Aveiro) that maps to exon 8. Mutant and normal alleles were found in both hematopoietic and buccal cells, indicating the presence of mosaicism. The available model of the protein predicts that this lesion lies in proximity to the dimer interface of the molecule. A possible mechanism to explain the severity of the defect is proposed. (Blood. 2000;95:1499-1501) PMID:10666231

  12. Protective effect of ethyl pyruvate on mice sperm parameters in phenylhydrazine induced hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mozafari, Ali Akbar; Shahrooz, Rasoul; Ahmadi, Abbas; Malekinjad, Hassan; Mardani, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of ethyl pyruvate (EP) on sperm quality parameters, testosterone level and malondialdehyde (MDA) in phenylhydrazine (PHZ) treated mice. For this purpose, 32 NMRI mice with the age range of 8 to 10 weeks, weight average 26.0 ± 2.0 g, were randomly divided into four equal groups. The control group (1) received normal saline (0. 1 mL per day) by intraperitoneal injection (IP). Group 2 (PHZ group) was treated with initial dose of PHZ (8 mg 100 g-1, IP) followed by 6 mg 100 g-1 , IP every 48 hr. Group 3, (Group PHZ+EP) received PHZ (according to the previous prescription) with EP (40 mg kg-1, daily, IP). Ethyl pyruvate group (4) received only EP (40 mg kg-1, daily, IP). Treatment period was 35 days. After euthanasia, sperms from caudal region of epididymis were collected and the total mean sperm count, sperm viability, motility and morphology were determined. Testis tissue MDA and serum testosterone levels of all experimental groups were also evaluated. A considerable reduction in mean percentage of number, natural morphology of sperm, sperm motility and viability and serum testosterone concentration besides DNA injury increment among mice treating with PHZ in comparison with control group were observed. However, in PHZ+EP group the above mentioned parameters were improved. This study showed that PHZ caused induction of toxicity on sperm parameters and reduction of testosterone as well as the increment of MDA level and EP as an antioxidant could reduce destructive effects of PHZ on sperm parameters, testosterone level and lipid peroxidation. PMID:27226889

  13. Acute methemoglobinemia with hemolytic anemia following bio-organic plant nutrient compound exposure: Two case reports.

    PubMed

    Malkarnekar, Santoshi Balkrishna; Anjanappa, Raveesha; Naveen, L; Kiran, B G

    2014-02-01

    Two young women, were reffered to our hospital on two different occasions with history of breathlessness and mental confusion, following consumption of two different bio-organic plant nutrient compounds with a suicidal intent. On examination, they had cyanotic mucous membranes, and their blood samples showed the classic 'dark chocolate brown' appearance. Work up revealed cyanosis unresponsive to oxygen supplementation and absence of cardiopulmonary abnormality. Pulse oximetry revealed saturation of 75% in case 1 and 80% in case 2, on 8 liters oxygen supplementation via face masks, although their arterial blood gas analysis was normal, suggestive of "saturation gap". Methemoglobinemia was suspected based on these findings and was confirmed by Carbon monoxide-oximetry (CO-oximetry). Methylene blue was administered and the patients showed dramatic improvement. Both the patients developed evidence of hemolysis approximately 72 hours following admission which improved with blood transfusion and supportive treatment. The patients were eventually discharged without any neurological sequalae. PMID:24678158

  14. [Hemolytic anemia associated with minor salmonellosis in an HIV positive, G6PD deficient Congolese woman].

    PubMed

    Bouchaud, O; Matheron, S; Coulaud, J P; Charmot, G

    1991-01-01

    Haemolytic anaemia in G6PD-deficient patients with thyphoid fever is well known, but there is only one case-report associated with non-typhic salmonella fever. We report here a case observed in a black african young woman whose HIV infection has been discovered on this occasion. Because of the high prevalence of HIV infection, salmonellosis and G6PD deficiency in sub-saharian Africa, an increasing number of such haemolytic anaemias should be expected in this geographic area. PMID:1807850

  15. Reticulocytopenia in severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) of the warm antibody type.

    PubMed

    Hauke, G; Fauser, A A; Weber, S; Maas, D

    1983-06-01

    A patient with severe AIHA of the warm antibody type, absence of reticulocytes and red cell hyperplasia of the bone marrow is described. In order to maintain a reasonable hemoglobin level 38 units of washed packed red cells were required within 24 days. The treatment with high doses of steroids showed no permanent beneficial effect. After splenectomy the red cell destruction was immediately reduced and the patient went into a remission. Bone marrow culture studies during the acute phase of the disease and at the time of complete hemato- and immunological remission, i.e. 4 months after splenectomy suggested a circulating autoantibody directed to early erythroid progenitors (BFU-E). The inhibitory activity in the patient's plasma did not influence granulocytic or mixed colony formation (CFU-GEMM). In addition to autoantibodies directed to erythroblasts and erythropoietin involved in the pathogenic mechanisms leading to red cell aplasia type I and II the culture studies suggest an unusual autoantibody that might cause the observed reticulocytopenia and erythropoietic hyperplasia of the bone marrow in AIHA. After the splenectomy the patient recovered, he required no further blood transfusions and his disease has not recurred. PMID:6850101

  16. Inborn anemias in mice. Comprehensive progress report, 1 August 1979-1 June 1982, to accompany twenty-seventh renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.; Barker, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been investigated including four macrocytic anemias, three hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules controlling a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse and by extension to man from an understanding of mammalian mechanisms utilized in the control of erythropoiesis. Each of the different anemias is studied through: (a) biochemical and biophysical characterization of peripheral blood cells; (b) determinations of cellular and organismic radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme biosynthesis; (d) morphological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli and inhibitors; and (g) physiological complementation analysis via transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  17. [New concepts about hemolytic-uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Urízar, R; Cerda, J; Muñoz, R; Largent, J; Saieh, C

    1991-01-01

    According to the heterogenous nature of hemolytic uremic syndrome in relation to the etiology, pathophysiology, treatment and diagnosis, we wish to draw attention to the main characteristics about its epidemiological clinical and immunopathological aspects. The HUS's distributes through all the world, but in Argentina, North of Europe, South Africa and west of USA the incidence is higher than the rest of the countries. The immunopathological studies shows thrombotic angiopathic lesion, consisting in generalized alteration of the capillary and arteriolar epithelium. Decreased levels of PGI2, Von Willebrand's factor and bacterial toxins are apparently involved among mechanism that are able to produce HUS. Dialysis is one of the main helps in the treatment of HUS, and in spite of our continued advances in knowledge about this disease, still further developments are needed in pathophysiology and therapeutics to enlight its intimate mechanisms. PMID:1844006

  18. Nutritional anemia and its control.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Deeksha; Agarwal, Kailash Nath; Agarwal, Dev Kumari

    2002-07-01

    Available studies on prevalence of nutritional anemia in India show that 65% infant and toddlers, 60% 1-6 years of age, 88% adolescent girls (3.3% had hemoglobin < 7.0 g/dl; severe anemia) and 85% pregnant women (9.9% having severe anemia) were anemic. The prevalence of anemia was marginally higher in lactating women as compared to pregnancy. The commonest is iron deficiency anemia. National programmes to control and prevent anemia have not been successful. Experiences from other countries in controlling moderately-severe anemia guide to adopt long-term measures i.e. fortification of food items like milk, cereal, sugar, salt with iron. Use of iron utensils in boiling milk, cooking vegetables etc may contribute significant amount of dietary iron. Nutrition education to improve dietary intakes in family for receiving needed macro/micro nutrients as protein, iron and vitamins like folic acid, B12, A and C etc. for hemoglobin synthesis is important. As an immediate measure medicinal iron is necessary to control anemia. Addition of folate with iron controls anemia and is neuroprotective. Evidence in early childhood suggests vitamin B12 deficiency anemia; thus it may also be given along with iron and folate. PMID:12173702

  19. Anemia in critical illness.

    PubMed

    Eckardt, K U

    2001-02-15

    Anemia is a frequent finding in patients treated in ICUs and results in a high number of red blood cell transfusions. Many patients are already admitted to ICUs with subnormal hemoglobin values. Surgery, frequent phlebotomies and overt bleeding episodes are obvious reasons for continuous blood loss during the ICU stay. However, these causes are usually not sufficient to explain the total blood consumption of critically ill patients, which may amount to several liters. Reduced red cell life span and occult gastrointestinal bleeding are possibly important contributory factors. Irrespective of the cause the erythropoietic response to anemia is severely blunted, as a consequence of an inappropriate increase in erythropoietin production, diminished iron availability and direct inhibitory effects of inflammatory cytokines. The importance of anemia for the course and outcome of critically ill patients and its optimal therapy remain to be defined. Considering red blood cell transfusions recent evidence indicates that a target range of 7-9 g/dl hemoglobin is at least as safe and may even be superior compared to a more liberal transfusion strategy. However, the optimal transfusion trigger in relation to patient comorbidity requires further investigation. Rigorous strategies of blood conservation may help to avoid transfusions. Red blood cell substitutes and recombinant erythropoietin are promising treatment options that are currently under investigation. PMID:11253745

  20. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1983-1984)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1984-09-01

    The hypotranserrinemic-hemochromatosis mutation in mice discovered in our laboratory is an almost exact duplicate of human atransferrinemia. Just as in man, the condition is inherited as a recessive lethal. The disease appears to stem from a congenital deficiency in transferrin. The new mutation arose spontaneously in BALB/c mice and results in death before 12 days of age. It is characterized by stunted growth, low numbers of erythrocytes, hypochromia, and in the absence of jaundice. Treatments with Imferon or other iron preparations were uniformly unsuccessful, but the use of normal mouse serum proved successful as a therapeutic measure. We find that we are able to keep these afflicted mice alive for more than a year with small amounts of normal serum, and transferrin bands are missing on cellulose acetate electrophoresis of serum proteins from affected individuals receiving no treatment. Genetic tests indicated that the new mutation was not an allele of any of the other known iron deficiency anemias in the mouse: sex linked anemia (sla), microcytic anemia (mk), or flexed anemia (f) or any of the members of the hemolytic disease group (sph, sph/sup ha/, nb, or ja). Biochemical and genetic analyses carried out during the past year indicate that the new mutation, tentatively designated hpx is not likely to be a mutation at the transferrin (Trf) locus on Chromosome 9. We observed no unusual serum proteins on cellulose acetate electrophoresis, such as might be expected if the Trf gene had mutated. Moreover, radial immunodiffusion examination and Ouchterlony analysis did not show the presence of smaller molecules (or fragments) with transferrin antigenic specificities. Instead they showed a total loss in serum transferrin. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome following Infection with O111 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli Revealed through Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Operario, Darwin J.; Moonah, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome in a 69-year-old woman due to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, possibly serotype O111, to illustrate the potentially deleterious implications of a Campylobacter enzyme immunoassay (EIA) result and the increasing importance of molecular testing when conventional methods are limited. PMID:24371241

  2. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. PMID:26637695

  3. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  4. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Anemia? Anemia is a common condition. It ... people have other medical conditions as well. Major Risk Factors Factors that raise your risk for anemia ...

  5. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Organizations (PDF, 270 KB). Alternate Language URL Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease Page Content On ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which a person ...

  6. Tacrolimus (FK 506)-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome after heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Walder, B; Ricou, B; Suter, P M

    1998-10-01

    A case of tacrolimus (FK 506)-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome is reported. The direct implication of tacrolimus, an alternative immunosuppressant to cyclosporine, was strongly supported by the recurrence of the syndrome after a second exposure to the treatment. PMID:9811409

  7. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  8. Pathophysiology and treatment of typical and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Picard, C; Burtey, S; Bornet, C; Curti, C; Montana, M; Vanelle, P

    2015-06-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a rare disease, frequently responsible for renal insufficiency in children. Recent findings have led to renewed interest in this pathology. The discovery of new gene mutations in the atypical form of HUS and the experimental data suggesting the involvement of the complement pathway in the typical form, open new perspectives for treatment. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge on both typical and atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome pathophysiology and examines new perspectives for treatment. PMID:25845294

  9. Congenital Anomalies in Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA)

    MedlinePLUS

    Congenital Anomalies In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) CS217857 National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities Division of Blood Disorders Congenital Anomalies In Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) ...

  10. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  11. Successful treatment of neonatal atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with C5 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Anastaze Stelle, K; Gonzalez, E; Wilhelm-Bals, A; Michelet, P-R; Korff, C M; Parvex, P

    2016-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is rare in neonates. We report the case of atypical HUS (aHUS) revealed by neonatal seizures. This 18-day-old baby presented with repeated clonus of the left arm and eye deviation. Four days earlier, she had suffered from gastroenteritis (non-bloody diarrhea and vomiting without fever). Her work-up revealed hemolytic anemia (120g/L), thrombocytopenia (78g/L), and impaired renal function (serum creatinine=102μmol/L) compatible with the diagnosis of HUS. Levels of C3 and C4 in the serum were normal. Shiga-toxin in the stools as well as the IgM and IgG against Escherichia coli O157 were negative. ADAMTS 13 deficiency, inborn error of the cobalamin pathway, deficiency in the H and I protein, and factor H antibodies were excluded and we concluded in aHUS. Genetic screening of the alternative complement pathway was normal. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging performed after 24h and 1week showed restricted diffusion areas with periventricular white matter ischemic-hemorrhagic lesions. Extensive infectious work-up was negative. Upon admission the baby received antiepileptic drugs and 2days later C5 monoclonal antibody (eculizumab) and two transfusions of packed erythrocytes because the hemoglobin value had dropped to 55g/L. The platelet value was minimal at 30g/L. Renal function normalized in 48h without dialysis and neurological examination was normal in 1week. She was discharged from the hospital at day 10 with eculizumab perfusions (300mg) planned every 3weeks. After 24months, she was relapse-free and seizure-free, with a normal neurological examination. PMID:26775886

  12. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome diagnosed four years after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Keiko; Kawanishi, Kunio; Sato, Masayo; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Fujii, Akiko; Kanetsuna, Yukiko; Huchinoue, Shouhei; Ohashi, Ryuji; Koike, Junki; Honda, Kazuho; Nagashima, Yoji; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) in allograft kidney transplantation is caused by various factors including rejection, infection, and immunosuppressive drugs. We present a case of a 32 year old woman with aHUS four years after an ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation from a living relative. The primary cause of end-stage renal disease was unknown; however, IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was suspected from her clinical course. She underwent pre-emptive kidney transplantation from her 60 year old mother. The allograft preserved good renal function [serum creatinine (sCr) level 110-130 μmol/L] until a sudden attack of abdominal pain four years after transplant, with acute renal failure (sCr level, 385.3 μmol/L), decreasing platelet count, and hemolytic anemia with schizocytes. On allograft biopsy, there was thrombotic microangiopathy in the glomeruli, with a cellular crescent formation and mesangial IgA and C3 deposition. Microvascular inflammation, such as glomerulitis, peritubular capillaritis, and arteriole endarteritis were also detected. A disintegrin-like and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motifs 13 (ADAMTS13) did not decrease and Shiga toxin was not detected. Donor-specific antibodies or autoantibodies, including anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody and anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody, were negative. The patient was diagnosed with aHUS and received three sessions of plasmapheresis and methylprednisolone pulse therapy, followed by oral methylprednisolone (0.25-0.5 mg/kg) instead of tacrolimus. She temporarily required hemodialysis (sCr level, 658.3 μmol/L). Thereafter, her sCr level improved to 284.5 μmol/L without dialysis therapy. This case is clinically considered as aHUS after kidney transplantation, associated with various factors, including rejection, glomerulonephritis, and toxicity from drugs such as tacrolimus. PMID:26031589

  13. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity and Ca(2+)-Mg(2+) ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro. PMID:26831695

  14. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: Current trends and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of hemolytic disease of the newborn has changed over the last few decades. With the implementation of Rhesus D immunoprophylaxis, hemolytic disease due to ABO incompatibility and other alloantibodies has now emerged as major causes of this condition. Though in developing countries, anti D is still a common antibody in pregnant women, many Asian countries have identified alloantibodies other than anti D as a cause of moderate-severe hemolytic disease. The most concerned fact is that, some of these have been described in Rh D positive women. It appears that universal antenatal screening in all pregnant women needs to be initiated, since Rh D positive women are just as likely as D negative women to form alloantibodies. Many developed nations have national screening programs for pregnant women. This is necessary to ensure timely availability of antigen negative blood and reduce effects on the newborn. Although universal screening seems justified, the cost and infrastructure required would be immense. Developing countries and under resourced nations need to consider universal antenatal screening and frame guidelines accordingly. PMID:21572705

  15. Oxidative Damage and Energy Metabolism Disorder Contribute to the Hemolytic Effect of Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lizhen; Yu, Yongbo; Li, Yang; Yu, Yang; Duan, Junchao; Zou, Yang; Li, Qiuling; Sun, Zhiwei

    2016-02-01

    Amorphous silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their particular characteristics. The increased environmental and iatrogenic exposure of SiNPs gained great concerns on the biocompatibility and hematotoxicity of SiNPs. However, the studies on the hemolytic effects of amorphous SiNPs in human erythrocytes are still limited. In this study, amorphous SiNPs with 58 nm were selected and incubated with human erythrocytes for different times (30 min and 2 h) at various concentrations (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 μg/mL). SiNPs induced a dose-dependent increase in percent hemolysis and significantly increased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content and decreased the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, leading to oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Hydroxyl radical (·OH) levels were detected by electron spin resonance (ESR), and the decreased elimination rates of ·OH showed SiNPs induced low antioxidant ability in human erythrocytes. Na+-K+ ATPase activity and Ca2+-Mg2+ ATPase activity were found remarkably inhibited after SiNP treatment, possibly causing energy sufficient in erythrocytes. Percent hemolysis of SiNPs was significantly decreased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). It was concluded that amorphous SiNPs caused dose-dependent hemolytic effects in human erythrocytes. Oxidative damage and energy metabolism disorder contributed to the hemolytic effects of SiNPs in vitro.

