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  1. Coomb’s Positive Hemolytic Anemia Due To Insect Bite

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has occasionally been described in association with insect bites. The venom of certain spiders, bees and wasps, and some snakes can rarely cause intravascular hemolysis. We report here a case of Coombs positive hemolytic anemia due to an insect bite. These bites often pose diagnostic challenges and when associated with systemic manifestations necessitate early intervention. This communication reviews the clinico- hematologic spectrum in these cases and also emphasizes the need to capture the insect as identification would help in early diagnosis and management. PMID:22400097

  2. Hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anemia. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . ... anemias. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al., eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . ...

  3. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Anemia Blood Transfusion Rh Incompatibility Sickle Cell Disease Thalassemias Send a link to NHLBI to ...

  4. HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA Erythrocytes premature

    E-print Network

    HEMOLYISIS · Within the Macrophages of the Spleen, liver, or BM · Causes · Inherited RBC Defects · Acquired EXTRINSIC DEFECTS · Antagonistic Plasma Factors · Traumatic Physical Cell Injury · Immune Medicated Cell of the Newborn HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA CAUSED BY PHYSICAL INJURY TO THE ERYTHROCYTE · Microangiopathic Hemolytic Anemia

  5. Complement in hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Robert A

    2015-11-26

    Complement is increasingly being recognized as an important driver of human disease, including many hemolytic anemias. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) cells are susceptible to hemolysis because of a loss of the complement regulatory proteins CD59 and CD55. Patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) develop a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) that in most cases is attributable to mutations that lead to activation of the alternative pathway of complement. For optimal therapy, it is critical, but often difficult, to distinguish aHUS from other TMAs, such as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura; however, novel bioassays are being developed. In cold agglutinin disease (CAD), immunoglobulin M autoantibodies fix complement on the surface of red cells, resulting in extravascular hemolysis by the reticuloendothelial system. Drugs that inhibit complement activation are increasingly being used to treat these diseases. This article discusses the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and therapy for PNH, aHUS, and CAD. PMID:26582375

  6. Primary Sjögren syndrome presenting with hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia following delivery due to Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and hemophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Komaru, Yohei; Higuchi, Takakazu; Koyamada, Ryosuke; Haji, Youichiro; Okada, Masato; Kamesaki, Toyomi; Okada, Sadamu

    2013-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman presented with hemolytic anemia without a reticulocyte response 38 days after delivery. A marked reduction in erythroid cells and an increase in macrophages with active hemophagocytosis were noted in the bone marrow. While conventional Coombs' tests were negative, the level of red blood cell (RBC)-bound immunoglobulin G (IgG) was increased. The patient was diagnosed with primary Sjögren syndrome (pSS) based on her symptoms, positive anti-SS-A antibodies, Coombs-negative autoimmune hemolytic anemia and pure red cell aplasia associated with RBC-bound IgG and hemophagocytosis. The unique presentation was considered to be a consequence of immunological derangement associated with pSS, pregnancy and delivery. PMID:24126397

  7. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  8. Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Rosse, Wendell F; Hillmen, Peter; Schreiber, Alan D

    2004-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia due to immune function is one of the major causes of acquired hemolytic anemia. In recent years, as more is known about the immune system, these entities have become better understood and their treatment improved. In this section, we will discuss three areas in which this progress has been apparent. In Section I, Dr. Peter Hillmen outlines the recent findings in the pathogenesis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), relating the biochemical defect (the lack of glycosylphosphatidylinositol [GPI]-linked proteins on the cell surface) to the clinical manifestations, particularly hemolysis (and its effects) and thrombosis. He discusses the pathogenesis of the disorder in the face of marrow dysfunction insofar as it is known. His major emphasis is on innovative therapies that are designed to decrease the effectiveness of complement activation, since the lack of cellular modulation of this system is the primary cause of the pathology of the disease. He recounts his considerable experience with a humanized monoclonal antibody against C5, which has a remarkable effect in controlling the manifestations of the disease. Other means of controlling the action of complement include replacing the missing modulatory proteins on the cell surface; these studies are not as developed as the former agent. In Section II, Dr. Alan Schreiber describes the biochemistry, genetics, and function of the Fc gamma receptors and their role in the pathobiology of autoimmune hemolytic anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura due to IgG antibodies. He outlines the complex varieties of these molecules, showing how they vary in genetic origin and in function. These variations can be related to three-dimensional topography, which is known in some detail. Liganding IgG results in the transduction of a signal through the tyrosine-based activation motif and Syk signaling. The role of these receptors in the pathogenesis of hematological diseases due to IgG antibodies is outlined and the potential of therapy of these diseases by regulation of these receptors is discussed. In Section III, Dr. Wendell Rosse discusses the forms of autoimmune hemolytic anemia characterized by antibodies that react preferentially in the cold-cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria (PCH). The former is due to IgM antibodies with a common but particular structure that reacts primarily with carbohydrate or carbohydrate-containing antigens, an interaction that is diminished at body temperature. PCH is a less common but probably underdiagnosed illness due to an IgG antibody reacting with a carbohydrate antigen; improved techniques for the diagnosis of PCH are described. Therapy for the two disorders differs somewhat because of the differences in isotype of the antibody. Since the hemolysis in both is primarily due to complement activation, the potential role of its control, as by the monoclonal antibody described by Dr. Hillmen, is discussed. PMID:15561676

  9. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    PubMed

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. PMID:26306021

  10. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    King, Karen E; Ness, Paul M

    2005-07-01

    The appropriate therapy of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is dependent on the correct diagnosis and classification of this family of hemolytic disorders. Although the majority of cases are warm AIHA, there are several distinct types of cold AIHA and a number of drug-induced etiologies of AIHA, which must be investigated to determine if stopping a drug will induce a remission. In warm AIHA, corticosteroids are standard, followed by consideration of splenectomy in recalcitrant cases. If steroids and splenectomy are insufficient, other forms of immunosuppressive therapy are typically initiated. In cold AIHA, keeping the patient warm in often sufficient, but therapy directed at an underlying lympholiferative disorder may be helpful. Brisk hemolysis, inadequate responses to therapy, and worsening anemia require transfusion therapy. Although the pretransfusion workup is made difficult by the presence of the autoantibody, transfusion services can usually provide blood safe for transfusion by excluding underlying alloantibodies. When transfusion is urgently required and compatible blood cannot be located, incompatible blood may be provided as a life-saving measure. Communication between the transfusion service and the hematologist is critical to assess the risks in these settings. Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers may provide an important bridging therapy in the future. Requests for "least incompatible" blood do not enhance transfusion safety and often result in unnecessary delays. PMID:16041662

  11. Chronic Hemolytic Anemia due to Cold Agglutinins: the Mechanism of Resistance of Red Cells to C? Hemolysis by Cold Agglutinins*

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert S.; Turner, Elizabeth; Bingham, Margaret

    1967-01-01

    The red cells of patients with chronic hemolytic anemia due to cold agglutinins are agglutinated by antiglobulin serum in a nongamma reaction due to the coating of ?-globulins, C?4 and C?3. The red cells of such patients are abnormally resistant to C? hemolysis by cold agglutinin. Normal red cells can be made equally resistant to C? hemolysis by incubation with cold agglutinin and normal serum at temperatures which allow transient reactions between the red cells and cold agglutinins. The development of resistance to C? hemolysis was related to increasing susceptibility to agglutination in anti-?1c- and anti-?1e-sera and by increasing uptake of 131I activity from labeled anti-?-globulin serum containing antibodies for both globulins. There was decrease in the adsorption of 131I-labeled cold agglutinin during the development of resistance to C? hemolysis and reduced susceptibility to agglutination by cold agglutinins. Since cold agglutinins have been demonstrated to dissociate from the red cell, leaving fractions of C? globulin attached, it is postulated that repeated transient reactions produce the accumulation of incomplete C? complexes. Steric hindrance by the adsorbed C? complexes is probably responsible for the inhibition of the reaction with cold agglutinin. There is evidence that the adsorbed C? complexes also interfere with the hemolytic action of C? even when cold agglutinin has become reattached to the red cells. The accumulation of C? complexes by cold agglutinins appears to be the most important factor in the abnormal resistance to C? hemolysis exhibited by the patient's red cells. Other factors, such as the heterogeneity within a population of normal cells, appear to be of minor significance. PMID:4166664

  12. [Hemolytic anemia under erlotinib treatment].

    PubMed

    Sakhri, L; Mennecier, B; Quoix, A

    2013-12-01

    Erlotinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor widely prescribed of which the most common sides effects are grade I or II rash and diarrhea. We report two cases of hemolytic anemia (HA) induced by erlotinib. Our two patients were treated with erlotinib after a prior line of systemic platinum-doublet therapy for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Both patients presented, shortly after starting treatment with erlotinib, an HA which was fatal for one of them. To our knowledge, this major side effect of erlotinib has not been reported in the literature. We will try through this article to make a literature review of the most important side effects of erlotinib and we will also focus on the HA induced by other molecules used in oncology. PMID:24183296

  13. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70–85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6–12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80–90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  14. Treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemias.

    PubMed

    Zanella, Alberto; Barcellini, Wilma

    2014-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon disorder caused by autoantibodies directed against self red blood cells. It can be idiopathic or secondary, and classified as warm, cold (cold hemagglutinin disease (CAD) and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) or mixed, according to the thermal range of the autoantibody. AIHA may develop gradually, or have a fulminant onset with life-threatening anemia. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. The first-line therapy for warm AIHA are corticosteroids, which are effective in 70-85% of patients and should be slowly tapered over a time period of 6-12 months. For refractory/relapsed cases, the current sequence of second-line therapy is splenectomy (effective approx. in 2 out of 3 cases but with a presumed cure rate of up to 20%), rituximab (effective in approx. 80-90% of cases), and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins, danazol, plasma-exchange, and alemtuzumab and high-dose cyclophosphamide as last resort option. As the experience with rituximab evolves, it is likely that this drug will be located at an earlier point in therapy of warm AIHA, before more toxic immunosuppressants, and in place of splenectomy in some cases. In CAD, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:25271314

  15. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  16. How Is Hemolytic Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medicines rituximab and cyclosporine. If you have severe sickle cell anemia , your doctor may recommend a medicine called hydroxyurea. ... hemoglobin that newborns have. In people who have sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin helps prevent red blood cells from ...

  17. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn with late-onset anemia due to anti-M: a case report and review of the Japanese literature.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroyasu; Ohto, Hitoshi; Nollet, Kenneth E; Kawabata, Kinuyo; Saito, Shunnichi; Yagi, Yoshihito; Negishi, Yutaka; Ishida, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) attributed to M/N-incompatibility varies from asymptomatic to lethally hydropic. Case reports are rare, and the clinical significance of anti-M is not completely understood. A challenging case of HDFN due to anti-M prompted an investigation of the Japanese literature, in order to characterize the clinical spectrum of M/N-incompatibility pregnancies in Japan and report results to English-language readers. Japanese reports of HDFN attributed to M/N incompatibility were compiled. Abstracted data include maternal antibody titers at delivery, fetal direct antiglobulin test, hemoglobin, total bilirubin, reticulocyte count at birth, and therapeutic interventions. We investigated characteristics of HDFN due to M/N-incompatible pregnancies in Japan after encountering a case of severe HDFN along with late-onset anemia in an infant born to a woman carrying IgG anti-M with a titer of 1. In total, thirty-three babies with HDFN due to anti-M and one due to anti-N have been reported in Japan since 1975. The median maternal antibody titer was 64 at delivery and was 16 or less in 10 of 34 women (29%). Five of 34 babies (15%) were stillborn or died as neonates. Twenty-one of 29 survivors (72%) had severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. The reticulocyte count of neonates with anemia stayed below the reference interval. Sixteen (55%) developed late-onset anemia and 14 (48%) were transfused with M-negative RBCs. Significant positive correlation (P < .05) between the hemoglobin value and the reticulocyte count within 4 days of birth was obtained in 16 babies with anti-M HDFN. In the Japanese population, 21 of 34 cases of M/N-incompatible HDFN (72%) have manifested as severe hemolytic anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Low reticulocyte count in neonates with late-onset anemia is consistent with suppressed erythropoiesis due to anti-M. PMID:24262303

  18. The Clinical Pictures of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Packman, Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by shortened red blood cell survival and a positive Coombs test. The responsible autoantibodies may be either warm reactive or cold reactive. The rate of hemolysis and the severity of the anemia may vary from mild to severe and life-threatening. Diagnosis is made in the laboratory by the findings of anemia, reticulocytosis, a positive Coombs test, and specific serologic tests. The prognosis is generally good but renal failure and death sometimes occur, especially in cases mediated by drugs.

  19. Iron deficiency and hemolytic anemia reversed by ventricular septal myectomy

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Steven M.; Cable, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has been reported to occur in the setting of aortic stenosis and prosthetic heart valves, but much more rarely in association with obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). Of the few descriptions of hemolytic anemia secondary to HC, all but one case involved bacterial endocarditis contributing to left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. We present the case of a 67-year-old man with recurrent hemolytic anemia and HC, without infective endocarditis. Attempts at iron repletion and augmentation of beta-blocker therapy proved his anemia to be refractory to medical management. Ventricular septal myectomy led to the resolution of hemolysis, anemia, and its coexisting symptoms. PMID:26424952

  20. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia: classification and therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Sève, Pascal; Philippe, Pierre; Dufour, Jean-François; Broussolle, Christiane; Michel, Marc

    2008-12-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a relatively uncommon cause of anemia. Classifications of AIHA include warm AIHA, cold AIHA (including mainly chronic cold agglutinin disease and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria), mixed-type AIHA and drug-induced AIHA. AIHA may also be further subdivided on the basis of etiology. Management of AIHA is based mainly on empirical data and on small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. The therapeutic options for treating AIHA are increasing with monoclonal antibodies and, potentially, complement inhibitory drugs. Based on data available in the literature and our experience, we propose algorithms for the treatment of warm AIHA and cold agglutinin disease in adults. Therapeutic trials are needed in order to better stratify treatment, taking into account the promising efficacy of rituximab. PMID:21082924

  1. Tolosa-Hunt syndrome in a patient with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Carrieri, Pietro Biagio; Montella, Silvana; Petracca, Maria; Cerullo, Giovanni; Elefante, Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Tolosa-Hunt syndrome is a steroid responsive painful opthalmoplegia due to a nonspecific inflammation of the cavernous sinus. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is caused by antibodies directed against unmodified autologous red cells. They are both rare conditions. Here we describe the simultaneous occurrence of Tolosa-Hunt syndrome and severe hemolytic crisis in the same patient. PMID:20718692

  2. Impairment of Bone Health in Pediatric Patients with Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Schündeln, Michael M.; Goretzki, Sarah C.; Hauffa, Pia K.; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. Study Design To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Results Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P?=?0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P?=?0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025) influence of LDH (partial r2?=?0.29), diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2?=?0.05) and age (partial r2?=?0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Conclusion Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment. PMID:25299063

  3. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID:24379786

  4. Management of hemolytic anemia following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Holbro, Andreas; Passweg, Jakob R

    2015-12-01

    Hemolytic anemia (HA) is a frequent condition with variable pathophysiology. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is unique because it is performed across the ABO blood group barrier. Thereby, there is a transfer of plasma, red blood cells, and immunocompetent cells from the donor to the recipient, possibly leading to HA, due to red blood cell incompatibility. The underlying disease, drugs (particularly those used for conditioning and immunosuppressants), infections, graft-versus-host disease, and autoimmune diseases may all contribute to the clinical and laboratory picture of HA. Additionally, transplantation-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TA-TMA) may occur and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review highlights the current knowledge on HA after allogeneic HSCT, particularly due to ABO incompatibility. We follow the timeline of the transplantation process and discuss investigations, differential diagnosis, and prophylactic measures including graft processing to avoid hemolysis in case of ABO incompatibility. Finally, current therapeutic approaches for both TA-TMA and post-HSCT autoimmune HA, which are associated with high morbidity and mortality, are discussed. PMID:26637746

  5. IgM autoagglutinins in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a poor prognostic feature.

    PubMed

    McCann, E L; Shirey, R S; Kickler, T S; Ness, P M

    1992-01-01

    The presence of both complete IgM autoagglutinins and IgG autoantibodies in warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon finding. Over a 6-year period, only 5 of 115 (4.1%) patients with AIHA had IgM and IgG autoantibodies. In 3 of the 5 cases, the complete IgM autoagglutinins reacted up to 30 degrees C and these patients responded well to corticosteroid or other therapies for warm AIHA. The 2 patients who had warm (37 degrees C) reactive IgM autoagglutinins, were refractory to corticosteroids, splenectomy and cytotoxic drugs, and died due to the complications of hemolytic anemia. The data in these 5 cases suggest that the thermal amplitude of the IgM antibody in these unusual AIHA cases may be predictive of refractoriness to therapy and poor clinical outcome. PMID:1466193

  6. An Imported Case of Severe Falciparum Malaria with Prolonged Hemolytic Anemia Clinically Mimicking a Coinfection with Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon

    2014-01-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  7. An imported case of severe falciparum malaria with prolonged hemolytic anemia clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-12-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia. PMID:25548419

  8. An Outbreak of Heinz Body Positive Hemolytic Anemia in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Heui-Jung; Kwon, Young Joo; Wee, Kyoung So; Kwon, So Young; Lee, Chang Hong; Kim, Suhnggwon; Lee, Jung Sang; Cho, Soo-Hun; Cha, Chul Whan

    1993-01-01

    During the four month period, from December 1988 to March 1989, there was an outbreak of Heinz body positive hemolytic anemia in 34 patients undergoing hemodialysis in a 500-bed hospital, Seoul, Korea. The episodes of hemolysis were not reduced by changing the charcoal column and reverse osmosis system, or by adding ascorbic acid to the dialysate. The concentrations of nitrate, copper, aluminum and zinc in the treated water were all within the standards for hemodialysis. The chloramine concentration of the treated water was over 0.6 mg/L, markedly exceeding the allowable level of 0.1 mg/L. This high level of chloramine was proved to be due to the contamination of the water source by raw sewage. After we changed the source of water supply to another, no more episodes of hemolytic anemia occurred. It is concluded that chloramine is one of the major contaminants causing dialysis-induced hemolytic anemia and regular determinations are necessary, especially during winter and dry seasons. PMID:8031729

  9. Hemolytic anemia in two patients with glioblastoma multiforme: A possible interaction between vorinostat and dapsone.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer A; Petty, William J; Harmon, Michele; Peacock, James E; Valente, Kari; Owen, John; Pirmohamed, Munir; Lesser, Glenn J

    2015-06-01

    Patients undergoing treatment for glioblastoma multiforme are routinely placed on prophylactic treatment for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia because of significant therapy-induced lymphopenia. In patients with sulfa allergies, dapsone prophylaxis is often used due to its efficacy, long half-life, cost effectiveness, and general safety at low doses. However, dapsone may uncommonly induce a hemolytic anemia, particularly in patients deficient of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. This hemolysis is thought to be a result of oxidative stress on red blood cells induced by dapsone metabolites which produce reactive oxygen species that disrupt the red blood cell membrane and promote splenic sequestration. A single case report of dapsone-induced hemolytic anemia in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme has been reported. We present two patients with glioblastoma multiforme who developed severe hemolytic anemia shortly after initiating therapy with vorinostat, a pan-active histone deacetylase inhibitor, while on prophylactic dapsone. There are several potential mechanisms by which histone deacetylase inhibition may alter dapsone metabolism including changes in hepatic acetylation or N-glucuronidation leading to an increase in the bioavailability of dapsone's hematotoxic metabolites. In addition, vorinostat may lead to increased hemolysis through inhibition of heat shock protein-90, a chaperone protein that maintains the integrity of the red blood cell membrane cytoskeleton. The potential interaction between dapsone and vorinostat may have important clinical implications as more than 10 clinical trials evaluating drug combinations with vorinostat in patients with malignant glioma are either ongoing or planned in North America. PMID:24576944

  10. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and other thrombotic microangiopathic hemolytic anemias: diagnosis and classification.

    PubMed

    Shenkman, Boris; Einav, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) include several diseases, most prominently are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). TMAs are characterized by profound thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia and organ ischemia. In most cases TTP results from deficiency of ADAMTS13, the von Willebrand factor-cleaving protease leading to increase of ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) multimers. Congenital TTP is due to mutations in the gene of ADAMTS13 whereas acquired TTP is due to production of autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. In both cases severe deficiency of ADAMTS13 exists. However, the presence of ADAMTS13 activity does not rule out TTP. Diagnostic criteria of TTP are based on clinical features of neurologic and renal disfunction along with anemia and thrombocytopenia, low ADAMTS13 activity, and the presence of ULVWF. The standard treatment of TTP includes plasma exchange, protein A immunoabsobtion, immunosuppressive drugs, CD20 antibodies against B cells, and splenectomy. HUS is commonly caused by infection with Shiga-toxin produced by Escherichia coli. HUS is characterized by thrombocytopenia, anemia, renal impairment and diarrhea. Rarely, atypical HUS appears as a consequence of mutations related to the alternative pathway for the compliment system. Plasmapheresis in HUS is not efficient. Alternatively, plasma therapy and in some cases dialysis are used. TMA diseases may be associated with other infections, bone marrow transplantation, pregnancy, systemic vasculitis, and certain drugs. PMID:24418304

  11. Successful treatment of fetal hemolytic disease due to glucose phosphate isomerase deficiency (GPI) using repeated intrauterine transfusions: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Adama van Scheltema, Phebe N; Zhang, Ai; Ball, Lynne M; Steggerda, Sylke J; van Wijk, Richard; Fransen van de Putte, Dietje E; van Kamp, Inge L

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Hemolytic anemia due to GPI deficiency can be severe and life threatening during fetal life. When parents decline invasive testing, ultrasound monitoring of fetuses at risk is feasible. Intrauterine transfusion can be effective for the treatment of severe fetal anemia due to GPI deficiency. PMID:26509025

  12. Immune Hemolytic Anemia: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Paramjit; Basu, Sabita; Kaur, Ravneet; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2009-01-01

    The transfusion-medicine specialists and physicians are often in a difficult situation when the patient has severe worsening anemia and all the blood is mismatched. This situation can arise in patients with red cell autoantibodies or alloantibodies due to previous transfusions. We report two cases of immune hemolysis – one due to warm auto antibodies and the second due to alloimmunization from multiple transfusions. PMID:21938245

  13. New Insights in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Summary Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is caused by the increased destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) by anti-RBC autoantibodies with or without complement activation. RBC destruction may occur both by a direct lysis through the sequential activation of the final components of the complement cascade (membrane attack complex), or by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). The pathogenic role of autoantibodies depends on their class (the most frequent are IgG and IgM), subclass, thermal amplitude (warm and cold forms),as well as affinity and efficiency in activating complement. Several cytokines and cytotoxic mechanisms (CD8+ T and natural killer cells) are further involved in RBC destruction. Moreover, activated macrophages carrying Fc receptors may recognize and phagocyte erythrocytes opsonized by autoantibodies and complement. Direct complement-mediated lysis takes place mainly in the circulations and liver, whereas ADCC, cytotoxicity, and phagocytosis occur preferentially in the spleen and lymphoid organs. The degree of intravascular hemolysis is 10-fold greater than extravascular one. Finally, the efficacy of the erythroblastic compensatory response can greatly influence the clinical picture of AIHA. The interplay and relative burden of all these pathogenic mechanisms give reason for the great clinical heterogeneity of AIHAs, from fully compensated to rapidly evolving fatal cases. PMID:26696796

  14. Oxidative stress as a potential causal factor for autoimmune hemolytic anemia and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Junichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Konno, Tasuku; Homma, Takujiro; Iuchi, Yoshihito

    2015-05-01

    The kidneys and the blood system mutually exert influence in maintaining homeostasis in the body. Because the kidneys control erythropoiesis by producing erythropoietin and by supporting hematopoiesis, anemia is associated with kidney diseases. Anemia is the most prevalent genetic disorder, and it is caused by a deficiency of glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), for which sulfhydryl oxidation due to an insufficient supply of NADPH is a likely direct cause. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) result in the sulfhydryl oxidation and hence are another potential cause for anemia. ROS are elevated in red blood cells (RBCs) under superoxide dismutase (SOD1) deficiency in C57BL/6 mice. SOD1 deficient mice exhibit characteristics similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) at the gerontic stage. An examination of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice, which have normal SOD1 and G6PD genes, indicated that ROS levels in RBCs are originally high and further elevated during aging. Transgenic overexpression of human SOD1 in erythroid cells effectively suppresses ROS elevation and ameliorates AIHA symptoms such as elevated anti-RBC antibodies and premature death in NZB mice. These results support the hypothesis that names oxidative stress as a risk factor for AIHA and other autoimmune diseases such as SLE. Herein we discuss the association between oxidative stress and SLE pathogenesis based mainly on the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of NZB and New Zealand white mice and provide insight into the mechanism of SLE pathogenesis. PMID:25949934

  15. An Unusual Case of Hepatosplenic ?? T-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Coombs’-Negative Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Feryal A.; Shanmugam, Vignesh; Amer, Aliaa; El-Omri, Halima; Al-Sabbagh, Ahmad; Taha, Ruba Y.; Soliman, Dina S.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTCL) is a rare and aggressive extranodal T-cell lymphoma that comprises <5% of peripheral T-cell lymphomas. The majority of cases harbor the ?? T-cell receptor (TCR), but recently, a few cases have been shown to express the ?? TCR. Comparison of these two subtypes (?? and ??) shows similar clinicopathologic and cytogenetic features; however, due to the paucity of reported cases, it is not clear whether they are prognostically distinct entities. We report a case of ?? HSTCL with a rather unusual presentation of Coombs’-negative hemolytic anemia. Diagnosis proved challenging due to an unusual blastoid morphology with the absence of typical intrasinusoidal distribution of tumor cells in the bone marrow. This unique case adds to the growing list of this rare subtype of T-cell lymphomas, which warrant urgent attention due to the lack of effective treatment options and dismal prognosis. PMID:26688667

  16. Acute cholestatic hepatitis a virus infection presenting with hemolytic anemia and renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lapp, Robert T; Rochling, Fedja

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is the most common acute viral hepatitis worldwide with approximately 1.5 million cases annually. Hepatitis A virus infection in general is self-limited. In rare cases, hepatitis A virus infection may cause renal failure, hemolytic anemia, and/or cholestasis. We report the first case of acute cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection complicated by hemolytic anemia, and renal failure in one patient. A 42-year-old Caucasian male presented with cholestasis, hemolytic anemia and renal failure after consuming street tacos in Central and South America while on a business trip. His protracted course required corticosteroid therapy, multiple sessions of plasma exchange, and numerous units of packed red blood cells. This case demonstrates the importance of vaccination in high-risk adults. A prompt diagnosis of acute hepatitis A virus infection is essential, as uncommon presentations may delay diagnosis leading to permanent morbidity and potentially death in fulminant cases. We also demonstrate the efficacy of treatment of cholestatic hepatitis A virus infection, hemolytic anemia, and renal failure with corticosteroids and plasma exchange. PMID:25431704

  17. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  18. Treatment Options for Primary Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Short Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-09-01

    Until now, treatment of primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm type (wAIHA) is primarily based on immunosuppression. However, many patients do not respond adequately to treatment, and treated patients may develop severe side effects due to uncontrolled, mixed and/or long-lasting immunosuppression. Unfortunately, the newly used therapeutic monoclonal antibodies are unspecific and remain frequently ineffective. Thus, development of a specific therapy for AIHA is necessary. The ideal therapy would be the identification and elimination of the causative origin of autoimmunization and/or the correction or reprogramming of the dysregulated immune components. Blood transfusion is the most rapidly effective measure for patients who develop or may develop hypoxic anemia. Although some effort has been made to guide physicians on how to adequately treat patients with AIHA, a number of individual aspects should be considered prior to treatment. Based on my serological and clinical experience and the analysis of evidence-based studies, we remain far from any optimized therapeutic measures for all AIHA patients. Today, the old standard therapy using controlled steroid administration, with or without azathioprine or cyclophosphamide, is, when complemented with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, still the most effective therapy in wAIHA. Rituximab or other monoclonal antibodies may be used instead of splenectomy in therapy-refractory patients. PMID:26696797

  19. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  20. [Infantile pyknocytosis: A cause of noenatal hemolytic anemia. Is recombinant erythropoietin an alternative to transfusion?].

    PubMed

    Bagou, M; Rolland, E; Gay, C; Patural, H

    2016-01-01

    Infantile pyknocytosis is a neonatal hemolytic disorder which causes anemia and icterus and is characterized by the presence of an increased number of distorted red blood cells called pyknocytes. Resolution spontaneously occurs in the first semester of life. It has been generally described as a rare entity, with an occasional family history. We report seven cases of infantile pyknocytosis observed in our hospital in 3years. Most of the infants presented with hemolytic icterus and profound anemia that was reaching its peak by the 3rd week of life. Three neonates received one to three red blood cell transfusions, according to former recommendations. However, the following four received a treatment with recombinant erythropoietin administered subcutaneously. Only one of these four cases required a transfusion. All of them were free of hematological disease 2-3months after completion of treatment. Infantile pyknocytosis is a recognized cause of neonatal hemolytic anemia, which requires careful examination of red cell morphology on a peripheral blood smear. The cause of this transient disorder remains unknown. Our observations show that recombinant erythropoietin therapy is effective in treating infantile pyknocytosis and increases the reticulocyte response, thus improving the hemoglobin level. PMID:26563723

  1. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sweidan, Alexander J; Brys, Adam K; Sohn, David D; Sheth, Milan R

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. PMID:26379449

  2. Diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in idiopathic hypereosinophilia with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Sweidan, Alexander J; Brys, Adam K; Sohn, David D; Sheth, Milan R

    2015-01-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES) encompasses numerous diverse conditions resulting in peripheral hypereosinophilia that cannot be explained by hypersensitivity, infection, or atopy and that is not associated with known systemic diseases with specific organ involvement. HES is often attributed to neoplastic or reactive causes, such as chronic eosinophilic leukemia, although a majority of cases remains unexplained and are considered idiopathic. Here, we review the current diagnosis and management of HES and present a unique case of profound hypereosinophilia associated with warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia requiring intensive management. This case clearly illustrates the limitations of current knowledge with respect to hypereosinophilia syndrome as well as the challenges associated with its classification and management. PMID:26379449

  3. Vitamin B12 and Vitamin D Deficiencies: An Unusual Cause of Fever, Severe Hemolytic Anemia and Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vikas A.; Harbada, Rishit; Sharma, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The array of diagnostic workup for pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) generally revolves in searching for infections, inflammatory/autoimmune, and endocrine etiologies. A differential diagnosis of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia can have etiologies varying from infections like malaria, dengue, cytomegalovirus, Ebstein barr virus, Parvovirus, infective endocarditis, to autoimmune disorder (systemic lupus erythromatosis), vasculitis, hemolytic uremic syndrome, thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), autoimmune hemolytic anemia/Evan's syndrome, paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuri (PNH), or drugs. Nutritional deficiencies (especially vitamin B12 deficiency) as a cause of fever, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia are very rare and therefore rarely thought of. Severe vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fever and if accompanied by concurrent hyper-homocysteinemia and hypophosphatemia can sometimes lead to severe hemolysis mimicking the above-mentioned conditions. We present a case that highlights vitamin B12 and vitamin D deficiency as an easily treatable cause of PUO, hemolytic anemia, and thrombocytopenia, which should be actively looked for and treated before proceeding with more complicated and expensive investigation or starting empiric treatments. PMID:25811010

  4. Dogs cast NETs too: Canine neutrophil extracellular traps in health and immune-mediated hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Unity; Kimura, Kayoko; Gray, Robert; Lueth, Paul; Bellaire, Bryan; LeVine, Dana

    2015-12-15

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are webs of DNA and protein with both anti-microbial and pro-thrombotic properties which have not been previously reported in dogs. To confirm dog neutrophils can form NETs, neutrophils were isolated from healthy dogs, and stimulated in vitro with 2?M, 8?M, 31?M, and 125?M platelet activating factor (PAF) or 0.03?M, 0.1?M, 0.4?M, 1.6?M and 6.4?M phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). Extracellular DNA was measured using the cell impermeable dye Sytox Green every hour for 4h. At 4h, extracellular DNA was significantly greater than non-stimulated cells at concentrations ?31?M and ?0.1?M for PAF and PMA, respectively. Cells stimulated with 31.25?M PAF reached maximal fluorescence by 1h, whereas maximal fluorescence was not achieved until 2h for cells stimulated with 0.1?M PMA. Immunofluorescent imaging using DAPI and anti-elastase antibody confirmed that extracellular DNA is released as NETs. As NETs have been implicated in thrombosis, nucleosomes, a marker correlated with NET formation, were measured in the serum of dogs with the thrombotic disorder primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) (n=7) and healthy controls (n=20) using a commercially available ELISA. NETs were significantly higher in IMHA cases than controls (median 0.12 and 0.90, respectively, p=0.01), but there were large positive interferences associated with hemolysis and icterus. In summary, the study is the first to describe NET generation by canine neutrophils and provides preliminary evidence that a marker associated with NETs is elevated in IMHA. However, this apparent elevation must be interpreted with caution due to the effect of interference, emphasizing the need for a more specific and robust assay for NETs in clinical samples. PMID:26574161

  5. Anti-CD20 treatment of giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Paganelli, Massimiliano; Patey, Natacha; Bass, Lee M; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell hepatitis with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (GCH-AHA) is a rare autoimmune disease of infancy characterized by severe liver disease associated with Coombs-positive hemolytic anemia. We recently showed that GCH-AHA is probably caused by a humoral immune mechanism. Such data support the use of rituximab, an anti-CD-20 monoclonal antibody specifically targeting B lymphocytes, as a treatment for GCH-AHA. We describe here the detailed clinical evolution of 4 children with GCH-AHA who showed a complete response to rituximab. All patients shared a severe course of the disease with poor control on standard and aggressive immunosuppression. Rituximab was well tolerated, and no side effects or infections were registered. Several doses were needed to induce remission, and 5 to 11 additional maintenance injections were necessary in the 2 more severe cases. Weaning from corticosteroids was achieved in all subjects. A steroid-sparing effect was noted in the 3 children who started rituximab early in the course of the disease. Overall, we show here that there is a strong rationale for treating GCH-AHA with rituximab. Early treatment could reduce the use of corticosteroids. Nevertheless, short-term steroids should be initially associated with rituximab to account for autoantibodies' half-life. Repeated injections are needed to treat and prevent relapses, but the best frequency and duration of treatment remain to be defined. PMID:25201797

  6. Phosphatidylserine exposure and red cell viability in red cell aging and in hemolytic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Boas, Franz Edward; Forman, Linda; Beutler, Ernest

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) normally localizes to the inner leaflet of cell membranes but becomes exposed in abnormal or apoptotic cells, signaling macrophages to ingest them. Along similar lines, it seemed possible that the removal of red cells from circulation because of normal aging or in hemolytic anemias might be triggered by PS exposure. To investigate the role of PS exposure in normal red cell aging, we used N-hydroxysuccinimide-biotin to tag rabbit red cells in vivo, then used phycoerythrin-streptavidin to label the biotinylated cells, and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to detect the exposed PS. Flow cytometric analysis of these cells drawn at 10-day intervals up to 70 days after biotinylation indicated that older, biotinylated cells expose more PS. Furthermore, our data match a simple model of red cell senescence that assumes both an age-dependent destruction of senescent red cells preceded by several hours of PS exposure and a random destruction of red cells without PS exposure. By using this model, we demonstrated that the exposure of PS parallels the rate at which biotinylated red cells are removed from circulation. On the other hand, using an annexin V-FITC label and flow cytometry demonstrates that exposed PS does not cause the reduced red cell life span of patients with hemolytic anemia, with the possible exception of those with unstable hemoglobins or sickle cell anemia. Thus, in some cases PS exposure on the cell surface may signal the removal of red cells from circulation, but in other cases some other signal must trigger the sequestration of cells. PMID:9501218

  7. Systematic review of evidence relating to the treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs.

    PubMed

    Swann, J W; Skelly, B J

    2013-01-01

    Despite being the most prevalent autoimmune disease of dogs, there is considerable variation between individuals and institutions in the treatment regimens that are employed for the management of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia. The aim of this review was to evaluate evidence relating to the treatment of the disease systematically and to use this evidence to draw conclusions that are applicable in wider veterinary practice. Search tools were employed to identify relevant articles and these were assessed according to stated criteria. The overall quality of published evidence was poor, with many articles failing to provide details of the enrollment, treatment, monitoring, and assessment stages of the study process. In view of this, firm conclusions cannot be drawn regarding the treatment of this disease and further research of a higher quality is required. PMID:23279007

  8. Erythrocytic Pyruvate Kinase Mutations Causing Hemolytic Anemia, Osteosclerosis, and Secondary Hemochromatosis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, G. Inal; Raj, K.; Foureman, P.; Lehman, S.; Manhart, K.; Abdulmalik, O.; Giger, U.

    2013-01-01

    Background Erythrocytic pyruvate kinase (PK) deficiency, first documented in Basenjis, is the most common inherited erythroenzymopathy in dogs. Objectives To report 3 new breed-specific PK-LR gene mutations and a retrospective survey of PK mutations in a small and selected group of Beagles and West Highland White Terriers (WHWT). Animals Labrador Retrievers (2 siblings, 5 unrelated), Pugs (2 siblings, 1 unrelated), Beagles (39 anemic, 29 other), WHWTs (22 anemic, 226 nonanemic), Cairn Terrier (n = 1). Methods Exons of the PK-LR gene were sequenced from genomic DNA of young dogs (<2 years) with persistent highly regenerative hemolytic anemia. Results A nonsense mutation (c.799C>T) resulting in a premature stop codon was identified in anemic Labrador Retriever siblings that had osteosclerosis, high serum ferritin concentrations, and severe hepatic secondary hemochromatosis. Anemic Pug and Beagle revealed 2 different missense mutations (c.848T>C, c.994G>A, respectively) resulting in intolerable amino acid changes to protein structure and enzyme function. Breed-specific mutation tests were developed. Among the biased group of 248 WHWTs, 9% and 35% were homozygous (affected) and heterozygous, respectively, for the previously described mutation (mutant allele frequency 0.26). A PK-deficient Cairn Terrier had the same insertion mutation as the affected WHWTs. Of the selected group of 68 Beagles, 35% were PK-deficient and 3% were carriers (0.37). Conclusions and Clinical Importance Erythrocytic PK deficiency is caused by different mutations in different dog breeds and causes chronic severe hemolytic anemia, hemosiderosis, and secondary hemochromatosis because of chronic hemolysis and, an as yet unexplained osteosclerosis. The newly developed breed-specific mutation assays simplify the diagnosis of PK deficiency. PMID:22805166

  9. [A Case of Mitral Valvular Re-repair in a Patient with Hemolytic Anemia after Mitral Valvular Repair].

    PubMed

    Tomino, Mikiko; Miyata, Kazuto; Takeshita, Yuji; Kaneko, Koki; Kanazawa, Hiroko; Uchino, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    A 54-year-old woman was admitted for mitral valvular repair. After folding plasty to A3, a 30 mm Cosgrove-Edwards ring was placed. There was no mitral regurgitation jet observed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during the operation. However, high blood pressure was monitored and treated in the intensive care unit, hemolytic anemia developed, and the serum lactate dehydrogenase level was elevated. Two weeks after the operation, serum lactate dehydrogenase was again elevated. TEE showed mild mitral regurgitation and the regurgitation jet colliding with the annuloplasty ring. Multiple transfusions of red blood cells were required. Repeat surgery was therefore undertaken. Lam and associates previously studying patients on hemolysis after mitral valvular repair noted high grade mitral regurgitation jets fragmented or accelerated. In the present case, mitral regurgitation was mild, but the high velocity and manner of regurgitation (collision with the annuloplasty ring) could cause hemolytic anemia. In the present case, high blood pressure might have caused chordae rupture. Furthermore, a flexible ring, such as the Cosgrove-Edwards ring, is likely to cause hemolytic anemia. As contributing factors to hemolysis after mitral valvular repair, perioperative blood pressure management and type of ring are significant. PMID:26422945

  10. GLUT1 mutations are a cause of paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesias and induce hemolytic anemia by a cation leak

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Yvonne G.; Storch, Alexander; Wuttke, Thomas V.; Brockmann, Knut; Kempfle, Judith; Maljevic, Snezana; Margari, Lucia; Kamm, Christoph; Schneider, Susanne A.; Huber, Stephan M.; Pekrun, Arnulf; Roebling, Robert; Seebohm, Guiscard; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Camelia; Kraft, Eduard; Blazevic, Dragica; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Fauler, Michael; Mottaghy, Felix M.; Münchau, Alexander; Edwards, Mark J.; Presicci, Anna; Margari, Francesco; Gasser, Thomas; Lang, Florian; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Lehmann-Horn, Frank; Lerche, Holger

    2008-01-01

    Paroxysmal dyskinesias are episodic movement disorders that can be inherited or are sporadic in nature. The pathophysiology underlying these disorders remains largely unknown but may involve disrupted ion homeostasis due to defects in cell-surface channels or nutrient transporters. In this study, we describe a family with paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia (PED) over 3 generations. Their PED was accompanied by epilepsy, mild developmental delay, reduced CSF glucose levels, hemolytic anemia with echinocytosis, and altered erythrocyte ion concentrations. Using a candidate gene approach, we identified a causative deletion of 4 highly conserved amino acids (Q282_S285del) in the pore region of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Functional studies in Xenopus oocytes and human erythrocytes revealed that this mutation decreased glucose transport and caused a cation leak that alters intracellular concentrations of sodium, potassium, and calcium. We screened 4 additional families, in which PED is combined with epilepsy, developmental delay, or migraine, but not with hemolysis or echinocytosis, and identified 2 additional GLUT1 mutations (A275T, G314S) that decreased glucose transport but did not affect cation permeability. Combining these data with brain imaging studies, we propose that the dyskinesias result from an exertion-induced energy deficit that may cause episodic dysfunction of the basal ganglia, and that the hemolysis with echinocytosis may result from alterations in intracellular electrolytes caused by a cation leak through mutant GLUT1. PMID:18451999

  11. Successful treatment of severe immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic stem cell transplantation with bortezomib: report of a case and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Hosoba, Sakura; Jaye, David L; Cohen, Cynthia; Roback, John D; Waller, Edmund K

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune hemolytic anemia is a well-known complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Posttransplant hemolytic anemia results in increased red blood cell transfusions and medical sequelae including iron overload. Case Report We present a case report of immune hemolytic anemia that occurred after allogeneic HSCT from an ABO major–mismatched, HLA-matched unrelated donor. The patient had high anti-donor A type antibodies that were unresponsive to treatment with steroids and rituximab, resulting in persistent transfusion dependence. A detailed time course of anti-A titers, plasma cell content of the marrow, and B-cell content of the blood is presented. Treatment with bortezomib, a protease inhibitor, eliminated residual host-type plasma cells secreting anti-A and restored normal donor-derived erythropoiesis. Conclusion This report, and a review of literature for treatment of immune hemolytic anemia after allogeneic HSCT, supports the utility of bortezomib as plasma cell–targeted therapy in this setting. PMID:25156334

  12. Hematopoietic effect of Bacillus subtilis-fermented antler extract on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hun; Suh, Hyung Joo; Lee, Hyun-Sun; Park, Yooheon; Park, Jang-Woo; Jung, Eun Young

    2012-09-01

    This study examined the effect of fermentation on the ability of antler to act as a stimulator of hematopoietic activity. Hemolytic anemia was induced by phenylhydrazine (PHZ) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. The vehicle or antler extract (nonfermented or fermented) mixed in drinking water was administered from Days 2 to 15 after PHZ injection. On Day 15, red blood cell counts in the fermented antler group (6.33×10?/?L) were significantly higher than those in the nonfermented antler group (5.90×10?/?L) (P<.05), and rats treated with fermented antler extract tended to have higher hemoglobin compared with rats treated with nonfermented antler extract, but not significantly. In addition, rats treated with fermented antler extract had slightly lower serum erythropoietin levels compared with nonfermented antler extract, which were not statistically different from serum erythropoietin levels of nonanemic rats. We conclude therefore that the hematopoietic activity of antler might be increased by the fermentation process. PMID:22870931

  13. A Case of Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn due to Dia Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Jethava, Ashif; Olivares, Esperanza; Shariatmadar, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Anti-Dia is a clinically significant red cell antibody known to cause hemolytic disease of the newborn. Here, we report on a case of mild hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by Dia antibody. The mother had three prior pregnancies with no history of blood transfusion. She delivered a preterm 35-week-old female newborn by cesarean section. The neonate developed anemia and mild icterus on postnatal day five with hemoglobin of 9500?mg/dL and total bilirubin of 10?mg/dL. The direct antiglobulin test on the neonate's red blood cells was positive. The maternal serum and an eluate from the infant RBCs were negative in routine antibody detection tests but were positive using commercially prepared Di(a+) red cells. The neonate was discharged home in stable condition following treatment with erythropoietin and phototherapy. When a newborn has a positive DAT in the absence of major blood group incompatibility or commonly detected RBC antibodies, an antibody to a low frequency antigen such as Dia must be considered. Further immunohematology tests are required to determine presence of the antibody and the clinician must be alerted to closely monitor the infant for signs of anemia and hemolysis. PMID:26682081

  14. Concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens associated with fatal hemolytic anemia in a cattle herd in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Meli, Marina L; Dreher, Ute M; Gönczi, Enikö; Deplazes, Peter; Braun, Ueli; Engels, Monika; Schüpbach, Jörg; Jörger, Kaspar; Thoma, Rudolf; Griot, Christian; Stärk, Katharina D C; Willi, Barbara; Schmidt, Joseph; Kocan, Katherine M; Lutz, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Bovine anaplasmosis is a vector-borne disease that results in substantial economic losses in other parts of the world but so far not in northern Europe. In August 2002, a fatal disease outbreak was reported in a large dairy herd in the Swiss canton of Grisons. Diseased animals experienced fever, anorexia, agalactia, and depression. Anemia, ectoparasite infestation, and, occasionally, hemoglobinuria were observed. To determine the roles of vector-borne pathogens and to characterize the disease, blood samples were collected from all 286 animals: 50% of the cows were anemic. Upon microscopic examination of red blood cells, Anaplasma marginale inclusion bodies were found in 47% of the cows. The infection was confirmed serologically and by molecular methods. Interestingly, we also found evidence of infections with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, large Babesia and Theileria spp., and Mycoplasma wenyonii. The last two species had not previously been described in Switzerland. Anemia was significantly associated with the presence of the infectious agents detected, with the exception of A. phagocytophilum. Remarkably, concurrent infections with up to five infectious vector-borne agents were detected in 90% of the ill animals tested by PCR. We concluded that A. marginale was the major cause of the hemolytic anemia, while coinfections with other agents exacerbated the disease. This was the first severe disease outbreak associated with concurrent infections with vector-borne pathogens in alpine Switzerland; it was presumably curtailed by culling of the entire herd. It remains to be seen whether similar disease outbreaks will have to be anticipated in northern Europe in the future. PMID:15297529

  15. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Anemia Overview What is anemia? Anemia is a condition that affects your red blood cells. Your red blood ... anemia, but this does not happen often. Diagnosis & Tests How is anemia diagnosed? Talk to your doctor ...

  16. First report of co-morbidity of pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration and three types of chronic hemolytic anemias

    PubMed Central

    Talaat, Iman M.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; El Melegy, Ebtessam H.K.; Alghamdi, Hamed A.; Aljabri, Mohammed F.; Abdallah, Enas A.A.; Sarar, Mohammed; Alshahrani, Mohamed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), sickle cell anemia, and thalassemia are autosomal recessive disorders that can cause iron deposition in tissues during childhood. PKAN is characterized by accumulation of iron in the basal ganglia causing progressive extrapyramidal manifestations. Thalassemia and sickle cell disease can cause iron overload and deposition in tissues, including central nervous system. Presentation of case we herein report the first report of comorbidity of PKAN, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD) anemias in a 9 years old Saudi female patient who presented with gait disturbance, speech difficulty, and progressive movement disorders of the neck, upper and lower limbs. Conclusion Although extremely rare, ?-thalassemia-major, sickle cell and G6PD anemias can be associated with PKAN. It is unknown whether this association is random or due to an unknown factor that may have caused several mutations.

  17. Lead poisoning: association with hemolytic anemia, basophilic stippling, erythrocyte pyrimidine 5'-nucleotidase deficiency, and intraerythrocytic accumulation of pyrimidines.

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, W N; Paglia, D E; Fink, K; Madokoro, G

    1976-01-01

    Lead intoxication is accompanied by an acquired deficiency of erythrocyte pryimidine-specific, 5'-nucleotidase. Genetically determined deficiency of this enzyme is associated with chronic hemolysis, marked basophilic stippling of erythrocytes on stained blood films, and unique intraerythrocytic accumulations of pyrimidine-containing nucleotides. The present report documents that lead-induced deficiency when sufficiently severe gives rise to findings similar to the hereditary disorder. Whereas pyrimidine-containing nucleotides are virutally absent in the erythrocytes of normal and reticulocyte-rich blood, 12% of erythrocyte nucloetides in the blood of a patient with lead intoxication contained cytidine. Nucleotidase activity was about 25% that in normal erythrocytes and 15% or less of that expected in comparable reticulocyte-rich blood. The distribution of nucleotidase activity in patient erythrocytes is unknown, and much more severe deficiency could have been present in subsets of the cell populations analyzed. The findings indicate that the hemolytic anemia and increased basophilic stippling characteristic of certain cases of lead intoxication may share a common etiology with essentially identical features of the genetically determined disorder. Images PMID:965496

  18. Deficiency of Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyltransferase 3 (Nmnat3) Causes Hemolytic Anemia by Altering the Glycolytic Flow in Mature Erythrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Hikosaka, Keisuke; Ikutani, Masashi; Shito, Masayuki; Kazuma, Kohei; Gulshan, Maryam; Nagai, Yoshinori; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Konno, Katsuhiro; Tobe, Kazuyuki; Kanno, Hitoshi; Nakagawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    NAD biosynthesis is of substantial interest because of its important roles in regulating various biological processes. Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 3 (Nmnat3) is considered a mitochondria-localized NAD synthesis enzyme involved in de novo and salvage pathways. Although the biochemical properties of Nmnat3 are well documented, its physiological function in vivo remains unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that Nmnat3 was localized in the cytoplasm of mature erythrocytes and critically regulated their NAD pool. Deficiency of Nmnat3 in mice caused splenomegaly and hemolytic anemia, which was associated with the findings that Nmnat3-deficient erythrocytes had markedly lower ATP levels and shortened lifespans. However, the NAD level in other tissues were not apparently affected by the deficiency of Nmnat3. LC-MS/MS-based metabolomics revealed that the glycolysis pathway in Nmnat3-deficient erythrocytes was blocked at a glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) step because of the shortage of the coenzyme NAD. Stable isotope tracer analysis further demonstrated that deficiency of Nmnat3 resulted in glycolysis stall and a shift to the pentose phosphate pathway. Our findings indicate the critical roles of Nmnat3 in maintenance of the NAD pool in mature erythrocytes and the physiological impacts at its absence in mice. PMID:24739386

  19. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  20. Acute Heinz-body anemia due to severe cresol poisoning: successful treatment with erythrocytapheresis.

    PubMed Central

    Côté, M A; Lyonnais, J; Leblond, P F

    1984-01-01

    A patient with massive intravascular Heinz-body hemolytic anemia associated with the presence of bizarre-looking erythrocytes following the oral ingestion of approximately 100 mL of "penetrating oil", a petroleum distillate containing 85% kerosene, 12% cresol and 2% surfactant, is described. He was treated successfully with immediate erythrocytapheresis and forced diuresis. Images Fig. 1A Fig. 1B Fig. 1C Fig. 1D PMID:6722696

  1. Types of Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have a shorter lifespan. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD) Deficiency In G6PD deficiency, the red blood cells are missing an important enzyme called G6PD. G6PD is part of the normal chemistry inside ...

  2. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... causes: blood loss, lack of red blood cell production, and high rates of red blood cell destruction. Conditions that may lead to anemia include Heavy ... the kind of anemia you have. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  3. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... reasons. A person may have a disorder like sickle cell anemia or spherocytosis . In other cases, the body's own ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC The Deal With Diets Sickle Cell Anemia My Friend Has Sickle Cell Disease. How Can ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on Genetics Home Reference: acute promyelocytic leukemia alpha thalassemia atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome beta thalassemia Coats plus syndrome congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Diamond-Blackfan ...

  5. Zinc-induced hemolytic anemia in a dog caused by ingestion of a game-playing die

    PubMed Central

    Clancey, Noel P.; Murphy, Megan C.

    2012-01-01

    A 16-month-old spayed female mixed breed dog was presented with a 1-week history of anorexia, lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, and difficulty rising. Hematologic evaluation indicated a marked macrocytic hypo-chromic, markedly regenerative anemia. A metallic foreign object in the gastrointestinal tract was identified on abdominal radiographs. Serum zinc concentration was markedly increased. PMID:23024383

  6. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... red blood cells. This process requires iron, the vitamins B12 and folic acid (or folate). Erythropoietin (EPO) stimulates ... Several factors can cause anemia: Too little iron, vitamin B12 or folate. A shortage of folate can cause ...

