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Sample records for hemorrhage sah due

  1. Neuropsychological assessments in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, perimesencephalic SAH, and incidental aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Kara; Dombek, Susanne; Martens, Tobias; Köppen, Johannes; Westphal, Manfred; Regelsberger, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is known to be associated with long-term cognitive deficits. Neurosurgical manipulation on the brain itself has been reported to have influence on neuropsychological sequelae. The following is a comparative study on perimesencephalic and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage patients as well as elective aneurysm patients that was carried out to determine the isolated and combined impact of surgical manipulation and hemorrhage, respectively, on long-term neuropsychological outcome. Inclusion criteria were good neurological recovery at discharge (modified Rankin Scale 0 or 1) without focal neurological deficit. Standardized psychological testing covered attention, memory, executive functions, and mood. Thirteen aneurysmal SAH patients, 15 patients undergoing elective clipping, and 14 patients with perimesencephalic SAH were analyzed. Standardized neuropsychological testing and social/professional history questionnaires were performed 2 years (mean) after discharge. Memory impairment and slower cognitive processing were found in the aneurysmal and perimesencephalic SAH groups, while elective aneurysm patients showed signs of impaired attention. However, compared with norm data for age-matched healthy controls, all groups showed no significant test results. In contrast, signs of clinical depression were seen in 9/42 patients, 45 % of all patients complained of stress disorders and 55 % of patients were unable to work in their previous professions. Nearly normal neuropsychological test results on long-term follow-up in SAH patients were unexpected. However, a 50 % rate of unemployment accompanied with stress disorders and depression manifests insufficient social and workplace reintegration. Therefore, even more specific rehabilitation programs are required following inpatient treatment to attain full recovery. PMID:23949148

  2. A non-human primate model of aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).

    PubMed

    Pluta, Ryszard M; Bacher, John; Skopets, Boris; Hoffmann, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    Aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is relatively rare form of hemorrhagic stroke, which produces significant social and medical challenges. As it affects people in their high productivity age and leaves 50 % of them dead and almost 70 % of survivors disabled, many of them severely, the reasons of such a dismal outcome have been intensively researched all over the world. Nevertheless, despite more than a half a century of clinical and scientific effort and dramatic improvement of surgical repair of aneurysms, the causes of poor outcome remain enigmatic. Introduction of numerous in vitro and in vivo models to study the unleashed by SAH mechanisms that injured the brain significantly advanced our understanding of biology of cerebral vessels, brain responses to intracranial pressure changes, and the presence of blood clot in subarachnoid space. One of the most important animal models that significantly contributed to those advances has been a non-human primate model introduced at the Bryce Weir laboratory in the University of Alberta, Canada, in 1984. Since then, this model, with some modifications, has been successfully used in several animal laboratories in the USA, Canada, and Japan. We present the model characteristics and describe in details medical, surgical, imagining techniques that we have used at the Surgical Neurology Branch of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke from 1989. PMID:25216692

  3. Monotherapy with stenting in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after middle cerebral artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Puri, Ajit S; Gounis, Matthew J; Massari, Francesco; Howk, Mary; Weaver, John; Wakhloo, Ajay K

    2016-04-01

    Isolated middle cerebral artery dissection is a rare clinical entity, with descriptions limited to a few case reports and case series. Symptomatic dissection in the anterior circulation can present as an ischemic stroke in a young population; however, it is rarely associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe a young patient who presented with acute headache from a subarachnoid hemorrhage that was ultimately determined to be due to a vascular dissection in the middle cerebral artery. The initial angiogram showed vascular irregularities in this area with stenosis. Repeat imaging 4 days after presentation identified a pseudoaneurysm proximal to the stenosis. The patient was successfully treated with a self-expanding nitinol stent and followed up with serial angiography during postoperative recovery in the hospital; additional angiograms were performed approximately 1 and 6 months after treatment. Serial angiograms demonstrated incremental healing of the dissection. The patient was discharged and remains neurologically intact at the 6-month follow-up. PMID:25854687

  4. Intracerebral hemorrhage due to developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodi; Wang, Yuzhou; Chen, Wenming; Wang, Wensheng; Chen, Kaizhe; Liao, Huayin; Lu, Jianjun; Li, Zhigang

    2016-04-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) and cavernous malformations (CM) are a common form of mixed vascular malformation. The relationship between DVA, CM and hemorrhage is complicated. It is important to differentiate hemorrhagic CM and hemorrhagic DVA. A retrospective review of all patients with acute spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) between 1 May 2008 and 1 May 2013 was performed. ICH due to DVA or CM were identified and compared for demographic features, clinical symptoms, neurological deficits, and radiological findings. A total of 1706 patients with acute spontaneous ICH were admitted to our hospital during the study period. Among these, 10 (0.59%) were caused by DVA and 42 (2.47%) were caused by CM. No significant differences were found in age (p=0.252) or sex ratio (p=1.000) between the two groups. Compared with CM-induced ICH, DVA-induced ICH were characterized by cerebellar predominance (p=0.000) and less severe neurological deficits (p=0.008). Infratentorial hemorrhagic DVA are characterized by cerebellar predominance and benign clinical course. Infratentorial hemorrhagic CM are mainly located in the brainstem. DVA should be given suspected rather than CM when considering the etiology of a cerebellar hemorrhage, especially in young adults. PMID:26803466

  5. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging. PMID:21905770

  6. Hemorrhagic pleural effusion due to pseudo-pancreatic cyst

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ruchi; Sachdeva, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic pleural effusion is a common clinical entity still diagnosis is often missed. An unusual and often over-looked cause of pleural effusion is an intra-abdominal process including complication arising due to pancreatitis. We report a rare case of massive left sided hemorrhagic pleural effusion in a patient due to pancreatic pathology.

  7. Cerebral infarction secondary to vasospasm after perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, A; Bond, R L; Aziz-Sultan, M A; Olvey, S E; Mangat, H S

    2011-07-01

    Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage (pSAH) has been described as a distinct form of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) associated with good outcomes. We report a 48-year-old female who developed cerebral infarction due to severe diffuse vasospasm following pSAH. The patient presented with non-aneurysmal pSAH and was discharged home on day 5. However, one week later she developed an acute onset of right hemiparesis. A brain MRI showed acute infarctions on diffusion weighted imaging and her cerebral angiogram showed diffuse vasospasm. The patient received intra-arterial diltiazem and hypervolemic-hypertensive-hemodilution therapy with resulting resolution of the vasospasm and hemiparesis. While not as common as in SAH, there is a potential for the occurrence of cerebral infarction due to vasospasm after pSAH. PMID:21565507

  8. Effective Use of Sertraline for Pathological Laughing after Severe Vasospasm Due to Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    TAKEUCHI, Hayato; IWAMOTO, Kazuhide; MUKAI, Mao; FUJITA, Tomoaki; TSUJINO, Hitoshi; IWAMOTO, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Pathological laughing, one subgroup of psuedobulbar affect, is known as laughter inappropriate to the patient's external circumstances and unrelated to the patient's internal emotional state. The authors present the case of a 76-year-old woman with no significant medical history who experienced pathological laughing after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to rupture of an aneurysm, which was successfully treated with craniotomy for aneurysm clipping. In the acute stage after the operation she suffered from severe vasospasm and resulting middle cerebral artery territory infarction and conscious disturbance. As she regained consciousness she was afflicted by pathological laughing 6 months after the onset of SAH. Her involuntary laughter was inappropriate to the situation and was incongruent with the emotional state, and she could not control by herself. Finally the diagnosis of pathological laughing was made and treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), effectively cured the symptoms. Her pathological laughing was estimated to be consequence of infarction in the right prefrontal cortex and/or corona radiata, resulting from vasospasm. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of pathological laughing after aneurysmal SAH. The authors offer insight into the pathophysiology of this rare phenomenon. Effectiveness of sertraline would widen the treatment modality against pathological laughing. PMID:24201096

  9. Neutrophil depletion after subarachnoid hemorrhage improves memory via NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Provencio, Jose Javier; Swank, Valerie; Lu, Haiyan; Brunet, Sylvain; Baltan, Selva; Khapre, Rohini V; Seerapu, Himabindu; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Lamb, Bruce T; Ransohoff, Richard M

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive deficits after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are common and disabling. Patients who experience delayed deterioration associated with vasospasm are likely to have cognitive deficits, particularly problems with executive function, verbal and spatial memory. Here, we report neurophysiological and pathological mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits in a murine model of SAH. On tests of spatial memory, animals with SAH performed worse than sham animals in the first week and one month after SAH suggesting a prolonged injury. Between three and six days after experimental hemorrhage, mice demonstrated loss of late long-term potentiation (L-LTP) due to dysfunction of the NMDA receptor. Suppression of innate immune cell activation prevents delayed vasospasm after murine SAH. We therefore explored the role of neutrophil-mediated innate inflammation on memory deficits after SAH. Depletion of neutrophils three days after SAH mitigates tissue inflammation, reverses cerebral vasoconstriction in the middle cerebral artery, and rescues L-LTP dysfunction at day 6. Spatial memory deficits in both the short and long-term are improved and associated with a shift of NMDA receptor subunit composition toward a memory sparing phenotype. This work supports further investigating suppression of innate immunity after SAH as a target for preventative therapies in SAH. PMID:26872422

  10. Turner syndrome with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min Kyung; Jung, Mo Kyung; Kim, Ki Eun; Kwon, Ah Reum; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2015-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a relatively common chromosomal disorder and is associated with a range of comorbidities involving the cardiovascular system. Vascular abnormalities, in particular, are a common finding in cases of TS. However, dissection involving the vertebral arteries is rare. Here, we report the case of a 9-year-old girl with TS who had been treated with growth hormone replacement therapy for the past 3 years. She presented with weakness of both lower legs, and was ultimately diagnosed with spinal hemorrhage due to vascular malformation. We treated her with intravenous high dose dexamethasone (0.6 mg/kg) and she could walk without assistance after 6 days of treatment. In conclusion, when a patient with TS shows sudden weakness of the lower limbs, we should consider the possibility of spinal vessel rupture and try to take spine magnetic resonance imaging as soon as possible. We suggest a direction how to make a proper diagnosis and management of sudden vertebral artery hemorrhage in patients with TS. PMID:26817012

  11. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in ten questions.

    PubMed

    Edjlali, M; Rodriguez-Régent, C; Hodel, J; Aboukais, R; Trystram, D; Pruvo, J-P; Meder, J-F; Oppenheim, C; Lejeune, J-P; Leclerc, X; Naggara, O

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has an annual incidence of 9 per 100 000 people. It is a rare but serious event, with an estimated mortality rate of 40% within the first 48hours. In 85% of cases, it is due to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm. In the early phase, during the first 24hours, cerebral CT, combined with intracranial CT angiography is recommended to make a positive diagnosis of SAH, to identify the cause and to investigate for an intracranial aneurysm. Cerebral MRI may be proposed if the patient's clinical condition allows it. FLAIR imaging is more sensitive than CT to demonstrate a subarachnoid hemorrhage and offers greater degrees of sensitivity for the diagnosis of restricted subarachnoid hemorrhage in cortical sulcus. A lumbar puncture should be performed if these investigations are normal while clinical suspicion is high. PMID:26141485

  12. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Presenting with Seizure due to Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage after Spinal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yaman, Mesut Emre

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leakage may commonly occur during spinal surgeries and it may cause dural tears. These tears may result in hemorrhage in the entire compartments of the brain. Most common site of such hemorrhages are the veins in the cerebellar region. We report a case of hemorrhage, mimicking aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage due to a cerebrospinal fluid leakage following lumbar spinal surgery and discuss the possible mechanisms of action. PMID:26885288

  13. Neurovascular Events After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Focusing on Subcellular Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Wu, Haijian; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, Jianmin; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the lack of effective therapy. Early brain injury (EBI) and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are the two most important pathophysiological mechanisms for brain injury and poor outcomes for patients with SAH. CVS has traditionally been considered the sole cause of delayed ischemic neurological deficits after SAH. However, the failure of antivasospastic therapy in patients with SAH supported changing the research target from CVS to other mechanisms. Currently, more attention has been focused on global brain injury within 3 days after ictus, designated as EBI. The dysfunction of subcellular organelles, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, mitochondrial failure, and autophagy–lysosomal system activation, has developed during EBI and delayed brain injury after SAH. To our knowledge, there is a lack of review articles addressing the direction of organelle dysfunction after SAH. In this review, we discuss the roles of organelle dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SAH and present the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies of SAH via modulating the functions of organelles. PMID:25366597

  14. Characteristics of Cerebrovascular Injury in the Hyperacute Phase After Induced Severe Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Uekawa, Ken; Kawano, Takayuki; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2015-12-01

    Although there have been several investigations regarding acute brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the pathological conditions of severe SAH are unclear. In this study, we pursued the characteristics of cerebrovascular injury in the hyperacute phase after experimentally induced severe SAH. Twenty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to sham or SAH operation using the endovascular perforation method and were evaluated for brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, and arterial endothelial cell injury at 5 min after SAH (experiment 1). Next, animals were examined for functional and morphological changes of cerebral artery for 30 min after an acetazolamide injection administered 5 min after SAH (experiment 2). In experiment 1, while cerebral blood flow (CBF) was reduced, brain edema was not observed in SAH-operated rats. BBB permeability detected by immunoglobulin G extravasation was observed in the optic tract and was accompanied by the upregulation of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-positive astrocytes. In addition, the number of phosphorylated ERK-positive endothelial cell in the distal middle cerebral artery (MCA) was significantly increased by SAH. In experiment 2, CBF in non-lethal SAH rats was reduced, and no response to acetazolamide was detected. Conversely, CBF in lethal SAH increased due to acetazolamide, although the value of CBF was low. Furthermore, there was significant narrowing of the MCA in SAH-operated rats. The findings suggest that the optic tract and the cerebral artery are the most vulnerable areas regarding cerebrovascular injury in a hyperacute phase after severe SAH and that they are associated with fatal outcomes. PMID:26358229

  15. Severe subdural hemorrhage due to minimal prenatal trauma.

    PubMed

    Piastra, Marco; Pietrini, Domenico; Massimi, Luca; Caldarelli, Massimo; De Luca, Daniele; Del Lungo, Laura Minguell; De Carolis, Maria Pia; Di Rocco, Concezio; Conti, Giorgio; Zecca, Enrico

    2009-12-01

    The authors report a case of minimal prenatal trauma producing a large subdural hematoma in the fetus, which was diagnosed in utero by MR imaging. The occurrence of such a complication is extremely rare in the absence of significant maternal trauma. Prenatally diagnosed intracranial hemorrhages, particularly those that are subdural in origin, have a poor prognosis in most cases. After birth, brain compression required a complex neurosurgical intervention because simple hematoma evacuation was not possible. The clinical and neurological outcome at 6 months was excellent, as confirmed by the neuroimaging findings. PMID:19951041

  16. Evaluation of a filament perforation model for mouse subarachnoid hemorrhage using 7.0 Tesla MRI.

    PubMed

    Muroi, Carl; Kashiwagi, Yuto; Rokugawa, Takemi; Tonomura, Misato; Obata, Atsushi; Nevzati, Edin; Tsuboi, Akio; Okuchi, Kazuo; Mishima, Kenichi; Abe, Kohji; Fujioka, Masayuki

    2016-06-01

    The filament perforation model (FPM) in mice is becoming increasingly popular to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of neuronal injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We evaluated brain MRI in a mouse FPM. A total of 28 male C57Bl/6J mice were used. Seventeen animals underwent SAH induction by FPM. In two animals, transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) was induced. Nine mice served as controls. T1-weighted images (T1WI), T2-weighted images (T2WI), T2(∗)-weighted images (T2*WI) and apparent diffusion coefficient maps were acquired at day 0 and at various time points following SAH (range: day 1-6 after SAH). Cerebral blood flow (CBF) analysis by (14)C-iodoamphetamine ((14)C-IMP) autoradiography was conducted in nine animals. Hemorrhage could be best confirmed using T2*WI. The degree of hemorrhage varied. All animals evaluated for ⩾2days were hydrocephalic, which was best seen on T2WI. T2-hyperintensity of the corpus callosum and external capsule, indicating white matter (WM) injury, was present after SAH. Ventricle and WM injury volumes were statistically significantly higher at day 3 compared to day 0. Territorial ischemia was detectable in MCAo but not in SAH. Markedly hypointense cortical veins were visible in the hyperacute and delayed phase after SAH on T2*WI. The (14)C-IMP analysis indicated decreased CBF after SAH. MRI is feasible and useful in evaluating pathophysiological changes over time. T2*WI seems best for SAH detection and grading. The chronological change of hydrocephalus and WM injury could be analyzed. T2*WI illustrated specific signal changes of cortical veins, possibly caused by increased oxygen extraction fraction due to decreased CBF. PMID:27021225