  16. Massive Esophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Rare Complication of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Gregory; Malik, Zubair; Mathur, Malini

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with sickle cell anemia presented with fatigue, dark stool, and coffee ground emesis. He was found to have large esophageal varices and experienced massive variceal hemorrhage in the hospital. The varices were caused by diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis, and his only risk factor for hypercoagulability was sickle cell anemia. Splanchnic venous thrombosis due to sickle cell anemia is exceedingly rare. PMID:26958556

  17. Massive Esophageal Variceal Bleeding as a Rare Complication of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    PubMed

    Malamood, Mark; Bernstein, Gregory; Malik, Zubair; Mathur, Malini

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old man with sickle cell anemia presented with fatigue, dark stool, and coffee ground emesis. He was found to have large esophageal varices and experienced massive variceal hemorrhage in the hospital. The varices were caused by diffuse splanchnic venous thrombosis, and his only risk factor for hypercoagulability was sickle cell anemia. Splanchnic venous thrombosis due to sickle cell anemia is exceedingly rare. PMID:26958556

  18. [Early anemia in diabetic nephropathy].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Judit; Kiss, István; Wittmann, István

    2005-02-27

    The number of diabetic patients with renal disease increased significantly in the last years worldwide. Anemia is an important and frequent component of diabetic nephropathy that may begin early in the course of the chronic renal disease of diabetics, and is more severe in diabetic patients with renal disease than in non - diabetic renal patients controlled for the same level of renal function. The reason for the anemia is decreased erythropoietin level caused by diminished production and, in a lesser degree, by increased excretion of erythropoietin in the urine. There is a close connection between diabetic nephropathy, anemia and cardiovascular complications. On the basis of small studies correction of anemia may decrease the progression of diabetic nephropathy and cardiovascular complications. However, the result of ongoing large randomised controlled studies are required to get "evidence-based" data to prove that correction of anemia has beneficial effects on microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications, particularly cardiac disease, and on progression of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:15830606

  19. Cardio-renal anemia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Efstratiadis, G; Konstantinou, D; Chytas, I; Vergoulas, G

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between cronic heart failure, cronic kidney insufficiency and anemia, form a vicious cycle, termed as the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. The interaction between these three conditions causes deterioration of the cardiac and renal function and increases anemia. Each of the three can cause or be caused by the others. We herein analyze and speculate the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of this new syndrome highlighting the main points of interest that seem to expand upon more than one specialty. The cardio-renal anemia syndrome is emerging in the area of clinical investigation with progressively elevated significance. Additionaly we report the data related to anemia treatment as part of therapeutic perspective concerning the management of patients manifesting the profile of this syndrome. PMID:18923761

  20. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  2. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  3. Iron Deficiency and Other Types of Anemia in Infants and Children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mary

    2016-02-15

    Anemia, defined as a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below the mean for age, is prevalent in infants and children worldwide. The evaluation of a child with anemia should begin with a thorough history and risk assessment. Characterizing the anemia as microcytic, normocytic, or macrocytic based on the mean corpuscular volume will aid in the workup and management. Microcytic anemia due to iron deficiency is the most common type of anemia in children. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the World Health Organization recommend routine screening for anemia at 12 months of age; the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to assess the benefits vs. harms of screening. Iron deficiency anemia, which can be associated with cognitive issues, is prevented and treated with iron supplements or increased intake of dietary iron. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence to recommend screening or treating pregnant women for iron deficiency anemia to improve maternal or neonatal outcomes. Delayed cord clamping can improve iron status in infancy, especially for at-risk populations, such as those who are preterm or small for gestational age. Normocytic anemia may be caused by congenital membranopathies, hemoglobinopathies, enzymopathies, metabolic defects, and immune-mediated destruction. An initial reticulocyte count is needed to determine bone marrow function. Macrocytic anemia, which is uncommon in children, warrants subsequent evaluation for vitamin B12 and folate deficiencies, hypothyroidism, hepatic disease, and bone marrow disorders. PMID:26926814

  4. The Senegal DNA haplotype is associated with the amelioration of anemia in African-American sickle cell anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Nagel, R L; Erlingsson, S; Fabry, M E; Croizat, H; Susuka, S M; Lachman, H; Sutton, M; Driscoll, C; Bouhassira, E; Billett, H H

    1991-03-15

    We have previously determined that in African sickle cell anemia (SS) patients three different beta-like globin gene cluster haplotypes are associated with different percent G gamma (one of the two types of non-alpha chains comprising hemoglobin F [HbF]), mean percent HbF, and percent dense cells. We report now that in adult New York SS patients, the presence of at least one chromosome with the Senegal haplotype is associated with higher Hb levels (1.2 g/dL higher) than is found for any other non-Senegal haplotype (P less than .004). The percent reticulocytes and the serum bilirubin levels were lower in these patients. When the effect of alpha-gene number was analyzed by examining a sample of SS patients with concomitant alpha-thalassemia, the same results were obtained. Because the HbF level is significantly higher among the Senegal haplotype carriers in this sample, the inhibitory effect on sickling of this Hb variant may be one of the reasons for the haplotype effect. We conclude that the Senegal beta-like globin gene cluster haplotype is associated with an amelioration of the hemolytic anemia that characterizes sickle cell disease. PMID:2001460

  5. [Management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is one of the commonest extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of anemia in IBD is complex but iron deficiency combined with inflammation is the most common factor related to the development of anemia. However, other causes such as vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, hemolysis, myelosuppression and drug also should not be overlooked. In addition to ferritin, inflammatory markers and new biochemical parameters such as hepcidin and ferritin index are being tested as diagnostic a tool. First step for treatment is disease activity control and iron supplementation. Although oral iron is widely used, intravenous iron therapy should be considered in patients who are intolerant to oral iron therapy, have severe and refractory anemia or are in active disease state. Recently, new intravenous iron formulations have been introduced and due to their safety and easy usage, they have become the standard treatment modality for managing anemia in IBD. Erythropoietin and transfusion can be considered in specific situations. Vitamin B12 and folate supplementation is also important in patients who are deficient of these micronutrients. Since anemia in IBD patients could significantly influence the disease outcome, further studies and standard guideline for IBD are needed. PMID:25797377

  6. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  7. Is Penicillium citrinum implicated in sago hemolytic disease?

    PubMed

    Atagazli, Latifeh; Greenhill, Andrew R; Melrose, Wayne; Pue, Aisak G; Warner, Jeffrey M

    2010-05-01

    Sago hemolytic disease (SHD) is an acute hemolytic syndrome affecting rural Papua New Guineans who depend on the starch of Metroxylon sagu as a staple carbohydrate. It is a suspected mycotoxicosis associated with fungal succession in stored and perhaps poorly fermented sago. Despite a mortality rate of approximately 25%, little is know about the disease. Recent studies have identified Penicillium citrinum as a possible candidate in the etiology of SHD. This is based on the frequency of isolation from sago starch and the hemolytic nature of the organism as demonstrated when cultured on sheep and human blood agar. A highly non-polar lipophilic P. citrinum fraction from C18 solid phase extraction demonstrated high hemolytic activity in a semi-quantitative assay using both mouse and human erythrocytes. When the red cell membrane proteins were subjected to sodium dodecyl-sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) separation, cleavage of protein band 3 and spectrin was demonstrated. This breach of major structural red cell proteins is consistent with the severe hemolysis found in vivo. Our findings warrant further investigation into the hemolytic activity of P. citrinum and its role as the etiological agent of SHD. PMID:20578553

  8. Plasmodium falciparum Merozoite Surface Protein-1 Polymorphisms among Asymptomatic Sickle Cell Anemia Patients in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bamidele Abiodun, Iwalokun; Oluwadun, Afolabi; Olugbenga Ayoola, Aina; Senapon Olusola, Iwalokun

    2016-01-01

    Asymptomatic malaria (ASM) has been implicated in the development of hemolytic crisis in infected sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients worldwide. This study surveyed steady state SCA Nigerian patients for ASM to investigate the influence of malaria prevention behaviors and age on parasitaemia and multiplicity of infection (MOI). A total of 78 steady SCA patients aged 5 - 27 years on routine care at three health facilities in Lagos were investigated for ASM by light microscopy and PCR with a multiplicity of infection determined by genotyping block 2 of merozoite surface protein 1 (msp1) gene of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum). Use of malaria prevention measures was captured using a semi-structured questionnaire. The prevalence rates of ASM (due to Pf only) by microscopy and PCR were found to be 27.3% and 47.4% respectively (P < 0.05) with a Mean + SEM parasite density of 2238.4 + 464.3 parasites/uL. Five distinct msp1 genotypes [K1 (2), MAD20 (2), RO33 (1)] were detected and significant (P<0.05) disparity in allele frequencies (K1, 91.8%, MAD20, 32.4%; RO33, 18.9%) was found. The overall MOI was 1.43 and 37.8% of infections were polyclonal (P<0.05). ASM was associated with non-use of preventive measures and occurred in 62.1% of SCA patients aged < 10y with lower MOI of 1.3 compared to 38.1% in older patients with a higher MOI of 1.5 (P<0.05). We conclude that PCR improved the diagnosis of ASM among Nigerian SCA patients with infections being of low complexity and associated with non-use of preventive interventions and R033 msp1 allele selection. PMID:26853290

  9. Administration of Ricin Induces a Severe Inflammatory Response via Nonredundant Stimulation of ERK, JNK, and P38 MAPK and Provides a Mouse Model of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Korcheva, Veselina; Wong, John; Corless, Christopher; Iordanov, Mihail; Magun, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Recent interest in the health consequences of ricin as a weapon of terrorism has led us to investigate the effects of ricin on cells in vitro and in mice. Our previous studies showed that depurination of the 28S rRNA by ricin results in the inhibition of translation and the coordinate activation of the stress-activated protein kinases JNK and p38 MAPK. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, ricin induced the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK, the accumulation of mRNA encoding tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1, the transcription factors c-Fos, c-Jun, and EGR1, and the appearance of TNF-α protein in the culture medium. Using specific inhibitors of MAPKs, we demonstrated the nonredundant roles of the individual MAPKs in mediating proinflammatory gene activation in response to ricin. Similarly, the intravenous administration of ricin to mice led to the activation of ERK, JNK, and p38 MAPK in the kidneys, and increases in plasma-borne TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Ricin-injected mice developed the hallmarks of hemolytic uremic syndrome, including thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. Microarray analyses demonstrated a massive proinflammatory transcriptional response in the kidneys, coincidental with the symptoms of hemolytic uremic syndrome. Therapeutic management of the inflammatory response may affect the outcome of intoxication by ricin. PMID:15632024

  10. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  11. Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A β-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A β-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A β-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  12. Hemolysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the breakdown of red blood cells. See also: Hemolytic anemia ... Schwartz RS. Autoimmune and intravascular hemolytic anemias. In: Goldman ... Elsevier; 2011:chap 163. Gallagher PG. Hemolytic anemias: ...

  13. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... need for blood transfusions. Medicines To Suppress the Immune System Research suggests that aplastic anemia may sometimes occur because the body's immune system attacks its own cells by mistake. For this ...

  14. Failure of Clindamycin To Eradicate Infection with Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Inducibly Resistant to Clindamycin in an Animal Model and in Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James S.; Lepak, Alex J.; Thompson, George R.; Craig, William A.; Andes, David R.; Sabol-Dzintars, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci remains an underrecognized phenomenon of unknown clinical significance. We performed an evaluation of inducible clindamycin resistance using an animal model as well as retrospectively reviewing the charts of patients treated with clindamycin monotherapy who were infected with beta-hemolytic streptococci inducibly resistant to clindamycin. The neutropenic mouse thigh model of infection was used to evaluate the in vivo activity of clindamycin against beta-hemolytic streptococci, including isolates susceptible, inducibly resistant, or constitutively resistant to clindamycin. The clinical microbiology laboratory information system and pharmacy databases were cross-referenced to identify patients with infections due to inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who were treated with clindamycin monotherapy. Medical records of these patients were reviewed to evaluate microbiologic and clinical outcomes. Inducible clindamycin resistance resulted in impaired killing of beta-hemolytic streptococci in the animal model. Though suppressed initially, compared to those with constitutive resistance (P = 0.0429), by 48 h, colony counts of inducibly clindamycin-resistant organisms were similar to those of constitutively resistant isolates (P = 0.1142). In addition, we identified 8 patients infected with inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who experienced clinical and microbiologic failure when treated with clindamycin monotherapy. These patients either improved initially and subsequently failed or never responded to clindamycin therapy. We have demonstrated in a murine model of infection and from human cases that inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci is clinically significant. Routine testing and reporting by clinical laboratories should be encouraged and alternative antimicrobial agents considered when these organisms are encountered in clinical care. PMID:24323478

  15. Peripheral gangrene in children with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Malina, Michal; Gulati, Ashima; Bagga, Arvind; Majid, Mohammad A; Simkova, Eva; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy with severe clinical manifestation, frequent recurrence, and poor long-term prognosis. It is usually caused by abnormalities in complement regulation. We report 2 cases of children affected by a catastrophic extrarenal complication. A 4-year-old Indian girl developed gangrene of the finger tips 2 days after initial presentation of aHUS. Factor H autoantibodies were identified. Renal function continued to decline despite daily plasma exchanges, and she was started on peritoneal dialysis 5 days after admission. The distal tips of the left hand remained gangrenous with a line of demarcation. Three weeks later, she did not return for follow-up and died at home because of dialysis-related complications. An Arabic girl developed end-stage renal disease due to aHUS in the fourth month after birth. A de novo activating C3 mutation was found. At age 9 months, she suddenly developed ischemic changes in fingers of both hands and several toes. The lesions progressed, and several finger tips became gangrenous despite intense plasma exchange therapy. The decision was made to administer complement blocking therapy with the C5 antibody eculizumab. All nonnecrotic digits rapidly regained perfusion. The 3 already gangrenous fingers healed with loss of the end phalanges. During maintenance, eculizumab aHUS activity subsided completely and some late recovery of renal function was observed. aHUS may present by thrombotic macroangiopathy of small peripheral arteries. Eculizumab appears effective in preserving tissue viability if administered before gangrene occurs and should be considered as first-line rescue therapy in such cases. PMID:23230076

  16. [Diagnosis and treatment of anemia in heart failure patients].