  7. Refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a patient with DiGeorge syndrome treated successfully with plasma exchange: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Damlaj, Moussab; Séguin, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) results from targeted antibodies towards the red blood cells (RBCs) and can be either idiopathic or secondary to certain diseases, such as autoimmune disorders or malignancy, drugs, or infection. Patients with DiGeorge syndrome are particularly vulnerable to autoimmune conditions secondary to thymic hypoplasia and dysfunction of the immune system. First-line therapy for AIHA consists of corticosteroids, with most patients showing signs of response. Relapses are not uncommon and are treated with splenectomy or rituximab. There is a paucity of reports in the literature regarding treatment options beyond this stage. Herein, we describe an unusual case of a 20-year-old female affected by DiGeorge syndrome with a history of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP), who presented with life-threatening AIHA. Standard first- and second-line therapeutic modalities were ineffective in controlling her disease and she ultimately underwent plasma exchange therapy with successful resolution of hemolysis. At her last follow-up, one year after her initial presentation, she remains clinically well without signs of hemolysis. We conclude that in refractory cases of warm AIHA, plasma exchange therapy can be a valuable tool in the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25079091

  8. Clinical and serologic features of primary Sjögren's syndrome concomitant with autoimmune hemolytic anemia: a large-scale cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wen; Liu, Yanying; Zhao, Chuchu; Sun, Xiaolin; Zhang, Chunfang; Li, Zhanguo

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an uncommon but clinically significant disorder in primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS). Among 565 pSS patients hospitalized in Peking University People's Hospital from January 2000 to March 2013, 16 patients were diagnosed with AIHA (2.8 % prevalence). AIHA presented at the onset of pSS without overt sicca symptoms in 3 of the 16 patients. Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) was more prevalent in the patients with SS-AIHA than in those without (p?=?0.007). Edema, fever, and liver involvement occurred significantly more frequently in pSS patients with AIHA than those without AIHA (p?=?0.035, p?=?0.029, p?=?0.024, respectively). The pSS patients with AIHA were more vulnerable to leukopenia and thrombocytopenia than those without AIHA (p?=?0.004 and p?=?0.001, respectively). Additionally, the levels of complement component 3 (C3) and complement component 4 (C4) were significantly lower in the SS-AIHA group (p?=?0.008 and p?=?0.037, respectively). Taken together, our results indicate that pSS should be considered in the differential diagnosis of AIHA, even in the absence of sicca symptoms. Among pSS patients, the existence of PBC, cytopenia, or hypocomplementemia suggests a higher risk of suffering from AIHA. PMID:26423426

  9. Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hyojun; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Kil, Ki-Jung; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2014-01-01

    Samul-tang (Si-Wu-Tang, SMT), a kind of herbal medicines, has been used for the hemato-deficient disease for hundreds of years. In this work, investigate the anti-anemia activity of the H2O extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang in an anemia model induced by intravenous infection of phenylhydrazine-HCL (PHZ) at 10 mg/kg for 4 days. After PHZ injection, female Sparague-Dawley rats were administrated extracts from constituent herbal medicines of SMT (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) daily for 1 week. Results showed that sever hemolysis was induced by PHZ. For Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) H2O extract treated groups, the concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cells number increased much more significantly than PHZ-treated group. Moreover, Angelica gigas (AG), Angelica. acutiloba (AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) extract administration significantly improved serum erythropoietin concentration. The activity of aminolevulinic acid dehydrates (ALDL) in liver homegenate was increased in Angelica gigas(AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) treated group. PMID:25337267

  10. Hemopoietic effect of extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang on phenylhydrazine-induced hemolytic anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Hyojun; Ryuk, Jin Ah; Kil, Ki-Jung; Ko, Byoung Seob

    2014-01-01

    Samul-tang (Si-Wu-Tang, SMT), a kind of herbal medicines, has been used for the hemato-deficient disease for hundreds of years. In this work, investigate the anti-anemia activity of the H2O extracts from constituent herbal medicines of Samul-tang in an anemia model induced by intravenous infection of phenylhydrazine-HCL (PHZ) at 10 mg/kg for 4 days. After PHZ injection, female Sparague-Dawley rats were administrated extracts from constituent herbal medicines of SMT (300 mg/kg/day, p.o.) daily for 1 week. Results showed that sever hemolysis was induced by PHZ. For Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) H2O extract treated groups, the concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cells number increased much more significantly than PHZ-treated group. Moreover, Angelica gigas (AG), Angelica. acutiloba (AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) extract administration significantly improved serum erythropoietin concentration. The activity of aminolevulinic acid dehydrates (ALDL) in liver homegenate was increased in Angelica gigas(AA), Paeonia lactiflora (PL2) and Rehmannia glutinosa (RG) treated group. PMID:25337267

  11. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aplastic Anemia Hemolytic Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Pernicious Anemia Sickle Cell Disease Send a link to NHLBI to someone ...

  12. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Tim H.; Richards, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS is a disease characterized by complement overactivation. Inherited defects in complement genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins have been described. Incomplete penetrance of mutations in all predisposing genes is reported, suggesting that a precipitating event or trigger is required to unmask the complement regulatory deficiency. The underlying genetic defect predicts the prognosis both in native kidneys and after renal transplantation. The successful trials of the complement inhibitor eculizumab in the treatment of atypical HUS will revolutionize disease management. PMID:24161037

  13. Emergence of long-lived autoreactive plasma cells in the spleen of primary warm auto-immune hemolytic anemia patients treated with rituximab.

    PubMed

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Vingert, Benoit; Moroch, Julien; Boutboul, David; Audia, Sylvain; Cagnard, Nicolas; Ripa, Julie; Menard, Cédric; Tarte, Karin; Mégret, Jérôme; Le Gallou, Simon; Patin, Pauline; Thai, Lan; Galicier, Lionel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Godeau, Bertrand; Noizat-Pirenne, France; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-08-01

    Primary warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA) is a rare autoimmune disease in which red blood cells are eliminated by IgG autoantibodies. We analyzed the antibody-secreting cells in the spleen and the peripheral blood of wAIHA patients in various contexts of treatment. Plasmablasts were observed in peripheral blood of newly diagnosed wAIHA patients and, accordingly, active germinal center reactions were present in the spleen of patients receiving short-term corticosteroid therapy. Long-term corticosteroid regimens markedly reduced this response while splenic plasma cells were able to persist, a fraction of them secreting anti-red blood cell IgG in vitro. In wAIHA patients treated by rituximab and who underwent splenectomy because of treatment failure, plasma cells were still present in the spleen, some of them being autoreactive. By using a set of diagnostic genes that allowed us to assess the plasma cell maturation stage, we observed that these cells displayed a long-lived program, differing from the one of plasma cells from healthy donors or from wAIHA patients with various immunosuppressant treatments, and more similar to the one of normal long-lived bone-marrow plasma cells. Interestingly, an increased level of B-cell activating factor (BAFF) was observed in the supernatant of spleen cell cultures from such rituximab-treated wAIHA patients. These results suggest, in line with our previous report on primary immune thrombocytopenia, that the B-cell depletion induced by rituximab promoted a suitable environment for the maturation and survival of auto-immune long-lived plasma cells in the spleen. PMID:26112660

  14. Unexpected Anemia and Reticulocytopenia in an Adolescent With Sickle Cell Anemia Receiving Chronic Transfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Blauel, Emily R; Grossmann, Lily T; Vissa, Madhav; Miller, Scott T

    2015-10-01

    In a patient with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion, exacerbation of anemia with reticulocytopenia must prompt consideration of a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction with hyperhemolysis, as further transfusion may worsen this condition; definitive diagnosis is sometimes difficult. Anemia evolving during parvovirus B19-induced erythroid hypoplasia (transient aplastic crisis) should be attenuated in chronic transfusion patients due to superior survival of transfused over endogenous red blood cells. A 16-year-old with sickle cell disease receiving chronic transfusion of modified intensity (goal to maintain hemoglobin S<50%) who developed symptomatic anemia with reticulocytopenia was later shown to have had transient aplastic crisis. PMID:26207780

  15. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  16. Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia in Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mihir B; Nanjapp, Veena; Devaraj, H S; Sindhu, K S

    2013-07-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anaemia is a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma though its association with Non- Hodgkin's lymphoma is well known. It is usually detected at the time of diagnosis when it accompanies Hodgkin's and rarely precedes it. It is a warm immune hemolytic anemia which is responsive to steroids and rituximab. We hereby report a case of advanced Hodgkin's disease who presented as AIHA. PMID:24772757

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is caused by infection with certain strains of Escherichia coli bacteria that produce toxic substances called Shiga-like ... clotting ; cell ; chronic ; clotting ; end-stage renal disease ; Escherichia coli ; ESRD ; familial ; gene ; hemolysis ; hemolytic anemia ; idiopathic ; immune ...

  18. Evaluation of stem cell reserve using serial bone marrow transplantation and competitive repopulation in a murine model of chronic hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Maggio-Price, L.; Wolf, N.S.; Priestley, G.V.; Pietrzyk, M.E.; Bernstein, S.E.

    1988-09-01

    Serial transplantation and competitive repopulation were used to evaluate any loss of self-replicative capacity of bone marrow stem cells in a mouse model with increased and persistent hemopoietic demands. Congenic marrows from old control and from young and old mice with hereditary spherocytic anemia (sphha/sphha) were serially transplanted at 35-day intervals into normal irradiated recipients. Old anemic marrow failed or reverted to recipient karyotype at a mean of 3.5 transplants, and young anemic marrow reverted at a mean of 4.0 transplants, whereas controls did so at a mean of 5.0 transplants. In a competitive assay in which a mixture of anemic and control marrow was transplanted, the anemic marrow persisted to 10 months following transplantation; anemic marrow repopulation was greater if anemic marrow sex matched with the host. It is possible that lifelong stress of severe anemia decreases stem cell reserve in the anemic sphha/sphha mouse marrow. However, marginal differences in serial transplantation number and the maintenance of anemic marrow in a competition assay would suggest that marrow stem cells, under prolonged stress, are capable of exhibiting good repopulating and self-replicating abilities.

  19. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  20. Severe Hemolytic Jaundice in a Neonate with a Novel COL4A1 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Tomotaki, Seiichi; Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hamabata, Takayuki; Kumakura, Akira; Shiota, Mitsutaka; Arai, Hiroshi; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Hata, Daisuke

    2014-05-23

    We report our experience with a preterm infant with severe hemolytic jaundice who required exchange transfusion just after birth. The patient was negative for alloimmune hemolysis as a result of maternal-fetal blood type incompatibility, and tests for inherited defects in erythrocyte metabolism, membrane function, and hemoglobin synthesis were normal. We also performed a bone marrow examination, but could not identify the cause of hemolysis. The patient had several other complications, including porencephaly, epilepsy, elevated serum levels of creatine kinase, and persistent microscopic hematuria. Later, we detected a genetic mutation in COL4A1, which was recently found to be associated with hemolytic anemia. We therefore believe that all of the patient's clinical features, including hemolytic anemia, were due to the mutation in COL4A1. Genetic testing for COL4A1 mutations is recommended in neonates who exhibit hemolytic disease of unknown etiology, especially when other complications compatible with COL4A1-related disorders are present. PMID:24861536

  1. Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn: managing the mother, fetus, and newborn.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Meghan; Matthews, Dana C

    2015-12-01

    Hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) affects 3/100 000 to 80/100 000 patients per year. It is due to maternal blood group antibodies that cause fetal red cell destruction and in some cases, marrow suppression. This process leads to fetal anemia, and in severe cases can progress to edema, ascites, heart failure, and death. Infants affected with HDFN can have hyperbilirubinemia in the acute phase and hyporegenerative anemia for weeks to months after birth. The diagnosis and management of pregnant women with HDFN is based on laboratory and radiographic monitoring. Fetuses with marked anemia may require intervention with intrauterine transfusion. HDFN due to RhD can be prevented by RhIg administration. Prevention for other causal blood group specificities is less studied. PMID:26637714

  2. Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by the triad of thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Hemolytic uremic syndrome represents a heterogeneous group of disorders with variable etiologies that result in differences in presentation, management and outcome. In recent years, better understanding of the HUS, especially those due to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway have provided an update on the terminology, classification, and treatment of the disease. This review will provide the updated classification of the disease and the current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches on the complement-mediated HUS in addition to STEC-HUS which is the most common cause of the HUS in childhood. PMID:26265890

  3. Anemia--a complication of antiviral treatment in chronic viral hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Or??an, Olga; Cozma, Angela; Rednic, N; Sâmpelean, D; Pârvu, Andrada; Petrov, L

    2009-01-01

    Anemia is an important and frequent secondary effect of the treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in patients with chronic viral C hepatitis. Ribavirin produces more often hemolytic anemia, while pegylated interferon may determine medullary suppression. The level of hemoglobin beneath 10 g/dL is considered by most authors as being the reference level for anemia secondary to the antiviral treatment. Beneath this hemoglobin value it is recommended to reduce or to stop the treatment with ribavirin, to administer recombinant human erythropoietin or blood transfusion, based on the severity of the anemia. The growth rate of the serum erythropoietin in the first few weeks of treatment is correlated with the necessity of decreasing the doses or even to stop the treatment with ribavirin. The SVR (sustained viral response) rate of the patients is reduced when the ribavirin doses are reduced due to anemia. PMID:20446436

  4. Inborn anemias in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  5. Inborn anemias in mice: (Annual report, 1981-1982)

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.

    1982-07-19

    Hereditary anemias of mice are the chief objects of investigation, specificially four macrocytic anemias, 3 types of hemolytic anemia, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, the autoimmune hemolytic anemia of NZB mice, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia and a new hypochromic anemia with hemochromatosis. New types of anemia may be analyzed as new mutations appear. Three new mutations have been identified during the past 18 months. These anemias are studied through characterization of peripheral blood values, determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, study of normal and abnormal erythrocyte membrane proteins, histological and biochemical characterization of blood-forming tissue, functional tests of the stem-cell component, examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and transplantation of tissue and parabiosis between individuals of differently affected genotypes. 31 refs.

  6. Pernicious anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... achylic anemia; Congenital pernicious anemia; Juvenile pernicious anemia; Vitamin B12 deficiency (malabsorption) ... Pernicious anemia is a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs ... cells. You get this vitamin from eating foods such as meat, ...

  7. Successful (?) therapy of hemolytic-uremic syndrome with factor H abnormality.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Angela; Kirchhoff-Moradpour, Antje H; Obieglo, Silke; Brandis, Matthias; Kirschfink, Michael; Zipfel, Peter F; Goodship, Judith A; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B

    2003-09-01

    We report a patient with continuously recurring hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to factor H deficiency. First at the age of 3 months he showed signs of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal insufficiency, often recurring concomitantly with respiratory tract infections, despite weekly to twice weekly plasma substitution (20 ml/kg body weight). Now at the age of 3.5 years glomerular filtration rate is approximately 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2) and psychomotoric development is normal. Since factor H is mainly synthesized in the liver, hepatic transplantation has been proposed as curative treatment. Before justification of liver transplantation as the ultimate treatment for these patients, an international registry should be developed to optimize and standardize therapeutic alternatives. PMID:12836093

  8. Congenital sideroblastic anemia due to mutations in the mitochondrial HSP70 homologue HSPA9.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Abe, Klaus; Ciesielski, Szymon J; Schmidt, Paul J; Campagna, Dean R; Rahimov, Fedik; Schilke, Brenda A; Cuijpers, Marloes; Rieneck, Klaus; Lausen, Birgitte; Linenberger, Michael L; Sendamarai, Anoop K; Guo, Chaoshe; Hofmann, Inga; Newburger, Peter E; Matthews, Dana; Shimamura, Akiko; Snijders, Pieter J L M; Towne, Meghan C; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Watson, Henry G; Dziegiel, Morten H; Heeney, Matthew M; May, Alison; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Swinkels, Dorine W; Markianos, Kyriacos; Craig, Elizabeth A; Fleming, Mark D

    2015-12-17

    The congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs) are relatively uncommon diseases characterized by defects in mitochondrial heme synthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or protein synthesis. Here we demonstrate that mutations in HSPA9, a mitochondrial HSP70 homolog located in the chromosome 5q deletion syndrome 5q33 critical deletion interval and involved in mitochondrial Fe-S biogenesis, result in CSA inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. In a fraction of patients with just 1 severe loss-of-function allele, expression of the clinical phenotype is associated with a common coding single nucleotide polymorphism in trans that correlates with reduced messenger RNA expression and results in a pseudodominant pattern of inheritance. PMID:26491070

  9. Intrauterine transfusion for fetal anemia due to red blood cell alloimmunization: 14 years experience in Leuven

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, S.A.; Claes, L.; Lewi, L.; Van Schoubroeck, D.; Debeer, A.; Emonds, M.; Geuten, E.; De Catte, L.; Devlieger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to report on the pregnancy and neonatal outcome of intrauterine transfusion (IUT) for red blood cell (RBC-)alloimmunization. Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study of all IUT for RBC-alloimmunization in the University Hospital of Leuven, between January 2000 and January 2014. The influence of hydrops, gestational age and technique of transfusion on procedure related adverse events were examined. Results: 135 IUTs were performed in 56 fetuses. In none of the cases fetal or neonatal death occurred. Mild adverse events were noted in 10% of IUTs, whereas severe adverse events occurred in 1.5%. Hydrops and transfusion in a free loop were associated with an increased risk of adverse events whereas gestational age (GA) at transfusion after 34 weeks was not. Median GA at birth was 35.6 weeks and 9% was born before 34 weeks. Besides phototherapy 65.4% required additional neonatal treatment for alloimmune anemia. Non-hematologic complications occurred in 23.6% and were mainly related to preterm birth. Conclusion: In experienced hands, IUT for RBC-alloimmunization is a safe procedure in this era. Patients should be referred to specialist centers prior to the development of hydrops. IUT in a free loop of cord and unnecessary preterm birth are best avoided. PMID:26175890

  10. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of anemia in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bain, B J

    1999-03-01

    Anemia is common in human immunodeficiency virus infection, particularly in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Anemia is multifactorial. HIV infection itself causes anemia, probably as a consequence of HIV infection of stromal cells rather than HIV infection of hematopoietic stem cells. Other common causes of anemia in AIDS are anemia of chronic disease consequent on opportunistic infections, bone marrow suppression by antiretroviral therapy, and hemolytic anemia induced by oxidant drugs. Thrombotic microangiopathy is a significant complication of HIV infection and may respond to plasmapheresis. PMID:10088638

  11. A case of splenic torsion with progressive anemia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Schnier, Lisa M

    2010-05-01

    A 4-year-old male, castrated Saint Bernard was evaluated for acute onset of lethargy and collapse. Moderately severe anemia and splenomegaly were noted. Immune mediated hemolytic anemia was initially suspected. Abdominal ultrasound demonstrated an absence of splenic blood flow. Splenic torsion was confirmed on exploratory laparotomy and a splenectomy was performed. PMID:20676299

  12. The Role of Inspiratory Muscle Training in Sickle Cell Anemia Related Pulmonary Damage due to Recurrent Acute Chest Syndrome Attacks

    PubMed Central

    Camc?o?lu, Burcu; Bo?nak-Güçlü, Meral; Karadall?, Mü?errefe Nur; Ak?, ?ahika Zeynep; Türköz-Sucak, Gülsan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The sickling of red blood cells causes a constellation of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and pulmonary manifestations. A 32-year-old gentleman with sickle cell anemia (SCA) had been suffering from recurrent acute chest syndrome (ACS). Aim. To examine the effects of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on pulmonary functions, respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, and quality of life in this patient with SCA. Methods. Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using six-minute walk test, respiratory muscle strength using mouth pressure device, hand grip strength using hand-held dynamometer, pain using Visual Analogue Scale, fatigue using Fatigue Severity Scale, dyspnea using Modified Medical Research Council Scale, and health related quality of life using European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL measurement. Results. A significant improvement has been demonstrated in respiratory muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life. There was no admission to emergency department due to acute chest syndrome in the following 12 months after commencing regular erythrocytapheresis. Conclusion. This is the first report demonstrating the beneficial effects of inspiratory muscle training on functional exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, pain, fatigue, dyspnea, and quality of life in a patient with recurrent ACS. PMID:26060589

  13. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children is an Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection of the digestive system. The ... of hemolytic uremic syndrome in children is an Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) infection of the digestive system. Normally, ...

  14. Recurrent hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Rajesh, R.; Jojo, A.; Kurian, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2008-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is an uncommon cause of acute renal failure. Diarrhea-associated (D+) HUS, usually seen in children, is a common variety of HUS. HUS that is not associated with diarrhea (D?) is caused by a heterogeneous group of disorders. We report here a case of recurrent HUS (D?) in an adult female with hypocomplementemia. PMID:20142920

  15. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't ... frequent infections and bleeding. Your doctor will diagnose aplastic anemia based on your medical and family histories, a ...

  16. About Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the shape changes, as is the case in sickle cell anemia , the red blood cells can get stuck and ... hard for them to move throughout the body. Sickle cell anemia is one of many genetic conditions that can ...

  17. Immune-mediated severe hemolytic crisis with a hemoglobin level of 1.6 g/dl caused by anti-piperacillin antibodies in a patient with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kunzmann, S; Thomas, W; Mayer, B; Kuhn, S; Hebestreit, H

    2010-04-01

    We report a 23-year-old female patient with cystic fibrosis developing severe intravascular hemolysis with a minimal hemoglobin level of 1.6 g/dl after 7 days of treatment with piperacillin, consistent with an immune-mediated hemolytic crisis. Twenty days later, the patient could leave the hospital in good condition without any neurological deficit. To our knowledge, this is the lowest reported hemoglobin value caused by hemolytic anemia with intact survival. As piperacillin is commonly used in patients with cystic fibrosis, it is important to monitor the full-blood counts of patients during treatment with piperacillin and to be aware of the potential for hemolytic anemia to develop. Anti-piperacillin antibodies should be considered whenever these patients develop hemolytic anemia or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT). Furthermore, drug-fever under piperacillin application could be a warning sign for the development of hemolytic anemia. PMID:20213286

  18. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    PubMed

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. PMID:26080453

  19. Natural history of premacular hemorrhage due to severe acute anemia: clinical and anatomical features in two untreated patients.

    PubMed

    Turco, Claudia Del; La Spina, Carlo; Mantovani, Elena; Gagliardi, Marco; Lattanzio, Rosangela; Pierro, Luisa

    2014-01-01

    Premacular retrohyaloid hemorrhage is a rare complication of acute severe anemia. The authors report two cases of premacular hemorrhage in which no treatment other than clinical and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography observation was performed. The natural history of this condition reveals that complete clinical resolution is not accompanied by full anatomical restoration. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2014;45:E5-E7.]. PMID:24496165

  20. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ?70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ?70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  1. An In vivo Drug Screening Model Using Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficient Mice to Predict the Hemolytic Toxicity of 8-Aminoquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Xiugong; Ishida, Hiroshi; Amnuaysirikul, Jack; Weina, Peter J.; Grogl, Max; O'Neil, Michael T.; Li, Qigui; Caridha, Diana; Ohrt, Colin; Hickman, Mark; Magill, Alan J.; Ray, Prabhati

    2013-01-01

    Anti-malarial 8-aminoquinolines drugs cause acute hemolytic anemia in individuals with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PDD). Efforts to develop non-hemolytic 8-aminoquinolines have been severely limited caused by the lack of a predictive in vivo animal model of hemolytic potential that would allow screening of candidate compounds. This report describes a G6PDD mouse model with a phenotype closely resembling the G6PDD phenotype found in the African A-type G6PDD human. These G6PDD mice, given different doses of primaquine, which used as a reference hemolytic drug, display a full array of hemolytic anemia parameters, consistently and reproducibly. The hemolytic and therapeutic indexes were generated for evaluation of hemotoxicity of drugs. This model demonstrated a complete hemolytic toxicity response to another known hemolytic antimalarial drug, pamaquine, but no response to non-hemolytic drugs, chloroquine and mefloquine. These results suggest that this model is suitable for evaluation of selected 8-AQ type candidate antimalarial drugs for their hemolytic potential. PMID:23530079

  2. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions.

  3. Two Cases of Primary Cold Agglutinin Disease Associated with Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1?:?>8,192 and 1?:?16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  4. Two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease associated with megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Takagishi, Katsushige; Saigo, Katsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of primary cold agglutinin disease (CAD) associated with megaloblastic anemia in Japanese elderly patients. Case 1 was a 67-year-old male and Case 2 was a 55-year-old male. Both patients were diagnosed with primary CAD, with continuously high cold agglutinin titers (1?:?>8,192 and 1?:?16,834, resp.), monoclonal IgM-kappa light chains, and no underlying disease. In addition, both patients had megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. One patient received rituximab and both received vitamin 12 supplementation. To date, no cooccurrence of primary CAD and megaloblastic anemia has been emphasized. Thus, the association of these hematological diseases may be incidental; however, given that CAD is an autoimmune disease which may show antibodies against intrinsic factor and gastric parietal cells, this association was thought to be probably not a coincidence. Clinicians should be aware of the possible simultaneous presence of autoimmune hemolytic/megaloblastic anemia in patients with primary CAD. PMID:25918651

  5. Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and platelets. This is because the bone marrow's stem cells are damaged. (Aplastic anemia also is called bone marrow failure.) Many diseases, conditions, and factors can damage the stem cells. ...

  6. Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Erwin

    2008-01-01

    Summary The risk of hemolytic transfusion reactions (HTRs) is approximately 1:70,000 per unit. Acute HTRs occurring during or within 24 h after administration of a blood product are usually caused by transfusion of incompatible red blood cells (RBCs), and, more rarely, of a large volume of incompatible plasma. Delayed HTRs are caused by a secondary immune response to an antigen on the donor's RBCs. In some patients with delayed HTRs, an additional bystander hemolysis of the patient's RBCs can be assumed. Different mechanisms lead to intra- and extra-vascular hemolysis, such as complete complement activation, phagocytosis of RBCs covered with C3b by macrophages after incomplete complement activation, or destruction of RBCs covered only with IgG by direct cell-cell contact with K cells. The clinical consequences of HTRs are triggered via several pathophysiological pathways like formation of anaphylatoxins, release of cytokines causing a systemic inflammatory response syndrome, activation of the kinin system, the intrinsic clotting cascade and fibrinolysis resulting in hypotension, disseminated intravascular coagulation, diffuse bleeding, and disruption of microcirculation leading to renal failure and shock. In the following, the symptoms of HTR are introduced, laboratory investigations and treatment are described, and some recommendations for prevention are given. PMID:21512623

  7. Pregnancy Induced Autoimmune Warm Antibodies Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Laužikien?, D.; Ramašauskait?, D.; L?ža, T.; Lenkutien?, R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), caused primarily by pregnancy, is poorly described in the literature. There is especially little information on coping with cases that are not responsive to glucocorticoid treatment, monitoring a fetal condition, and identifying fetal haemolytic anaemia as early as possible. Case: A case of pregnancy-induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is reported with major problems in differential diagnosis, treatment and the risks posed to both the mother and the fetus. The anaemia went into spontaneous remission of the disease several weeks after delivery. Conclusion: Autoimmune haemolytic anaemia is rarely reported in literature, but can be dangerous for both fetus and mother. It therefore should be described and discussed among obstetricians and gynaecologists, and the etiopathogenesis should be further studied. PMID:26719601

  8. Anemia of chronic disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease is anemia that is found in people with ... blood. Some conditions can lead to anemia of chronic disease include: Autoimmune disorders , such as Crohn disease , systemic ...

  9. Inborn anemias in mice. Progress report, 1 August 1979-15 July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1980-08-01

    Four macrocytic anemias, four hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia are under investigation in mice. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values; (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis; (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli; and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  10. Assesment, Treatment and Prevention of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nickavar, Azar; Sotoudeh, Kambiz

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a heterogeneous group of hemolytic disorders. Different terminologies have been described in HUS, which are as follows: (1) D+ HUS: Presentation with a preceding diarrhea; (2) typical HUS: D+ HUS with a single and self-limited episode; (3) atypical HUS (aHUS): Indicated those with complement dysregulation; (4) recurrent HUS: Recurrent episodes of thrombocytopenia and/or microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) after improvement of hematologic abnormalities; and (5) familial HUS: Necessary to distinct synchronous outbreaks of D+ HUS in family members and asynchronous disease with an inherited risk factor. aHUS is one of the potential causes of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in children. It has a high recurrence after renal transplantation in some genetic forms. Therefore, recognition of the responsible mechanism and proper prophylactic treatment are recommended to prevent or delay the occurrence of ESRD and prolong the length of survival of the transplanted kidney. A computerized search of MEDLINE and other databases was carried out to find the latest results in pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of aHUS. PMID:23412906

  11. Iron deficiency anemia in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient that may be depleted in celiac disease. Iron deficiency and anemia may complicate well-established celiac disease, but may also be the presenting clinical feature in the absence of diarrhea or weight loss. If iron deficiency anemia occurs, it should be thoroughly evaluated, even if celiac disease has been defined since other superimposed causes of iron deficiency anemia may be present. Most often, impaired duodenal mucosal uptake of iron is evident since surface absorptive area in the duodenum is reduced, in large part, because celiac disease is an immune-mediated disorder largely focused in the proximal small intestinal mucosa. Some studies have also suggested that blood loss may occur in celiac disease, sometimes from superimposed small intestinal disorders, including ulceration or neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma. In addition, other associated gastric or colonic disorders may be responsible for blood loss. Rarely, an immune-mediated hemolytic disorder with increased urine iron loss may occur that may respond to a gluten-free diet. Reduced expression of different regulatory proteins critical in iron uptake has also been defined in the presence and absence of anemia. Finally, other rare causes of microcytic anemia may occur in celiac disease, including a sideroblastic form of anemia reported to have responded to a gluten-free diet. PMID:26309349

  12. Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Toxins, Vessels, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Victoria; Trachtman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy of the glomerular microcirculation and other vascular beds. Its defining clinical phenotype is acute kidney injury (AKI), microangiopathic anemia, and thrombocytopenia. There are many etiologies of HUS including infection by Shiga toxin-producing bacterial strains, medications, viral infections, malignancy, and mutations of genes coding for proteins involved in the alternative pathway of complement. In the aggregate, although HUS is a rare disease, it is one of the most common causes of AKI in previously healthy children and accounts for a sizable number of pediatric and adult patients who progress to end stage kidney disease. There has been great progress over the past 20?years in understanding the pathophysiology of HUS and its related disorders. There has been intense focus on vascular injury in HUS as the major mechanism of disease and target for effective therapies for this acute illness. In all forms of HUS, there is evidence of both systemic and intra-glomerular inflammation and perturbations in the immune system. Renewed investigation into these aspects of HUS may prove helpful in developing new interventions that can attenuate glomerular and tubular injury and improve clinical outcomes in patients with HUS. PMID:25593915

  13. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood cells because it doesn't have enough vitamin B12. Vitamin B12 is a nutrient found in some foods. The ... who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. This is because they lack intrinsic ( ...

  14. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome: absence of circulating endotoxin.

    PubMed

    van Wieringen, P M; Monnens, L A; Bakkeren, J A

    1976-10-01

    In children with hemolytic-uremic syndrome endotoxin determinations were carried out in the peripheral circulation in order to get evidence for the hypothetical role of endotoxin in the pathogenesis of the disease. For this purpose the Limulus test was used to determine endotoxin activity in 16 patients with hemolytic-uremic syndrome. In the plasma of these patients no endotoxin could be detected above the lower detection limit of 100 pg/ml, although in all patients with septicemia due to gram-negative bacilli the test was positive. PMID:972798

  15. Anemia Due to Excessive Bleeding

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Version Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ... students Medical Topics Blood Disorders Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Brain, Spinal Cord, and Nerve Disorders Cancer Children's ...

  16. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... to aplastic anemia. Examples include Fanconi anemia , Shwachman-Diamond syndrome, dyskeratosis (DIS-ker-ah-TO-sis) congenita, and Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video ...

  17. Sickle cell anemia - resources

    MedlinePLUS

    Resources - sickle cell anemia ... The following organizations are good resources for information on sickle cell anemia : American Sickle Cell Anemia Association -- www.ascaa.org/ National Heart, Blood, and Lung Institute -- www. ...

  18. Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... sickle cell anemia, thalassemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, and hereditary spherocytosis. Sickle cell anemia is ... in less severe anemia. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency most commonly affects males of African heritage, ...

  19. Prophylactic Eculizumab Use in Kidney Transplantation: A Review of the Literature and Report of a Case with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kasapo?lu, Umut; Ruhi, Çaglar; Tu?cu, Murat; Boynue?ri, Ba?ak; Titiz, ?zzet; Hançer, Veysel Sabri; Apayd?n, Süheyla

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a very rare disease, which presents with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from acute kidney injury is observed in 60% of aHUS cases. The prognosis of aHUS patients who undergo kidney transplantation (Ktx) is generally poor, but these patients should be treated prophylactically with eculizumab to prevent recurrence after transplantation. CASE REPORT An 18-year-old man was referred to our center with a history of rapid progression to ESRD with unknown etiology. He had anemia, thrombocytopenia, high levels of LDH, and indirect bilirubin and creatinine on initial laboratory results. Our diagnosis was aHUS due to initial results, normal level of ADAMTS activity, and lack of predisposing factors seen in typical HUS. We planned to perform genetic analysis for the patient and the donor candidate (mother). The variations found on exon 7 of the CFH gene had not been reported previously. According to PolyPhen analysis, this mutation was reported as a potential cause for aHUS. We decided to perform Ktx under eculizumab prophylaxis. Weekly administration of prophylaxis was extended to 1 month. The graft functioned immediately after Ktx. The patient has completed his first year uneventfully in our follow-up, with a creatinine 0.79 mg/dl at his last control visit. CONCLUSIONS We found favorable results of an aHUS case successfully treated with kidney transplantation combined with short-term prophylactic eculizumab therapy. PMID:26621268

  20. What Causes Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood cells to cause anemia. Lack of Red Blood Cell Production Both acquired and inherited conditions and factors ... can cause aplastic anemia. High Rates of Red Blood Cell Destruction Both acquired and inherited conditions and factors ...

  1. The Anemias of Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  2. Irreversible Loss of Vision in a Child due to Occipital Infarction after Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Hasbini, Dana; Younis, Muhammad H.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2015-01-01

    A 2½-year-old girl developed a bilateral occipital infarct following severe gastroenteritis with bilateral vision of light perception. Evaluations for sickle cell anemia, hemolytic anemia and coagulopathies were negative. Cortical blindness is an uncommon but dramatic complication of gastroenteritis, hence the need of prompt hydration and other supportive measures to avoid irreversible visual loss or mental sequela. PMID:25960732

  3. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism. PMID:26458428

  4. Hashimoto's thyroiditis and acute chest syndrome revealing sickle cell anemia in a 32 years female patient

    PubMed Central

    Igala, Marielle; Nsame, Daniela; Ova, Jennie Dorothée Guelongo Okouango; Cherkaoui, Siham; Oukkach, Bouchra; Quessar, Asmae

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia results from a single amino acid substitution in the gene encoding the ?-globin subunit. Polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin leads to decreased deformability of red blood cells. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is a common thyroid disease now recognized as an auto-immune thyroid disorder, it is usually thought to be haemolytic autoimmune anemia. We report the case of a 32 years old women admitted for chest pain and haemolysis anemia in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis and sickle cell anemia were found. In our observation the patient is a young woman whose examination did not show signs of goitre but the analysis of thyroid function tests performed before an auto-immune hemolytic anemia (confirmed by a high level of unconjugated bilirubin and a Coombs test positive for IgG) has found thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and positive thyroid antibody at rates in excess of 4.5 times their normal value. In the same period, as the hemolytic anemia, and before the atypical chest pain and anguish they generated in the patient, the search for hemoglobinopathies was made despite the absence of a family history of haematological disease or painful attacks in childhood. Patient electrophoresis's led to research similar cases in the family. The mother was the first to be analyzed with ultimately diagnosed with sickle cell trait have previously been ignored. This case would be a form with few symptoms because the patient does not describe painful crises in childhood or adolescence. PMID:26327979

  5. Group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  6. Group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis outbreak.

    PubMed

    Culqui, Dante R; Manzanares-Laya, Sandra; Van Der Sluis, Sarah Lafuente; Fanlo, Albert Anton; Comas, Rosa Bartolomé; Rossi, Marcello; Caylá, Joán A

    2014-04-01

    The aim was to describe an outbreak of group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis in health care professionals. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study of 17 clients who dined at the same table in a restaurant in Barcelona in July 2012. The frequency, timing and severity of symptoms were analyzed, as were demographic variables and others concerning the food ingested. The attack rate was 58.8%. Six of the 10 clients were positive for group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal. Six of the 13 individuals who handled the food involved in the dinner had symptoms. No association was identified with the food consumed. There is epidemiological evidence of foodborne group A ?-hemolytic streptococcal transmission, but respiratory transmission could not be ruled out. PMID:24897054

  7. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  8. How Is Pernicious Anemia Treated?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Doctors treat pernicious anemia by replacing the missing vitamin B12 in the body. People who have pernicious anemia ... Pernicious anemia usually is easy to treat with vitamin B12 shots or pills. If you have severe pernicious ...

  9. Sickle-cell anemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cherry-Peppers, G; Davis, V; Atkinson, J C

    1992-01-01

    Sickle-cell disease is characterized by the pathophysiological features of chronic hemolytic anemia, vaso-occlusion resulting in ischemic tissue injury and painful episodes. The organs at greatest risk are the spleen, kidney and bone marrow, where oxygen tension is low and blood flow is diminished. However, disease may also present in the mandible. The oral manifestations and radiographic findings of a sickle cell patient with a left mandibular neuropathy, along with dental management guidelines are presented in the context of interdisciplinary care. PMID:1521400

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Foods for Babies Formula Feeding FAQs: Getting Started Vegan Food Guide Vegetarianism Anemia Word! Anemia About Anemia ... Anemia Anemia Blood Test: Complete Blood Count Blood Vegan Food Guide Vitamins and Minerals Contact Us Print ...

  11. Sickle Cell Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    Sickle cell anemia is a disease in which your body produces abnormally shaped red blood cells. The cells are shaped like a crescent or sickle. They don' ... problem causes sickle cell anemia. People with the disease are born with two sickle cell genes, one ...

  12. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  13. Intestinal HIF2? promotes tissue-iron accumulation in disorders of iron overload with anemia.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Erik R; Taylor, Matthew; Xue, Xiang; Ramakrishnan, Sadeesh K; Martin, Angelical; Xie, Liwei; Bredell, Bryce X; Gardenghi, Sara; Rivella, Stefano; Shah, Yatrik M

    2013-12-10

    Several distinct congenital disorders can lead to tissue-iron overload with anemia. Repeated blood transfusions are one of the major causes of iron overload in several of these disorders, including ?-thalassemia major, which is characterized by a defective ?-globin gene. In this state, hyperabsorption of iron is also observed and can significantly contribute to iron overload. In ?-thalassemia intermedia, which does not require blood transfusion for survival, hyperabsorption of iron is the leading cause of iron overload. The mechanism of increased iron absorption in ?-thalassemia is unclear. We definitively demonstrate, using genetic mouse models, that intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor-2? (HIF2?) and divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) are activated early in the pathogenesis of ?-thalassemia and are essential for excess iron accumulation in mouse models of ?-thalassemia. Moreover, thalassemic mice with established iron overload had significant improvement in tissue-iron levels and anemia following disruption of intestinal HIF2?. In addition to repeated blood transfusions and increased iron absorption, chronic hemolysis is the major cause of tissue-iron accumulation in anemic iron-overload disorders caused by hemolytic anemia. Mechanistic studies in a hemolytic anemia mouse model demonstrated that loss of intestinal HIF2?/DMT1 signaling led to decreased tissue-iron accumulation in the liver without worsening the anemia. These data demonstrate that dysregulation of intestinal hypoxia and HIF2? signaling is critical for progressive iron overload in ?-thalassemia and may be a novel therapeutic target in several anemic iron-overload disorders. PMID:24282296

  14. Early diagnosis and management of postpartum hemolytic uremic syndrome with plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Manisha; Modi, Gopesh; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Navaid, Seema

    2011-06-01

    The likelihood of survival in cases of postpartum hemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is as high as 80-90% with early diagnosis and aggressive treatment using plasma exchange (PE). The patients, referred to our center, diagnosed as postpartum HUS presented with thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anaemia with or without fever and severe renal failure, were managed aggressively with PE in conjunction with hemodialysis. All patients showed clinical improvement, along with laboratory indicators like normal renal function tests, increased platelet counts and decreased lactic dehydrogenase levels. Awareness amongst treating physicians, early diagnosis and treatment with PE could be the key factors in reducing maternal mortality due to postpartum HUS in developing countries. PMID:21550309

  15. Eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates need for dialysis in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Maro; Cable, Christian; Halka, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This case report describes how eculizumab reversed neurologic impairment and improved renal damage in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. A 50-year-old female, after presenting with diarrhea and abdominal pain, developed pancolitis, acute renal failure, and thrombocytopenia. The patient underwent total abdominal colectomy. Pathology confirmed ischemic colitis with scattered mesenteric microthrombi. Due to mental and respiratory decline, she remained intubated. Continuous venovenous hemodialysis was initiated. Renal failure, neurologic changes, hemolysis, thrombotic microangiopathy, and low complement levels all suggested atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Eculizumab 900 mg was administered intravenously on hospital day 6 and continued weekly for four doses followed by maintenance therapy. She recovered neurologically and renally after the third dose, and hematologically by the sixth dose. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. In severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, eculizumab safely reverses neurologic impairment and eliminates the need for dialysis. The optimal duration of treatment with eculizumab remains to be determined. PMID:22287852

  16. Plasmodium vivax induced hemolytic uremic syndrome: An uncommon manifestation that leads to a grave complication and treated successfully with renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jhorawat, Rajesh; Beniwal, Pankaj; Malhotra, Vinay

    2015-01-01

    We are reporting a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome, a rare manifestation of Plasmodium vivax malaria. A young driver was admitted with acute febrile illness, decreased urine output, anemia, thrombocytopenia, jaundice, and increased serum lactate dehydrogenase. He showed a partial response to antimalarial drugs. However, he was readmitted with worsening renal parameters. His kidney biopsy revealed chronic thrombotic microangiopathy. He remained dialysis dependent and later underwent renal transplantation successfully, with excellent graft function at 1-year.

  17. Isolation of a hemolytic Actinobacillus from waterfowl.

    PubMed

    Hacking, M A; Sileo, L

    1977-01-01

    A previously undescribed species of hemolytic Actinobacillus was isolated from six waterfowl, three with periocular serous exudation and two with airsacculitis and bronchopneumonia. Cultural and biochemical characteristics were compared with those of Actinobacillus and Pasteurella spp, using a numerical technique. PMID:839627

  18. Depressed eruption rate of the rat maxillary incisor in a drug-induced uncompensated hemolytic state model

    SciTech Connect

    Giglio, M.J.; Sanz, A.M.; Bozzini, C.E. )

    1990-03-01

    Female rats weighing about 180 g were separated into two groups. One group (A) received phenylhydrazine (PHZ) every other day during three weeks (for induction of an uncompensated hemolytic state), while the control group (C) received saline. The evidence for the establishment of the uncompensated hemolytic state was obtained by hematocrit value, reticulocyte count, and red-cell-volume-59Fe uptake. Body-weight gain (which is a measure of overall body growth rate), body-length gain (which is a measure of longitudinal skeletal growth rate), food intake, and maxillary incisor eruption rate (ER) were significantly depressed in rats of group A during the PHZ-injection period, in relation to rats of group C. These results indicate that anemia and/or associated factors depress ER, along with body growth and skeletal growth.

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    MedlinePLUS

    G-6-PD deficiency; Hemolytic anemia due to G6PD deficiency; Anemia - hemolytic due to G6PD deficiency ... G6PD deficiency occurs when a person is missing or doesn't have enough of an enzyme called ...

  20. Reassessment of the microcytic anemia of lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.R.; Trotzky, M.S.; Pincus, D.

    1981-06-01

    Hematologic abnormalities in childhood lead poisoning may be due, in part, to the presence of other disorders, such as iron deficiency or thalassemia minor. In order to reassess increased lead burden as a cause of microcytic anemia, we studied 58 children with class III or IV lead poisoning, normal iron stores, and no inherited hemoglobinopathy. Anemia occurred in 12% and microcytosis in 21% of these children. The combination of anemia and microcytosis was found in only one of 58 patients (2%). When only children with class IV lead poisoning were studied, the occurrence of microcytosis increased to 46%. However, the combination of microcytosis and anemia was found in only one of these 13 more severely affected patients. Microcytic anemia was similarly uncommon in children with either blood lead concentration greater than or equal to 50 microgram/100 ml. These data indicate that microcytosis and anemia occur much less commonly than previously reported in childhood lead poisoning uncomplicated by other hematologic disorders.

  1. Folate-deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... type of B vitamin. It is also called folic acid. Anemia is a condition in which the body ... Folate (folic acid) is needed for red blood cells to form and grow. You can get folate by eating green ...

  2. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    Cooley's Anemia Foundation Leading the Fight against Thalassemia About Us Mission/Purpose History Medical Research Board/Staff Contact the Foundation U.S. Patients: Register for Information Learn about Thalassemia About Thalassemia Clinical ...

  3. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  4. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization has met with limited success via the use of hyperbaric oxygen, electron-affinic radiosensitizers, and mitomycin. Improvements in tumor oxygenation via the use of carbogen and nicotinamide, RSR13, and tirapazamine have shown promising clinical results and are all currently being tested in Phase III trials. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend transfusion or erythropoietin for symptomatic patients with a hemoglobin of 10-11 g/dl and state that erythropoietin should strongly be considered if hemoglobin falls to less than 10 g/dl. These recommendations were based on studies that revealed an improvement in the quality of life of cancer patients, but not patient survival with anemia correction. Phase III studies evaluating the correction of anemia via erythropoietin have shown mixed results with some studies reporting a decrease in patient survival despite an improvement in hemoglobin levels. Diverse functions of erythropoietin are reviewed, including its potential to inhibit apoptosis via the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Correction of anemia by the use of blood transfusions has also shown a decrement in patient survival, possibly through inflammatory and/or immunosuppressive pathways. Conclusions: Anemia is a prevalent condition associated with cancer and its therapies. Proper Phase III trials are necessary to find the best way to correct anemia for specific patients. Future studies of erythropoietin must evaluate the possible anti-apoptotic effects by directly assessing the tumor for erythropoietin receptors or the presence of the JAK2/STAT5/BCL-X pathway. Due to the ability of transfusions to cause immunosuppression, most probably through inflammatory pathways, it may be best to study the effects of transfusion with the prolonged use of anti-inflammatory medications.

  5. Acute Systolic Heart Failure Associated with Complement-Mediated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, John L.; Moore, Jared M.; Cataland, Spero R.

    2015-01-01

    Complement-mediated hemolytic uremic syndrome (otherwise known as atypical HUS) is a rare disorder of uncontrolled complement activation that may be associated with heart failure. We report the case of a 49-year-old female with no history of heart disease who presented with microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute kidney injury. Given her normal ADAMSTS13 activity, evidence of increased complement activation, and renal biopsy showing evidence of thrombotic microangiopathy, she was diagnosed with complement-mediated HUS. She subsequently developed acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to pulmonary edema requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed evidence of a Takotsubo cardiomyopathy with an estimated left ventricular ejection fraction of 20%, though ischemic cardiomyopathy could not be ruled out. Treatment was initiated with eculizumab. After several failed attempts at extubation, she eventually underwent tracheotomy. She also required hemodialysis to improve her uremia and hypervolemia. After seven weeks of hospitalization and five doses of eculizumab, her renal function and respiratory status improved, and she was discharged in stable condition on room air and independent of hemodialysis. Our case illustrates a rare association between acute systolic heart failure and complement-mediated HUS and highlights the potential of eculizumab in stabilizing even the most critically-ill patients with complement-mediated disease. PMID:26557394

  6. Facts about Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Form Controls NCBDDD Cancel Submit Search The CDC Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare blood disorder ...

  7. Hemolytik: a database of experimentally determined hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singh, Sandeep; Joshi, Anshika; Anand, Priya; Tuknait, Abhishek; Mathur, Deepika; Varshney, Grish C.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytik (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hemolytik/) is a manually curated database of experimentally determined hemolytic and non-hemolytic peptides. Data were compiled from a large number of published research articles and various databases like Antimicrobial Peptide Database, Collection of Anti-microbial Peptides, Dragon Antimicrobial Peptide Database and Swiss-Prot. The current release of Hemolytik database contains ?3000 entries that include ?2000 unique peptides whose hemolytic activities were evaluated on erythrocytes isolated from as many as 17 different sources. Each entry in Hemolytik provides comprehensive information about a peptide, like its name, sequence, origin, reported function, property such as chirality, types (linear and cyclic), end modifications as well as details pertaining to its hemolytic activity. In addition, tertiary structure of each peptide has been predicted, and secondary structure states have been assigned. To facilitate the scientific community, a user-friendly interface has been developed with various tools for data searching and analysis. We hope, Hemolytik will be useful for researchers working in the field of designing therapeutic peptides. PMID:24174543

  8. Anemia and Oxygen Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bliss, Stuart

    2015-09-01

    Clinical assessment of tissue oxygenation is challenging. Anemia reflects a decreased oxygen carrying capacity of the blood and its significance in the perioperative setting relates largely to the associated risk of insufficient oxygen delivery and cellular hypoxia. Until meaningful clinical measures of tissue oxygenation are available in veterinary practice, clinicians must rely on evaluation of a patient's hemodynamic and ventilatory performance, along with biochemical and hemogasometric measurements. Blood transfusion is used commonly for treatment of perioperative anemia, and may improve tissue oxygenation by normalizing the rheologic properties of blood and enhancing perfusion, independent of increases in oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:26033442

  9. Generation of hemolytic activity in ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Butterman, J.; Chan, P.C.; Kesner, L.

    1987-04-01

    When liposomes prepared from purified soybean phosphatidylcholine were treated with ozone, at least two types of hemolytic agents were formed. One type was stable at 0 degree C but was destroyed rapidly at 37 degrees C. A second type was evolved during storage of ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine at 37 degrees C in the absence of EDTA. This study is concerned mainly with the heat-labile type. The hemolytic activity was not associated with lipid hydroperoxides. A number of substances were shown to inhibit the hemolytic activity and these may be divided into two classes. The first included cysteine, polyamines, n-heptylamine, semicarbazide, and tryptophan. Preincubation of the ozone-treated phosphatidylcholine was necessary with a Class 1 inhibitor, presumably for the interaction of the inhibitor with a functional group of the hemolytic agents. The Class II inhibitors, including BHT and vitamin C, required no preincubation. These possibly abolished the hemolytic activity by scavenging free radicals in the process.

  10. How Is Anemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... parts of your blood. The test checks your hemoglobin and hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) levels. Hemoglobin is the iron-rich protein in red blood ... up in your blood. A low level of hemoglobin or hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The ...

  11. Living with Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... milk also are at risk for anemia. Cow's milk is low in the iron needed for growth. Most of the iron your child needs comes from food. Talk with your child's doctor about a healthy diet and good sources of iron, vitamins B12 and C, and folic acid (folate). Only give your child iron supplements if ...

  12. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  13. Anemia and School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  14. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-08-15

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  15. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  16. A Novel Hemotropic Mycoplasma (Hemoplasma) in a Patient With Hemolytic Anemia and Pyrexia

    PubMed Central

    Steer, Jane A.; Barker, Emily N.; Jensen, Jørgen; Mitchell, Joanne; Stocki, Teresa; Chalker, Victoria J.; Hamon, Mike

    2011-01-01

    A patient with chronic moderate neutropenia, acute hemolysis, and pyrexia was found to be infected with a novel hemoplasma species. A clinical response to doxycyline was noted, and moxifloxacin was added subsequently to aid infection clearance. This represents the first report of hemolysis in association with confirmed hemoplasma infection in a human. PMID:22021921

  17. Inborn anemias in mice. Comprehensive progress report, 1 August 1979-1 June 1982, to accompany twenty-seventh renewal proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, S.E.; Russell, E.S.; Barker, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    Hereditary anemias of mice have been investigated including four macrocytic anemias, three hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an ..cap alpha..-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules controlling a different metabolic process. Thus the wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse and by extension to man from an understanding of mammalian mechanisms utilized in the control of erythropoiesis. Each of the different anemias is studied through: (a) biochemical and biophysical characterization of peripheral blood cells; (b) determinations of cellular and organismic radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions; (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme biosynthesis; (d) morphological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue; (e) functional tests of the stem cell component; (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli and inhibitors; and (g) physiological complementation analysis via transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes.

  18. Anemia mexicana (Native) 3 

    E-print Network

    Robert W. Corbett

    2011-08-02

    Circulatory changes 4 Urinary porphyrin increases 9-17 Melanosis 6-20 Hyperkeratosis 6-20 Peripheral vascular alterations 12 Gangrene of the extremities 25-35 Hematology effects 40 Distal polyneuropathy 40 Anemia 50 Prominent peripheral neuropathy 300... and glucocorticoids. 21 A sampling of pharmaceuticals and compounds recognized to induce diabetes (and application) include: Vacor (rat poison), pentamidine (antimicrobial), nicotinic acid (vitamin b 3 ), glucocorticoids (steroid), thyroid hormone, diazoxide...

  19. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-12-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. PMID:26637695

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Spano, Filippo; Giardina, Irene; Brillo, Eleonora; Clerici, Graziano; Roura, Luis Cabero

    2015-11-01

    Anemia is the most frequent derailment of physiology in the world throughout the life of a woman. It is a serious condition in countries that are industrialized and in countries with poor resources. The main purpose of this manuscript is to give the right concern of anemia in pregnancy. The most common causes of anemia are poor nutrition, iron deficiencies, micronutrients deficiencies including folic acid, vitamin A and vitamin B12, diseases like malaria, hookworm infestation and schistosomiasis, HIV infection and genetically inherited hemoglobinopathies such as thalassemia. Depending on the severity and duration of anemia and the stage of gestation, there could be different adverse effects including low birth weight and preterm delivery. Treatment of mild anemia prevents more severe forms of anemia, strictly associated with increased risk of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. PMID:26472066

  1. Fanconi anemia and the development of leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Blanche P.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, due to mutations in 16 genes, whose protein products collaborate in a DNA repair pathway. The major complications are aplastic anemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and specific solid tumors. A severe subset, due to mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, has a cumulative incidence of cancer of 97% by age 7 years; the cancers are AML, brain tumors, and Wilms tumor; several patients have multiple events. Patients with the other genotypes (FANCA through FANCQ) have cumulative risks of more than 50% of marrow failure, 20% of AML, and 30% of solid tumors (usually head and neck or gynecologic squamous cell carcinoma), by age 40, and they too are at risk of multiple adverse events. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant may cure AML and MDS, and preemptive transplant may be appropriate, but its use is a complicated decision. PMID:25455269

  2. Fanconi anemia and the development of leukemia.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, due to mutations in 16 genes, whose protein products collaborate in a DNA repair pathway. The major complications are aplastic anemia, acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and specific solid tumors. A severe subset, due to mutations in FANCD1/BRCA2, has a cumulative incidence of cancer of 97% by age 7 years; the cancers are AML, brain tumors, and Wilms tumor; several patients have multiple events. Patients with the other genotypes (FANCA through FANCQ) have cumulative risks of more than 50% of marrow failure, 20% of AML, and 30% of solid tumors (usually head and neck or gynecologic squamous cell carcinoma), by age 40, and they too are at risk of multiple adverse events. Hematopoietic stem cell transplant may cure AML and MDS, and preemptive transplant may be appropriate, but its use is a complicated decision. PMID:25455269

  3. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. PMID:26404446

  4. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo... span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  6. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Takahiro; Manabe, Atsushi

    2010-10-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are a heterogeneous group of rare hereditary disorders of erythropoiesis characterized by morphologic abnormal erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Three types of the disease are known as type I, II and III, and the variant type of CDA and several minor subgroups of CDA have been also reported since the first classification. Recently, responsible genes for type I (CDAN1) and type II (SEC23B) have been identified and the molecular pathogenesis of the disease is currently being explored. Although CDAs rarely transform to myelodysplastic syndrome or leukemia, the disease is important to understand the mechanism of hemopoiesis in humans. PMID:20820969

  7. Sickle Cell Anemia Jonathan Altamirano

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Sickle Cell Anemia Jonathan Altamirano Biochem 118 01/24/12 #12;Sickle Cell Disease - Summary sickle- low pH or O2 Homozygous Recessive Blood Cell Destruction Physical Weakness Anemia for quick screenings Peripheral blood smear Sickled cells and RBC easily seen Focus of these treatments

  8. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  9. 78 FR 72155 - Medicare Program; End-Stage Renal Disease Prospective Payment System, Quality Incentive Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ...282.3 Other hemolytic anemias due to enzyme D55.2 Anemia due to disorders of glycolytic deficiency enzymes D55.3 Anemia due to disorders of nucleotide...metabolism D55.8 Other anemias due to enzyme disorders D55.9 Anemia due to...