  17. Hemoglobin induced NO/cGMP suppression Deteriorate Microcirculation via Pericyte Phenotype Transformation after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo; Luo, Chunxia; Zuo, Shilun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, John H.; Ruan, Huaizhen; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) usually results from ruptured aneurysm, but how leaked hemoglobin regulates the microcirculation in the pathophysiology of early brain injury after SAH is still unclear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and possible mechanism of hemoglobin induced pericyte phenotype transformation in the regulation of microcirculation after SAH. Endovascular perforation SAH rat model, brain slices and cultured pericytes were used, and intervened with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) antagonist L-NNA and its agonist scutellarin, hemoglobin, DETA/NO (nitric oxide(NO) donor), PITO (NO scavenger), 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog). We found modulating eNOS regulated pericyte α-SMA phenotype transformation, microcirculation, and neurological function in SAH rats. Modulating eNOS also affected eNOS expression, eNOS activity and NO availability after SAH. In addition, we showed hemoglobins penetrated into brain parenchyma after SAH. And hemoglobins significantly reduced the microvessel diameters at pericyte sites, due to the effects of hemoglobin inducing α-SMA expressions in cultured pericytes and brain slices via inhibiting NO/cGMP pathway. In conclusion, pericyte α-SMA phenotype mediates acute microvessel constriction after SAH possibly by hemoglobin suppressing NO/cGMP signaling pathway. Therefore, by targeting the eNOS and pericyte α-SMA phenotype, our present data may shed new light on the management of SAH patients. PMID:26911739

  18. Hemoglobin induced NO/cGMP suppression Deteriorate Microcirculation via Pericyte Phenotype Transformation after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Chen, Yujie; Li, Bo; Luo, Chunxia; Zuo, Shilun; Liu, Xin; Zhang, John H; Ruan, Huaizhen; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) usually results from ruptured aneurysm, but how leaked hemoglobin regulates the microcirculation in the pathophysiology of early brain injury after SAH is still unclear. In the present study, we sought to investigate the role and possible mechanism of hemoglobin induced pericyte phenotype transformation in the regulation of microcirculation after SAH. Endovascular perforation SAH rat model, brain slices and cultured pericytes were used, and intervened with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) antagonist L-NNA and its agonist scutellarin, hemoglobin, DETA/NO (nitric oxide(NO) donor), PITO (NO scavenger), 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog). We found modulating eNOS regulated pericyte α-SMA phenotype transformation, microcirculation, and neurological function in SAH rats. Modulating eNOS also affected eNOS expression, eNOS activity and NO availability after SAH. In addition, we showed hemoglobins penetrated into brain parenchyma after SAH. And hemoglobins significantly reduced the microvessel diameters at pericyte sites, due to the effects of hemoglobin inducing α-SMA expressions in cultured pericytes and brain slices via inhibiting NO/cGMP pathway. In conclusion, pericyte α-SMA phenotype mediates acute microvessel constriction after SAH possibly by hemoglobin suppressing NO/cGMP signaling pathway. Therefore, by targeting the eNOS and pericyte α-SMA phenotype, our present data may shed new light on the management of SAH patients. PMID:26911739

  19. A Case Report of Acute Acalculous Cholecystitis and Acute Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Beyazal Polat, Hatice; Beyazal Çeliker, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi are a rare condition. A 24-year-old female patient was admitted to our clinic with abdominal pain, nausea, fever, headache, urinary burning, and bloody urine. Based on clinical, laboratory, and radiological evaluations, the patient was diagnosed with acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis due to Salmonella Typhi. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for two weeks. After the treatment, the patient's clinical and laboratory findings improved. Acute acalculous cholecystitis due to Salmonella Typhi concomitant with acute hemorrhagic cystitis is very rare and might be difficult to diagnose. Infectious agents such as Salmonella Typhi should be considered when acute acalculous cholecystitis and acute hemorrhagic cystitis are detected in adult patients with no underlying diseases. PMID:25161668

  20. Brainstem opioidergic system is involved in early response to experimental SAH.

    PubMed

    Cetas, Justin S; McFarlane, Robin; Kronfeld, Kassi; Smitasin, Phoebe; Liu, Jesse J; Raskin, Jeffrey S

    2015-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a form of stroke with high rates of mortality and permanent disability for patients who survive the initial event. Previous research has focused on delayed cerebral vasospasm of large conduit arteries as the cause of poor long-term outcomes after SAH. New evidence suggests that acute failure to restore cerebral blood flow (CBF) after SAH may be setting the stage for delayed ischemic neurological deficits. Our lab previously demonstrated that the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM), an autonomic and sensorimotor integration center, is important for maintaining CBF after experimental SAH. In this study, we have demonstrated that ablation of μ-opioid receptor containing cells with dermorphin conjugates in the RVM results in a high mortality rate after experimental SAH and, in survivors, causes a dramatic decrease in CBF. Further, locally blocking the μ-opioid receptor with the antagonist naltrexone attenuated the reduction in CBF secondary to experimental SAH. Saturating μ-opioid receptors with the agonist [D-Ala(2),NMe-Phe(4),Gly-ol(5)]-encephalin (DAMGO) had no effect. Taken together, these results suggest that SAH activates opioidergic signaling in the RVM with a resultant reduction in CBF. Further, cells in the RVM that contain μ-opioid receptors are important for survival after acute SAH. We propose that failure of the RVM μ-opioid receptor cells to initiate the compensatory CBF response sets the stage for acute and delayed ischemic injury following SAH. PMID:25417789

  1. Role of trauma and infection in childhood hemorrhagic stroke due to vascular lesions

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Nilika Shah; Hills, Nancy K.; Sidney, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Trauma and infection have been postulated as triggers for hemorrhage from underlying brain vascular lesions (arteriovenous malformations, cavernous malformations, and aneurysms) in pediatric hemorrhagic stroke. We decided to perform an association study examining these environmental risk factors. Methods: In this case-control study nested within the cohort of 2.3 million children enrolled in a Northern California integrated health plan (19932004), we identified childhood hemorrhagic stroke cases through electronic searches of diagnostic and radiology databases, confirmed through chart review. Three age- and facility-matched controls per case were randomly selected from the study population. Exposure variables were measured using medical records documented before stroke diagnosis. Main outcome measure was hemorrhagic stroke. Results: Of 132 childhood, non-neonatal hemorrhagic stroke cases, 65 had underlying vascular lesions: 34 arteriovenous malformations, 16 cavernous malformations, and 15 aneurysms. A documented exposure to head and neck trauma in the prior 12 weeks was present in 3 cases (4.6%) with underlying vascular lesions, compared with no controls (p < 0.015). However, all 3 vascular lesions were aneurysms, and traumatic pseudoaneurysms were possible. Recent minor infection (prior 4 weeks) was present in 5 cases (7.7%) and 9 controls (4.6%) (p = 0.34). Conclusions: Our observed association between trauma and hemorrhagic stroke with a vascular lesion may be explained by traumatic pseudoaneurysms. Neither recent head or neck trauma nor infection appeared to be a trigger for pediatric hemorrhagic stroke due to underlying vascular malformations. PMID:23825175

  2. Intracranial Vasospasm without Intracranial Hemorrhage due to Acute Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jung-Hwan; Jwa, Seung-Joo; Yang, Tae Ki; Lee, Chang Sub; Oh, Kyungmi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma (SDH) is very rare. Furthermore, intracranial vasospasm (ICVS) associated with spinal hemorrhage has been very rarely reported. We present an ICVS case without intracranial hemorrhage following SDH. A 41-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of severe headache. Multiple intracranial vasospasms were noted on a brain CT angiogram and transfemoral cerebral angiography. However, intracranial hemorrhage was not revealed by brain MRI or CT. On day 3 after admission, weakness of both legs and urinary incontinence developed. Spine MRI showed C7~T6 spinal cord compression due to hyperacute stage of SDH. After hematoma evacuation, her symptoms gradually improved. We suggest that spinal cord evaluation should be considered in patients with headache who have ICVS, although intracranial hemorrhage would not be visible in brain images. PMID:26713084

  3. Decorin alleviated chronic hydrocephalus via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hui; Chen, Yujie; Li, Lingyong; Jiang, Jiaode; Wu, Guangyong; Zuo, Yuchun; Zhang, John H; Feng, Hua; Yan, Xiaoxin; Liu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hydrocephalus is one of the severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, there is no efficient treatment for the prevention of chronic hydrocephalus, partially due to poor understanding of underlying pathogenesis, subarachnoid fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) is a potent fibrogenic factor implicated in wide range of fibrotic diseases. To investigate whether decorin, a natural antagonist for TGF-β1, protects against subarachnoid fibrosis and chronic hydrocephalus after SAH, two-hemorrhage-injection SAH model was conducted in 6-week-old rats. Recombinant human decorin(rhDecorin) (30ug/2ul) was administered before blood injection and on the 10th day after SAH. TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide were assessed via western blotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay and immunofluorescence. And neurobehavioral tests and Morris water maze were employed to evaluate long-term neurological functions after SAH. We found that SAH induced heightened activation of TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF axis, presenting as a two peak response of TGF-β1 in cerebrospinal fluid, elevation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I in brain parenchyma and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide in cerebrospinal fluid, and increased lateral ventricle index. rhDecorin treatment effectively inhibited up-regulation of TGF-β1, p-Smad2/3, CTGF, collagen I and pro-collagen I c-terminal propeptide after SAH. Moreover, rhDecorin treatment significantly reduced lateral ventricular index and incidence of chronic hydrocephalus after SAH. Importantly, rhDecorin improved neurocognitive deficits after SAH. In conclusion, rhDecorin suppresses extracellular matrix accumulation and following subarachnoid fibrosis via inhibiting TGF-β1/Smad/CTGF pathway, preventing development of hydrocephalus and attenuating long-term neurocognitive defects after SAH. PMID:26556770

  4. Endovascular Perforation Murine Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Du, Guo Jia; Lu, Gang; Zheng, Zhi Yuan; Poon, Wai Sang; Wong, Kwok Chu George

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a subtype of stroke with disastrous outcomes of high disability and mortality. A variety of endeavors have been developed to explore a SAH animal model for investigation of the disease. Among these models, the endovascular perforation SAH model was considered to be the most simulative to the clinical human SAH because it reproduces several pathophysiology procedures and presents some of the most important post-hemorrhage features. An applicable SAH animal model should have the characteristics of low mortality rate, limited surgical manipulation, and adaptation to many species, which permits reproducibility and standardization. An intensive discussion of how to improve the techniques and refine the procedure has taken place in the last decade. This report describes our experiences with a murine model of SAH. We aim to standardize and optimize the procedures to establish a relatively stable animal model for SAH research. PMID:26463927

  5. Protocol Based Real-Time Continuous Electroencephalography for Detecting Vasospasm in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Bang, Jae Seung; Chung, Jin-Heon

    2016-01-01

    A continuous electroencephalography (cEEG) can be helpful in detecting vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We describe a patient with an aneurysmal SAH whose symptomatic vasospasm was detected promptly by using a real-time cEEG. Patient was immediately treated by intraarterial vasodilator therapy. A 50-year-old woman without any significant medical history presented with a severe bifrontal headache due to acute SAH with a ruptured aneurysm on the anterior communicating artery (Fisher grade 3). On bleed day 6, she developed a sudden onset of global aphasia and left hemiparesis preceded by cEEG changes consistent with vasospasm. A stat chemical dilator therapy was performed and she recovered without significant neurological deficits. A real-time and protocol-based cEEG can be utilized in order to avoid any delay in detection of vasospasm in aneurysmal SAH and thereby improve clinical outcomes. PMID:26962422

  6. Fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by infection due to Kytococcus sedentarius--a pathogen or passenger?

    PubMed

    Levenga, Henriëtte; Donnelly, Peter; Blijlevens, Nicole; Verweij, Paul; Shirango, Hebste; de Pauw, Ben

    2004-07-01

    A 55-year old man developed a hemorrhagic pneumonia, likely due to infection with Kytococcus sedentarius during neutropenia following induction chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. Severe mucosal barrier injury and the selective pressure of broad-spectrum antibiotics probably made it possible for this normally harmless commensal to penetrate the gut, spread through the blood stream, and invade the lungs. PMID:14689234

  7. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  8. Activation of TRPV4 channels does not mediate inversion of neurovascular coupling after SAH

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neurovascular coupling (NVC) allows increased blood flow to metabolically active neurons and involves the Ca2+-dependent release of vasodilator influences by astrocyte endfeet encasing parenchymal arterioles. We have previously reported inversion of NVC from dilation to constriction in brain slices from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. Corresponding to NVC inversion, there was a marked increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocyte endfeet. Calcium-permeable transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels have been reported in astrocyte endfeet and activators of these channels enhance Ca2+ oscillations in healthy animals. Here, we examined the role of TRPV4 channels in the development of high amplitude spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations in astrocyte endfeet and the inversion of neurovascular coupling after SAH. Treatment of brain slices with the TRPV4 channel antagonist, HC-067047 (10 μM), did not alter the amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ oscillations after SAH. In addition, HC-067047 did not inhibit or change SAH-induced inversion of neurovascular coupling. In summary, TRPV4 channels do not appear to be involved in the inversion of neurovascular coupling after SAH. Further studies examining the impact of SAH on additional Ca2+ signaling pathways in astrocytes are likely to reveal valuable insights into new therapeutic strategies to advance SAH treatments. PMID:25366609

  9. Successful application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation due to pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Petermann, Arndt; Visouli, Aikaterini; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Ketteler, Markus; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Brachmann, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly applied in adults with acute refractory respiratory failure that is deemed reversible. Bleeding is the most frequent complication during ECMO support. Severe pre-existing bleeding has been considered a contraindication to ECMO application. Nevertheless, there are cases of successful ECMO application in patients with multiple trauma and hemorrhagic shock or head trauma and intracranial hemorrhage. ECMO has proved to be life-saving in several cases of life-threatening respiratory failure associated with pulmonary hemorrhage of various causes, including granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener’s disease). We successfully applied ECMO in a 65-year-old woman with acute life-threatening respiratory failure due to diffuse massive pulmonary hemorrhage secondary to granulomatosis with polyangiitis, manifested as severe pulmonary-renal syndrome. ECMO sustained life and allowed disease control, together with plasmapheresis, cyclophosphamide, corticoids, and renal replacement therapy. The patient was successfully weaned from ECMO, extubated, and discharged home. She remains alive on dialysis at 17 months follow-up. PMID:23926421

  10. Melatonin attenuated early brain injury induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage via regulating NLRP3 inflammasome and apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yushu; Fan, Chongxi; Hu, Wei; Jiang, Shuai; Ma, Zhiqiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Deng, Chao; Di, Shouyin; Xin, Zhenlong; Wu, Guiling; Yang, Yang; Reiter, Russel J; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating condition with high morbidity and mortality rates due to the lack of effective therapy. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor family pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation associated with the upregulation of apoptotic signaling pathway has been implicated in various inflammatory diseases including hemorrhagic insults. Melatonin is reported to possess substantial anti-inflammatory properties, which is beneficial for early brain injury (EBI) after SAH. However, the molecular mechanisms have not been clearly identified. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of melatonin against EBI induced by SAH and to elucidate the potential mechanisms. The adult mice were subjected to SAH. Melatonin or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally 2 hr after SAH. Melatonin was neuroprotective, as shown by increased survival rate, as well as elevated neurological score, greater survival of neurons, preserved brain glutathione levels, and reduced brain edema, malondialdehyde concentrations, apoptotic ratio, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Melatonin also attenuated the expressions of NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC), cleaved caspase-1, interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6); these changes were also associated with an increase in the anti-apoptotic factor (Bcl2) and reduction in the pro-apoptotic factor (Bim). In summary, our results demonstrate that melatonin treatment attenuates the EBI following SAH by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome-associated apoptosis. PMID:26639408

  11. A case of metastatic testicular cancer complicated by pulmonary hemorrhage due to choriocarcinoma syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Shuya; Kawai, Koji; Fukuhara, Yoshiharu; Joraku, Akira; Miyanaga, Naoto; Shimazui, Toru; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2010-12-01