    PubMed

    Santilli, Giovanna; Tarantini, Luigi; Baio, Pierangelo; Senni, Michele

    2011-05-01

    Anemia is a common comorbidity in patients with acute and chronic heart failure (HF) with preserved and reduced systolic function. It is recognized as a new therapeutic goal in HF since the reduction in hemoglobin levels is considered a significant independent predictive factor of mortality and hospitalization. At present, it is difficult to determine the real magnitude of the problem in terms of actual incidence and prevalence as no consistent definition of anemia associated with HF does exist, and a variety of hemoglobin thresholds have been used in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The etiology of anemia is multifactorial with the main causes including renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding and nutritional deficiency. Nevertheless, such criteria are not present in some patients, who show a peculiar type of anemia that may be classified as anemia of chronic diseases, likely due to the chronic inflammatory process of HF. No guidelines for the treatment of anemia in HF patients are available. Most of the previous studies in the literature are limited by small sample sizes. The very few randomized multicenter studies that evaluated the effects of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents associated with intravenous iron therapy did not provide the expected results. Indeed, despite an increase in hemoglobin levels, they did not show any improvement of NYHA functional class, nor of left ventricular ejection fraction. In addition, reasonable hemoglobin levels as a goal of therapy have not been established yet, in particular in relation to the side effects and the cardiovascular risk observed after the administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in oncologic patients. Further studies are warranted to define the magnitude of the problem and establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. It is likely that more reliable data will be derived from an ongoing randomized, double-blind, multicenter study, the RED-HF (Reduction Event with Darbepoetin alfa in Heart Failure), which aims at evaluating morbidity and mortality in a cohort of 2600 HF patients with anemia treated with darbepoetin alfa. PMID:21593950

  17. Anemia in Clinical Practice-Definition and Classification: Does Hemoglobin Change With Aging?

    PubMed

    Cappellini, M Domenica; Motta, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries at all ages. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels <12.0 g/dL in women and <13.0 g/dL in men. However, normal Hb distribution varies not only with sex but also with ethnicity and physiological status. New lower limits of normal Hb values have been proposed, according to ethnicity, gender, and age. Anemia is often multifactorial and is not an independent phenomenon. For the classification and diagnosis the hematologic parameters, the underlying pathological mechanism and patient history should be taken into account. The aging of population, especially in Western countries, causes an increase of anemia in elderly people. In this population, anemia, recently defined by levels of Hb <12 g/dL in both sexes, is mostly of mild degree (10-12 g/dL). Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in this population is important because it contributes to morbidity and mortality. In one third of the patients, anemia is due to nutritional deficiency, including iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency; moreover, anemia of chronic disease accounts for about another third of the cases. However, in one third of patients anemia cannot be explained by an underlying disease or by a specific pathological process, and for this reason it is defined "unexplained anemia". Unexplained anemia might be due to the progressive resistance of bone marrow erythroid progenitors to erythropoietin, and a chronic subclinical pro-inflammatory state. PMID:26404438

  18. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  19. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia? The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue ( ... mild symptoms or none at all. Complications of Anemia Some people who have anemia may have arrhythmias ( ...

  20. Anemia on Admission Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Mortality in Hip Fracture Population

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Licheng; Yin, Pengbin; Lv, Houchen; Long, Anhua; Gao, Yuan; Zhang, Lihai; Tang, Peifu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is a disputable factor for long-term mortality in hip fracture population in previous studies. Previous studies indicated that the level of hemoglobin (Hb) might fluctuate due to various factors, such as comorbidities and in-hospital interventions, and the changing level of Hb, may lead to discordance diagnosis of anemia and thus to the conflicting conclusions on prognostic value of anemia. So in this study, we aim to compare factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia at different time-points, admission, postoperation, and discharge, and to determine which the time point is most suitable for mortality prediction. This prospective cohort study included 1330 hip fracture patients from 1 January 2000 to 18 November 2012. Hb levels at 3 different time points, such as admission, postoperation, and discharge, were collected and used to stratify the cohort into anemia and nonanemia groups. Candidate factors including commodities, perioperative factors, blood transfusion, and other in-hospital interventions were collected before discharge. Logistic regression analyses were performed to detect risk factors for anemia for the 3 time points separately. Kaplan–Meier and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between anemia and 2-year mortality. Factors affecting the diagnosis of anemia were different for the 3 time points. Age, female sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists score (ASA), and intertrochanteric fracture were associated with admission anemia, while surgical procedure, surgical duration, blood transfusion, blood loss during the operation, and drainage volume were major risk factors for postoperation anemia. Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis suggested that the risk of all-cause mortality was higher in the anemia group on admission (1.680, 95%CI: 1.201–2.350, P < 0.01), but not postoperation or on discharge, after adjustment for confounding factors. Our study showed that risk factors for anemia varied at different time points, and therapy interventions would greatly affect the status of postoperation and discharge anemia in hip fracture patients. The take-home message is when anemia is used for mortality prediction in these patients, a specific time point should be chosen. We suggest that only admission anemia should be used for mortality prediction, but not postoperation nor discharge anemia. PMID:26844456

  1. Persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn associated with severe congenital anemia of various etiologies.

    PubMed

    Landau, Danielle; Kapelushnik, Josef; Harush, Miri B; Marks, Kyla; Shalev, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Among the many associated features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the neonate (PPHN), severe congenital anemia has been described only occasionally and is not included in the list of conditions that may cause PPHN in the neonate. We describe the clinical course of a group of 12 full-term neonates with PPHN and congenital anemia due to congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (7/12), α thalasemia (1/12), Diamond-Blackfan (1/12), and epsilon gamma delta beta thalassemia (3/12). The association of congenital anemia and PPHN is more common than previously thought; it can exist with various etiologies and severity of anemia. Congenital anemia has not been described until now as a cause or risk factor for PPHN; it should be considered as such alone or in combination with other known causes to be recognized early and treated appropriately to improve outcome. In families with known cases of congenital anemia due to the above-mentioned diagnosis, closer prenatal follow-up should be offered to anticipate possible fetal distress and/or fetal anemia and PPHN after birth. PMID:24309603

  2. Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Due to Cryptococcal Osteomyelitis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Liang, Jinqian; Shen, Jianxiong; Qiu, Guixing; Weng, Xisheng

    2016-02-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans causes opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients, with vertebral osteomyelitis being a very rare involvement.This study is to present a case of thoracolumbar scoliosis occurring in the setting of cryptococcal osteomyelitis.Pharmacological intervention with anticryptococcal medicine and medical management of immune hemolytic anemia were administered. After initial acute stabilization, she underwent spinal debridement and fusion on October 29, 2008. She eventually recovered fully from this episode with no subsequent mechanical instability or neurological deficits on subsequent clinic follow-ups.To the best of our knowledge, there have been no reports describing the onset of spinal cryptococcal osteomyelitis along with immune hemolytic anemia. We suggest a comprehensive algorithm for the diagnosis of vertebral cryptococcal osteomyelitis. PMID:26844472

  3. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria due to an IgA Donath-Landsteiner antibody.

    PubMed

    Whipple, Nicholas S; Moreau, Dawn A B; Moulds, JoAnn M; Hankins, Jane S; Wang, Winfred C; Nottage, Kerri A

    2015-11-01

    Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH) is an autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) characterized by the presence of a Donath-Landsteiner (D-L) antibody. PCH occurs most commonly in young children and is associated with acute, often self-limited hemolytic anemia. The D-L antibody is classically a biphasic IgG anti-P autoantibody identified by the D-L test. Rare case reports confirm the existence of IgM D-L antibodies. We report the case of a 2-year-old male diagnosed with acute AIHA and found to have PCH caused by an IgA D-L antibody. The clinical course and treatment of this condition, which has not been reported previously, are described. PMID:26053459

  4. Sleep alterations and iron deficiency anemia in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Peirano, Patricio D.; Algarín, Cecilia R.; Chamorro, Rodrigo A.; Reyes, Sussanne C.; Durán, Samuel A.; Garrido, Marcelo I.; Lozoff, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to be the most common single nutrient deficiency in the world. An estimated 20-25% of the world’s infants have IDA, with at least as many having iron deficiency without anemia. Infants are at particular risk due to rapid growth and limited dietary sources of iron. We found that infants with IDA showed different motor activity patterning in all sleep-waking states and several differences in sleep states organization. Sleep alterations were still apparent years after correction of anemia with iron treatment in the absence of subsequent IDA. We suggest that altered sleep patterns may represent an underlying mechanism that interferes with optimal brain functioning during sleep and wakefulness in former IDA children. PMID:20620103

  5. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  6. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus. PMID:18293883

  7. FastStats: Anemia or Iron Deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Anemia or Iron Deficiency Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... visits Number of visits to emergency departments with anemia as the primary hospital discharge diagnosis: 237,000 ...

  8. Iron deficiency anemia in children.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Girish; Girish, Meenakshi

    2015-06-01

    Iron deficiency is not just anemia; it can be responsible for a long list of other manifestations. This topic is of great importance, especially in infancy and early childhood, for a variety of reasons. Firstly, iron need is maximum in this period. Secondly, diet in infancy is usually deficient in iron. Thirdly and most importantly, iron deficiency at this age can result in neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits, which may not be reversible. Hypochromia and microcytosis in a complete blood count (CBC) makes iron deficiency anemia (IDA) most likely diagnosis. Absence of response to iron should make us look for other differential diagnosis like β thalassemia trait and anemia of chronic disease. Celiac disease is the most important cause of true IDA not responding to oral iron therapy. While oral ferrous sulphate is the cheapest and most effective therapy for IDA, simple nonpharmacological and pharmacological measures can go a long way in prevention of iron deficiency. PMID:25636824

  9. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Dufay, J. Noelia; Steele, Shelby L.; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K.; Coombs, Andrew J.; Liwski, Robert S.; Fernandez, Conrad V.; Berman, Jason N.; McMaster, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  10. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Murray, J Pedro; Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Dufay, J Noelia; Steele, Shelby L; Gaston, Daniel; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; Coombs, Andrew J; Liwski, Robert S; Fernandez, Conrad V; Berman, Jason N; McMaster, Christopher R

    2016-01-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala) a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia. PMID:26821380

  11. Favism: a hemolytic disease associated with increased superoxide dismutase and decreased glutathione peroxidase activities in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Mavelli, I; Ciriolo, M R; Rossi, L; Meloni, T; Forteleoni, G; De Flora, A; Benatti, U; Morelli, A; Rotilio, G

    1984-02-15

    Red blood cells of favism patients with acute hemolytic crisis have markedly more superoxide dismutase (superoxide:superoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.15.1.1) and less glutathione peroxidase (glutathione:hydrogenperoxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.9) than either normal controls, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient subjects or favism patients outside hemolytic crisis. This altered value of the two enzyme activities is not due to increased reticulocyte content of blood. The electrophoretic triplet pattern of superoxide dismutase is also changed, with significant increase of the most positively charged band. Similar modifications of the two enzyme activities are observed after treatment of normal red blood cells with high concentrations of divicine and ascorbate, which are redox compounds that are contained in fava seeds. This treatment produces no hemolysis, but leads to hemolysis if the treated cells are resuspended in the homologous plasma. These results suggest a possible role of active oxygen species in the development of favism. PMID:6698000

  12. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... العربية) Anemia (Arabic) العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Anemia Anemija - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Anemia 贫血 - 简体中文 (Chinese - Simplified) ...

  13. (Inborn anemias of mice): Terminal progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations located at 11 different chromosomal locations in the mouse all affecting hemopoiesis have been studied. These include: Hertwig's anemia (an), W-anemias (W, W/sup v/, W/sup 17J/ to W/sup 41J/), Steel anemias (Sl, Sl/sup d/, etc.), Normoblastic anemia (nb), Jaundiced (ja), Spherocytic anemias (sph, sph/sup ha/), sph/sup 2J/, sph/sup 2BC/, Flexed-tail anemia (f), Microcytic anemia (mk), Sex-linked anemia (Sla), Alpha thallasemia (Hba/sup th/), and a hypochromic anemia associated with low transferrin levels (hpx). Our findings indicate that the erythroid defect in W-anemias stem from an intrinsic defect in the erythroid progenitor cells, and that all other erythroid hemostatic mechanisms are fully functional. Hertwig's anemia (an) is affected in a similar fashion. However, in the case of Steel anemias, the erythroid progenitors are repressed, but when transplanted to appropriate recipients were found to be fully functional. 70 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Free fatty acids released from phospholipids are the major heat-stable hemolytic factor of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    PubMed Central

    Said-Fernández, S; López-Revilla, R

    1988-01-01

    The major hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites is located in a vesicular fraction called P30 and known to be due to heat-labile and heat-stable hemolytic components whose effect increases up to 100 times during preincubation at 36 degrees C. The heat-stable hemolytic activity (HSHA) was found in the chloroform-methanol extract of preincubated P30, whose partition with 2 M KCl yielded a lipid fraction, an interphase, and an aqueous phase. HSHA was detected only in the lipid fraction, where it amounted to 59% of the chloroform-methanol extract activity and increased 50% when supplemented with the interphase material; it was accounted for by the free fatty acids, whose potency increased 33% with the interphase material, and was blocked by delipidated bovine serum albumin. A parallel increase in free fatty acids and lysophospholipids and a corresponding decrease in phospholipids were observed during P30 preincubation. Most of the phospholipase activity of trophozoite homogenates was also found in P30. Therefore, most of the HSHA generated during preincubation was due to free fatty acids released from phospholipids by a P30 phospholipase that may contribute significantly to E. histolytica cytopathogenicity and virulence. Images PMID:2894362

  15. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: A neglected issue with relevant effects

    PubMed Central

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  16. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: a neglected issue with relevant effects.

    PubMed

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J

    2014-04-01

    Anemia, a common complication associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), is frequently overlooked in the management of IBD patients. Unfortunately, it represents one of the major causes of both decreased quality of life and increased hospital admissions among this population. Anemia in IBD is pathogenically complex, with several factors contributing to its development. While iron deficiency is the most common cause, vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiencies, along with the effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hemolysis, drug therapies, and myelosuppression, have also been identified as the underlying etiology in a number of patients. Each of these etiological factors thus needs to be identified and corrected in order to effectively manage anemia in IBD. Because the diagnosis of anemia in IBD often presents a challenge, combinations of several hematimetric and biochemical parameters should be used. Recent studies underscore the importance of determining the ferritin index and hepcidin levels in order to distinguish between iron deficiency anemia, anemia due to chronic disease, or mixed anemia in IBD patients. With regard to treatment, the newly introduced intravenous iron formulations have several advantages over orally-administered iron compounds in treating iron deficiency in IBD. In special situations, erythropoietin supplementation and biological therapies should be considered. In conclusion, the management of anemia is a complex aspect of treating IBD patients, one that significantly influences the prognosis of the disease. As a consequence, its correction should be considered a specific, first-line therapeutic goal in the management of these patients. PMID:24707137

  17. The systemic vascular resistance response: a cardiovascular response modulating blood viscosity with implications for primary hypertension and certain anemias.

    PubMed

    Sloop, Gregory D; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, John A

    2015-12-01

    Without an active regulatory feedback loop, increased blood viscosity could lead to a vicious cycle of ischemia, increased erythropoiesis, further increases of blood viscosity, decreased tissue perfusion with worsened ischemia, further increases in red cell mass, etc. We suggest that an increase in blood viscosity is detected by mechanoreceptors in the left ventricle which upregulate expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides and soluble erythropoietin receptor. This response normalizes systemic vascular resistance and blood viscosity at the cost of producing 'anemia of chronic disease or inflammation' or 'hemolytic anemia' both of which are better described as states of compensated hyperviscosity. Besides its role in disease, this response is also active in the physiologic adaptation to chronic exercise. Malfunction of this response may cause primary hypertension. PMID:26116626

  18. Erythroblast transferrin receptors and transferrin kinetics in iron deficiency and various anemias

    SciTech Connect

    Muta, K.; Nishimura, J.; Ideguchi, H.; Umemura, T.; Ibayashi, H.

    1987-06-01

    To clarify the role of transferrin receptors in cases of altered iron metabolism in clinical pathological conditions, we studied: number of binding sites; affinity; and recycling kinetics of transferrin receptors on human erythroblasts. Since transferrin receptors are mainly present on erythroblasts, the number of surface transferrin receptors was determined by assay of binding of /sup 125/I-transferrin and the percentage of erythroblasts in bone marrow mononuclear cells. The number of binding sites on erythroblasts from patients with an iron deficiency anemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects. Among those with an aplastic anemia, hemolytic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and polycythemia vera compared to normal subjects, there were no considerable differences in the numbers of binding sites. The dissociation constants (Kd) were measured using Scatchard analysis. The apparent Kd was unchanged (about 10 nmol/L) in patients and normal subjects. The kinetics of endocytosis and exocytosis of /sup 125/I-transferrin, examined by acid treatment, revealed no variations in recycling kinetics among the patients and normal subjects. These data suggest that iron uptake is regulated by modulation of the number of surface transferrin receptors, thereby reflecting the iron demand of the erythroblast.

  19. [Occurrence and drug-resistance of beta-hemolytic streptococci].