  10. [Megaloblastic-vitamin B12 deficiency anemia in childhood].

    PubMed

    Mtvarelidze, Z G; Kvezereli-Kopadze, A N; Kvezereli-Kopadze, M A

    2009-05-01

    Megaloblastic anemias are basically caused by vitamin B(12) and/or folic acid deficiency. Childhood vitamin B(12) deficiency is extremely rare. There are congenital and acquired forms of vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemias. The article captures findings of 10 year observation of 3 patients with Imerslund-Gräsbeck Syndrome (congenital chronic megaloblastic anemia with proteinuria), in which the diagnosis was established by us in early childhood and due to correct treatment and prevention complete clinical-laboratory remission is kept so far. We have also observed rare case of acquired megaloblastic anemia - 14 years old vegetarian patient, who was diagnosed with vitamin B(12)-deficiency anemia based on history, clinical and para-clinical data. It was caused by strict vegetarianism of the patient. Therefore first of all the diet was corrected. In 5 days of specific treatment with vitamin B(12) "reticulocyte crisis" was manifested (proving the correctness of diagnosis and treatment) and complete clinical-hematological remission was achieved in 2 weeks. The given cases are interesting as megaloblastic anemias in childhood are both rare and difficult to diagnose. In such cases timely diagnosis, treatment and prevention tactics should be based on cause-and-effect relation of disease. PMID:19556642

  11. [Management of anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyeong Ok

    2015-03-01

    Anemia is one of the commonest extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The pathogenesis of anemia in IBD is complex but iron deficiency combined with inflammation is the most common factor related to the development of anemia. However, other causes such as vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, hemolysis, myelosuppression and drug also should not be overlooked. In addition to ferritin, inflammatory markers and new biochemical parameters such as hepcidin and ferritin index are being tested as diagnostic a tool. First step for treatment is disease activity control and iron supplementation. Although oral iron is widely used, intravenous iron therapy should be considered in patients who are intolerant to oral iron therapy, have severe and refractory anemia or are in active disease state. Recently, new intravenous iron formulations have been introduced and due to their safety and easy usage, they have become the standard treatment modality for managing anemia in IBD. Erythropoietin and transfusion can be considered in specific situations. Vitamin B12 and folate supplementation is also important in patients who are deficient of these micronutrients. Since anemia in IBD patients could significantly influence the disease outcome, further studies and standard guideline for IBD are needed. PMID:25797377

  12. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  13. Failure of Clindamycin To Eradicate Infection with Beta-Hemolytic Streptococci Inducibly Resistant to Clindamycin in an Animal Model and in Human Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James S.; Lepak, Alex J.; Thompson, George R.; Craig, William A.; Andes, David R.; Sabol-Dzintars, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci remains an underrecognized phenomenon of unknown clinical significance. We performed an evaluation of inducible clindamycin resistance using an animal model as well as retrospectively reviewing the charts of patients treated with clindamycin monotherapy who were infected with beta-hemolytic streptococci inducibly resistant to clindamycin. The neutropenic mouse thigh model of infection was used to evaluate the in vivo activity of clindamycin against beta-hemolytic streptococci, including isolates susceptible, inducibly resistant, or constitutively resistant to clindamycin. The clinical microbiology laboratory information system and pharmacy databases were cross-referenced to identify patients with infections due to inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who were treated with clindamycin monotherapy. Medical records of these patients were reviewed to evaluate microbiologic and clinical outcomes. Inducible clindamycin resistance resulted in impaired killing of beta-hemolytic streptococci in the animal model. Though suppressed initially, compared to those with constitutive resistance (P = 0.0429), by 48 h, colony counts of inducibly clindamycin-resistant organisms were similar to those of constitutively resistant isolates (P = 0.1142). In addition, we identified 8 patients infected with inducibly clindamycin-resistant beta-hemolytic streptococci who experienced clinical and microbiologic failure when treated with clindamycin monotherapy. These patients either improved initially and subsequently failed or never responded to clindamycin therapy. We have demonstrated in a murine model of infection and from human cases that inducible clindamycin resistance in beta-hemolytic streptococci is clinically significant. Routine testing and reporting by clinical laboratories should be encouraged and alternative antimicrobial agents considered when these organisms are encountered in clinical care. PMID:24323478

  14. ITPA gene variant may protect against anemia induced during pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin combination treatment in Ukrainian patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, A; Pampukha, V; Bobrova I; Moroz, L; Livshits, L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the association between the inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA) gene variants and PEG-IFNalpha/RBV combination treatment induced anemia in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) Ukrainian patients. The data were collected from 80 CHC patients with HCV genotype 1 infection. All study participants received standard doses of PEG-IFNalpha and RBV According to the Hb level changes patients were distributed into: case group--42 patients with combination treatment induced anemia, and control group--38 patients with no signs of anemia. Genotyping for ITPA gene rs1127354 and rs7270101 variants was performed using PCR followed by RFLP assay. Fisher's exact test was used to estimate the difference in genotype and allelic distribution. Distribution of rs 7270101 genotypes was not significantly different between groups of CHC patients with RB Vinduced anemia and without it. The frequency of rs1127354 A allele carriers was significantly higher (P < < 0,05) in group of CHC patients without anemia (23.7%) comparing to the group ofpatients with anemia (7.3%). The respective allele frequency in control group (13.2%) was almost 3-fold higher (P < 0,05) comparing to the case group (4.9%). Significant association of ITPA gene rs1127354 with protection against RB V-induced hemolytic anemia was found in Ukrainian patients with CHC infection. Rs1127354 variant may assist as a pharmacogenetic marker in HCV antiviral therapy correction for side effect avoidance.. PMID:26030972

  15. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug...Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop...Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis...

  16. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Foundation U.S. Food and Drug Administration MedlinePlus Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... 345 KB)????? Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this page: What is ...

  17. Anemia in Clinical Practice-Definition and Classification: Does Hemoglobin Change With Aging?

    PubMed

    Domenica Cappellini, M; Motta, Irene

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a global public health problem affecting both developing and developed countries at all ages. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), anemia is defined as hemoglobin (Hb) levels <12.0 g/dL in women and <13.0 g/dL in men. However, normal Hb distribution varies not only with sex but also with ethnicity and physiological status. New lower limits of normal Hb values have been proposed, according to ethnicity, gender, and age. Anemia is often multifactorial and is not an independent phenomenon. For the classification and diagnosis the hematologic parameters, the underlying pathological mechanism and patient history should be taken into account. The aging of population, especially in Western countries, causes an increase of anemia in elderly people. In this population, anemia, recently defined by levels of Hb <12 g/dL in both sexes, is mostly of mild degree (10-12 g/dL). Understanding the pathophysiology of anemia in this population is important because it contributes to morbidity and mortality. In one third of the patients, anemia is due to nutritional deficiency, including iron, folate, or vitamin B12 deficiency; moreover, anemia of chronic disease accounts for about another third of the cases. However, in one third of patients anemia cannot be explained by an underlying disease or by a specific pathological process, and for this reason it is defined "unexplained anemia". Unexplained anemia might be due to the progressive resistance of bone marrow erythroid progenitors to erythropoietin, and a chronic subclinical pro-inflammatory state. PMID:26404438

  18. Complement Inhibitor Eculizumab in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Acham-Roschitz, Birgit; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Kirschfink, Michael; Zipfel, Peter F.; Roedl, Siegfried; Vester, Udo; Ring, Ekkehard

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is associated with a congenital or acquired dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway that leads to continuous complement activation on host cells causing inflammation and damage. Eculizumab, a humanized mAb against complement protein C5, inhibits activation of the terminal complement pathway. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: We report an adolescent with relapsing unclassified aHUS. On admission, a high plasma creatinine level indicated a poor prognosis, and hemodialysis had to be started. Plasma exchanges were initially effective against the microangiopathic hemolytic activity and allowed a temporary improvement of renal function with termination of hemodialysis after 7 wk. Subsequently, plasma exchanges (three times per week) failed to prevent ongoing aHUS activity and progressive renal failure. After 12 wk, aHUS treatment was switched to eculizumab. Results: Eculizumab was effective in terminating the microangiopathic hemolytic process in two aHUS relapses; however, after normalization of complement activity, aHUS recurred and ultimately led to anuric end-stage renal failure. Conclusions: In this patient, complement inhibition by eculizumab temporarily terminated the microangiopathic hemolytic activity. Nevertheless, renal damage as a result of preceding and subsequent aHUS activity resulted in end-stage renal failure; therefore, therapeutic success may depend on early administration of eculizumab. The optimal duration of treatment may be variable and remains to be determined. PMID:19556379

  19. Hemolytic activity of dermatophytes species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Aktas, E; Y?g?t, N

    2015-03-01

    Hemolytic activity was recently reported for several pathogenic fungal species, such as Aspergillus, Candida, Trichophyton, Penicillium and Fusarium. Based on a number of mechanistic and characterization studies, several fungal hemolysins have been proposed as virulence factors. Hemolysins lyse red blood cells resulting in the release of iron, an important growth factor for microbes especially during infection. The requirement of iron in fungal growth is necessary for metabolic processes and as a catalyst for various biochemical processes. Expression of a hemolytic protein with capabilities to lyse red blood cells has also been suggested to provide a survival strategy for fungi during opportunistic infections. The aims of this study were to investigate the hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species isolated from patients with dermatophytosis. Hair, skin and nail samples of patients were examined with direct microscopy using potassium hydroxide and cultivated on Mycobiotic agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar. To determine hemolytic activities of dermatophytes species, they were subcultured on Columbia Agar with 5% sheep blood and incubated for 7-14 days at 25°C in aerobic conditions. Media which displayed hemolysis were further incubated for 1-5 days at 37°C to increase hemolytic activity. In this study, 66 dermatophytes strains were isolated from clinical specimens and were identified by six different species: 43 (65.1%) Trichophyton rubrum, 7 (10.7%) Trichophyton mentagrophytes, 5 (7.6%) Microsporum canis, 5 (7.6%) Trichophyton tonsurans, 4 (6.0%) Epidermophyton floccosum and 2 (3.0%) Trichophyton violaceum. Twenty-one T. rubrum strains showed incomplete (alpha) hemolysis and nine T. rubrum strains showed complete (beta) hemolysis, whereas hemolysis was absent in 13 T. rubrum strains. Four T. mentagrophytes strains showed complete hemolysis and three T. tonsurans strains showed incomplete hemolysis. However, M. canis, E. floccosum and T. violaceum species had no hemolytic activity. Hemolytic activity is pronounced in dermatophytes and may play an important role as a virulence factor. Hemolysins produced may play an important role in the balance between the host's cellular immunity and the ability of the fungus to diminish the immune response. PMID:25467819

  20. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-01-01

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time. PMID:19787825

  1. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disease that primarily affects the black population. This anemia is due to a homozygous state of the abnormal hemoglobin S. An alteration occurs on the DNA molecule involving the substitution of the amino acid valine for glutamic acid at the sixth position on the beta polypeptide chain. This biochemical variation on the DNA molecule creates a physiological change that causes sickle-shaped red blood cells to be produced. The sickle-shaped cells are the result of the hemoglobin S being deoxygenated. This case report presents a case of 16-year-old female with sickle cell disease and its dental management. How to cite this article: Acharya S. Oral and Dental Considerations in Management of Sickle Cell Anemia. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(2):141-144. PMID:26379384

  2. [Floppy baby with macrocytic anemia and vegan mother].

    PubMed

    Schlapbach, L J; Schütz, B; Nuoffer, J M; Brekenfeld, C; Müller, G; Fluri, S

    2007-08-29

    We report the case of a 7 month-old girl that presented with acute anemia, generalized muscular hypotonia and failure to thrive. Laboratory evaluation revealed cobalamin deficiency, due to a vegan diet of the mother. The clinical triad of an acquired floppy baby syndrome with megaloblastic anemia and failure to thrive is pathognomic for infantile cobalamin deficiency. Neurological abnormalities are often irreversible and may be associated with delayed myelinization in the MRI. A normal cobalamin level in maternal serum and absence of anemia do not exclude subclinical deficiency. If cobalamin deficiency is suspected, e.g. in pregnant women on vegan diet, urinary methylmalonic acid excretion and plasma homocysteine levels should be determined and cobalamin substitution should be started at an early stage to avoid potentially irreversible damage of the fetus. PMID:18293883

  3. Anemia - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home ? Multiple Languages ? All Health Topics ? Anemia URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/anemia.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  4. Diamond Blackfan Anemia, Genetics, and You

    MedlinePLUS

    Diamond Blackfan Anemia, Genetics, and You Q0 Is Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) a genetic disorder? A Yes, ... A The body’s failure to make enough red blood cells has been linked to genetic mutations in ...

  5. The systemic vascular resistance response: a cardiovascular response modulating blood viscosity with implications for primary hypertension and certain anemias.

    PubMed

    Sloop, Gregory D; Weidman, Joseph J; St Cyr, John A

    2015-12-01

    Without an active regulatory feedback loop, increased blood viscosity could lead to a vicious cycle of ischemia, increased erythropoiesis, further increases of blood viscosity, decreased tissue perfusion with worsened ischemia, further increases in red cell mass, etc. We suggest that an increase in blood viscosity is detected by mechanoreceptors in the left ventricle which upregulate expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides and soluble erythropoietin receptor. This response normalizes systemic vascular resistance and blood viscosity at the cost of producing 'anemia of chronic disease or inflammation' or 'hemolytic anemia' both of which are better described as states of compensated hyperviscosity. Besides its role in disease, this response is also active in the physiologic adaptation to chronic exercise. Malfunction of this response may cause primary hypertension. PMID:26116626

  6. Sickle Cell Anemia Diagnosis, Treatment, & Genetics

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    Sickle Cell Anemia Diagnosis, Treatment, & Genetics Katarzyna Zabrocka BIOC118Q #12;Sickle Cell and Citrate Agar Electrophoresis- hemoglobin will migrate in specific patterns. Sickle Cell Anemia is only one%20cell %20anemia&rid=gnd.section.98 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sickle-cell_disease http

  7. Erythema nodosum and pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Milman, Perry J; Goldenberg, Steven P; Scheinfeld, Noah; Pereira, Frederick A

    2013-07-01

    Erythema nodosum (EN) often presents as a sudden onset of tender, erythematous, subcutaneous nodules on the legs and ankles. Although rare, pernicious anemia may be related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Discussion of this association in the context of a particular patient is presented. PMID:24010520

  8. Detection of hemolytic Listeria monocytogenes by using DNA colony hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, A.R.; Wentz, B.A.; Hill, W.E.

    1987-09-01

    A fragment of about 500 base pairs of the beta-hemolysin gene from Listeria monocytogenes was used to screen different bacterial strains by DNA colony hybridization. The cells in the colonies were lysed by microwaves in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Of 52 different strains of Listeria species screened, only the DNA from beta-hemolytic (CAMP-positive) strains of L. monocytogenes hybridized with this probe.

  9. Tc-99m red blood cells for the study of rapid hemolytic processes associated with heterologous blood transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Benedetto, A.R.; Harrison, C.R.; Blumhardt, R.; Trow, L.L.

    1984-10-01

    Chromium-51 labeled erythrocytes (Cr-51 RBC) are suitable for the study of hematologic disorders which involve relatively slow destruction of circulating erythrocytes, taking several days to several weeks. However, Cr-51 RBC are not suitable for investigating rapid hemolytic processes which occur within a matter of a few hours due to the variable and unpredictable elution of Cr-51 from the erythrocytes during the first 24 hours or so. Imaging, which could be useful in identifying organ systems involved in the hemolytic process, cannot be performed with Cr-51 RBC because of the high dose commitment caused by the low yield of gamma rays from Cr-51 (2). A method of labeling RBC with Tc-99m, which results in a radiopharmaceutical that combines the excellent dosimetric and imaging qualities of Tc-99m with an extremely stable bond between the Tc-99m and the RBC, is reported. The successful application of this technique in providing red cell support for a cancer patient with an unusual history of intravascular hemolytic transfusion reactions is also reported.

  10. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hypersignal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hypersignal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia vary according to studies and age range. Digestive and hematological manifestations are well known. Neurological and psychiatric manifestations of pernicious anemia were also described in the early literature. They can be the initial symptoms or the only ones. However, inaugural neuropsychiatric features are often unrecognized. The most common psychiatric symptoms were depression, mania, psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment and obsessive compulsive disorder. Neurological involvement includes mainly combined spinal sclerosis, peripheral neuropathy and dementia. Cerebellar ataxia and movement disorders are reported less often. Severity of neuropsychiatric features and therapeutic efficacy depends on the duration of signs and level of B12 deficiency. Macrocytic anemia may lack. Neuropsychiatric manifestations could be isolated or be the first manifestation of vitamin deficiency and occur without any hematological or gastrointestinal context. Pernicious anemia and serum B12 assay should be discussed in all patients with organic mental disorders, atypical psychiatric symptoms and fluctuation of symptomatology. Nevertheless, B12 level could be normal in genuine pernicious anemia diseases and macrocytic anemia may lack. Substitutive vitaminotherapy is required when diagnosis is strongly suspected and etiologic assessment is negative. PMID:26345354

  11. Hemolytic venoms from marine cnidarian jellyfish – an overview

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Cnidarian jellyfish are viewed as an emergent problem in several coastal zones throughout the world. Recurrent outbreaks pose a serious threat to tourists and bathers, as well as to sea-workers, involving health and economical aspects. As a rule, cnidarian stinging as a consequence of nematocyst firing induces merely local symptoms but cardiovascular or neurological complications can also occur. Hemolysis is a frequent effect of cnidarian stinging; this dangerous condition is known to be caused by several venoms and can sometimes be lethal. At present, the bulk of data concerning hemolytic cnidarian venoms comes from the study of benthic species, such as sea anemones and soft corals, but hemolytic factors were found in venoms of several siphonophore, cubozoan and scyphozoan jellyfish, which are mainly involved in the envenomation of bathers and sea-workers. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the scientific literature concerning the hemolytic venoms from cnidarian jellyfish taking into consideration their importance in human pathology as well as health implications and possible therapeutic measures. PMID:25386336

  12. Perioperative anemia management in colorectal cancer patients: A pragmatic approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; Martín-Montañez, Elisa; Auerbach, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Anemia, usually due to iron deficiency, is highly prevalent among patients with colorectal cancer. Inflammatory cytokines lead to iron restricted erythropoiesis further decreasing iron availability and impairing iron utilization. Preoperative anemia predicts for decreased survival. Allogeneic blood transfusion is widely used to correct anemia and is associated with poorer surgical outcomes, increased post-operative nosocomial infections, longer hospital stays, increased rates of cancer recurrence and perioperative venous thromboembolism. Infections are more likely to occur in those with low preoperative serum ferritin level compared to those with normal levels. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management, minimizes or eliminates allogeneic blood transfusion. This includes restrictive transfusion policy, thromboprophylaxis and anemia management to improve outcomes. Normalization of preoperative hemoglobin levels is a World Health Organization recommendation. Iron repletion should be routinely ordered when indicated. Oral iron is poorly tolerated with low adherence based on published evidence. Intravenous iron is safe and effective but is frequently avoided due to misinformation and misinterpretation concerning the incidence and clinical nature of minor infusion reactions. Serious adverse events with intravenous iron are extremely rare. Newer formulations allow complete replacement dosing in 15-60 min markedly facilitating care. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents may improve response rates. A multidisciplinary, multimodal, individualized strategy, collectively termed Patient Blood Management used to minimize or eliminate allogeneic blood transfusion is indicated to improve outcomes. PMID:24587673

  13. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Post-Kidney Transplantation: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Alasfar, Sami; Alachkar, Nada

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disorder characterized by over-activation and dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway. Its estimated prevalence is 1–2 per million. The disease is characterized by thrombotic microangiopathy, which causes anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. aHUS has more severe course compared to typical (infection-induced) HUS and is frequently characterized by relapses that leads to end stage renal disease. For a long time, kidney transplantation for these patients was contraindicated because of high rate of recurrence and subsequent renal graft loss. The post-kidney transplantation recurrence rate largely depends on the pathogenetic mechanisms involved. However, over the past several years, advancements in the understanding and therapeutics of aHUS have allowed successful kidney transplantation in these patients. Eculizumab, which is a complement C5 antibody that inhibits complement factor 5a and subsequent formation of the membrane-attack complex, has been used in prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. In this paper, we present two new cases of aHUS patients who underwent successful kidney transplantation in our center with the use of prophylactic and maintenance eculizumab therapy that have not been published before. The purpose of reporting these two cases is to emphasize the importance of using eculizumab as a prophylactic therapy to prevent aHUS recurrence post-transplant in high-risk patients. We will also review the current understanding of the genetics of aHUS, the pathogenesis of its recurrence after kidney transplantation, and strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant aHUS recurrence. PMID:25593925

  14. Anemia prevalence and treatment practice in patients with non-myeloid tumors receiving chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Merlini, Laura; Cartenì, Giacomo; Iacobelli, Stefano; Stelitano, Caterina; Airoldi, Mario; Balcke, Peter; Keil, Felix; Haslbauer, Ferdinand; Belton, Laura; Pujol, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe the prevalence and management of anemia in cancer patients. Methods This cross-sectional, observational survey was conducted in Italy and Austria. Centers prespecified one day, during a 4-month enrollment window, to report specific data collected during normal clinical practice for patients with non-myeloid tumors attending for chemotherapy (±radiotherapy) treatment. The primary endpoint was the prevalence of anemia as determined using a prespecified algorithm: hemoglobin (Hb) ?10 g/dL on/within 3 days prior to visit; ongoing anemia treatment; physician diagnosis of anemia, together with ?1 anemia symptom. Results Between November 18, 2010 and March 18, 2011, data for 1412 patients were collected (Italy n = 1130; Austria n = 282). Most patients (n = 1136; 80%) had solid tumors; 809 (57%) had received ?3 chemotherapy cycles. The prevalence of anemia was 32% (95% confidence interval: 29.4%–34.2%); 196 patients (14%) were deemed anemic based on Hb ?10 g/dL, 131 (9%) on ongoing anemia treatment, and 121 (9%) on physician diagnosis/anemia symptom. Overall, 1153 patients (82%) had Hb data; mean (standard deviation [SD]) Hb levels were 11.7 (1.7) g/dL. In total, 456 patients (32%) had anemia symptoms: fatigue (n = 392; 28%), depression (n = 122; 9%), and dyspnea (n = 107; 8%) were most common. Fifty-one patients (4%) had had their current chemotherapy cycle delayed due to anemia. On visit day, or ?28 days prior, 91 (6%), 188 (13%), and 81 patients (6%) had evidence of whole blood/red blood cell transfusion, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use, or iron use, respectively. Conclusion On the prespecified study day, one-third of patients with non-myeloid tumors undergoing chemotherapy were found to be anemic and 13% had evidence of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent use then or in the 28 days prior. PMID:23946669

  15. Megaloblastic anemia: back in focus.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Jagdish

    2010-07-01

    Megaloblastic anemia (MA), in most instances in developing countries, results from deficiency of vitamin B(12) or folic acid. Over the last two to three decades, incidence of MA seems to be increasing. Of the two micronutrients, folic acid deficiency contributed to MA in a large majority of cases. Now deficiency of B(12) is far more common. In addition to anemia, occurrence of neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia is increasingly being reported. Among cases presenting with pancytopenia, MA stands out as an important (commonest cause in some series) cause. This article focuses on these and certain other aspects of MA. Possible causes of increasing incidence of MA are discussed. Observations on other clinical features like neurocognitive dysfunction, associated hyperhomocysteinemeia and occurrence of tremors and thrombocytosis during treatment are highlighted. PMID:20589460

  16. Acute Renal Failure, Microangiopathic Haemolytic Anemia, and Secondary Oxalosis in a Young Female Patient

    PubMed Central

    Stepien, Karolina M.; Prinsloo, Peter; Hitch, Tony; McCulloch, Thomas A.; Sims, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    A 29-year old female presented with a one-week history of vomiting, diarrhoea, abdominal pain, and headache. On admission, she had acute renal failure requiring dialysis. Tests revealed a hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia. An initial diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic microangiopathy was made and plasma exchange was instigated. However, renal biopsy did not show thrombotic microangiopathy but instead revealed acute kidney injury with mild tubulointerstitial nephritis and numerous oxalate crystals, predominantly in the distal tubules. The patient had been taking large doses (>1100?mg daily) of vitamin C for many months. She also gave a history of sclerotherapy using injections of an ethylene glycol derivative for superficial leg veins. The patient completed five sessions of plasma exchange and was able to discontinue dialysis. She eventually achieved full renal recovery. She has now discontinued sclerotherapy and vitamin supplementation. PMID:21785726

  17. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activity of hydroxyapatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanivelu, R.; Ruban Kumar, A.

    2014-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, HAP) nanoparticles are widely used in several biomedical applications due to its compositional similarities to bone mineral, excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity, osteoconductivity. In this present investigation, HAP nanoparticles synthesized by precipitation technique using calcium nitrate and di-ammonium phosphate. The crystalline nature and the functional group analysis are confirmed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) respectively. The morphological observations are ascertained from field emission electron scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). In vitro anti-proliferative and hemolytic activities are carried out on the synthesized HAP samples and the studies reveals that HAP have mild activity against erythrocytes.

  18. Pernicious anemia. From past to present.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez de Santiago, E; Ferre Aracil, C; García García de Paredes, A; Moreira Vicente, V F

    2015-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is currently the most common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in Western countries. The histological lesion upon which this condition is based is autoimmune chronic atrophic gastritis. The destruction of parietal cells causes a deficiency in intrinsic factor, an essential protein for vitamin B12 absorption in the terminal ileum. Advances in the last two decades have reopened the debate on a disease that seemed to have been forgotten due to its apparent simplicity. The new role of H. pylori, the value of parietal cell antibodies and intrinsic factor antibodies, the true usefulness of serum vitamin B12 levels, the risk of adenocarcinoma and gastric carcinoids and oral vitamin B12 treatment are just some of the current issues analyzed in depth in this review. PMID:25680481

  19. Refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia after intestinal transplant responding to conversion from a calcineurin to mTOR inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Acquazzino, Melissa A; Fischer, Ryan T; Langnas, Alan; Coulter, Don W

    2013-08-01

    AIHA is a rare and serious complication of solid organ transplantation. Herein, we report four cases of warm or mixed AIHA in pediatric patients following combined liver, small bowel and pancreas transplant. The hemolysis was refractory to multiple treatment modalities including steroids, rituximab, IVIG, plasmapheresis, cytoxan, discontinuation of prophylactic penicillin, and a change in immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine. All patients had resolution or marked improvement of hemolysis after discontinuation of maintenance of CNI and initiation of sirolimus immunosuppression. One patient developed nephrotic syndrome but responded to a change in immunosuppression to everolimus. Three of the four patients continue on immunosuppression with sirolimus or everolimus without further hemolysis, evidence of rejection or medication side effects. Based on our experience and review of similar cases in the literature, we have proposed a treatment algorithm for AIHA in the pediatric intestinal transplant patient population that recommends an early change in immunosuppressive regimen from CNIs to sirolimus therapy. PMID:23730873

  20. Diverse point mutations in the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene cause enzyme deficiency and mild or severe hemolytic anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Vulliamy, T.J.; D'Urso, M.; Battistuzzi, G.; Estrada, M.; Foulkes, N.S.; Martini, G.; Calabro, V.; Poggi, V.; Giordano, R.; Town, M.; Luzzatto, L.; Persico, M.G. )

    1988-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a common genetic abnormality affecting an estimated 400 million people worldwide. Clinical and biochemical analyses have identified many variants exhibiting a range of phenotypes, which have been well characterized from the hematological point of view. However, until now, their precise molecular basis has remained unknown. The authors have cloned and sequenced seven mutant G6PD alleles. In the nondeficient polymorphic African variant G6PD A they have found a single point mutation. The other six mutants investigated were all associated with enzyme deficiency. The mutations observed show a striking predominance of C {yields} T transitions, with CG doublets involved in four of seven cases. Thus, diverse point mutations may account largely for the phenotypic heterogeneity of G6PD deficiency.

  1. The Interplay of nitric oxide and hemoglobin in hemolytic anemia : consequences for parasite and host during malaria

    E-print Network

    Sobolewski, Peter

    2006-01-01

    site viability and red cell permeability were assessed afterwas used to assess cell permeability. In the untreatedpermeability (f). The low NO bioavailability (a-d), prevents NO from signaling to smooth muscle cells

  2. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  3. Severe Aplastic Anemia Associated With Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    de Masson, Adèle; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Benhamou, Ygal; Moluçon-Chabrot, Cécile; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Laquerrière, Annie; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Michonneau, David; Leguy-Seguin, Vanessa; Rybojad, Michel; Bonnotte, Bernard; Jardin, Fabrice; Lévesque, Hervé; Bagot, Martine; Socié, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Diffuse eosinophilic fasciitis (Shulman disease) is a rare sclerodermiform syndrome that, in most cases, resolves spontaneously or after corticosteroid therapy. It has been associated with hematologic disorders, such as aplastic anemia. The clinical features and long-term outcomes of patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia have been poorly described. We report the cases of 4 patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated severe aplastic anemia. For 3 of these patients, aplastic anemia was refractory to conventional immunosuppressive therapy with antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporine. One of the patients received rituximab as a second-line therapy with significant efficacy for both the skin and hematologic symptoms. To our knowledge, this report is the first to describe rituximab used to treat eosinophilic fasciitis with associated aplastic anemia. In a literature review, we identified 19 additional cases of eosinophilic fasciitis and aplastic anemia. Compared to patients with isolated eosinophilic fasciitis, patients with eosinophilic fasciitis and associated aplastic anemia were more likely to be men (70%) and older (mean age, 56 yr; range, 18–71 yr). Corticosteroid-containing regimens improved skin symptoms in 5 (42%) of 12 cases but were ineffective in the treatment of associated aplastic anemia in all but 1 case. Aplastic anemia was profound in 13 cases (57%) and was the cause of death in 8 cases (35%). Only 5 patients (22%) achieved long-term remission (allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: n = 2; cyclosporine-containing regimen: n = 2; high-dose corticosteroid-based regimen: n = 1). PMID:23429351

  4. SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Genetics, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatments

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Genetics, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatments Iris Jovel Biochemistry 118Q #12;THE DISEASE: SICKLE CELL ANEMIA (SCA) Most common inherited blood, sickle shape #12;IMPLICATIONS OF SICKLE CELL ANEMIA Misshapen and rigid RBC fail

  5. Hemolytic activity of venom from crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci spines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The crown-of-thorns starfish Acanthaster planci is a venomous species from Taiwan whose venom provokes strong hemolytic activity. To understand the hemolytic properties of A. planci venom, samples were collected from A. planci spines in the Penghu Islands, dialyzed with distilled water, and lyophilized into A. planci spine venom (ASV) powder. Results Both crude venom and ASV cause 50% hemolysis at a concentration of 20 ?g/mL. The highest hemolytic activity of ASV was measured at pH 7.0-7.4; ASV-dependent hemolysis was sharply reduced when the pH was lower than 3 or greater than 8. There was almost no hemolytic activity when the Cu2+ concentration was increased to 10 mM. Furthermore, incubation at 100°C for 30 to 60 minutes sharply decreased the hemolytic activity of ASV. After treatment with the protease ?-chymotrypsin, the glycoside hydrolase cellulase, and the membrane component cholesterin, the hemolytic activity of ASV was significantly inhibited. Conclusions The results of this study provide fundamental information about A. planci spine venom. The hemolytic activity was affected by pH, temperature, metal ions, EDTA, cholesterin, proteases, and glycoside hydrolases. ASV hemolysis was inhibited by Cu2+, cholesterin, ?-chymotrypsin, and cellulose, factors that might prevent the hemolytic activity of venom and provide the medical treatment for sting. PMID:24063308

  6. Hemolytic Porcine Intestinal Escherichia coli without Virulence-Associated Genes Typical of Intestinal Pathogenic E. coli ? †

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  7. Hemolytic porcine intestinal Escherichia coli without virulence-associated genes typical of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Schierack, Peter; Weinreich, Joerg; Ewers, Christa; Tachu, Babila; Nicholson, Bryon; Barth, Stefanie

    2011-12-01

    Testing 1,666 fecal or intestinal samples from healthy and diarrheic pigs, we obtained hemolytic Escherichia coli isolates from 593 samples. Focusing on hemolytic E. coli isolates without virulence-associated genes (VAGs) typical for enteropathogens, we found that such isolates carried a broad variety of VAGs typical for extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli. PMID:21965399

  8. Bilateral nephrectomy stopped disease progression in plasma-resistant hemolytic uremic syndrome with neurological signs and coma.

    PubMed

    Remuzzi, G; Galbusera, M; Salvadori, M; Rizzoni, G; Paris, S; Ruggenenti, P

    1996-01-01

    Four women were admitted over three years because of anemia and renal failure. They had evidence of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with severe vascular involvement and glomerular collapse. Despite intensive plasma exchange, all patients developed neurologic signs (with seizures and coma in 2) and papilledema. Three developed refractory hypertension and three required dialysis. All patients had abnormal von Willebrand factor (vWF) fragmentation as reflected by decreased high molecular weight and increased low molecular weight vWF multimers in the circulation. Assuming that the disease was sustained by shear stress-induced abnormal vWF fragmentation in damaged renal microvasculature, bilateral nephrectomy was done. Surgery was followed within two weeks by complete hematologic and clinical remission consistently associated with the restoring of vWF fragmentation pathway to normal. We speculate that in HUS resistant to plasma exchange or infusion, removing the kidneys eliminates a major site of vWF fragmentation, which would limit platelet activation and protect patients from the further spreading of microvascular lesions. PMID:8770981

  9. Genetics Home Reference: Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia? anemia ; autosomal ; autosomal recessive ; cell ; deficiency ; gene ; hemoglobin ; hereditary ; hypochromic ; inherited ; iron ; metabolism ; molecule ; oxygen ; ...

  10. Anticariogenic and Hemolytic Activity of Selected Seed Protein Extracts In vitro conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ishnava, Kalpesh B; Shah, Pankit P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the anticariogenic and hemolytic activity of crude plant seed protein extracts against tooth decaying bacteria. Materials and Methods: The proteins from seeds of 12 different plants were extracted and used for antimicrobial assay against six different organisms. The extraction was carried out in 10mM of sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0). Protein concentrations were determined as described by Bradford method. Anticariogenic activity was studied by agar well diffusion method and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was evaluated by the two-fold serial broth dilution method. Hemolytic activity, treatment of proteinase K and Kinetic study in Mimusops elengi crude seed protein extract. Results: The anticariogenic assay demonstrated the activity of Mimusops elengi against Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. A minor activity of Glycine wightii against Streptococcus mutans was also found. The protein content of Mimusops elengi seed protein extract was 5.84mg/ml. The MIC values for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes against Mimusops elengi seed protein extract were 364.36?g/ml and 182.19?g/ml, respectively. Kinetic study further elucidated the mode of inhibition in the presence of the Mimusops elengi plant seed protein with respect to time. The concentration of crude extract which gave 50% hemolysis compared to Triton X-100 treatment (HC50) value was 1.58 mg/ml; which is more than five times larger than that of the MIC. Treatment with proteinase K of the Mimusops elengi seed protein resulted in absence of the inhibition zone; which clearly indicates that the activity was only due to protein. Conclusion: Our results showed the prominence of Mimusops elengi plant seed protein extract as an effective herbal medication against tooth decaying bacteria. PMID:25628685

  11. Aplastica Anemia And Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cudillo, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (aAA) is a severe and rare disease, characterized by hematopoietic bone marrow failure and peripheral cytopenia. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, activated T1 lymphocytes have been identified as effector cells. The disease can be successfully treated with combined immunosuppressive therapy or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Hepatitis-associated aplastic anemia (HAA) is a syndrome of bone marrow failure following the development of acute seronegative hepatitis. HAA syndrome most often affects young males who presented severe pancytopenia two to three months after an episode of acute hepatitis. The clinical course of hepatitis is more frequently benign but a fulminant severe course is also described. The bone marrow failure can be explosive and severe and it is usually fatal if untreated, no correlations have been observed between severity of hepatitis and AA. In none of the studies a specific virus could be identified and most cases are seronegative for known hepatitis viruses. The clinical characteristics and response to immunotherapy indicate a central role for immune-mediated mechanism in the pathogenesis of HAA. The initial target organ of the immune response is the liver as suggested by the time interval between hepatitis and the onset of bone marrow failure. Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic and blood lymphocytes with T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia. PMID:21415960

  12. Case 40. Misdiagnosis of refractory macrocytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Stringaris, Kate; Bain, Barbara

    2008-11-01

    A diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome, refractory anemia subtype, was made in an elderly Indian woman on the basis of a refractory macrocytic anemia with normal vitamin B(12) and folate assays, normal thyroid function, essentially normal liver function and normal cytogenetic analysis. Disease evolution revealed that the diagnosis was erroneous. PMID:19021064

  13. The Student with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetrault, Sylvia M.

    1981-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common and severe of inherited chronic blood disorders. In the United States, sickle cell anemia is most common among the Black population. Among the most commonly occurring symptoms are: an enlarged spleen, episodes of severe pain, easily contracted infections, skin ulcers, and frequent urination. (JN)

  14. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  15. 9 CFR 311.34 - Anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Anemia. 311.34 Section 311.34 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.34 Anemia. Carcasses...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... function of bone marrow is to produce new blood cells. In Diamond-Blackfan anemia, the bone marrow malfunctions and fails ... of developing certain cancers, including a cancer of blood-forming tissue known ... with Diamond-Blackfan anemia have physical abnormalities. They may have ...

  17. Large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe anemia treated by laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Meigs' syndrome is a rare but well-known syndrome defined as the triad of benign solid ovarian tumor, ascites, and pleural effusion. Meigs' syndrome always requires surgical treatment. However, the optimal approach for its management has not been sufficiently investigated. Case presentation We report a patient with a large twisted ovarian fibroma associated with Meigs’ syndrome, abdominal pain and severe hemolytic anemia that was treated by laparoscopic surgery. This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs’ syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach and the adverse impact that Meigs’ syndrome can have on the patient’s condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. Considering the patient’s serious clinical condition and assuming that she had Meigs' syndrome with a twisted large ovarian mass and possible hemolytic anemia, we first concentrated on effective medical management of our patient and chose the most appropriate surgical treatment after laparoscopic examination. The main aim of our initial approach was preoperative management of the anemia. Blood transfusions and glucocorticoid therapy resulted in stabilization of the hemoglobin level and normalization of the bilirubin levels, which confirmed the appropriateness of this approach. Laparoscopic surgery 4 days after admission enabled definitive diagnosis of the tumor, confirmed torsion and removed the bulky ovarian fibroma, resulting in timely resolution of symptoms, short hospitalization, relatively low morbidity and a rapid return to her social and professional life. Conclusions This case highlights the difficulties that may be encountered in the management of patients with Meigs' syndrome, including potential misdiagnosis of the tumor as a malignant ovarian neoplasm that may influence the medical and surgical approach, and the adverse impact that Meigs' syndrome can have on the patient's condition, especially if it is associated with acute pain and severe anemia. The present case suggests that laparoscopic surgery for potentially large malignant tumors is feasible and safe, but requires an appropriate medical and gynecological oncology expertise. PMID:24962423

  18. Runner's anemia and iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hunding, A; Jordal, R; Paulev, P E

    1981-01-01

    Systemic iron deficiency was found in 63 (56%) of 113 joggers and competition runners (33 women and 80 men). Thirteen women and ten men had latent anemia. A majority of the women were fertile with iron loss from menstruation; the men were runners training long distances. The average transferrin iron-binding capacity was 80 mu mol/l serum in the women and 77 (iron-binding groups) in the men. The haptoglobin and iron concentrations in serum were remarkably low (most often below 10 and 20 mu mol/l, respectively). Three of the long-distance runners ran 25 km daily. They returned with so much free hemoglobin in their plasma that an accompanying iron loss (integrated over months), if not balanced by diet, would lead to iron deficiency and anemia. Oral iron therapy (200 mg ferrous sulphate per day) normalized the hemoglobin concentration and improved the transferrin saturation fraction in 61 persons. The competition runners reported personal records. PMID:7234508

  19. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... body gets more iron than it needs? Iron overload happens when too much iron builds up in ... heart, and pancreas. Many problems can cause iron overload. Most people with hemochromatosis inherit it from their ...

  20. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have enough hemoglobin. The body needs certain vitamins, minerals, and nutrients to make enough red blood cells. ... vitamin B12, folic acid, and other vitamins and minerals Red blood count and hemoglobin level Reticulocyte count ...

  1. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Career Development Division of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites News & Resources Press Releases Spotlight On Research NHLBI ...

  2. Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... include those with high levels of iron (beef, dark green leafy vegetables, dried fruits, andnuts),vitamin B- ... meat and dairy), and folic acid (citrus juices, dark green leafy vegetables, legumes, and fortified cereals). A ...

  3. Aplastic anemia complicating orthotopic liver transplantation for non-A, non-B hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Tzakis, A G; Arditi, M; Whitington, P F; Yanaga, K; Esquivel, C; Andrews, W A; Makowka, L; Malatak, J; Freese, D K; Stock, P G

    1988-08-18

    Aplastic anemia developed in 9 of 32 patients (28 percent) undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation for acute non-A, non-B hepatitis, at one to seven weeks after the procedure. No patient previously had evidence of hematologic dysfunction or conditions known to be associated with aplastic anemia. No other cases of aplastic anemia were identified among 1463 patients undergoing liver transplantation for all other indications at the four centers participating in the study (chi-square = 415, P less than 0.001; 95 percent confidence interval for the incidence of aplastic anemia after transplantation for non-A, non-B hepatitis, 13 to 44 percent, vs. 0.00 to 0.13 percent for all other indications). The operative and postoperative treatment of these patients was not otherwise different, indicating that the aplastic anemia was a complication of the hepatitis, not of the transplantation procedure. Four of the nine patients died of complications due to infections. Three of the surviving patients have been followed for less than six months, one for one year, and one for two years. The two patients followed the longest have recovered marrow function to an appreciable degree, and two of the others have evidence of early recovery. We conclude that patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation for non-A, non-B hepatitis are at a high risk for the development of aplastic anemia. PMID:3135496

  4. APLASTIC ANEMIA COMPLICATING ORTHOTOPIC LIVER TRANSPLANTATION FOR NON-A, NON-B HEPATITIS

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, A.G.; Arditi, M.; Whitington, P.F.; Yanaga, K.; Esquivel, C.; Andrews, W.A.; Makowka, L.; Malatak, J.; Freese, D.K.; Stock, P.G.; Ascher, N.L.; Johnson, F.L.; Broelsch, C.E.; Starzl, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    Aplastic anemia developed in 9 of 32 patients (28 percent) undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation for acute non-A, non-B hepatitis, at one to seven weeks after the procedure. No patient previously had evidence of hematologic dysfunction or conditions known to be associated with aplastic anemia. No other cases of aplastic anemia were identified among 1463 patients undergoing liver transplantation for all other indications at the four centers participating in the study (chi-square = 415, P<0.001; 95 percent confidence interval for the incidence of aplastic anemia after transplantation for non-A, non-B hepatitis, 13 to 44 percent, vs. 0.00 to 0.13 percent for all other indications). The operative and postoperative treatment of these patients was not otherwise different, indicating that the aplastic anemia was a complication of the hepatitis, not of the transplantation procedure. Four of the nine patients died of complications due to infections. Three of the surviving patients have been followed for less than six months, one for one year, and one for two years. The two patients followed the longest have recovered marrow function to an appreciable degree, and two of the others have evidence of early recovery. We conclude that patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation for non-A, non-B hepatitis are at a high risk for the development of aplastic anemia. PMID:3135496

  5. [Anemia and erythropoietin in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Baginski, S; Körner, R; Frei, U; Eckardt, K-U

    2003-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells is still associated with possible adverse effects and a residual risk of transmission of viral and nonviral diseases. In addition, there is an increasing shortage of blood supply worldwide. These two facts together with the success experienced in the treatment of various types of anemia with recombinant human EPO, have recently led to an increasing interest in the anemia of critically ill patients. As in the anemia of chronic diseases there are several reasons that contribute to the development of anemia in patients on intensive care units: pre-existing anemia, blood loss, reduced red cell life span, impaired iron availability and a direct inhibition of erythropoiesis by inflammatory cytokines. The implications of anemia for the progression and prognosis of critical illness are still unclear and the optimal treatment, including optimal "transfusion triggers" remains controversial. Recombinant human EPO has been proven to be effective in ameliorating the anemia of critical illness in several pilot studies and is currently being tested in larger trials. PMID:12865954

  6. Risk Factors of Pulmonary Hypertension in Brazilian Patients with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; do Nascimento, Emilia Matos; Abelha, Renato; Queiroz, Ana Maria Mach; Connes, Philippe; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Ballas, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    This study was a prospective cross-sectional cohort study of 125 patients with sickle cell anemia (SS) between the ages of 16 to 60 years. Enrolled patients were followed-up prospectively for 15 months. Demographic, clinical, hematological and routine biochemical data were obtained on all patients. Six-minute walk test and Doppler Echocardiography were performed on all patients. A tricuspid regurgitant jet velocity (TRJV) < 2.5 m/sec was considered normal, 2.5 ? TRJV ? 3.0 was considered mild-moderate and > 3.0 m/sec, severe. Patients with abnormal TRJV were significantly older and more anemic, had significantly higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, reticulocyte count and incidence of death. The logistic multimodal model implemented for the 125 patients indicated that age was the covariate that influenced the outcome of normal or abnormal TRJV with a cutoff age of thirty-two years. The survival rate for the group of patients with creatinine (Cr) > 1.0 mg/dL was lower than the group with Cr ? 1 and normal TRJV. A coefficient matrix showed that the LDH values were weakly correlated with the reticulocyte count but strongly correlated with hemoglobin suggesting that the TRJV values were not correlated with the hemolytic rate but with anemia. Ten patients died during the follow-up of whom 7 had TRJV > 2.5 m/sec. Acute chest syndrome was the most common cause of death followed by sepsis. In conclusion, this study shows that patients with SS older than thirty-two years with high LDH, elevated TRJV, severe anemia and Cr > 1 have poor prognosis and may be at risk of having pulmonary hypertension and should undergo RHC. PMID:26335226

  7. A steryl glycoside fraction with hemolytic activity from tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Li, W W; Yeung, H W

    1986-10-01

    A hemolytic fraction has been obtained from fresh tubers of Momordica cochinchinensis. The fraction was strongly adsorbed on DEAE-Sepharose CL6B. It did not stain with Coomassie brilliant blue in SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and it gave no immunoprecipitin arcs in immunoelectrophoresis. The hemolytic activity of the fraction was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes. The behavior of the fraction in thin-layer chromatography and its positive reaction in Liebermann-Burchard test indicated that the hemolytic activity of the fraction can be attributed to a steryl glycoside(s). PMID:3821135

  8. Relationship of maternal knowledge of anemia with maternal and child anemia and health-related behaviors targeted at anemia among families in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Souganidis, Ellie S; Sun, Kai; de Pee, Saskia; Kraemer, Klaus; Rah, Jee-Hyun; Moench-Pfanner, Regina; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W; Semba, Richard D

    2012-12-01

    Our specific aim was to characterize maternal knowledge of anemia and its relationship to maternal and child anemia and to behaviors related to anemia reduction. We examined the relationship between maternal knowledge of anemia and anemia in the mother and the youngest child, aged 6-59 months, in 7,913 families from urban slums and 37,874 families from rural areas of Indonesia. Knowledge of anemia was defined based upon the mother's ability to correctly name at least one symptom of anemia and at least one treatment or strategy for reducing anemia. Hemoglobin was measured in both the mother and the child. In urban and rural areas, respectively, 35.8 and 36.9% of mothers had knowledge of anemia, 28.7 and 25.1% of mothers were anemic (hemoglobin <12 g/dL), and 62.3 and 54.0% of children were anemic (hemoglobin <11 g/dL). Maternal knowledge of anemia was associated with child anemia in urban and rural areas, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79, 1.02, P = 0.10; OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.87, 0.98, P = 0.01) in multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders. There was no significant association between maternal knowledge of anemia and maternal anemia. Maternal knowledge of anemia was significantly associated with iron supplementation during pregnancy and child consumption of fortified milk. There was no association of maternal knowledge of anemia with child deworming. Maternal knowledge of anemia is associated with lower odds of anemia in children and with some health behaviors related to reducing anemia. PMID:22241619

  9. TNF-? signaling in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Pang, Qishen

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-? is a major pro-inflammatory cytokine involved in systemic inflammation and the acute phase reaction. Dysregulation of TNF production has been implicated in a variety of human diseases including Fanconi anemia (FA). FA is a genomic instability syndrome characterized by progressive bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. The patients with FA are often found overproducing TNF-?, which may directly affect hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function by impairing HSC survival, homing and proliferation, or indirectly change the bone marrow microenvironment critical for HSC homeostasis and function, therefore contribute to disease progression in FA. In this brief review, we discuss the link between TNF-? signaling and FA pathway with emphasis on the implication of inflammation in the pathophysiology and abnormal hematopoiesis in FA. PMID:23890415

  10. Protrusio acetabuli in sickle-cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, S.; Apple, J.S.; Baber, C.; Putman, C.E.; Rosse, W.F.

    1984-04-01

    Of 155 adults with sickle-cell anemia (SS, SC), radiographs of the pelvis or hip demonstrated protrusio acetabuli on at least one side in 14 (3 men and 11 women), as indicated by projection of the acetabular line medial to the ilio-ischial line. All 14 patients had bone changes attributable to sickle-cell anemia, including marrow hyperplasia and osteonecrosis; however, the severity of femoral or acetabular osteonecrosis did not appear directly related to the protrusion. The authors conclude that sickle-cell anemia can predispose to development of protrusio acetabuli.

  11. Retrospective cohort study of 205 cases with congenital dyserythropoietic anemia type II: definition of clinical and molecular spectrum and identification of new diagnostic scores.

    PubMed

    Russo, Roberta; Gambale, Antonella; Langella, Concetta; Andolfo, Immacolata; Unal, Sule; Iolascon, Achille

    2014-10-01

    Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia II (CDA II) is a rare hyporegenerative anemia of variable degree, whose causative gene is SEC23B. More than 60 causative mutations in 142 independent pedigrees have been described so far. However, the prevalence of the CDA II is probably underestimated, since its clinical spectrum was not yet well-defined and thus it is often misdiagnosed with more frequent clinically-related anemias. This study represents the first meta-analysis on clinical and molecular spectrum of CDA II from the largest cohort of cases ever described. We characterized 41 new cases and 18 mutations not yet associated to CDA II, thus expanding the global series to 205 cases (172 unrelated) and the total number of causative variants to 84. The 68.3% of patients are included in our International Registry of CDA II (Napoli, Italy). A genotype-phenotype correlation in three genotypic groups of patients was assessed. To quantify the degree of severity in each patient, a method based on ranking score was performed. We introduced a clinical index to easily discriminate patients with a well-compensated hemolytic anemia from those with ineffective erythropoiesis. Finally, the worldwide geographical distribution of SEC23B alleles highlighted the presence of multiple founder effects in different areas of the world. PMID:25044164

  12. Successful Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation of a Patient Suffering from Type II Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia A Rare Case Report from Western India

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Gaurang; Shah, Sandip; Panchal, Harsha; Patel, Apurva; Uparkar, Urmila; Anand, Asha; Parikh, Sonia; Patel, Kinnari; Shah, Kamlesh; Revannasiddaiah, Swaroop

    2015-01-01

    The most frequent form of congenital dyserythropoiesis (CDA) is congenital dyserythropoietic anemia II (CDA II). CDA II is a rare genetic anemia in humans, inherited in an autosomally recessive mode, characterized by hepatosplenomegaly normocytic anemia and hemolytic jaundice. Patients are usually transfusion-independent except in severe type. We are here reporting a case of severe transfusion-dependent type II congenital dyserythropoietic anemia in a 5-year-old patient who has undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at our bone marrow transplantation centre. Patient has had up until now more than 14?mL/kg/month of packed cell volume (PCV), which he required every 15 to 20 days to maintain his hemoglobin of 10?gm/dL and hematocrit of 30%. His pre-HSCT serum ferritin was 1500?ng/mL and he was on iron chelating therapy. Donor was HLA identical sibling (younger brother). The preparative regimen used was busulfan, cyclophosphamide, and antithymocyte globulin (Thymoglobulin). Cyclosporine and short-term methotrexate were used for graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Engraftment of donor cells was quick and the posttransplant course was uneventful. The patient is presently alive and doing well and he has been transfusion-independent for the past 33 months after HSCT. PMID:25692053

  13. Immunosuppressive therapy for transplant-ineligible aplastic anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Körper, Sixten; Höchsmann, Britta

    2015-02-01

    Aplastic anemia is a rare life-threatening bone marrow failure that is characterized by bicytopenia or pancytopenia in the peripheral blood and a hypoplastic or aplastic bone marrow. The patients are at risk of infection and hemorrhage due to neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and suffer from symptoms of anemia. The main treatment approaches are allogeneic stem cell transplantation and immunosuppression. Here, we review current standard immunosuppression and the attempts that have been made in the past two decades to improve results: review of recent developments also reveals that sometimes not only the advent of new drugs, good ideas and well-designed clinical trials decide the progress in the field but also marketing considerations of pharmaceutical companies. Aplastic anemia experts unfortunately had to face the situation that efficient drugs were withdrawn simply for marketing considerations. We will discuss the current options and challenges in first-line treatment and management of relapsing and refractory patients with an emphasis on adult patients. Some promising new approaches are currently under investigation in prospective, randomized trials. PMID:25572607

  14. Drag reducing polymers as simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices

    E-print Network

    Shieh, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine if drag reducing polymers can be simple indicators of hemolytic potential in biomechanical devices. Specifically, three different blood pumps, known as a left ventricle ...