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of metastatic testicular cancer. Computerized tomography revealed multiple lung, liver, and retroperitoneal lymph node metastases. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple brain metastases. Induction chemotherapy with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin was started the day after a high orchiectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was yolk sac carcinoma. The serum human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was markedly increased to 630,000 mIU/ml, which suggested the presence of a choriocarcinoma element at metastatic sites. The patient subsequently suffered respiratory failure due to pulmonary hemorrhage. Intensive supportive care prevented a fatal outcome. Physicians who treat advanced testicular tumors should be aware of the potential complication of acute pulmonary hemorrhage, called choriocarcinoma syndrome, in cases with a high hCG level, which indicates a rapidly progressive and high-volume choriocarcinoma. PMID:20544252

  12. Continuous Selective Intra-Arterial Application of Nimodipine in Refractory Cerebral Vasospasm due to Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Stephanie; Jedlicka, Sheila; Wolf, Stefan; Peter, Mozes; Pudenz, Christine; Merker, Patrick; Schürer, Ludwig; Lumenta, Christianto Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cerebral vasospasm is one of the leading courses for disability in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Effective treatment of vasospasm is therefore one of the main priorities for these patients. We report about a case series of continuous intra-arterial infusion of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine for 1–5 days on the intensive care unit. Methods. In thirty patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and refractory vasospasm continuous infusion of nimodipine was started on the neurosurgical intensive care unit. The effect of nimodipine on brain perfusion, cerebral blood flow, brain tissue oxygenation, and blood flow velocity in cerebral arteries was monitored. Results. Based on Hunt & Hess grades on admission, 83% survived in a good clinical condition and 23% recovered without an apparent neurological deficit. Persistent ischemic areas were seen in 100% of patients with GOS 1–3 and in 69% of GOS 4-5 patients. Regional cerebral blood flow and computed tomography perfusion scanning showed adequate correlation with nimodipine application and angiographic vasospasm. Transcranial Doppler turned out to be unreliable with interexaminer variance and failure of detecting vasospasm or missing the improvement. Conclusion. Local continuous intra-arterial nimodipine treatment for refractory cerebral vasospasm after aSAH can be recommended as a low-risk treatment in addition to established endovascular therapies. PMID:24527461

  13. [Diagnostic challenges of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Juho; Niemelä, Mika; Korja, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Diagostic approach to aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is based on computer tomography (CT) imaging, although a lumbar puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid analysis is sometimes necessary. Identification of the ruptured aneurysm is done using angiography. Despite of modern imaging techniques, diagnostic definition of aSAH is still occasionally challenging. We describe three cases in which the diagnosis of aSAH has been delayed, in spite of positive imaging or lumbar puncture findings. PMID:27089620

  14. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists data repository (SAHIT).

    PubMed

    Macdonald, R Loch; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Jaja, Blessing; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has improved slowly over the past 25 years. This improvement may be due to early aneurysm repair by endovascular or open means, use of nimodipine, and better critical care management. Despite this improvement, mortality remains at about 40%, and many survivors have permanent neurologic, cognitive, and neuropsychologic deficits. Randomized clinical trials have tested pharmacologic therapies, but few have been successful. There are numerous explanations for the failure of these trials, including ineffective interventions, inadequate sample size, treatment side effects, and insensitive or inappropriate outcome measures. Outcome often is evaluated on a good-bad dichotomous scale that was developed for traumatic brain injury 40 years ago. To address these issues, we established the Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) data repository. The primary aim of the SAHIT data repository is to provide a unique resource for prognostic analysis and for studies aimed at optimizing the design and analysis of phase III trials in aneurysmal SAH. With this aim in mind, we convened a multinational investigator meeting to explore merging individual patient data from multiple clinical trials and observational databases of patients with SAH and to create an agreement under which such a group of investigators could submit data and collaborate. We welcome collaboration with other investigators. PMID:23295631

  15. Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Relation to Nitric Oxide and Endothelin-1 on Pathogenesis of Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rabbit.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Akira; Naraoka, Masato; Katagai, Takeshi; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunctions that include decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity and increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) bioactivity have been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Recent cardiovascular studies have revealed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in a disturbance in cross-talk between NO and ET-1. COX-2 expression was detected in the endothelial cells of a spastic artery after experimental SAH; however, the pathophysiological significance of COX-2 in relation to CVS remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of COX-2 in relation to NO and ET-1 in the pathogenesis of CVS by using the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib. In the SAH group, SAH was simulated using the double-hemorrhage rabbit model. In the celecoxib group, SAH was simulated and celecoxib was administered. The basilar artery was extracted on day 5 and examined. The cross-section area of the basilar artery in the celecoxib group was significantly larger than in the SAH group. An increased expression of COX-2, ET-1, and ETA receptor (ETAR), and a decreased expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were seen in the SAH group. In the celecoxib group compared to the SAH group, expression of COX-2, ET-1, and ETAR were statistically significantly decreased, and eNOS expression was significantly increased. COX-2 might be involved in the pathogenesis of CVS due to up-regulation of ET-1 and ETAR and down-regulation of eNOS, and celecoxib may potentially serve as an agent in the prevention of CVS after SAH. PMID:27044361

  16. Functionalized graphene oxide as a drug carrier for loading pirfenidone in treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lijun; Wang, Feng; Han, Haie; Yang, Liang; Zhang, Gengshen; Fan, Zhenzeng

    2015-05-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a life-threatening disease that causes high morbidity and mortality. Pirfenidone is a SAH drug that prevents secondary bleeding and cerebral infarction. To improve its therapeutic efficacy, this study aimed to employ a functionalized graphene oxide nanosheet (FGO) as a drug carrier loading pirfenidone to treat SAH. The graphene oxide nanosheet was introduced with transcription activator peptide (Tat), followed by functionalization with methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) and loading with pirfenidone. The pirfenidone-loaded FGO (pirfenidone-FGO) exhibits better treatment efficacy than the single pirfenidone due to more effective loading and controlled release of the drug in tissue. The introduction of Tat and mPEG onto GO nanosheet contributes to the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and the stability in blood circulation of the drug. At lower pH values, the highly efficient release of the drug from the pirfenidone-FGO exerts effective treatment to acidic inflammatory lesion after severe SAH. Besides its treatment function, FGO is also shown as a strong near infrared absorbing material which can be applied in photoacoustic imaging, allowing rapid real-time monitoring with deep resolution of brain tissues after SAH. The treatment efficacy of pirfenidone-FGO for central nervous system injuries is further demonstrated by hematoxylin and eosin staining of coronal brain slices, as well as measurements of brain water content and blood-brain barrier permeability. Our study supports the potential of FGO in clinical application in treatment of SAH. PMID:25819362

  17. Unfractionated Heparin: Multitargeted Therapy for Delayed Neurological Deficits Induced by Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Schreibman, David; Aldrich, E. Francois; Stallmeyer, Bernadette; Le, Brian; James, Robert F.; Beaty, Narlin

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with numerous “delayed neurological deficits” (DNDs) that have been attributed to multiple pathophysiological mechanisms, including ischemia, microthrombosis, free radical damage, inflammation, and vascular remodeling. To date, effective prophylactic therapy for SAH-induced DNDs has been elusive, due perhaps to the multiplicity of mechanisms involved that render typical, single-agent therapy seemingly futile. We hypothesized that heparin, which has multiple underappreciated salutary effects, might be useful as a multitargeted prophylactic agent against SAH-induced DNDs. We performed a comprehensive review of the literature to evaluate the potential utility of heparin in targeting the multiple pathophysiological mechanisms that have been identified as contributing to SAH-induced DNDs. Our literature review revealed that unfractionated heparin can potentially antagonize essentially all of the pathophysiological mechanisms known to be activated following SAH. Heparin binds >100 proteins, including plasma proteins, proteins released from platelets, cytokines, and chemokines. Also, heparin complexes with oxyhemoglobin, blocks the activity of free radicals including reactive oxygen species, antagonizes endothelin-mediated vasoconstriction, smooth muscle depolarization, and inflammatory, growth and fibrogenic responses. Our review suggests that the use of prophylactic heparin following SAH may warrant formal study. PMID:20809188

  18. Clinical Features and Complications in Idiopathic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Plata Bello, Julio; Acosta-Lopez, Silvia; Garcia-Marin, Victor

    2016-05-01

    Background Negative angiography subarachnoid hemorrhage, also known as idiopathic subarachnoid hemorrhage (iSAH), is a challenging pathologic condition whose evolution and final outcome is difficult to predict with certainty. This article describes the clinical features, the type of complications and rates, as well as the final outcome of patients with iSAH. Methods A prospective evaluation of patients with SAH was performed. Patients with a diagnosis of iSAH were included. Demographic data, clinical features, complication rates, and functional outcomes were all collected. iSAH cases were subsequently compared with patients with aneurysmal SAH (aSAH) taken from the same period. Results Forty-nine patients fulfilled the criteria for iSAH. Patients with aSAH presented with a worse clinical condition and had a larger amount of blood in the initial computed tomography (CT) scan than iSAH patients. There were no differences in the incidence of acute hydrocephalus, and there was a positive correlation with the Fisher score and the initial clinical status in both groups. Vasospasm was more frequent among patients with aSAH, but the relationship between the incidence of vasospasm and the amount of blood in the initial CT scan was not linear. Good functional outcome was present in > 90% of iSAH patients. Conclusions Although iSAH generally has a good prognosis, it may be accompanied with serious complications. The incidence of acute hydrocephalus in iSAH is similar to that in aSAH. There is a lower incidence of vasospasm in iSAH than aSAH. A different relationship seems to exist between these complications and the amount of blood in the CT scan. PMID:26216737

  19. Time trends in outcome of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lovelock, C.E.; Rinkel, G.J.E.; Rothwell, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has changed substantially over the last 25 years but there is a lack of reliable population-based data on whether case-fatality or functional outcomes have improved. Methods: We determined changes in the standardized incidence and outcome of SAH in the same population between 1981 and 1986 (Oxford Community Stroke Project) and 2002 and 2008 (Oxford Vascular Study). In a meta-analysis with other population-based studies, we used linear regression to determine time trends in outcome. Results: There were no reductions in incidence of SAH (RR = 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.48–1.29, p = 0.34) and in 30-day case-fatality (RR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.39–1.13, p = 0.14) in the Oxford Vascular Study vs Oxford Community Stroke Project, but there was a decrease in overall mortality (RR = 0.47, 0.23–0.97, p = 0.04). Following adjustment for age and baseline SAH severity, patients surviving to hospital had reduced risk of death or dependency (modified Rankin score > 3) at 12 months in the Oxford Vascular Study (RR = 0.51, 0.29–0.88, p = 0.01). Among 32 studies covering 39 study periods from 1980 to 2005, 7 studied time trends within single populations. Unadjusted case-fatality fell by 0.9% per annum (0.3–1.5, p = 0.007) in a meta-analysis of data from all studies, and by 0.9% per annum (0.2–1.6%, p = 0.01) within the 7 population studies. Conclusion: Mortality due to subarachnoid hemorrhage fell by about 50% in our study population over the last 2 decades, due mainly to improved outcomes in cases surviving to reach hospital. This improvement is consistent with a significant decrease in case-fatality over the last 25 years in our pooled analysis of other similar population-based studies. GLOSSARY CI = confidence interval; mRS = modified Rankin score; OCSP = Oxford Community Stroke Project; OXVASC = Oxford Vascular Study; SAH = subarachnoid hemorrhage; WFNS = World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. PMID:20375310

  20. Cerebral hemorrhage due to tuberculosis meningitis: a rare case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Hai; Pan, Ke-Hua; Pan, Hong-Ying; Huang, Dong-Sheng; Zheng, Ming-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a common disease to threaten human health. TB of the central nervous system (CNS) is rare but the most serious type of systemic TB because of its high mortality rate, serious neurological complications and sequelae. In this case report, we describe a woman who presented with walking instability, intracerebral hemorrhage and leptomeningeal enhancement due to tuberculosis meningitis. The patient had no significant medical history and the initial clinical symptoms were walking instability. On analysis, the cerebrospinal fluid was colorless and transparent, the pressure was more than 400 mm H2O, there was lymphocytic pleocytosis, increased protein, and decreased glucose levels present. No tuberculosis or other bacteria were detected. The patient's brain computed tomography image showed intra-cerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and contrast magnetic resonance imaging showed ICH in the right frontal lob, and leptomeningeal enhancement. CNS TB is rare but has a high mortality rate. As this disease has no unique characteristics at first presentation such as epidemiology and obvious clinical manifestation, a diagnosis of CNS TB remains difficult. PMID:26675758

  1. The Role of Arterioles and the Microcirculation in the Development of Vasospasm after Aneurysmal SAH

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Kenichiro; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm of the major cerebral arteries, which is characterized by angiographic narrowing of those vessels, had been recognized as a main contributor to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. However, the CONSCIOUS-1 trial revealed that clazosentan could not improve mortality or clinical outcome in spite of successful reduction of relative risk in angiographic vasospasm. This result indicates that the pathophysiology underlying DCI is multifactorial and that other pathophysiological factors, which are independent of angiographic vasospasm, can contribute to the outcome. Recent studies have focused on microcirculatory disturbance, such as microthrombosis and arteriolar constriction, as a factor affecting cerebral ischemia after SAH. Reports detecting microthrombosis and arteriolar constriction will be reviewed, and the role of the microcirculation on cerebral ischemia during vasospasm after SAH will be discussed. PMID:24900959

  2. Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : Rare Complication of Vertebroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae Bum; Park, Joung Soo

    2009-01-01

    On rare occasions, percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) may be associated with adverse spinal and extraspinal events. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has not been reported complication following a PV. This is a report of two elderly women with spine compressions who developed idiopathic SAH after injecting polymethylmethacrylate into the thoracolumbar region transcutaneously. PV was performed as an usual manner on prone position under local anesthesia for these patients. During the interventions, two patients complained of a bursting nature of headache and their arterial blood pressure was jumped up. Computed tomography scans revealed symmetric SAH on the both hemispheres and moderate degree of hydrocephalus. Any intracranial vascular abnormalities for their SAH were not evident on modern neuroangiography modalities. One patient received a ventricular shunt surgery, but both fully recovered from the procedure-related SAH. The pathophysiologic mechanism that induce SAH will be discussed, with suggesting the manner that prevent and minimize this rare intracranial complication after PV. PMID:19609425

  3. A fatal outcome due to pulmonary hemorrhage following Russell’s viper bite

    PubMed Central

    Palangasinghe, Dhammika R.; Weerakkody, Ranga M.; Dalpatadu, Chamila G.; Gnanathasan, Christeine A.