    PubMed

    Mikołajczyk, Dorota; Budzyńska, Anna; Kaczmarek, Agnieszka; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was the analysis of drug-resistance and frequency appearance of beta-hemolytic streptococci strains which were isolated in 2003-2005 in the University Hospital at the L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz University of Nicolaus Copernicus in Toruń. Among investigeted beta-hemolytic streptococci the most frequency isolated species was S. agalactiae. All isolates examined in our study were susceptible to penicillin, the higest rate of resistance was found for tetracycline. The rates of resistence to macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (phenotyp MLS(B)) were as follows: S. agalactiae (18.7%), S. pyogenes (10.1%), group G streptococci (10.6%) and group C streptococci (8.0%). In our study we presented also a special case patient from which in investigeted period S. agalactiae was isolated twenty eight times. For ten chromosomal DNA isolated from this patient three different PFGE profiles were obtained. PMID:18416122

  20. Critical appraisal of eculizumab for atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Lilian M Pereira; Langman, Craig B

    2016-01-01

    The biology of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome has been shown to involve inability to limit activation of the alternative complement pathway, with subsequent damage to systemic endothelial beds and the vasculature, resulting in the prototypic findings of a thrombotic microangiopathy. Central to this process is the formation of the terminal membrane attack complex C5b-9. Recently, application of a monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to C5, eculizumab, became available to treat patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, replacing plasma exchange or infusion as primary therapy. This review focuses on the evidence, based on published clinical trials, case series, and case reports, on the efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:27110144

  1. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  2. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  3. An anemia of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Faux, N G; Rembach, A; Wiley, J; Ellis, K A; Ames, D; Fowler, C J; Martins, R N; Pertile, K K; Rumble, R L; Trounson, B; Masters, C L; Bush, A I

    2014-11-01

    Lower hemoglobin is associated with cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since brain iron homeostasis is perturbed in AD, we investigated whether this is peripherally reflected in the hematological and related blood chemistry values from the Australian Imaging Biomarker and Lifestyle (AIBL) study (a community-based, cross-sectional cohort comprising 768 healthy controls (HC), 133 participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 211 participants with AD). We found that individuals with AD had significantly lower hemoglobin, mean cell hemoglobin concentrations, packed cell volume and higher erythrocyte sedimentation rates (adjusted for age, gender, APOE-ɛ4 and site). In AD, plasma iron, transferrin, transferrin saturation and red cell folate levels exhibited a significant distortion of their customary relationship to hemoglobin levels. There was a strong association between anemia and AD (adjusted odds ratio (OR)=2.43, confidence interval (CI) (1.31, 4.54)). Moreover, AD emerged as a strong risk factor for anemia on step-down regression, even when controlling for all other available explanations for anemia (adjusted OR=3.41, 95% CI (1.68, 6.92)). These data indicated that AD is complicated by anemia, which may itself contribute to cognitive decline. PMID:24419041

  4. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  5. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  6. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2016-03-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., “FKK”, “LKL”, “KKLL”, “KWK”, “VLK”, “CYCR”, “CRR”, “RFC”, “RRR”, “LKKL”) are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/).

  7. A Web Server and Mobile App for Computing Hemolytic Potency of Peptides.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Ritesh; Singh, Sandeep; Tuknait, Abhishek; Gautam, Ankur; Mathur, Deepika; Anand, Priya; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-01-01

    Numerous therapeutic peptides do not enter the clinical trials just because of their high hemolytic activity. Recently, we developed a database, Hemolytik, for maintaining experimentally validated hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. The present study describes a web server and mobile app developed for predicting, and screening of peptides having hemolytic potency. Firstly, we generated a dataset HemoPI-1 that contains 552 hemolytic peptides extracted from Hemolytik database and 552 random non-hemolytic peptides (from Swiss-Prot). The sequence analysis of these peptides revealed that certain residues (e.g., L, K, F, W) and motifs (e.g., "FKK", "LKL", "KKLL", "KWK", "VLK", "CYCR", "CRR", "RFC", "RRR", "LKKL") are more abundant in hemolytic peptides. Therefore, we developed models for discriminating hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides using various machine learning techniques and achieved more than 95% accuracy. We also developed models for discriminating peptides having high and low hemolytic potential on different datasets called HemoPI-2 and HemoPI-3. In order to serve the scientific community, we developed a web server, mobile app and JAVA-based standalone software (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemopi/). PMID:26953092

  8. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  9. Is there any relation between Duration of breastfeeding and anemia?

    PubMed Central

    Dalili, H; Baghersalimi, A; Dalili, S; Pakdaman, F; Hassanzadeh Rad, A; Abbasi Kakroodi, M; Rezvany, SM; Koohmanaei, Sh

    2015-01-01

    Background In the early months of life, Breastfeeding increases chance of survival, reduces recovery time after disease and mortality due to infections such as diarrhea and acute respiratory infections. However, infants who are exclusively breast-fed for more than 6 months in developing countries may be at increased risk of anemia. Therefore, the aim of study was to assess the relation between duration of breastfeeding and anemia. Materials and Methods In this analytical cross-sectional study, 400 neonates registered in primary health care system since birth time. Complete blood count and serum ferritin were obtained. Data were analyzed by chi- square test and regression analysis. P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant and 95% confidence interval was noted. Results Results of this study showed that 199 infants were anemic (Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration <11 mg/dl). Ten percent of anemic patients reported Ferritin< 12ng/dl and %25 of anemic children had iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In Binominal logistic regression, merely kind of delivery and duration of breastfeeding were effective factors. Binominal logistic regression also showed that natural vaginal delivery and exclusive breastfeeding up to 6 months had a significant influence on anemia. Exclusive breast feeding for 6 months or more increased the likelihood of anemia. In addition, 4 months exclusive breastfeeding decreased 0.686 fold the likelihood of anemia. Conclusion According to the results, it seems that revision of health program recommendations for iron supplementation can be constructive. National planning to promote the level of knowledge regarding natural vaginal delivery and appropriate period for clamping can be recommended. PMID:26985355

  10. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  11. Serratamolide is a Hemolytic Factor Produced by Serratia marcescens

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M. Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Wang, Shaoru; Veverka, Tara I.; Kowalski, Regis P.; Liu, Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Serratia marcescens is a common contaminant of contact lens cases and lenses. Hemolytic factors of S. marcescens contribute to the virulence of this opportunistic bacterial pathogen. We took advantage of an observed hyper-hemolytic phenotype of crp mutants to investigate mechanisms of hemolysis. A genetic screen revealed that swrW is necessary for the hyper-hemolysis phenotype of crp mutants. The swrW gene is required for biosynthesis of the biosurfactant serratamolide, previously shown to be a broad-spectrum antibiotic and to contribute to swarming motility. Multicopy expression of swrW or mutation of the hexS transcription factor gene, a known inhibitor of swrW expression, led to an increase in hemolysis. Surfactant zones and expression from an swrW-transcriptional reporter were elevated in a crp mutant compared to the wild type. Purified serratamolide was hemolytic to sheep and murine red blood cells and cytotoxic to human airway and corneal limbal epithelial cells in vitro. The swrW gene was found in the majority of contact lens isolates tested. Genetic and biochemical analysis implicate the biosurfactant serratamolide as a hemolysin. This novel hemolysin may contribute to irritation and infections associated with contact lens use. PMID:22615766

  12. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  13. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome in children of Mendoza, Argentina: association with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection].

    PubMed

    Rivas, M; Balbi, L; Miliwebsky, E S; Garca, B; Tous, M I; Leardini, N A; Prieto, M A; Chillemi, G M; de Principi, M E

    1998-01-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) has been associated with pathogenesis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) worldwide. The aim of the present study was to characterize the HUS cases reported in Mendoza and to determine their association with STEC infection. From July 1994 through June 1996 thirty-six patients with HUS were admitted to Hospital Peditrico "Dr. HJ Notti" (Mean age 22.8 +/- 14.9 months, 44% females). The children developed HUS following an acute diarrheal illness in 94.4% of the cases. Bloody diarrhea was observed in 83.3% of them. Antimicrobial therapy had been administered to 69.4% of the patients. Most of the patients were well-nourished (88.9%), belong to middle-low socioeconomical condition (91.7%), from urban areas (72.2%) and they were mostly assisted during summer and the beginning of autumn. The acute stage of the disease occurred with presentation of pallor (100%), edema (25%), anuria (38.9%), oliguria (41.7%), hemolytic anemia (97.2%), thrombocytopenia (86.1%) and neurological involvement (41.7%). Twenty-five of them presented the full clinical syndrome. Peritoneal dialysis were performed in 50% and packed blood cell transfusion in 88.9%. The mean days of hospitalization was 15.1 +/- 9.2 [range 1-32]. A 91.7% of the patients recovered renal function, two developed chronic renal failure and one died. Cumulative evidence of STEC infection was found in 19 (86.4%) of 22 HUS patients. STEC O157:H7, biotype C was found in 8 (36.4%). The prevalent Stx type was Stx2 in STEC, free fecal Stx (STMF) and Stx-neutralizing antibodies (a-Stx). In Mendoza, as in the rest of Argentina E. coli O157:H7, biotype C, Stx2 producer is the most frequently detected pathogen in HUS cases. PMID:9674201

  14. Harderoporphyria due to homozygosity for coproporphyrinogen oxidase missense mutation H327R.

    PubMed

    Hasanoglu, Alev; Balwani, Manisha; Kasapkara, Ciğdem S; Ezgü, Fatih S; Okur, Ilyas; Tümer, Leyla; Cakmak, Alpay; Nazarenko, Irina; Yu, Chunli; Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Desnick, Robert J

    2011-02-01

    Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria due to the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX). The enzyme catalyzes the step-wise oxidative decarboxylation of the heme precursor, coproporphyrinogen III, to protoporphyrinogen IX via a tricarboxylic intermediate, harderoporphyrinogen. In autosomal dominant HCP, the deficient enzymatic activity results primarily in the accumulation of coproporphyrin III. To date, only a few homozygous HCP patients have been described, most having Harderoporphyria, a rare variant due to specific CPOX mutations that alter enzyme residues D400-K404, most patients described to date having at least one K404E allele. Here, we describe a Turkish male infant, the product of a consanguineous union, who presented with the Harderoporphyria phenotype including neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hemolytic anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin lesions when exposed to UV light. He was homoallelic for the CPOX missense mutation, c.980A>G (p.H327R), and had massively increased urinary uroporphyrins I and III (9,250 and 2,910 μM, respectively) and coproporphyrins I and III (895 and 19,400 μM, respectively). The patient expired at 5 months of age from an apparent acute neurologic porphyric attack. Structural studies predicted that p.H327R interacts with residue W399 in the CPOX active site, thereby accounting for the Harderoporphyria phenotype. PMID:21103937

  15. HARDEROPORPHYRIA DUE TO HOMOZYGOSITY FOR COPROPORPHYRINOGEN OXIDASE MISSENSE MUTATION H327R

    PubMed Central

    Hasanoglu, A; Balwani, M; Kasapkara, ÇS; Ezgü, FS; Okur, I; Tümer, L; Çakmak, A; Nazarenko, I; Yu, C; Clavero, S; Bishop, DF; Desnick, RJ

    2011-01-01

    Summary Hereditary coproporphyria (HCP) is an autosomal dominant acute hepatic porphyria due to the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme, coproporphyrinogen oxidase (CPOX). The enzyme catalyzes the step-wise oxidative decarboxylation of the heme precursor, coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX via a tricarboxylic intermediate, harderoporphyrinogen. In autosomal dominant HCP, the deficient enzymatic activity results primarily in the accumulation of coproporphyrin III. To date, only a few homozygous HCP patients have been described, most having Harderoporphyria, a rare variant due to specific CPOX mutations that alter enzyme residues D400-K404, most patients described to date having at least one K404E allele. Here, we describe a Turkish male infant, the product of a consanguineous union, who presented with the Harderoporphyria phenotype including neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, hemolytic anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, and skin lesions when exposed to UV light. He was homoallelic for the CPOX missense mutation, c.980A>G (p.H327R), and had massively increased urinary uroporphyrins I and III (9250 and 2910 μM, respectively) and coproporphyrins I and III (895 and 19,400 μM, respectively). The patient expired at five months of age from an apparent acute neurologic porphyric attack. Structural studies predicted that p.H327R interacts with residue W399 in the CPOX active site, thereby accounting for the Harderoporphyria phenotype. PMID:21103937

  16. [Iron supplementation is recommended in renal anemia].

    PubMed

    Stefansson, Bergur

    2015-01-01

    The main causes for renal anemia are insufficient erythropoietin production and absolute and/or functional iron deficiency. Absolute iron deficiency occurs with blood losses (most common are gastro-intestinal bleedings and hemodialysis treatments) or inadequate iron absorption in the gut (mainly due to increased circulating hepcidin or treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents). The explanation for functional iron deficiency is the high level of circulating hepcidin found in chronic kidney disease patients. The transmembrane iron transporter ferroportin is internalized and degraded by hepcidin with subsequent decreased iron absorption from the gut and reduced mobilization from iron storing cells. Thus, the bioavailability of iron is decreased despite normal or high total iron content. The diagnosis of iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease can be problematic because inflammation is common, leading to false high circulating ferritin and false low transferrin saturation. Treatment with iron is recommended in chronic kidney disease patients to prevent or minimize anemia symptoms or to reduce the need for treatment with erythropoiesis stimulating agents or blood transfusions. Intravenous iron is recommended in patients on dialysis treatment but in non-dialysis patients, a 1-3 month trial of oral iron can be tried. However, this is seldom sufficient in patients treated with erythropoiesis stimulating agents. PMID:25756713

  17. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported.

  18. Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Laura; Cartenì, Giacomo; Iacobelli, Stefano; Stelitano, Caterina; Airoldi, Mario; Balcke, Peter; Keil, Felix; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Belton, Laura; Pujol, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ≤10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ≥1 anemia symptom. Results Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ≤3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%–34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ≤10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ≤28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively. Conclusion On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior. PMID:23946669

  19. Iron deficiency anemia in a group of Turkish adolescents: frequency and contributing factors.

    PubMed

    Derman, Orhan; Okstüz-Kanbur, Nuray; Yenicesu, Idil; Klink, Ero

    2005-01-01

    Need for iron increases rapidly during adolescence. In girls, this is primarily due to the beginning of menstruation and dieting to loose weight, while in boys increased erythropoetic activity during pubertal period is the major cause. Between November 1999 and June 2000, 2,900 patients, between 9-17 years of age were screened for the presence of anemia in our Adolescent Outpatient Clinic. Tanner's scale of sexual maturation was used to categorize genital development. Those patients diagnosed with anemia were further examined for bone age, history of pica, parasitosis and gastrointestinal symptoms. Complete blood count showed anemia in 44 patients. Twenty one patients (15 girls and 6 boys) were diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, 19 (15 girls and 4 boys) were diagnosed with anemia associated with infections, 3 (two girls and one boy) were carriers for beta-thalasemia and one girl had acute myeloblastic leukemia. Laboratory parameters alone were not enough in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, but age, sex, growth rate and sexual maturation stage in the pubertal period must be taken into consideration. We suggest that the reason for the lower rate of iron deficiency anemia in our patients, than expected for this age group, could be due to our patient population being more aware and careful about a balanced diet compared to the feeding behaviour of the general population in Turkey. Further studies that include lower socio-economic groups are necessary to conclude the prevalance of iron deficiency anemia among adolescents. PMID:15971737

  20. [Management of renal anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease: the role of the general practitioner].