  15. Comparison of hemolytic activities of coal fly ash and its soluble and insoluble fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.K.; Wong, M.H.; Tam, N.F.Y.

    1986-08-01

    Coal fly ash of a particle diameter smaller than 10 ..mu..m was collected from the precipitator of a power plant in Hong Kong. Comparison of hemolytic activities between fly ash and free silica showed that fly ash had a lower biological effect than free silica. The hemolytic activities of the soluble and insoluble fractions of fly ash were further compared by two methods: total hemoglobin method and cyanmethemoglobin method. An analysis of results showed significant differences for fly ash and its soluble fraction between methods. Fly ash, which contained a silicate level similar to its insoluble fraction, had a hemolytic activity higher than the summation of both its soluble and insoluble fractions. This indicates that the hemolytic activity was independent of the silicate content in the fly ash samples.

  16. Sigma E Regulators Control Hemolytic Activity and Virulence in a Shrimp Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi

    E-print Network

    Rattanama, Pimonsri

    Members of the genus Vibrio are important marine and aquaculture pathogens. Hemolytic activity has been identified as a virulence factor in many pathogenic vibrios including V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, ...

  17. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... than for healthy people. Here are some examples. Airplane Travel and High Altitudes The farther you get ... If you have aplastic anemia, flying in an airplane or going up high in the mountains may ...

  18. Darbepoetin alfa for anemia with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seastone, David J; Gerds, Aaron T

    2015-04-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes are characterized by refractory cytopenias that lead to symptomatic anemia, bleeding, and increased risk for infections. For almost two decades, the use of darbepoetin and other erythropoietin stimulating agents to treat symptomatic anemia in lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes has been a standard of care. This practice is supported by numerous Phase I/II studies and one Phase III study demonstrating the benefit of using erythropoietin stimulating agents alone, or in combination with granulocyte colony stimulating factor, for treatment of symptomatic anemia with the goal of decreasing red blood cell transfusion requirements. This review summarizes the published experience regarding the use of erythropoietin stimulating agents, with a special focus on darbepoetin, in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and symptomatic anemia. PMID:25579702

  19. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePLUS

    ... exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re feeling constantly exhausted and sluggish, ... your body doesn’t have enough healthy red blood cells. You may either have too few red blood ...

  20. Anemia: Progress in molecular mechanisms and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Vijay G.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a major source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Here we review recent insights into how red blood cells (RBCs) are produced, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying various forms of anemia, and novel therapies derived from these findings. It is likely that these new insights, mainly arising from basic scientific studies, will contribute immensely to understanding frequently debilitating forms of anemia and the ability to treat affected patients. Major worldwide diseases that may stand to benefit from the new advances include the hemoglobinopathies (?-thalassemia and sickle cell disease), rare genetic disorders of red blood cell production, and anemias associated with chronic kidney disease, inflammation, and cancer. Promising new treatment approaches include drugs that target recently defined pathways in red blood cell production, iron metabolism, and fetal globin gene expression, as well as gene therapies using improved viral vectors and newly developed genome editing technologies. PMID:25742458

  1. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    MedlinePLUS

    Anemia - iron deficiency - children ... able to absorb iron well, even though the child is eating enough iron Slow blood loss over ... bleeding in the digestive tract Iron deficiency in children can also be related to lead poisoning .

  2. A HEMOLYTIC SYSTEM ASSOCIATED WITH ENTERITIS IN RABBITS : I. NATURE OF THE CELL CHANGE AND THE SERUM FACTORS CONCERNED.

    PubMed

    Evans, R S; Bingham, M; Weiser, R S

    1963-03-31

    A disease characterized by frequent association of enteritis and polyagglutinable cells often develops in weanling rabbits. The red cell lesion renders the cells susceptible to agglutination and hemolysis in normal rabbit sera. The degree of red cell abnormality varies among different animals and disappears when the animals recover. The abnormality of the red cells responsible for their polyagglutinability and susceptibility to hemolysis was resistant to the action of trypsin or papain and persisted in heated stroma preparations derived from polyagglutinable cells. The factors necessary for agglutination and hemolysis of the polyagglutinable cells are present in normal rabbit sera but are lacking in the sera of affected rabbits. These factors returned to normal levels as the polyagglutinable cell lesion disappeared. The sera of rabbits with polyagglutinable cells contained normal levels of complement and properdin. Whereas the agglutinating factor in normal sera is heat-stable at 56 degrees C for 30 minutes, the hemolytic factor is heat labile. The hemolytic factor is apparently distinct from complement and properdin since it was adsorbed from normal rabbit serum by zymosan or by polyagglutinable cells at 0 degrees C. However, complement was fixed when normal rabbit serum was reacted with stroma from polyagglutinable cells. Hemolysis of polyagglutinable cells by normal rabbit serum at 25 degrees C was inhibited by preliminary incubation of the mixture at 0 degrees C prior to incubation at 25 degrees C. Evidence was obtained which indicated that this inhibition was due to progression of a reaction involving Ca(++) independent of a reaction involving Mg(++). PMID:19867227

  3. Effects of co-existing microalgae and grazers on the production of hemolytic toxins in Karenia mikimotoi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weidong; Zhang, Naisheng; Cui, Weimin; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2011-11-01

    Karenia mikimotoi (Miyake & Kominami ex Oda) Hansen & Moestrup is associated with harmful algal blooms in temperate and subtropical zones of the world. The hemolytic substances produced by K. mikimotoi are thought to cause mortality in fishes and invertebrates. We evaluated the composition of the hemolytic toxin produced by K. mikimotoi cultured in the laboratory using thin-layer chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the effect of co-occuring algae ( Prorocentrum donghaiense and Alexandrium tamarense) and the cladoceran grazer Moina mongolica on hemolytic toxin production in K. mikimotoi. The hemolytic toxins from K. mikimotoi were a mixture of 2 liposaccharides and 1 lipid. Waterborne clues from P. donghaiense and A. tamarense inhibited the growth of K. mikimotoi but increased the production of hemolytic toxins. Conversely, K. mikimotoi strongly inhibited the growth of caged P. donghaiense and A. tamarense. In addition, the ingestion of K. mikimotoi by M. mongolica induced the production of hemolytic toxins in K. mikimotoi. Taken together, our results suggest that the presence of other microalgae and grazers may be as important as environmental factors for controlling the production of hemolytic substances. K. mikimotoi secreted allelochemicals other than unstable fatty acids with hemolytic activity. The production of hemolytic toxins in dinoflagellates was not only dependent on resource availability, but also on the risk of predation. Hemolytic toxins likely play an important role as chemical deterrents secreted by K. mikimotoi.

  4. Multiple myeloma in a patient with sickel cell anemia. Interacting effects on blood viscosity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I S; Yeung, K Y; Hillman, D; Lessin, L S

    1975-10-01

    Described here is a case of multiple myeloma in a patient with sickle cell anemia. Viscometric studies were made by comparing the patient's whole blood, plasma and washed red blood cells with those of a normal control subject and a patient with sickle cell anemia. Results showed that the increased viscosity of the patient's whole blood as compared with that of the control patient with sickle cell anemia was mainly due to erythrocytic interaction with the circulating abnormal immunoglobulin. It is postulated that the increased frequency of vaso-occlusive crisis that occurred in our patient in the months before the diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma, was due to this cell-protein interaction with the resulting enhancement of whole blood viscosity and the sickling phenomena. PMID:810022

  5. Mutated Fanconi anemia pathway in non-Fanconi anemia cancers

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yihang; Lee, Yuan-Hao; Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Zhang, Jun; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Fei, Peiwen

    2015-01-01

    An extremely high cancer incidence and the hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents associated with Fanconi Anemia (FA) have marked it to be a unique genetic model system to study human cancer etiology and treatment, which has emerged an intense area of investigation in cancer research. However, there is limited information about the relationship between the mutated FA pathway and the cancer development or/and treatment in patients without FA. Here we analyzed the mutation rates of the seventeen FA genes in 68 DNA sequence datasets. We found that the FA pathway is frequently mutated across a variety of human cancers, with a rate mostly in the range of 15 to 35 % in human lung, brain, bladder, ovarian, breast cancers, or others. Furthermore, we found a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between the mutated FA pathway and the development of human bladder cancer that we only further analyzed. Together, our study demonstrates a previously unknown fact that the mutated FA pathway frequently occurs during the development of non-FA human cancers, holding profound implications directly in advancing our understanding of human tumorigenesis as well as tumor sensitivity/resistance to crosslinking drug-relevant chemotherapy. PMID:26015400

  6. Deletions affecting hemolytic and toxin activities of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Bellalou, J; Sakamoto, H; Ladant, D; Geoffroy, C; Ullmann, A

    1990-01-01

    The Bordetella pertussis cyaA gene encodes a virulence factor which is a bifunctional protein exhibiting calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase and hemolytic activities (P. Glaser, H. Sakamoto, J. Bellahov, A. Ullmann, and A. Danchin, EMBO J. 7:3997-4004, 1988). We characterized the hemolytic and toxin activities of the 200-kilodalton (kDa) bifunctional (CyaA) protein and showed that, whether cell associated or secreted, the 200-kDa CyaA protein carries hemolytic and toxin functions. The catalytically active 45-kDa form of adenylate cyclase released by proteolytic digestion of the 200-kDa CyaA protein displayed neither hemolytic nor toxin activities. We constructed in-phase deletions in the 3' region of the cyaA gene, which presumably carries the hemolytic determinant, and showed that the resulting proteins exhibited wild-type adenylate cyclase activity and were secreted without processing into culture supernatants. The hemolytic activities of these mutant CyaA proteins were severely reduced, and their toxin activities were abolished. These results suggest that the structural integrity of the 200-kDa CyaA protein is necessary for toxin activity and that distinct structural determinants within the CyaA protein are involved in secretion, pore formation, and entry into target cells. Images PMID:2401563

  7. Eculizumab in Typical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) With Neurological Involvement.

    PubMed

    Pape, Lars; Hartmann, Hans; Bange, Franz Christoph; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Bueltmann, Eva; Ahlenstiel-Grunow, Thurid

    2015-06-01

    In typical hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) approximately 25% of patients show central nervous system (CNS) involvement often leading to serious long-term disabilities. We used the C5-complement inhibitor Eculizumab as rescue therapy. From 2011 to 2014, 11 children (median age 22 months, range 11-175) with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli-positive HUS requiring dialysis who had seizures (11/11) and/or were in a stupor or coma (10/11) were treated with Eculizumab. Two patients enrolled on the Safety and Efficacy Study of Eculizumab in Shiga-Toxin Producing E coli Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome (STEC-HUS) each received 6 doses of Eculizumab, 3 patients 2 doses, and 6 patients 1 dose. Laboratory diagnostics of blood samples and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed as per center practice. Data were analyzed retrospectively. Cranial MRI was abnormal in 8 of 10 patients with findings in the basal ganglia and/or white matter. A 2-year-old boy with severe cardiac involvement and status epilepticus needed repeated cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. He died 8 days after start of Eculizumab treatment. Two patients with hemorrhagic colitis and repeated seizures required artificial ventilation for 6 and 16 days, respectively. At the time of discharge, 1 patient showed severe neurological impairment and 1 mild neurological impairment. The 8 surviving patients experienced no further seizures after the first dose of Eculizumab. Three patients showed mild neurological impairment at discharge, whilst the remaining 5 showed no impairment. The platelets normalized 4 days (median) after the first dose of Eculizumab (range 0-20 days). The mean duration of dialysis after the first dose of Eculizumab was 14.1 ± 6.1 days. In children with typical HUS and CNS involvement early use of Eculizumab appears to improve neurological outcome. In severe HUS cases which progress rapidly with multiple organ involvement, late treatment with Eculizumab seems to show less benefit. We speculate that prophylactic Eculizumab therapy before development of neurological symptoms could be advantageous. PMID:26091445

  8. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  9. The CXCR4/CXCR7/SDF-1 pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of Shiga toxin–associated hemolytic uremic syndrome in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Petruzziello-Pellegrini, Tania N.; Yuen, Darren A.; Page, Andrea V.; Patel, Sajedabanu; Soltyk, Anna M.; Matouk, Charles C.; Wong, Dennis K.; Turgeon, Paul J.; Fish, Jason E.; Ho, J.J. David; Steer, Brent M.; Khajoee, Vahid; Tigdi, Jayesh; Lee, Warren L.; Motto, David G.; Advani, Andrew; Gilbert, Richard E.; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Robinson, Lisa A.; Tarr, Phillip I.; Liles, W. Conrad; Brunton, James L.; Marsden, Philip A.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a potentially life-threatening condition. It often occurs after gastrointestinal infection with E. coli O157:H7, which produces Shiga toxins (Stx) that cause hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal injury. Stx-mediated changes in endothelial phenotype have been linked to the pathogenesis of HUS. Here we report our studies investigating Stx-induced changes in gene expression and their contribution to the pathogenesis of HUS. Stx function by inactivating host ribosomes but can also alter gene expression at concentrations that minimally affect global protein synthesis. Gene expression profiling of human microvascular endothelium treated with Stx implicated a role for activation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 by their shared cognate chemokine ligand (stromal cell–derived factor-1 [SDF-1]) in Stx-mediated pathophysiology. The changes in gene expression required a catalytically active Stx A subunit and were mediated by enhanced transcription and mRNA stability. Stx also enhanced the association of CXCR4, CXCR7, and SDF1 mRNAs with ribosomes. In a mouse model of Stx-mediated pathology, we noted changes in plasma and tissue content of CXCR4, CXCR7, and SDF-1 after Stx exposure. Furthermore, inhibition of the CXCR4/SDF-1 interaction decreased endothelial activation and organ injury and improved animal survival. Finally, in children infected with E. coli O157:H7, plasma SDF-1 levels were elevated in individuals who progressed to HUS. Collectively, these data implicate the CXCR4/CXCR7/SDF-1 pathway in Stx-mediated pathogenesis and suggest novel therapeutic strategies for prevention and/or treatment of complications associated with E. coli O157:H7 infection. PMID:22232208

  10. The complex differential diagnosis between thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and the atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: Laboratory weapons and their impact on treatment choice and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Mannucci, P M; Cugno, M

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia are the hallmark of the thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs) thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). TTP, inherited or autoimmune, is mainly caused by the plasma deficiency of the von Willebrand factor cleaving protease ADAMTS13, owing to gene mutations or autoantibodies. Typical HUS is often caused by infections with Shiga-Toxin-producing Escherichia coli and thus is called STEC-HUS. The rarer atypical form of HUS is often associated with complement dysregulation, owing to the inherited deficiency or dysfunction of factor H or other complement proteins. In the past the distinction between these TMAs was almost exclusively based on clinical grounds, the term TTP being used for cases with predominant neurological involvement, STEC HUS for cases presenting with bloody diarrhea and atypical HUS identifying patients with severe renal damage. However the clinical presentation may not easily distinguish TTP from atypical HUS. A more accurate differential diagnosis has clinical implications, because plasma exchange (the treatment of choice in TTP) is much less effective in atypical HUS, which shows dramatic short- and long-term therapeutic benefits from eculizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits complement activation. This article will point out that the measurement of ADAMTS13 is able to diagnose accurately the majority of TTP cases, and that very simple tests such as the platelet count and serum creatinine can predict the deficiency of the protease with a good degree of accuracy. In atypical HUS, new methods were recently developed that not only demonstrate the activation of the complement system, i.e., the main disease mechanism, but also help to tailor the short- and long-term treatment with eculizumab. PMID:26386489

  11. Update on hemolytic uremic syndrome: Diagnostic and therapeutic recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Maurizio; Bertoni, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a rare disease. In this work the authors review the recent findings on HUS, considering the different etiologic and pathogenetic classifications. New findings in genetics and, in particular, mutations of genes that encode the complement-regulatory proteins have improved our understanding of atypical HUS. Similarly, the complement proteins are clearly involved in all types of thrombotic microangiopathy: typical HUS, atypical HUS and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Furthermore, several secondary HUS appear to be related to abnormalities in complement genes in predisposed patients. The authors highlight the therapeutic aspects of this rare disease, examining both “traditional therapy” (including plasma therapy, kidney and kidney-liver transplantation) and “new therapies”. The latter include anti-Shiga-toxin antibodies and anti-C5 monoclonal antibody “eculizumab”. Eculizumab has been recently launched for the treatment of the atypical HUS, but it appears to be effective in the treatment of typical HUS and in TTP. Future therapies are in phases I and II. They include anti-C5 antibodies, which are more purified, less immunogenic and absorbed orally and, anti-C3 antibodies, which are more powerful, but potentially less safe. Additionally, infusions of recombinant complement-regulatory proteins are a potential future therapy. PMID:24255888

  12. Thrombotic microangiopathy, hemolytic uremic syndrome, and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ruggenenti, P; Noris, M; Remuzzi, G

    2001-09-01

    The term thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) defines a lesion of vessel wall thickening (mainly arterioles or capillaries), intraluminal platelet thrombosis, and partial or complete obstruction of the vessel lumina. Depending on whether renal or brain lesions prevail, two pathologically indistinguishable but somehow clinically different entities have been described: the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Injury to the endothelial cell is the central and likely inciting factor in the sequence of events leading to TMA. Loss of physiological thromboresistance, leukocyte adhesion to damaged endothelium, complement consumption, abnormal von Willebrand factor release and fragmentation, and increased vascular shear stress may then sustain and amplify the microangiopathic process. Intrinsic abnormalities of the complement system and of the von Willebrand factor pathway may account for a genetic predisposition to the disease that may play a paramount role in particular in familial and recurrent forms. Outcome is usually good in childhood, Shiga toxin-associated HUS, whereas renal and neurological sequelae are more frequently reported in adult, atypical, and familial forms of HUS and in TTP. Plasma infusion or exchange is the only treatment of proven efficacy. Bilateral nephrectomy and splenectomy may serve as rescue therapies in very selected cases of plasma resistant HUS or recurrent TTP, respectively. PMID:11532079

  13. Hemorrhagic retinopathy in an infant with hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Geraissate, João Caetano Ávila; Yamamoto, Rafael Eidi; Isaac, David Leonardo Cruvinel; Ávila, Marcos Pereira de

    2014-01-01

    We describe the case of a 23-month-old female infant with a diagnosis of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and hemorrhagic retinopathy. The patient had a past history of abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and acute renal failure. On ophthalmologic examination, indirect ophthalmoscopy revealed extensive areas of flame-shaped hemorrhage, cotton wool spots, macular edema and optic nerve head neovascularization in both eyes. Fluorescein angiography showed severe bilateral retinal ischemia and neovascularization leakage in disk. The patient, who had the visual acuity of 20/1000 in the right eye (OD) and 20/540 in the left eye (OS) at the first examination, was treated with panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) and presented at the end of the 6th month of follow-up improvement to 20/540 in OD and 20/270 in OS. There was also a regression of disc neovascularization, hemorrhages and macular edema. Despite intense retinal ischemia, there were no complications related to angiogenesis such as vitreous hemorrhage and/or neovascular glaucoma. We describe, in this report, the association between hemorrhagic retinopathy with features of Purtscher-like disease and HUS. PMID:25627190

  14. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Sevda; Y?ld?z, Sevler; Korucu, Tuba; Gundogan, Burcu; Sunbul, Zehra Emine; Korkmaz, Hasan; Atmaca, Murad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency. Methods All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb) and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic. Findings Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%), followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%). Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients. Results The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population. Thus, the study concluded that it would be beneficial to consider the physical symptoms and to conduct the required examinations to determine anemia among this patient group. PMID:26543367

  15. THE ENDOPARASITOID Campoletis chlorideae INDUCES A HEMOLYTIC FACTOR IN THE HERBIVOROUS INSECT Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiong-Ya; Bai, Su-Fen; Li, Xin; Yin, Xin-Ming; Li, Xian-Chun

    2015-09-01

    Although lysis of invading organisms is a major innate form of immunity used by invertebrates, it remains unclear whether herbivorous insects have hemolysin or not. To address this general question, we tested the hemolytic (HL) activity of the hemolymph and tissue extracts from various stages of the polyphagous insect Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner) against the erythrocytes from chicken, duck, and rabbit. An HL activity was identified in the hemolymph of H. armigera larvae. Further studies demonstrated that the HL activity is proteinaceous as it was precipitable by deproteinizing agents. Hemolysins were found in Helicoverpa egg, larva, pupa, and adult, but the activity was higher in feeding larvae than in molting or newly molted larvae. Hemolysins were distributed among a variety of larval tissues including salivary gland, fat body, epidermis, midgut, or testes, but the highest activity was found in salivary gland and fat body. Relative to nonparasitized larvae, parasitization of H. armigera larvae by the endoparasitoid Campoletis chlorideae Uchida induced a 3.4-fold increase in the HL activity in the plasma of parasitized host at day two postparasitization. The present study shows the presence of a parasitoid inducible HL factor in the parasitized insect. The HL activity increased significantly in H. armigera larvae at 12 and 24 h postinjection with Escherichia coli. We infer the HL factor(s) is inducible or due to de novo synthesis, which means that the HL factor(s) is associated with insect immune response by inhibiting or clearance of invading organisms. PMID:25929852

  16. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acquired aplastic anemia].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2015-10-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is one of the options for curative treatment of aplastic anemia. However, physicians often hesitate in selecting this option due to the lack of ample evidence regarding the optimal conditioning regimen and long-term outcomes of allo-SCT from alternative donors. Allo-SCT is the first choice of treatment in patients under 40 years of age with stage 3-5 aplastic anemia who possess HLA-matched sibling donors. Allo-SCT from alternative donors such as unrelated individuals or employing umbilical cord blood should be considered for patients with disease refractory to immunosuppressive therapy. High dose cyclophosphamide (CY) which was formerly used as the standard conditioning regimen is currently being replaced by a reduced dose CY regimen combined with fludarabine to avoid cardiotoxicity. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation must be avoided due to the higher incidence of chronic GVHD than with bone marrow transplantation. Among transplants from alternative donors, HLA-haploidentical SCT from related donors using post-transplant CY is now attracting considerable attention due to its low transplant-related mortality and low incidence of chronic GVHD. PMID:26458455

  17. Anemia among school children in eastern Nepal.

    PubMed

    Khatiwada, Saroj; Gelal, Basanta; Gautam, Sharad; Tamang, Man Kumar; Shakya, Prem Raj; Lamsal, Madhab; Baral, Nirmal

    2015-06-01

    Anemia is one of the most common public health problems in developing countries like Nepal. This study was done to find the prevalence of anemia among the children aged 4-13 years in eastern Nepal. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012 in four districts (Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam) of eastern Nepal to find the prevalence of anemia among the school children of eastern Nepal. Children aged 4-13 years were selected randomly from different schools of above districts and 618 venous blood samples were collected. Hemoglobin level was estimated by using cyanmethemoglobin method. The mean hemoglobin level was 12.2 ± 1.82 gm/dl. About 37.9% (n = 234) children were found anemic. Anemia prevalence was 42.4% (n = 78), 31.6% (n = 60), 45.3% (n = 48) and 34.8% (n = 48) among school children of Morang, Udayapur, Bhojpur and Ilam district, respectively. The study finds anemia as a significant health problem among the school children of eastern Nepal. PMID:25828831

  18. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Wollmann, Muriel; Gerzson, Branca Maria Cerezer; Schwert, Vanessa; Figuera, Rafael Weber; Ritzel, Guilherme de Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios) in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33), and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6). The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003), and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03) compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6). Conclusion The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results. PMID:24624032

  19. An unusual case of iron deficiency anemia is associated with extremely low level of transferrin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Shuangying; Li, Huihui; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Juan; Li, Kuanyu

    2015-01-01

    A case study of a female patient, diagnosed with iron deficiency anemia, was unresponsive to oral iron treatment and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy, a clinical profile resembling the iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) disorder. However, the patient failed to exhibit microcytic phenotype, one of the IRIDA hallmarks. Biochemical assays revealed that serum iron, hepcidin, interluekin 6, and transferrin saturation were within the normal range of references or were comparable to her non-anemic offspring. Iron contents in serum and red blood cells and hemoglobin levels were measured, which confirmed the partial improvement of anemia after parenteral iron therapy. Strikingly, serum transferrin receptor in patient was almost undetectable, reflecting the very low activity of bone-marrow erythropoiesis. Our data demonstrate that this is not a case of systemic iron deficiency, but rather cellular iron deficit due to the low level of transferrin receptor, particularly in erythroid tissue. PMID:26339443

  20. Aplastic anemia in a petrochemical factory worker.

    PubMed Central

    Baak, Y M; Ahn, B Y; Chang, H S; Kim, J H; Kim, K A; Lim, Y

    1999-01-01

    A petrochemical worker with aplastic anemia was referred to our hospital. He worked in a petroleum resin-producing factory and had been exposed to low-level benzene while packaging the powder resin and pouring lime into a deactivation tank. According to the yearly environmental survey of the working area, the airborne benzene level was approximately 0.28 ppm. Exposure to benzene, a common chemical used widely in industry, may progressively lead to pancytopenia, aplastic anemia, and leukemia. The hematotoxicity of benzene is related to the amount and duration of exposure. Most risk predictions for benzene exposures have been based on rubber workers who were exposed to high concentrations. In the petroleum industry, the concentration of benzene is relatively low, and there are disputes over the toxicity of low-level benzene because of a lack of evidence. In this paper we report the case of aplastic anemia induced by low-level benzene exposure. Images Figure 1 PMID:10504154

  1. [Research Progress on Pathogenesis of Aplastic Anemia].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Yun; Liu, Ting-Ting

    2015-08-01

    Aplastic anemia is a disease characterized by low bone marrow hematopoietic function and derease of whole blood cells caused by a variety of reasons. Its pathogenesis includes abnormality of hematopoietic stem cells (seed theory), hematopoietic microenvironment (soil theory) and immune function (such as worms theory). These 3 causes of disease interact each other and facilitate the development of aplastic anemia, thereby increase the complexity of the etiological diagnosis and uncertainty of treatment. On this basis, this review summarizes the latest research progress on the blood supply of bone marrow microcirculation in the hematopoietic microenvironment, stromal cells, cytokins, the immune function of dendritic cells, natural killer cells, T cell subgroup, the secretion of cytokines, cell signal transduction, and hematopoietic stem cell gene abnormality to provides the theoretic basis for the diagnosis and treatment of aplastic anemia. PMID:26314477

  2. Nucleolar stress in Diamond Blackfan anemia pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R

    2014-06-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia is a red cell hypoplasia that typically presents within the first year of life. Most cases of Diamond Blackfan anemia are caused by ribosome assembly defects linked to haploinsufficiency for structural proteins of either ribosomal subunit. Nucleolar stress associated with abortive ribosome assembly leads to p53 activation via the interaction of free ribosomal proteins with HDM2, a negative regulator of p53. Significant challenges remain in linking this nucleolar stress signaling pathway to the clinical features of Diamond Blackfan anemia. Defining aspects of disease presentation may relate to developmental and physiological triggers that work in conjunction with nucleolar stress signaling to heighten the p53 response in the developing erythron after birth. The growing number of ribosomopathies provides additional challenges for linking molecular mechanisms with clinical phenotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease. PMID:24412987

  3. In vitro studies of the hemolytic activity of microemulsions in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Rosa M; José García-Celma, M; Pilar Vinardell, M; Mitjans, Montserrat

    2005-10-01

    Hemolytic activity in human erythrocytes as alternative to in vivo testing was used as a potential screening method to evaluate irritant potential of microemulsions for possible application in pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations. Microemulsions were prepared by mixing surfactants and oil and slowly titrating the mixtures with aliquots of phosphate buffer saline or water. All microemulsions were characterized by dynamic light scattering to determine both the mean droplet size and droplet distribution. Microemulsion droplet size decreased as aqueous component increased. No differences in droplet size were observed between formulations containing phosphate buffered saline or water. The hemolytic activity was measured photometrically by the RBC assay, based in the cell membrane lysis, to estimate the potential irritation of both surfactants and microemulsions selected with water or PBS as aqueous component. The most hemolytic microemulsions corresponded to those containing the surfactant Labrasol, with or without butyl lactate, and no differences were found between the hemolytic activity between these components and microemulsions containing them. The highest hemolytic activity of microemulsions in this study may be attributed to the excipient used in the formulations. We should avoid the use of high amounts of Labrasol and butyl lactate in microemulsions because they may be potential irritants. PMID:16054795

  4. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  5. Genetic modulation of sickle cell anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.H.

    1995-05-01

    Sickle cell anemia, a common disorder associated with reduced life span of the red blood cell and vasoocclusive events, is caused by a mutation in the {Beta}-hemoglobin gene. Yet, despite this genetic homogeneity, the phenotype of the disease is heterogeneous. This suggests the modulating influence of associated inherited traits. Some of these may influence the accumulation of fetal hemoglobin, a hemoglobin type that interferes with the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin. Another inherited trait determines the accumulation of {alpha}-globin chains. This review focuses on potential genetic regulators of the phenotype of sickle cell anemia. 125 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Scott, Angela; Glover, Jason; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Torgerson, Troy R; Xu, Min; Burroughs, Lauri M; Woolfrey, Ann E; Fleming, Mark D; Shimamura, Akiko

    2015-11-01

    Aplastic anemia in the neonate is rare. We report a case of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) presenting with neonatal aplastic anemia. This report highlights the importance of considering SCID early in the evaluation of neonatal aplastic anemia prior to the development of infectious complications. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26011426

  7. Comparison of immune manifestations between refractory cytopenia of childhood and aplastic anemia in children: A single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jun; Cheng, Yifei; Zhang, Leping

    2015-12-01

    This retrospective single-center study assessed the incidence and clinical features of immune manifestations of refractory cytopenia of childhood (RCC) and childhood aplastic anemia (AA). We evaluated 72 children with RCC and 123 with AA between February 2008 and March 2013. RCC was associated with autoimmune disease in 4 children, including 1 case each with autoimmune hemolytic anemia, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and anaphylactoid purpura. No children with AA were diagnosed with autoimmune diseases. Immune abnormalities were common in both RCC and AA; the most significant reductions were in the relative numbers of CD3-CD56+ subsets found in RCC. Despite the many similar immunologic abnormalities in AA and RCC, the rate of autoimmune disease was significantly lower in childhood AA than RCC (p=0.008, ?(2)=6.976). The relative numbers of natural killer cells were significantly lower in RCC patients than AA patients. By month 6, there was no significant difference in autoimmune manifestations between RCC and AA in relation to the response to immunosuppressive therapy (p=0.907, ?(2)=0.014). The large overlap of analogous immunologic abnormalities indicates that RCC and childhood AA may share the same pathogenesis. PMID:26427728

  8. Novel hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the intermediate subunit of Entamoeba histolytica lectin

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kentaro; Yahata, Kazuhide; Gopal Dhoubhadel, Bhim; Fujii, Yoshito; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) inhibitable lectin of Entamoeba histolytica, a common protozoan parasite, has roles in pathogenicity and induction of protective immunity in mouse models of amoebiasis. The lectin consists of heavy (Hgl), light (Lgl), and intermediate (Igl) subunits. Hgl has lectin activity and Lgl does not, but little is known about the activity of Igl. In this study, we assessed various regions of Igl for hemagglutinating activity using recombinant proteins expressed in Escherichia coli. We identified a weak hemagglutinating activity of the protein. Furthermore, we found novel hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of the lectin, which resided in the carboxy-terminal region of the protein. Antibodies against Igl inhibited the hemolytic activity of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites. This is the first report showing hemagglutinating, hemolytic and cytotoxic activities of an amoebic molecule, Igl. PMID:26354528

  9. Alloantibodies to a paternally derived RBC KEL antigen lead to hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn in a murine model

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Henry, Kate L.; Smith, Nicole H.; Hudson, Krystalyn E.; Halverson, Greg R.; Park, Jaekeun C.; Bennett, Ashley M.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Bunting, Silvia T.; Zimring, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to nonself red blood cell (RBC) antigens, either from transfusion or pregnancy, may result in alloimmunization and incompatible RBC clearance. First described as a pregnancy complication 80 years ago, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is caused by alloimmunization to paternally derived RBC antigens. Despite the morbidity/mortality of HDFN, women at risk for RBC alloimmunization have few therapeutic options. Given that alloantibodies to antigens in the KEL family are among the most clinically significant, we developed a murine model with RBC-specific expression of the human KEL antigen to evaluate the impact of maternal/fetal KEL incompatibility. After exposure to fetal KEL RBCs during successive pregnancies with KEL-positive males, 21 of 21 wild-type female mice developed anti-KEL alloantibodies; intrauterine fetal anemia and/or demise occurred in a subset of KEL-positive pups born to wild type, but not agammaglobulinemic mothers. Similar to previous observations in humans, pregnancy-associated alloantibodies were detrimental in a transfusion setting, and transfusion-associated alloantibodies were detrimental in a pregnancy setting. This is the first pregnancy-associated HDFN model described to date, which will serve as a platform to develop targeted therapies to prevent and/or mitigate the dangers of RBC alloantibodies to fetuses and newborns. PMID:23801629

  10. The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps with washout holes.

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Osamu; Nishida, Masahiro; Tsutsui, Tatsuo; Jikuya, Tomoaki; Yamane, Takashi

    2005-04-01

    The hemolytic characteristics of monopivot magnetic suspension blood pumps as a function of impeller washout hole configuration and female pivot shape are observed. The pump impellers are designed with three washout hole configurations for blood circulation, and four female pivot shapes to reduce blood stagnation and to enhance antithrombogenicity. The hemolytic characteristics of the monopivot pumps were observed to be better than those of a currently available commercial centrifugal blood pump, BP-80, and changed to be nearly equal when the female pivot shape was changed. This indicates that hemolysis in monopivot pumps is mainly caused by shear stress between the male and female pivots. PMID:15787632

  11. The Molecular Connection Between Aluminum Toxicity, Anemia,

    E-print Network

    Appanna, Vasu

    to iron deficiency (McClung et al, 2009). Gaining incredible importance as a global health issue, obesity, there is an increase in the incidence of childhood and adolescent obesity in industrialized countries where the number25 The Molecular Connection Between Aluminum Toxicity, Anemia, Inflammation and Obesity

  12. Who Is at Risk for Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... keep an infant or toddler from eating enough iron-rich foods or absorbing enough iron from foods. Older adults also are at increased risk for anemia. Researchers continue to study how the condition affects older adults. Many of ... that is low in iron, vitamins, or minerals Blood loss from surgery or ...

  13. Screening for neonatal isohemolytic anemia in calves.

    PubMed

    Luther, D G; Cox, H U; Nelson, W O

    1985-05-01

    Anti-erythrocytic immunoglobulins in serum and colostrum of 124 anaplasmosis-vaccinated cows were detected with a saline agglutination test. Positive results were correlated with the occurrence of neonatal isohemolytic anemia (NIA) in calves and were used to predict the occurrence of NIA. The disease was prevented by withholding colostrum from calves with a high potential for NIA. PMID:4003882

  14. Diagnosing and treating severe aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    McKee, Natasha

    2015-09-01

    Severe aplastic anemia is a disorder of stem cell failure, leading to pancytopenia. The condition is characterized by an impairment of the function of hematopoietic stem cells. Patients typically have fatigue, infections, and increased or unusual bleeding. A bone marrow biopsy establishes the diagnosis. Treatment includes hematopoietic stem cell transplant or immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:26302322

  15. The maternal side of Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sergio; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2014-09-18

    Fanconi anemia is characterized by a higher sensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, including aldehydes. In this issue of Molecular Cell, Oberbeck et al. (2014) reveal that detoxification of aldehydes by pregnant mothers contributes to limit the severity of the disease. PMID:25238193

  16. Mutations in the ribosomal protein genes in Japanese patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Yuki; Toki, Tsutomu; Tandai, Satoru; Xu, Gang; Wang, RuNan; Terui, Kiminori; Ohga, Shouichi; Hara, Toshiro; Hama, Asahito; Kojima, Seiji; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Yanagisawa, Ryu; Koike, Kenichi; Kanai, Rie; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Hongo, Teruaki; Park, Myoung-Ja; Sugita, Kanji; Ito, Etsuro

    2010-01-01

    Background Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, clinically heterogeneous, congenital red cell aplasia: 40% of patients have congenital abnormalities. Recent studies have shown that in western countries, the disease is associated with heterozygous mutations in the ribosomal protein (RP) genes in about 50% of patients. There have been no studies to determine the incidence of these mutations in Asian patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Design and Methods We screened 49 Japanese patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (45 probands) for mutations in the six known genes associated with Diamond-Blackfan anemia: RPS19, RPS24, RPS17, RPL5, RPL11, and RPL35A. RPS14 was also examined due to its implied involvement in 5q- syndrome. Results Mutations in RPS19, RPL5, RPL11 and RPS17 were identified in five, four, two and one of the probands, respectively. In total, 12 (27%) of the Japanese Diamond-Blackfan anemia patients had mutations in ribosomal protein genes. No mutations were detected in RPS14, RPS24 or RPL35A. All patients with RPS19 and RPL5 mutations had physical abnormalities. Remarkably, cleft palate was seen in two patients with RPL5 mutations, and thumb anomalies were seen in six patients with an RPS19 or RPL5 mutation. In contrast, a small-for-date phenotype was seen in five patients without an RPL5 mutation. Conclusions We observed a slightly lower frequency of mutations in the ribosomal protein genes in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia compared to the frequency reported in western countries. Genotype-phenotype data suggest an association between anomalies and RPS19 mutations, and a negative association between small-for-date phenotype and RPL5 mutations. PMID:20378560

  17. A Novel Quantitative Hemolytic Assay Coupled with Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms Analysis Enabled Early Diagnosis of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome and Identified Unique Predisposing Mutations in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Yoko; Miyata, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Masanori; Shirotani-Ikejima, Hiroko; Uchida, Yumiko; Ohyama, Yoshifumi; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Fujimura, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    For thrombotic microangiopathies (TMAs), the diagnosis of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is made by ruling out Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC)-associated HUS and ADAMTS13 activity-deficient thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), often using the exclusion criteria for secondary TMAs. Nowadays, assays for ADAMTS13 activity and evaluation for STEC infection can be performed within a few hours. However, a confident diagnosis of aHUS often requires comprehensive gene analysis of the alternative complement activation pathway, which usually takes at least several weeks. However, predisposing genetic abnormalities are only identified in approximately 70% of aHUS. To facilitate the diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS, we describe a quantitative hemolytic assay using sheep red blood cells (RBCs) and human citrated plasma, spiked with or without a novel inhibitory anti-complement factor H (CFH) monoclonal antibody. Among 45 aHUS patients in Japan, 24% (11/45) had moderate-to-severe (?50%) hemolysis, whereas the remaining 76% (34/45) patients had mild or no hemolysis (<50%). The former group is largely attributed to CFH-related abnormalities, and the latter group has C3-p.I1157T mutations (16/34), which were identified by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Thus, a quantitative hemolytic assay coupled with RFLP analysis enabled the early diagnosis of complement-mediated aHUS in 60% (27/45) of patients in Japan within a week of presentation. We hypothesize that this novel quantitative hemolytic assay would be more useful in a Caucasian population, who may have a higher proportion of CFH mutations than Japanese patients. PMID:25951460

  18. Role of Anemia in Home Oxygen Therapy in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Copur, Ahmet Sinan; Fulambarker, Ashok; Molnar, Janos; Nadeem, Rashid; McCormack, Charles; Ganesh, Aarthi; Kheir, Fayez; Hamon, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a known comorbidity found in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. Hypoxemia is common and basically due to ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch in COPD. Anemia, by decreasing arterial oxygen content, may be a contributing factor for decreased delivery of oxygen to tissues. The objective of this study is to determine if anemia is a factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. The study was designed as a retrospective, cross-sectional, observational chart review. Patients who were referred for home oxygen therapy evaluation were selected from the computerized patient record system. Demographic data, oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise, pulmonary function test results, hemoglobin level, medications, reason for anemia, comorbid diseases, and smoking status were recorded. The ? tests, independent sample t tests, and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis. Only 356 of total 478 patient referrals had a diagnosis of COPD over a 2-year period. Although 39 of them were excluded, 317 patients were included in the study. The overall rate of anemia was 38% in all COPD patients. Anemia was found significantly more frequent in COPD patients on home oxygen therapy (46%) than those not on home oxygen therapy (18.5%) (P < 0.0001). Mean saturation of peripheral oxygen values were significantly lower in anemic COPD patients both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.0001). Also, in COPD patients, age, Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease class, smoking status, hemoglobin level, hematocrit, percent of forced expiratory volume in first second, forced expiratory volume in first second/forced vital capacity, residual volume/total lung volume, percent of carbon monoxide diffusion capacity were significantly different between home oxygen therapy and those not on home oxygen therapy (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression showed that anemia remained a strong predictor for long-term oxygen therapy use in COPD patients after adjusting for other significant parameters. Anemic COPD patients are more hypoxic especially during exercise than those who are not anemic. We conclude that anemia is a contributing factor in qualifying COPD patients for home oxygen therapy. PMID:23567789

  19. Cytomorphometric and cytomorphologic analysis of oral mucosa in children with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Paraizo, Juliana Umetsu; Rech, Itauana Aliete Vettorello; Azevedo-Alanis, Luciana Reis; Pianovski, Mara Albonei Dudeque; De Lima, Antonio Adilson Soares; Machado, Maria Ângela Naval

    2013-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder, characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs, consequence of vaso occlusive phenomenon and vasculopathy. Several forms of the chronic anemia, consequence of hemolysis, can be associated with oral epithelial cells changes. Exfoliative cytology can be used to detect real changes in the oral mucosa in SCA. Aims: To evaluate morphometric and morphological changes in oral epithelial cells by exfoliative cytology in children with SCA. Materials and Methods: Oral smears were collected from clinically normal-appearing mucosa by liquid-based exfoliative cytology in 20 SCA children (SCA group) and 20 healthy children (C group), matched for age and gender. The slides were prepared and stained by the Papanicolaou technique. Cell morphology and cellularity were analyzed and compared by Chi-square test (P < 0.05). Images of 50 cells per slide were captured and the nuclear area (NA) and cytoplasmic area (CA) were analyzed using an image analysis system. The nucleus-to-cytoplasmic area ratio (NA/CA) was calculated. To compare the means of groups SCA and C, the Student's t-test (P < 0.05) was applied to NA and CA; test non-parametric Mann Whitney U (P < 0.05) was used to compare NA/CA. Results: Mean values for SCA and C groups were: NA (69.38 and 59.63 ?m²; P = 0.01); CA (2321.85 and 2185.60 ?m²; P = 0.24); NA/CA (0.03 and 0.02; P = 0.13), respectively. A significant increase in NA for SCA group (P = 0.01) was seen. No morphological differences were found between the groups. There was a predominance of nucleated cells of the superficial layer in the smears of both groups. Class I smears were predominant in both groups. Conclusions: This study revealed that SCA was able to induce significant changes on nuclear area of the oral epithelial cells. PMID:23833399

  20. Severe malarial anemia: innate immunity and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Douglas J; Were, Tom; Davenport, Gregory C; Kempaiah, Prakasha; Hittner, James B; Ong'echa, John Michael

    2011-01-01

    Greater than 80% of malaria-related mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa due to infections with Plasmodium falciparum. The majority of P. falciparum-related mortality occurs in immune-naïve infants and young children, accounting for 18% of all deaths before five years of age. Clinical manifestations of severe falciparum malaria vary according to transmission intensity and typically present as one or more life-threatening complications, including: hyperparasitemia; hypoglycemia; cerebral malaria; severe malarial anemia (SMA); and respiratory distress. In holoendemic transmission areas, SMA is the primary clinical manifestation of severe childhood malaria, with cerebral malaria occurring only in rare cases. Mortality rates from SMA can exceed 30% in pediatric populations residing in holoendemic transmission areas. Since the vast majority of the morbidity and mortality occurs in immune-naïve African children less than five years of age, with SMA as the primary manifestation of severe disease, this review will focus primarily on the innate immune mechanisms that govern malaria pathogenesis in this group of individuals. The pathophysiological processes that contribute to SMA involve direct and indirect destruction of parasitized and non-parasitized red blood cells (RBCs), inefficient and/or suppression of erythropoiesis, and dyserythropoiesis. While all of these causal etiologies may contribute to reduced hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations in malaria-infected individuals, data from our laboratory and others suggest that SMA in immune-naïve children is characterized by a reduced erythropoietic response. One important cause of impaired erythroid responses in children with SMA is dysregulation in the innate immune response. Phagocytosis of malarial pigment hemozoin (Hz) by monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils is a central factor for promoting dysregulation in innate inflammatory mediators. As such, the role of P. falciparum-derived Hz (PfHz) in mediating suppression of erythropoiesis through its ability to cause dysregulation in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factors, chemokines, and effector molecules is discussed in detail. An improved understanding of the etiological basis of suppression of erythropoietic responses in children with SMA may offer the much needed therapeutic alternatives for control of this global disease burden. PMID:22110393

  1. 78 FR 79469 - Strategies To Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Globulin Infusions; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public... Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions.'' The purpose of the public workshop is to... complication of Immune Globulin Intravenous (IGIV) (Human) infusion. Complications of hemolysis include...

  2. Escherichia coli O 157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome after ingestion of contaminated hamburgers.

    PubMed

    Brandt, J R; Fouser, L S; Watkins, S L; Zelikovic, I; Tarr, P I; Nazar-Stewart, V; Avner, E D

    1994-10-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of 37 children with Escherichia coli O157:H7-associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The infection was traced to contaminated hamburgers at a fast-food restaurant chain. Within 5 days of the first confirmed case, the Washington State Department of Health identified the source and interrupted transmission of infection. Ninety-five percent of the children initially had severe hemorrhagic colitis. Nineteen patients (51%) had significant extrarenal abnormalities, including pancreatitis, colonic necrosis, glucose intolerance, coma, stroke, seizures, myocardial dysfunction, pericardial effusions, adult respiratory disease syndrome, and pleural effusions. Three deaths occurred, each in children with severe multisystem disease. At follow-up two children have significant impairment of renal function (glomerular filtration rate < 80 ml/min/per 1.73 Hm2); both of these children have a normal serum creatinine concentration. Hemolytic-uremic syndrome is the most common cause of acute renal failure in children, and this experience emphasizes the systemic nature of this disease. Clinicians should anticipate that multisystem involvement may occur in these patients, necessitating acute intervention or chronic follow-up. This outbreak of Hemolytic-uremic syndrome also highlights the microbiologic hazards of inadequately prepared food and emphasizes the importance of public health intervention in controlling Hemolytic-uremic syndrome. PMID:7931869

  3. Comparing micellar, hemolytic, and antibacterial properties of di-and tricarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles

    E-print Network

    Falkinham, Joseph

    amphiphiles Bhadreshkumar B. Maisuria a, , Marcelo L. Actis a,à , Shauntrece N. Hardrict a,§ , Joseph O April 2011 Keywords: Dendritic amphiphiles Staphylococcus aureus MRSA Critical micelle concentrations Hemolytic activities a b s t r a c t Homologous dicarboxyl dendritic amphiphiles--RCONHC(CH3)(CH2CH2COOH)2

  4. Dissociation of antimicrobial and hemolytic activities of gramicidin?S through N-methylation modification.

    PubMed

    Li, Yangmei; Bionda, Nina; Yongye, Austin; Geer, Phaedra; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Martinez, Karina; Houghten, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    ?-Sheet antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well recognized as promising candidates for the treatment of multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. To dissociate antimicrobial activity and hemolytic effect of ?-sheet AMPs, we hypothesize that N-methylation of the intramolecular hydrogen bond(s)-forming amides could improve their specificities for microbial cells over human erythrocytes. We utilized a model ?-sheet antimicrobial peptide, gramicidin?S (GS), to study the N-methylation effects on the antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. We synthesized twelve N-methylated GS analogues by replacement of residues at the ?-strand and ?-turn regions with N-methyl amino acids, and tested their antimicrobial and hemolytic activities. Our experiments showed that the HC50 values increased fivefold compared with that of GS, when the internal hydrogen-bonded leucine residue was methylated. Neither hemolytic effect nor antimicrobial activity changed when proline alone was replaced with N-methylalanine in the ?-turn region. However, analogues containing N-methylleucine at ?-strand and N-methylalanine at ?-turn regions exhibited a fourfold increase in selectivity index compared to GS. We also examined the conformation of these N-methylated GS analogues using (1)H?NMR and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy in aqueous solution, and visualized the backbone structures and residue orientations using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that N-methylation of the internal hydrogen bond-forming amide affected the conformation, backbone shape, and side chain orientation of GS. PMID:24023000

  5. Anemia among Primary School Children in Eastern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Anemia during childhood impairs physical growth, cognitive development and school performance. Identifying the causes of anemia in specific contexts can help efforts to prevent negative consequences of anemia among children. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and identify correlates of anemia among school children in Eastern Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted from January 2012 to February 2012 in Kersa, Eastern Ethiopia. The study included randomly selected primary school students. Hemoglobin concentration was measured using a Hemocue haemoglobinometer. A child was identified as anemic if the hemoglobin concentration was <11.5 g/dl for children (5–11 yrs) and < 12 g/dl for child older than 12 years age. Poisson regression model with robust variance was used to calculate prevalence ratios. Result The overall prevalence of anemia was 27.1% (95% CI: 24.98, 29.14): 13.8% had mild, 10.8% moderate, and 2.3% severe anemia. Children with in the age group of 5-9 years (APR, 1.083; 95% CI, 1.044- 1.124) were at higher risk for anemia. Paternal education (Illiterate, 1.109; 1.044 - 1.178) was positively associated with anemia. Children who had irregular legume consumption (APR, 1.069; 95% CI, 1.022 -1.118) were at higher risk for anemia. Conclusion About a quarter of school children suffer from anemia and their educational potential is likely to be affected especially for those with moderate and severe anemia. Child age, irregular legume consumption, and low paternal schooling were associated with anemia. Intervention programmes aimed to reduce anemia among school children are crucial to ensure proper growth and development of children. PMID:25902055

  6. [Molecular study of Fanconi anemia in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Bouchlaka, Chiraz; Abdelhak, Sonia; Dellagi, Koussay

    2004-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive rare disease characterized by progressive pancytopenia, congenital malformations and predisposition to acute myeloid leukemia. Fanconi anemia is genetically heterogeneous, with at least eight complementation groups of FA (FAA to FAD2). In order to characterize the molecular defects underlying FA in Tunisia, fourty-one families were genotyped with microsatellite markers linked to known FA gene. Haplotype analysis and homozygosity mapping showed that 92% of these families belong to FAA group. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the molecular analysis for a better selection of bone marrow graft donor and for the evaluation of chimerism after bone marrow transplantation. This study also allows genetic counselling for FA family members. PMID:15453041

  7. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...aids in the diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo survival of mature red blood cells and inability of the bone marrow to compensate for their decreased life span) and sickle cell anemia....

  8. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo survival of mature red blood cells and inability of the bone marrow to compensate for their decreased life span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  9. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo survival of mature red blood cells and inability of the bone marrow to compensate for their decreased life span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  10. 21 CFR 866.5490 - Hemopexin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... diagnosis of various hematologic disorders, such as hemolytic anemia (anemia due to shortened in vivo survival of mature red blood cells and inability of the bone marrow to compensate for their decreased life span) and sickle cell anemia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is...