    2015-01-01

    Russell’s viper (RV) envenomation causes local effects, coagulopathy, thrombosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute kidney injury, and neurological manifestations. Although coagulopathy and endothelial destruction causing local and mucosal surface bleeding is known, isolated severe pulmonary hemorrhage is not commonly reported. We report a previously healthy 18-year-old male who had bilateral severe pulmonary hemorrhages, which resulted in a fatal outcome following RV bite. This diagnosis was supported by persistent alveolar shadows, with minimum improvement despite hemodialysis without heparin, mixed acidosis and endotracheal tube bleeding. Other bleeding manifestations were absent. Polyvalent antivenom was administered in lieu of prolonged whole blood clotting time. Thrombocytopenia and mildly deranged clotting parameters were noted. Pulmonary hemorrhages were significant enough to require transfusion. This case highlights the importance of suspecting pulmonary hemorrhages in patients with alveolar shadows and desaturation following RV bite despite the absence of other bleeding manifestations in light of failure of optimum therapy including hemodialysis. PMID:25935188

  4. Large hemorrhage due to venipuncture in the elbow of a patient with severe hemophilia: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LYU, JINGTONG; WU, WENJIE; XIANG, ZHOU; HUANG, FUGUO

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia A, which is the most common form of hemophilia, is caused by a deficiency of clotting factor VIII. The incidence of hemophilia A is 1:10,000 people worldwide. The most common complication associated with hemophilia A is bleeding into joints, predominantly the knees, ankles, and elbows, which may lead to destruction or osteoarthritis of the specific joint. Various degrees of disability may follow these initial or recurrent hemorrhages. Subsequent to improvements in medical management, patients with hemophilia A currently have a life expectancy similar to that of the normal population. However, the management of patients with hemophilia A remains a clinical challenge for various reasons, including the lack of reliable and cost-effective treatment, and the high risk of intra- or post-operative hemorrhages. Large hemorrhages due to the phlebotomizing of young patients are very rare. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report regarding the occurrence of a large hemorrhage due to venipuncture in the elbow of a patient with hemophilia A, and discusses the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and the medico-chirurgical treatment of this patient. PMID:26998031

  5. Angiogram-negative subarachnoid hemorrhage: outcomes data and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Scott; Thorell, William; Gogela, Steve; Lyden, Elizabeth; Surdell, Dan

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is most commonly caused by rupture of a saccular aneurysm or other structural pathologies. Occasionally, no structural cause for the hemorrhage can be identified by radiographic imaging. These hemorrhages, termed angiogram-negative SAH, are generally considered to have a better prognosis than aneurysmal SAH. Angiogram-negative SAH subgroups include benign perimesencephalic SAH (PMH) and aneurysmal-type SAH. Outcome data for these subgroups differ from those for the group as a whole. We report data for 31 patients who presented to our institution from 2006 to the present. We performed a retrospective chart review, and report outcome data that include rates of rehemorrhage, hydrocephalus, vasospasm, permanent ischemic deficits, headaches, and outcomes based on modified Rankin Scale scores. We also performed a review of the literature and meta-analysis of the data therein. We compared rates of complications in the PMH subgroup and the diffuse-type hemorrhage subgroup. The chart review revealed no poor outcomes and no rehemorrhages in the patients with PMH. In the diffuse hemorrhage subgroup, 1 patient had a rehemorrhage and 2 patients had a poor outcome. Our literature review found an OR of 6.23 for a good outcome for PMH versus diffuse-type hemorrhage, and an OR of 2.78 for rehemorrhage in PMH versus diffuse-type hemorrhage. Angiogram-negative SAH is not a benign entity. Complications are present but are significantly reduced, and outcomes are improved, compared with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:22465208

  6. The clinical significance of small subarachnoid hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Albertine, Paul; Borofsky, Samuel; Brown, Derek; Patel, Smita; Lee, Woojin; Caputy, Anthony; Taheri, M Reza

    2016-06-01

    With advancing technology, the sensitivity of computed tomography (CT) for the detection of traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) continues to improve. Increased resolution has allowed for the detection of hemorrhage that is limited to one or two images of the CT exam. At our institution, all patients with a SAH require intensive care unit (ICU) admission, regardless of size. It was our hypothesis that patients with small subarachnoid hemorrhage experience favorable outcomes, and may not require the intensive monitoring offered in the ICU. This retrospective study evaluated 62 patients between 2011 and 2014 who presented to our Level I trauma center emergency room for acute traumatic injuries, and found to have subarachnoid hemorrhages on CT examination. The grade of subarachnoid hemorrhage was determined using previously utilized scoring systems, such as the Fisher, Modified Fisher, and Claassen grading systems. Electronic medical records were used to evaluate for medical decline, neurological decline, neurosurgical intervention, and overall hospital course. Admitting co-morbidities were noted, as were the presence of patient intoxication and use of anticoagulants. Patient outcomes were based on discharge summaries upon which the neurological status of the patient was assessed. Each patient was given a score based on the Glasgow outcome scale. The clinical and imaging profile of 62 patients with traumatic SAH were studied. Of the 62 patients, 0 % underwent neurosurgical intervention, 6.5 % had calvarial fractures, 25.8 % had additional intracranial hemorrhages, 27.4 % of the patients had significant co-morbidities, and 1.6 % of the patients expired. Patients with low-grade tSAH spent less time in the ICU, demonstrated neurological and medical stability during hospitalization. None of the patients with low-grade SAH experienced seizure during their admission. In our study, patients with low-grade tSAH demonstrated favorable clinical outcomes. This suggests that patients may not require as aggressive monitoring as is currently provided for those with tSAH. PMID:26873602

  7. Multiple non-branching dissecting aneurysms of the mid-basilar trunk presenting with sequential subarachnoid hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Defillo, Archie; Nussbaum, Eric S.; Zelensky, Andrea; Nussbaum, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We describe a rare case of a patient with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to a ventral dissecting mid-basilar aneurysm that was treated surgically. One week after surgery, the patient experienced sudden deterioration due to a new SAH caused by the development of a new aneurysm of the basilar trunk distinct from the previously clipped aneurysm. Case Description: A 54-year-old woman with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage was found to have a small, broad-based aneurysm arising from the ventral aspect of the mid-basilar artery. This complicated lesion was treated with a microsurgical clipping via a translabyrinthine pre-sigmoidal sub-temporal approach. One week postoperatively, the patient suffered a new SAH and was found to have developed a distinct basilar artery aneurysm. The patient was returned to the Operating Room for microsurgical clipping via the previous craniotomy. After surgery, the patient made a slow, but steady, recovery. She underwent repeated angiographic imaging, demonstrating a stable appearance. Two years post surgery, the patient had returned to work and had no obvious neurological deficit, with the exception of unilateral iatrogenic hearing loss. Conclusion: We describe a rare case of multiple aneurysms originating in relation to a mid-basilar dissection, resulting in multiple episodes of SAH. These are difficult and dangerous lesions that can be treated with open microsurgical reconstruction or possibly via an endovascular approach. The intricate location of the lesions poses a particular challenge to neurosurgeons attempting to directly treat mid-basilar lesions. PMID:22059122

  8. Bilateral macular hemorrhage due to megaloblastic anemia: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Vaggu, Sree Kumar; Bhogadi, Preethi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 17-year-old female patient who presented with sudden, painless, nonprogressive diminished vision in both eyes (best corrected visual acuity in right eye - 6/60 and left eye - 6/36). An ophthalmological evaluation revealed bilateral pale tarsal conjunctiva and bilateral macular hemorrhage. Hematological evaluation revealed the presence of megalocytic anemia (with hemoglobin - 4.9 g%). General examination showed severe pallor. On systemic examination, no abnormality was detected, confirmed by ultrasonography abdomen. Other causes. This case documents the rare occurrence of bilateral subinternal limiting membrane macular hemorrhage with megaloblastic anemia without thrombocytopenia and other retinal features of anemic retinopathy. PMID:27050355

  9. A new grading system based on magnetic resonance imaging in a mouse model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Yusuke; Shishido, Hajime; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A grading system for experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that does not require animal euthanasia is currently unavailable. We proposed a new grading system based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and evaluated the feasibility of this method in a mouse model of SAH. Methods SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male C57BL/6 mice. Mice underwent MRI 24 hours after SAH, and were categorized into the following five grades based on T2*-weighted imaging: Grade 0, no visible SAH or intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH); Grade 1, minimal/localized SAH without IVH; Grade 2, minimal/localized SAH with IVH; Grade 3, thick/diffuse SAH without IVH; Grade 4, thick/diffuse SAH with IVH. Neurological deficits were then assessed and the mice euthanized for conventional SAH grading. Results Among a total of 47 mice, 4% were scored as grade 0, 30% as grade 1, 11% as grade 2, 30% as grade 3, and 36% as grade 4. This MRI grading had excellent interobserver reliability (weighted κ value = 0.94), and there were strong correlations between the MRI grading and the conventional grading (r = 0.85; P < 0.001), or between MRI grade and neurological scores (r = −0.46; P < 0.01). Conclusions The new MRI grading correlated well with conventional grading, and enabled in-vivo evaluation of SAH severity. This grading system may offer advantages in future studies of experimental SAH. PMID:25550373

  10. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung

    2016-01-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  11. Delayed Vasospasm after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Behcet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hak; Lee, Si-Un; Huh, Choonwoong; Oh, Chang Wan; Bang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tackeun

    2016-03-01

    A man visited the emergency room with a headache. Brain computed tomography showed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and multiple aneurysms. After aneurysm clipping surgery, the patient was discharged. After 5 days, he was admitted to the hospital with skin ulceration and was diagnosed with Behcet syndrome. An angiogram taken 7 weeks after aneurysmal SAH showed intracranial vasospasm. Because inflammation in Behcet syndrome may aggravate intracranial vasospasm, intracranial vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH in Behcet syndrome should be monitored for longer compared to general aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27114963

  12. Aphasia and unilateral spatial neglect due to acute thalamic hemorrhage: clinical correlations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages are associated with a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is well known that such cognitive changes constitute a limiting factor of recovery of the activities of daily living (ADL). The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and hematomas is unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aphasia/neglect and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. One hundred fifteen patients with thalamic hemorrhage (70 men and 45 women) were studied. Their mean age was 68.9 ± 10.3 years, and patients with both left and right lesions were included. We calculated hematoma volume and examined the presence or absence of aphasia/neglect and the relationships between these dysfunctions and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. Fifty-nine patients were found to have aphasia and 35 were found to have neglect. Although there was no relationship between hematoma type and cognitive dysfunction, hematoma volume showed a correlation with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. The ADL score and ratio of patient discharge for patients with aphasia/neglect were lower than those for patients without aphasia/neglect. We observed a correlation between the hematoma volume in thalamic hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction. Aphasia/neglect is found frequently in patients with acute thalamic hemorrhage and may influence the ADL. PMID:26796359

  13. [Continuous EEG monitoring for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Pugin, D; Vulliemoz, S; Bijlenga, P; Gasche, Y

    2014-12-10

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) still carries a high morbidity and mortality, despite improvement in surgical and medical management. Seizures and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) secondary to vasospasm or cortical spreading depression are frequent after SAH. Continuous EEG allows early detection of non-convulsive seizures or delayed cerebral ischemia and may become a promissing tool in the monitoring of SAH patients. However, its use in clinical practice is still limited because many resources are required for recording and analyzing continuous EEG. Moreover, we require more data to confirm the relationship between aggressive treatment of non-convulsive seizure or delayed cerebral ischemia triggered by continuous EEG and outcome. PMID:25632630

  14. The Harmful Effects of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Extracerebral Organs

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Qian; Wu, Haijian; Krafft, Paul R.; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating neurological disorder. Patients with aneurysmal SAH develop secondary complications that are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Aside from secondary neurological injuries, SAH has been associated with nonneurologic medical complications, such as neurocardiogenic injury, neurogenic pulmonary edema, hyperglycemia, and electrolyte imbalance, of which cardiac and pulmonary complications are most common. The related mechanisms include activation of the sympathetic nervous system, release of catecholamines and other hormones, and inflammatory responses. Extracerebral complications are directly related to the severity of SAH-induced brain injury and indicate the clinical outcome in patients. This review provides an overview of the extracerebral complications after SAH. We also aim to describe the manifestations, underlying mechanisms, and the effects of those extracerebral complications on outcome following SAH. PMID:25110700

  15. Seasonal and meteorological determinants of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, W A A; Algra, A; van den Broek, M F M; Dorhout Mees, S M; Rinkel, G J E

    2013-02-01

    Many studies have assessed the relationships between seasonal or meteorological determinants and the occurrence of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), but the data are conflicting. We systematically searched the literature and meta-analyzed data from all relevant articles when possible. We searched MEDLINE (1966-2011), EMBASE (1980-2011) and the Cochrane Library to identify all observational studies examining the relationship between seasonal and meteorological determinants (temperature, atmospheric pressure and relative humidity) and the occurrence of SAH. Two authors independently extracted data from articles that were included based on predefined criteria. We pooled relative risks (RR's) with corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI's) from the individual studies on season and month by means of the random effects method. We included 48 articles, totaling 72,694 patients. SAH occurred less often in summer than in winter (RR 0.89, 95 % CI 0.83-0.96), and was statistically significant more often in January than in the summer months of June-September. For atmospheric pressure seven of 17 studies found a significant association, six of 18 studies were significant for temperature, and three of 15 studies were significant for humidity, but the direction of these associations was conflicting and data on these determinants were too heterogeneous to pool. Seasons influence the occurrence of SAH, with SAH occurring less often in summer than in winter, and most often in January. The explanation for the seasonal differences remains uncertain, due to the lack of sound data on the influence of meteorological factors on SAH occurrence. PMID:23070464

  16. Cholesterol as a Risk Factor for Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lindbohm, Joni Valdemar; Kaprio, Jaakko; Korja, Miikka

    2016-01-01

    Background The role played by total cholesterol (TC) in risk for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is unclear because studies report both high and low TC each as a risk factor. We performed a systematic review to clarify associations between lipid profile and SAH. Methods Our literature search comprised Pubmed, Scopus, and Cochrane Library databases with no language, publication year, or study type limitations. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-analyses (PRISMA) checklist guided our reporting. Data forms adapted from the Critical Appraisal Skills Program (CASP), and Cochrane Collaboration guidelines provided a platform for risk-of-bias evaluation. We used a random effects model to calculate pooled estimates and assessed heterogeneity with I2-statistics. Results Of the final 21 studies reviewed, 12 were prospective and 9 retrospective. All studies assessed TC, four assessed HDL, and none LDL in risk for SAH. Heterogeneity among all, retrospective, and Asian studies was high (I2 = 79.5%, I2 = 89.0%, and I2 = 84.3%) and considerable in prospective (I2 = 46.0%). We therefore focused on qualitative analysis and found that only two studies had a low risk of bias. According to these studies high TC increases risk for SAH in men, whereas the role of HDL remained unclear. Conclusion The low-risk-of-bias studies suggest that elevated TC levels elevate risk for SAH in men. Due to the high prevalence of hypercholesterolemia, population attributable risk (PAR) of hypercholesterolemia may exceed the PARs of smoking and hypertension in men. Apart from diabetes and obesity, the risk-factor profile of SAH seems to resemble that of other cerebrovascular diseases, at least in men. PMID:27077917

  17. Syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with spinal arachnoiditis following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ishizaka, Shunsuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Otsuka, Munehiro; Fukuda, Shuji; Tsunoda, Keishi; Ushijima, Ryujiro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old woman with primary Sjogren syndrome developed syringomyelia following two episodes of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to the rupture of basilar artery aneurysms. Gait disturbance and abnormal sensation with pain over the foot and abdomen appeared 3 years after the last SAH. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed a syringomyelia throughout the thoracic cord, from the T2 to T11 levels. In addition, the thoracic cord was compressed by multiple arachnoid cysts in the ventral side of spinal cord. Computed tomography myelography revealed complete block of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow at the T7 level. Surgery for microlysis of the adhesions and restoration of the CSF flow pathway was performed. Postoperatively, leg motor function slowly improved and she could walk unaided. However, abdominal paresthesia was persisted. Postoperative MR imaging revealed diminished size of the syrinxes. We should recognize syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts due to adhesive arachnoiditis as a late complication of SAH. Microlysis of the adhesions focusing on the lesion thought to be the cause of the symptoms is one of the choices to treat massive syringomyelia and arachnoid cysts associated with arachnoiditis following SAH. PMID:23006888

  18. Controversies and Evolving New Mechanisms in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng; Feng, Hua; Sherchan, Prativa; Klebe, Damon; Zhao, Gang; Sun, Xiaochuan; Zhang, Jianmin; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Despite decades of study, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) continues to be a serious and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. The mechanisms contributing to brain injury after SAH remain unclear. Traditionally, most in vivo research has heavily emphasized the basic mechanisms of SAH over the pathophysiological or morphological changes of delayed cerebral vasospasm after SAH. Unfortunately, the results of clinical trials based on this premise have mostly been disappointing, implicating some other pathophysiological factors, independent of vasospasm, as contributors to poor clinical outcomes. Delayed cerebral vasospasm is no longer the only culprit. In this review, we summarize recent data from both experimental and clinical studies of SAH and discuss the vast array of physiological dysfunctions following SAH that ultimately lead to cell death. Based on the progress in neurobiological understanding of SAH, the terms “early brain injury” and “delayed brain injury” are used according to the temporal progression of SAH-induced brain injury. Additionally, a new concept of the vasculo-neuronal-glia triad model for SAH study is highlighted and presents the challenges and opportunities of this model for future SAH applications. PMID:24076160

  19. Static perfect fluids with Pant-Sah equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze the 3-parameter family of exact, regular, static, spherically symmetric perfect fluid solutions of Einstein’s equations (corresponding to a 2-parameter family of equations of state) due to Pant and Sah and “rediscovered” by Rosquist and by the present author. Except for the Buchdahl solutions which are contained as a limiting case, the fluids have finite radius and are physically realistic for suitable parameter ranges. The equations of state can be characterized geometrically by the property that the 3-metric on the static slices, rescaled conformally with the fourth power of any linear function of the norm of the static Killing vector, has constant scalar curvature. This local property does not require spherical symmetry; in fact it simplifies the proof of spherical symmetry of asymptotically flat solutions which we recall here for the Pant-Sah equations of state. We also consider a model in Newtonian theory with analogous geometric and physical properties, together with a proof of spherical symmetry of the asymptotically flat solutions.