    PubMed

    Ruedin, P; Dickenmann, M; Martin, P-Y; Wüthrich, R P

    2012-01-11

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of CKD. One of the most common complications of CKD is anemia, the frequency and severity of which increase as kidney failure progresses. Renal anemia is primarily caused by reduced renal erythropoietin production. It can also be associated with iron deficiency caused by reduced iron absorption, occult blood loss and impaired iron mobilization. This work provides an overview of the management of renal anemia with focus on intravenous iron therapy, which is more effective than oral iron administration in CKD due to reduced iron absorption. PMID:22303745

  1. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin <12.0 g/dl and ferritin level <12 ng/ml were interviewed about their habits of eating ice or other non-food substances. Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors. PMID:24850454

  2. Refractory Sideroblastic and Nonsideroblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Geschke, Wilfred; Beutler, Ernest

    1977-01-01

    A study was done with 27 patients who met the following criteria: (1) anemia, (2) cellular bone marrow not diagnostic of leukemia, (3) absence of underlying disease that could account for the hematologic abnormalities at time of initial study and (4) absence of iron, B12 or folate deficiency. Of the 27 patients, 13 had ringed sideroblasts and 14 did not. Eleven patients received corticosteroids, 18 received folate, 23 pyridoxine and 12 androgens. Two partial responses occurred in the sideroblastic group and were attributed to androgen therapy in one patient and pyridoxine therapy in the other. In the nonsideroblastic group, two partial responses occurred which were attributed to prednisone therapy. Transfusions were required in 23 patients. Leukemia developed in six patients. It is concluded that currently used treatments have little effect on refractory anemia and that in most patients continuing transfusions are required. In a small percentage of patients, there is transformation to leukemia. PMID:898952

  3. Prevention of Iatrogenic Anemia in Critical and Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Jakacka, Natalia; Snarski, Emilian; Mekuria, Selamawit

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic anemia caused by diagnostic blood sampling is a common problem in the intensive care unit, where continuous monitoring of blood parameters is very often required. Cumulative blood loss associated with phlebotomy along with other factors render this group of patients particularly susceptible to anemia. As it has been proven that anemia in this group of patients leads to inferior outcomes, packed red blood cell transfusions are used to alleviate possible threats associated with low hemoglobin concentration. However, the use of blood components is a procedure conferring a set of risks to the patients despite improvements in safety. Iatrogenic blood loss has also gained particular attention in neonatal care, where cumulative blood loss due to samples taken during the first week of life could easily equal or exceed circulating blood volume. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the causes of iatrogenic anemia and discusses the most common preventive measures taken to reduce diagnostic blood loss and the requirement for blood component transfusions in the aforementioned clinical situations. PMID:26935514

  4. Decreased hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio and increased lactate dehydrogenase level in patients with sickle cell anemia and recurrent leg ulcers.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+)--with no leg ulcers at the time of the study--were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role. PMID:24223994

  5. Decreased Hematocrit-To-Viscosity Ratio and Increased Lactate Dehydrogenase Level in Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia and Recurrent Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Connes, Philippe; Lamarre, Yann; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Waltz, Xavier; Mougenel, Danièle; Mukisi-Mukaza, Martin; Lalanne-Mistrih, Marie-Laure; Tarer, Vanessa; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Romana, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Leg ulcer is a disabling complication in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but the exact pathophysiological mechanisms are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the hematological and hemorheological alterations associated with recurrent leg ulcers. Sixty-two SCA patients who never experienced leg ulcers (ULC-) and 13 SCA patients with a positive history of recurrent leg ulcers (ULC+) - but with no leg ulcers at the time of the study – were recruited. All patients were in steady state condition. Blood was sampled to perform hematological, biochemical (hemolytic markers) and hemorheological analyses (blood viscosity, red blood cell deformability and aggregation properties). The hematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR), which reflects the red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency, was calculated for each subject. Patients from the ULC+ group were older than patients from the ULC- group. Anemia (red blood cell count, hematocrit and hemoglobin levels) was more pronounced in the ULC+ group. Lactate dehydrogenase level was higher in the ULC+ group than in the ULC- group. Neither blood viscosity, nor RBC aggregation properties differed between the two groups. HVR was lower and RBC deformability tended to be reduced in the ULC+ group. Our study confirmed increased hemolytic rate and anemia in SCA patients with leg ulcers recurrence. Furthermore, our data suggest that although systemic blood viscosity is not a major factor involved in the pathophysiology of this complication, decreased red blood cell oxygen transport efficiency (i.e., low hematocrit/viscosity ratio) may play a role. PMID:24223994

  6. Membrane cofactor protein mutations in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), fatal Stx-HUS, C3 glomerulonephritis, and the HELLP syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Celia J.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Liszewski, M. Kathryn; Pianetti, Gaia; Noris, Marina; Goodship, Timothy H. J.

    2008-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal impairment. Genetic studies demonstrate that heterozygous mutations of membrane cofactor protein (MCP;CD46) predispose to atypical HUS (aHUS), which is not associated with exposure to Shiga toxin (Stx). Among the initial 25 MCP mutations in patients with aHUS were 2, R69W and A304V, that were expressed normally and for which no dysfunction was found. The R69W mutation is in complement control protein module 2, while A304V is in the hydrophobic transmembrane domain. In addition to 3 patients with aHUS, the A304V mutation was identified in 1 patient each with fatal Stx-HUS, the HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome, and glomerulonephritis with C3 deposits. A major goal was to assess if these putative mutations lead to defective complement regulation. Permanent cell lines expressing the mutated proteins were complement “challenged,” and membrane control of C3 fragment deposition was monitored. Both the R69W and A304V MCP mutations were deficient in their ability to control the alternative pathway of complement activation on a cell surface, illustrating the importance of modeling transmembrane proteins in situ. PMID:17914026

  7. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  8. Acute Renal Failure, Microangiopathic Haemolytic Anemia, and Secondary Oxalosis in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Karolina M.; Prinsloo, Peter; Hitch, Tony; McCulloch, Thomas A.; Sims, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year old female presented with a one-week history of vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and headache. On admission, she had acute renal failure requiring dialysis. Tests revealed a hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia. An initial diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic microangiopathy was made and plasma exchange was instigated. However, renal biopsy did not show thrombotic microangiopathy but instead revealed acute kidney injury with mild tubulointerstitial nephritis and numerous oxalate crystals, predominantly in the distal tubules. The patient had been taking large doses (>1100 mg daily) of vitamin C for many months. She also gave a history of sclerotherapy using injections of an ethylene glycol derivative for superficial leg veins. The patient completed five sessions of plasma exchange and was able to discontinue dialysis. She eventually achieved full renal recovery. She has now discontinued sclerotherapy and vitamin supplementation. PMID:21785726

  9. Meta-analysis of Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Changtai; Gao, Yulu; Jiang, Ting; Hao, Cao; Gao, Zongshuai; Sun, Yongning

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia therapy remains difficult, due to lack of effective treatment regimens. In recent years, Huangqi injection for the adjunctive therapy of aplastic anemia has been reported in many clinical trials. Considering that Huangqi injection may be a novel approach to aplastic anemia treatment, we conducted a meta-analysis of clinical controlled trials to assess the clinical value of Huangqi injection in the treatment of aplastic anemia. We searched the Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Chinese Scientific Journals Full-text Database (VIP), Wanfang Database, PubMed and EMBASE database to collect the data about the trials of Huangqi injection combined with androgens for treating aplastic anemia. A total of ten studies involving 720 patients with aplastic anemia were included in this study. The meta-analysis showed significant increases in the pool effectiveness rate, white blood cells (WBC), haematoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), and reticulocytes (Ret) between the experimental group versus the control group. No severe side effects were found in this study. However, the lower Jadad scores and asymmetric funnel plot degrades the validity of the meta-analysis as the clinical evidence. Therefore, Huangqi injection may significantly enhance the efficacy of androgens for aplastic anemia, suggesting that the novel approach of Chinese traditional medicine combined with Western medicine is promising. The exact outcome required confirmation with rigorously well-designed multi-center trials. PMID:26379817

  10. Anemia Among Hospitalized Children at a Multispecialty Hospital, Bangalore (Karnataka), India

    PubMed Central

    Saba, Firdos; Poornima, Siddaraju; Balaji, Pishey Ashwathnarayan Rao; Varne, Smitha Ranoji Rao; Jayashree, Krishnamurthy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to the limited availability of data related to anemia in hospitalized children, this research was conducted to study the occurrence, morphological patterns, distribution in different age groups, sex, and severity of anemia among children aged 6 months-12 years. Setting: Inpatients in department of pediatrics at a multispecialty hospital, Bangalore. Study Design: Descriptive cross sectional study from Oct, 2011 to Sep, 2012. Materials and Methods: Ethical clearance was obtained from the ethical committee of the hospital as per 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. Unrestricted random sampling method was used to select the study group consisting of 882 children between the age of 6 months and 12 years. After obtaining the consent, data were obtained and statistically analyzed using statistical tools like mean, median, standard deviation, and Chi-square test. Results: Out of 882 children selected, 642 (72.79%) were anemic, out of which a majority of 629 (98%) children suffered from nonhemoglobinopathies and a meagre 13 (2%) suffered from hemoglobinopathies. Children in the age group of 6 months-1 year were most affected with nonhemoglobinopathies (33%). Moderate degree of anemia (hemoglobin = 7-9.9 g/dL) was the commonest grade of anemia (80%), while microcytic hypochromic anemia was commonest morphological type of anemia (48%). Among hemoglobinopathies, thalassemia major was the most common (69%, that is 9 out of 13 patients). Conclusion: The occurrence of anemia among children aged between 6 months and 12 years is high and nonhemoglobinopathies predominate over the hemoglobinopathies. PMID:24791237

  11. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  12. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Palanivelu, R; Ruban Kumar, A

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes. PMID:24650878

  13. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vulliamy, T.J.; D'Urso, M.; Battistuzzi, G.; Estrada, M.; Foulkes, N.S.; Martini, G.; Calabro, V.; Poggi, V.; Giordano, R.; Town, M.; Luzzatto, L.; Persico, M.G. )

    1988-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. The authors have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A they have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C {yields} T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency.

  14. Engineering antimicrobial peptides with improved antimicrobial and hemolytic activities.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Liang, Guizhao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Zheng, Jie

    2013-12-23

    The rapid rise of antibiotic resistance in pathogens becomes a serious and growing threat to medicine and public health. Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are an important line of defense in the immune system against invading bacteria and microbial infection. In this work, we present a combined computational and experimental study of the biological activity and membrane interaction of the computationally designed Bac2A-based peptide library. We used the MARTINI coarse-grained molecular dynamics with adaptive biasing force method and the umbrella sampling technique to investigate the translocation of a total of 91 peptides with different amino acid substitutions through a mixed anionic POPE/POPG (3:1) bilayer and a neutral POPC bilayer, which mimic the bacterial inner membrane and the human red blood cell (hRBC) membrane, respectively. Potential of mean force (PMF, free energy profile) was obtained to measure the free energy barrier required to transfer the peptides from the bulk water phase to the water-membrane interface and to the bilayer interior. Different PMF profiles can indeed identify different membrane insertion scenarios by mapping out peptide-lipid energy landscapes, which are correlated with antimicrobial activity and hemolytic activity. Computationally designed peptides were further tested experimentally for their antimicrobial and hemolytic activities using bacteria growth inhibition assay and hemolysis assay. Comparison of PMF data with cell assay results reveals a good correlation of the peptides between predictive transmembrane activity and antimicrobial/hemolytic activity. Moreover, the most active mutants with the balanced substitutions of positively charged Arg and hydrophobic Trp residues at specific positions were discovered to achieve the improved antimicrobial activity while minimizing red blood cell lysis. Such substitutions provide more effective and cooperative interactions to distinguish the peptide interaction with different lipid bilayers. This work provides a useful computational tool to better understand the mechanism and energetics of membrane insertion of AMPs and to rationally design more effective AMPs. PMID:24279498

  15. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical. Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  16. Recurrent Hemolytic and Uremic Syndrome Induced by Escherichia Coli.

    PubMed

    Commereuc, Morgane; Weill, Francois-Xavier; Loukiadis, Estelle; Gouali, Malika; Gleizal, Audrey; Kormann, Raphaël; Ridel, Christophe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    A widespread belief is that typical hemolytic and uremic syndrome (HUS) does not recur. We report the case of a patient infected twice with raw milk taken from his own cow and containing a Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 that induced recurrent HUS causing severe renal and cerebral disorders. A genomic comparison of the human and bovine Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O174:H21 isolates revealed that they were identical.Typical HUS may recur. Since milk from this animal was occasionally distributed locally, thereby posing a serious threat for the whole village, this particular cow was destroyed. PMID:26735524

  17. [Management of renal anemia in 2013].

    PubMed

    Gianella, P; Martin, P-Y; Stucker, F

    2013-02-27

    Anemia occurs frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), especially in the later stages, and the main etiologies are decreased production of erythropoietin (EPO) as well as iron and vitamin deficiencies. For these reasons, it is essential to detect anemia in patients with CKD and to investigate the etiology. If anemia (Hb < 100 g/l) persists after substitution of deficiencies, treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) should be considered. New guidelines (KDIGO - August 2012) have just been published by the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) for the management of anemia in patients with renal failure. This article reviews the principles and innovations in management in 2013. PMID:23539813

  18. Anemia in the frail, elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Röhrig, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Anemia and frailty are two common findings in geriatric patients and have been shown to be associated with poor outcomes in this patient group. Recent studies have contributed to the growing evidence of a possible association with the age-related chronic inflammatory status known as “inflammaging”. These findings do not only give a better insight into the pathogenesis of anemia in frailty, but also offer new treatment options. The present article focuses on this assumed association between anemia, frailty, and inflammaging and summarizes current management options for anemia in frail patients. PMID:27051279

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Open All Close All Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  20. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians. Objective To critically analyze, from the nephrologists’ point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment. Methods The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases. Results Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers. Conclusion Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can achieve cost savings without compromising anemia management. PMID:25050070

  1. Diagnosis and treatment of unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding.

    PubMed

    Dahlerup, Jens Frederik; Eivindson, Martin; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Jensen, Nanna Martin; Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Rasmussen, Morten; Nathan, Torben

    2015-04-01

    A general overview is given of the causes of anemia with iron deficiency as well as the pathogenesis of anemia and the para-clinical diagnosis of anemia. Anemia with iron deficiency but without overt GI bleeding is associated with a risk of malignant disease of the gastrointestinal tract; upper gastrointestinal cancer is 1/7 as common as colon cancer. Benign gastrointestinal causes of anemia are iron malabsorption (atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, chronic inflammation, and bariatric surgery) and chronic blood loss due to gastrointestinal ulcerations. The following diagnostic strategy is recommended for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency: conduct serological celiac disease screening with transglutaminase antibody (IgA type) and IgA testing and perform bidirectional endoscopy (gastroscopy and colonoscopy). Bidirectional endoscopy is not required in premenopausal women < 40 years of age. Small intestine investigation (capsule endoscopy, CT, or MRI enterography) is not recommended routinely after negative bidirectional endoscopy but should be conducted if there are red flags indicating malignant or inflammatory small bowel disease (e.g., involuntary weight loss, abdominal pain or increased CRP). Targeted treatment of any cause of anemia with iron deficiency found on diagnostic assessment should be initiated. In addition, iron supplementation should be administered, with the goal of normalizing hemoglobin levels and replenishing iron stores. Oral treatment with a 100-200 mg daily dose of elemental iron is recommended (lower dose if side effects), but 3-6 months of oral iron therapy is often required to achieve therapeutic goals. Intravenous iron therapy is used if oral treatment lacks efficacy or causes side effects or in the presence of intestinal malabsorption or prolonged inflammation. Three algorithms are given for the following conditions: a) the paraclinical diagnosis of anemia with iron deficiency; b) the diagnostic work-up for unexplained anemia with iron deficiency without overt bleeding; and c) how to proceed after negative bidirectional endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25872536

  2. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 μg/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH 7.0-7.4; ASV-dependent hemolysis was sharply reduced when the pH was lower than 3 or greater than 8. There was almost no hemolytic activity when the Cu2+ concentration was increased to 10 mM. Furthermore, incubation at 100°C for 30 to 60 minutes sharply decreased the hemolytic activity of ASV. After treatment with the protease α-chymotrypsin, the glycoside hydrolase cellulase, and the membrane component cholesterin, the hemolytic activity of ASV was significantly inhibited. Conclusions The results of this study provide fundamental information about A. planci spine venom. The hemolytic activity was affected by pH, temperature, metal ions, EDTA, cholesterin, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases. ASV hemolysis was inhibited by Cu2+, cholesterin, α-chymotrypsin, and cellulose, factors that might prevent the hemolytic activity of venom and provide the medical treatment for sting. PMID:24063308

  3. The hemolytic activity of bracken extracts in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Tjatur Rasa, F S; Saito, T; Satoh, H

    1999-02-01

    This study was conducted to elucidate the hemolytic activity of a new toxic substance in bracken fern. A crude extract (CE) was prepared from the methanol extracts of bracken by the column chromatography. When the CE was injected subcutaneously in guinea pigs, the hemoglobinuria and hemolysis were observed within 6 hr, and 3 days later edema and hemorrhages in the urinary bladder were observed. The CE was then fractionated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and three (HF, BF and CF) of the fractions showed the toxic activities in guinea pigs. The HF caused the hemolysis, whereas both the BF and the CF caused the hemorrhagic cystitis without any hemolytic activities. The HF was further fractionated by the HPLC, resulting of the 3 fractions (HF-I, II and III). The hemolysis was caused only with the HF-II, and HF-II as well as HF did not cause the hemorrhagic cystitis. HPLC analysis revealed that both BF and CF contains braxin B and braxin C, respectively, and both HF and HF-II do not contain braxin A, B or C. These facts suggest that bracken fern contains a new toxic substance (hemolysin) which induces the acute hemolysis in guinea pigs. PMID:10081750

  4. Intestinal parasites infestation and anemia in primary school children in Gaza Governorates--Palestine.

    PubMed

    al-Agha, R; Teodorescu, I

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out to identify the prevalence of anemia, nutritional indices and intestinal parasitic infestation in primary school children. The target population included 209 pupils aged 6-11 years, attending schools in two areas, Rimal area (urban) and Jabalia village (rural), in Gaza Governorates. Prevalence of intestinal parasites was high in Jabalia village (more than 53%) in comparison to Rimal area (33%). The main intestinal parasites were Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and Ascaris lumbricoides. Polyparasitism frequency is higher especially in rural area. In both areas anemia showed a high prevalence in children due to malnutrition and intestinal parasitic diseases. There was no association between intestinal parasitic infestation and children growth, but there was association between anemia and intestinal parasitic infestation in children, particularly in rural area. The correlation between anemia and mixed infestation reaches a highly significant level. PMID:11845471

  5. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B; Shah, Pankit P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria. Materials and Methods: The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract. Results: The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36μg/ml and 182.19μg/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50) value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein. Conclusion: Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria. PMID:25628685

  6. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  7. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  8. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  9. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  10. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  11. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  12. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  13. Homozygosity mapping of Fanconi anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gschwend, M.; Botstein, D.; Kruglyak, L.