  11. Kleine–Levin syndrome with comorbid iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rajendra Singh; Kumar, Sunil; Srivastava, Trilochan; Sannegowda, Raghavendra Bakki

    2015-01-01

    Kleine–Levin syndrome (KLS) is a rare chronic sleep disorder of unknown etiopathology, which typically occurs in adolescent males. Although the severity of symptoms and disease course varies between the KLS patients, it usually resolves spontaneously, but sometime comorbid conditions may worsen the symptoms. Herein, we report a case of KLS who presented with severe episodic hypersomnia. During episodes, the patient used to sleep as long as 20 h in a day, affecting his daily living activities. All the relevant investigations including electroencephalography, magnetic resonance imaging of brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal except for severe iron deficiency anemia (IDA). In our patient, the severity of symptoms worsened due to coexistent IDA. The treatment of IDA along with modafinil decreased the severity of symptoms and shortened the hospital stay during episodes. This might be the first case report of KLS with comorbid IDA. PMID:26634130

  12. Diagnosis and classification of pernicious anemia.

    PubMed

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Antico, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Pernicious anemia (PA) is a complex disorder consisting of hematological, gastric and immunological alterations. Diagnosis of PA relies on histologically proven atrophic body gastritis, peripheral blood examination showing megaloblastic anemia with hypersegmented neutrophils, cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor and to gastric parietal cells. Anti-parietal cell antibodies are found in 90% of patients with PA, but have low specificity and are seen in atrophic gastritis without megaloblastic anemia as well as in various autoimmune disorders. Anti-intrinsic factor antibodies are less sensitive, being found in only 60% of patients with PA, but are considered highly specific for PA. The incidence of PA increases with age and is rare in persons younger than 30 years of age. The highest prevalence is seen in Northern Europeans, especially those in the United Kingdom and Scandinavia, although PA has been reported in virtually every ethnic group. Because of the complexity of the diagnosis, PA prevalence is probably underestimated and no reliable data are available on the risk of gastric cancer as the end-stage evolution of atrophic gastritis in these patients. PMID:24424200

  13. [Copper deficiency anemia morphologically mimicking myelodysplastic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Taku; Mori, Takehiko; Shimizu, Takayuki; Morita, Shinya; Kono, Hidaka; Nakagawa, Ken; Mitsuhasi, Takayuki; Murata, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2014-03-01

    A 64-year-old man underwent kidney transplantation for progressive chronic renal failure which had developed 8 years after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. Because of post-operative complications, he had been placed on intravenous hyperalimentation. Three months after the transplantation, anemia rapidly progressed (hemoglobin, 7.9 g/dl). The proportion of reticulocytes was 0.2%, but white blood cell and platelet counts remained within normal ranges. Serum iron, vitamin B12, and folate levels were normal. Bone marrow examination showed the presence of ringed sideroblasts and cytoplasmic vacuoles in a fraction of erythroid cells. Megakaryocytes were adequate in number with normal morphology. Although the findings were consistent with refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts according to the WHO classification, cytoplasmic vacuolations were also observed in myeloid cells, suggesting copper deficiency. Indeed, serum copper and ceruloplasmin levels were found to be low (33 ?g/dl and 11 mg/dl, respectively), and oral copper supplementation at a daily dose of 1 mg was initiated. There was a prompt increase in reticulocytes, and the hemoglobin level was normalized within one month, in response to this regimen. In progressive anemia cases with ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow, copper deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis. PMID:24681939

  14. HIV Symptom Burden and Anemia among HIV-Positive Individuals: Cross-Sectional Results of a Community-Based Positive Living with HIV (POLH) Study in Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Catherine; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Poudel, Krishna C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has reported high rates of anemia in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in hospital or tertiary care settings. The objective of this community-based study was to measure the prevalence of anemia and describe the risk factors, with a specific emphasis on HIV symptom burden, in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 319 PLWHA residing in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. We recruited participants from five non-governmental organizations in the Kathmandu Valley. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used. Results Our study found a 55.8% prevalence of anemia in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley. The prevalence of anemia among the participants with first, second, third, and fourth quartiles of HIV symptom burden was 44.8%, 49.3%, 60.3%, and 69.6%, respectively. Compared to the participants with lowest level of HIV symptom burden, the participants with highest level of HIV symptom burden were more likely to have anemia (adjusted odds ratio?=?2.14; 95% confidence interval?=?1.07 to 4.30). Conclusion Due to a high prevalence of anemia in a community-based sample of PLWHA, HIV patients should be counseled on their risk of developing anemia and encouraged to seek timely care for HIV symptoms. PMID:25551656

  15. Diamond-Blackfan anemia: genotype-phenotype correlations in Italian patients with RPL5 and RPL11 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Quarello, Paola; Garelli, Emanuela; Carando, Adriana; Brusco, Alfredo; Calabrese, Roberto; Dufour, Carlo; Longoni, Daniela; Misuraca, Aldo; Vinti, Luciana; Aspesi, Anna; Biondini, Laura; Loreni, Fabrizio; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo

    2010-01-01

    Background Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare, pure red blood cell aplasia of childhood due to an intrinsic defect in erythropoietic progenitors. About 40% of patients display various malformations. Anemia is corrected by steroid treatment in more than 50% of cases; non-responders need chronic transfusions or stem cell transplantation. Defects in the RPS19 gene, encoding the ribosomal protein S19, are the main known cause of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and account for more than 25% of cases. Mutations in RPS24, RPS17, and RPL35A described in a minority of patients show that Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of ribosome biogenesis. Two new genes (RPL5, RPL11), encoding for ribosomal proteins of the large subunit, have been reported to be involved in a considerable percentage of patients. Design and Methods In this genotype-phenotype analysis we screened the coding sequence and intron-exon boundaries of RPS14, RPS16, RPS24, RPL5, RPL11, and RPL35A in 92 Italian patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia who were negative for RPS19 mutations. Results About 20% of the patients screened had mutations in RPL5 or RPL11, and only 1.6% in RPS24. All but three mutations that we report here are new mutations. No mutations were found in RPS14, RPS16, or RPL35A. Remarkably, we observed a higher percentage of somatic malformations in patients with RPL5 and RPL11 mutations. A close association was evident between RPL5 mutations and craniofacial malformations, and between hand malformations and RPL11 mutations. Conclusions Mutations in four ribosomal proteins account for around 50% of all cases of Diamond-Blackfan anemia in Italian patients. Genotype-phenotype data suggest that mutation screening should begin with RPL5 and RPL11 in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with malformations. PMID:19773262

  16. Anemia Among Children Exposed to Polyparasitism in Coastal Kenya.

    PubMed

    Chang Cojulun, Alicia; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Sutherland, Laura J; Mungai, Peter L; Mutuku, Francis; Muchiri, Eric; Kitron, Uriel; King, Charles H

    2015-11-01

    Anemia represents a substantial problem for children living in areas with limited resources and significant parasite burden. We performed a cross-sectional study of 254 Kenyan preschool- and early school-age children in a setting endemic for multiple chronic parasitic infections to explore mechanisms of their anemia. Complete venous blood cell counts revealed a high prevalence of local childhood anemia (79%). Evaluating the potential links between low hemoglobin and socioeconomic factors, nutritional status, hemoglobinopathy, and/or parasite infection, we identified age < 9 years (odds ratio [OR]: 12.0, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.4, 33) and the presence of asymptomatic malaria infection (OR: 6.8, 95% CI: 2.1, 22) as the strongest independent correlates of having anemia. A total of 130/155 (84%) of anemic children with iron studies had evidence of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), 16% had non-IDA; 50/52 of additionally tested anemic children met soluble transferrin-receptor (sTfR) criteria for combined anemia of inflammation (AI) with IDA. Children in the youngest age group had the greatest odds of iron deficiency (OR: 10.0, 95% CI: 3.9, 26). Although older children aged 9-11 years had less anemia, they had more detectable malaria, Schistosoma infection, hookworm, and proportionately more non-IDA. Anemia in this setting appears multifactorial such that chronic inflammation and iron deficiency need to be addressed together as part of integrated management of childhood anemia. PMID:26324733

  17. Nutrient Intake and Anemia Risk in the WHI Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanaway, Jeffrey; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Snetselaar, Linda G.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Arendell, Leslie; Chen, Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Nutritional anemia among post-menopausal women is preventable; recent data on prevalence are limited. Objective To investigate the association between nutrient intakes and anemia prevalence, in relation to both incidence and persistence, in a longitudinal sample of post-menopausal women. We hypothesized that anemia prevalence, incidence and persistence would be greater among women reporting lower intake of B12, folate and iron. Design Prospective cohort analysis. Participants/setting Observational Cohort of the Women’s Health Initiative(WHI-OS) including 93,676 postmenopausal women, age 50 to 79 years, were recruited across the United States at 40 clinical study sites. Women were enrolled between 1993 and 1998; data collection for these analyses continued through 2000. Main outcome measures Anemia was defined as a blood hemoglobin concentration of <12.0 mg/dL. Persistent anemia was defined as anemia present at each measurement time point. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaire for iron, folate, B12, red meat and cold breakfast cereal; inadequacies were based on dietary reference intakes for women over age 50 years. Statistical analysis Descriptive statistics (mean and standard deviation) were used to characterize the population demographics, anemia rates and diet. Unconditional logistic regression was used to investigate associations between diet and incident and persistent anemia. Associations are presented as odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Anemia was identified in 3,979 women or 5.5% of the cohort. Inadequate intakes of multiple anemia-associated nutrients were less frequent in non-Hispanic whites (7.4%) than other race/ethnic groups (inadequacies demonstrated in 14.6 to 16.3% of sample). Age, body mass index and smoking were associated with anemia. Women with anemia reported lower intakes of energy, protein, folate, B12, iron, vitamin C and red meat. Multiple (more than a single nutrient) dietary deficiencies were associated with a 21% greater risk of persistent anemia (OR-1.21, 95% CI: 1.05–1.41) and three deficiencies resulted in a 44% increase in risk for persistent anemia (OR-1.44, 95% CI: 1.20–1.73). Conclusion Inadequate nutrient intake, a modifiable condition, is associated with greater risk for anemia in post-menopausal women participating in the WHI-OS. Efforts to identify and update incidence estimates for anemia-associated nutrient deficiencies in aging women should be undertaken. PMID:21443985

  18. Iron deficiency anemia--bridging the knowledge and practice gap.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence T; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Auerbach, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey; Ershler, William B; Ghiglione, Mary; Glaspy, John; Lew, Indu

    2014-07-01

    Despite its high prevalence, anemia often does not receive proper clinical attention, and detection, evaluation, and management of iron deficiency anemia and iron-restricted erythropoiesis can possibly be an unmet medical need. A multidisciplinary panel of clinicians with expertise in anemia management convened and reviewed recent published data on prevalence, etiology, and health implications of anemia as well as current therapeutic options and available guidelines on management of anemia across various patient populations and made recommendations on the detection, diagnostic approach, and management of anemia. The available evidence confirms that the prevalence of anemia is high across all populations, especially in hospitalized patients. Anemia is associated with worse clinical outcomes including longer length of hospital stay, diminished quality of life, and increased risk of morbidity and mortality, and it is a modifiable risk factor of allogeneic blood transfusion with its own inherent risks. Iron deficiency is usually present in anemic patients. An algorithm for detection and management of anemia was discussed, which incorporated iron study (with primary emphasis on transferrin saturation), serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, and vitamin B12 and folic acid measurements. Management strategies included iron therapy (oral or intravenous), erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and referral as needed. PMID:24931617

  19. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    Narayanavari, Suneel A.; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A.; Matsunaga, James

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity. Complementation of the mutation with the sph2 gene partially restored production of hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities. These results indicate that the sph2 gene product contributes to the hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities secreted by L. interrogans and most likely dominates those functions under the culture condition tested. PMID:26274394

  20. Role of sph2 Gene Regulation in Hemolytic and Sphingomyelinase Activities Produced by Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Narayanavari, Suneel A; Lourdault, Kristel; Sritharan, Manjula; Haake, David A; Matsunaga, James

    2015-08-01

    Pathogenic members of the genus Leptospira are the causative agents of leptospirosis, a neglected disease of public and veterinary health concern. Leptospirosis is a systemic disease that in its severest forms leads to renal insufficiency, hepatic dysfunction, and pulmonary failure. Many strains of Leptospira produce hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities, and a number of candidate leptospiral hemolysins have been identified based on sequence similarity to well-characterized bacterial hemolysins. Five of the putative hemolysins are sphingomyelinase paralogs. Although recombinant forms of the sphingomyelinase Sph2 and other hemolysins lyse erythrocytes, none have been demonstrated to contribute to the hemolytic activity secreted by leptospiral cells. In this study, we examined the regulation of sph2 and its relationship to hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities produced by several L. interrogans strains cultivated under the osmotic conditions found in the mammalian host. The sph2 gene was poorly expressed when the Fiocruz L1-130 (serovar Copenhageni), 56601 (sv. Lai), and L495 (sv. Manilae) strains were cultivated in the standard culture medium EMJH. Raising EMJH osmolarity to physiological levels with sodium chloride enhanced Sph2 production in all three strains. In addition, the Pomona subtype kennewicki strain LC82-25 produced substantially greater amounts of Sph2 during standard EMJH growth than the other strains, and sph2 expression increased further by addition of salt. When 10% rat serum was present in EMJH along with the sodium chloride supplement, Sph2 production increased further in all strains. Osmotic regulation and differences in basal Sph2 production in the Manilae L495 and Pomona strains correlated with the levels of secreted hemolysin and sphingomyelinase activities. Finally, a transposon insertion in sph2 dramatically reduced hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities during incubation of L. interrogans at physiologic osmolarity. Complementation of the mutation with the sph2 gene partially restored production of hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities. These results indicate that the sph2 gene product contributes to the hemolytic and sphingomyelinase activities secreted by L. interrogans and most likely dominates those functions under the culture condition tested. PMID:26274394

  1. Hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left heart chambers: a new sign for autopsy diagnosis of freshwater drowning.

    PubMed

    Zátopková, Lenka; Hejna, Petr; Janík, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Despite the availability of modern imaging and molecular tools, traditional autopsy, and laboratory findings remain the gold standard for the diagnosis of drowning. This article presents two cases of freshwater drowning in which hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left heart chambers was observed at autopsy. One case was a suicidal drowning of an 84-year-old man, and the other case was an accidental drowning of an 86-year-old woman. In both cases, there was marked hemolytic staining of the endocardium of the left atrium and ventricle. The endocardium of the right heart chambers was clear and transparent in appearance. Hemolytic intimal staining of the aortic root was observed in one case. Gettler's test was positive in both cases. Hemolytic discoloration of the endocardium of the left heart chambers after freshwater drowning is analogous to hemolytic staining of the aortic root. Both staining patterns result from the hypo-osmolar hemolysis that occurs in the left heart chambers and systemic circulation after hypotonic fluid passes across the alveolocapillary membrane. Hemolytic discoloration of the endocardium of the left heart chambers at autopsy may support a diagnosis of freshwater drowning. PMID:25326681

  2. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wolney de Andrade; Lopes, Heno Ferreira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda Marciano; Gualandro, Sandra de Fátima Menosi; Arteaga-Fernández, Edmundo; Mady, Charles

    2012-01-26

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated to increased cardiac output, normal heart rate (HR), abnormal QT dispersion and lower diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The mechanisms are still unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction (CAD) in SCA. The secondary objectives were to distinguish the roles of chronic anemia and hemoglobinopathy and to evaluate the predominance of the sympathetic or parasympathetic systems in the pathogenesis of CAD. Sixteen subjects with SCA, 13 with sickle cell trait (SCT), 13 with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and 13 healthy volunteers (HV) were evaluated. All subjects were submitted to 24h-electrocardiogram (24h-ECG), plasma norepinephrine (NE) measurement before and after isometric exercise (IE), and also Valsalva maneuver (VM), diving maneuver (DV), and tilt test (TT). Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was also evaluated. The minimum, average and maximum HR as well as the percentage of bradycardia and tachycardia at 24-h ECG were similar in all groups. NE at baseline and after IE did not differ between groups. The SCA group showed less bradycardia at phase IV of VM, less bradycardia during DV, and also less tachycardia and lower DBP during TT. BRS for bradycardia and tachycardia reflex was decreased in the SCA and SCT groups. In conclusion, 1) there is CAD in SCA, and it is characterized by the reduction of BRS and the limitation of HR modulation mediated by the parasympathetic system; 2) cardiovascular sympathetic activity is preserved in SCA; and 3) hemoglobinopathy is the preponderant ethiopathogenic factor. PMID:21868290

  3. Aplastic Anemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    DeZern, Amy E.; Guinan, Eva C.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent and young adult patient presentations of aplastic anemia require a particular perspective on both diagnosis and treatment. This unique age group necessitates a thorough diagnostic evaluation to ensure the etiology, acquired or inherited, is sufficiently determined. The treatment options include human leukocyte antigen-identical sibling hematopoietic cell transplantation or immunosuppressive therapy, and both require attention to the specific medical and social needs of these adolescents and young adults. Longitudinal surveillance throughout life for the development of late complications of the disease and treatment is mandatory. PMID:25228559

  4. Mast cell degranulation by a hemolytic lipid toxin decreases GBS colonization and infection

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Claire; Vornhagen, Jay; Ngo, Lisa; Whidbey, Christopher; Boldenow, Erica; Santana-Ufret, Veronica; Clauson, Morgan; Burnside, Kellie; Galloway, Dionne P.; Waldorf, Kristina Adams; Piliponsky, Adrian M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Ascending infection of microbes from the lower genital tract into the amniotic cavity increases the risk of preterm birth, stillbirth, and newborn infections. Host defenses that are critical for preventing ascending microbial infection are not completely understood. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) are Gram-positive bacteria that frequently colonize the lower genital tract of healthy women but cause severe infections during pregnancy, leading to preterm birth, stillbirth, or early-onset newborn infections. We recently described that the GBS pigment is hemolytic, and increased pigment expression promotes GBS penetration of human placenta. Here, we show that the GBS hemolytic pigment/lipid toxin and hyperpigmented GBS strains induce mast cell degranulation, leading to the release of preformed and proinflammatory mediators. Mast cell–deficient mice exhibit enhanced bacterial burden, decreased neutrophil mobilization, and decreased immune responses during systemic GBS infection. In a vaginal colonization model, hyperpigmented GBS strains showed increased persistence in mast cell–deficient mice compared to mast cell–proficient mice. Consistent with these observations, fewer rectovaginal GBS isolates from women in their third trimester of pregnancy were hyperpigmented/hyperhemolytic. Our work represents the first example of a bacterial hemolytic lipid that induces mast cell degranulation and emphasizes the role of mast cells in limiting genital colonization by hyperpigmented GBS. PMID:26425734

  5. Comparative study of hemolytic substances produced by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus strains.

    PubMed Central

    Loyer, M; Beaudet, R; Bisaillon, J G

    1990-01-01

    Hemolytic substances H7, H62, and E56, produced by Staphylococcus haemolyticus 7 and 62 and S. epidermidis 56, respectively, were purified. H7 and H62 are probably similar on the basis of their isoelectric focusing profiles in 8 M urea and complete immunological identity as revealed by immunodiffusion with rabbit anti-H7 and anti-E56 sera. For E56, we observed seven bands instead of three in isoelectric focusing and only partial immunological identity with H7 and H62. However, H7 and E56 were similar with regard to the following characteristics: hemolytic spectra against different erythrocytes, kinetics of erythrocyte lysis, heat stability, and inhibition by phosphatidylcholine. E56 was not active at a temperature lower than or equal to 25 degrees C, and its activity increased more rapidly with increased temperature compared with H7. For both substances, the complexes obtained by molecular filtration on Ultrogel AcA54 and the purified peptides by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography showed some hemolytic activity. These results suggest that a particular association or the presence of a given peptide could enhance the activity. Images PMID:2114358

  6. Atypical Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rafiq, Arsalan; Tariq, Hassan; Abbas, Naeem; Shenoy, Roopalekha

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 59 Final Diagnosis: Atyipcal hemolytic uremic syndrome Symptoms: Delirium • headache Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Hematology Objective: Rare disease Background: Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease characterized by hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and renal dysfunction. It is a disease related to genetic mutations in the alternative complement pathway and has a distinct pathophysiology but is difficult to differentiate from other thrombotic microangiopathies. Case Report: We present a case of a 59-year-old female patient who presented with accelerated hypertension, acute renal failure, hemolysis, and encephalopathy. She was managed with antihypertensive medication, but her encephalopathy did not improve. Evaluation resulted in our impression of the disease being atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The patient continued to be managed with good blood pressure control and later was started on eculizumab, but evaluation of response to therapy was hindered by the patient’s non-compliance with therapy and follow-up appointments. Conclusions: We have a very limited understanding of the genetics and epidemiology of atypical HUS, and the overlapping clinical features sometimes delay diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment of this rare disease. PMID:25708146

  7. Iron-Hepcidin Dysmetabolism, Anemia and Renal Hypoxia, Inflammation and Fibrosis in the Remnant Kidney Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Patrícia; Ribeiro, Sandra; Fernandes, João; Vala, Helena; Bronze-da-Rocha, Elsa; Rocha-Pereira, Petronila; Belo, Luís; Costa, Elísio; Santos-Silva, Alice; Reis, Flávio

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD) that develops early and its severity increases as renal function declines. It is mainly due to a reduced production of erythropoietin (EPO) by the kidneys; however, there are evidences that iron metabolism disturbances increase as CKD progresses. Our aim was to study the mechanisms underlying the development of anemia of CKD, as well as renal damage, in the remnant kidney rat model of CKD induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. This model of CKD presented a sustained degree of renal dysfunction, with mild and advanced glomerular and tubulointerstitial lesions. Anemia developed 3 weeks after nephrectomy and persisted throughout the protocol. The remnant kidney was still able to produce EPO and the liver showed an increased EPO gene expression. In spite of the increased EPO blood levels, anemia persisted and was linked to low serum iron and transferrin levels, while serum interleukin (IL)-6 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels showed the absence of systemic inflammation. The increased expression of duodenal ferroportin favours iron absorption; however, serum iron is reduced which might be due to iron leakage through advanced kidney lesions, as showed by tubular iron accumulation. Our data suggest that the persistence of anemia may result from disturbances in iron metabolism and by an altered activity/function of EPO as a result of kidney cell damage and a local inflammatory milieu, as showed by the increased gene expression of different inflammatory proteins in the remnant kidney. In addition, this anemia and the associated kidney hypoxia favour the development of fibrosis, angiogenesis and inflammation that may underlie a resistance to EPO stimuli and reduced iron availability. These findings might contribute to open new windows to identify putative therapeutic targets for this condition, as well as for recombinant human EPO (rHuEPO) resistance, which occurs in a considerable percentage of CKD patients. PMID:25867633

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

    MedlinePLUS

    ... these episodes, red blood cells are prematurely destroyed (hemolysis). Affected individuals may pass dark-colored urine due ... class ; clotting ; deficiency ; gene ; glycan ; hematopoietic ; hemoglobin ; hemoglobinuria ; hemolysis ; hemolytic anemia ; hemorrhage ; immune system ; infection ; inherited ; leukemia ; ...

  9. Etiology of Strokes in Children with Sickle Cell Anemia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBaun, Michael R.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; McKinstry, Robert C., III

    2006-01-01

    The most devastating complication of sickle cell anemia is cerebral infarction, affecting [approximately]30% of all individuals with sickle cell anemia. Despite being one of the most common causes of stroke in infants and children, the mechanism of cerebral infarction in this population has not been extensively studied and is poorly understood.…

  10. Quantifying the Rheological and Hemodynamic Characteristics of Sickle Cell Anemia

    E-print Network

    Quantifying the Rheological and Hemodynamic Characteristics of Sickle Cell Anemia Huan Lei to full occlusion in some cases. INTRODUCTION Sickle cell anemia was the first disorder to be identified a validated multiscale model of red blood cells (RBCs) to represent different sickle cell morphologies based

  11. Probing vasoocclusion phenomena in sickle cell anemia via mesoscopic simulations

    E-print Network

    Probing vasoocclusion phenomena in sickle cell anemia via mesoscopic simulations Huan Lei December 6, 2012) Vasoocclusion crisis is a key hallmark of sickle cell anemia. Although early studies groups in multiple stages. However, the quantification of the biophysical characteristics of sickle cell

  12. Anemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Jéssica; Fontela, Paula Caitano; Winkelmann, Eliane Roseli; Zimmermann, Carine Eloise Prestes; Sandri, Yana Picinin; Mallet, Emanelle Kerber Viera; Frizzo, Matias Nunes

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of anemia in DM2 patients and its correlation with demographic and lifestyle and laboratory variables. This is a descriptive and analytical study of the type of case studies in the urban area of the Ijuí city, registered in programs of the Family Health Strategy, with a total sample of 146 patients with DM2. A semistructured questionnaire with sociodemographic and clinical variables and performed biochemical test was applied. Of the DM2 patients studied, 50 patients had anemia, and it was found that the body mass items and hypertension and hematological variables are significantly associated with anemia of chronic disease. So, the prevalence of anemia is high in patients with DM2. The set of observed changes characterizes the anemia of chronic disease, which affects quality of life of diabetic patients and is associated with disease progression, development, and comorbidities that contribute significantly to increasing the risk of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26640706

  13. Mild Anemia and Pregnancy Outcome in a Swiss Collective

    PubMed Central

    Bencaiova, Gabriela; Breymann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Over half of all women in the world experience anemia during their pregnancy. Our aim was to investigate the relation between hemoglobin and iron status examined in second trimester and pregnancy outcome. Methods. In a prospective longitudinal study, 382 pregnant women were included. Blood samples were examined for hematological status and serum ferritin between 16 and 20 weeks and for hemoglobin before delivery. The adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes were determined. Regression analysis was performed to establish if anemia and low serum ferritin are risk factors for pregnancy complications. Results. There was no increase of complications in women with mild anemia and in women with depleted iron stores. The finding showed that mild iron deficiency anemia and depleted iron stores are not risk factors for adverse outcomes in iron supplemented women. Conclusions. Mild anemia and depleted iron stores detected early in pregnancy were not associated with adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes in iron supplemented women. PMID:25478229

  14. Selenium and Vitamin E as antioxidants in chronic hemolytic anemia: Are they deficient? A case-control study in a group of Egyptian children

    PubMed Central

    Hamdy, Mona M.; Mosallam, Dalia S.; Jamal, Alaa M.; Rabie, Walaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated oxidative damage is one of the hallmarks in both sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia major (TM). A decreased antioxidant level is found in both diseases. Our study was carried out to evaluate the variation in serum levels of Selenium and Vitamin E among a group of transfusion dependant Egyptian SCD and TM patients, further more to correlate these levels with iron overload status or transfusion requirements. A case-control study was conducted at the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital to assess the serum levels of Selenium using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer and Vitamin E using commercially available ELISA Kit in transfusion dependent children, 30 with beta thalassemia and 30 with SCD in a steady state aged from 6 to 18 years, these findings were compared to 30 age/sex matched healthy controls. Our results revealed a depleted antioxidants level in the studied group of Egyptian children with TM and SCD relative to healthy controls (P < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between Vitamin E levels and ferritin (r = 0.26, p = 0.047) in SCD and TM patients. Nonsignificant correlation was detected between serum Selenium and Vitamin E. Moreover, values of these antioxidants did not correlate with indices of hemolysis nor with those of inflammation in chronically transfused TM and SCD patients. PMID:26644944

  15. Selenium and Vitamin E as antioxidants in chronic hemolytic anemia: Are they deficient? A case-control study in a group of Egyptian children.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Mona M; Mosallam, Dalia S; Jamal, Alaa M; Rabie, Walaa A

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated oxidative damage is one of the hallmarks in both sickle cell disease (SCD) and thalassemia major (TM). A decreased antioxidant level is found in both diseases. Our study was carried out to evaluate the variation in serum levels of Selenium and Vitamin E among a group of transfusion dependant Egyptian SCD and TM patients, further more to correlate these levels with iron overload status or transfusion requirements. A case-control study was conducted at the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital to assess the serum levels of Selenium using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer and Vitamin E using commercially available ELISA Kit in transfusion dependent children, 30 with beta thalassemia and 30 with SCD in a steady state aged from 6 to 18 years, these findings were compared to 30 age/sex matched healthy controls. Our results revealed a depleted antioxidants level in the studied group of Egyptian children with TM and SCD relative to healthy controls (P < 0.05). A significant positive correlation was found between Vitamin E levels and ferritin (r = 0.26, p = 0.047) in SCD and TM patients. Nonsignificant correlation was detected between serum Selenium and Vitamin E. Moreover, values of these antioxidants did not correlate with indices of hemolysis nor with those of inflammation in chronically transfused TM and SCD patients. PMID:26644944

  16. The epidemiology of aplastic anemia in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Issaragrisil, Surapol; Kaufman, David W.; Anderson, Theresa; Chansung, Kanchana; Leaverton, Paul E.; Shapiro, Samuel; Young, Neal S.

    2006-01-01

    Aplastic anemia has been linked to environmental exposures, from chemicals and medical drugs to infectious agents. The disease occurs more frequently in Asia than in the West, with incidence rates 2- to 3-fold higher. We report updated results of an epidemiologic study conducted in Thailand from 1989 to 2002, in which 541 patients and 2261 controls were enrolled. Exposures were determined by in-person interview. We observed significantly elevated relative risk estimates for benzene (3.5) and other solvents (2.0) and for sulfonamides (5.6), thiazides (3.8), and mebendazole (3.0). Chloramphenicol use was infrequent, and no significant association was observed. Agricultural pesticides were implicated in Khonkaen (northeastern Thailand). There were significant associations with organophosphates (2.1), DDT (6.7), and carbamates (7.4). We found significant risks for farmers exposed to ducks and geese (3.7) and a borderline association with animal fertilizer (2.1). There was a significant association in Khonkaen with drinking other than bottled or distilled water (2.8). Nonmedical needle exposure was associated in Bangkok and Khonkaen combined (3.8). Most striking was the large etiologic fraction in a rural region accounted for by animal exposures and drinking of water from sources such as wells, rural taps, and rainwater, consistent with an infectious etiology for many cases of aplastic anemia in Thailand. PMID:16254144

  17. Microfluidic approach of Sickled Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Loiseau, Etienne; Massiera, Gladys

    2012-11-01

    Sickle Cell Anemia is a disorder of the microcirculation caused by a genetic point mutation that produces an altered hemoglobin protein called HbS. HbS self-assembles reversibly into long rope like fibers inside the red blood cells. The resulting distorded sickled red blood cells are believed to block the smallest capillaries of the tissues producing anemia. Despite the large amount of work that provided a thorough understanding of HbS polymerization in bulk as well as in intact red blood cells at rest, no consequent cellular scale approaches of the study of polymerization and its link to the capillary obstruction have been proposed in microflow, although the problem of obstruction is in essence a circulatory problem. Here, we use microfluidic channels, designed to mimic physiological conditions (flow velocity, oxygen concentration, hematocrit...) of the microcirculation to carry out a biomimetic study at the cellular scale of sickled cell vaso-occlusion. We show that flow geometry, oxygen concentration, white blood cells and free hemoglobin S are essential in the formation of original cell aggregates which could play a role in the vaso-occlusion events.

  18. Reduced dose maintenance eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS): an update on a previous case report

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Maro; Cable, Christian; Halka, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe how maintenance eculizumab sustains improved renal function in severe atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS). Case report A previously described 50-year-old woman with aHUS had a remarkable recovery with eculizumab, which safely reversed profound neurologic damage and eliminated the need for dialysis. Her recovery has been sustained on long-term eculizumab treatment. She initially received eculizumab 900 mg weekly for four doses. On week 5 she commenced maintenance therapy starting at 1200 mg every 2 weeks. Due to nausea and vomiting at that dose, the maintenance dosing was reduced to 600 mg weekly, beginning on dose seven. After receiving 600 mg weekly for nine doses, eculizumab was then reduced to 600 mg every 2 weeks, with continued improvement in renal function. This dosing is lower than the usual 1200 mg every 2 weeks described in the adult literature and used in current clinical trials of aHUS. Conclusion Six months after the initial diagnosis, our patient continues to have improved renal function on maintenance doses of eculizumab as low as 600 mg every 2 weeks. PMID:22287856

  19. COEXISTENCE OF ADDISON'S DISEASE AND PERNICIOUS ANEMIA: IS THE NEW CLASSIFICATION OF AUTOIMMUNE POLYGLANDULAR SYNDROME APPROPRIATE?

    PubMed

    Vrkljan, Ana Marija; Pašali?, Ante; Strinovi?, Mateja; Peri?, Božidar; Kruljac, Ivan; Mirošev?, Gorana

    2015-06-01

    A case of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome (APS) is presented. A 45-year-old man was admitted due to fatigue, malaise and inappetence. He had a history of primary hypothyroidism and was on levothyroxine substitution therapy. One year before, he was diagnosed with normocytic anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency, which was treated with vitamin B12 substitution therapy. Physical examination revealed hypotension and marked hyperpigmentation. Laboratory testing showed hyponatremia, hyperkaliemia and severe normocytic anemia. Endocrinological evaluation disclosed low morning cortisol and increased adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Hence, the diagnosis of Addison's disease was established. Additional laboratory workup showed positive parietal cell antibodies. However, his vitamin B12 levels were increased due to vitamin B12 supplementation therapy, which was initiated earlier. Gastroscopy and histopathology of gastric mucosa confirmed atrophic gastritis. Based on prior low serum vitamin B12 levels, positive parietal cell antibodies and atrophic gastritis, the patient was diagnosed with pernicious anemia. Hydrocortisone supplementation therapy was administered and titrated according to urinary-free cortisol levels. Electrolyte disbalance and red blood cell count were normalized. This case report demonstrates rather unique features of pernicious anemia in a patient with Addison's disease. It also highlights the link between type II and type III APS. Not only do they share the same etiological factors, but also overlap in pathophysiological and clinical characteristics. This case report favors older classification of APS, which consolidates all endocrine and other organ-specific autoimmune diseases into one category. This is important since it might help avoid pitfalls in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with APS. PMID:26415323

  20. Development, Validation, and Cost Effectiveness of Clinical Prediction Rules for Group A Beta Hemolytic Streptococcal Pharyngitis In Children From Lower and Upper Middle Income Countries

    E-print Network

    Assefa, Mehret

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from children with pharyngitisPharyngitis Group A beta hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS) isstreptococcus (GABHS), a bacterial pathogen, is responsible for pharyngitis

  1. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: from diagnosis to treatment.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is a relatively rare condition but a medical urgency requiring immediate intervention to avoid irreversible organ damage or death. Symptoms on presentation include microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and organ damage. The most frequent direct causes of TMA are thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). The most common form of HUS is related to Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infection while approximately 10% of cases are due to dysregulation of the complement pathway (atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, aHUS). Optimal treatment regimens differ depending on the underlying cause; however, differential diagnosis may be difficult. The most accurate method of diagnosis is based on exclusion and should consider, beyond the symptoms common to TMA, ADAMTS13 activity levels and STEC infection status. For the management of TTP, plasma exchange (PE) is the most important acute intervention and is associated with lower mortality and better outcomes than plasma infusion. In most patients with STEC-HUS, the course of disease is self-limiting although management of acute kidney injury is often required. Until recently, the management of aHUS consisted of early and intensive PE, although this was mostly ineffective in protecting from subsequent organ damage. Eculizumab, an inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, produces a rapid and sustained inhibition of the TMA process, with significant improvements in long-term clinical outcomes. Due to the significant improvement achieved, eculizumab has subsequently been approved as first-line therapy when an unequivocal diagnosis of aHUS has been made. PMID:25803082

  2. A high prevalence of biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency does not translate into a comparable prevalence of anemia.

    PubMed

    Metz, Jack

    2008-06-01

    Based on biochemical evidence, a high prevalence of biochemical evidence of vitamin B12 or folate deficiency has been reported in a number of areas in the world. The evidence that these biochemical abnormalities lead to a comparable prevalence of anemia is reviewed. The overall contribution of vitamin B12 deficiency to the global burden of anemia is probably not significant, except perhaps in women and their infants and children in vegetarian communities. In developed countries, folate-deficiency anemia is uncommon. In some developing countries, this anemia is still seen, but there are no comprehensive data on the relative prevalence compared with anemia due to malaria, iron-deficiency, hemoglobinopathy, and HIV disease. It seems unlikely that folate deficiency makes a major contribution to the burden of anemia in developing countries. Iron-deficiency anemia may coexist with vitamin B12 and especially folate deficiency, and may confound the hematological features of the vitamin deficiencies whose prevalence would then be underestimated. Supplementation of the diet of pregnant women with folic acid can virtually eliminate folate-deficiency anemia in these women. There are very few data on the hematological effect of vitamin B12 supplementation or fortification at the population level. The addition of vitamin B12 to the supplementation of the diet of pregnant women with iron and folic acid does not produce an increased hematological response, at least in nonvegetarian populations. There are numerous reports of the effect of folic acid fortification of food on tests of folate status, but only a single published report on the hematological response was found. PMID:18709883

  3. Diagnosis of Pernicious Anemia and the Risk of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pari; Rhim, Andrew D.; Haynes, Kevin; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Yang, Yu-Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A number of studies have demonstrated a trophic effect of gastrin on pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Pernicious anemia is a clinical condition characterized by chronic hypergastrinemia. The aim of this study is to determine if pernicious anemia is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study using the Health Improvement Network (THIN) database, which contains comprehensive health information on 7.5 million patients in the United Kingdom from 1993–2009. All patients with pernicious anemia in the study cohort were identified and composed the exposed group. Each exposed patient was matched on practice site, sex, and age with up to four unexposed patients without pernicious anemia. The outcome was incident pancreatic cancer. The hazard ratio and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Results We identified 15,324 patients with pernicious anemia and 55,094 unexposed patients. Mean follow up time was similar between groups (exposed 4.31 [standard deviation (SD) 3.38] years, unexposed 4.63 [SD 3.44] years). The multivariable adjusted hazard ratio for pancreatic cancer associated with pernicious anemia was 1.16 (95% CI 0.77–1.76, p=0.47). Conclusions There is no significant association between pernicious anemia and the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24622073

  4. Prevalence and Determinants of Anemia and Iron Deficiency in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Al Zenki, Sameer; Alomirah, Husam; Al Hooti, Suad; Al Hamad, Nawal; Jackson, Robert T.; Rao, Aravinda; Al Jahmah, Nasser; Al Obaid, Ina’am; Al Ghanim, Jameela; Al Somaie, Mona; Zaghloul, Sahar; Al Othman, Amani

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency (ID) of a nationally representative sample of the Kuwait population. We also determined if anemia differed by socioeconomic status or by RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. The subjects who were made up of 1830 males and females between the ages of 2 months to 86 years, were divided into the following age groups (0–5, 5–11, 12–14, 15–19, 20–49, ?50 years). Results showed that the prevalence of anemia was 3% in adult males and 17% in females. The prevalence of ID varied according to age between 4% (?50 years) and 21% (5–11 years) and 9% (12–14 years) and 23% (15–19 years), respectively, in males and females. The prevalence of anemia and ID was higher in females compared to males. Adults with normal ferritin level, but with low RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels had higher prevalence of anemia than those with normal RBC folate and vitamins A and B12 levels. This first nationally representative nutrition and health survey in Kuwait indicated that anemia and ID are prevalent and ID contributes significantly to anemia prevalence. PMID:26264015

  5. Anemia and risk of dementia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Hyung; Falvey, Cherie; Harris, Tamara B.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metti, Andrea L.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether anemia is associated with incident dementia in older adults. Methods: We studied 2,552 older adults (mean age 76.1 years; 38.9% black; 51.8% female) participating in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study and free of dementia at baseline. We defined anemia using WHO criteria (hemoglobin concentration <13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women). Dementia diagnosis was determined by dementia medication use, hospital records, or a change in Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) score of more than 1.5 SD from mean. Discrete time Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the hazard for developing dementia associated with anemia. Results: Of 2,552 participants, 392 (15.4%) older adults had anemia at baseline. Over 11 years of follow-up, 455 (17.8%) participants developed dementia. In the unadjusted model, those with baseline anemia had an increased risk of dementia (23% vs 17%, hazard ratio = 1.64; 95% confidence interval 1.30, 2.07) compared to those without anemia. The association remained significant after adjusting for demographics, APOE ?4, baseline 3MS score, comorbidities, and renal function. Additional adjustment for other anemia measures (mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width), erythropoietin, and C-reactive protein did not appreciably change the results. There was no interaction by sex and race on risk of developing dementia. Conclusion: Among older adults, anemia is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Findings suggest that further study of anemia as a risk factor for dementia and a target for intervention for cognitive health is warranted. PMID:23902706

  6. How I treat acquired aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.

    2012-01-01

    Survival in severe aplastic anemia (SAA) has markedly improved in the past 4 decades because of advances in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, immunosuppressive biologics and drugs, and supportive care. However, management of SAA patients remains challenging, both acutely in addressing the immediate consequences of pancytopenia and in the long term because of the disease's natural history and the consequences of therapy. Recent insights into pathophysiology have practical implications. We review key aspects of differential diagnosis, considerations in the choice of first- and second-line therapies, and the management of patients after immunosuppression, based on both a critical review of the recent literature and our large personal and research protocol experience of bone marrow failure in the Hematology Branch of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. PMID:22517900

  7. Assessing Chaos in Sickle Cell Anemia Crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Wesley; Le Floch, Francois

    2006-11-01

    Recent developments in sickle cell research and blood flow modeling allow for new interpretations of the sickle cell crises. With an appropriate set of theoretical and empirical equations describing the dynamics of the red cells in their environment, and the response of the capillaries to major changes in the rheology, a complete mathematical system has been derived. This system of equations is believed to be of major importance to provide new and significant insight into the causes of the disease and related crises. With simulations, it has been proven that the system transition from a periodic solution to a chaotic one, which illustrates the onset of crises from a regular blood flow synchronized with the heart beat. Moreover, the analysis of the effects of various physiological parameters exposes the potential to control chaotic solutions, which, in turn, could lead to the creation of new and more effective treatments for sickle cell anemia. .

  8. [Complementary treatment of acute heart failure in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or anemia].

    PubMed

    Carrasco Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Recio Iglesias, Jesús; Grau Amorós, Jordi

    2014-03-01

    Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and anemia are comorbidities with a high prevalence and impact in heart failure (HF). The presence of these comorbidities considerably worsens the prognosis of HF. Diabetic patients have a higher likelihood of developing symptoms of HF and both the treatment of diabetes and that of acute HF are altered by the coexistence of both entities. The glycemic targets in patients with acute HF are not well-defined, but could show a U-shaped relationship. Stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetic patients with HF could also have a deleterious effect on the medium-term prognosis. The inter-relationship between COPD and HF hampers diagnosis due to the overlap between the symptoms and signs of both entities and complementary investigations. The treatment of acute HF is also altered by the presence of COPD. Anemia is highly prevalent and is often the direct cause of decompensated HF, the most common cause being iron deficiency anemia. Iron replacement therapy, specifically intravenous forms, has helped to improve the prognosis of acute HF. PMID:24930086

  9. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy associated with chronic anemia: a case series of myelodysplastic syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Brouzas, Dimitrios; Charakidas, Antonios; Ladas, Ioannis; Apostolopoulos, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: We report on three cases of visual loss due to nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy that developed during the course of refractory anemia, a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome. Patients and methods: Patients underwent fundus, visual field examination, and fluorescein angiography. A thrombophilic tendency investigation including prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, protein C, free protein S, and antithrombin III, polymerase chain reaction and hybridisation to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes and a bone marrow biopsy were also performed. Results: Relative recovery of visual function was noted in two patients, a 58-year-old man and a 67-year-old woman, whereas the vision of the third patient, a 62-year-old man, showed only marginal improvement during the follow-up period. Two patients received vigorous blood transfusion during hospitalization, while dosage adjustment of the erythropoietin infusion was decided for the third one. Thrombophilic tendency was not identified in any patient. Discussion: Chronic anemia, as presented in myelodysplastic syndrome’s refractory anemia subtype, probably in the presence of additional factors, such as hypotension, is likely to be complicated by optic neuropathy, possibly through a mechanism of anemic hypoxia and/or microvascular insufficiency. PMID:19668557

  10. [The serum and intraerythrocyte concentration of ferritin in the anemia of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Camacho, J; Arnalich, F; Zamorano, A F; Larrocha, C; Pérez de Ayala, C; Vázquez, J J

    1990-11-10

    Serum concentration of ferritin (Ft) and its glycosylated fraction (Ft-Gl) and intraerythrocytic ferritin (Ft-e) concentration were measured in 26 patients with anemia and active rheumatoid arthritis. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of anemia of chronic diseases (n = 13) or associated ferropenia. Unlike the first group, patients with associated ferropenia had lower concentration of the above parameters than 31 control subjects. The logarithmic value of FT (log FT) directly correlated with globular sedimentation velocity. Ft-Gl and log Ft-e correlated with transferrin saturation (r = 0.603, p less than 0.01 and r = 0.444, p less than 0.05). Log Ft-e also correlated with Ft (r = 0.504, p less than 0.01). The probability of ferropenia when Ft was 60 micrograms/l or lower was 0.91, and when Ft-e was 1.5 ag/cel or lower was 0.66. It is concluded that the ferropenic status in active rheumatoid anemia decreases the iron dependent synthesis of ferritin (Ft-Gl) more than that mediated by the acute phase response. The intraerythrocytic content is low due to the scanty iron supply to the erythroblast. Ft is more efficacious than Ft-e in the diagnosis of ferropenia. PMID:2097451

  11. The role of recombinant human erythropoietin alpha in the treatment of chronic anemia in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Dammacco, Franco; Luccarelli, Grazia; Prete, Marcella; Silvestris, Franco

    2002-01-01

    Chronic anemia of variable severity occurs in more than two-thirds of patients with multiple myeloma (MM) as a consequence of the B cell malignancy. Its pathogenesis is multifactorial. Besides the altered inflammatory cytokine network, other events are held responsible, namely persistent defect of erythropoietin due to the kidney failure, shortening of red cell survival, accumulation of the serum monoclonal component and platelet dysfunction. Our recent studies have demonstrated that excessive erythroblast apoptosis promoted by myeloma cells drives the appearance of anemia, in particular in patients with severely progressive disease. A number of clinical trials have provided evidence for the effectiveness of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO-alpha: epoetin alpha) in improving the deregulated erythropoiesis in MM, since it acts as a major erythroid growth factor by exerting a specific anti-apoptotic effect. In the majority of these studies, the long-term treatment of MM-associated anemia with rHuEPO-alpha induced a significant improvement of erythropoiesis, as shown by a stable increase of hemoglobin values (> or = 2g/dL) and reduction of transfusion requirements. In a recent trial which included both a double-blind and an open-label phase, we have documented that rHuEPO-alpha induces a stable improvement of anemia in more than 75% of patients and a significant decrease of fatigue, with an overall recovery of the quality of life. Patients receiving a placebo also achieved similar results in the open-label phase, when they were switched to rHuEPO-alpha. PMID:12735213

  12. Impact of silica nanoparticle design on cellular toxicity and hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tian; Malugin, Alexander; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2011-07-26

    Understanding the toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SiO(2)) on the cellular level is crucial for rational design of these nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Herein, we explore the impacts of geometry, porosity, and surface charge of SiO(2) on cellular toxicity and hemolytic activity. Nonporous Sto?ber silica nanospheres (115 nm diameter), mesoporous silica nanospheres (120 nm diameter, aspect ratio 1), mesoporous silica nanorods with aspect ratio of 2, 4, and 8 (width by length 80 × 200 nm, 150 × 600 nm, 130 × 1000 nm), and their cationic counterparts were evaluated on macrophages, lung carcinoma cells, and human erythrocytes. It was shown that the toxicity of SiO(2) is cell-type dependent and that surface charge and pore size govern cellular toxicity. Using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, the cellular association of SiO(2) was quantitated with the association amount increasing in the following order: mesoporous SiO(2) (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified mesoporous SiO(2) (aspect ratio 1, 2, 4, 8) < amine-modified nonporous Sto?ber SiO(2) < nonporous Sto?ber SiO(2). Geometry did not seem to influence the extent of SiO(2) association at early or extended time points. The level of cellular association of the nanoparticles was directly linked to the extent of plasma membrane damage, suggesting a biological cause-and-effect relationship. Hemolysis assay showed that the hemolytic activity was porosity- and geometry-dependent for bare SiO(2) and surface-charge-dependent for amine-modified SiO(2). A good correlation between hemolytic activity and cellular association was found on a similar dosage basis. These results can provide useful guidelines for the rational design of SiO(2) in nanomedicine. PMID:21630682

  13. Hereditary nonspherocytic hemolytic disease associated with an altered phospholipid composition of the erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jaffé, Ernst R.; Gottfried, Eugene L.

    1968-01-01

    A hemolytic disorder with mild hyperbilirubinemia and reticulocytosis of 6 to 15% was documented in eight members of a large family from the Dominican Republic and was presumed to be present in eight other members. The disorder appeared to be inherited as an autosomal dominant characteristic. Analysis of phospholipids by quantitative thinlayer chromatography revealed a distinct increase in phosphatidyl choline (lecithin) to 35.5 ± SD 1.3% of the total (normal: 28.2 ± 1.4%) in erythrocytes of affected members of the family, but not in the cells of unaffected relatives. The alteration appeared to constitute an absolute increase in lecithin content, rather than a decrease in other phospholipids. Erythrocytes from patients with other varieties of hereditary hemolytic disorders and comparable levels of reticulocytosis had normal phospholipid compositions. Plasma lipids of six affected members of the family were not unusual with respect to total lipid weight, total phospholipid, and cholesterol. Three patients with liver disease and jaundice were found to have marked increases in the lecithin content of the erythrocytes, but they also had extremely high plasma levels of total lipid, phospholipids, and cholesterol. Osmotic fragility of the erythrocytes of affected patients was decreased and the increase in fragility after incubation for 24 hr was less than that observed with normal erythrocytes. Autohemolysis after 48 hr was slightly increased and was corrected to nearly normal by the addition of glucose. The activities of 15 enzymes of the erythrocytes of the propositus were normal or elevated and the adenosine triphosphate content was normal. An abnormal hemoglobin could not be demonstrated. The life span of isologous erythrocytes in the propositus was reduced, but homologous erythrocytes survived normally. A causal relationship between the altered phospholipid composition and the hemolytic disorder has not been established. Images PMID:5653215

  14. Case report of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome with retinal arterial and venous occlusion treated with eculizumab

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Gregory T

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare disease caused by chronic, uncontrolled activation of the alternative complement pathway, leading to thrombotic microangiopathy. Renal impairment and progression to end-stage renal disease are common in untreated patients with aHUS, and extrarenal manifestations are being increasingly characterized in the literature. Ocular involvement remains rare in aHUS. This report describes a patient with aHUS with bilateral central retinal artery and vein occlusion, vitreous hemorrhage, and blindness in addition to renal impairment. The patient’s hematologic and renal parameters and ocular manifestation improved following initiation of eculizumab therapy. PMID:26508891

  15. Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    E-print Network

    Ludwig, Leif S.

    Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA)[superscript 1, 2], congenital asplenia[superscript 3] and T cell leukemia[superscript 4]. Yet, how mutations in ...

  16. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of aplastic anemia. Signs and Symptoms of Low Blood Cell Counts Red Blood Cells The most common symptom of a low red ... an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . White Blood Cells White blood cells help fight infections. Signs and ...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... individuals with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome develop optic atrophy, which is the degeneration (atrophy) of the ... with diabetes mellitus and sensorineural deafness MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Optic nerve atrophy MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Thiamine You might also ...

  18. How the Fanconi Anemia pathway guards the genome

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, George-Lucian; D’Andrea, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is an inherited genomic instability disorder, caused by mutations in genes regulating replication-dependent removal of interstrand DNA crosslinks. The Fanconi Anemia pathway is thought to coordinate a complex mechanism that enlists elements of three classic DNA repair pathways, namely homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair, and mutagenic translesion synthesis, in response to genotoxic insults. To this end, the Fanconi Anemia pathway employs a unique nuclear protein complex that ubiquitinates FANCD2 and FANCI, leading to formation of DNA repair structures. Lack of obvious enzymatic activities among most FA members has made it challenging to unravel its precise modus operandi. Here we review the current understanding of how the Fanconi Anemia pathway components participate in DNA repair and discuss the mechanisms that regulate this pathway to ensure timely, efficient, and correct restoration of chromosomal integrity. PMID:19686080

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... helps maintain an appropriate balance of iron (iron homeostasis) in developing red blood cells. ABCB7 mutations slightly ... its usual role in heme production and iron homeostasis. Anemia results when heme cannot be produced normally, ...

  20. Diphyllobothrium pacificum Infection is Seldom Associated with Megaloblastic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gamboa, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Lourdes; Garcia, Hector H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty cases of Dyphillobothrium pacificum (fish tapeworm) infections were prospectively studied to determine whether this tapeworm is associated with megaloblastic anemia, as commonly reported for D. latum infections. The most frequent symptoms were fatigue and mild abdominal pain, which were identified in approximately 66.6% of the 18 patients interviewed. Fourteen patients received treatment with niclosamide and all were cured. The other six patients spontaneously eliminated the tapeworms. One patient, who also had chronic diabetes and gastric atrophy, had low vitamin B12 levels and megaloblastic anemia. In all other patients, including three other patients with anemia, baseline vitamin B12 levels were in the reference range and did not significantly change when re-assessed three months later. Unlike D. latum, infection with D. pacificum is seldom associated with megaloblastic anemia or vitamin B12 deficit. PMID:22987655

  1. Red cell distribution width in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, D J

    1981-04-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is a new parameter, measured electronically on the Coulter Counter Model S-Plus. This new parameter measures the degree of anisocytosis, as compared to the average cell size calculated by the MCV parameter. In this study, comparison of RDW values between patients with anemia caused by sickle cell disease and patients with anemia of other causes were significantly different in an ANCOVA statistical analysis (F = 23.0 and p less than 0.001). RDW values greater than 13.0 (Coulter normal range 9.5-11.5) were found in 33 out of 40 patients with sickel cell anemia, whereas only 15 out of 40 patients with anemia of other causes had increased RDW. The RDW value was the only parameter that discriminated between the two groups--MCV and hemoglobin showing no significant difference. PMID:7223771

  2. Comparative hemolytic activity of undiluted organic water-miscible solvents for intravenous and intra-arterial injection.