  20. Effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LIN, CHENG; ZHAO, YUANLI; WAN, GANG; ZHU, ANLIN; WANG, HAO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to observe the effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rabbits. A total of 48 New Zealand white rabbits were allocated at random into four groups (control, SAH, SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups; n=12 each). The rabbit model of DCVS was established using a double hemorrhage method, which involved injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna in the SAH groups. The SAH + simvastatin group was administered oral simvastatin (5 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. The SAH + taurine group was administered oral taurine (50 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. Starch (50 mg/kg) was administered orally to the animals in the other two groups (control and SAH groups). The control group were not subjected to any other injections or treatment. The internal diameter and internal diameter/wall thickness of the basilar artery (BA) were measured. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were determined using immunohistochemical and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods following the sacrifice of all animals on day 7. The activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the BA was also measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The BA walls in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups exhibited reduced narrowing and corrugation of the tunica elastica interna compared with the SAH group. At the protein and cDNA levels, it was found that cerebral vasospasm of the BA in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups was alleviated, as indicated by the reduced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and NF-κB compared with the SAH group (P<0.05). In conclusion, simvastatin and taurine reduced DCVS following SAH in rabbits, which suggests that these compounds may exert anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27073449

  1. Evaluation of a Murine Single-Blood-Injection SAH Model

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Clemens; Steiger, Hans-Jakob; Schneider, Toni; Hänggi, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis after subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) are poorly understood and continue to be a matter of debate. A valid murine SAH injection model is not yet available but would be the prerequisite for further transgenic studies assessing the mechanisms following SAH. Using the murine single injection model, we examined the effects of SAH on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in the somatosensory (S1) and cerebellar cortex, neuro-behavioural and morphological integrity and changes in quantitative electrocorticographic and electrocardiographic parameters. Micro CT imaging verified successful blood delivery into the cisterna magna. An acute impairment of rCBF was observed immediately after injection in the SAH and after 6, 12 and 24 hours in the S1 and 6 and 12 hours after SAH in the cerebellum. Injection of blood into the foramen magnum reduced telemetric recorded total ECoG power by an average of 65%. Spectral analysis of ECoGs revealed significantly increased absolute delta power, i.e., slowing, cortical depolarisations and changes in ripples and fast ripple oscillations 12 hours and 24 hours after SAH. Therefore, murine single-blood-injection SAH model is suitable for pathophysiological and further molecular analysis following SAH. PMID:25545775

  2. Endoscopic cryotherapy for the treatment of epistaxis due to hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Yeon; Oh, Jung Ho; Kim, Geun Tae; Kwon, Jae Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), an autosomal dominant vascular disease, involves mainly skin, mucocutaneous membranes, and viscera. Epistaxis is one of the most common symptoms of HHT, and chronic, frequently relapsing epistaxis can cause symptoms such as iron deficiency anemia, severe crusting, and nasal obstruction that can cause lower quality of life. Treatments for HHT range from medication and conservative management to more aggressive surgeries. None of the treatment options, however, have had satisfactory outcomes until now. We introduced cryotherapy for a patient with HHT and at least a 10-year history of frequent, severe epistaxis. This treatment strategy resulted in successful management of symptoms and no associated complications. We present herein a literature review and the clinical course and symptoms of an HHT patient who underwent cryotherapy. PMID:24469376

  3. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage due to metastatic angiosarcoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    PAN, ZHIJIE; AN, ZHOU; LI, YANYUAN; ZHOU, JIANYING

    2015-01-01

    Angiosarcoma is a rare, heterogeneous malignant tumor that derives from endothelial cells, and it has aggressive characteristics with a marked tendency for distant metastasis. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a catastrophic clinical syndrome, however, it is rare as the presentation of pulmonary angiosarcoma. To increase awareness with regard to angiosarcoma and DAH, the current study presents a case of angiosarcoma that originated from the subcutaneous soft tissue of the mastoid process, but was subject to a delayed diagnosis and rapid invasion into the brain and lung. The metastatic angiosarcoma of the lung presented with DAH as the initial manifestation. The pathological examination of a biopsy of the subcutaneous mass and pulmonary lesions confirmed the diagnosis of angiosarcoma. The patient succumbed to respiratory failure at 1 month post-diagnosis. PMID:26788222

  4. Memantine Attenuates Delayed Vasospasm after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage via Modulating Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Yuan; Wang, Liang-Chao; Shan, Yan-Shen; Pan, Chia-Hsin; Tsai, Kuen-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm is an important pathological feature of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The cause of vasospasm is multifactorial. Impairs nitric oxide availability and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction has been reported to underlie vasospasm. Memantine, a low-affinity uncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) blocker has been proven to reduce early brain injury after SAH. This study investigated the effect of memantine on attenuation of vasospasm and restoring eNOS functionality. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350–450 g were randomly divided into three weight-matched groups, sham surgery, SAH + vehicle, and SAH + memantine groups. The effects of memantine on SAH were evaluated by assessing the severity of vasospasm and the expression of eNOS. Memantine effectively ameliorated cerebral vasospasm by restoring eNOS functionality. Memantine can prevent vasospasm in experimental SAH. Treatment strategies may help combat SAH-induced vasospasm in the future. PMID:26110388

  5. Endovascular perforation subarachnoid hemorrhage fails to cause Morris water maze deficits in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Eric; Holtzman, Jacob C; Friess, Stuart; Hartman, Richard E; Brody, David L; Han, Byung H; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is the primary driver of poor long-term outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) survivors; modeling such deficits preclinically is thus key for mechanistic and translational investigation. Although rat SAH causes long-term deficits in learning and memory, it remains unknown whether similar deficits are seen in the mouse, a species particularly amenable to powerful, targeted genetic manipulation. We thus subjected mice to endovascular perforation SAH and assessed long-term cognitive outcome via the Morris water maze (MWM), the most commonly used metric for rodent neurocognition. No significant differences in MWM performance (by either of two protocols) were seen in SAH versus sham mice. Moreover, SAH caused negligible hippocampal CA1 injury. These results undercut the potential of commonly used methods (of SAH induction and assessment of long-term neurocognitive outcome) for use in targeted molecular studies of SAH-induced cognitive deficits in the mouse. PMID:24938403

  6. A hypothesis on possible neurochemical mechanisms of action of cervical spinal cord stimulation in prevention and treatment of cerebral arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yin, D; Slavin, K V

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with the high incidence of development of cerebral vasospasm that results in morbidity and mortality due to delayed cerebral ischemia. So far there are no consistently effective therapies for treatment of vasospasm in patients suffering from SAH. It is well known that cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) can induce vasodilatation and increase cerebral blood flow (CBF). Based on the experiments in animals and the studies in humans, we have proposed the possibility to use SCS as a therapeutic strategy for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. However, the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS in this regard are poorly understood. Better understanding of the pathophysiology of vasospasm after SAH may provide insight into the role of SCS in such conditions. We hypothesize that effect of SCS on vasodilatation may be related to modulation of activity of phosphodiesterases 5 (PDE-5) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), resulting in enhancement of nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, which may help prevent and/or treat vasospasm after SAH. Further investigations on the physiological mechanisms of action of SCS would be necessary to support this hypothesis. PMID:26141634

  7. Multimodal MRI characterization of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Shen, Q; Watts, L T; Muir, E R; Huang, S; Yang, G-Y; Suarez, J I; Duong, T Q

    2016-03-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We implemented an in-scanner rat model of mild SAH in which blood or vehicle was injected into the cistern magna, and applied multimodal MRI to study the brain prior to, immediately after (5min to 4h), and upto 7days after SAH. Vehicle injection did not change arterial lumen diameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), T2, venous signal, vascular reactivity to hypercapnia, or foot-fault scores, but mildly reduce cerebral blood flow (CBF) up to 4h, and open-field activity up to 7days post injection. By contrast, blood injection caused: (i) vasospasm 30min after SAH but not thereafter, (ii) venous abnormalities at 3h and 2days, delayed relative to vasospasm, (iii) reduced basal CBF and to hypercapnia 1-4h but not thereafter, (iv) reduced ADC immediately after SAH but no ADC and T2 changes on days 2 and 7, and (v) reduced open-field activities in both SAH and vehicle animals, but no significant differences in open-field activities and foot-fault tests between groups. Mild SAH exhibited transient and mild hemodynamic disturbances and diffusion changes, but did not show apparent ischemic brain injury nor functional deficits. PMID:26708744

  8. Signaling Pathway in Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: News Update.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chengyuan; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The annual incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture is approximately 10.5/10 million people in China, making SAH the third most frequently occurring hemorrhage of the intracranial type after cerebral embolism and hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage. SAH caused by ruptured aneurysm leads to a mortality rate as high as 67 %, and, because of the sudden onset of this disease, approximately 12-15 % of patients die before they can receive effective treatment. Early brain injury (EBI) is the brain damage occurring within the first 72 h after SAH. Two-thirds of mortality caused by SAH occurs within 48 h, mainly as a result of EBI. With the development of molecular biology and medicine microscopy techniques, various signaling pathways involved in EBI after SAH have been revealed. Understanding these signaling pathways may help clinicians treat EBI after SAH and improve long-term prognosis of SAH patients. This chapter summarizes several important signaling pathways implicated in EBI caused by SAH. PMID:26463934

  9. Serum lipid profile spectrum and delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage: Is there a relation?

    PubMed Central

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Aggarwal, Ashish; Srinivasan, Anirudh; Meena, Rajesh; Gaudihalli, Sachin; Singh, Harnarayan; Dhandapani, Manju; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.; Gupta, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Serum lipid abnormalities are known to be important risk factors for vascular disorders. However, their role in delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), the major cause of morbidity after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. This study was an attempt to evaluate the spectrum of lipid profile changes in SAH compared to matched controls, and their relation with the occurrence of DCI. Methods: Admission serum lipid profile levels were measured in patients of SAH and prospectively studied in relation to various factors and clinical development of DCI. Results: Serum triglyceride (TG) levels were significantly lower among SAH patients compared to matched controls (mean [±standard deviation (SD)] mg/dL: 117.3 [±50.4] vs. 172.8 [±89.1], P = 0.002), probably because of energy consumption due to hypermetabolic response. Patients who developed DCI had significantly higher TG levels compared to those who did not develop DCI (mean [±SD] mg/dL: 142.1 [±56] vs. 111.9 [±54], P = 0.05). DCI was noted in 62% of patients with TG >150 mg/dL, compared to 22% among the rest (P = 0.01). Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) neither showed a significant difference between SAH and controls and nor any significant association with DCI. Multivariate analysis using binary logistic regression adjusting for the effects of age, sex, systemic disease, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, Fisher grade, and clipping/coiling, revealed higher TG levels to have significant independent association with DCI (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Higher serum TG levels appear to be significantly associated with DCI while other lipid parameters did not show any significant association. This may be due to their association with remnant cholesterol or free fatty acid-induced lipid peroxidation. PMID:26664869

  10. SAH-induced MMP activation and KV current suppression is mediated via both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels regulate cerebral artery tone and have been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced pathologies. Here, we examined whether matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activation contributes to SAH-induced KV current suppression and cerebral artery constriction via activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Using patch clamp electrophysiology, we observed that KV currents were selectively decreased in cerebral artery myocytes isolated from SAH model rabbits. Consistent with involvement of enhanced MMP and EGFR activity in SAH-induced KV current suppression, we found that: 1) OxyHb and/or the exogenous EGFR ligand, HB-EGF, failed to induce further KV current suppression after SAH and 2) gelatin zymography detected significantly higher MMP-2 activity after SAH. The removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by combined treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase partially inhibited OxyHb-induced KV current suppression. However, these agents had little effect on OxyHb-induced MMP-2 activation. Interestingly, in the presence of a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor (GM6001), OxyHb failed to cause KV current suppression. These data suggest OxyHb suppresses KV currents through both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent pathways involving MMP activation. The ROS-independent pathway involves activation of MMP-2, whereas the ROS-dependent pathway involves activation of a second unidentified MMP or ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain). PMID:25366605

  11. Basal Ganglia Damage in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a primary therapeutic target, and early SAH-induced basal ganglia injury is not well studied. The present study examined basal ganglia injury in a rat model of SAH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 78) weighing 275-300 g underwent endovascular perforation to mimic aneurysmal SAH. Sham rats (n = 12) underwent the same procedure but without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (T2 MRI) was performed at 24 h after SAH to measure ventricle volumes and brain T2 lesion. Hydrocephalus in SAH rats was defined as a ventricular volume greater than three standard deviations above that in shams. Western blotting and immunochemistry were utilized to assess basal ganglia damage. Sixty rats survived the SAH and 40 % of those animals had T2 lesions in the basal ganglia. Twenty-six SAH rats had hydrocephalus. Rats with hydrocephalus had higher incidence of basal ganglia lesion (69 vs. 18 % in rats without hydrocephalus; p < 0.01). Basal ganglia neuronal injury was also determined by examining the levels of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, Mr 32 kDa (DARPP-32). We found that rats with hydrocephalus had more severe basal ganglia injury with greater DARPP-32 depletion (DARPP-32/beta-actin: 0.38 ± 0.32 vs. 0.86 ± 0.45 in rats without hydrocephalus and 1.10 ± 0.28 in sham, p < 0.05). In conclusion, SAH resulted in severe basal ganglia damage, which is associated with hydrocephalus development. PMID:26463938

  12. [Complete remission of consciousness disturbances and spasticity due to a severe subarachnoid hemorrhage after intrathecal baclofen therapy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Asahi, Takashi; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Koh, Masaki; Matsumura, Nobuhisa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2015-03-01

    Typically, intrathecal baclofen therapy(ITB)for spasticity is continuously required because the spasticity can recur if the ITB is stopped. Thus, an infusion pump for the ITB is permanently implanted. Some sporadic cases exhibiting remarkable improvements in their spasticity and consciousness disturbances have been reported after implanting the ITB pump. We experienced a rare case involving removal of the ITB pump after the spasticity resolved and the consciousness disturbances markedly improved. A 15-year-old girl developed a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to rupture of an aneurysm in the right anterior cerebral artery. Her initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 4(E1V1M2). Trapping of the aneurysm and decompression craniotomy were performed. Subsequently, she underwent a tracheotomy, and a percutaneous gastrostomy(PEG)tube was implanted because of persistent consciousness disturbances. Cranioplasty and lumbar-peritoneal shunt for normal pressure hydrocephalus were performed after 1 month. An ITB pump was implanted to improve the spasticity observed mainly in the lower extremities 61 days after hemorrhage onset. Right hemiparesis remained due to Kernohan's notch. After transfer to the rehabilitation hospital, her consciousness disturbances and spasticity remarkably improved(1.9 to 1.0 and 3.5 to 1.0 on the Ashworth scale for the upper and lower extremities, respectively). The tracheostomy and PEG tubes were removed, and the baclofen dose was gradually reduced. She was completely off baclofen after 7 months, and she was discharged with a short leg brace and a cane for walking. The baclofen pump was then removed. In this case, temporary ITB improved the spasticity and consciousness disturbances. PMID:25748812

  13. The Subarachnoid Hemorrhage International Trialists (SAHIT) Repository: advancing clinical research in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jaja, Blessing N R; Attalla, Daniel; Macdonald, R Loch; Schweizer, Tom A; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Johnston, S Claiborne; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Noble, Adam; Quinn, Audrey; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Singh, Jeffrey; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Tseng, Ming; van den Bergh, William; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C

    2014-12-01

    Researchers and other stakeholders continue to express concern about the failure of randomized clinical trials (RCT) in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to show efficacy of new treatments. Pooled data may be particularly useful to generate hypotheses about causes of poor outcomes and reasons for failure of RCT in SAH, and strategies to improve them. Investigators conducting SAH research collaborated to share data with the intent to develop a large repository of pooled individual patient data for exploratory analysis and testing of new hypotheses relevant to improved trial design and analysis in SAH. This repository currently contains information on 11,443 SAH patients from 14 clinical databases, of which 9 are datasets of recent RCTs and 5 are datasets of prospective observational studies and hospital registries. Most patients were managed in the last 15 years. Data validation and quality checks have been conducted and are satisfactory. Data is available on demographic, clinical, neuroimaging, and laboratory results and various outcome measures. We have compiled the largest known dataset of patients with SAH. The SAHIT repository may be an important resource for advancing clinical research in SAH and will benefit from contributions of additional datasets. PMID:24865271

  14. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Parrot, A; Fartoukh, M; Cadranel, J