    1994-09-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare, recessive, genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by progressive insufficiency of the bone marrow and increased cellular sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents. Complementation tests among different FA cells have indicated the presence of at least 4 FA-causing genes. One of the genes, FACC, was identified by functional complementation but appears unlikely to account for many phenotypically indistinguishable FA caes. We have begun a linkage study of FA using {open_quotes}homozygosity mapping{close_quotes}, a method that involves genotyping with DNA markers on affected individuals whose parents are related. Because FA is a rare recessive disease, it is most likely that probands are homozygous by descent at the disease locus and, therefore, at nearby DNA markers. Although the probability that any given marker will be homozygous in an inbred individual is high, given markers with moderate heterozygosities, the chance that two unrelated inbred individuals will be homozygous at the same marker is considerably lower. By locating overlapping regions of homozygosity between different families we hope to identify genes that cause FA. Sixteen consanguineous non-FACC FA families from the International Fanconi Anemia Registry at Rockefeller University are under study. An efficient algorithm for data analysis was developed and incorporated into software that can quickly compute exact multipoint lod scores using all markers on an entire chromosome. At the time of this writing, 171 of 229 microsatellite markers spaced at 20 cM intervals across the genome have been analyzed.

  14. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach, and the adverse impact that Meigs' syndrome can have on the patient's condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. The present case suggests that laparoscopic surgery for potentially large malignant tumors is feasible and safe, but requires an appropriate medical and gynecological oncology expertise. PMID:24962423

  15. Examination of Reticulocytosis among Chronically Transfused Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Megha; Byrnes, Colleen; Khademian, Zarir; Duncan, Natalie; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Fasano, Ross M.; Meier, Emily Riehm

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited hemolytic anemia with compensatory reticulocytosis. Recent studies have shown that increased levels of reticulocytosis during infancy are associated with increased hospitalizations for SCA sequelae as well as cerebrovascular pathologies. In this study, absolute reticulocyte counts (ARC) measured prior to transfusion were analysed among a cohort of 29 pediatric SCA patients receiving chronic transfusion therapy (CTT) for primary and secondary stroke prevention. A cross-sectional flow cytometric analysis of the reticulocyte phenotype was also performed. Mean duration of CTT was 3.1 ± 2.6 years. Fifteen subjects with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) -vasculopathy had significantly higher mean ARC prior to initiating CTT compared to 14 subjects without MRA-vasculopathy (427.6 ± 109.0 K/μl vs. 324.8 ± 109.2 K/μl, p<0.05). No significant differences in hemoglobin or percentage sickle hemoglobin (HbS) were noted between the two groups at baseline. Reticulocyte phenotyping further demonstrated that the percentages of circulating immature [CD36(+), CD71(+)] reticulocytes positively correlated with ARC in both groups. During the first year of CTT, neither group had significant reductions in ARC. Among this group of children with SCA, cerebrovasculopathy on MRA at initiation of CTT was associated with increased reticulocytosis, which was not reduced after 12 months of transfusions. PMID:27116614

  16. Anemia of Chronic Disease and Iron Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Murawska, Natalia; Fabisiak, Adam; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-05-01

    Anemia coexists with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in up to two-thirds of patients, significantly impairing quality of life. The most common types of anemia in patients with IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia of chronic disease, which often overlap. In most cases, available laboratory tests allow successful diagnosis of iron deficiency, where difficulties appear, recently established indices such as soluble transferrin-ferritin ratio or percentage of hypochromic red cells are used. In this review, we discuss the management of the most common types of anemia in respect of the latest available data. Thus, we provide the mechanisms underlying pathophysiology of these entities; furthermore, we discuss the role of hepcidin in developing anemia in IBD. Next, we present the treatment options for each type of anemia and highlight the importance of individual choice of action. We also focus on newly developed intravenous iron preparations and novel, promising drug candidates targeting hepcidin. Concurrently, we talk about difficulties in differentiating between the true and functional iron deficiency, and discuss tools facilitating the process. Finally, we emphasize the importance of proper diagnosis and treatment of anemia in IBD. We conclude that management of anemia in patients with IBD is tricky, and appropriate screening of patients regarding anemia is substantial. PMID:26818422

  17. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... affect how well nutrients are absorbed (for example, celiac disease ) Poor diet Slow blood loss (for example, from ... Long-term (chronic) diseases such as chronic kidney disease, ... such as lymphoma, leukemia, myelodysplasia, multiple myeloma, ...

  18. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Clinical News Society News Clinical News Features ASH Self-Assessment Program Read the ASH-SAP, Fifth Edition Pre- ... Publications Blood The Hematologist ASH Clinical News ASH Self-Assessment Program Hematology , ASH Education Program About Awards Membership ...

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... body gets more iron than it needs? Iron overload happens when too much iron builds up in ... heart, and pancreas. Many problems can cause iron overload. Most people with hemochromatosis inherit it from their ...

  20. Molecular Basis for Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcal Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellerqvist, Carl G.; Sundell, Hakan; Gettins, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Group B β -hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin.

  1. Molecular basis for group B beta-hemolytic streptococcal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Hellerqvist, C G; Sundell, H; Gettins, P

    1987-01-01

    Group B beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GBS) is a major pathogen affecting newborns. We have investigated the molecular mechanism underlying the respiratory distress induced in sheep after intravenous injection of a toxin produced by this organism. The pathophysiological response is characterized by pulmonary hypertension, followed by granulocytopenia and increased pulmonary vascular permeability to protein. 31P NMR studies of GBS toxin and model components before and after reductive alkaline hydrolysis demonstrated that phosphodiester residues are an integral part of the GBS toxin. Reductive alkaline treatment cleaves phosphate esters from secondary and primary alcohols and renders GBS toxin nontoxic in the sheep model and inactive as a mediator of elastase release in vitro from isolated human granulocytes. We propose that the interaction of cellular receptors with mannosyl phosphodiester groups plays an essential role in the pathophysiological response to GBS toxin. PMID:3540959

  2. Peripheral gangrene complicating idiopathic and recessive hemolytic uremic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, B S; Garcia, C D; Chesney, R W; Segar, W E; Giugno, K; Chem, R

    2000-09-01

    Three patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) developed peripheral gangrene. Bilateral carotid artery thromboses occurred in one of these patients after recovery from HUS. One patient had a long history of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. In the second patient, a flu-like illness preceded the onset of HUS. The third was one of two sisters, with the HUS appearing more than 1 year apart. None had evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulation or infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The patient with rheumatoid arthritis had renal cortical necrosis but recovered moderate renal function after treatment with dialysis and plasmapheresis for 6 months. The child with a genetic form of HUS died of renal failure and had massive cortical necrosis and vascular thrombosis at autopsy. This is the first report of peripheral gangrene in children with idiopathic HUS and autosomal recessive HUS. PMID:10975312

  3. Fetal Anemia and Hydrops Fetalis Associated with Homozygous Hb Constant Spring (HBA2: c.427T > C).

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Zhao, Ying; Lou, Ji-Wu; Liu, Yan-Hui; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2016-03-01

    Hb Constant Spring (Hb CS, HBA2: c.427T > C) is a common nondeletional α-thalassemia (α-thal) that results from a nucleotide substitution at the termination codon of the α2-globin gene. Homozygosity for Hb CS (α(CS)α/α(CS)α) is relatively rare, and generally characterized with mild hemolytic anemia, jaundice, and splenomegaly. In this report we present a fetus with cardiomegaly, pericardial effusion, enlarged placenta and increased middle cerebral artery-peak systolic velocity (MCA-PSV) at 24 weeks' gestation. Fetal blood sampling revealed the severe anemia [hemoglobin (Hb) level being 4.8 g/dL] and Hb H (β4) disease-like hematological findings with Hb Bart's (γ4) level of 17.9%. DNA sequencing of the α-globin genes found that both partners were Hb CS carriers and the fetus was an Hb CS homozygote. Therefore, this was a rare case of homozygous Hb CS which demonstrated an unusual and serious anemia and hydrops fetalis in utero. PMID:26757782

  4. nm1054: a spontaneous, recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mutation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Ohgami, Robert S; Campagna, Dean R; Antiochos, Brendan; Wood, Emily B; Sharp, John J; Barker, Jane E; Fleming, Mark D

    2005-11-15

    Hypochromic, microcytic anemias are typically the result of inadequate hemoglobin production because of globin defects or iron deficiency. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of a new recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mouse mutant, nm1054. Although the mutation nm1054 is pleiotropic, also resulting in sparse hair, male infertility, failure to thrive, and hydrocephaly, the anemia is the focus of this study. Hematologic analysis reveals a moderately severe, congenital, hypochromic, microcytic anemia, with an elevated red cell zinc protoporphyrin, consistent with functional erythroid iron deficiency. However, serum and tissue iron analyses show that nm1054 animals are not systemically iron deficient. From hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and iron uptake studies in nm1054 reticulocytes, we provide evidence that the nm1054 anemia is due to an intrinsic hematopoietic defect resulting in inefficient transferrin-dependent iron uptake by erythroid precursors. Linkage studies demonstrate that nm1054 maps to a genetic locus not previously implicated in microcytic anemia or iron phenotypes. PMID:15994289

  5. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The major causes of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) include iron loss due to bleeding, increased iron requirements, and decreased iron absorption by the intestine. The most common cause of IDA in Japanese women is iron loss during menstruation. Autoimmune atrophic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection can also cause IDA by reducing intestinal iron absorption. In addition to these common etiologies, germline mutations of TMPRSS6 can cause iron-refractory IDA (IRIDA). TMPRSS6 encodes matriptase-2, a membrane-bound serine protease primarily expressed in the liver. Functional loss of matriptase-2 due to homozygous mutations results in an increase in the expression of hepcidin, which is the key regulator of systemic iron homeostasis. The serum hepcidin increase in turn leads to a decrease in iron supply from the intestine and macrophages to erythropoietic cells. IRIDA is microcytic and hypochromic, but decreased serum ferritin is not observed as in IDA. IRIDA is refractory to oral iron supplementation, but does respond to intravenous iron supplementation to some extent. Because genetic testing is required for the diagnoses of IRIDA, a considerable number of cases may go undiagnosed and may thus be overlooked. PMID:26935626

  6. [Association of anemia with nutrition in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yasuko; Katsuta, Sayaka; Kitagawa, Chihiro; Kondo, Seiji

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed the data for 59 cases in which elderly patients receiving home medical care presented with anemia. Our results demonstrated that the cause of anemia was iron deficiency, chronic inflammation, or chronic kidney disease in 75% of the patients, and that anemia was improved in more than 80% of the patients after appropriate therapeutic treatment. We also found so-called senile anemia with no particular causes in 20% of the patients, and in some of them, both nutrition and anemia have improved. We concluded that not only the treatment of anemia, but also the improvement of nutrition, is important in elderly patients with anemia. PMID:23268911

  7. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Overview

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Answered Other Names for this Disease G6PD deficiency Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency About the GARD Information ... topic. Other Names for this Disease G6PD deficiency Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency About the GARD Information ...

  8. Iron overload of spleen, liver and kidney as a consequence of hemolytic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Solecki, R; von Zglinicki, T; Müller, H M; Clausing, P

    1983-01-01

    Iron overload in spleen, liver and kidney induced by hemolytic anaemia due to a 90-day oral exposure of rats to diuron (N-3,4-dichlorphenyl-N,N-dimethylurea), an urea herbicide, was studied by histochemistry, transmission electronmicroscopy, morphometry and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis. Increasing dosages of diuron provoked a hemosiderosis in the spleen followed by erythrocytic sequestration and the formation of haemopoietic foci coinciding with Kupffer cell siderosis of the liver. A strong enlargement of the spleen red pulp on the one hand faces an unchanged total white pulp volume as well as no alterations of the white pulp microscopic structure on the other. The electron dense bodies of the endothelial cells did not contain iron whereas hepatocytes possess two types of lysosomes, homogeneous iron containing ones at the sinusoidal site and complex structured ones without detectable iron at the biliary site. The formation of the homogeneous lysosomes is suggested to be due to the hepatocytic reception of hemoglobin-haptoglobin-complexes after intravascular hemolysis. The lysosomes of the biliary site seem to be engaged in hemoglobin degradation. A partial nephrohydrosis due to hemosiderotic events in succession of intravascular hemolysis including hemoglobin reabsorption from the primary urine could be observed. It is assumed that exocytosis might play a major role in hemosiderin removal from kidney tubule cells. PMID:6683665

  9. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s). PMID:3821135

  10. Risk Factors of Pulmonary Hypertension in Brazilian Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; do Nascimento, Emilia Matos; Abelha, Renato; Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Connes, Philippe; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Ballas, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a prospective cross-sectional cohort study of 125 patients with sickle cell anemia (SS) between the ages of 16 to 60 years. Enrolled patients were followed-up prospectively for 15 months. Demographic, clinical, hematological and routine biochemical data were obtained on all patients. Six-minute walk test and Doppler Echocardiography were performed on all patients. A tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRJV) < 2.5 m/sec was considered normal, 2.5 ≤ TRJV ≤ 3.0 was considered mild-moderate and > 3.0 m/sec, severe. Patients with abnormal TRJV were significantly older and more anemic, had significantly higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, reticulocyte count and incidence of death. The logistic multimodal model implemented for the 125 patients indicated that age was the covariate that influenced the outcome of normal or abnormal TRJV with a cutoff age of thirty-two years. The survival rate for the group of patients with creatinine (Cr) > 1.0 mg/dL was lower than the group with Cr ≤ 1 and normal TRJV. A coefficient matrix showed that the LDH values were weakly correlated with the reticulocyte count but strongly correlated with hemoglobin suggesting that the TRJV values were not correlated with the hemolytic rate but with anemia. Ten patients died during the follow-up of whom 7 had TRJV > 2.5 m/sec. Acute chest syndrome was the most common cause of death followed by sepsis. In conclusion, this study shows that patients with SS older than thirty-two years with high LDH, elevated TRJV, severe anemia and Cr > 1 have poor prognosis and may be at risk of having pulmonary hypertension and should undergo RHC. PMID:26335226

  11. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  12. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials. PMID:25572607

  13. THE PREVALENCE OF CELIAC DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH IRON-DEFICIENCY ANEMIA IN CENTER AND SOUTH AREA OF IRAN.