    PubMed

    Mottu, F; Stelling, M J; Rüfenacht, D A; Doelker, E

    2001-01-01

    In humans, nonaqueous solvents are administered intravascularly in two kinds of situations. They have been used in subcutaneous or intramuscular pharmaceutical formulations to dissolve water-insoluble drugs. The need for these vehicles had increased in recent years, since the drug development process has yielded many poorly water-soluble drugs. The use of water-miscible nonaqueous solvents in therefore one of the approaches for administering these products as reference solutions useful in formulation bioequivalence studies. The intravascular use of organic solvents has also gained importance owing to a new approach for the treatment of cerebral malformations using precipitating polymers dissolved in water-miscible organic solvents. At present, the solvent most commonly used for the liquid embolics to solubilize the polymers is dimethyl sulfoxide, which exhibits some local and hemodynamic toxicities. In order to find new, less toxic vehicles for pharmaceutical formulations for the intravenous and intra-arterial routes and for embolic materials, 13 water-miscible organic solvents currently used (diluted with water) for pharmaceutical applications, were evaluated in this study. Their hemolytic activity and the morphological changes induced when mixed with blood (1:99, 5:95, 10:90 solvent:blood) were estimated in vitro. From these data, the selected organic solvents could be subdivided into four groups depending on their hemolytic activity: very highly hemolytic solvents (ethyl lactate, dimethyl sulfoxide), highly hemolytic solvents (polyethylene glycol 200, acetone), moderately hemolytic solvents (tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, glycerol formal, ethanol, Solketal, glycofurol) and solvents with low hemolytic activity (propylene glycol, dimethyl isosorbide, diglyme). PMID:11212416

  3. Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Leif S.; Gazda, Hanna T.; Eng, Jennifer C.; Eichhorn, Stephen W.; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; George, Tracy I.; Gotlib, Jason R.; Beggs, Alan H.; Sieff, Colin A.; Lodish, Harvey F.; Lander, Eric S.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA),1,2 congenital asplenia,3 and T-cell leukemia.4 Yet how mutations in such ubiquitously expressed proteins result in cell-type and tissue specific defects remains a mystery.5 Here, we show that GATA1 mutations that reduce full-length protein levels of this critical hematopoietic transcription factor can cause DBA in rare instances. We show that ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency, the more common cause of DBA, can similarly reduce translation of GATA1 mRNA - a phenomenon that appears to result from this mRNA having a higher threshold for initiation of translation. In primary hematopoietic cells from patients with RPS19 mutations, a transcriptional signature of GATA1 target genes is globally and specifically reduced, confirming that the activity, but not the mRNA level, of GATA1 is reduced in DBA patients with ribosomal protein mutations. The defective hematopoiesis observed in DBA patients with ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency can be at least partially overcome by increasing GATA1 protein levels. Our results provide a paradigm by which selective defects in translation due to mutations in ubiquitous ribosomal proteins can result in human disease. PMID:24952648

  4. Altered translation of GATA1 in Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Leif S; Gazda, Hanna T; Eng, Jennifer C; Eichhorn, Stephen W; Thiru, Prathapan; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; George, Tracy I; Gotlib, Jason R; Beggs, Alan H; Sieff, Colin A; Lodish, Harvey F; Lander, Eric S; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2014-07-01

    Ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency occurs in diverse human diseases including Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), congenital asplenia and T cell leukemia. Yet, how mutations in genes encoding ubiquitously expressed proteins such as these result in cell-type- and tissue-specific defects remains unknown. Here, we identify mutations in GATA1, encoding the critical hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-binding protein-1, that reduce levels of full-length GATA1 protein and cause DBA in rare instances. We show that ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency, the more common cause of DBA, can lead to decreased GATA1 mRNA translation, possibly resulting from a higher threshold for initiation of translation of this mRNA in comparison with other mRNAs. In primary hematopoietic cells from patients with mutations in RPS19, encoding ribosomal protein S19, the amplitude of a transcriptional signature of GATA1 target genes was globally and specifically reduced, indicating that the activity, but not the mRNA level, of GATA1 is decreased in patients with DBA associated with mutations affecting ribosomal proteins. Moreover, the defective hematopoiesis observed in patients with DBA associated with ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency could be partially overcome by increasing GATA1 protein levels. Our results provide a paradigm by which selective defects in translation due to mutations affecting ubiquitous ribosomal proteins can result in human disease. PMID:24952648

  5. Dysregulated Ca2+ homeostasis in Fanconi anemia cells.

    PubMed

    Usai, Cesare; Ravera, Silvia; Cuccarolo, Paola; Panfoli, Isabella; Dufour, Carlo; Cappelli, Enrico; Degan, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare and complex inherited blood disorder associated with bone marrow failure and malignancies. Many alterations in FA physiology appear linked to red-ox unbalance including alterations in the morphology and structure of nuclei, intermediate filaments and mitochondria, defective respiration, reduced ATP production and altered ATP/AMP ratio. These defects are consistently associated with impaired oxygen metabolism indeed treatment with antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and resveratrol (RV) does rescue FA physiology. Due to the importance of the intracellular calcium signaling and its key function in the control of intracellular functions we were interested to study calcium homeostasis in FA. We found that FANCA cells display a dramatically low intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in resting conditions. This condition affects cellular responses to stress. The flux of Ca(2+) mobilized by H2O2 from internal stores is significantly lower in FANCA cells in comparison to controls. The low basal [Ca(2+)]i in FANCA appears to be an actively maintained process controlled by a finely tuned interplay between different intracellular Ca(2+) stores. The defects associated with the altered Ca(2+) homeostasis appear consistently overlapping those related to the unbalanced oxidative metabolism in FA cells underlining a contiguity between oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis. PMID:25627108

  6. Dysregulated Ca2+ Homeostasis in Fanconi anemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Usai, Cesare; Ravera, Silvia; Cuccarolo, Paola; Panfoli, Isabella; Dufour, Carlo; Cappelli, Enrico; Degan, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare and complex inherited blood disorder associated with bone marrow failure and malignancies. Many alterations in FA physiology appear linked to red-ox unbalance including alterations in the morphology and structure of nuclei, intermediate filaments and mitochondria, defective respiration, reduced ATP production and altered ATP/AMP ratio. These defects are consistently associated with impaired oxygen metabolism indeed treatment with antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and resveratrol (RV) does rescue FA physiology. Due to the importance of the intracellular calcium signaling and its key function in the control of intracellular functions we were interested to study calcium homeostasis in FA. We found that FANCA cells display a dramatically low intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in resting conditions. This condition affects cellular responses to stress. The flux of Ca2+ mobilized by H2O2 from internal stores is significantly lower in FANCA cells in comparison to controls. The low basal [Ca2+]i in FANCA appears to be an actively maintained process controlled by a finely tuned interplay between different intracellular Ca2+ stores. The defects associated with the altered Ca2+ homeostasis appear consistently overlapping those related to the unbalanced oxidative metabolism in FA cells underlining a contiguity between oxidative stress and calcium homeostasis. PMID:25627108

  7. Mechanism of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-11-01

    Vaso-occlusion crisis is one of the key hallmark of sickle cell anemia. While early studies suggested that the crisis is caused by blockage of a single elongated cell, recent experimental investigations indicate that vaso-occlusion is a complex process triggered by adhesive interactions among different cell groups in multiple stages. Based on dissipative particle dynamics, a multi-scale model for the sickle red blood cells (SS-RBCs), accounting for diversity in both shapes and cell rigidities, is developed to investigate the mechanism of vaso-occlusion crisis. Using this model, the adhesive dynamics of single SS-RBC was investigated in arterioles. Simulation results indicate that the different cell groups (deformable SS2 RBCs, rigid SS4 RBCs, leukocytes, etc.) exhibit heterogeneous adhesive behavior due to the different cell morphologies and membrane rigidities. We further simulate the tube flow of SS-RBC suspensions with different cell fractions. The more adhesive SS2 cells interact with the vascular endothelium and further trap rigid SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in vessels less than 15 ?m . Under inflammation, adherent leukocytes may also trap SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in even larger vessels. This work was supported by the NSF grant CBET-0852948 and the NIH grant R01HL094270.

  8. Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Under-Estimated Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Rogler, Gerhard; Vavricka, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most frequent complications and/or extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of anemia in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis patients. Iron deficiency even without anemia may impact the quality of life of our IBD patients. In the last 10?years, the understanding of the pathology of iron-deficiency anemia and “anemia of chronic diseases” has increased; new diagnostic tools have been developed and new therapeutic strategies have been discussed. Hepcidin has been identified to be a central regulator of iron absorption from the intestine and of iron plasma levels. Hepcidin is regulated by iron deficiency but also as an acute phase protein by pro-inflammatory mediators such as interleukin-6. Innovative diagnostic tools have not been introduced in clinical routine or are not available for routine diagnostics. As iron substitution therapy is easy these days with a preference for intravenous substitution, the impact of differential diagnosis of anemia in IBD patients is underestimated. PMID:25646159

  9. CYP72A67 Catalyzes a Key Oxidative Step in Medicago truncatula Hemolytic Saponin Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Biazzi, Elisa; Carelli, Maria; Tava, Aldo; Abbruscato, Pamela; Losini, Ilaria; Avato, Pinarosa; Scotti, Carla; Calderini, Ornella

    2015-10-01

    In the Medicago genus, triterpenic saponins are bioactive secondary metabolites constitutively synthesized in the aerial and subterranean parts of plants via the isoprenoid pathway. Exploitation of saponins as pharmaceutics, agrochemicals and in the food and cosmetic industries has raised interest in identifying the enzymes involved in their synthesis. We have identified a cytochrome P450 (CYP72A67) involved in hemolytic sapogenin biosynthesis by a reverse genetic TILLING approach in a Medicago truncatula ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutagenized collection. Genetic and biochemical analyses, mutant complementation, and expression of the gene in a microsome yeast system showed that CYP72A67 is responsible for hydroxylation at the C-2 position downstream of oleanolic acid synthesis. The affinity of CYP72A67 for substrates with different substitutions at multiple carbon positions was investigated in the same in vitro yeast system, and in relation to two other CYP450s (CYP72A68) responsible for the production of medicagenic acid, the main sapogenin in M. truncatula leaves and roots. Full sib mutant and wild-type plants were compared for their sapogenin profile, expression patterns of the genes involved in sapogenin synthesis, and response to inoculation with Sinorhizobium meliloti. The results obtained allowed us to revise the hemolytic sapogenin pathway in M. truncatula and contribute to highlighting the tissue specificities (leaves/roots) of sapogenin synthesis. PMID:26079384

  10. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos

    PubMed Central

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  11. Estimating the Risk of ABO Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn in Lagos.

    PubMed

    Akanmu, Alani Sulaimon; Oyedeji, Olufemi Abiola; Adeyemo, Titilope Adenike; Ogbenna, Ann Abiola

    2015-01-01

    Background. ABO hemolytic disease of the newborn is the most common hemolytic consequence of maternofetal blood group incompatibility restricted mostly to non-group-O babies of group O mothers with immune anti-A or anti-B antibodies. Aim. We estimated the risk of ABO HDN with view to determining need for routine screening for ABO incompatibility between mother and fetus. Materials and Methods. Prevalence of ABO blood group phenotypes in blood donors at the donor clinic of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital and arithmetic methods were used to determine population prevalence of ABO genes. We then estimated proportion of pregnancies of group O mothers carrying a non-group-O baby and the risk that maternofetal ABO incompatibility will cause clinical ABO HDN. Results. Blood from 9138 donors was ABO typed. 54.3%, 23%, 19.4%, and 3.3% were blood groups O, A, B, and AB, respectively. Calculated gene frequencies were 0.1416, 0.1209, and 0.7375 for A, B, and O genes, respectively. It was estimated that 14.3% of deliveries will result in a blood group O woman giving birth to a child who is non-group-O. Approximately 4.3% of deliveries are likely to suffer ABO HDN with 2.7% prone to suffer from moderately severe to severe hemolysis. PMID:26491605

  12. Oxidative stress-mediated hemolytic activity of solvent exchange-prepared fullerene (C60) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trpkovic, Andreja; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kleut, Duska; Misirkic, Maja; Janjetovic, Kristina; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Pantovic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Markovic, Zoran; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated the hemolytic properties of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles prepared by solvent exchange using tetrahydrofuran (nC60THF), or by mechanochemically assisted complexation with macrocyclic oligosaccharide gamma-cyclodextrin (nC60CDX) or the copolymer ethylene vinyl acetate-ethylene vinyl versatate (nC60EVA-EVV). The spectrophotometrical analysis of hemoglobin release revealed that only nC60THF, but not nC60CDX or nC60EVA-EVV, was able to cause lysis of human erythrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Atomic force microscopy revealed that nC60THF-mediated hemolysis was preceded by erythrocyte shrinkage and increase in cell surface roughness. A flow cytometric analysis confirmed a decrease in erythrocyte size and demonstrated a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production in red blood cells exposed to nC60THF. The nC60THF-triggered hemolytic activity was efficiently reduced by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and butylated hydroxyanisole, as well as by serum albumin, the most abundant protein in human blood plasma. These data indicate that nC60THF can cause serum albumin-preventable hemolysis through oxidative stress-mediated damage of the erythrocyte membrane.

  13. Antibacterial and hemolytic activity of a new lectin purified from the seeds of Sterculia foetida L.

    PubMed

    Braga, Alana Araújo; Rodrigues e Lacerda, Rodrigo; Medeiros, Gracy Kelly Vieira de Vasconcelos; Gonçalves, Gregório Fernandes; Pessoa, Hilzeth de Luna Freire; Cardoso, Juscélio Donizete; Gadelha, Carlos Alberto de Almeida; da Silva, Bagnólia Araújo; Santi-Gadelha, Tatiane

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to isolate, characterize, and verify possible antibacterial and hemolytic activity for a lectin found in the seeds of Sterculia foetida L. Purification of the lectin from S. foetida (SFL) was realized with ion exchange chromatography DEAE-Sephacel coupled to HPLC. The purity and the molecular weight was determined by SDS-PAGE. The isolated SFL was characterized as to its glycoprotein nature, and sugar specificity, as well as resistance to pH, temperature, denaturing agents, reduction, oxidation, and chelation. A microdilution method was used to determine antibacterial activity, and hemolytic activity was observed in human erythrocytes. The SFL has a molecular weight of 17 kDa, and a carbohydrate content of 53 ?g/mL, specific for arabinose and xylose, and is resistant to treatment with urea, sensitive to treatment with sodium metaperiodate and ?-mercaptoethanol, and in the presence of EDTA lost its hemagglutinating activity (HA). However, in the presence of divalent cations (Ca(2 +) and Mn(2 +)) the HA was increased. The SFL remained active even after incubation at 80 °C, and, within pH values of between 5 and 11. The SFL inhibited the bacterial growth of all the tested strains and caused little hemolysis in human erythrocytes when compared to the positive control Triton X-100. PMID:25422058

  14. Hemolytic crisis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... perform a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms. The physical exam may occasionally show swelling of the spleen ( splenomegaly ). Tests that may be done include: Blood chemistry panel Complete blood count ( CBC ) Coombs test Haptoglobin ...

  15. [History of the therapy of pernicious anemia].

    PubMed

    Jeney, András

    2013-11-01

    Increased blood cell regeneration in exsanguinated experimental animals treated either with liver or with aqueous liver extracts was reported by Whipple and by Jeney and Jobling, respectively. These findings stimulated Minot and Murphy to provide evidence for the efficacy of liver against anaemia in clinical studies. After oral administration of liver (45-50 g per day) for 45 patients with anaemia perniciosa improvement of the hematological status was demonstrated. Consequently, for proving the therapeutic value of liver therapy Whipple, Minot and Murphy received Nobel price in 1934. The isolation of the antianemic factor from the liver has been succeeded in 1948 and designated as vitamin B12. At the same time Lucy Wills applied yeast for the treatment of pregnant women with anemia related to undernourishment. The conclusions of this study inspired the discovery of folate. The detailed investigation of the mode of action of vitamin B12 and folate enriched our knowledge in the area of pathophysiology and extended the clinical application of these two drugs. PMID:24161600

  16. Diamond Blackfan anemia: ribosomal proteins going rogue.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R; Gleizes, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2011-04-01

    Within the decade following the demonstration that mutations in the RPS19 gene can lead to Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), this disease has become a paradigm for an emerging group of pathologies linked to defects in ribosome biogenesis. DBA patients exhibit abnormal pre-rRNA maturation patterns and the majority bear mutations in one of several ribosomal protein genes that encode structural components of the ribosome essential for the correct assembly of the ribosomal subunits. Extensive study of the most frequently mutated gene, RPS19, has shown that mutations prevent the assembly of the ribosomal protein into forming pre-ribosomal particles. This defect in ribosome production triggers nucleolar stress pathways, the activation of which appears to be central to pathophysiological mechanisms. Why mutations in ribosomal protein genes so strongly and specifically affect erythropoiesis in DBA remains a challenging question, especially given the fact that defects in genes encoding nonstructural ribosome biogenesis factors have been shown to cause diseases other than DBA. A major problem in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms in DBA remains the lack of a suitable animal model. Despite this, considerable strides have been made over that past few years demonstrating that several factors involved in the synthesis of ribosomes are targets of disease-causing mutations. PMID:21435505

  17. Overcoming reprogramming resistance of Fanconi anemia cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Lars U W; Milsom, Michael D; Harris, Chad E; Vyas, Rutesh; Brumme, Kristina M; Parmar, Kalindi; Moreau, Lisa A; Schambach, Axel; Park, In-Hyun; London, Wendy B; Strait, Kelly; Schlaeger, Thorsten; Devine, Alexander L; Grassman, Elke; D'Andrea, Alan; Daley, George Q; Williams, David A

    2012-06-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive syndrome characterized by progressive fatal BM failure and chromosomal instability. FA cells have inactivating mutations in a signaling pathway that is critical for maintaining genomic integrity and protecting cells from the DNA damage caused by cross-linking agents. Transgenic expression of the implicated genes corrects the phenotype of hematopoietic cells, but previous attempts at gene therapy have failed largely because of inadequate numbers of hematopoietic stem cells available for gene correction. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) constitute an alternate source of autologous cells that are amenable to ex vivo expansion, genetic correction, and molecular characterization. In the present study, we demonstrate that reprogramming leads to activation of the FA pathway, increased DNA double-strand breaks, and senescence. We also demonstrate that defects in the FA DNA-repair pathway decrease the reprogramming efficiency of murine and human primary cells. FA pathway complementation reduces senescence and restores the reprogramming efficiency of somatic FA cells to normal levels. Disease-specific iPSCs derived in this fashion maintain a normal karyotype and are capable of hematopoietic differentiation. These data define the role of the FA pathway in reprogramming and provide a strategy for future translational applications of patient-specific FA iPSCs. PMID:22371882

  18. VACTERL-H Association and Fanconi Anemia.

    PubMed

    Alter, B P; Rosenberg, P S

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) often have birth defects that suggest the diagnosis of VATER association. A review of 2,245 cases of FA reported in the literature from 1927 to 2012 identified 108 cases with at least 3 of the defining features of VATER association; only 29 had been so noted by the authors. The FA VATER signature was the significantly higher frequency of renal and limb (radial and/or thumb) anomalies (93% of cases had both) compared with less than 30% of VATER patients; the presence of one or both of these birth defects should lead to testing for FA. The relative frequencies of the genotypes of the patients with FA VATER were strikingly different from those expected from the general FA population; only 19% were FANCA, while 21% were FANCB, 14% FANCD1/BRCA2, and 12% FANCD2. Consistent with their genotypes, those with the FA VATER phenotype had a worse prognosis than FA patients with milder phenotypes, with shorter median survival and earlier onset of malignancies. The early identification of FA patients among infants with VATER association should lead to earlier more proactive management, such as cancer surveillance and genetic counseling. PMID:23653579

  19. Optimizing hydroxyurea therapy for sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Ware, Russell E

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyurea has proven efficacy in numerous clinical trials as a disease-modifying treatment for patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) but is currently under-used in clinical practice. To improve the effectiveness of hydroxyurea therapy, efforts should be directed toward broadening the clinical treatment indications, optimizing the daily dosage, and emphasizing the benefits of early and extended treatment. Here, various issues related to hydroxyurea treatment are discussed, focusing on both published evidence and clinical experience. Specific guidance is provided regarding important but potentially unfamiliar aspects of hydroxyurea treatment for SCA, such as escalating to maximum tolerated dose, treating in the setting of cerebrovascular disease, switching from chronic transfusions to hydroxyurea, and using serial phlebotomy to alleviate iron overload. Future research directions to optimize hydroxyurea therapy are also discussed, including personalized dosing based on pharmacokinetic modeling, prediction of fetal hemoglobin responses based on pharmacogenomics, and the risks and benefits of hydroxyurea for non-SCA genotypes and during pregnancy/lactation. Another critical initiative is the introduction of hydroxyurea safely and effectively into global regions that have a high disease burden of SCA but limited resources, such as sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and India. Final considerations emphasize the long-term goal of optimizing hydroxyurea therapy, which is to help treatment become accepted as standard of care for all patients with SCA. PMID:26637755

  20. The care of a child with multiple trauma and severe anemia who was a Jehovah's Witness.

    PubMed

    Digieri, Luciana Andrea; Pistelli, Ivan Pollastrini; de Carvalho, Cid Eduardo

    2006-06-01

    Jehovah's Witness followers do not accept blood derived transfusions and available methods for avoiding transfusion have been used with degrees of success, demonstrating that the probability of death after trauma in these patients may not be significantly different from religious groups. In this report, we describe the case of a child victim of a multiple trauma with severe anemia due to blood loss, whose family would not authorize blood transfusion because of their Jehovah's Witness faith. We discuss the current indications for restricting transfusion, as well as highlighting new tools that contribute to the success of minimizing blood loss, thus avoiding transfusion. PMID:17325960

  1. Red blood cell transfusion in pediatric patients with severe chronic anemia: how slow is necessary?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag K; Hsu, Edmund; Quirolo, Keith; Neumayr, Lynne D; Flori, Heidi R

    2012-03-01

    Historic practice recommends slow transfusion for children with chronic anemia and hemoglobin less than 5.0?g/dl due to the theoretical risk of transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO). In our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), we have been utilizing a more liberal transfusion practice in patients without underlying cardiopulmonary disease, and a faster transfusion rate appears safe in this population. Rate of transfusion must be based on multiple factors including convenience, timeliness of procedures and transport to an appropriate care facility, risk of alloimmunization and wastage of blood, stress for the family, and need for PICU monitoring. PMID:21793178

  2. Interference of alpha-hemolytic streptococci isolated from tonsillar surface on beta-hemolytic streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes)--a methodological study.

    PubMed

    Grahn, E; Holm, S E; Ekedahl, C; Roos, K

    1983-07-01

    The interference between alpha-streptococcal strains obtained from patients with repeated tonsillitis and a collection of group A streptococcal strains were studied. For this purpose three in vitro methods were designed and compared. The results obtained by a simple plating technique suitable for screening purposes were found to correlate well with those using more laborious techniques. In a limited scale some of the alpha- and beta-streptococcal combinations were tested under in vivo conditions using a tissue cage model allowing repeated sampling. In most instances agreement between the results of the in vitro and in vivo methods was registered. Several alpha-strains having inhibitory capacity to the majority of a collection of group A streptococci belonging to different serotypes were found, but also alpha-strains with an inhibitory activity restricted to few group A isolates within a certain serotype. Also beta-streptococcal strains with growth inhibiting activity towards some alpha-strains were found. As the methods were chosen to eliminate many of the unspecific inhibitory factors and the beta-hemolytic test strains showed a pattern of inhibition that varied for each of the reference alpha-strains the activity is most likely attributed to bacteriocin-like substances. PMID:6372328

  3. Infections and inequalities: anemia in AIDS, the disadvantages of poverty

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Lucia; Seley, Celeste; Martorano, Julieta; Garcia-Moreno, Isabella; Troncoso, Alcides

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study anemia in AIDS patients and its relation with socioeconomic, employment status and educational levels. Methods A total number of 442 patients who visited the Infectious Diseases University Hospital in Buenos Aires, Argentina were included in the study. Patients were dividied into two groups, i.e. one with anemia and the other without anemia. Anemia epidemiology and its relationship with educational level, housing, job situation, monthly income, total daily caloric intake and weekly intake of meat were evaluated. Results Anemia was found in 228 patients (54%). Comparing patients with or without anemia, a statistically significant difference was found (P<0.000?1) in those whose highest educational level reached was primary school, who lived in a precarious home, who had no stable job or were unable to work, whose income was less than 30 dollars per month, whose meat consumption was less than twice a week or received less than 8?000 calories per day. Conclusions The high prevalence of anemia found in poor patients with AIDS suggests that poverty increases the risk to suffer from this hematological complication. The relationship between economic development policies and AIDS is complex. Our results seem to point to the fact that AIDS epidemic may affect economic development and in turn be affected by it. If we consider that AIDS affects the economically active adult population, despite recent medical progress it usually brings about fatal consequences, especially within the poorest sectors of society where the disease reduces the average life expectancy, increases health care demand and tends to exacerbate poverty and iniquity. PMID:23569955

  4. The rise and fall of felbamate as a treatment for partial epilepsy - aplastic anemia and hepatic failure to blame?

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Karan; Billa, Gauri; Rane, Jay; Chudasama, Hiren; Goswami, Sailendra; Shah, Rajen

    2015-12-01

    Felbamate has been approved for refractory partial seizures since the early nineties. Due to safety concerns regarding its use, namely, in aplastic anemia and hepatic failure, felbamate's use has been restricted and a 'Black Box' warning has been inserted. Nonetheless, it is a useful drug in refractory cases of partial epilepsy. There are certain precautions which can prevent and minimize the serious idiosyncratic reactions associated with felbamate, thereby providing an option in refractory cases where no other drug works. PMID:26566191

  5. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates.

    PubMed

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus' peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  6. Novel Twin Streptolysin S-Like Peptides Encoded in the sag Operon Homologue of Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus anginosus

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, Atsushi; Nakano, Kota; Ohkura, Kazuto; Tomoyasu, Toshifumi; Kikuchi, Ken; Whiley, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the anginosus group streptococci, which form part of the normal human oral flora. In contrast to the pyogenic group streptococci, our knowledge of the virulence factors of the anginosus group streptococci, including S. anginosus, is not sufficient to allow a clear understanding of the basis of their pathogenicity. Generally, hemolysins are thought to be important virulence factors in streptococcal infections. In the present study, a sag operon homologue was shown to be responsible for beta-hemolysis in S. anginosus strains by random gene knockout. Interestingly, contrary to pyogenic group streptococci, beta-hemolytic S. anginosus was shown to have two tandem sagA homologues, encoding streptolysin S (SLS)-like peptides, in the sag operon homologue. Gene deletion and complementation experiments revealed that both genes were functional, and these SLS-like peptides were essential for beta-hemolysis in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus. Furthermore, the amino acid sequence of these SLS-like peptides differed from that of the typical SLS of S. pyogenes, especially in their propeptide domain, and an amino acid residue indicated to be important for the cytolytic activity of SLS in S. pyogenes was deleted in both S. anginosus homologues. These data suggest that SLS-like peptides encoded by two sagA homologues in beta-hemolytic S. anginosus may be potential virulence factors with a different structure essential for hemolytic activity and/or the maturation process compared to the typical SLS present in pyogenic group streptococci. PMID:23292771

  7. Effect of Relative Arrangement of Cationic and Lipophilic Moieties on Hemolytic and Antibacterial Activities of PEGylated Polyacrylates

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Ashish; Lee, Kevin; He, Edward; Mukherjee, Sumit; Mancuso, Andrew; Banerjee, Probal; Yang, Nan-Loh

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amphiphilic polymers have been established as potentially efficient agents to combat widespread deadly infections involving antibiotic resistant superbugs. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) side chains into amphiphilic copolymers can reduce their hemolytic activity while maintaining high antibacterial activity. Our study found that the incorporation of PEG has substantially different effects on the hemolytic and antibacterial activities of copolymers depending on structural variations in the positions of cationic centers relative to hydrophobic groups. The PEG side chains dramatically reduced the hemolytic activities in copolymers with hydrophobic hexyl and cationic groups on the same repeating unit. However, in case of terpolymers with cationic and lipophilic groups placed on separate repeating units, the presence of PEG has significantly lower effect on hemolytic activities of these copolymers. PEGylated terpolymers displayed substantially lower activity against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) than Escherichia coli (E. coli) suggesting the deterring effect of S. aureus’ peptidoglycan cell wall against the penetration of PEGylated polymers. Time-kill studies confirmed the bactericidal activity of these copolymers and a 5 log reduction in E. coli colony forming units was observed within 2 h of polymer treatment. PMID:26473831

  8. Serum Shiga toxin 2 values in patients during the acute phase of post-diarrheal hemolytic uremic syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Shiga toxins (Stxs) produced by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are considered as the main causative agent, leading to the development of the hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS); these toxins injure endothelial cells mainly the glomeruli. After passing through the intestinal wall, Stxs hav...

  9. Erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors associated with hereditary anemia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2014-01-01

    Most heritable anemias are caused by mutations in genes encoding globins, red blood cell (RBC) membrane proteins, or enzymes in the glycolytic and hexose monophosphate shunt pathways. A less common class of genetic anemia is caused by mutations that alter the functions of erythroid transcription factors (TFs). Many TF mutations associated with heritable anemia cause truncations or amino acid substitutions, resulting in the production of functionally altered proteins. Characterization of these mutant proteins has provided insights into mechanisms of gene expression, hematopoietic development, and human disease. Mutations within promoter or enhancer regions that disrupt TF binding to essential erythroid genes also cause anemia and heritable variations in RBC traits, such as fetal hemoglobin content. Defining the latter may have important clinical implications for de-repressing fetal hemoglobin synthesis to treat sickle cell anemia and ? thalassemia. Functionally important alterations in genes encoding TFs or their cognate cis elements are likely to occur more frequently than currently appreciated, a hypothesis that will soon be tested through ongoing genome-wide association studies and the rapidly expanding use of global genome sequencing for human diagnostics. Findings obtained through such studies of RBCs and associated diseases are likely generalizable to many human diseases and quantitative traits. PMID:24652993

  10. Iron deficiency anemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Neil D

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is the most common form of anemia worldwide, caused by poor iron intake, chronic blood loss, or impaired absorption. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly likely to have iron deficiency anemia, with an estimated prevalence of 36%–76%. Detection of iron deficiency is problematic as outward signs and symptoms are not always present. Iron deficiency can have a significant impact on a patient’s quality of life, necessitating prompt management and treatment. Effective treatment includes identifying and treating the underlying cause and initiating iron replacement therapy with either oral or intravenous iron. Numerous formulations for oral iron are available, with ferrous fumarate, sulfate, and gluconate being the most commonly prescribed. Available intravenous formulations include iron dextran, iron sucrose, ferric gluconate, and ferumoxytol. Low-molecular weight iron dextran and iron sucrose have been shown to be safe, efficacious, and effective in a host of gastrointestinal disorders. Ferumoxytol is the newest US Food and Drug Administration-approved intravenous iron therapy, indicated for iron deficiency anemia in adults with chronic kidney disease. Ferumoxytol is also being investigated in Phase 3 studies for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients without chronic kidney disease, including subgroups with IBD. A review of the efficacy and safety of iron replacement in IBD, therapeutic considerations, and recommendations for the practicing gastroenterologist are presented. PMID:23766655

  11. Allicin from garlic neutralizes the hemolytic activity of intra- and extra-cellular pneumolysin O in vitro.

    PubMed

    Arzanlou, M; Bohlooli, S; Jannati, E; Mirzanejad-Asl, H

    2011-03-15

    Pneumolysin (PLY) is a key virulence factor contributes to the pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study we investigated the effect of allicin and aqueous garlic extracts on hemolytic activity of PLY both in prelysed and intact cells. Additionally the antimicrobial activity of allicin was tested against the bacteria. All tested materials potently inhibited the PLY hemolytic activity. Allicin neutralizes PLY in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Twenty five minute incubation of PLY (2 HU/mL) with 0.61 ?M/mL concentration of allicin, totally inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY (IC50 = 0.28 ?M/mL). The inhibitory activity of old extract of garlic was similar to pure allicin (IC50 = 50.46 ?L/mL; 0.31 ?M/mL; P < 0.05). In contrast fresh extract of garlic inhibits the PLY hemolytic activity at lower concentrations (IC50 = 13.96 ?L/mL; 0.08 ?M/mL allicin). Exposure of intact cells to allicin (1.8 ?M) completely inhibited hemolytic activity of PLY inside bacterial cells. The inhibitory effect of the allicin was restored by addition of reducing agent DTT at 5 mM, proposing that allicin likely inhibits the PLY by binding to cysteinyl residue in the binding site. The MIC value of allicin was determined to be 512 ?g/mL (3.15 ?M/mL). These results indicate that PLY is a novel target for allicin and may provide a new line of investigation on pneumococcal diseases in the future. PMID:21184771

  12. Characterization of Antibacterial and Hemolytic Activity of Synthetic Pandinin 2 Variants and Their Inhibition against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Alexis; Villegas, Elba; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Corzo, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    The contention and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other bacteria that cause infectious diseases require the use of new type of antibiotics. Pandinin 2 (Pin2) is a scorpion venom antimicrobial peptide highly hemolytic that has a central proline residue. This residue forms a structural “kink” linked to its pore-forming activity towards human erythrocytes. In this work, the residue Pro14 of Pin2 was both substituted and flanked using glycine residues (P14G and P14GPG) based on the low hemolytic activities of antimicrobial peptides with structural motifs Gly and GlyProGly such as magainin 2 and ponericin G1, respectively. The two Pin2 variants showed antimicrobial activity against E. coli, S. aureus, and M. tuberculosis. However, Pin2 [GPG] was less hemolytic (30%) than that of Pin2 [G] variant. In addition, based on the primary structure of Pin2 [G] and Pin2 [GPG], two short peptide variants were designed and chemically synthesized keeping attention to their physicochemical properties such as hydrophobicity and propensity to adopt alpha-helical conformations. The aim to design these two short antimicrobial peptides was to avoid the drawback cost associated to the synthesis of peptides with large sequences. The short Pin2 variants named Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] showed antibiotic activity against E. coli and M. tuberculosis. Besides, Pin2 [14] presented only 25% of hemolysis toward human erythrocytes at concentrations as high as 100 µM, while the peptide Pin2 [17] did not show any hemolytic effect at the same concentration. Furthermore, these short antimicrobial peptides had better activity at molar concentrations against multidrug resistance M. tuberculosis than that of the conventional antibiotics ethambutol, isoniazid and rifampicin. Therefore, Pin2 [14] and Pin2 [17] have the potential to be used as an alternative antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis agents with reduced hemolytic effects. PMID:25019413

  13. What is wrong with Fanconi anemia cells?

    PubMed Central

    Cantor, Sharon B; Brosh, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Figuring out what is wrong in Fanconi anemia (FA) patient cells is critical to understanding the contributions of the FA pathway to DNA repair and tumor suppression. Although FA patients exhibit a wide range of disease manifestation as well as severity (asymptomatic to congenital abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and cancer), cells from FA patients share underlying defects in their ability to process DNA lesions that interfere with DNA replication. In particular, FA cells are very sensitive to agents that induce DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). The cause of this pronounced ICL sensitivity is not fully understood, but has been linked to the aberrant activation of DNA damage repair proteins, checkpoints and pathways. Thus, regulation of these responses through coordination of repair processing at stalled replication forks is an essential function of the FA pathway. Here, we briefly summarize some of the aberrant DNA damage responses contributing to defects in FA cells, and detail the newly-identified relationship between FA and the mismatch repair protein, MSH2. Understanding the contribution of MSH2 and/or other proteins to the replication problem in FA cells will be key to assessing therapeutic options to improve the health of FA patients. Moreover, loss of these factors, if linked to improved replication, could be a key event in the progression of FA cells to cancer cells. Likewise, loss of these factors could synergize to enhance tumorigenesis or confer chemoresistance in tumors defective in FA-BRCA pathway proteins and provide a basis for biomarkers for disease progression and response. PMID:25486020

  14. Venom from Opisthacanthus elatus scorpion of Colombia, could be more hemolytic and less neurotoxic than thought.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Gómez, Sebastián; Vargas Muñoz, Leidy Johana; Saldarriaga-Córdoba, Mónica; Quintana Castillo, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We report the first biochemical, biological, pharmacological and partial proteomic characterization studies of the Opisthancanthus elatus venom (Gervais, 1844) from Colombia. The Reverse Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography venom profile showed 28 main well-defined peaks, most eluting between 20 and 45min (18-30% of acetonitrile, respectively). High-resolution mass analysis indicates the presence of 106 components ranging from 806.59742Da to 16849.4139Da. O. elatus venom showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the specific substrate BapNa suggesting the presence of proteins with serine-protease activity. Collected RP-HPLC fractions eluting at 52.6, 55.5, 55.8, 56.2, and 63.9min (PLA2 region between 33 and 40% of acetonitrile), showed hemolytic activity and hydrolyzed the synthetic substrate 4-nitro-3-octanoyloxy-benzoic acid, indicating the presence of compounds with phospholipases A2 activity. These RP-HPLC fractions, showed molecular masses values up to 13978.19546Da, corroborating the possible presence of the mentioned enzymes. Tryptic digestion and MS/MS analysis showed the presence of a phospholipase like fragment, similar to on described in other Opisthacanthus genus studies. No coagulant activity was observed. No larvicidal or antimicrobial activity was observed at concentrations evaluated. Lethal and toxic activity is expected at doses above 100mg/kg, no neurotoxic effects were detected at lower doses. In conclusion, O. elatus exhibits a venom with a predominant phospholipase A2 activity than thought; mammal's neurotoxic activity is expected above the 100mg/kg, which is very high compared to the venom from other neurotoxic scorpions. PMID:26477848

  15. Phenotypic features and phylogenetic background of extraintestinal hemolytic Escherichia coli responsible of mortality in puppies.

    PubMed

    Turchetto, Sara; Ustulin, Martina; Citterio, Carlo Vittorio; Zanardello, Claudia; Vascellari, Marta; Vio, Denis; Conedera, Gabriella; Milone, Nicola Maria Ferro; Cocchi, Monia

    2015-08-31

    A 10-day-old litter of five puppies of Bracco Italiano dog breed showed weakness and diarrhea and, 2 days later, four of them died. At the same time, the bitch showed high hyperthermia (40 °C) and endometritis. The necropsy of a puppy revealed a severe lobar pneumonia accompanied with a bilateral nephrosis. No gross lesions were detected in other organs. Histopathology of the lung revealed severe multifocal fibrino-suppurative necrotizing bronchiolar-alveolitis associated with rod-shaped bacterial aggregates and diffuse interstitial lymphocytic infiltration. The kidney showed severe multifocal necrosis of the tubular epithelium and diffuse severe congestion of the parenchyma. A pure culture of hemolytic Escherichia coli carrying the Cnf-1 gene was identified, from both the puppy organs and bitch's milk. Moreover, phylo-typing assigned them to the phylogroup B2. Two weeks later, fecal samples from the bitch and the survived puppy were collected for a second microbiological analysis, identifying two hemolytic E. coli strains, Cnf positive and Cdt negative and Cnf and Cdt negative, respectively. Some E. coli pathogenic strains may cause enteric or extraintestinal disease. In dogs and cats, strains of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) produce specific virulent factors such as hemolysis and cytotoxin necrotizing factors (Cnf). In this episode, we hypothesize that the bitch's milk could be the main source of ExPEC infection causing high puppies mortality. The role of the bitch as a carrier could not be excluded: stressful conditions, such as pregnancy and delivery, would change the host-pathogen dynamics possibly increasing the release of the infectious burden. PMID:25835470

  16. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    PubMed Central

    Khoa, D. V. A.; Wimmers, K.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  17. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity.

    PubMed

    Khoa, D V A; Wimmers, K

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future. PMID:26194222

  18. Treatment of Anemia in Patients with Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians ... of Anemia in Patients With Heart Disease: A Clinical Practice Guideline From the American College of Physicians.” ...

  19. High prevalence of iron deficiency and anemia in female military recruits.

    PubMed

    Dubnov, Gal; Foldes, A Joseph; Mann, Gideon; Magazanik, Abraham; Siderer, Moshe; Constantini, Naama

    2006-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia has long been known to impair physical and mental performance. Iron deficiency itself, even without anemia, may also cause such an effect. Similar to female athletes, women in active military units may have increased risks for iron deficiency and its detrimental effects. Female recruits were screened for anemia and iron store status, and a questionnaire on lifestyle habits and menstruation was completed. Iron depletion (serum ferritin level of <20 microg/L) was found for 77% of study participants. Iron deficiency (ferritin level of <12 microg/L and transferrin saturation of <15%) was found for 15% of study participants. Anemia was found for 24% of subjects, and iron deficiency anemia was found for 10% of subjects. High prevalence of iron depletion, iron deficiency, anemia, and iron deficiency anemia was found among female recruits intended for active military duty. Therefore, a recommendation can be made to screen such female recruits for anemia and iron stores. PMID:17036608

  20. Laboratory testing for cobalamin deficiency in megaloblastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Oberley, Matthew J; Yang, David T

    2013-06-01

    Cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency is a common cause of megaloblastic anemia in Western populations. Laboratory evaluation of megaloblastic anemia frequently includes the assessment of patient cobalamin and folate status. Current total serum cobalamin measurements are performed in the clinical laboratory with competitive binding luminescence assays, whose results may not always accurately reflect actual cobalamin stores. Surrogate markers of cobalamin deficiency such as methylmalonic acid and homocysteine have been utilized to improve diagnostic accuracy; however, the specificity of these tests by themselves is rather low. Measurement of the biologically active fraction of cobalamin, holotranscobalamin, has been proposed as a replacement for current total cobalamin assays. Although holotranscobalamin measurements appear to have slighter better sensitivity, the specificity of this assay remains to be determined. The relative merits and demerits of commonly available methods to assess cobalamin deficiency in patients with suspected megaloblastic anemia are discussed. PMID:23423840

  1. Iron Deficiency Anemia: A Common and Curable Disease

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia arises when the balance of iron intake, iron stores, and the body's loss of iron are insufficient to fully support production of erythrocytes. Iron deficiency anemia rarely causes death, but the impact on human health is significant. In the developed world, this disease is easily identified and treated, but frequently overlooked by physicians. In contrast, it is a health problem that affects major portions of the population in underdeveloped countries. Overall, the prevention and successful treatment for iron deficiency anemia remains woefully insufficient worldwide, especially among underprivileged women and children. Here, clinical and laboratory features of the disease are discussed, and then focus is placed on relevant economic, environmental, infectious, and genetic factors that converge among global populations. PMID:23613366

  2. Chronic Anemia and the Role of the Infusion Therapy Nurse.

    PubMed

    Betcher, Jeffrey; Van Ryan, Velvet; Mikhael, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Chronic anemia develops over a course of weeks to months and is usually mild to moderate in nature. It is important to understand the etiology of the reduced number of circulating red blood cells to treat the anemia appropriately. Diagnosis is dependent on patient history and laboratory findings, such as complete blood counts, iron studies, a peripheral smear, and occasionally, a bone marrow biopsy. Treatment modalities frequently administered by infusion therapy nurses include treatment of the underlying chronic disease, replacement of deficiencies (iron, vitamin B12, folate, or erythropoietin), or transfusion of red blood cells. Infusion therapy nurses play a vital role in the assessment and delivery of medication therapy to patients with chronic anemia. PMID:26339940

  3. Prevalence of HIV and anemia among pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Oladeinde, Bankole Henry; Phil, Richard Omoregie M.; Olley, Mitsan; Anunibe, Joshua A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence is high among rural dwellers and pregnant women. Aims: This study aims to determine the prevalence of HIV and anemia among pregnant women attending antenatal clinic in rural community of Okada, Edo State, Nigeria. Patients and Methods: Anticoagulated blood and sera samples were obtained from 480 women consisting of 292 pregnant and 188 non-pregnant women. Antibodies to HIV were detected in the sera samples and hemoglobin concentration of the anticoagulated blood specimens were determined using standard techniques. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin concentration <11g/dl for pregnant women and <12g/dl for non-pregnant women. Results: Pregnancy was not a risk factor for acquiring HIV infection (pregnant vs. non-pregnant: 10.2% vs. 13.8%; OR=0.713, 95% CI=0.407, 1.259, P = 0.247). The prevalence of HIV was significantly (P = 0.005 and P = 0.025) higher in the age group 10-20 years and 21 – 30 years among pregnant and non-pregnant women respectively. Pregnancy was a risk factor for acquiring anemia (OR=1.717, 95% CI=1.179, 2.500, P = 0.006). Only the age of pregnant women significantly (P = 0.004) affected the prevalence of anemia inversely. Conclusion: The prevalence of HIV and anemia among pregnant women were 10.2% and 49.3% respectively. Pregnancy was associated with anemia. Interventions by appropriate agencies are advocated to reduce associated sequelae. PMID:22363076

  4. Noninvasive Molecular Screening for Oral Precancer in Fanconi Anemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Smetsers, Stephanie E; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Wu, Thijs; Brink, Arjen; Buijze, Marijke; Deeg, Dorly J H; Soulier, Jean; Leemans, C René; Braakhuis, Boudewijn J M; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2015-11-01

    LOH at chromosome arms 3p, 9p, 11q, and 17p are well-established oncogenetic aberrations in oral precancerous lesions and promising biomarkers to monitor the development of oral cancer. Noninvasive LOH screening of brushed oral cells is a preferable method for precancer detection in patients at increased risk for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), such as patients with Fanconi anemia. We determined the prevalence of LOH in brushed samples of the oral epithelium of 141 patients with Fanconi anemia and 144 aged subjects, and studied the association between LOH and HNSCC. LOH was present in 14 (9.9%) nontransplanted patients with Fanconi anemia, whereas LOH was not detected in a low-risk group (n = 50, >58 years, nonsmoking/nonalcohol history) and a group with somewhat increased HNSCC risk (n = 94, >58 years, heavy smoking/excessive alcohol use); Fisher exact test, P = 0.023 and P = 0.001, respectively. Most frequent genetic alteration was LOH at 9p. Age was a significant predictor of LOH (OR, 1.13, P = 0.001). Five patients with Fanconi anemia developed HNSCC during the study at a median age of 39.6 years (range, 24.8-53.7). LOH was significantly associated with HNSCC (Fisher exact test, P = 0.000). Unexpectedly, the LOH assay could not be used for transplanted patients with Fanconi anemia because donor DNA in brushed oral epithelium, most likely from donor leukocytes present in the oral cavity, disturbed the analysis. Noninvasive screening using a LOH assay on brushed samples of the oral epithelium has a promising outlook in patients with Fanconi anemia. However, assays need to be adapted in case of stem cell transplantation, because of contaminating donor DNA. Cancer Prev Res; 8(11); 1102-11. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26276748

  5. Anemia as the sole presenting symptom of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kao-Chun; Hsiao, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Shun-Chen; Ko, Sheung-Fat; Niu, Chen-Kuang

    2004-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH) is a rare disease in children and has an unknown etiology. It is characterized by the triad of hemoptysis, pulmonary infiltrates on chest radiograph (CXR) and iron deficiency anemia. We report two young children, aged 3 and 4 years, were admitted due to pale-looking appearance but without hemoptysis or other respiratory symptoms. Pallor was the sole presenting feature in these 2 children with IPH and which was unusual. CXR obtained on admission led to the suspicion of pulmonary hemorrhage. The diagnosis of IPH was confirmed based on the presence of many hemosiderin-laden macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained by flexible bronchoscopy. Steroid was initiated after the diagnosis of IPH was established; the both of them have been well and received regular follow-up in our outpatient department. IPH may not be diagnosed because of difficulty in diagnosis. Anemia may be the only presenting feature of IPH, which was due to occult pulmonary hemorrhage. Initial treatment with corticosteroids has been successful in our patients for a period of 6 and 8 months of follow up respectively. PMID:15796258

  6. Association of human papillomavirus with Fanconi anemia promotes carcinogenesis in Fanconi anemia patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guang Bin; Chen, Jiezhong; Wu, Zhan He; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare recessive disorder associated with chromosomal fragility. FA patients are at very high risk of cancers, especially head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas caused by infection of human papillomaviruses (HPVs). By integrating into the host genome, HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 drive the genomic instability to promote DNA damage and gene mutations necessary for carcinogenesis in FA patients. Furthermore, E6 and E7 oncoproteins not only inhibit p53 and retinoblastoma but also impair the FANC/BRCA signaling pathway to prevent DNA damage repair and alter multiple signals including cell-cycle checkpoints, telomere function, cell proliferation, and interference of the host immune system leading to cancer development in FA patients. In this review, we summarize recent advances in unraveling the molecular mechanisms of FA susceptibility to HPV-induced cancers, which facilitate rational preventive and therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25776992

  7. Severe anemia associated with Mycoplasma wenyonii infection in a mature cow

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Velguth, Karen E.; Snider, Timothy A.; Kocan, Katherine M.; Simpson, Katharine M.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical findings, diagnostic tests, and treatment of clinical anemia in a mature Angus cow infected with the hemoplasma Mycoplasma wenyonii are described. Mycoplasma wenyonii has been previously reported to cause clinical anemia in young or splenectomized cattle; however, infection has not been associated with severe anemia in mature animals. PMID:22379205

  8. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned...

  9. 21 CFR 250.201 - Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... anemia. 250.201 Section 250.201 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Drugs and Foods § 250.201 Preparations for the treatment of pernicious anemia. (a) The ninth announcement of the Anti-anemia Preparations Advisory Board of the United States Pharmacopeia is concerned...

  10. Assessment of Anemia Knowledge, Attitudes and Behaviors among Pregnant Women in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna A. D.; Drolet, Judy C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Iron deficiency anemia prevalence of pregnant Sierra Leone women currently is reported to be 59.7%. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 3-7% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. This study explores knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of urban pregnant Sierra Leone women regarding anemia.…

  11. PREDICTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYDROXYUREA IN INDIVIDUAL SICKLE CELL ANEMIA PATIENTS

    E-print Network

    Valafar, Faramarz

    1 PREDICTING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HYDROXYUREA IN INDIVIDUAL SICKLE CELL ANEMIA PATIENTS Homayoun patients with sickle cell anemia. The study described in this paper was undertaken to develop the ability therapy in patients with sickle cell anemia. Adult hemoglobin (HbA) is a tetrameric protein composed

  12. From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia

    E-print Network

    From a Dry Bone to a Genetic Portrait: A Case Study of Sickle Cell Anemia MARINA FAERMAN,1* ALMUT identification; Y chromosome polymorphic markers; sickle cell anemia ABSTRACT The potential and reliability sample, which represented a documented case of sickle cell anemia. -globin gene sequences obtained from

  13. Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State

    E-print Network

    Vekilov, Peter

    Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State, TX 77204-4004, USA The primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia is the polymerization reserved. Keywords: sickle cell anemia; hemoglobin S polymerization; fiber nucleation; homogeneous

  14. Successful intrauterine treatment and good long-term outcome in an extremely severe case of fetal hemolytic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kretowicz, Piotr; Tarasiuk, Anna; Dangel, Joanna; D?bski, Romuald

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with anti-Rh-D antibodies (1: 512) and fetal hydrops at the 21st week of gestation. Ultrasound revealed massive fetal skin edema, ascites, hepatomegaly, placentomegaly, and anhydramnios. No fetal movements were observed. Fetal heart was enlarged, with reportedly decreased contractibility. The Doppler parameters were abnormal: the peak systolic velocity in median cerebral artery (MCA PSV) was increased (84 cm/s, 3 MoM), and absent end diastolic flow (AEDF) was reported in the umbilical artery. Ultrasound examination indicated severe fetal anemia and heart failure. Umbilical vein puncture was performed and the fetal blood count was determined (RBC 0.01 × 106/µl, Ht 0.1%, PLT 67 × 103/µl, WBC 2.1 × 103/µl, indeterminable hemoglobin level). Packed red blood cells (0 Rh-, 30 ml) were immediately transfused to the fetus. Altogether, seven intrauterine transfusions were performed. Fetal hydrops disappeared gradually during the next few weeks. The male neonate (1860 g, 45 cm, Apgar score 3–4) was delivered after the last transfusion at 34th week of gestation due of intrauterine asphyxia. The infant was discharged after 21 days, in good condition, on breastfeeding. There was one 10 mm focus of periventricular leukomalacia in the brain, diagnosed based on trans-fontanel ultrasound, without any signs of damage to other organs. At the age of 5 years, the child is healthy, with no abnormalities in his neurodevelopmental parameters. PMID:26673879

  15. Prenatal management and perinatal outcome in giant placental chorioangioma complicated with hydrops fetalis, fetal anemia and maternal mirror syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Giant placental chorioangiomas have been associated with a number of severe fetal complications and high perinatal mortality. Case presentation We report a case of giant chorioangioma with fetal hydrops, additionally complicated by severe anemia, mild cardiomegaly with hyperdinamic heart circulation and maternal mirror syndrome. Intrauterine blood transfusion and amniodrainage was performed at 29?weeks. Worsening of the fetal and maternal condition prompted us to proceed with delivery at 29?+?5?weeks. The newborn died 3 hours later due to pulmonary hypoplasia and hemodynamic failure. Maternal course was favourable, mirror syndrome resolved in the second day and the patient was discharged four days following delivery. Conclusions In the case described here, fetal condition got worse despite of the anemia correction and amniodrainage. Our outcome raises the issue whether additional intrauterine clinical intervention, as intersticial laser, should have been performed to stop further deterioration of the fetal condition when progressive severe hydrops develops. PMID:22840187

  16. High-Content Screening in Zebrafish Embryos Identifies Butafenacil as a Potent Inducer of Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Leet, Jessica K.; Lindberg, Casey D.; Bassett, Luke A.; Isales, Gregory M.; Yozzo, Krystle L.; Raftery, Tara D.; Volz, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Using transgenic zebrafish (fli1:egfp) that stably express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) within vascular endothelial cells, we recently developed and optimized a 384-well high-content screening (HCS) assay that enables us to screen and identify chemicals affecting cardiovascular development and function at non-teratogenic concentrations. Within this assay, automated image acquisition procedures and custom image analysis protocols are used to quantify body length, heart rate, circulation, pericardial area, and intersegmental vessel area within individual live embryos exposed from 5 to 72 hours post-fertilization. After ranking developmental toxicity data generated from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) zebrafish teratogenesis assay, we screened 26 of the most acutely toxic chemicals within EPA's ToxCast Phase-I library in concentration-response format (0.05–50 µM) using this HCS assay. Based on this screen, we identified butafenacil as a potent inducer of anemia, as exposure from 0.39 to 3.125 µM butafenacil completely abolished arterial circulation in the absence of effects on all other endpoints evaluated. Butafenacil is an herbicide that inhibits protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPO) – an enzyme necessary for heme production in vertebrates. Using o-dianisidine staining, we then revealed that severe butafenacil-induced anemia in zebrafish was due to a complete loss of hemoglobin following exposure during early development. Therefore, six additional PPO inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase-I library were screened to determine whether anemia represents a common adverse outcome for these herbicides. Embryonic exposure to only one of these PPO inhibitors – flumioxazin – resulted in a similar phenotype as butafenacil, albeit not as severe as butafenacil. Overall, this study highlights the potential utility of this assay for (1) screening chemicals for cardiovascular toxicity and (2) prioritizing chemicals for future hypothesis-driven and mechanism-focused investigations within zebrafish and mammalian models. PMID:25090246

  17. Severe Soft Tissue Infection Caused by a Non-Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes Strain Harboring a Premature Stop Mutation in the sagC Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Roman G.; Ensser, Armin; Dahesh, Samira; Popp, Isabel; Heeg, Christiane; Bleiziffer, Oliver; Merz, Thomas; Schulz, Theresia; Horch, Raymund E.; Bogdan, Christian; Nizet, Victor; van der Linden, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We recovered a non-beta-hemolytic Streptococcus pyogenes strain from a severe soft tissue infection. In this isolate, we detected a premature stop codon within the sagC gene of the streptolysin S (SLS) biosynthetic operon. Reintroduction of full-length sagC gene on a plasmid vector restored the beta-hemolytic phenotype to our clinical isolate, indicating that the point mutation in sagC accounted for loss of hemolytic activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that a severe soft tissue infection can be caused by a non-beta-hemolytic S. pyogenes strain lacking a functional SagC. PMID:23515542

  18. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-05

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  19. Thorotrast-Associated Anemia and Bone Marrow Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Diane E.; Chung, E. B.

    1986-01-01

    Two patients with chronic anemia and bone marrow hypoplasia secondary to Thorotrast deposition are described. In one case thorium dioxide was identified by histoautoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray spectrometry. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:3806691

  20. Anemia, Heart Failure and Evidence-Based Clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Camila Alves; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Zanati, Silméia Garcia; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a prevalent comorbidity and marker of a poorer prognosis in patients with heart failure (HF). Its clinical relevance, as well as its pathophysiology and the clinical management of these patients are important subjects in the specialized literature. In the present review, we describe the current concepts on the pathophysiology of anemia in HF, its diagnostic criteria, and the recommendations for iron supplementation. Also, we make a critical analysis of the major studies showing evidences on the benefits of this supplementation. The four main components of anemia are addressed: chronic disease, dilutional, "renal" and malabsorption. In patients with HF, the diagnostic criteria are the same as those used in the general population: serum ferritin levels lower than 30 mcg/L in patients without kidney diseases and lower than 100 mcg/L or serum ferritin levels between 100-299 mcg/L with transferring saturation lower than 20% in patients with chronic kidney diseases. Finally, the therapeutic possibilities for anemia in this specific patient population are discussed. PMID:23917508

  1. Short Report Menstruation Does Not Cause Anemia: Endometrial Thickness

    E-print Network

    Lummaa, Virpi

    was measured by transvaginal ultrasound in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and their red blood cell a reasonable proxy for menstrual blood loss in normal women. Twenty-six healthy women from the Mogielica Human-deficiency anemia in women include: when menstrual blood loss exceeds 80 ml a month (Janssen et al., 1998), a long

  2. Behavior of Infants with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozoff, Betsy; And Others

    1998-01-01

    Compared behavior of 52 Costa Rican 12- to 23-month-olds with iron-deficiency anemia to that of 139 infants with better iron status. Found that iron-deficient infants maintained closer contact with caregivers; showed less pleasure and playfulness; were more wary, hesitant, and easily tired; made fewer attempts at test items; and attended less to…

  3. Studies of the pathogenesis of anemia of inflammation: erythrocyte survival

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, D.J.; Krehbiel, J.D.