    2015-04-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage occurs relatively rarely and is a therapeutic emergency because it can quickly lead to acute respiratory failure, which can be fatal. Hemoptysis associated with anemia and pulmonary infiltrates suggest the diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage, but may be absent in one third of cases including patients in respiratory distress. The diagnosis of alveolar hemorrhage is based on the findings of a bronchoalveolar lavage. The causes are numerous. It is important to identify alveolar hemorrhage due to sepsis, then separate an autoimmune cause (vasculitis associated with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody, connective tissue disease and Goodpasture's syndrome) with the search for autoantibodies and biopsies from readily accessible organs, from a non-immune cause, performing echocardiography. Lung biopsy should be necessary only in exceptional cases. If the hemorrhage has an immune cause, treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide may be started. The indications for treatment with rituximab are beginning to be established (forms that are not severe and refractory forms). The benefit of plasma exchange is unquestionable in Goodpasture's syndrome. In patients with an immune disease that can lead to an alveolar hemorrhage, removing any source of infection is the first priority. PMID:25891303

  15. Biomarkers as outcome predictors in subarachnoid hemorrhage – a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Caron M.; Tosun, Cigdem; Kurland, David B.; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Schreibman, David; Simard, J. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Context Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has a high fatality rate and many suffer from delayed neurological deficits. Biomarkers may aid in the identification of high-risk patients, guide treatment/management and improve outcome. Objective The aim of this review was to summarize biomarkers of SAH associated with outcome. Methods An electronic database query was completed, including an additional review of reference lists to include all potential human studies. Results A total of 298 articles were identified; 112 were reviewed; 55 studies were included. Conclusion This review details biomarkers of SAH that correlate with outcome. It provides the basis for research investigating their possible translation into the management of SAH patients. PMID:24499240

  16. Report of a patient with chronic intractable autoimmune hemorrhaphilia due to anti-factor XIII/13 antibodies who died of hemorrhage after sustained clinical remission for 3 years.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Takeshi; Souri, Masayoshi; Takada, Koji; Kosugi, Satoru; Nakata, Soichi; Ichinose, Akitada

    2015-06-01

    Although the incidence of autoimmune hemorrhaphilia due to anti-Factor XIII (FXIII, not FVIII or FXII to avoid confusion) antibodies (AH13) or hemorrhagic "acquired FXIII deficiency due to anti-FXIII autoantibodies" was previously considered rare, it has been on the increase in the twenty-first century, at least in Japan. An 83-year-old woman with an unexplained hemorrhage was admitted to our hospital for intramuscular hematoma and severe anemia. Her FXIII activity was reduced to 10 % of normal; since FXIII inhibitors and anti-FXIII-A subunit autoantibodies were detected, she was definitively diagnosed with AH13. Despite developing cardiac tamponade due to pericardial hemorrhage, she clinically recovered from AH13 after hemostatic therapy with FXIII-concentrates and immunosuppressive treatment with rituximab and cyclophosphamide. However, her FXIII activity remained low and she died of hemorrhage 3.5 years after admission. AH13 patients should be monitored for a prolonged period, as this disease is very likely a chronic intractable hemorrhagic disorder. PMID:25663511

  17. Monitoring in Neurointensive Care – The Challenge to Detect Delayed Cerebral Ischemia in High-Grade Aneurysmal SAH

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafzadeh, Asita S.; Vajkoczy, Peter; Bijlenga, Philippe; Schaller, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a feared and significant medical complication following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). It occurs in about 30% of patients surviving the initial hemorrhage, mostly between days 4 and 10 after aSAH. Clinical deterioration attributable to DCI is a diagnosis of exclusion and especially difficult to diagnose in patients who are comatose or sedated. The latter are typically patients with a high grade on the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies scale (WFNS grade 4–5), who represent approximately 40–70% of the patient population with ruptured aneurysms. In this group of patients, the incidence of DCI is often underestimated and higher when compared to low WFNS grade patients. To overcome difficulties in diagnosing DCI, which is especially relevant in sedated and comatose patients, the article reports the most recent recommendation for definition of DCI and discusses their advantages and problematic issues in neurocritical care practice. Finally, appropriate neuromonitoring techniques and their clinical impact in high-grade SAH patients are summarized. PMID:25101052

  18. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  19. Controversies in epidemiology of intracranial aneurysms and SAH.

    PubMed

    Korja, Miikka; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of an intracranial aneurysm is the most common cause of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), which is a life-threatening acute cerebrovascular event that typically affects working-age people. The exact prevalence of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) is unknown, but at least one in 20 to 30 adults is likely to carry an asymptomatic UIA. Approximately one quarter of these UIAs rupture in a lifetime. Complex methodological challenges in conducting studies of epidemiology and risk factors for UIAs and SAH might have led to conclusions being drawn on the basis of epidemiological data of variable quality. We believe that, as a result, misconceptions about UIAs and SAH may have arisen. In this Perspectives article, we discuss three possible misconceptions about the epidemiology of UIAs and SAH, and suggest how the quality of future research could be improved. PMID:26670298

  20. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Models: Do They Need a Fix?

    PubMed Central

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Pluta, Ryszard M.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue plasminogen activator to treat acute stroke is a success story of research on preventing brain injury following transient cerebral ischemia (TGI). That this discovery depended upon development of embolic animal model reiterates that proper stroke modeling is the key to develop new treatments. In contrast to TGI, despite extensive research, prevention or treatment of brain injury following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) has not been achieved. A lack of adequate aSAH disease model may have contributed to this failure. TGI is an important component of aSAH and shares mechanism of injury with it. We hypothesized that modifying aSAH model using experience acquired from TGI modeling may facilitate development of treatment for aSAH and its complications. This review focuses on similarities and dissimilarities between TGI and aSAH, discusses the existing TGI and aSAH animal models, and presents a modified aSAH model which effectively mimics the disease and has a potential of becoming a better resource for studying the brain injury mechanisms and developing a treatment. PMID:23878760

  1. Myocarditis in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage: A histopathologic study.

    PubMed

    van der Bilt, Ivo A C; Vendeville, Jean-Paul; van de Hoef, Tim P; Begieneman, Mark P V; Lagrand, Wim K; Kros, Johan M; Wilde, Arthur A M; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Niessen, Hans W M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) such as electrocardiographic changes, echocardiographic wall motion abnormalities, and elevated troponin levels are independently associated with a poor prognosis. They are caused by catecholaminergic stress coinciding with influx of inflammatory cells into the heart. These abnormalities could be a sign of a myocarditis, potentially giving insight in pathophysiology and treatment options. These inflammatory cells are insufficiently characterized, and it is unknown whether myocarditis is associated with SAH. Myocardium of 25 patients who died of SAH and 18 controls was stained with antibodies identifying macrophages (CD68), lymphocytes (CD45), and neutrophil granulocytes (myeloperoxidase). Myocytolysis was visualized using complement staining (C3d). CD31 was used to identify putative thrombi. We used Mann-Whitney U testing for analysis. In the myocardium of SAH patients, the amount of myeloperoxidase-positive (P < .005), CD45-positive (P < .0005), and CD68-positive (P < .0005) cells was significantly higher compared to controls. Thrombi in intramyocardial arteries were found in 22 SAH patients and 1 control. Myocytolysis was found in 6 SAH patients but not in controls. Myocarditis, consisting of an influx of neutrophil granulocytes, lymphocytes, and macrophages, coinciding with myocytolysis and thrombi in intramyocardial arteries, occurs in patients with SAH but not in controls. These findings might explain the cardiac abnormalities after SAH and may have implications for treatment. PMID:26777746

  2. Higher mortality due to intracerebral hemorrhage in dialysis patients: a comparison with the general population in Japan.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Minako; Matsuo, Koji; Kazama, Junichiro James; Narita, Ichiei

    2015-02-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases, including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, remain prevalent causes of morbidity and mortality among dialysis patients. Their mortality rate for cerebrovascular diseases is roughly three times higher than that in the general population. However, whether mortality rates for all subtypes of cerebrovascular diseases are equally higher has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate for each stroke subtype, comparing dialysis patients and the general population in Japan. We used mortality data reported by the Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy and national Vital Statistics data between 2008 and 2009. We calculated standardized mortality ratios and compared the mortality rates for stroke subtypes including intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage. During the 2-year study period, 51 994 and 933 deaths from intracerebral hemorrhage, 79 124 and 511 deaths from cerebral infarction, and 24 957 and 147 deaths from subarachnoid hemorrhage were recorded per 252 million person-years and per 546 474 dialysis patient-years, respectively. Standardized mortality ratios among dialysis patients relative to the general population were 3.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.6-4.1), 1.3 (1.2-1.4), and 1.3 (1.1-1.6) for intracerebral hemorrhage, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, respectively. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the highest cause of mortality in the dialysis population, although cerebral infarction was the highest in the general population. Relative to the general population in Japan, Japanese dialysis patients had higher mortality rates, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage. PMID:25196294

  3. Axonal pathology in subarachnoid and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Petzold, A; Rejdak, K; Belli, A; Sen, J; Keir, G; Kitchen, N; Smith, M; Thompson, E J

    2005-03-01

    Electrically active axons degenerate in the presence of nitric oxide (NO) in vitro. High CSF NO concentrations have been observed in patients with hemorrhagic brain injury such as subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). This study investigated the evidence for axonal injury in SAH and ICH and related this to CSF NO levels. In this study, neurofilament phosphoforms (NfH(SMI34), NfH(SMI35), NfH(SMI38), NfH(SMI310)), surrogate markers for axonal injury, and NO metabolites (nitrate, nitrite = NOx) were measured by ELISA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with SAH and ICH and from a group of controls. Injury severity was classified using the Glasgow Coma Scale, and survival was used as the outcome measure. Compared to the control group, a higher proportion of patients with SAH and ICH had elevated NfH(SMI34) levels from day 0 to day 6 (p < 0.001), elevated NfH(SMI35) levels from day 1 to 6 (p < 0.001), and elevated NfH(SMI310) levels at day 0, 1, 4, and 6 (p < 0.001). The NOx levels were higher in the SAH and ICH patients than in the controls (p < 0.05) and distinguished the non-survivors from the survivors (p < 0.05). No direct correlation was found for NOx with any of the NfH phosphoforms. This study provides evidence for primary and secondary axonal injury in patients with SAH and ICH, with non-survivors also having higher NOx levels. CSF NfH phosphoforms might emerge as a putative surrogate marker for monitoring the development for secondary axonal degeneration in neurocritical care and guiding targeted neuroprotective strategies. PMID:15785235

  4. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control.

    PubMed

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4(-/-) mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  5. Melatonin mitigate cerebral vasospasm after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage: a study of synchrotron radiation angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; He, C.; Chen, L.; Han, T.; Huang, S.; Huang, Y.; Bai, Y.; Bao, Y.; Zhang, H.; Ling, F.

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm (CV) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating and unsolved clinical issue. In this study, the rat models, which had been induced SAH by prechiasmatic cistern injection, were treated with melatonin. Synchrotron radiation angiography (SRA) was employed to detect and evaluate CV of animal models. Neurological scoring and histological examinations were used to assess the neurological deficits and CV as well. Using SRA techniques and histological analyses, the anterior cerebral artery diameters of SAH rats with melatonin administration were larger than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). The neurological deficits of SAH rats treated with melatonin were less than those without melatonin treatment (p < 0.05). We concluded that SRA was a precise and in vivo tool to observe and evaluate CV of SAH rats; intraperitoneally administration of melatonin could mitigate CV after experimental SAH.

  6. Paravascular pathways contribute to vasculitis and neuroinflammation after subarachnoid hemorrhage independently of glymphatic control

    PubMed Central

    Luo, C; Yao, X; Li, J; He, B; Liu, Q; Ren, H; Liang, F; Li, M; Lin, H; Peng, J; Yuan, T F; Pei, Z; Su, H

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a devastating disease with high mortality. The mechanisms underlying its pathological complications have not been fully identified. Here, we investigate the potential involvement of the glymphatic system in the neuropathology of SAH. We demonstrate that blood components rapidly enter the paravascular space following SAH and penetrate into the perivascular parenchyma throughout the brain, causing disastrous events such as cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, microcirculation dysfunction and widespread perivascular neuroinflammation. Clearance of the paravascular pathway with tissue-type plasminogen activator ameliorates the behavioral deficits and alleviates histological injury of SAH. Interestingly, AQP4−/− mice showed no improvements in neurological deficits and neuroinflammation at day 7 after SAH compared with WT control mice. In conclusion, our study proves that the paravascular pathway dynamically mediates the pathological complications following acute SAH independently of glymphatic control. PMID:27031957

  7. Progesterone Attenuates Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm by Upregulation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase via Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Mao; Su, Yu-Feng; Chang, Chih-Zen; Tsai, Yee-Jean; Loh, Joon-Khim

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). However, the mechanism and adequate treatment of vasospasm are still elusive. In the present study, we evaluate the effect and possible mechanism of progesterone on SAH-induced vasospasm in a two-hemorrhage rodent model of SAH. Progesterone (8 mg/kg) was subcutaneously injected in ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats one hour after SAH induction. The degree of vasospasm was determined by averaging the cross-sectional areas of basilar artery 7 days after first SAH. Expressions of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and phosphorylated Akt (phospho-Akt) in basilar arteries were evaluated. Prior to perfusion fixation, there were no significant differences among the control and treated groups in physiological parameters recorded. Progesterone treatment significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated SAH-induced vasospasm. The SAH-induced suppression of eNOS protein and phospho-Akt were relieved by progesterone treatment. This result further confirmed that progesterone is effective in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm. The beneficial effect of progesterone might be in part related to upregulation of expression of eNOS via Akt signaling pathway after SAH. Progesterone holds therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:24949428

  8. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with acute hemorrhage due to portal hypertension--personal experience].

    PubMed

    Husov, L; Senkyrk, M; Lata, J; Husa, P; Jurnkov, J; Dastych, M

    2003-10-01

    Acute bleeding from upper part of gastrointestinal tract is a frequent and serious complication affecting 20 to 60% of patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. It is associated with a high death rate of 30 to 50% and a frequent relapse of bleeding occurs in up to 40% of these patients. The most recent meta-analyses have shown that bacterial infection is an independent factor in the failure of blood hemostasis and significantly influenced mortality in these patients. The authors investigated 25 patients with acute bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract due to portal hypertension in patients with liver cirrhosis. Irrespective of the proved bacterial infection the patients were given antibiotic prophylaxis. In 13 patients the authors administered norfloxacin orally and 12 patients were treated intravenously with ampicilin/sulbactam. The prophylaxis of the bleeding cirrhotic patients by norfloxacin (orally) resulted in a statistically significant prevention of early relapse as compared with the therapy by ampicilin/sulbactam (intravenously). The death rate reached 40% in spite of the antibiotic prophylaxis. There was no significant difference in the death rate between the two groups with different treatments. PMID:14682154

  9. Astragaloside IV Alleviates Early Brain Injury Following Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Anwen; Guo, Songxue; Tu, Sheng; Ammar, Al-baadani; Tang, Junjia; Hong, Yuan; Wu, Haijian; Zhang, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Astragaloside IV, one of the main effective components isolated from Astragalus membranaceus, has multiple neuroprotective properties, while the effects of astragaloside IV on the attenuation of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) and its possible mechanisms are unknown. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether astragaloside IV could inhibit oxidative stress, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and improve neurological deficits after experimental SAH in rats. Rats (n=68) were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH+vehicle group, and SAH+astragaloside IV group. Astragaloside IV or an equal volume of vehicle was administered at 1 h and 6 h after SAH, all the rats were subsequently sacrificed at 24 h after SAH. Mortality, neurological scores, and brain edema were assessed, biochemical tests and histological studies were also performed at that point. SAH induced an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) level, neuronal apoptosis, cleaved caspase 3, brain edema and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px). Astragaloside IV treatment reversed these changes and improved neurobehavioral outcomes of SAH rats. Our findings suggested that astragaloside IV may alleviate EBI after SAH through antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects. PMID:25136262

  10. Ultra-early microsurgical treatment within 24 h of SAH improves prognosis of poor-grade aneurysm combined with intracerebral hematoma

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JUNHUI; ZHU, JUN; HE, JIANQING; WANG, YUHAI; CHEN, LEI; ZHANG, CHUNLEI; ZHOU, JINGXU; YANG, LIKUN