    PubMed

    Baghbanian, Mahmud; Farahat, Ali; Vahedian, Hasan Ali; Sheyda, Elham; Zare-Khormizi, Mohamad Reza

    2015-12-01

    Background - Celiac disease is an immune-mediated enteropathy due to a permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible people. Iron-deficiency anemia is the most widely experienced anemia in humans. Iron-deficiency anemia additionally is a common extra intestinal manifestation of celiac disease. Objective - To investigate correlation between tTg levels and histological alterations and then to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in Center and South area patients of Iran with iron deficiency anemia. Methods - A total of 402 patients aged 12-78 years who presented with iron-deficiency anemia were included in this study. Hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume and serum ferritin were determined. Venous blood samples for anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody immunoglobuline A and G were obtained from these patients. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was recommended to patients who had positive serology. Results - Of 402 patients with iron-deficiency anemia, 42 (10.4%) had positive serology for celiac disease. The small intestine biopsy of all patients with positive serology showed pathological changes (Marsh I, II & III). There was not significant difference in the mean hemoglobin level between iron-deficiency anemia patients with celiac disease and without celiac disease, duodenal biopsy results did not show significant relationship between the severity of pathological changes and levels of anti-tTG IgG (P -value: 0/869) but significant relationship was discovered between pathological changes and levels of anti-tTG IgA (P -value: 0/004). Conclusion - Screening of celiac disease by anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody should be completed as a routine investigation in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Also physicians must consider celiac disease as a possible reason of anemia in all patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26840468

  14. How the Target Hemoglobin of Renal Anemia Should Be.

    PubMed

    Mimura, Imari; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2015-01-01

    Renal anemia is caused by the deficiency of endogenous erythropoietin (Epo) due to renal dysfunction. We think that it is possible to slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in case we initiate Epo early in pre-dialysis patients, especially in the non-diabetic population. Erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) treatments targeting mild anemia (10-12 g/dl) can decrease the risk of occurrence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and congestive heart failure. As the large randomized controlled trials such as Cardiovascular Risk Reduction by Early Anemia Treatment with Epoetin Beta, Correction of Hemoglobin and Outcomes in Renal Insufficiency and Trial to Reduce Cardiovascular Events with Aranesp Thearpy in the Western countries suggested, we do not recommend high doses of ESA to achieve the target hemoglobin (Hb) level. The target Hb of >13 g/dl might lead to increase in the risk of CVD although maintaining a high Hb of >12 g/dl without ESA is not harmful for CKD patients. It is desirable to determine the target Hb in dialysis patients depending on their ages. Renal anemia should be monitored constantly to start ESA and iron replacement therapy at an appropriate time, while avoiding their excess in order to minimize the occurrence of CVD and other complications. Taken all the international guidelines and our clinical experiences together, we should consider administration of ESA when the Hb level becomes <11 g/dl in pre-dialysis patients and <10 g/dl in dialysis patients. PMID:26381503

  15. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  16. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and High Altitudes The farther you get from Earth, the less oxygen there is. If you have aplastic anemia, flying in an airplane or going up high ... in Philanthropy Leadership in Service Financials Code ...

  17. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re feeling constantly exhausted ... when your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells. You may either have too few ...

  18. Alleviating anemia and thrombocytopenia in myelofibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Francisco; Correa, Juan-Gonzalo; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Anemia and thrombocytopenia are frequent clinical manifestations of myelofibrosis as well as important prognostic factors of the disease. Concerning the treatment of anemia, the first step should be the correction of reversible contributing factors, such as possible iron, folate and vitamin B12 deficiency. Then, treatment options include erythropoiesis stimulating agents, androgens, immunomodulating drugs, corticosteroids, and splenectomy. Anemia responses may also be observed in some patients treated with JAK inhibitors. However, most patients eventually fail to such therapies and become transfusion dependent. Some of the aforementioned therapies can also improve thrombocytopenia, but the responses are usually observed in patients with moderate platelet count decrease. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the only curative treatment of myelofibrosis, can be an alternative for selected patients with cytopenias who are refractory to conventional therapies. However, for the majority of patients, the management of anemia and severe thrombocytopenia remains an unmet need. PMID:26891375

  19. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 21. Epub 2004 Jul 20. Review. Renella R, Wood WG. The congenital dyserythropoietic anemias. Hematol Oncol Clin ... 2005 Aug;130(4):628-34. Wickramasinghe SN, Wood WG. Advances in the understanding of the congenital ...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and ... proteins may increase the self-destruction of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow, resulting in anemia. ...

  1. Do You Know about Sickle Cell Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Do You Know About Sickle Cell Anemia? KidsHealth > For Kids > Do ... cell genes, too. previous continue How Do Doctors Know a Kid Has It? Special blood tests can ...

  2. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  3. Comparison of hemolytic activities of coal fly ash and its soluble and insoluble fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Wong, M.H.; Tam, N.F.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Coal fly ash of a particle diameter smaller than 10 ..mu..m was collected from the precipitator of a power plant in Hong Kong. Comparison of hemolytic activities between fly ash and free silica showed that fly ash had a lower biological effect than free silica. The hemolytic activities of the soluble and insoluble fractions of fly ash were further compared by two methods: total hemoglobin method and cyanmethemoglobin method. An analysis of results showed significant differences for fly ash and its soluble fraction between methods. Fly ash, which contained a silicate level similar to its insoluble fraction, had a hemolytic activity higher than the summation of both its soluble and insoluble fractions. This indicates that the hemolytic activity was independent of the silicate content in the fly ash samples.

  4. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G.; Raffel, O. Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F.

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bacigalupo, Andrea; Passweg, Jakob

    2009-04-01

    Acquired severe aplastic anemia can be treated successfully with either immunosuppressive therapy or bone marrow transplantation. Although immunosuppressive therapy can be readily administered to all patients, it is not a curative approach and is associated with a higher risk of clonal evolution than is transplantation, which yields rapid and long-lasting hematologic remission. This article reviews the key diagnostic and prognostic factors that influence the choice of therapy in patients with acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:19327577

  6. Cerebral Microcirculation during Experimental Normovolaemic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Bellapart, Judith; Cuthbertson, Kylie; Dunster, Kimble; Diab, Sara; Platts, David G; Raffel, O Christopher; Gabrielian, Levon; Barnett, Adrian; Paratz, Jenifer; Boots, Rob; Fraser, John F

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is accepted among critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anemia. Experimental studies suggest that anemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise, when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion among critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure, and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anemia does not result in short-term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain. PMID:26869986

  7. Hemolytic activity in the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: kinetics of enzyme release and localization.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, L; Bramanti, T E; Ebersole, J L; Holt, S C

    1991-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis W50, W83, A7A1-28, and ATCC 33277 were investigated for their abilities to lyse sheep, human, and rabbit erythrocytes. All of the P. gingivalis strains studied produced an active hemolytic activity during growth, with maximum activity occurring in late-exponential-early-stationary growth phase. The enzyme was cell bound and associated with the outer membrane. Fractionation of P. gingivalis W50 localized the putative hemolysin almost exclusively in the outer membrane fraction, with significant hemolytic activity concentrated in the outer membrane vesicles. Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions significantly increased the expression of hemolytic activity. Hemolytic activity was inhibited by proteinase K, trypsin, the proteinase inhibitors Na-P-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone and benzamidine, the metabolic inhibitor M-chlorophenyl-hydrazone, and iodoacetate. KCN and sodium azide (NaN3) only partially inhibited P. gingivalis hemolytic activity, while antiserum to whole cells of each of the P. gingivalis strains had a significant inhibitory effect on hemolytic activity. The P. gingivalis W50 hemolysin was inhibited by cysteine, dithiothreitol, and glutathione at concentrations of at least 10 mM; at low concentrations (i.e., 2 mM), dithiothreitol did not completely inhibit hemolytic activity. Heating to temperatures above 55 degrees C resulted in an almost complete inhibition of hemolytic activity. The effect of heme limitation (i.e., iron) on hemolysin production indicated that either limitation or starvation for heme resulted in significantly increased hemolysin production compared with that of P. gingivalis grown in the presence of excess heme. PMID:2037355

  8. Mouse Models of Anemia of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Airie; Rivera, Seth; Shprung, Dana; Limbrick, Donald; Gabayan, Victoria; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Anemia of cancer (AC) may contribute to cancer-related fatigue and impair quality of life. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of AC could facilitate better treatment, but animal models to study AC are lacking. We characterized four syngeneic C57BL/6 mouse cancers that cause AC. Mice with two different rapidly-growing metastatic lung cancers developed the characteristic findings of anemia of inflammation (AI), with dramatically different degrees of anemia. Mice with rapidly-growing metastatic melanoma also developed a severe anemia by 14 days, with hematologic and inflammatory parameters similar to AI. Mice with a slow-growing peritoneal ovarian cancer developed an iron-deficiency anemia, likely secondary to chronically impaired nutrition and bleeding into the peritoneal cavity. Of the four models, hepcidin mRNA levels were increased only in the milder lung cancer model. Unlike in our model of systemic inflammation induced by heat-killed Brucella abortus, ablation of hepcidin in the ovarian cancer and the milder lung cancer mouse models did not affect the severity of anemia. Hepcidin-independent mechanisms play an important role in these murine models of AC. PMID:24681760

  9. A Burkholderia cepacia complex non-ribosomal peptide-synthesized toxin is hemolytic and required for full virulence

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Euan L.S.; Dennis, Jonathan J.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) have recently gained notoriety as significant bacterial pathogens due to their extreme levels of antibiotic resistance, their transmissibility in clinics, their persistence in bacteriostatic solutions, and their intracellular survival capabilities. As pathogens, the Bcc are known to elaborate a number of virulence factors including proteases, lipases and other exoproducts, as well as a number of secretion system associated effectors. Through random and directed mutagenesis studies, we have identified a Bcc gene cluster capable of expressing a toxin that is both hemolytic and required for full Bcc virulence. The Bcc toxin is synthesized via a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase mechanism, and appears to be related to the previously identified antifungal compound burkholdine or occidiofungin. Further testing shows mutations to this gene cluster cause a significant reduction in both hemolysis and Galleria mellonella mortality. Mutation to a glycosyltransferase gene putatively responsible for a structural-functional toxin variant causes only partial reduction in hemolysis. Molecular screening identifies the Bcc species containing this gene cluster, of which several strains produce hemolytic activity. PMID:22546908

  10. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  11. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Zhang, Naisheng; Cui, Weimin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2011-11-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world. The hemolytic substances produced by K. mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates. We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K. mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae ( Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K. mikimotoi. The hemolytic toxins from K. mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and 1 lipid. Waterborne clues from P. donghaiense and A. tamarense inhibited the growth of K. mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins. Conversely, K. mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P. donghaiense and A. tamarense. In addition, the ingestion of K. mikimotoi by M. mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K. mikimotoi. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances. K. mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity. The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability, but also on the risk of predation. Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K. mikimotoi.

  12. Telomerase gene therapy rescues telomere length, bone marrow aplasia, and survival in mice with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Bär, Christian; Povedano, Juan Manuel; Serrano, Rosa; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Popkes, Miriam; Formentini, Ivan; Bobadilla, Maria; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2016-04-01

    Aplastic anemia is a fatal bone marrow disorder characterized by peripheral pancytopenia and marrow hypoplasia. The disease can be hereditary or acquired and develops at any stage of life. A subgroup of the inherited form is caused by replicative impairment of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells due to very short telomeres as a result of mutations in telomerase and other telomere components. Abnormal telomere shortening is also described in cases of acquired aplastic anemia, most likely secondary to increased turnover of bone marrow stem and progenitor cells. Here, we test the therapeutic efficacy of telomerase activation by using adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 gene therapy vectors carrying the telomeraseTertgene in 2 independent mouse models of aplastic anemia due to short telomeres (Trf1- andTert-deficient mice). We find that a high dose of AAV9-Terttargets the bone marrow compartment, including hematopoietic stem cells. AAV9-Terttreatment after telomere attrition in bone marrow cells rescues aplastic anemia and mouse survival compared with mice treated with the empty vector. Improved survival is associated with a significant increase in telomere length in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells, as well as improved blood counts. These findings indicate that telomerase gene therapy represents a novel therapeutic strategy to treat aplastic anemia provoked or associated with short telomeres. PMID:26903545

  13. Anemia in elderly hospitalized patients: prevalence and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Migone De Amicis, Margherita; Poggiali, Erika; Motta, Irene; Minonzio, Francesca; Fabio, Giovanna; Hu, Cinzia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2015-08-01

    Anemia is a common finding in elderly individuals. Several studies have shown a strong relationship between anemia, morbidity and mortality, suggesting anemia as a significant independent predictor of adverse outcome in elderly hospitalized patients. The pathophisiology of anemia in the elderly is not yet completely understood. Several mechanisms are involved. We investigated the prevalence of anemia in a cohort of 193 elderly patients admitted to the Internal Medicine Ward of Ca'Granda Policlinico Hospital along 6 months, and its relationship to comorbidities and to the length of hospitalization. Anemia was classified according to the WHO criteria. The majority of patients (48 %) had a mildmoderate, normocytic anemia; severe anemia was found in 8 out of 92 anemic patients. In a subgroup of patients erythropoietin was tested and resulted statistically higher if compared to non-anemic controls (p = 0.003). Considering the most common cause of anemia, nutritional deficiency, chronic renal disease and anemia of chronic disease were found respectively in 36, 15 and 25 % of cases. Unexplained anemia was diagnosed in 24 % of patients, according to the literature. Anemia was independently associated with increased length of hospital stay. Our study confirmed a high prevalence of anemia in elderly patients, and its association with a higher number of comorbidities and a longer stay. A correct clinical approach to anemia in elderly hospitalized patients is essential, considering its negative impact on patients' quality of life, and its social burden in term of healthcare needs and costs. PMID:25633233

  14. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  15. A novel atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated hybrid CFHR1/CFH gene encoding a fusion protein that antagonizes factor H-dependent complement regulation.

    PubMed

    Valoti, Elisabetta; Alberti, Marta; Tortajada, Agustin; Garcia-Fernandez, Jesus; Gastoldi, Sara; Besso, Luca; Bresin, Elena; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Noris, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Genomic aberrations affecting the genes encoding factor H (FH) and the five FH-related proteins (FHRs) have been described in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare condition characterized by microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and ARF. These genomic rearrangements occur through nonallelic homologous recombinations caused by the presence of repeated homologous sequences in CFH and CFHR1-R5 genes. In this study, we found heterozygous genomic rearrangements among CFH and CFHR genes in 4.5% of patients with aHUS. CFH/CFHR rearrangements were associated with poor clinical prognosis and high risk of post-transplant recurrence. Five patients carried known CFH/CFHR1 genes, but we found a duplication leading to a novel CFHR1/CFH hybrid gene in a family with two affected subjects. The resulting fusion protein contains the first four short consensus repeats of FHR1 and the terminal short consensus repeat 20 of FH. In an FH-dependent hemolysis assay, we showed that the hybrid protein causes sheep erythrocyte lysis. Functional analysis of the FHR1 fraction purified from serum of heterozygous carriers of the CFHR1/CFH hybrid gene indicated that the FHR1/FH hybrid protein acts as a competitive antagonist of FH. Furthermore, sera from carriers of the hybrid CFHR1/CFH gene induced more C5b-9 deposition on endothelial cells than control serum. These results suggest that this novel genomic hybrid mediates disease pathogenesis through dysregulation of complement at the endothelial cell surface. We recommend that genetic screening of aHUS includes analysis of CFH and CFHR rearrangements, particularly before a kidney transplant. PMID:24904082

  16. Chicken (Gallus gallus) hemolytic complement: optimal conditions for its titration.

    PubMed

    Barta, O; Barta, V

    1975-01-01

    The effect of pH, ionic strength, cation concentration, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid trisodium salt (Na3EDTA), time and temperature were studied to determine the optimal conditions for titrating the hemolytic complement (C) activity in sera of chicken (Gallus gallus). Swine erythrocytes (E) sensitized with rabbit antibodies were the most sensitive, while chicken serum had a smaller amount of "natural" antibody against them than against red blood cells from other five species tested. The highest titers of chicken C, when tested with swine sensitized E, were detected when isotonic NaCl-barbital buffer was used as diluent, having the ionic strength of 0.15, conductance of 11 millimhos/cm at 20 degrees C. However, maximal chicken C titers detected with sensitized rabbit E were obtained at ionic strength of 0.07 to 0.11 depending on pH. A final concentration of 1 X 10(-3) M of Mg2+ and 3 X 10(-4) M of Ca2+ and pH 8 were optimal in both cases. The temperature of 30 degrees C and time of 60 minutes were appropriate to reveal the maximal titers.. PMID:241720

  17. Age-related penetrance of hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Maren; Rybicki, Lisa A; Winter, Aurelia; Hoffmann, Michael M; Reiermann, Stefanie; Linke, Hannah; Arbeiter, Klaus; Patzer, Ludwig; Budde, Klemens; Hoppe, Bernd; Zeier, Martin; Lhotta, Karl; Bock, Andreas; Wiech, Thorsten; Gaspert, Ariana; Fehr, Thomas; Woznowski, Magdalena; Berisha, Gani; Malinoc, Angelica; Goek, Oemer-Necmi; Eng, Charis; Neumann, Hartmut P H

    2011-11-01

    Hereditary atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a dramatic disease frequently leading to dialysis, is associated with germline mutations of the CFH, CD46, or CFI genes. After identification of the mutation in an affected aHUS patient, single-site gene testing of relatives is the preventive care perspective. However, clinical data for family counselling are scarce. From the German-Speaking-Countries-aHUS-Registry, 33 index patients with mutations were approached for permission to offer relatives screening for their family-specific mutations and to obtain demographic and clinical data. Mutation screening was performed using direct sequencing. Age-adjusted penetrance of aHUS was calculated for each gene in index cases and in mutation-positive relatives. Sixty-one relatives comprising 41 parents and 20 other relatives were enrolled and mutations detected in 31/61. In total, 40 research participants had germline mutations in CFH, 19 in CD46 and in 6 CFI. Penetrance at age 40 was markedly reduced in mutation-positive relatives compared to index patients overall with 10% versus 67% (P < 0.001); 6% vs. 67% (P < 0.001) in CFH mutation carriers and 21% vs. 70% (P= 0.003) in CD46 mutation carriers. Age-adjusted penetrance for hereditary aHUS is important to understand the disease, and if replicated in the future, for genetic counselling. PMID:21906045