    1983-10-01

    Erythrocyte survival was investigated in healthy cats and in cats with sterile abscesses. Erythrocyte survival time in cats with sterile abscesses was found to be significantly reduced. The erythrocyte destruction appeared to be the major factor in the early stages of anemia of inflammation.

  4. Anemia among Pediatric Critical Care Survivors: Prevalence and Resolution.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Quang N; Matsui, Doreen M; Singh, Ram N; Zelcer, Shayna; Kornecki, Alik

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of anemia among pediatric critical care survivors and to determine whether it resolves within 6 months of discharge. Design. A prospective observational study. Patients with anemia upon discharge from the pediatric critical care unit (PCCU) underwent in hospital and post hospital discharge followup (4-6 months) for hemoglobin (Hb) levels. Setting. A medical-surgical PCCU in a tertiary care center. Patients. Patients aged 28 days to 18 years who were treated in the PCCU for over 24 hours. Measurements and Main Results. 94 (24%) out of 392 eligible patients were anemic at time of discharge. Patients with anemia were older, median 8.0?yrs [(IQR 1.0-14.4) versus 3.2?yrs (IQR 0.65-9.9) (P < 0.001)], and had higher PeLOD [median 11 (IQR 10-12) versus 1.5 (1-4) (P < 0.001)], and PRISM [median 5 (IQR 2-11) versus 3 (IQR 0-6) (P < 0.001)] scores. The Hb level normalized in 32% of patients before discharge from hospital. Of the 28 patients who completed followup, all had normalization of their Hb in the absence of medical intervention. Conclusions. Anemia is not common among patients discharged from the PCCU and recovers spontaneously within 4-6 months. PMID:23509619

  5. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  6. Multivitamin and Iron Supplementation to Prevent Periconceptional Anemia in Rural Tanzanian Women: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratna, Nilupa S.; Masanja, Honorati; Mrema, Sigilbert; Levira, Francis; Spiegelman, Donna; Hertzmark, Ellen; Saronga, Naomi; Irema, Kahema; Shuma, Mary; Elisaria, Ester; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2015-01-01

    Objective Women’s nutritional status during conception and early pregnancy can influence maternal and infant outcomes. This study examined the efficacy of pre-pregnancy supplementation with iron and multivitamins to reduce the prevalence of anemia during the periconceptional period among rural Tanzanian women and adolescent girls. Design A double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted in which participants were individually randomized to receive daily oral supplements of folic acid alone, folic acid and iron, or folic acid, iron, and vitamins A, B-complex, C, and E at approximately single recommended dietary allowance (RDA) doses for six months. Setting Rural Rufiji District, Tanzania. Subjects Non-pregnant women and adolescent girls aged 15–29 years (n = 802). Results The study arms were comparable in demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, food security, nutritional status, pregnancy history, and compliance with the regimen (p>0.05). In total, 561 participants (70%) completed the study and were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Hemoglobin levels were not different across treatments (median: 11.1 g/dL, Q1-Q3: 10.0–12.4 g/dL, p = 0.65). However, compared with the folic acid arm (28%), there was a significant reduction in the risk of hypochromic microcytic anemia in the folic acid and iron arm (17%, RR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42–0.90, p = 0.01) and the folic acid, iron, and multivitamin arm (19%, RR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.45–0.96, p = 0.03). Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) to adjust for potential selection bias due to loss to follow-up did not materially change these results. The effect of the regimens was not modified by frequency of household meat consumption, baseline underweight status, parity, breastfeeding status, or level of compliance (in all cases, p for interaction>0.2). Conclusions Daily oral supplementation with iron and folic acid among women and adolescents prior to pregnancy reduces risk of anemia. The potential benefits of supplementation on the risk of periconceptional anemia and adverse pregnancy outcomes warrant investigation in larger studies. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01183572 PMID:25905863

  7. [Prevalence and determinants of anemia in young children in French-speaking Africa. Role of iron deficiency].

    PubMed

    Diouf, S; Folquet, M; Mbofung, K; Ndiaye, O; Brou, K; Dupont, C; N'dri, D; Vuillerod, M; Azaïs-Braesco, V; Tetanye, E

    2015-11-01

    Anemia and iron deficiency are major public health issues worldwide and particularly in Africa. Reliable information about their prevalence and associated factors is required to allow for effective actions. In this study, we used data from recent (2006-2012) large population health surveys, carried out in 11 French-speaking African countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Congo Brazzaville, Ivory Coast, Gabon, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Democratic Republic of Congo, and Senegal). Hemoglobin (Hb) was assessed and demographic and health-related parameters were obtained from nation-representative samples of children aged 6-59 months. Anemia (Hb<11g/dL) was found in 72.4% of the children (60.2-87.8%), with no gender difference but a slightly lower incidence in older children (62% at age 4-5 years versus 85% at age 9 months), especially for the more severe forms (2.1% versus 8.7%, respectively). Anemia was only slightly but significantly affected by location (75.5% in rural areas versus 67.3% in towns), income (79.8% in lower quintile of income versus 62.3% in higher quintile), or maternal education (74.1% in children from non-educated mothers versus 62.4% in children whose mothers had secondary education). Nearly 50% of women of child-bearing age had anemia. In the countries that report this information, less than 50% (17-65%) of children consumed iron-rich foods regularly and only 12% (7.4-20.5%) received iron supplementation. Infection and parasitism are known to affect some markers of iron status, because of the inflammatory reaction, thereby making the diagnosis of iron deficiency difficult. In the study countries, acute respiratory diseases and diarrhea affected 6.2 and 15.6% of children aged between 6 and 59 months, respectively; their distribution according to age and location is very different from the one of anemia, which is also the case for the distribution of malaria. It is thus likely that a large part of the anemia observed in young children is due to iron deficiency, although further research is needed to confirm this. This fully justifies the nationwide programs of iron fortification of flour, currently undergoing in most countries of French-speaking Africa. Their formal evaluation is still pending but the initial data suggest some efficacy, although far from optimal. It is thus likely that a more holistic approach, including iron fortification, actions against undernutrition and parasitism in children, and actions in favor of improving young women's iron and nutritional status, together with appropriate communication and education objectives, would be more effective. PMID:26433575

  8. Pharmacodynamic model for chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Jusko, William J

    2008-06-01

    Anticancer agents often cause bone marrow toxicity resulting in progressive anemia which may influence the therapeutic effects of erythropoietic-stimulating agents. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to describe chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats. Anemia was induced in male Wistar rats with a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of 60 mg/kg carboplatin. Hematological responses including reticulocytes, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin, and endogenous rat erythropoietin (EPO) were measured for up to 4 weeks. A catenary, lifespan-based, indirect response model served as a basic PD model to represent erythroid cellular populations in the bone marrow and blood involved in erythropoiesis. The model assumed that actively proliferating progenitor cells in the bone marrow are sensitive to anti-cancer agents and subject to an irreversible removal process. The removal rate of the target cells is proportional to drug activity concentrations and the cell numbers. An additional RBC loss from the circulation resulting from thrombocytopenia was described by a first-order process. The turnover process of rat EPO and EPO-mediated feedback inhibition mechanism regulated by hemoglobin changes were incorporated. Reticulocyte counts decreased rapidly and reached a nadir by day 3 after administration of carboplatin and returned to the baseline by day 13. This was followed by a gradual increase and the rebound peak occurred at about day 15. The hemoglobin nadir was approximately 9 g/dl observed at about 11-13 days compared to its normal value of 13 g/dl and hemoglobin returned to the baseline by day 30. The increase in endogenous rat EPO mirrored inversely hemoglobin changes and the maximum increase was observed soon after the hemoglobin nadir. The carboplatin-treated rats exhibited progressive anemia. The proposed model adequately described the time course of hematological changes after carboplatin in rats and can be a useful tool to explore potential strategies for the management of anemia caused by chemotherapy. PMID:17891399

  9. Pharmacodynamic model for chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sukyung; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Anticancer agents often cause bone marrow toxicity resulting in progressive anemia which may influence the therapeutic effects of erythropoietic-stimulating agents. The objective of this study was to develop a pharmacodynamic (PD) model to describe chemotherapy-induced anemia in rats. Anemia was induced in male Wistar rats with a single intravenous (i.v.) injection of 60 mg/kg carboplatin. Hematological responses including reticulocytes, red blood cells (RBC), hemoglobin, and endogenous rat erythropoietin (EPO) were measured for up to 4 weeks. A catenary, lifespan-based, indirect response model served as a basic PD model to represent erythroid cellular populations in the bone marrow and blood involved in erythropoiesis. The model assumed that actively proliferating progenitor cells in the bone marrow are sensitive to anti-cancer agents and subject to an irreversible removal process. The removal rate of the target cells is proportional to drug activity concentrations and the cell numbers. An additional RBC loss from the circulation resulting from thrombocytopenia was described by a first-order process. The turnover process of rat EPO and EPO-mediated feedback inhibition mechanism regulated by hemoglobin changes were incorporated. Reticulocyte counts decreased rapidly and reached a nadir by day 3 after administration of carboplatin and returned to the baseline by day 13. This was followed by a gradual increase and the rebound peak occurred at about day 15. The hemoglobin nadir was approximately 9 g/dl observed at about 11–13 days compared to its normal value of 13 g/dl and hemoglobin returned to the baseline by day 30. The increase in endogenous rat EPO mirrored inversely hemoglobin changes and the maximum increase was observed soon after the hemoglobin nadir. The carboplatin-treated rats exhibited progressive anemia. The proposed model adequately described the time course of hematological changes after carboplatin in rats and can be a useful tool to explore potential strategies for the management of anemia caused by chemotherapy. PMID:17891399

  10. Management of Anemia in Children Receiving Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Borzych-Duzalka, Dagmara; Bilginer, Yelda; Ha, Il Soo; Bak, Mustafa; Rees, Lesley; Cano, Francisco; Munarriz, Reyner Loza; Chua, Annabelle; Pesle, Silvia; Emre, Sevinc; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Quiroz, Lily; Ruscasso, Javier Darío; White, Colin; Pape, Lars; Ramela, Virginia; Printza, Nikoleta; Vogel, Andrea; Kuzmanovska, Dafina; Simkova, Eva; Müller-Wiefel, Dirk E.; Sander, Anja; Warady, Bradley A.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists regarding the efficacy, modifiers, and outcomes of anemia management in children with CKD or ESRD. We assessed practices, effectors, and outcomes of anemia management in 1394 pediatric patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) who were prospectively followed in 30 countries. We noted that 25% of patients had hemoglobin levels below target (<10 g/dl or <9.5 g/dl in children older or younger than 2 years, respectively), with significant regional variation; levels were highest in North America and Europe and lowest in Asia and Turkey. Low hemoglobin levels were associated with low urine output, low serum albumin, high parathyroid hormone, high ferritin, and the use of bioincompatible PD fluid. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) were prescribed to 92% of patients, and neither the type of ESA nor the dosing interval appeared to affect efficacy. The weekly ESA dose inversely correlated with age when scaled to weight but did not correlate with age when normalized to body surface area. ESA sensitivity was positively associated with residual diuresis and serum albumin and inversely associated with serum parathyroid hormone and ferritin. The prevalence of hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy increased with the degree of anemia. Patient survival was positively associated with achieved hemoglobin and serum albumin and was inversely associated with ESA dose. In conclusion, control of anemia in children receiving long-term PD varies by region. ESA requirements are independent of age when dose is scaled to body surface area, and ESA resistance is associated with inflammation, fluid retention, and hyperparathyroidism. Anemia and high ESA dose requirements independently predict mortality. PMID:23471197

  11. Dhatrilauha: Right choice for iron deficiency anemia in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Anuradha; Dwivedi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Background: Anemia in pregnancy is multi-factorial. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common one. Major cause is increased demand of iron during pregnancy. In Ayurveda, under Pandu-Roga the features of anemia are described. It is characterized by Vaivarnyata or Varnanasha (change/destruction in normal color of the body), a disorder of Pitta vitiation. Ayurvedic management is an effective way of curing anemia in general by a large number of Lauha preparations of which Dhatrilauha has been used widely for centuries. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Dhatrilauha in the management of IDA based on the scientific parameters among pregnant patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 58 cases were selected by simple randomized sampling method as per inclusion criteria of pregnant women between 4th and 7th months of pregnancy with a clinical diagnosis and laboratory confirmation of IDA. Dhatrilauha 500 mg in two divided doses after food with normal potable water were given for 45 days with three follow-ups, each of 15 days intervals. Final assessment was done after completion of 45 days and results were statistically analyzed by using Cochran's Q-test and Student's t-test. Results: Dhatrilauha showed statistically significant (P < 0.01) improvement in the majority of sign-symptoms and objective parameters such as weakness, fatigue, palpitation, effort intolerance, breathlessness, heartburn, pallor, constipation, hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, mean platelet volume, serum iron, and total iron binding capacity. Conclusion: Dhatrilauha possesses many fold effectiveness in anemia (IDA), which was evidenced with the significant results obtained in the majority of parameters in this study. PMID:25972720

  12. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta for the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Since more than two decades erythropoiesis-stimulating agents are the main pillar for treatment of anemia associated with chronic kidney disease. Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin beta (MPG-EPO), also called continuous erythropoietin receptor activator, is the longest acting erythropoiesis-stimulating agent currently available. MPG-EPO is characterized by an elimination half-life of approximately 137 h and offers extended dosing intervals up to 4 weeks. Numerous phase I/II studies and a comprehensive clinical phase III program demonstrated the feasibility of MPG-EPO therapy for anemia correction and maintenance of stable hemoglobin levels in adult chronic kidney disease patients. Due to patent disputes MPG-EPO was only available outside the US market so far. In view of a prevailing US market introduction, this review focuses on efficacy and safety data from pivotal trials, summarizes recent clinical research and finally tries to substantiate potential benefits associated with the use of this anti-anemic drug. PMID:26573694

  13. Defective FANCI Binding by a Fanconi Anemia-Related FANCD2 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koichi; Ishiai, Masamichi; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    FANCD2 is a product of one of the genes associated with Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare recessive disease characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal malformations, developmental defects, and cancer predisposition. FANCD2 forms a complex with FANCI (ID complex) and is monoubiquitinated, which facilitates the downstream interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair steps, such as ICL unhooking and nucleolytic end resection. In the present study, we focused on the chicken FANCD2 (cFANCD2) mutant harboring the Leu234 to Arg (L234R) substitution. cFANCD2 L234R corresponds to the human FANCD2 L231R mutation identified in an FA patient. We found that cFANCD2 L234R did not complement the defective ICL repair in FANCD2?/? DT40 cells. Purified cFANCD2 L234R did not bind to chicken FANCI, and its monoubiquitination was significantly deficient, probably due to the abnormal ID complex formation. In addition, the histone chaperone activity of cFANCD2 L234R was also defective. These findings may explain some aspects of Fanconi anemia pathogenesis by a FANCD2 missense mutation. PMID:25489943

  14. Percutaneous Glue Embolization of a Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysm in a Case of Sickle Cell Anemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, Gurpreet S.; Gulati, Manpreet S. Makharia, Govind; Hatimota, Pradeep; Saikia, Nripen; Paul, Shashi B.; Acharya, Subrat

    2006-08-15

    Although aneurysmal complications of sickle cell anemia have been described in the intracranial circulation, visceral artery pseudoaneurysms in this disease entity have not previously been reported in the literature. Conventional treatment of visceral pseudoaneurysms has been surgical ligation or resection of the aneurysm. Transcatheter embolization has emerged as an attractive, minimally invasive alternative to surgery in the treatment of these lesions. In certain situations, however, due to the unfavorable angiographic anatomy precluding safe transcatheter embolization, direct percutaneous glue injection of the pseudoaneurysm sac may be considered to achieve successful occlusion of the sac. The procedure may be rendered safer by simultaneous balloon protection of the parent artery. We describe this novel treatment modality in a case of inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with sickle cell anemia. Although a complication in the form of glue reflux into the parent vessel occurred that necessitated surgery, this treatment modality may be used in very selected cases (where conventional endovascular embolization techniques are not applicable) after careful selection of the balloon diameter and appropriate concentration of the glue-lipiodol mixture.

  15. Contribution to the food products' analysis: A research and evaluation on the hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Al-Alam, Josephine; Millet, Maurice; Chbani, Asma; Fajloun, Ziad

    2015-11-01

    Pesticides are a real concern for the society as their use has become critical, leading sometimes to their accumulation as residues in fruits and vegetables. After examining the pesticides sold in Northern Lebanon, this study is focused on the analysis and identification of pesticides residues in fruits and vegetables that are harvested in this region and treated with the locally sold pesticides. Results show: first, (i) a use of Zineb by the name of another pesticide Micronized Sulfur to avoid prosecution; (ii) a significant presence of Metalaxyl in lemons and oranges; (iii) a significant presence of Trifluralin in strawberries; and (iv) a significant presence of Zineb in lemons and tomatoes. Second, with the use of hemolytic tests on human blood results show: (i) a critical concentration and a significant hemolytic effect of some pesticides used in Lebanon; and (ii) an absence of hemolytic effect in the collected fractions of the different analyzed fruit extracts containing pesticides. Finally, this work is the first step for pesticides' analysis in vegetables and fruits in Lebanon, initiating a wider analytical study in order to control and examine the use of pesticides which, according to our results, could have an adverse effect on human health over a long term. PMID:26357889

  16. Sensitive, reliable and easy-performed laboratory monitoring of eculizumab therapy in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Volokhina, Elena B; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Bergseth, Grethe; van der Velden, Thea J A M; Westra, Dineke; Wetzels, Jack F M; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-01

    Complement C5 inhibitor eculizumab treatment in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome is effective, but associated with high costs. Complement inhibition monitoring in these patients has not been standardized. In this study we evaluated novel functional assays for application in routine follow-up. We documented that the Wieslab® complement screen assay showed a sensitivity of 1-2% of C5 activity by adding purified C5 or normal human serum to a C5 deficient serum. All the patient samples obtained during the treatment course, were completely blocked for terminal complement pathway activity for up to four weeks after the eculizumab infusion. Levels of complexes between eculizumab and C5 were inversely correlated to the complement activity (p=0.01). Moreover, titrating serum from eculizumab-treated patients into normal serum revealed that eculizumab was present in excess up to four weeks after infusion. Thus, we demonstrate sensitive, reliable and easy-performed assays which can be used to design individual eculizumab dosage regimens. PMID:26111482

  17. A compact highly efficient and low hemolytic centrifugal blood pump with a magnetically levitated impeller.

    PubMed

    Asama, Junichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Hoshi, Hideo; Takatani, Setsuo; Shimokohbe, Akira

    2006-03-01

    A magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump (CBP), intended for use as a ventricular assist device, needs to be highly durable and reliable for long-term use without any mechanical failure. Furthermore, maglev CBPs should be small enough to be implanted into patients of various size and weight. We have developed a compact maglev CBP employing a two-degree-of-freedom controlled magnetic bearing, with a magnetically suspended impeller directly driven by an internal brushless direct current (DC) motor. The magnetic bearing actively controls the radial motion of the impeller and passively supports axial and angular motions using a permanent magnet embedded in the impeller. The overall dimensions of the maglev CBP are 65 mm in diameter and 40 mm in height. The total power consumption and pump efficiency for pumping 6 L/min against a head pressure of 105 mm Hg were 6.5 W and 21%, respectively. To evaluate the characteristics of the maglev CBP when subjected to a disturbance, excitation of the base, simulating the movement of the patient in various directions, and the sudden interception of the outlet tube connected with the pump in a mock circulatory loop, simulating an unexpected kink and emergent clamp during a heart surgery, were tested by monitoring the five-degree-of-freedom motion of the impeller. Furthermore, the hemolytic characteristics of the maglev CBP were compared with those of the Medtronic Biomedicus BPX-80, which demonstrated the superiority of the maglev CBP. PMID:16480390

  18. [Delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sicle cell disease patients: a new challenge for the Hemovigilance network].

    PubMed

    Rieux, C; De Meyer, E; Boudjedir, K

    2015-03-01

    Delayed hemolytic reaction transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is a serious and still under diagnosed event. Clinical and biological presentation mimics an acute SCD complication. It is a life-threatening event, especially in hyperhemolysis syndrome (HS) characterized by a massive destruction of both the donor's and patient's red blood cells. The main cause is related to the presence of alloantibodies directed against red blood cell antigens, more rarely autoantibodies. In approximately a third of the cases, no new antibody is highlighted. Pathophysiological hypotheses are still under debate but most of the authors agree on the role played by the SCD inflammatory state. Several therapeutic approaches are used but the data are still insufficient to estimate their efficiency. It is admitted that a new transfusion may exacerbate the phenomenon and the benefit-risk of any transfusion must be carefully evaluated. Measures limiting alloimmunization and rigorous follow-up of SCD patients and their immunohematologic status can prevent some of these accidents. The Hemovigilance network has a role to play in the recognition and the description of this risk. A first analysis realized on the French national Hemovigilance database of the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety (ANSM) over the period 2000-2013, shows us interesting information but some inadequacies, described here, must be taken into account to strengthen these data and insure in the future a better reporting quality. PMID:25441454

  19. End-tidal carbon monoxide as an indicator of the hemolytic rate.

    PubMed

    Christensen, R D; Lambert, D K; Henry, E; Yaish, H M; Prchal, J T

    2015-03-01

    In the first days of life, low grade jaundice is essentially universal. The source of the elevated bilirubin level giving rise to "physiological jaundice of the newborn" is only partly known. We hypothesized that it is, at least in part, the result of active and specific hemolysis involving a physiological mechanism to lower the high fetal hematocrit, appropriate for the relatively low oxygen environment in utero, to a lower level appropriate for the state of oxygen abundance after birth. We tested this by quantifying end tidal carbon monoxide (ETCO) as a marker of the rate of heme metabolism to bilirubin. We found that ETCO values of 20 neonates and children with known hemolytic disorders were higher than 20 age-matched healthy controls (p<0.0001), indicating that this instrumentation recognizes hemolysis in neonates and children. We also found that ETCO reference intervals were indeed higher in healthy neonates during the first three days after birth (5th to 95th percentile reference range, 1.4 to 1.7ppm) than after 1month of age (all ?1.0ppm, p<0.0001). These results suggest to us that hemolysis is physiological during the first days after birth. The cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for transient hemolysis after birth are topics of current investigation. PMID:25624169

  20. An international consensus approach to the management of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome in children.

    PubMed

    Loirat, Chantal; Fakhouri, Fadi; Ariceta, Gema; Besbas, Nesrin; Bitzan, Martin; Bjerre, Anna; Coppo, Rosanna; Emma, Francesco; Johnson, Sally; Karpman, Diana; Landau, Daniel; Langman, Craig B; Lapeyraque, Anne-Laure; Licht, Christoph; Nester, Carla; Pecoraro, Carmine; Riedl, Magdalena; van de Kar, Nicole C A J; Van de Walle, Johan; Vivarelli, Marina; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) emerged during the last decade as a disease largely of complement dysregulation. This advance facilitated the development of novel, rational treatment options targeting terminal complement activation, e.g., using an anti-C5 antibody (eculizumab). We review treatment and patient management issues related to this therapeutic approach. We present consensus clinical practice recommendations generated by HUS International, an international expert group of clinicians and basic scientists with a focused interest in HUS. We aim to address the following questions of high relevance to daily clinical practice: Which complement investigations should be done and when? What is the importance of anti-factor H antibody detection? Who should be treated with eculizumab? Is plasma exchange therapy still needed? When should eculizumab therapy be initiated? How and when should complement blockade be monitored? Can the approved treatment schedule be modified? What approach should be taken to kidney and/or combined liver-kidney transplantation? How should we limit the risk of meningococcal infection under complement blockade therapy? A pressing question today regards the treatment duration. We discuss the need for prospective studies to establish evidence-based criteria for the continuation or cessation of anticomplement therapy in patients with and without identified complement mutations. PMID:25859752

  1. A prototypical Fanconi anemia pathway in lower eukaryotes?

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Peter J.; Ward, Thomas A.; Chovanec, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) present a major challenge to cells, preventing separation of the two strands of duplex DNA and blocking major chromosome transactions, including transcription and replication. Due to the complexity of removing this form of DNA damage, no single DNA repair pathway has been shown to be capable of eradicating ICLs. In eukaryotes, ICL repair is a complex process, principally because several repair pathways compete for ICL repair intermediates in a strictly cell cycle-dependent manner. Yeast cells require a combination of nucleotide excision repair, homologous recombination repair and postreplication repair/translesion DNA synthesis to remove ICLs. There are also a number of additional ICL repair factors originally identified in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, called Pso1 though 10, of which Pso2 has an apparently dedicated role in ICL repair. Mammalian cells respond to ICLs by a complex network guided by factors mutated in the inherited cancer-prone disorder Fanconi anemia (FA). Although enormous progress has been made over recent years in identifying and characterizing FA factors as well as in elucidating certain aspects of the biology of FA, the mechanistic details of the ICL repair defects in FA patients remain unknown. Dissection of the FA DNA damage response pathway has, in part, been limited by the absence of FA-like pathways in highly tractable model organisms, such as yeast. Although S. cerevisiae possesses putative homologs of the FA factors FANCM, FANCJ and FANCP (Mph1, Chl1 and Slx4, respectively) as well as of the FANCM-associated proteins MHF1 and MHF2 (Mhf1 and Mhf2), the corresponding mutants display no significant increase in sensitivity to ICLs. Nevertheless, we and others have recently shown that these FA homologs, along with several other factors, control an ICL repair pathway, which has an overlapping or redundant role with a Pso2-controlled pathway. This pathway acts in S-phase and serves to prevent ICL-stalled replication forks from collapsing into DNA double-strand breaks. PMID:22895051

  2. [Cytogenetics study of chromosomal instability in Fanconi anemia in Tunisia].

    PubMed

    Chbili, Chahra; Bouraoui, Sana; El Ghezal, Hatem; Saad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Cells of Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by cellular and chromosomal hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. We tested mitomycin C at 25 ng/mL, 40 ng/mL and diepoxybutane 0.1 ?g/mL in order to select a reference technique in the diagnosis of AF. We also studied the mitotic segregation of sex chromosomes. Our study focused on 73 patients with aplastic anemia suspecting AF and also 17 healthy controls. Thus, the MMC 25 ng/mL with a sensitivity to detect AF cells. DEB, by contrast, showed better specificity. FISH study shows the presence of instability in the AF mitotic cells. The association for routine diagnosis of MMC 25 ng/mL and DEB 0.1 mcg/mL, and the search for a mitotic instability by FISH is the best way of cytogenetic diagnosis of AF. PMID:25119806

  3. A Hemoglobin Variant Associated with Neonatal Cyanosis and Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Moira A.; Mollan, Todd L.; Abdulmalik, Osheisa Y.; Butler, Andrew D.; Goodwin, Emily F.; Sarkar, Arindam; Stolle, Catherine A.; Gow, Andrew J.; Olson, John S.; Weiss, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Globin-gene mutations are a rare but important cause of cyanosis. We identified a missense mutation in the fetal G ?-globin gene (HBG2) in a father and daughter with transient neonatal cyanosis and anemia. This new mutation modifies the ligand-binding pocket of fetal hemoglobin by means of two mechanisms. First, the relatively large side chain of methionine decreases both the affinity of oxygen for binding to the mutant hemoglobin subunit and the rate at which it does so. Second, the mutant methionine is converted to aspartic acid post-translationally, probably through oxidative mechanisms. The presence of this polar amino acid in the heme pocket is predicted to enhance hemoglobin denaturation, causing anemia. PMID:21561349

  4. A hemoglobin variant associated with neonatal cyanosis and anemia.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Moira A; Mollan, Todd L; Abdulmalik, Osheisa Y; Butler, Andrew D; Goodwin, Emily F; Sarkar, Arindam; Stolle, Catherine A; Gow, Andrew J; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J

    2011-05-12

    Globin-gene mutations are a rare but important cause of cyanosis. We identified a missense mutation in the fetal G?-globin gene (HBG2) in a father and daughter with transient neonatal cyanosis and anemia. This new mutation modifies the ligand-binding pocket of fetal hemoglobin by means of two mechanisms. First, the relatively large side chain of methionine decreases both the affinity of oxygen for binding to the mutant hemoglobin subunit and the rate at which it does so. Second, the mutant methionine is converted to aspartic acid post-translationally, probably through oxidative mechanisms. The presence of this polar amino acid in the heme pocket is predicted to enhance hemoglobin denaturation, causing anemia. PMID:21561349

  5. Molecular analysis of Fanconi anemia: the experience of the Bone Marrow Failure Study Group of the Italian Association of Pediatric Onco-Hematology.

    PubMed

    De Rocco, Daniela; Bottega, Roberta; Cappelli, Enrico; Cavani, Simona; Criscuolo, Maria; Nicchia, Elena; Corsolini, Fabio; Greco, Chiara; Borriello, Adriana; Svahn, Johanna; Pillon, Marta; Mecucci, Cristina; Casazza, Gabriella; Verzegnassi, Federico; Cugno, Chiara; Locasciulli, Anna; Farruggia, Piero; Longoni, Daniela; Ramenghi, Ugo; Barberi, Walter; Tucci, Fabio; Perrotta, Silverio; Grammatico, Paola; Hanenberg, Helmut; Della Ragione, Fulvio; Dufour, Carlo; Savoia, Anna

    2014-06-01

    Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease characterized by congenital malformations, pancytopenia, cancer predisposition, and sensitivity to cross-linking agents. The molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is relatively complex for several aspects including genetic heterogeneity with mutations in at least 16 different genes. In this paper, we report the mutations identified in 100 unrelated probands enrolled into the National Network of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematoly and Oncology. In approximately half of these cases, mutational screening was carried out after retroviral complementation analyses or protein analysis. In the other half, the analysis was performed on the most frequently mutated genes or using a next generation sequencing approach. We identified 108 distinct variants of the FANCA, FANCG, FANCC, FANCD2, and FANCB genes in 85, 9, 3, 2, and 1 families, respectively. Despite the relatively high number of private mutations, 45 of which are novel Fanconi anemia alleles, 26% of the FANCA alleles are due to 5 distinct mutations. Most of the mutations are large genomic deletions and nonsense or frameshift mutations, although we identified a series of missense mutations, whose pathogenetic role was not always certain. The molecular diagnosis of Fanconi anemia is still a tiered procedure that requires identifying candidate genes to avoid useless sequencing. Introduction of next generation sequencing strategies will greatly improve the diagnostic process, allowing a rapid analysis of all the genes. PMID:24584348

  6. Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A S; Prichard, J S; Freedman, M H

    1973-03-17

    During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. PMID:4691106

  7. Aplastic anemia and membranous nephropathy induced by intravenous mercury

    PubMed Central

    Priya, N.; Nagaprabhu, V. N.; Kurian, G.; Seethalakshmi, N.; Rao, G. G.; Unni, V. N.

    2012-01-01

    Self-injection of mercury can be life-threatening. We report a case of attempted suicide by self-intravenous injection of elemental mercury. The patient suffered from two side effects : membranous nephropathy and aplastic anemia. She was treated and the systemic effects of mercury were reversed after 4 years. The toxicology of mercury, mechanisms of renal and systemic toxicities, and the various therapeutic measures for mercury poisoning are discussed. PMID:23439491

  8. Improvement in hematopoiesis after iron chelation therapy with deferasirox in patients with aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Eun; Yahng, Seung-Ah; Cho, Byung-Sik; Eom, Ki-Sung; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Lee, Seok; Min, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hee-Je; Cho, Seok-Goo; Kim, Dong-Wook; Min, Woo-Sung; Park, Chong-Won; Lee, Jong Wook

    2013-01-01

    Iron overload due to regular transfusions of packed red cells can cause multiple organ damage. Iron chelation therapy (ICT) is important in patients with aplastic anemia (AA) who require blood transfusions as supportive management. With the introduction of the oral iron chelator deferasirox, ICT has become more widely available and feasible. We studied 4 adult AA patients who had transfusion-induced iron overload and showed hematological improvement after ICT with oral deferasirox. Following deferasirox treatment, hemoglobin increased and serum ferritin levels decreased, and the patients subsequently became transfusion independent. Our experience raises the possibility of the potential benefit of ICT on hematopoiesis. Further long-term studies in larger patient cohorts are needed to clarify the effect of the restoration of hematopoiesis after iron chelation therapy. PMID:23154600

  9. FANCJ suppresses microsatellite instability and lymphomagenesis independent of the Fanconi anemia pathway.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Borel, Valerie; Adelman, Carrie A; Schindler, Detlev; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-12-15

    Microsatellites are short tandem repeat sequences that are highly prone to expansion/contraction due to their propensity to form non-B-form DNA structures, which hinder DNA polymerases and provoke template slippage. Although error correction by mismatch repair plays a key role in preventing microsatellite instability (MSI), which is a hallmark of Lynch syndrome, activities must also exist that unwind secondary structures to facilitate replication fidelity. Here, we report that Fancj helicase-deficient mice, while phenotypically resembling Fanconi anemia (FA), are also hypersensitive to replication inhibitors and predisposed to lymphoma. Whereas metabolism of G4-DNA structures is largely unaffected in Fancj(-/-) mice, high levels of spontaneous MSI occur, which is exacerbated by replication inhibition. In contrast, MSI is not observed in Fancd2(-/-) mice but is prevalent in human FA-J patients. Together, these data implicate FANCJ as a key factor required to counteract MSI, which is functionally distinct from its role in the FA pathway. PMID:26637282

  10. Update of the human and mouse Fanconi anemia genes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hongbin; Nebert, Daniel W; Bruford, Elspeth A; Thompson, David C; Joenje, Hans; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessively inherited disease manifesting developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancies. Whereas FA has been studied for nearly 90 years, only in the last 20 years have increasing numbers of genes been implicated in the pathogenesis associated with this genetic disease. To date, 19 genes have been identified that encode Fanconi anemia complementation group proteins, all of which are named or aliased, using the root symbol "FANC." Fanconi anemia subtype (FANC) proteins function in a common DNA repair pathway called "the FA pathway," which is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. The various FANC mutant proteins contribute to distinct steps associated with FA pathogenesis. Herein, we provide a review update of the 19 human FANC and their mouse orthologs, an evolutionary perspective on the FANC genes, and the functional significance of the FA DNA repair pathway in association with clinical disorders. This is an example of a set of genes--known to exist in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, and yeast--that are grouped together on the basis of shared biochemical and physiological functions, rather than evolutionary phylogeny, and have been named on this basis by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC). PMID:26596371

  11. Aplastic anemia and dental implant rehabilitation: a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun-Hwa; Shet, Uttom Kumar; Kim, Byeong-Guk; Kim, Myung-In; Kook, Min-Suk; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Ryu, Sun-Youl; Park, Hong-Ju

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate implant-supported restoration as a technique for restoring missing teeth in patients with aplastic anemia. Recurrent bleeding from wound sites leads to persistent release of iron in the tissue. Excessive iron in tissue is related to clinical findings, including fibrosis, poor wound healing, and high level of angiogenesis, which are possible etiological factors of reduced osseointegration. A 44-year-old female patient with aplastic anemia was treated with multiple endosseous implants throughout the mandible and in the posterior region of the maxilla. After 14 implants were placed, radiological and clinical parameters were assessed during the follow-up period. Marginal bone did not change significantly during the follow-up period. The fine trabecular bone in intimate contact and enclosing the implant fixture was sufficient for successful osseointegration. None of the 14 implants were associated with compilations during the seven-year experimental period. This study suggests that dental implant procedures are a safe and reliable treatment option for restoration of missing dentition in patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:26568929

  12. Myocardial mechanics and energetics in experimental iron-deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Levine, H J; Wolk, M J; Keefe, J F; Bing, O H; Snow, J A; Messer, J V

    1977-05-01

    The effect of iron-deficiency anemia on myocardial mechanics and energetics was studied in 10 anesthetized bealge puppies. Nine littermates served as controls. Left ventricular/body weight ratio was increased 14.2% (P less than 0.05) and cardiac index 36.5% (P less than 0.02) in the anemic puppies. Heart rate, mean systolic pressure, myocardial lactate extraction coefficient, and lactic dehydrogenase isozymes were similar in both groups. Contractile state measured in vivo (pressure-velocity curves) and in isolated muscles (isotonic force-velocity curves) was virtually identical in the littermate groups. Despite markedly increased coronary blood flow in the anemia animals, oxygen consumption per unit weight of myocardium was the same in both groups. Contractile element efficiency averaged 18.3% in 10 adult mongrel dogs studied in a similar fashion and was 27.1% and 39.8% in the normal puppies and anemic puppies, respectively. The oxygen cost of internal or force-generating work was similar among the three groups of dogs. It is concluded that the volume load produced by iron-deficiency anemia was associated with a normal contractile state, normal unit myocardial oxygen consumption, no evidence of chronic anaerobiosis, and a high contractile element efficiency, perhaps as a consequence of increased diastolic fiber stretch. PMID:140609

  13. Neocytolysis contributes to the anemia of renal disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, L.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T.; Whitley, C. E.; Hachey, D. L.; Suki, W.

    1999-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiological process affecting the selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin (EPO) depression appears to initiate the process, providing the rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When EPO therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients showed chromium 51 (51Cr)-red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these four patients received oral 13C-glycine and 15N-glycine, and there was a suggestion of pathological isotope enrichment of stool porphyrins when EPO therapy was held, again supporting selective hemolysis of newly released red cells that take up the isotope (one patient had chronic hemolysis indicated by isotope studies of blood and stool). Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explain some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus EPO therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared with lower doses administered more frequently subcutaneously.

  14. Neocytolysis Contributes to the Anemia of Renal Disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Lawrence; Alfrey, Clarence P.; Driscoll, Theda; Whitley, Carl E.; Hachey, David; Suki, Wadi

    1997-01-01

    Neocytolysis is a recently described physiologic process effecting selective hemolysis of young red blood cells in circumstances of plethora. Erythropoietin depression appears to initiate the process, providing rationale to investigate its contributions to the anemia of renal disease. When erythropoietin therapy was withheld, four of five stable hemodialysis patients demonstrated Cr-51 red cell survival patterns indicative of neocytolysis; red cell survival was short in the first 9 days, then normalized. Two of these patients received oral (13)C-glycine and (15)N-glycine and showed pathologic enrichment of stool porphyrins by the most recently ingested isotope when EPO therapy was held. This confirms selective hemolysis of newly-released red cells. (One patient had chronic hemolysis by isotope studies of blood and stool.) Thus, neocytolysis can contribute to the anemia of renal disease and explains some unresolved issues about such anemia. One implication is the prediction that intravenous bolus erythropoietin therapy is metabolically and economically inefficient compared to lower doses given more frequently subcutaneously.

  15. Aplastic anemia and dental implant rehabilitation: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwa; Shet, Uttom Kumar; Kim, Byeong-Guk; Kim, Myung-In; Kook, Min-Suk; Oh, Hee-Kyun; Ryu, Sun-Youl; Park, Hong-Ju; Jung, Seunggon

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate implant-supported restoration as a technique for restoring missing teeth in patients with aplastic anemia. Recurrent bleeding from wound sites leads to persistent release of iron in the tissue. Excessive iron in tissue is related to clinical findings, including fibrosis, poor wound healing, and high level of angiogenesis, which are possible etiological factors of reduced osseointegration. A 44-year-old female patient with aplastic anemia was treated with multiple endosseous implants throughout the mandible and in the posterior region of the maxilla. After 14 implants were placed, radiological and clinical parameters were assessed during the follow-up period. Marginal bone did not change significantly during the follow-up period. The fine trabecular bone in intimate contact and enclosing the implant fixture was sufficient for successful osseointegration. None of the 14 implants were associated with compilations during the seven-year experimental period. This study suggests that dental implant procedures are a safe and reliable treatment option for restoration of missing dentition in patients with aplastic anemia. PMID:26568929

  16. Physical performance decrements in children with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed Central

    Millis, R. M.; Baker, F. W.; Ertugrul, L.; Douglas, R. M.; Sexcius, L.

    1994-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested that cardiorespiratory dysfunction might contribute to the inability of children with sickle cell anemia to exercise competitively with normal children. This article presents a study designed to detect differences in performance of routine physical activities between groups of children having homozygous hemoglobin of sickle cell anemia (HbSS) and those with normal hemoglobin (HbAA). Thirty 10-year-old girls were divided into two equal groups exhibiting no significant differences in height, weight, or body surface area. Each subject performed 20-yd swimming, 40-yd swimming, and 100-yd "potato" foot-racing activities. Results showed significant performance decrements in HbSS compared with HbAA children. Performance decrements on the 20-yd swimming were found to be significantly greater than in either the 40-yd swimming or the 100-yd "potato" races. Assessment of 20-yd swim time as a fraction of 40-yd swim time showed diminished capacity of HbSS children for "burst activity." It is concluded that distance might play a role in the capacity of HbSS children to compete with HbAA children in racing activities such as those encountered in school-based physical education programs. Parents and educators should consider that short distance racing might exaggerate the inability of children with sickle cell anemia to compete with normal children. PMID:8169985

  17. The relation of maternal blood arsenic to anemia during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vigeh, Mohsen; Yokoyama, Kazuhito; Matsukawa, Takehisa; Shinohara, Atsuko; Ohtani, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the relationship of prenatal arsenic exposure to hemoglobin concentrations and anemia during pregnancy, a longitudinal study was conducted of 364 participants during early pregnancy from October 2006 to March 2011 in Tehran, Iran. Maternal whole blood (taken between 8-12 and 20-24 weeks of gestation, and at delivery) and umbilical cord blood samples were collected for arsenic measurement. The mean concentration of maternal blood arsenic in the first trimester of pregnancy was significantly lower in anemic women compared with non-anemic participants (mean ± SD: 12.4 ± 3.4 versus 14.8 ± 4.0 ?g/L, respectively, p < 0.001). Maternal whole blood arsenic levels in the first and third trimesters were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with hemoglobin concentrations measured throughout gestation (r = 0.312, 0.424, and 0.183). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that increased maternal blood arsenic levels in the first trimester were significantly negatively associated to anemia during pregnancy (OR = 0.85, CI: 0.77-0.94, p < 0.01). The present study showed that prenatal blood arsenic exposure was not a risk factor for the occurrence of anemia. PMID:25402686

  18. Phytomedicines and Nutraceuticals: Alternative Therapeutics for Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Imaga, Ngozi Awa

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a genetically inherited disease in which the “SS” individual possesses an abnormal beta globin gene. A single base substitution in the gene encoding the human ?-globin subunit results in replacement of ?6 glutamic acid by valine, leading to the devastating clinical manifestations of sickle cell disease. This substitution causes drastic reduction in the solubility of sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) when deoxygenated. Under these conditions, the HbS molecules polymerize to form long crystalline intracellular mass of fibers which are responsible for the deformation of the biconcave disc shaped erythrocyte into a sickle shape. First-line clinical management of sickle cell anemia include, use of hydroxyurea, folic acid, amino acids supplementation, penicillinprophylaxis, and antimalarial prophylaxis to manage the condition and blood transfusions to stabilize the patient's hemoglobin level. These are quite expensive and have attendant risk factors. However, a bright ray of hope involving research into antisickling properties of medicinal plants has been rewarding. This alternative therapy using phytomedicines has proven to not only reduce crisis but also reverse sickling (in vitro). The immense benefits of phytomedicines and nutraceuticals used in the management of sickle cell anemia are discussed in this paper. PMID:23476125

  19. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  20. Anemia in Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: Prevalence, pathogenesis, and potential impact.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Malay; Rajta, Puja Negi; Khatana, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common preventable and treatable lifestyle-related disease with high global prevalence. COPD is associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Comorbidities are important events in the natural history of the disease and have a negative effect on the morbidity and mortality of COPD patients. Cardiac diseases, lung cancer, osteoporosis, and depression are common comorbidities reported for COPD. Recently, anemia has been recognized as a frequent comorbidity in COPD patients. The prevalence of anemia in patients with COPD varies from 7.5% to 33%. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is probably the most common type of anemia associated with COPD. ACD is driven by COPD-mediated systemic inflammation. Anemia in COPD is associated with greater healthcare resource utilization, impaired quality of life, decreased survival, and a greater likelihood of hospitalization. We need large prospective studies to discern the association between anemia and COPD. PMID:25814799

  1. Low Vitamin D Levels: Are Associated with Both Iron Deficiency and Anemia in Children and Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ömer; Kartal, Ay?e Tu?ba

    2015-01-01

    We have read, with great interest, the recent article by Lee. In this excellent study, the authors investigated the association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia in a nationally representative sample of Korean children and adolescents. They concluded that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of anemia, especially iron deficiency anemia, in healthy female children and adolescents. We appreciate and congratulate the authors for having addressed such an important issue. However, we have some concerns regarding this report, which we would like to share with you. As a result, further studies are needed for the association between vitamin D deficiency and anemia. Factors affecting Vitamin D status and anemia such as measurement method, nutrition, medications, and infections should be considered to conclude an association between vitamin D and anemia. Therefore, we think that considering these confounders would add value to this well-written article. PMID:25996780

  2. Case report: Benefits and challenges of long-term eculizumab in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cullinan, Noelle; Gorman, Kathleen Mary; Riordan, Michael; Waldron, Mary; Goodship, Timothy H J; Awan, Atif

    2015-06-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is caused by dysregulation of the complement system, leading to complement overactivation. A humanized anti-C5 monoclonal antibody, eculizumab, has been available for the treatment of aHUS since 2011. The long-term safety and efficacy of this novel drug in the pediatric population remain under review. We present a child with a hybrid CFH/CFHR3 gene who, having had multiple disease relapses despite optimal treatment with plasma exchange, commenced eculizumab therapy in August 2010. She remains relapse free in follow-up at 52 months, and treatment has been well tolerated. The risk of meningococcal disease during this treatment is recognized. Despite vaccination against meningococcal disease and appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis, our patient developed meningococcal bacteremia 30 months into treatment. She presented with nonspecific symptoms but recovered without sequelae with appropriate treatment. We recommend that children be vaccinated against invasive meningococcal infection before beginning eculizumab therapy and take appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis during treatment, and we suggest that vaccine responses should be checked and followed annually. Clinicians need to maintain a high index of suspicion for invasive meningococcal disease. Neither vaccination nor antibiotic prophylaxis provides complete protection in patients on eculizumab therapy. The appropriate dosage of eculizumab needed to achieve remission in aHUS in the pediatric population is unknown. Having achieved remission in our patient, we monitor eculizumab and CH50 levels to evaluate ongoing blockade of the terminal complement cascade. Such information may help guide dosing intervals in the future. PMID:25941307

  3. Priming dose of phenylhydrazine protects against hemolytic and lethal effects of 2-butoxyethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palkar, Prajakta S.; Philip, Binu K.; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2007-11-15

    Protection against a high dose of a toxicant by prior exposure to another toxicant is called heteroprotection. Our objective was to establish a heteroprotection model in RBCs. Female Sprague Dawley rats treated with an LD90 dose of 2-butoxyethanol (BE, 1500 mg/kg in water, 5 ml/kg po) 14 days after priming with 0.9% NaCl suffered 90% mortality by 15 days, whereas all rats receiving the LD90 dose of BE 14 days after priming with phenylhydrazine (PHZ, 125 mg/kg in 0.9% NaCl, 3 ml/kg po) survived. Hematocrit decreased from normal 45% to 24% by day 3 after PHZ priming and improved thereafter. Increasing the time interval between the priming and LD90 dose to 21 days abolished the heteroprotection. RBCs obtained on days 7 and 14 after PHZ priming unlike those on day 21 were resilient to the hemotoxic metabolite of BE, butoxyacetic acid (BAA). Unaltered hepatic alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase activities upon PHZ priming suggested that bioactivation of BE to BAA was unaffected. Lower renal (6 and 12 h) and hepatic (12 h) BAA levels and 3 fold higher excretion of BAA in PHZ-primed rat urine suggested a protective role of toxicokinetics. Higher erythropoietin, reticulocytes, and resiliency of PHZ-primed rat RBCs indicated that newly formed RBCs are resilient to hemolytic BAA. The antioxidant levels in the PHZ-primed rat RBCs did not indicate a protective role in heteroprotection. In conclusion, the resistance of PHZ-primed rats against BE-induced hemotoxicity and lethality is mediated by a combination of altered toxicokinetics, robust erythropoiesis, and resiliency of new RBCs.

  4. Combined Complement Gene Mutations in Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Influence Clinical Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bresin, Elena; Rurali, Erica; Caprioli, Jessica; Sanchez-Corral, Pilar; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Pinto, Sheila; Goodship, Timothy H.J.; Alberti, Marta; Ribes, David; Valoti, Elisabetta; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Several abnormalities in complement genes reportedly contribute to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), but incomplete penetrance suggests that additional factors are necessary for the disease to manifest. Here, we sought to describe genotype–phenotype correlations among patients with combined mutations, defined as mutations in more than one complement gene. We screened 795 patients with aHUS and identified single mutations in 41% and combined mutations in 3%. Only 8%–10% of patients with mutations in CFH, C3, or CFB had combined mutations, whereas approximately 25% of patients with mutations in MCP or CFI had combined mutations. The concomitant presence of CFH and MCP risk haplotypes significantly increased disease penetrance in combined mutated carriers, with 73% penetrance among carriers with two risk haplotypes compared with 36% penetrance among carriers with zero or one risk haplotype. Among patients with CFH or CFI mutations, the presence of mutations in other genes did not modify prognosis; in contrast, 50% of patients with combined MCP mutation developed end stage renal failure within 3 years from onset compared with 19% of patients with an isolated MCP mutation. Patients with combined mutations achieved remission with plasma treatment similar to patients with single mutations. Kidney transplant outcomes were worse, however, for patients with combined MCP mutation compared with an isolated MCP mutation. In summary, these data suggest that genotyping for the risk haplotypes in CFH and MCP may help predict the risk of developing aHUS in unaffected carriers of mutations. Furthermore, screening patients with aHUS for all known disease-associated genes may inform decisions about kidney transplantation. PMID:23431077

  5. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: Differential Diagnosis from TTP/HUS and Management

    PubMed Central

    Yenerel, Mustafa N.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). It has an unfavorable outcome with death rates as high as 25% during the acute phase and up to 50% of cases progressing to end-stage renal failure. Uncontrolled complement activation through the alternative pathway is thought to be the main underlying pathopysiology of aHUS and corresponds to all the deleterious findings of the disease. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and Shiga toxin-associated HUS are the 2 other important TMA diseases. Although differentiating HUS from TTP is relatively easy in children with a preceding diarrheal illness or invasive S. pneumoniae, differentiating aHUS from TTP or other microangiopathic disorders can present a major diagnostic challenge in adults. ADAMTS13 analysis is currently the most informative diagnostic test for differentiating TTP, congenital TTP, and aHUS. Today empiric plasma therapy still is recommended by expert opinion to be used as early as possible in any patient with symptoms of aHUS. The overall treatment goal remains restoration of a physiological balance between activation and control of the alternative complement pathway. So it is a reasonable approach to block the terminal complement complex with eculizumab in order to prevent further organ injury and increase the likelihood organ recovery. Persistence of hemolysis or lack of improvement of renal function after 3-5 daily plasmaphereses have to be regarded as the major criteria for uncontrolled TMA even if platelet count has normalized and as an indication to switch the treatment to eculizumab. Eculizumab has changed the future perspectives of patients with aHUS and both the FDA and the EMA have approved it as life-long treatment. However, there are still some unresolved issues about the follow-up such as the optimal duration of eculizumab treatment and whether it can be stopped or how to stop the therapy. PMID:25319590

  6. Genetics and Outcome of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome: A Nationwide French Series Comparing Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fremeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Fakhouri, Fadi; Garnier, Arnaud; Bienaimé, Frank; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnès; Ngo, Stéphanie; Moulin, Bruno; Servais, Aude; Provot, François; Rostaing, Lionel; Burtey, Stéphane; Niaudet, Patrick; Deschênes, Georges; Lebranchu, Yvon; Zuber, Julien; Loirat, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare complement-mediated kidney disease that was first recognized in children but also affects adults. This study assessed the disease presentation and outcome in a nationwide cohort of patients with aHUS according to the age at onset and the underlying complement abnormalities. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A total of 214 patients with aHUS were enrolled between 2000 and 2008 and screened for mutations in the six susceptibility factors for aHUS and for anti–factor H antibodies. Results Onset of aHUS occurred as frequently during adulthood (58.4%) as during childhood (41.6%). The percentages of patients who developed the disease were 23%, 40%, 70%, and 98% by age 2, 18, 40, and 60 years, respectively. Mortality was higher in children than in adults (6.7% versus 0.8% at 1 year) (P=0.02), but progression to ESRD after the first aHUS episode was more frequent in adults (46% versus 16%; P<0.001). Sixty-one percent of patients had mutations in their complement genes. The renal outcome was not significantly different in adults regardless of genetic background. Only membrane cofactor protein (MCP) and undetermined aHUS were less severe in children than adults. The frequency of relapse after 1 year was 92% in children with MCP-associated HUS and approximately 30% in all other subgroups. Conclusion Mortality rate was higher in children than adults with aHUS, but renal prognosis was worse in adults than children. In children, the prognosis strongly depends on the genetic background. PMID:23307876

  7. Erythrocyte Catalase Activity in More Frequent Microcytic Hypochromic Anemia: Beta-Thalassemia Trait and Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lazarte, Sandra Stella; Mónaco, María Eugenia; Jimenez, Cecilia Laura; Ledesma Achem, Miryam Emilse; Terán, Magdalena María; Issé, Blanca Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Most common microcytic hypochromic anemias are iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and ?-thalassemia trait (BTT), in which oxidative stress (OxS) has an essential role. Catalase causes detoxification of H2O2 in cells, and it is an indispensable antioxidant enzyme. The study was designed to measure erythrocyte catalase activity (ECAT) in patients with IDA (10) or BTT (21), to relate it with thalassemia mutation type (?0 or ?+) and to compare it with normal subjects (67). Ninety-eight individuals were analyzed since September 2013 to June 2014 in Tucumán, Argentina. Total blood count, hemoglobin electrophoresis at alkaline pH, HbA2, catalase, and iron status were performed. ?-thalassemic mutations were determined by real-time PCR. Normal range for ECAT was 70,0–130,0?MU/L. ECAT was increased in 14% (3/21) of BTT subjects and decreased in 40% (4/10) of those with IDA. No significant difference (p = 0,245) was shown between normal and BTT groups, while between IDA and normal groups the difference was proved to be significant (p = 0,000). In ?0 and ?+ groups, no significant difference (p = 0,359) was observed. An altered ECAT was detected in IDA and BTT. These results will help to clarify how the catalase activity works in these anemia types. PMID:26527217

  8. Iron-refractory microcytic anemia as the presenting feature of unicentric Castleman disease in children.

    PubMed

    Chandrakasan, Shanmuganathan; Bakeer, Nihal; Mo, Jun Qin; Cost, Carrye; Quinn, Charles T

    2014-04-01

    Chronic, iron-refractory, microcytic anemia can be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We report the cases of 2 children with occult, unicentric Castleman disease whose primary presenting feature was a chronic, unexplained, iron-refractory, microcytic anemia. Diagnosis was delayed because neither child had palpable lymphadenopathy and the lymphoproliferation was intra-abdominal. Surgical resection cured the anemia and the Castleman disease. A diagnostic clue to Castleman disease is an elevated concentration of interleukin-6 in blood, which causes anemia by inducing the expression of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. PMID:24367988

  9. Acute hemolytic vascular inflammatory processes are prevented by nitric oxide replacement or a single dose of hydroxyurea.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Camila Bononi; Souza, Lucas Eduardo Botelho; Leonardo, Flavia Costa; Costa, Fabio Trindade Maranhão; Werneck, Claudio C; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Conran, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Hemolysis and consequent release of cell-free hemoglobin (CFHb) impair vascular nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and cause oxidative and inflammatory processes. Hydroxyurea (HU), a common therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD), induces fetal Hb production and can act as an NO donor. We evaluated the acute inflammatory effects of intravenous water-induced hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice and determined the abilities of an NO donor, diethylamine NONOate (DEANO), and a single dose of HU to modulate this inflammation. Intravenous water induced acute hemolysis in C57BL/6 mice, attaining plasma Hb levels comparable to those observed in chimeric SCD mice. This hemolysis resulted in significant and rapid systemic inflammation and vascular leukocyte recruitment within 15 minutes, accompanied by NO metabolite generation. Administration of another potent NO scavenger (2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide) to C57BL/6 mice induced similar alterations in leukocyte recruitment, whereas hemin-induced inflammation occurred over a longer time frame. Importantly, the acute inflammatory effects of water-induced hemolysis were abolished by the simultaneous administration of DEANO or HU, without altering CFHb, in an NO pathway-mediated manner. In vitro, HU partially reversed the Hb-mediated induction of endothelial proinflammatory cytokine secretion and adhesion molecule expression. In summary, pathophysiological levels of hemolysis trigger an immediate inflammatory response, possibly mediated by vascular NO consumption. HU presents beneficial anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting rapid-onset hemolytic inflammation via an NO-dependent mechanism, independently of fetal Hb elevation. Data provide novel insights into mechanisms of hemolytic inflammation and further support perspectives for the use of HU as an acute treatment for SCD and other hemolytic disorders. PMID:26019278

  10. Prevalence of High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Thalassemia, Sickle-Cell Anemia, and Iron-Deficiency Anemia among the UAE Adolescent Population

    PubMed Central

    Barakat-Haddad, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high blood pressure, heart disease, and medical diagnoses in relation to blood disorders, among 6,329 adolescent students (age 15 to 18 years) who reside in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Findings indicated that the overall prevalence of high blood pressure and heart disease was 1.8% and 1.3%, respectively. Overall, the prevalence for thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia was 0.9%, 1.6%, and 5%, respectively. Bivariate analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the prevalence of high blood pressure among the local and expatriate adolescent population in the Emirate of Sharjah. Similarly, statistically significant differences in the prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia were observed among the local and expatriate population in Abu Dhabi city, the western region of Abu Dhabi, and Al-Ain. Multivariate analysis revealed the following significant predictors of high blood pressure: residing in proximity to industry, nonconventional substance abuse, and age when smoking or exposure to smoking began. Ethnicity was a significant predictor of heart disease, thalassemia, sickle-cell anemia, and iron-deficiency anemia. In addition, predictors of thalassemia included gender (female) and participating in physical activity. Participants diagnosed with sickle-cell anemia and iron-deficiency anemia were more likely to experience different physical activities. PMID:23606864

  11. Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) with recovery after a long-lasting anuria: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Georgaki-Angelaki, H; Stergiou, N; Kapogiannis, A; Orfanou, I; Grapsa, B; Roma, E

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a seven-year-old girl who suffered from atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS) complicated by septicaemia, central nervous system involvement, and cholangiitis. She remained anuric requiring treatment with peritoneal dialysis (PD) for a five-month period. In addition to conventional therapeutic measures including fresh frozen plasma (FFP) and blood cells transfusions she also underwent to plasma exchange (PE) treatment. Following a stormy hospitalization period of 17 weeks, the patient finally regained renal function and three years later she remains well on antihypertensive treatment and free of dialysis. PMID:21607045

  12. Fifth Disease (Parvovirus B19)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... anemia (low red blood cell count) such as sickle cell anemia. Outbreaks of parvovirus B19 infections occur from time ... exercising, bathing , or sunbathing . Parvovirus infections can make sickle cell anemia and other hemolytic anemias, much worse. This complication ...