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the most common cerebrovascular disease. The conventional treatment for SAH is usually associated with high mortality. The present study aims to assess the prognosis of microsurgical treatment for patients with poor-grade aneurysm (Hunt and Hess grades IV–V) associated with intracerebral hematoma. A total of 18 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with poor-grade aneurysm accompanied with intracerebral hematoma were retrospectively recruited. All patients underwent microsurgical treatment between April 2010 and June 2013 at The 101st Hospital of Chinese People's Liberation Army (Wuxi, China). Among them, 15 cases underwent microsurgery within 24 h of SAH, and 3 cases underwent microsurgery 24 h following SAH. All 18 cases were examined by computed tomography angiography (CTA). The outcome was assessed during a follow-up time of 6–36 months. According to the Glasgow Outcome Scale, 4 patients experienced a good recovery, 6 were dissatisfied with the outcome, 4 were in vegetative state and 4 succumbed to disease. Poor outcome occurred in patients with an aneurysm diameter >10 mm, exhibited >50 ml volume of intracerebral hematoma or presented cerebral hernia prior to the surgical operation. The outcome of ultra-early surgery (within 24 h of SAH) was improved, compared with that of surgery following 24 h of SAH (P=0.005). Among 7 patients who accepted extraventricular drainage, good outcomes were achieved in 4 of them, whereas dissatisfaction and mortality occurred in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Therefore, ultra-early microsurgery (within 24 h of SAH) combined with extraventricular drainage may improve the prognosis of patients with poor-grade aneurysm. PMID:27123084

  11. SAH-induced suppression of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channel currents in parenchymal arteriolar myocytes involves activation of the HB-EGF/EGFR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Potassium channels play an important role in the regulation of arterial tone and decreased activity of these ion channels has been linked to pial artery vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Our previous work has shown that acute application of a blood component, oxyhemoglobin, caused suppression of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels through heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) mediated activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Using patch clamp electrophysiology, we have now examined whether this pathway of KV channel suppression is activated in parenchymal arteriolar myocytes following long-term in vivo exposure to subarachnoid blood. We have found that KV currents, but not large conductance Ca2+ activated or inwardly rectifying K+ channel currents, were decreased in parenchymal arteriolar myocytes freshly isolated from Day-5 SAH model rabbits. Interestingly, parenchymal arteriolar myocytes from control animals were more sensitive to exogenous HB-EGF (IC50: 0.2 ± 0.4 ng/mL) compared to pial arterial myocytes (IC50: 2.4 ±1.3 ng/mL). However, HB-EGF and oxyhemoglobin failed to decrease KV currents in parenchymal arteriolar myocytes from SAH animals, consistent with EGFR activation and KV current suppression by SAH. These data suggest that HB-EGF/EGFR pathway activation contributes to KV current suppression and enhanced parenchymal arteriolar constriction after SAH. PMID:22890666

  12. The Early Endocrine Stress Response in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjörn; Hillered, Lars; Stridsberg, Mats; Ronne Engström, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In patients with severe illness, such as aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a physiologic stress response is triggered. This includes activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the very early responses of these systems. Methods A porcine animal model of aneurysmal SAH was used. In this model, blood is injected slowly to the basal cisterns above the anterior skull base until the cerebral perfusion pressure is 0 mm Hg. Sampling was done from blood and urine at -10, +15, +75 and +135 minutes from time of induction of SAH. Analyses of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol, aldosterone, catecholamines and chromogranin-A were performed. Results Plasma ACTH, serum cortisol and plasma aldosterone increased in the samples following induction of SAH, and started to decline after 75 minutes. Urine cortisol also increased after SAH. Urine catecholamines and their metabolites were found to increase after SAH. Many samples were however below detection level, not allowing for statistical analysis. Plasma chromogranin-A peaked at 15 minutes after SAH, and thereafter decreased. Conclusions The endocrine stress response after aneurysmal SAH was found to start within 15 minutes in the HPA axis with early peak values of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone. The fact that the concentrations of the HPA axis hormones decreased 135 minutes after SAH may suggest that a similar pattern exists in SAH patients, thus making it difficult to catch these early peak values. There were also indications of early activation of the sympathetic nervous system, but the small number of valid samples made interpretation difficult. PMID:27007694

  13. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Iron accumulation was involved in the acute phase following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could attenuate cellular iron accumulation following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could decrease ROS generation and improve cell energy supply following SAH. • Blockage of MCU could alleviate apoptosis and brain injury following SAH. - Abstract: Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH + RR, and SAH + Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron–sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH.

  14. The Biochemical Basis of Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors as Neuroprotective Agents in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wong, George Kwok Chu; Poon, Wai Sang

    2010-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has the highest morbidity and mortality rates of all types of stroke. Many aneurysmal SAH patients continue to suffer from significant neurological morbidity and mortality directly related to delayed cerebral ischemia. Pilot clinical studies of the use of Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors (statins) in aneurysmal SAH patients have reported a reduction in delayed cerebral ischemia and better clinical outcomes. We review the biochemical effects of statins on endothelium vascular function, glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, inflammatory changes, and oxidative injuries, with reference to their possible neuroprotective effects in aneurysmal SAH.

  15. Early identification of secondary brain damage in subarachnoid hemorrhage: a role for glial fibrillary acidic protein.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Keir, Geoffrey; Kerr, Mary; Kay, Andrew; Kitchen, Neil; Smith, Martin; Thompson, Edward J

    2006-07-01

    Secondary ischaemic deficit adversely affects outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Astrocytes are vulnerable to ischemia, releasing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) when challenged. In this study, we followed nine patients with SAH who underwent extra-ventricular drainage for the management of secondary hydrocephalus. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected daily for up to 14 days. CSF GFAP was quantified using a standard ELISA. In the patients, we found that the CSF GFAP values were pathologically elevated in 83/89 (93%) of the CSF samples. The levels were highest on day 1 (median = 47.64 ng/mL) and decreased to 11.19 ng/mL on day 3, leveling out at approximately 1 ng/mL after 10 days. In non-survivors, a secondary rise of GFAP levels became significant during the high-risk period for vasospasm, with median levels of 21.76 ng/mL compared to 2.62 ng/mL in the survivors (p = 0.037) on day 6. This study suggests that CSF GFAP levels are of prognostic value in SAH. Additionally, the difference in the slope of GFAP levels between survivors (rapid wash-out) and non-survivors (secondary peaks) may allow difierentiation between primary brain injury from secondary brain damage due to delayed cerebral ischaemia. PMID:16866629

  16. Effect of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Word Generation

    PubMed Central

    Ladowski, Daniella; Qian, Winnie; Kapadia, Anish N.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) survivors commonly exhibit impairment on phonemic and semantic fluency tests; however, it is unclear which of the contributing cognitive processes are compromised in aSAH patients. One method of disentangling these processes is to compare initial word production, which is a rapid, semiautomatic, frontal-executive process, and late phase word production, which is dependent on more effortful retrieval and lexical size and requires a more distributed neural network. Methods. Seventy-two individuals with aSAH and twenty-five control subjects were tested on a cognitive battery including the phonemic and semantic fluency task. Demographic and clinical information was also collected. Results. Compared to control subjects, patients with aSAH were treated by clipping and those with multiple aneurysms were impaired across the duration of the phonemic test. Among patients treated by coiling, those with anterior communicating artery aneurysms or a neurological complication (intraventricular hemorrhage, vasospasm, and edema) showed worse output only in the last 45 seconds of the phonemic test. Patients performed comparably to control subjects on the semantic test. Conclusions. These results support a “diffuse damage” hypothesis of aSAH, indicated by late phase phonemic fluency impairment. Overall, the phonemic and semantic tests represent a viable, rapid clinical screening tool in the postoperative assessment of patients with aSAH. PMID:24803729

  17. SAH derived potent and selective EZH2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kung, Pei-Pei; Huang, Buwen; Zehnder, Luke; Tatlock, John; Bingham, Patrick; Krivacic, Cody; Gajiwala, Ketan; Diehl, Wade; Yu, Xiu; Maegley, Karen A

    2015-04-01

    A series of novel enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) inhibitors was designed based on the chemical structure of the histone methyltransferase (HMT) inhibitor SAH (S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine). These nucleoside-based EZH2 inhibitors blocked the methylation of nucleosomes at H3K27 in biochemical assays employing both WT PRC2 complex as well as a Y641N mutant PRC2 complex. The most potent compound, 27, displayed IC50's against both complexes of 270 nM and 70 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, compound 27 is the most potent SAH-derived inhibitor of the EZH2 PRC2 complex yet identified. This compound also displayed improved potency, lipophilic efficiency (LipE), and selectivity profile against other lysine methyltransferases compared with SAH. PMID:25746813

  18. Role of levosimendan in the management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Varvarousi, Giolanda; Xanthos, Theodoros; Sarafidou, Pavlina; Katsioula, Ellisavet; Georgiadou, Marianthi; Eforakopoulou, Maria; Pavlou, Hlias

    2016-02-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is one of the leading causes of neurologic disability accounting for dismal long term survival rates. aSAH leads to a sudden increase in intracranial pressure and a massive sympathetic discharge. Excessive sympathetic stimulation leads to catecholamine mediated myocardial dysfunction and hemodynamic instability which may critically hamper brain perfusion and oxygenation. In the setting of acute aSAH, administration of vasoactive drugs aims at stabilizing impaired hemodynamics. However, studies have shown that conventional treatment with vasoactive drugs that lead to Ca(+2) overload and increase myocardial oxygen consumption, fail to restore hemodynamics and decrease cerebral blood flow. Levosimendan is a non-adrenergic inotropic Ca(+2) sensitizer with not only beneficial hemodynamic properties but also pleiotropic effects, contributing to its cardioprotective and neuroprotective role. Although there have been limited data available regarding the use of levosimendan in patients with aSAH, current evidence suggests that levosimendan may have a role in the setting of post-aSAH cardiomyopathy and decreased cerebral blood flow both in the emergency departments and in intensive care units. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of studies of levosimendan therapy for aSAH, and describe current knowledge about the effects of levosimendan in the management of aSAH. PMID:26669277

  19. Referral pattern of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schievink, W I; van der Werf, D J; Hageman, L M; Dreissen, J J

    1988-05-01

    The referral pattern of 334 patients admitted to a neurosurgical clinic with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was analyzed. Forty-nine percent of the patients were admitted after the day following the SAH. Failure of patients to seek prompt medical care was a cause of delay in 29 patients and of physician diagnostic errors in 95 patients. Common misdiagnoses included migraine, mental exhaustion, sinusitis, and influenza. A delay at the referring hospital was observed in 97 patients. Early intervention is important for the optimal management of patients with SAH. Educating the public, medical students, and physicians about the signs and symptoms of SAH and the importance of prompt therapy is likely to improve overall outcome after aneurysmal rupture. PMID:3363473

  20. Post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage: A review.

    PubMed

    Modi, Nikhilkumar J; Agrawal, Manish; Sinha, Virendra Deo

    2016-01-01

    Head injury has been the leading cause of death and disability in people younger than 40 years and the incidence is rising continuously. Anticipation of the pathological consequences of post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (tSAH) and an outcome-oriented management are very important in these cases. To encounter the complications pertaining to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and tSAH, various classifications have been proposed and goal-oriented screening strategies have been offered. The role of serial computed tomography (CT) scans, perfusion studies, transcranial Doppler, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and angiographic studies as diagnostic tools, has been described. Recently, MRI fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), gradient reversal echo (GRE), and susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) have emerged as excellent complimentary MRI sequences, and the authors of this article have evaluated their role in the diagnosis and prognostication of patients with tSAH. Numerous studies have been conducted on the various complications associated with tSAH such as vasospasm, hydrocephalus, and electrolyte disturbances and their management. This article discusses these aspects of tSAH and their management nuances. PMID:26954974

  1. Chronic hydrocephalus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Peter; Vahmjanin, Alexander; Hu, Qin; Krafft, Paul R; Rolland, William; Zhang, John H

    2013-01-01

    Chronic communicating hydrocephalus is a significant health problem affecting up to 20% of survivors of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The development of new treatment strategies is hampered by the lack of well characterized disease models. This study investigated the incidence of chronic hydrocephalus by evaluating the temporal profile of intracranial pressure (ICP) elevation after SAH, induced by endovascular perforation in rats. Twenty-five adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (260-320 g) were subjected to either endovascular perforation or sham surgery. Five animals died after SAH induction. At 7, 14 and 21 days after surgery ICP was measured by stereotaxic puncture of the cisterna magna in SAH (n=10) and SHAM (n=10) animals. On day 21 T-maze test was performed and the number of alterations and latency to decision was recorded. On day 23, samples were processed for histological analyses. The relative ventricle area was evaluated in coronal Nissl stained sections. On day 7 after surgery all animals showed normal ICP. The absolute ICP values were significantly higher in SAH compared to SHAM animals on day 21 (8.26±4.53 mmHg versus 4.38±0.95 mmHg) but not on day 14. Observing an ICP of 10 mmHg as cut-off, 3 animals showed elevated ICP on day 14 and another animal on day 21. The overall incidence of ICP elevation was 40% in SAH animals. On day 21, results of T-maze testing were significantly correlated with ICP values, i.e. animals with elevated ICP showed a lower number of alterations and a delayed decision. Histology yielded a significantly higher (3.59 fold increased) relative ventricle area in SAH animals with ICP elevation compared to SAH animals without ICP elevation. In conclusion, the current study shows that experimental SAH leads to chronic hydrocephalus, which is associated with ICP elevation, behavioral alterations and ventricular dilation in about 40% of SAH animals. PMID:23936048

  2. Brain interstitial fluid TNF-? after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hanafy, Khalid A.; Grobelny, Bartosz; Fernandez, Luis; Kurtz, Pedro; Connolly, ES; Mayer, Stephan A.; Schindler, Christian; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2010-01-01

    Objective: TNF-? is an inflammatory cytokine that plays a central role in promoting the cascade of events leading to an inflammatory response. Recent studies have suggested that TNF-? may play a key role in the formation and rupture of cerebral aneurysms, and that the underlying cerebral inflammatory response is a major determinate of outcome following subrarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: We studied 14 comatose SAH patients who underwent multimodality neuromonitoring with intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral microdialysis as part of their clinical care. Continuous physiological variables were time-locked every 8 hours and recorded at the same point that brain interstitial fluid TNF-? was measured in brain microdialysis samples. Significant associations were determined using generalized estimation equations. Results: Each patient had a mean of 9 brain tissue TNF-? measurements obtained over an average of 72 hours of monitoring. TNF-? levels rose progressively over time. Predictors of elevated brain interstitial TNF-? included higher brain interstitial fluid glucose levels (?=0.066, P<0.02), intraventricular hemorrhage (?=0.085, P<0.021), and aneurysm size >6 mm (?=0.14, p<0.001). There was no relationship between TNF-? levels and the burden of cisternal SAH; concurrent measurements of serum glucose, or lactate-pyruvate ratio. Interpretation: Brain interstitial TNF-? levels are elevated after SAH, and are associated with large aneurysm size, the burden of intraventricular blood, and elevation brain interstitial glucose levels. PMID:20110094

  3. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  4. Blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter prevents iron accumulation in a model of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huiying; Hao, Shuangying; Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Dingding; Gao, Xin; Yu, Zhuang; Li, Kuanyu; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-01-24

    Previous studies have shown that iron accumulation is involved in the pathogenesis of brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and chelation of iron reduced mortality and oxidative DNA damage. We previously reported that blockage of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) provided benefit in the early brain injury after experimental SAH. This study was undertaken to identify whether blockage of MCU could ameliorate iron accumulation-associated brain injury following SAH. Therefore, we used two reagents ruthenium red (RR) and spermine (Sper) to inhibit MCU. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into four groups including sham, SAH, SAH+RR, and SAH+Sper. Biochemical analysis and histological assays were performed. The results confirmed the iron accumulation in temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, blockage of MCU dramatically reduced the iron accumulation in this area. The mechanism was revealed that inhibition of MCU reversed the down-regulation of iron regulatory protein (IRP) 1/2 and increase of ferritin. Iron-sulfur cluster dependent-aconitase activity was partially conserved when MCU was blocked. In consistence with this and previous report, ROS levels were notably reduced and ATP supply was rescued; levels of cleaved caspase-3 dropped; and integrity of neurons in temporal lobe was protected. Taken together, our results indicated that blockage of MCU could alleviate iron accumulation and the associated injury following SAH. These findings suggest that the alteration of calcium and iron homeostasis be coupled and MCU be considered to be a therapeutic target for patients suffering from SAH. PMID:25529443