  18. Update on hemolytic uremic syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease. In this work the authors review the recent findings on HUS, considering the different etiologic and pathogenetic classifications. New findings in genetics and, in particular, mutations of genes that encode the complement-regulatory proteins have improved our understanding of atypical HUS. Similarly, the complement proteins are clearly involved in all types of thrombotic microangiopathy: typical HUS, atypical HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Furthermore, several secondary HUS appear to be related to abnormalities in complement genes in predisposed patients. The authors highlight the therapeutic aspects of this rare disease, examining both “traditional therapy” (including plasma therapy, kidney and kidney-liver transplantation) and “new therapies”. The latter include anti-Shiga-toxin antibodies and anti-C5 monoclonal antibody “eculizumab”. Eculizumab has been recently launched for the treatment of the atypical HUS, but it appears to be effective in the treatment of typical HUS and in TTP. Future therapies are in phases I and II. They include anti-C5 antibodies, which are more purified, less immunogenic and absorbed orally and, anti-C3 antibodies, which are more powerful, but potentially less safe. Additionally, infusions of recombinant complement-regulatory proteins are a potential future therapy. PMID:24255888

  19. [Detection and analysis of ABO Hemolytic disease in newborn].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhao-Xia; Dong, Qing-Song

    2014-10-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the incidence and the model of ABO hemolytic disease in newborn (ABO-HDN) and the results of the three hemolysis test, so as to provide the evidences for clinical diagnosis and therapy. A total of 227 cases of maternal-fetal ABO incompatibility from January 2013 to October 2013 in the First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University were enrolled in the study. The ABO blood group of newborn and mother was detemined and three hemolysis tests (direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test, RBC antibody release test) were performed. The results indicated that in 227 cases of ABO incompatible pregnancies,186 cases were ABO-HDN (81.94%). There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies (P > 0.05). The positive ratio of direct antiglobulin test, free antibody test and RBC antibody release test were 59.14% (110/186), 84.78% (156/186) and 94.62% (176/186) respectively. It is concluded that the incidence of ABO-HDN is high. The main models of ABO-HDN were O-A and O-B. There was no significant difference in the incidence between O-A and O-B incompatible pregnancies. Three hemolysis tests are high sensitivity and are helpful in early diagnosis and early treatment of HDN. PMID:25338602

  20. Management of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in children

    PubMed Central

    Grisaru, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    Acute renal failure associated with a fulminant, life-threatening systemic disease is rare in previously healthy young children; however, when it occurs, the most common cause is hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). In most cases (90%), this abrupt and devastating illness is a result of ingestion of food or drink contaminated with pathogens that produce very potent toxins. Currently, there are no proven treatment options that can directly inactivate the toxin or effectively interfere with the cascade of destructive events triggered by the toxin once it gains access to the bloodstream and binds its receptor. However, HUS is self-limited, and effective supportive management during the acute phase is proven to be a life saver for children affected by HUS. A minority of childhood HUS cases, approximately 5%, are caused by various genetic mutations causing uncontrolled activation of the complement system. These children, who used to have a poor prognosis leading to end-stage renal disease, now have access to exciting new treatment options that can preserve kidney function and avoid disease recurrences. This review provides a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of childhood HUS, focusing on a practical approach to best management measures. PMID:24966691

  1. Strategies for Surveillance of Pediatric Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet), 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Kanyin L.; Apostal, Mirasol; Comstock, Nicole; Hurd, Sharon; Webb, Tameka Hayes; Mickelson, Stephanie; Scheftel, Joni; Smith, Glenda; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Boothe, Effie

    2012-01-01

    Background. Postdiarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is the most common cause of acute kidney failure among US children. The Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) conducts population-based surveillance of pediatric HUS to measure the incidence of disease and to validate surveillance trends in associated Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O157 infection. Methods. We report the incidence of pediatric HUS, which is defined as HUS in children <18 years. We compare the results from provider-based surveillance and hospital discharge data review and examine the impact of different case definitions on the findings of the surveillance system. Results. During 2000–2007, 627 pediatric HUS cases were reported. Fifty-two percent of cases were classified as confirmed (diarrhea, anemia, microangiopathic changes, low platelet count, and acute renal impairment). The average annual crude incidence rate for all reported cases of pediatric HUS was 0.78 per 100 000 children <18 years. Regardless of the case definition used, the year-to-year pattern of incidence appeared similar. More cases were captured by provider-based surveillance (76%) than by hospital discharge data review (68%); only 49% were identified by both methods. Conclusions. The overall incidence of pediatric HUS was affected by key characteristics of the surveillance system, including the method of ascertainment and the case definitions. However, year-to-year patterns were similar for all methods examined, suggesting that several approaches to HUS surveillance can be used to track trends. PMID:22572665

  2. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Yıldız, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  3. THE ENDOPARASITOID Campoletis chlorideae INDUCES A HEMOLYTIC FACTOR IN THE HERBIVOROUS INSECT Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong-Ya; Bai, Su-Fen; Li, Xin; Yin, Xin-Ming; Li, Xian-Chun

    2015-09-01

    Although lysis of invading organisms is a major innate form of immunity used by invertebrates, it remains unclear whether herbivorous insects have hemolysin or not. To address this general question, we tested the hemolytic (HL) activity of the hemolymph and tissue extracts from various stages of the polyphagous insect Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) against the erythrocytes from chicken, duck, and rabbit. An HL activity was identified in the hemolymph of H. armigera larvae. Further studies demonstrated that the HL activity is proteinaceous as it was precipitable by deproteinizing agents. Hemolysins were found in Helicoverpa egg, larva, pupa, and adult, but the activity was higher in feeding larvae than in molting or newly molted larvae. Hemolysins were distributed among a variety of larval tissues including salivary gland, fat body, epidermis, midgut, or testes, but the highest activity was found in salivary gland and fat body. Relative to nonparasitized larvae, parasitization of H. armigera larvae by the endoparasitoid Campoletis chlorideae Uchida induced a 3.4-fold increase in the HL activity in the plasma of parasitized host at day two postparasitization. The present study shows the presence of a parasitoid inducible HL factor in the parasitized insect. The HL activity increased significantly in H. armigera larvae at 12 and 24 h postinjection with Escherichia coli. We infer the HL factor(s) is inducible or due to de novo synthesis, which means that the HL factor(s) is associated with insect immune response by inhibiting or clearance of invading organisms. PMID:25929852

  4. Functional characterization of two novel non-synonymous alterations in CD46 and a Q950H change in factor H found in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Mohlin, Frida C; Nilsson, Sara C; Levart, Tanja Kersnik; Golubovic, Ema; Rusai, Krisztina; Müller-Sacherer, Thomas; Arbeiter, Klaus; Pállinger, Éva; Szarvas, Nóra; Csuka, Dorottya; Szilágyi, Ágnes; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Prohászka, Zoltán; Blom, Anna M

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a disease of complement dysregulation, characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Mutations in complement inhibitors are major risk factors for development of aHUS. The three aHUS patients reported in this study had several previously identified alterations in complement inhibitors; e.g. risk haplotypes in CD46 and factor H but we also identified two novel heterozygous non-synonymous CD46 alterations (p.E142Q and p.G259V). Presence of G259V caused decreased expression of the recombinant mutant CD46 compared to wild type (WT). Western blot analysis showed that the majority of the expressed G259V protein was in the precursor form, suggesting that it is processed less efficiently than WT. Low CD46 expression on the surface of the patient's neutrophils confirmed the in vitro results. Further, G259V had a substantially impaired ability to act as a cofactor to factor I, in the degradation of both C3b and C4b. The E142Q mutant showed neither decreased expression nor impaired function. Two of the patients also had a heterozygous non-synonymous alteration in factor H (p.Q950H), reported previously in aHUS but not functionally tested. This variant showed moderately impaired function in hemolytic assays, both using patient sera and recombinant proteins. The recombinant Q950H also showed a somewhat decreased expression compared to WT but the complement inhibitory function in fluid phase was normal. Taken together, we report a novel CD46 alteration showing both a decreased protein expression and substantially impaired cofactor function (G259V) and another without an effect on expression or cofactor function (E142Q). Moreover, mild consequences of a previously reported aHUS associated rare variant in factor H (Q950H) was also revealed, underlining the clear need for functional characterization of each new aHUS associated mutation. PMID:25733390

  5. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome with acute encephalopathy in a pregnant woman infected with epidemic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli: characteristic brain images and cytokine profiles.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Shiozaki, A; Shimizu, M; Saito, S

    2015-05-01

    A food-poisoning outbreak due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) occurred in Toyama, Japan. The case of a 26-year-old pregnant woman with hemolytic-uremic syndrome who developed acute encephalopathy due to EHEC infection after eating raw meat is presented herein. On day 2 following admission, a cesarean section was performed because of a non-reassuring fetal status. Fecal bacterial culture confirmed an O111/O157 superinfection. Intensive care therapies including continuous hemodiafiltration and plasma exchange were performed. After the operation, the patient developed encephalopathy for which steroid pulse therapy was added. Her condition improved gradually and she was discharged 55 days after delivery. PMID:25841635

  6. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  7. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  8. Utility of reticulocyte maturation parameters in the differential diagnosis of macrocytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Torres Gomez, A; Casaño, J; Sánchez, J; Madrigal, E; Blanco, F; Alvarez, M A

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to test the clinical utility of reticulocyte maturation parameters in the differential diagnosis of macrocytic anemias. Using an automated reticulocyte counter, we analyzed immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), mean reticulocyte volume (MRV) and mean fluorescence index (MFI) in peripheral blood samples from healthy donors (n = 30), patients diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS, n = 35), with megaloblastic anemia (MA, n = 10) and with non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias (NMMA, n = 30). Macrocytic anemias due to ineffective erythropoiesis (MA and MDS) showed reticulocytes skewed to a more immature fraction. Therefore, they have a larger volume and a greater RNA content than healthy controls. Interestingly, reticulocytes in both low and high risk MDS are significantly larger (127.3 vs. 118.3 fl, P < 0.01) and have a greater RNA content (MFI 20.5 vs. 12.9, P < 0.01 and IRF 22.5 vs. 9.1%, P < 0.01) than NMMA patients. We conclude that measurement of reticulocyte maturation parameters may be a very useful tool in the differential diagnosis of macrocytic anemia. The presence of extremely high values of IRF (>16%), MFI (>18) and MRV (>129 fl), makes the diagnosis of NMMA very unlikely. An underlying MDS should, therefore, be sought. PMID:12974717

  9. Incidence and risk factors for the development of anemia following gastric bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Avgerinos, Dimitrios V; Llaguna, Omar H; Seigerman, Matthew; Lefkowitz, Amanda J; Leitman, I Michael

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the incidence and risk factors for the development of anemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of patients undergoing RYGB from January 2003 to November 2007 was performed. All patients had a preoperative body mass index > 40 kg/m2. A total of 206 patients were evaluated. All patients were given daily supplements of ferrous sulfate tablets for 2 wk following their operation. Hematological and metabolic indices were routinely evaluated following surgery. Patients were followed for a minimum of 86 wk. RESULTS: There were 41 males and 165 females with an average age of 40.8 years. 21 patients (10.2%) developed post-operative anemia and 185 patients (89.8%) did not. Anemia was due to iron deficiency in all cases. The groups had similar demographics, surgical procedure and co-morbidities. Menstruation (P = 0.02) and peptic ulcer disease (P = 0.01) were risk factors for the development of post-operative anemia. CONCLUSION: Iron deficiency anemia is frequent. RYGB surgery compounds occult blood loss. Increased ferrous sulfate supplementation may prevent iron depletion in populations at increased risk. PMID:20397264

  10. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  11. Epoetin beta for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Ricci, Clara; Egan, Colin Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Epoetin beta belongs to the class of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) that are currently available to treat anemic patients receiving chemotherapy. Chemotherapy-induced anemia affects a high percentage of cancer patients and, due to its negative effects on disease outcome and the patient’s quality of life, should be treated when first diagnosed. Initial trials with ESAs have shown efficacy in improving quality of life and reducing the need for blood transfusions in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia. However, recent meta-analyses have provided conflicting data on the impact of ESAs on survival and tumor progression. Here we provide an overview of these recent data and review the role of epoetin beta in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia over the past 20 years. PMID:25784818

  12. Bed bugs reproductive life cycle in the clothes of a patient suffering from Alzheimer's disease results in iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Sabou, Marcela; Imperiale, Delphine Gallo; Andrès, Emmanuel; Abou-Bacar, Ahmed; Foeglé, Jacinthe; Lavigne, Thierry; Kaltenbach, Georges; Candolfi, Ermanno

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of an 82-year-old patient, hospitalized for malaise. Her clothes were infested by numerous insects and the entomological analysis identified them as being Cimex lectularius (bed bugs). The history of the patient highlighted severe cognitive impairment. The biological assessment initially showed a profound microcytic, aregenerative, iron deficiency anemia. A vitamin B12 deficiency due to pernicious anemia (positive intrinsic factor antibodies) was also highlighted, but this was not enough to explain the anemia without macrocytosis. Laboratory tests, endoscopy and a CT scan eliminated a tumor etiology responsible for occult bleeding. The patient had a mild itchy rash which was linked to the massive colonization by the bed bugs. The C. lectularius bite is most often considered benign because it is not a vector of infectious agents. Far from trivial, a massive human colonization by bed bugs may cause such a hematic depletion that severe microcytic anemia may result. PMID:23673315

  13. Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157257.html Anemia Drugs May Not Boost Kidney Patients' Well-Being: ... MONDAY, Feb. 15, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The pricey anemia drugs often given to people with chronic kidney ...

  14. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Fanconi Anemia? Major Signs and Symptoms Your doctor may suspect ... sisters also should be tested for the disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  15. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia? Lower than normal numbers of red blood cells, ... most of the signs and symptoms of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts ...

  16. Very severe aplastic anemia appearing after thymectomy.

    PubMed

    Park, Chi Young; Kim, Hee Je; Kim, Yoo Jin; Park, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jong Wook; Min, Woo Sung; Kim, Chun Choo

    2003-03-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare complication of thymoma and is extremely infrequent after thymectomy. We present a case of a 60-year-old woman with very severe aplastic anemia appearing sixteen months after thymectomy for a thymoma. She underwent thymectomy for a thymoma in April 2000. Preoperative examination revealed no hematologic abnormality. About sixteen months after the operation, she was readmitted because of pancytopenia with cough and fever. Bone marrow aspiration revealed a very severe hypoplasia in all the three cell lines with over 80% fatty tissue, and chest CT revealed no recurrence of thymoma. Her aplastic anemia had responded to cyclosporine A and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). PMID:12760272

  17. Iron deficiency anemia: evaluation and management.

    PubMed

    Short, Matthew W; Domagalski, Jason E

    2013-01-15

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional disorder worldwide and accounts for approximately one-half of anemia cases. The diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia is confirmed by the findings of low iron stores and a hemoglobin level two standard deviations below normal. Women should be screened during pregnancy, and children screened at one year of age. Supplemental iron may be given initially, followed by further workup if the patient is not responsive to therapy. Men and postmenopausal women should not be screened, but should be evaluated with gastrointestinal endoscopy if diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia. The underlying cause should be treated, and oral iron therapy can be initiated to replenish iron stores. Parenteral therapy may be used in patients who cannot tolerate or absorb oral preparations. PMID:23317073

  18. Diagnosis of Fanconi Anemia by Diepoxybutane Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Auerbach, Arleen D.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous disorder characterized by congenital malformations, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer, particularly hematological malignancies and solid tumors of the head and neck. The main role of FA proteins is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). FA results from pathogenic variants in at least 16 distinct genes, causing genomic instability. Although the highly variable phenotype makes accurate diagnosis on the basis of clinical manifestations difficult in some patients, diagnosis based on a profound sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents can be used to identify the pre-anemia patient as well as patients with aplastic anemia or leukemia who may or may not have the physical stigmata associated with the syndrome. Diepoxybutane (DEB) analysis is the preferred test for FA because other agents have higher rates of false-positive and false-negative results. PMID:25827349

  19. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  20. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963