  13. High Antimicrobial Effectiveness with Low Hemolytic and Cytotoxic Activity for PEG/Quaternary Copolyoxetanes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The alkyl chain length of quaternary ammonium/PEG copolyoxetanes has been varied to discern effects on solution antimicrobial efficacy, hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity. Monomers 3-((4-bromobutoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (BBOx) and 3-((2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethoxy)methyl)-3-methyloxetane (ME2Ox) were used to prepare precursor P[(BBOx)(ME2Ox)-50:50–4 kDa] copolyoxetane via cationic ring opening polymerization. The 1:1 copolymer composition and Mn (4 kDa) were confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. After C–Br substitution by a series of tertiary amines, ionic liquid Cx-50 copolyoxetanes were obtained, where 50 is the mole percent of quaternary repeat units and “x” is quaternary alkyl chain length (2, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, or 16 carbons). Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC) studies showed Tgs between ?40 and ?60 °C and melting endotherms for C14–50 and C16–50. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A systematic dependence of MIC on alkyl chain length was found. The most effective antimicrobials were in the C6–50 to C12–50 range. C8–50 had better overall performance with MICs of 4 ?g/mL, E. coli; 2 ?g/mL, S. aureus; and 24 ?g/mL, P. aeruginosa. At 5 × MIC, C8–50 effected >99% kill in 1 h against S. aureus, E. coli, and P. aeruginosa challenges of 108 cfu/mL; log reductions (1 h) were 7, 3, and 5, respectively. To provide additional insight into polycation interactions with bacterial membranes, a geometric model based on the dimensions of E. coli is described that provides an estimate of the maximum number of polycations that can chemisorb. Chain dimensions were estimated for polycation C8–50 with a molecular weight of 5 kDa. Considering the approximations for polycation chemisorption (PCC), it is surprising that a calculation based on geometric considerations gives a C8–50 concentration within a factor of 2 of the MIC, 4.0 (±1.2) ?g/mL for E. coli. Cx-50 copolyoxetane cytotoxicity was low for human red blood cells, human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFF). Selectivities for bacterial kill over cell lysis were among the highest ever reported for polycations indicating good prospects for biocompatibility. PMID:24422429

  14. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli as Causes of Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Marejková, Monika; Bláhová, Kv?ta; Janda, Jan; Fruth, Angelika; Petráš, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) cause diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+ HUS) worldwide, but no systematic study of EHEC as the causative agents of HUS was performed in the Czech Republic. We analyzed stools of all patients with D+ HUS in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2012 for evidence of EHEC infection. We determined virulence profiles, phenotypes, antimicrobial susceptibilities and phylogeny of the EHEC isolates. Methodology/Principal Findings Virulence loci were identified using PCR, phenotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined using standard procedures, and phylogeny was assessed using multilocus sequence typing. During the 15-year period, EHEC were isolated from stools of 39 (69.4%) of 56 patients. The strains belonged to serotypes [fliC types] O157:H7/NM[fliCH7] (50% of which were sorbitol-fermenting; SF), O26:H11/NM[fliCH11], O55:NM[fliCH7], O111:NM[fliCH8], O145:H28[fliCH28], O172:NM[fliCH25], and Orough:NM[fliCH25]. O26:H11/NM[fliCH11] was the most common serotype associated with HUS (41% isolates). Five stx genotypes were identified, the most frequent being stx2a (71.1% isolates). Most strains contained EHEC-hlyA encoding EHEC hemolysin, and a subset (all SF O157:NM and one O157:H7) harbored cdt-V encoding cytolethal distending toxin. espP? encoding serine protease EspP? was found in EHEC O157:H7, O26:H11/NM, and O145:H28, whereas O172:NM and Orough:NM strains contained espP?. All isolates contained eae encoding adhesin intimin, which belonged to subtypes ? (O26), ? (O55, O145, O157), ?2/? (O111), and ? (O172, Orough). Loci encoding other adhesins (efa1, lpfAO26, lpfAO157OI-141, lpfAO157OI-154, iha) were usually associated with particular serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated nine sequence types (STs) which correlated with serotypes. Of these, two STs (ST660 and ST1595) were not found in HUS-associated EHEC before. Conclusions/Significance EHEC strains, including O157:H7 and non-O157:H7, are frequent causes of D+ HUS in the Czech Republic. Identification of unusual EHEC serotypes/STs causing HUS calls for establishment of an European collection of HUS-associated EHEC, enabling to study properties and evolution of these important pathogens. PMID:24040117

  15. [Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome related to abnormalities within the complement system].

    PubMed

    Frémeaux-Bacchi, V; Fakhouri, F; Roumenina, L; Dragon-Durey, M-A; Loirat, C

    2011-04-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) disorder characterised by the association of haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Atypical forms (non-shigatoxin related forms) may be familial or sporadic, frequently with relapses and most of them lead to end stage renal failure. During the last years, different groups have demonstrated genetic predisposition to atypical HUS (aHUS) involving five genes encoding for complement components which play a role in the activation or control of the alternative pathway: encoding factor H (CFH), accounting for 30% of aHUS; CD46 (encoding membrane cofactor protein [MCP]) accounting for approximately 10% of aHUS; CFI (encoding factor I) accounting for an estimated 5-15% of patients; C3 (encoding C3) accounting for approximately 10% of aHUS; and rarely CFB (encoding factor B). Predisposition to aHUS is inherited with incomplete penetrance. It is admitted that mutations confer a predisposition to develop aHUS rather than directly causing the disease and that a second event (genetic or environmental) is required for disease manifestation. HUS onset follows a triggering event in most cases (frequently banal seasonal infection and pregnancy). Uncontrolled C3 convertase leads to increased deposition of C3b on vascular endothelium and participates to the prothrombotic state. The phenotype of aHUS is variable ranging from mild forms, with complete recovery of renal function to severe forms with end stage renal disease within the first year after the onset. Overall, the outcome is severe with a mortality rate of 10% and with more than 60% of patients on dialysis. The most severe prognosis was in the CFH mutation group. There is a high risk of recurrence of the disease after renal transplantation in patients with mutations in CFH, CFI, CFB and C3. Plasma therapy may allow complete haematological remission but frequently with persistent renal damage. Some patients are plasma resistant and some are plasma dependent. The recent progress in the determination of the susceptibility factors for aHUS, have allowed to propose new diagnostic tests including a molecular genetic testing and may permit to consider some new specific treatments in this disease (human plasma-derived CFH or complement inhibitors). PMID:21376430

  16. Unrecognized pattern of von Willebrand factor abnormalities in hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Galbusera, M; Benigni, A; Paris, S; Ruggenenti, P; Zoja, C; Rossi, C; Remuzzi, G

    1999-06-01

    Heterogeneous abnormalities in multimeric structure and fragmentation of endothelial-derived von Willebrand factor (vWF) have been reported in hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). This study was conducted to establish whether different patterns of vWF abnormalities were associated with different clinical syndromes. Plasmatic levels of vWF antigen (vWF:Ag), vWF release from endothelial cells (EC) exposed to patient sera, and vWF multimeric pattern were studied during episodes and again in remission in three groups of patients with severe forms of HUS and TTP paradigmatic of the most common clinical patterns of disease presentation: (1) plasma-responsive; (2) plasma-resistant; and (3) frequently relapsing. Plasma vWF:Ag and serum-induced vWF release from EC were increased in the acute phase of either plasma-responsive and plasma-resistant HUS and TTP, but normalized at remission only in plasma-responsive cases. Both indices were persistently normal in the relapsing forms. Enhanced vWF fragmentation as defined by disappearance of high molecular weight and increase in low molecular weight forms was a consistent finding of the acute phases, and always normalized in remission in all three groups. Unusually large vWF multimers were found exclusively in plasma of relapsing forms of HUS and TTP both during and between relapses. Enhanced levels of vWF:Ag and serum capability to induce vWF release in vitro are markers of disease activity and may reflect systemic endothelial injury and consequent activation. Their presence discriminates acute single-episode cases from relapsing forms and, when failing to normalize with plasma therapy, predicts plasma resistance. Enhanced low molecular weight multimers that closely paralleled disease activity suggest a permissive role of fragmented vWF in the formation of microvascular thrombi. Finally, finding of unusually large multimers exclusively in relapsing forms of HUS and TTP even between relapses, when no other clinical signs of disease activity could be detected, suggests that they cannot be the only factor in microvascular thrombosis. PMID:10361861

  17. Interventions for preventing diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS) may follow infection with Shiga-toxin-producing organisms, principally E. coli O157: H7 (STEC), causing high morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify interventions to prevent diarrhea-associated HUS. Methods Systematic search of the literature for relevant systematic reviews (SRs), randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and public health guidelines. Results Of 1097 animal and 762 human studies, 18 animal studies (2 SRs, 2 reviews, plus 14 RCTs) and 6 human studies (3 SRs, plus 3 RCTs) met inclusion criteria. E. coli O157: H7 Type III secreted protein vaccination decreased fecal E. coli O157 shedding in cattle (P?=?0.002). E. coli O157: H7 siderophore receptor and porin proteins (SRP) vaccines reduced fecal shedding in cows (OR 0.42 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.73) and increased anti-E. coli 0157: H7 SRP antibodies in their calves (P?

  18. Four cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome--source contaminated swimming water?

    PubMed

    Cransberg, K; van den Kerkhof, J H; Bänffer, J R; Stijnen, C; Wernars, K; van de Kar, N C; Nauta, J; Wolff, E D

    1996-07-01

    In June '93, 4 children, aged 1.5-3.5 years, all living in one town, were admitted to our hospital with the diagnosis hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) within one week. In cooperation with the local health authorities a common source was searched for. Questionnaires indicated that the single condition shared by all patients was swimming water. The patients were not acquainted, visited different daycares, and had no food resources in common. All 4 patients bathed in the same, shallow, recreational lake within a period of 5 days. During this time the air temperature was high according to Dutch standards (around 27 degrees C), and many people visited the lake, estimated several hundreds a day. The water level was lower than normal. Diarrhea followed 3-11 days after swimming and the first clinical symptoms of HUS developed 6-7 days after the onset of diarrhea. The lake was closed for swimming when the fourth HUS patient was diagnosed and the possibility of transmission by way of the lake was mentioned. E. coli O157: H7 was demonstrated in the fecal samples of 2 index patients. The samples were taken 9-20 days after the start of diarrhea. Antibodies to O157 and verotoxin 2 were strongly positive in all patients. A local outbreak of diarrheal illness was not registered. Of 16 family members who also swam in the same lake, 7 developed symptoms of enteritis, 3 had positive cultures of their fecal samples and 5 had positive serology. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of the E. coli isolates of the patients and family members showed an identical pattern. No O157: H7-DNA could be detected in filter concentrated lake water samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enhancement. These samples were, however, taken 16 days after the latest possible date of contamination of our patients, 15 days after decrease of the air temperature to 15-17 degrees C, and 14 days after the inlet from water from the environment. It could thus very well be that the microorganism was no longer present. This third report of swimming water associated HUS should direct environmental surveys in similar cases of local HUS outbreaks. PMID:8832151

  19. Fanconi anemia is characterized by delayed repair kinetics of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Leskovac, Andreja; Vujic, Dragana; Guc-Scekic, Marija; Petrovic, Sandra; Joksic, Ivana; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Joksic, Gordana

    2010-05-01

    Among patients with bone marrow failure (BMF) syndrome, some are happened to have underlying Fanconi anemia (FA), a genetically heterogeneous disease, which is characterized by progressive pancytopenia and cancer susceptibility. Due to heterogeneous nature of the disease, a single genetic test, as in vitro response to DNA cross-linking agents, usually is not enough to make correct diagnosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether measuring repair kinetics of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can distinguish Fanconi anemia from other BMF patients. An early step in repair of DSBs is phosphorylation of the histone H2AX, generating gamma-H2AX histone, which extends over mega base-pair regions of DNA from the break site and is visualised as foci (gamma-H2AX foci) with specific antibodies. The primary fibroblasts, established from FA patients, were exposed to gamma-rays, a dose of 2 Gy ((60)Co), incubated for up to 24 hours under repair-permissive conditions, and assayed for the level of gamma-H2AX foci and apoptosis at different recovery times after the treatment. Cell lines originating from FA patients displayed a significant delay in the repair of radiation-induced DNA DSBs relative to non-FA bone marrow failure (non-FA BMF) and control cell lines. The delay is especially evident at recovery time of 24 hours, and is seen as about 8-fold increase of residual gamma-H2AX foci compared to self-state before irradiation. The delay in repair kinetics of FA cells represents the unique feature of FA cellular phenotype, which should be exploited to distinguish FA cellular phenotype. PMID:20453460

  20. Iron deficiency anemia in captive ?alayan tapir calves (Tapirus indicus).

    PubMed

    Helmick, Kelly E; Milne, Victoria E

    2012-12-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was diagnosed in two captive female neonatal Malayan tapirs (Tapirus indicus) at separate institutions. Both calves had unremarkable exams and normal blood parameters within the first 3 days of life. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (hematocrit, HCT= 20%; mean corpuscular volume, MCV = 32.8 fl; mean corpuscular hemoglobin, MCH = 10.5 pg) was diagnosed at day 66 of age in calf EPZ-1. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 71. A normal HCT (33%) with microcytosis and hypochromasia (MCV = 33.0 fl; MCH = 11.7 pg) was identified at day 80. No further concerns were noted through 610 days of age. Microcytic hypochromic anemia (HCT = 16%; MCV = 38.4 fl; MCH = 13.3 pg; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, MCHC= 34.6 g/dl) with thrombocytosis (platelets= 1018 10(3)/UL) and poikilocytosis was diagnosed at day 38 of age in calf WPZ-1 by samples obtained through operant conditioning. Iron dextran (10 mg/kg i.m.) was administered at day 40 and day 68. Improving hematocrit (32%) and low serum iron (45 micorg/dl) was identified at day 88; total iron binding capacity (TIBC; 438 microg/dl) and percentage saturation (10%) were also measured. No further concerns were noted through day 529 of age. Retrospective evaluation identified presumptive IDA in two male siblings of calf WPZ-1. One calf died at day 40 (iron = 40 microg/dl; TIBC = 482 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 4%) and another at day 72 (HCT = 11%; iron = 26 microg/dl; TIBC = 470 microg/dl; percentage saturation = 6%). Death in both calves was attributed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and bacterial septicemia. IDA can develop in Malayan tapirs between day 38 and day 72 of age and may be a significant precursor to bacterial septicemia and death in neonatal Malayan tapirs. PMID:23272357

  1. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in women.

    PubMed

    Coad, Jane; Pedley, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional problems in the world and disproportionately affects women and children. Stages of iron deficiency can be characterized as mild deficiency where iron stores become depleted, marginal deficiency where the production of many iron-dependent proteins is compromised but hemoglobin levels are normal and iron deficiency anemia where synthesis of hemoglobin is decreased and oxygen transport to the tissues is reduced. Iron deficiency anemia is usually assessed by measuring hemoglobin levels but this approach lacks both specificity and sensitivity. Failure to identify and treat earlier stages of iron deficiency is concerning given the neurocognitive implications of iron deficiency without anemia. Most of the daily iron requirement is derived from recycling of senescent erythrocytes by macrophages; only 5-10 % comes from the diet. Iron absorption is affected by inhibitors and enhancers of iron absorption and by the physiological state. Inflammatory conditions, including obesity, can result in iron being retained in the enterocytes and macrophages causing hypoferremia as a strategic defense mechanism to restrict iron availability to pathogens. Premenopausal women usually have low iron status because of iron loss in menstrual blood. Conditions which further increase iron loss, compromise absorption or increase demand, such as frequent blood donation, gastrointestinal lesions, athletic activity and pregnancy, can exceed the capacity of the gastrointestinal tract to upregulate iron absorption. Women of reproductive age are at particularly high risk of iron deficiency and its consequences however there is a controversial argument that evolutionary pressures have resulted in an iron deficient phenotype which protects against infection. PMID:25083899

  2. FROM CELL TO SYMBOL: A BIOCULTURAL STUDY OF ANEMIA AND SUBJECTIVITY AMONG THE POQOMCHI' MAYA IN GUATEMALA

    E-print Network

    Herynk, James William

    2014-05-31

    Anemia afflicts nearly 2 billion people worldwide by reducing oxygen carrying capacity in the blood. Practitioners of Western biomedicine consider anemia to be an easily treatable ‘symptom’ that results from some other ...

  3. Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, A. S.; Prichard, J. S.; Freedman, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:4691106

  4. Diamond Blackfan Anemia: Diagnosis, Treatment and Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lipton, Jeffrey M.; Ellis, Steven R.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by erythroid failure, congenital anomalies and a predisposition to cancer. Faulty ribosome biogenesis, resulting in pro-apoptotic erythropoiesis leading to erythroid failure, is hypothesized to be the underlying defect. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA all encode ribosomal proteins associated with either the small (RPS) or large (RPL) subunit and in these cases haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. Extraordinarily robust laboratory and clinical investigations have recently led to demonstrable improvements in clinical care for patients with DBA. PMID:19327583

  5. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    PubMed

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation. PMID:25035146

  6. Successful creation of an anemia management algorithm for hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kazuhiro; Mizutani, Yasuhide; Kodera, Hitoshi; Miyake, Masato; Yasuda, Yoshiki; Ohara, Sanae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several anemia guidelines for hemodialysis patients have recommended a target hemoglobin (Hb) range of 10–12 g/dL. However, maintaining Hb values continuously within a narrow target has been difficult, and there has been no generally accepted anemia management algorithm for hemodialysis patients. Methods In our study, we created an anemia management algorithm that considers the length of erythrocyte lifetimes, focuses on the combination of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent management and iron administration, and prevents iron deficiency and overload. Our algorithm established a target Hb range of 10–12 g/dL. Results We evaluated our algorithm in 49 patients for 6 months. The mean Hb values were approximately 11 g/dL during our study period. The percentage of patients in the target Hb range of 10–12 g/dL increased from 77.6% (38 of 49) at baseline to 85.7% (42 of 49) at 4–6 months. Throughout monthly regular blood tests during 1–6 months after we introduced our algorithm, Hb values remained within the target range in 55.1% (27 of 49) of patients. The standard deviation of Hb values significantly decreased at 5 and 6 months (P=0.013 and P=0.047, respectively; 1 g/dL at 0 month, 0.7 g/dL at 5 months, and 0.7 g/dL at 6 months). Our algorithm also succeeded in suppressing cumulative doses of iron (?800 mg) and decreasing the ferritin values significantly (P=0.011). There were no significant differences in erythropoiesis-stimulating agent doses between 0 and 6 months (P=0.357). Conclusion Our anemia management algorithm successfully increased the number of patients in the target Hb range, significantly decreased the Hb standard deviation, suppressed cumulative doses of iron, and decreased ferritin values. These results suggest a better prognosis for hemodialysis patients. Further studies are required to evaluate our algorithm. PMID:26150734

  7. Autoimmune gastritis presenting as iron deficiency anemia in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Cristina; Oliveira, Maria Emília; Palha, Ana M; Ferrão, Anabela; Morais, Anabela; Lopes, Ana Isabel

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To characterize clinical, laboratorial, and histological profile of pediatric autoimmune gastritis in the setting of unexplained iron deficiency anemia investigation. METHODS: A descriptive, observational study including pediatric patients with a diagnosis of autoimmune gastritis (positive parietal cell antibody and gastric corpus atrophy) established in a 6 year period (2006-2011) in the setting of refractory iron deficiency anemia (refractoriness to oral iron therapy for at least 6 mo and requirement for intravenous iron therapy) investigation, after exclusion of other potentially contributing causes of anemia. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and anti-secretory therapy were also excluded. Data were retrospectively collected from clinical files, including: demographic data (age, gender, and ethnic background), past medical history, gastrointestinal symptoms, familial history, laboratorial evaluation (Hb, serum ferritin, serum gastrin, pepsinogen?I/ pepsinogen II, B12 vitamin, intrinsic factor autoantibodies, thyroid autoantibodies, and anti-transglutaminase antibodies), and endoscopic and histological findings (HE, Periodic Acid-Schiff/Alcian blue, gastrin, chromogranin A and immunochemistry analysis for CD3, CD20 and CD68). Descriptive statistical analysis was performed (mean, median, and standard deviation). RESULTS: We report a case-series concerning 3 girls and 2 boys with a mean age of 13.6 ± 2.8 years (3 Caucasian and 2 African). One girl had type?I?diabetes. Familial history was positive in 4/5 cases, respectively for autoimmune thyroiditis (2/5), sarcoidosis (1/5) and multiple myeloma (1/5). Laboratorial evaluation on admission included: Hb: 9.5 ± 0.7 g/dL; serum ferritin: 4.0 ± 0.9 ng/mL; serum gastrin: 393 ± 286 pg/mL; low pepsinogen?I/ pepsinogen II ratio in 1/5 patients; normal vitamin B12 levels (analyzed in 3 patients). Endoscopy findings included: duodenal nodularity (2/5) and gastric fold softening (2/5), and histological evaluation showed corpus atrophic gastritis with lymphocytic infiltration (5/5), patchy oxyntic gland mononuclear cell infiltration (5/5), intestinal and/or pseudo-pyloric metaplasia in corpus mucosa (4/5), and enterochromaffin cell hyperplasia (4/5). Immunochemistry for gastrin on corpus biopsies was negative in all cases. Duodenal histology was normal. All biopsies were negative for H. pylori (Giemsa staining and cultural examination). CONCLUSION: We highlight autoimmune gastritis as a diagnosis to be considered when investigating refractory iron deficiency anemia in children, particularly in the setting of a personal/familial history of autoimmune disease, as well as the diagnostic contribution of a careful immunohistological evaluation. PMID:25400463

  8. Anemia in cats with hemotropic mycoplasma infection: Retrospective evaluation of 23 cases (1996–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Snead, Elisabeth C.; Waldner, Cheryl; Taylor, Susan M.; Jackson, Marion L.; Knorr, Laina M.

    2009-01-01

    This study summarizes the diagnostic findings from all anemic cats diagnosed with hemotropic mycoplasma (HM) infections at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine — Veterinary Teaching Hospital between 1996 and 2005. The objectives were to determine the frequency of HM-induced anemia among all cats presented with anemia during this period, the clinical findings and risk factors associated with clinical HM infection, and factors affecting or predicting survival. Medical records were examined from 23 cats with HM-induced anemia from the total of 170 cats diagnosed with anemia during this period. The frequency of HM-induced anemia was 14% (23/170) among all anemic cats. Cats with HM-induced anemia were less likely to be purebred (P = 0.04) than other cats with anemia. Of the cats with HM-induced anemia, those with positive retroviral status (P = 0.01), concurrent illness (P < 0.01), or lack of erythroid regeneration (P = 0.01) were most likely to die. The 1-year survival of HM-infected cats was 65% (13/20). PMID:20119543

  9. Malaria and Anemia among Children in a Low Resource Setting In Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Oladeinde, BH; Omoregie, R; Olley, M; Anunibe, JA; Onifade, AA; Oladeinde, OB

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed at determining the prevalence of malaria and anemia among children in rural community of Okada, Edo State Nigeria, as well as to assess the level of use of Insecticide treated bed nets and its impact on prevalence of malaria and anemia among study population. Methods Thick blood films from 226 children with signs and symptoms of malaria in Okada community were stained and examined for presence of malaria parasites. Hemoglobin concentration of all children was also determined using standard method. Result A total of 185 (81.9%) children were infected with malaria parasite. Malaria parasitaemia was significantly affected by age (P =0.003). A significantly higher number of positive cases of malaria and anemia was observed in rainy season as compared to dry season (P<0.05). The prevalence of anemia in children was 47.3%. Malaria was a risk factor for development of anemia in children (OR=2.551; 95% CI=1.227, 5.305; P=0.015). Use of insecticide treated bed nets was recorded in 11(4.9%) of children studied, and did not significantly reduce the prevalence of malaria and anemia. However among malaria parasite infected children, its use significantly reduced the prevalence of anemia (OR=0.126; 95%CI=0.015, 1.047; P=0.031). Conclusion Malaria and anemia among children was high malaria intervention progammes by relevant agencies is strongly advocated. PMID:23109959

  10. Prevention of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Infants and Children of Preschool Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fomon, Samuel J.

    Iron-deficiency anemia is almost certainly the most prevalent nutritional disorder among infants and young children in the United States. Anemia is frequently seen among children of low socioeconomic status but is probably also the most frequent nutritional deficiency disease seen among children cared for by private doctors. Possible reasons for…

  11. Anemia in postmenopausal women: dietary inadequacy or non-dietary factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Postmenopausal women are disproportionately affected by anemia, and the prevalence in females > 65 years of age in the United States is approximately 10%. The manifestation of anemia in older populations is associated with dietary inadequacy, blood loss, genetics, alterations in bioavailability, ren...

  12. Socio-Ecological Factors Affecting Pregnant Women's Anemia Status in Freetown, Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    M'Cormack, Fredanna; Drolet, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sierra Leone has high maternal mortality. Socio-ecological factors are considered contributing factors to this high mortality. Anemia is considered to be a direct cause of 4% of maternal deaths and an indirect cause of 20-40% of maternal deaths. Purpose: The current study explores socio-ecological contributing factors to the anemia

  13. "Untangling Sickle-Cell Anemia and the Teaching of Heterozygote Protection"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Eric Michael

    2007-01-01

    Introductory biology textbooks often use the example of sickle-cell anemia to illustrate the concept of heterozygote protection. Ordinarily scientists expect the frequency of a gene associated with a debilitating illness would be low owing to its continual elimination by natural selection. The gene that causes sickle-cell anemia, however, has a…

  14. A Group Counseling Approach for Persons Who Work With Sickle Cell Anemia Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvin, Richmond

    Although many workshops on sickle cell anemia have been held, it is still difficult to implement a comprehensive training program for sickle cell anemia clients in many communities. Research data on the topic are somewhat nebulous and insufficient political and social pressure have been exerted to change attitudes and take action towards the…

  15. Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors of Anemia in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chien, Wu-Chien; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Ling

    2010-01-01

    Anemia is known to be a significant public health problem in many countries. Most of the available information is incomplete or limited to special groups such as people with intellectual disability. The present study aims to provide the information of anemia prevalence and associated risk factors of children and adolescents with intellectual…

  16. In anemia of multiple myeloma hepcidin is induced by increased bone-morphogenetic protein-2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepcidin is the principal iron-regulatory hormone and pathogenic factor in anemia of inflammation. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) frequently present with anemia. We showed that MM patients had increased serum hepcidin, which inversely correlated with hemoglobin, suggesting that hepcidin contrib...

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia Associated With Methemoglobinemia and Anemia: An Overlooked Association?

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Tawfik; Abu Rmeileh, Ayman; Kornspan, Jonathan David; Abel, Roy; Mizrahi, Meir; Nir-Paz, Ran

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of acute methemoglobinemia and anemia in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumoniae pneumonia. We suggest that M. pneumoniae secretes a putative protein that can induce methemoglobin in red blood cells. Thus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae may induce methemoglobinemia in patients who have low oxygen saturation and anemia. PMID:26034771

  18. Association of diarrhea with anemia among children under age five living in rural areas of Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Howard, Caitlin T; de Pee, Saskia; Sari, Mayang; Bloem, Martin W; Semba, Richard D

    2007-08-01

    The high incidence of anemia of infection among children in developing countries is not well characterized. We investigated the relationship between diarrhea, fever and other risk factors for anemia in young children in the community. The relationship between risk factors for anemia was examined in a cross-sectional study of 85 229 children, aged 6-59 months, from impoverished families in rural areas of Indonesia. The prevalence of anemia was 56.1% among the study subjects. Those considered anemic were more likely to be younger, male, stunted, underweight, wasted, to have low maternal and paternal education and to have current diarrhea or history of diarrhea in the previous 7 days compared with children without anemia (all P < 0.0001). In separate multivariate models adjusted for age, sex, stunting, maternal age and education, and weekly per capita household expenditure, current diarrhea (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.07-1.325, P < 0.0001) and a history of diarrhea in the previous 7 days (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.09-1.25, P < 0.0001) were associated with an increased risk of anemia. In similar models, current fever had a borderline association with anemia (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.98-1.32, P = 0.09). We conclude that diarrhea is a contributing factor of anemia among young children living in rural areas in Indonesia. PMID:17463011

  19. Prediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network

    E-print Network

    Valafar, Faramarz

    Prediction of Sickle Cell Anemia Patient's Response to Hydroxyurea Treatment Using ARTMAP Network distance-based ARTMAP (MART) network to the predication of sickle cell anemia patients' response In the United States, about 1 in 500 African Ameri- cans develops sickle cell anima [5]. In Africa, about 1

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Spondyloenchondrodysplasia with immune dysregulation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... blood cells (hemolytic anemia), an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism), or chronic inflammatory disorders such as systemic lupus ... chronic ; deficiency ; disability ; dysplasia ; enzyme ; gene ; hemolytic anemia ; hypothyroidism ; immune response ; immune system ; immunodeficiency ; infection ; inflammation ; inherited ; ...

  1. Compatibility and stability of aplidine, a novel marine-derived depsipeptide antitumor agent, in infusion devices, and its hemolytic and precipitation potential upon i.v. administration.

    PubMed

    Nuijen, B; Bouma, M; Henrar, R E; Manada, C; Bult, A; Beijnen, J H

    1999-11-01

    Aplidine is a novel marine-derived antitumor agent isolated from the Mediterranean tunicate Aplidium albicans. The compound is pharmaceutically formulated as a lyophilized product containing 500 microg active substance per dosage unit. Prior to i.v. administration it is reconstituted with a solution composed of Cremophor EL, ethanol absolute and Water for Injection (15/15/70% v/v/v) with further dilution in 0.9% w/v sodium chloride for infusion (normal saline). The aim of this study was to investigate the compatibility of aplidine infusion solutions with polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-containing and PVC-free administration sets, and to determine the stability of aplidine after reconstitution and further dilution in infusion solutions. Furthermore, in vitro biocompatibility studies to estimate the hemolytic and precipitation potential of aplidine infusion solutions upon i.v. administration were conducted. In this study we show that sorption of aplidine to PVC and to a lesser extent to PVC-free administration set materials occurs. Also, most probably due to the presence of Cremophor EL in the infusion solution, significant leaching of diethylhexyl phtalate (DEHP) from the PVC administration set occurs. After reconstitution and dilution the drug is stable for at least 24 and 48 h, respectively, in glass containers when stored at room temperature (20-25 degrees C) and ambient light conditions. We found that aplidine should be administered in infusion concentrations equal or above 28.8 microg/ml using a PVC-free administration set consisting of a glass container and PVC-free infusion tubing. After reconstitution it must be diluted further with normal saline within 24 h after preparation and subsequently administered to the patient within 48 h. Additionally, results from the biocompatibility studies show that neither hemolysis nor precipitation of aplidine is expected upon i.v. administration. PMID:10630355

  2. Association between polymorphisms in PDCD1 gene and aplastic anemia in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zixia; Miao, Miao; Qiu, Yuhua; Qin, Zhenghong; Wang, Jin; Jiang, Yiguo; Ming, Zhijun; Zhang, Xueguang

    2013-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1, encoded by PDCD1) has been reported to be associated with several autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Graves' disease and multiple sclerosis (MS). In order to study the correlation between PD-1 gene polymorphism and aplastic anemia in a Chinese Han population, two SNPs, PD-1.1 G/A (rs36084323) and PD-1.6 G/A (rs10204525), were genotyped in 166 patients with aplastic anemia and 144 healthy controls by direct sequencing. All genotype distributions in both patients and controls were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Associations of genotypes and alleles with aplastic anemia were analyzed. The results suggested that the G allele of PD-1.1 was associated with an increased risk for aplastic anemia, while SNP of PD-1.6 was not associated with aplastic anemia in a Chinese Han population. PMID:23373967

  3. Molecular defects identified by whole exome sequencing in a child with Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhaojing; Geng, Juan; Yao, Ru-En; Li, Caihua; Ying, Daming; Shen, Yongnian; Ying, Lei; Yu, Yongguo; Fu, Qihua

    2013-11-10

    Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure, multiple congenital malformations, and an increased susceptibility to malignancy. At least 15 genes have been identified that are involved in the pathogenesis of Fanconi anemia. However, it is still a challenge to assign the complementation group and to characterize the molecular defects in patients with Fanconi anemia. In the current study, whole exome sequencing was used to identify the affected gene(s) in a boy with Fanconi anemia. A recurring, non-synonymous mutation was found (c.3971C>T, p.P1324L) as well as a novel frameshift mutation (c.989_995del, p.H330LfsX2) in FANCA gene. Our results indicate that whole exome sequencing may be useful in clinical settings for rapid identification of disease-causing mutations in rare genetic disorders such as Fanconi anemia. PMID:23973728

  4. 9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities, and research facilities. 75.4... IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities,...

  5. 9 CFR 75.4 - Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities, and research facilities. 75.4... IN HORSES, ASSES, PONIES, MULES, AND ZEBRAS Equine Infectious Anemia (swamp Fever) § 75.4 Interstate movement of equine infectious anemia reactors and approval of laboratories, diagnostic facilities,...

  6. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  7. Association of Household Environment and Prevalence of Anemia Among Children Under-5 in India

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Annu; Baranwal, Anshu; Roy, Nobhojit

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study explores the association between the household environment and the prevalence of anemia among children under the age of 5?years in India. Data and methodology: The study is based on 52,868 children under the age of 5?years, included in India’s National Family Health Survey-3. The outcome variable was the prevalence of anemia. To understand the role of environment in determining child anemia, step wise logistic regression models consisting of environmental, child, socio-economic, and media exposure variables were applied. Results: The occurrence of childhood anemia was higher in the North Eastern and Eastern regions compared to all other regions of India. Unclean fuel use, poor toilet facilities, staying in non-concrete house, exposure to smoking were important variables determining the prevalence of anemia. Smoking, when it was controlled with only socio economic factors, showed lesser impact on anemia, but when it got adjusted with socio-economic, child, and media variables together it showed an important impact as it increased the risk of anemia. Conclusion: Children under 5?years of age generally stay inside their house and are more exposed to the household environment. Thus, among these children there are multiple risk factors causing anemia along with the nutritional deficiencies. Better resources are needed to educate the public and to increase awareness for improved hygiene, sanitation and housing facilities, health and nutrition, etc. Along with a wider program to manage nutritional deficiency, anemia in children <5?years, there should be a holistic approach toward anemia control inculcating household environmental conditions and socio economic determinants. PMID:25368862

  8. Anemia among Muslim Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in Southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Treister-Goltzman, Yulia; Peleg, Roni; Biderman, Aya

    2015-11-01

    There are inequalities in health indicators among different ethnic groups living in the same region and receiving the same medical services. Anemia is a global problem. Although the prevalence of anemia is not high in Israel, differences among ethnic groups have not been studied. Our objective was to assess anemia among Bedouin and Jewish women of childbearing age in southern Israel. A retrospective observational study was conducted based on data from computerized medical records. Seven thousand eight hundred seventy-one women in the study clinics underwent complete blood counts and had blood hemoglobin levels of 11 g/dl or below. The Jewish patients were older (31.7 vs. 29.7 years, P?anemia were iron deficiency and anemia of chronic disease. Two types of anemia were proportionally higher among Jewish women, anemia of chronic disease (18.1 vs. 9.7 %, P??0.001). The adherence rates for treatment were very low. Three factors associated with severe anemia (hemoglobin below 8 g/dl) were being Bedouin (odds ratio (OR)?=?1.295, P?anemia, and adherence to treatment for anemia is very low in both groups. These findings should be addressed in a national program to reduce health inequalities. PMID:26211919

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-12-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-? superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective erythropoiesis and ameliorate anemia both in animal models of myelodysplastic syndrome and in RARS patients. PMID:26637696

  10. The prevalence of nutritional anemia in pregnancy in an east Anatolian province, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anemia is considered a severe public health problem by World Health Organization when anemia prevalence is equal to or greater than 40% in the population. The purpose of this study was to determine the anemia prevalence with the associated factors in pregnant women and to determine the serum iron, folate and B12 vitamin status in anaemic pregnants in Malatya province. Methods This is a cross-sectional survey. A multi-sage stratified probability-proportional-to-size cluster sampling methodology was used. A total of 823 pregnant women from sixty clusters were studied. Women were administered a questionnaire related with the subject and blood samples were drawn. Total blood count was performed within four hours and serum iron, folate and B12 vitamin were studied after storing sera at -20 C for six months. Results Anemia prevalence was 27.1% (Hb < 11.0 gr/dl). Having four or more living children (OR = 2.2), being at the third trimester (OR = 2.3) and having a low family income (OR = 1.6) were determined as the independent predictors of anemia in pregnancy. Anemia was also associated with soil eating (PICA) in the univariate analysis (p < 0.05). Of anaemic women, 50.0% had a transferrin saturation less than 10% indicating iron deficiency, 34.5% were deficient in B12 vitamin and 71.7% were deficient in folate. Most of the anemias were normocytic-normochromic (56.5%) indicating mixed anemia. Conclusions In Malatya, for pregnant women anemia was a moderate public health problem. Coexisting of iron, folate and B vitamin deficiencies was observed among anaemics. To continue anemia control strategies with reasonable care and diligence was recommended. PMID:20537176

  11. Anemia induced by high zinc intake in chicks: Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Pimentel, J.L.; Greger, J.L.; Cook, M.E. )

    1991-03-15

    The mechanisms by which excess Zn induced anemia in chickens was assessed in 8 studies in which chicks were randomly assigned to a 2 {times} 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with 60 or 2,000 {mu}g Zn and 10 or 250 {mu}g Cu/g diet. Less Fe-59 appeared in the plasma 1 hour after a labeled meal when chicks were fed excess Zn in 1 of 2 studies but less Fe-59 appeared in livers of chicks fed excess Zn in both studies. The decrease of Fe-59 uptake into tissues paralleled a decrease in Fe concentrations in livers and tibiotarsi. These differences in tissue Fe did not reflect differences in Fe excretion because excretion and incorporation into tissues of injected Fe-59 was not affected by high Zn intake. Although excess Zn decreased tissue Cu concentrations, excess Zn, per se, did not affect cytosolic superoxide dismutase activity, the in vivo t 1/2 of erythrocytes, or erythrocyte hemolysis in vitro. The decrease in body weight of chicks fed excess Zn indicated that protein synthesis and/or degradation could be affected. Increased incorporation of C-14 tyrosine into liver and bone marrow of chicks fed excess Zn suggested increased protoporphyrin synthesis or metallothionein synthesis. These results indicated that decreased Fe absorption was the primary mechanism by which excess Zn induced anemia.

  12. New Treatment Approaches for the Anemia of CKD.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Normocytic normochromic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. The introduction of ESAs into clinical practice was a success story, mediating an increase in hemoglobin concentrations without the risk for recurrent blood transfusions and improving quality of life substantially. However, recombinant ESAs are still expensive and require a parenteral route of administration. Moreover, concern has arisen following randomized clinical trials showing that higher hemoglobin targets and/or high ESA doses may cause significant harm. This, together with changes in ESA reimbursement policy in some countries, has resulted in a significant reduction in ESA prescribing and the hemoglobin level targeted during therapy. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with improved characteristics and/or easier manufacturing processes compared with currently available ESAs, including new treatment approaches that may indirectly improve erythropoiesis. We give an update on the new investigational strategies for increasing erythropoiesis, examining in depth their characteristics and possible advantages in the clinical setting and the caveats to be aware of at the present stage of development. PMID:26372086

  13. [Severe sideropenic anemia in a young middle-distance runner].

    PubMed

    Guala, A; Giorcelli, V; Gallo, G; Pastore, G; Rossi, M; Cerruti Mainardi, P

    1992-04-01

    In recent years several cases of anemia (iron deficiency) have been reported in adults who participate in long-distance running although its etiology has not been entirely explained. We report the case of a 16-year-old girl who had participated in middle-distance running at a competitive level for about three years and who had been admitted to hospital because of a progressive weakness and a reduction in her sporting performance. Evaluation revealed that the patient had a balanced diet, normal menstrual cycles and slight abdominal pain. The objective examination were negative except for the presence of a pronounced pallor of the skin and the mucous membranes. The blood count revealed Hb 7.5 g%, Ht 26%, GV 63 mu 3, the reticulocyte count was 10%, serum iron 9 micrograms/dl, serum transferrin 450 micrograms/dl and serum ferritin 4 ng/ml. All tests for constitutional anemia proved negative. Stool Hemoccult tests proved negative (these tests were carried out some weeks after the patient had stopped running). Her symptoms resolved after the beginning of iron treatment and her blood test results returned to normal. This case has been reported to draw attention to the existence of this problem in adolescents who practice sport. The knowledge of the problem night lead to a preventive scanning of young athletes and the presence of clinical manifestations would reduce the need for invasive tests. PMID:1588899

  14. [Molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of Diamond-Blackfan anemia].

    PubMed

    Toki, Tsutomu; Ito, Etsuro

    2015-07-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital bone marrow failure syndrome, characterized by red blood cell aplasia. Macrocytic anemia is a prominent feature of DBA but the disease is also characterized by growth retardation and congenital anomalies that are present in approximately 40% of affected patients. DBA is associated with single, monoallelic, inactivating mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes. In DBA, mutations or large deletions in RP genes include RPS7, RPS10, RPS17, RPS19, RPS24, RPS26, RPL5, RPL11, RPL26 and RPL35A. These mutations have been reported in up to 60% of DBA patients. To date, no known pathogenic mutations have been found in the remaining patients. In an effort to identify new mutations responsible for DBA, we performed whole-exome sequencing analysis of 48 patients with no documented mutations/deletions in our first screening and identified a de novo splicing error mutation in RPL27 and a frameshift deletion in RPS27 in sporadic patients with DBA. In vitro knockdown of the gene expression disturbed pre-ribosomal RNA processing. Zebrafish models of rpl27 and rps27 mutations showed impairments of erythrocyte production and tail and/or brain development. In this report, we also discuss current knowledge regarding pathways from the impairment of ribosomal biogenesis to the pathology of DBA. PMID:26251151

  15. Erythroid Transcription Factor EKLF/KLF1 Mutation Causing Congenital Dyserythropoietic Anemia Type IV in a Patient of Taiwanese Origin: Review of All Reported Cases and Development of a Clinical Diagnostic Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Jaffray, Julie A.; Mitchell, W. Beau; Gnanapragasam, Merlin Nithya; Seshan, Surya V; Guo, Xinhuo; Westhoff, Connie M.; Bieker, James J.; Manwani, Deepa

    2013-01-01

    KLF1 is an erythroid specific transcription factor that is involved in erythroid lineage commitment, globin switching and terminal red blood cell maturation. Various mutations of KLF1 have been identified in humans, which has led to both benign and pathological phenotypes. The E325K mutation, within the second zinc finger of the KLF1 gene, has been shown to cause a new form of congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) now labeled as CDA type IV. We report the fourth documented case of this mutation, and propose a clinical diagnostic model to better identify this disease in other patients. Our patient is a Taiwanese child who presented to us at 8 years of age with severe hemolytic anemia, splenomegaly, elevated fetal hemoglobin (HbF), iron overload, and dyserythropoiesis in the bone marrow. KLF1 sequence analysis revealed a G-to-A transition in one allele of exon 3, which resulted in the substitution of a glutamate 325 by a lysine. Flow cytometry analysis revealed decreased protein expression of CD44 on the red blood cells, and decreased red blood cell deformability as measured using an ektacytometer. Blood typing revealed his red blood cells to be Co(a?b?), In(b?), LW(ab?) and Lu(b+), even though DNA testing predicted he would be Co(a+b?) and LW(a+b?ab+). This newly discovered CDA combines features of a hemoglobinopathy, RBC membrane defect and hereditary persistence of HbF (HPFH) which is not seen in previous types of CDA. Increased awareness of this phenotype may improve more prompt and accurate diagnosis of these patients. PMID:23522491

  16. Anemia and Feeding Practices among Infants in Rural Shaanxi Province in China

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Renfu; Shi, Yaojiang; Zhou, Huan; Yue, Ai; Zhang, Linxiu; Sylvia, Sean; Medina, Alexis; Rozelle, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent public health problems among infants and iron deficiency anemia has been related to many adverse consequences. The overall goal of this study is to examine the prevalence of anemia among infants in poor rural China and to identify correlates of anemia. In April 2013, we randomly sampled 948 infants aged 6–11 months living in 351 villages across 174 townships in nationally-designated poverty counties in rural areas of southern Shaanxi Province, China. Infants were administered a finger prick blood test for hemoglobin (Hb). Anthropometric measurement and household survey of demographic characteristics and feeding practices were conducted in the survey. We found that 54.3% of 6–11 month old infants in poor rural China are anemic, and 24.3% of sample infants suffer from moderate or severe anemia. We find that children still breastfed over 6 months of age had lower Hb concentrations and higher anemia prevalence than their non-breastfeeding counterparts (p < 0.01), and that children who had ever been formula-fed had significantly higher Hb concentrations and lower anemia prevalence than their non-formula-fed counterparts (p < 0.01). The results suggest the importance of iron supplementation or home fortification while breastfeeding. PMID:25533008

  17. Determinants of Anemia and Hemoglobin Concentration in Haitian School-Aged Children.

    PubMed

    Iannotti, Lora L; Delnatus, Jacques R; Odom, Audrey R; Eaton, Jacob C; Griggs, Jennifer J; Brown, Sarah; Wolff, Patricia B

    2015-11-01

    Anemia diminishes oxygen transport in the body, resulting in potentially irreversible growth and developmental consequences for children. Limited evidence for determinants of anemia exists for school-aged children. We conducted a cluster randomized controlled trial in Haiti from 2012 to 2013 to test the efficacy of a fortified school snack. Children (N = 1,047) aged 3-13 years were followed longitudinally at three time points for hemoglobin (Hb) concentrations, anthropometry, and bioelectrical impedance measures. Dietary intakes, infectious disease morbidities, and socioeconomic and demographic factors were collected at baseline and endline. Longitudinal regression modeling with generalized least squares and logit models with random effects identified anemia risk factors beyond the intervention effect. At baseline, 70.6% of children were anemic and 2.6% were severely anemic. Stunting increased the odds of developing anemia (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.48, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.05-2.08) and severe anemia (adjusted OR: 2.47, 95% CI: 1.30-4.71). Parent-reported vitamin A supplementation and deworming were positively associated with Hb concentrations, whereas fever and poultry ownership showed a negative relationship with Hb concentration and increased odds of severe anemia, respectively. Further research should explore the full spectrum of anemia etiologies in school children, including genetic causes. PMID:26350448

  18. Myelodysplastic syndrome evolving from aplastic anemia treated with immunosuppressive therapy: efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Yong; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; Antin, Joseph H.; Anderlini, Paolo; Ayas, Mouhab; Battiwalla, Minoo; Carreras, Jeanette; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Eapen, Mary; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2014-01-01

    A proportion of patients with aplastic anemia who are treated with immunosuppressive therapy develop clonal hematologic disorders, including post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome. Many will proceed to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We identified 123 patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome who from 1991 through 2011 underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in a matched-pair analysis compared outcome to that in 393 patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. There was no difference in overall survival. There were no significant differences with regard to 5-year probabilities of relapse, non-relapse mortality, relapse-free survival and overall survival; these were 14%, 40%, 46% and 49% for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome, and 20%, 33%, 47% and 49% for de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, respectively. In multivariate analysis, relapse (hazard ratio 0.71; P=0.18), non-relapse mortality (hazard ratio 1.28; P=0.18), relapse-free survival (hazard ratio 0.97; P=0.80) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.02; P=0.88) of post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome were similar to those of patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome. Cytogenetic risk was independently associated with overall survival in both groups. Thus, transplant success in patients with post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome was similar to that in patients with de novo myelodysplastic syndrome, and cytogenetics was the only significant prognostic factor for post-aplastic anemia myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:25107891

  19. Anemia and the Need for Intravenous Iron Infusion after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Kotkiewicz, Adam; Donaldson, Keri; Dye, Charles; Rogers, Ann M; Mauger, David; Kong, Lan; Eyster, M Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of anemia, iron deficiency, and the long-term need for IV iron following Roux-en-y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has not been well characterized. Three-hundred and nineteen out of 904 consecutive subjects who underwent RYGB at Penn State Hershey Medical Center from 1999 to 2006 met the inclusion criteria for a preoperative complete blood count (CBC) and at least one CBC >6 months following surgery. Cumulative incidence of anemia 7 years post procedure was 58%. Menstruation status and presence of preoperative anemia were predictive of anemia by univariate analysis and multivariable Cox regression (P = 0.0014 and 0.044, respectively). Twenty-seven subjects, primarily premenopausal women, representing 8.5% of the cohort and 22% of the 122 anemic subjects, needed intravenous (IV) iron a mean of 51 months postoperatively for anemia unresponsive or refractory to oral iron. The risk for development of anemia necessitating IV iron therapy following RYGB is highest in menstruating women and continues to increase for many years, even in post-menopausal women. Well-designed prospective studies are needed to identify the incidence of iron deficiency anemia and the patient populations at increased risk for requiring IV iron replacement after RYGB surgery. PMID:26078589

  20. 21 CFR 500.27 - Methylene blue-containing drugs for use in animals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-antispasmodic preparations that contained methylene blue cause Heinz body hemolytic anemia in cats when used... Heinz body hemolytic anemia reaction to methylene blue has also been demonstrated in dogs under... inclusion bodies (Heinz bodies) and associated hemolytic anemia is unclear. (2) The effectiveness of...