  5. SAH-induced MMP activation and K V current suppression is mediated via both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K V) channels regulate cerebral artery tone and have been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced pathologies. Here, we examined whether matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activation contributes to SAH-induced K V current suppression and cerebral artery constriction via activation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). Using patch clamp electrophysiology, we observed that K V currents were selectively decreased in cerebral artery myocytes isolated from SAH model rabbits. Consistent with involvement of enhanced MMP and EGFR activity in SAH-induced K V current suppression, we found that: (1) oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and/or the exogenous EGFR ligand, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF), failed to induce further K V current suppression after SAH and (2) gelatin zymography detected significantly higher MMP-2 activity after SAH. The removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by combined treatment with superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase partially inhibited OxyHb-induced K V current suppression. However, these agents had little effect on OxyHb-induced MMP-2 activation. Interestingly, in the presence of a broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor (GM6001), OxyHb failed to cause K V current suppression. These data suggest that OxyHb suppresses K V currents through both ROS-dependent and ROS-independent pathways involving MMP activation. The ROS-independent pathway involves activation of MMP-2, whereas the ROS-dependent pathway involves activation of a second unidentified MMP or ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain). PMID:25366605

  6. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Acute Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema by Preventing Neutrophil Migration after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhao, Diana; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated whether JWH133, a selective cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2R) agonist, prevented neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) by attenuating inflammation. Adult male rats were assigned to six groups: sham-operated, SAH with vehicle, SAH with JWH133 (0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 mg/kg) treatment 1 h after surgery, and SAH with JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) at 1 h with a selective CB2R antagonist, SR144528 (3.0 mg/kg). The perforation model of SAH was performed and pulmonary wet-to-dry weight ratio was evaluated 24 and 72 h after surgery. Western blot analyses and immunohistochemistry were evaluated 24 h after surgery. JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) significantly and most strongly improved lung edema 24 h after SAH. SR144528 administration significantly reversed the effects of JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg). SAH-induced increasing levels of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and decreasing levels of a tight junction (TJ) protein, junctional adhesion molecule (JAM)-A, were ameliorated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) administration 24 h after SAH. Immunohistochemical assessment also confirmed substantial leukocyte infiltration in the outside of vessels in SAH, which were attenuated by JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) injection. CB2R agonist ameliorated lung permeability by inhibiting leukocyte trafficking and protecting tight junction proteins in the lung of NPE after SAH. PMID:26463937

  7. The Effect of Gender on Acute Hydrocephalus after Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shishido, Hajime; Zhang, Haining; Okubo, Shuichi; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F; Xi, Guohua

    2016-01-01

    Acute hydrocephalus is a common complication of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We investigated the effect of gender on acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. SAH was induced in adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats using endovascular perforation. Sham rats underwent the same procedure without perforation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed 24 h after SAH to determine ventricular volume. Hydrocephalus was defined as a ventricular volume that was more than 3 standard deviations from the mean value in sham-operated animals. After MRI, animals were euthanized and the extent of SAH was assessed using a modified grading system. No sham animals died. Mortality rates after SAH induction in male and female animals were 27 and 22 %, respectively. SAH induced significant ventricular enlargement compared with sham-operated rats (p < 0.01). The T2* hypointensity volume in the ventricle (used to assess intraventricular blood) was correlated with ventricular volume after SAH (r = 0.33, p < 0.05). The incidence of acute hydrocephalus 24 h after SAH was greater in female (75 %) than in male animals (47 %, p < 0.05) and the relative changes in ventricular volume were significantly larger in female than in male rats (292 ± 150 % vs 216 ± 127 % of sham-operated animals, respectively, p < 0.05). The increased hydrocephalus occurred even though SAH severity grade and ventricular T2* hypointensity volumes were not significantly different between male and female animals. Our data demonstrate that gender influences acute hydrocephalus development in a rat SAH model. Future studies should determine the role of estrogen in SAH-induced hydrocephalus. PMID:26463971

  8. Ruptured internal carotid artery bifurcation aneurysm presenting with only intracerebral hemorrhage without subarachnoid hemorrhage--case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naoki; Terakawa, Yuzo; Okada, Yumiko; Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Nishio, Akimasa; Shimotake, Katsumi; Murata, Takaho

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old man presented with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) without subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) manifesting as acute onset of consciousness disturbance and right hemiparesis. Computed tomography showed ICH mainly localized in the left putamen, but no evidence of SAH. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated a cerebral aneurysm originating from the bifurcation of the left internal carotid artery, which was considered to be responsible for the ICH. The patient underwent emergent intravascular surgery for coil embolization of the aneurysm, and his neurological symptoms gradually recovered with rehabilitation after surgery. Although ICH without SAH is a rare presentation of cerebral aneurysm, ruptured cerebral aneurysm should be considered as a potential cause of ICH. The localization and extent of ICH may be suggestive of latent cerebral aneurysm in such cases. PMID:21358153

  9. Onyx embolization of a thoracolumbar perimedullary spinal arteriovenous fistula in an infant presenting with subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kenning, Tyler J; Deshaies, Eric M; Adamo, Matthew A; Waldman, John B; Boulos, Alan S

    2009-03-01

    Identifying a source of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in patients with negative results on cranial angiographic imaging can be a diagnostic challenge. The authors present the case of a 14-month-old girl who presented with lethargy and spontaneous SAH and IVH, and later became acutely paraplegic. Except for the SAH and IVH, findings on neuroimages of the brain were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intramedullary thoracolumbar spinal cord hemorrhage that was found to be associated with arterialized veins intraoperatively. Catheter-based diagnostic angiography identified a spinal perimedullary macroarteriovenous fistula (macro-AVF) that was completely embolized with Onyx, negating the need for further surgical intervention. The authors believe this to be the first reported case of a thoracolumbar perimedullary macro-AVF presenting with SAH and IVH. In addition, descriptions of Onyx embolization of a spinal AVF in the literature are rare, especially in pediatric patients. PMID:19338467

  10. Spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage in children: report of a hemophilia patient who survived due to a brain cyst

    PubMed Central

    Colleti Junior, José; Koga, Walter; de Carvalho, Werther Brunow

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 2-year-old child who survived an acute episode of severe spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage with clinical and radiological signs of intracranial hypertension and transtentorial herniation. The patient underwent emergency surgery to drain the hematoma, and a catheter was inserted to monitor intracranial pressure. In the initial computed tomography analysis performed prior to hematoma drainage, a brain cyst was evident contralateral to the hematoma, which, based on the analysis by the care team, possibly helped to avoid a worse outcome because the cyst accommodated the brain after the massive hemorrhage. After the investigation, the patient was determined to have previously undiagnosed hemophilia A. The patient underwent treatment in intensive care, which included the control of intracranial pressure, factor VIII replacement and discharge without signs of neurological impairment. PMID:26761482

  11. Thrombin-induced TGF-β1 pathway: a cause of communicating hydrocephalus post subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Zhang, Peng; Yuan, Bin; Zhao, Dongliang; Chen, Yueqin; Zhang, Xinzhong

    2013-03-01

    The mechanism of communicating hydrocephalus after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains unclear. Revealing a signaling cascade may provide significant insights into the molecular etiology of the accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in cerebral compartments during SAH. To investigate the mechanism of the communicating hydrocephalus following SAH, we infused CSF with thrombin (TH), resulting in proinflammatory and proliferative responses in rat meninges of SAH. The effect of TH could be completely blocked by a transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) inhibitor, SB-431542, suggesting that TH-stimulated proliferation of meninges is through the TGF-β1 signaling pathway. The cascade of TGF β1-Smad3 was significantly upregulated by TH, which, in turn, stimulated the proliferation of subarachnoid meninges. TH-induced overexpression of TGF-β1 and activation of its downstream factors might be a mechanism of communicating hydrocephalus after SAH. PMID:23338707

  12. Application of lumbar drainage in vasospasm after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and prevention of late cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Hasan Emre; Ozbek, Zühtü; Aydin, Nevin; Bolluk, Ozge; Vural, Murat; Arslantas, Ali; Atasoy, Metin Ant

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm, especially delayed cerebral ischemia following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is the most important complication that effects mortality and morbidity of patients with intracranial aneurysms. The presence of cerebral vasospasm has been correlated with an increase in mortality in the first 2 weeks after SAH. Despite clinical studies and research, the etiopathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm is not understood exactly and there is not yet an effective therapy. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of application of lumber drainage on vasospasm and delayed cerebral infarction following SAH and to examine the incidence of complications. Patient groups were determined by retrospective screening of 70 patients who underwent a surgical operation at the Osmangazi University Medical Faculty Department of Neurosurgery between 2009 and 2013 after a diagnosis of ruptured aneurysmal SAH. After the application of lumbar drainage, the complications and mortality after aneurysm surgery was significantly decreased and correlated with the amount of hemorrhagic cerebrospinal fluid drainage. PMID:25366633

  13. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Secondary to Forceful Sneeze

    PubMed Central

    Nomani, Ali Zohair; Rajput, Haris Majid; Iqbal, Mansoor; Jan, Zakir; Irshad, Muhammad; Badshah, Mazhar; Khan, Rao Sohail Yasin

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a relatively less common but important neurological condition comprising 5% of all the cerebrovascular accidents. In most populations the reported incidence is 6-7 per 100,000 person-years and one-third of survivors become dependent. It is a serious but potentially treatable cause of neurological morbidity. Multiple authors have identified the most unusual novel associations and triggers of subarachnoid bleeds over the past decade. We herein report a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage leading to focal neurological deficit in a middle aged man secondary to forceful sneeze. PMID:25685569

  14. Changes in trace elements of cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage, and effects of trace elements on vasospasm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, N.; Kuroda, K.; Suzuki, M.; Ogawa, A.; Sera, K.

    1999-04-01

    Various causal factors have been proposed for cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), such as serotonin, acetylcholine, angiotensin, thrombin and thromboxane A2. However, none of them explain the whole pathomechanism of vasospasm. To evaluate the role of trace elements on vasospasm, we have examined these sequential changes in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after SAH by PIXE, and have investigated the relation between trace elements and vasospasm. We obtained the CSF samples from cisternal drainage in patients with SAH who underwent radical surgery within 48 h from the onset. The drainage was placed into basal cisterns at the end of the operation. Three sampling times (3-5, 7-9 and 12-14 days from the onset) has been scheduled because vasospasm is likely to occur from day 4 to day 14 after the onset. In this study, we focused on the levels of Mg, Ca, Mn, Al, Zn, P, Pb, Sr, Br, Co, Cu, Si, Ti, Mn,Co, Cu, Zn, Br, Sr, Mo and Pb, and we found a significantly lower level of Mg in the CSF of patients with vasospasm on days 7-9 after the onset. These results suggest that Mg in the CSF may ameliorate vasoconstriction due to Ca in the pathomechanism of vasospasm.

  15. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy secondary to intracranial hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage often present with electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities that mimic cardiac ischemia, but documented left ventricular regional wall-motion dysfunction has rarely been reported. This report is intended to raise the awareness of possible ECG changes secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We cared for a 55-year-old female with an acute aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, whose evaluation was delayed and complicated by the presence of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM). Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may induce Takotsubo cardiomyopathy that can present as an acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction. Physicians need to be aware of this possibility since it can lead to significant delays and treatment options for the patient. PMID:25635193

  16. Copeptin as a Marker for Severity and Prognosis of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Christian; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Katan, Mira; Seiler, Marleen; Arnold, Marcel; Gralla, Jan; Raabe, Andreas; Beck, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Background Grading of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is often confounded by seizure, hydrocephalus or sedation and the prediction of prognosis remains difficult. Recently, copeptin has been identified as a serum marker for outcomes in acute ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We investigated whether copeptin might serve as a marker for severity and prognosis in aSAH. Methods Eighteen consecutive patients with aSAH had plasma copeptin levels measured with a validated chemiluminescence sandwich immunoassay. The primary endpoint was the association of copeptin levels at admission with the World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) grade score after resuscitation. Levels of copeptin were compared across clinical and radiological scores as well as between patients with ICH, intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, vasospasm and ischemia. Results Copeptin levels were significantly associated with the severity of aSAH measured by WFNS grade (P = 0.006), the amount of subarachnoid blood (P = 0.03) and the occurrence of ICH (P = 0.02). There was also a trend between copeptin levels and functional clinical outcome at 6-months (P = 0.054). No other clinical outcomes showed any statistically significant association. Conclusions Copeptin may indicate clinical severity of the initial bleeding and may therefore help in guiding treatment decisions in the setting of aSAH. These initial results show that copeptin might also have prognostic value for clinical outcome in aSAH. PMID:23326397

  17. Microglia inflict delayed brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Ulf C; Davids, Anja-Maria; Brandenburg, Susan; Müller, Annett; Elke, Anna; Magrini, Salima; Atangana, Etienne; Turkowski, Kati; Finger, Tobias; Gutenberg, Angelika; Gehlhaar, Claire; Brück, Wolfgang; Heppner, Frank L; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory changes have been postulated to contribute to secondary brain injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In human specimens after SAH as well as in experimental SAH using mice, we show an intracerebral accumulation of inflammatory cells between days 4 and 28 after the bleeding. Using bone marrow chimeric mice allowing tracing of all peripherally derived immune cells, we confirm a truly CNS-intrinsic, microglial origin of these immune cells, exhibiting an inflammatory state, and rule out invasion of myeloid cells from the periphery into the brain. Furthermore, we detect secondary neuro-axonal injury throughout the time course of SAH. Since neuronal cell death and microglia accumulation follow a similar time course, we addressed whether the occurrence of activated microglia and neuro-axonal injury upon SAH are causally linked by depleting microglia in vivo. Given that the amount of neuronal cell death was significantly reduced after microglia depletion, we conclude that microglia accumulation inflicts secondary brain injury after SAH. PMID:25956409

  18. Neuroprotective Effect of Radix Trichosanthis Saponins on Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Haiyan; Huang, Liyong; Li, Juxiang; Zhou, Wenke; Chang, Jingling

    2015-01-01

    Redox homeostasis has been implicated in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). As a result, antioxidants and/or free radical scavengers have become an important therapeutic modality. Considering that radix trichosanthis (RT) saponins exhibited strong antioxidant ability both in vivo and in vitro, the present study aimed to reveal whether the neuroprotective activities of RT saponins were mediated by p38/p53 signal pathway after SAH. An established SAH model was used and superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), p-p38, and p53 activation were detected after 48 h of SAH. The results showed that RT saponins inhibited iNOS expression to restore NO to basal level. Moreover, compared with Cu/Zn-SOD, RT saponins (2 mg/kg/d dosage) significantly increased Mn-SOD activity after SAH. Accompanied with lowered NO and elevated SOD, decreased p38 phosphorylation and p53 activities were observed, especially for RT saponins at 2 mg/kg/d dosage. In this setting, the neurological outcome was also improved with less neuronal cells damage after RT saponins pretreatment. Our findings demonstrated the beneficial effects of RT saponins in enhancing neuroprotective effects by deducing iNOS activity, normalizing SOD level, and inhibiting p-p38 and p53 expression, hence offering significant therapeutic implications for SAH. PMID:26089937

  19. Sex Differences in the Formation of Intracranial Aneurysms and Incidence and Outcome of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Review of Experimental and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Turan, Nefize; Heider, Robert Allen-James; Zaharieva, Dobromira; Ahmad, Faiz U; Barrow, Daniel L; Pradilla, Gustavo

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are defined as pathological dilatations of cerebral arteries and rupture of intracranial aneurysms leads to subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The goal of this review was to outline the sex differences in the formation and progression of intracranial aneurysms as well as sex-related differences in incidence and outcome of SAH. The literature review was performed using PubMed with a combination of these search terms: "subarachnoid hemorrhage," "incidence," "outcome," "sex," "gender," "male," "female," "experimental," "mice," and "rats." Studies written in English were used. Female sex is thought to be a risk factor for aneurysm formation, especially in postmenopausal age populations, suggesting the potential protective involvement of sex steroids. Female sex is also considered a risk factor for SAH occurrence. Although incidence and mortality are confirmed to be higher in females in most studies, they elucidated no clear differences in the functional outcome among SAH survivors. The effect of gender on the pathophysiology of SAH is not very well understood; nevertheless, the majority of pre-clinical studies suggest a beneficial effect of sex steroids in experimental SAH. Moreover, conflicting results exist on the role and effect of hormone replacement therapies and oral contraceptive pills on the incidence and outcome of human SAH. Sex differences exist in the formation of aneurysms as well as the incidence and mortality of SAH. Potential therapeutic effects of sex steroids have been replicated in many animal studies, but their potential use in the treatment of acute SAH in human populations needs more future study. PMID:26573918

  20. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiles of Patients with a Past Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    van ’t Hof, Femke N. G.; Ruigrok, Ynte M.; Medic, Jelena; Sanjabi, Bahram; van der Vlies, Pieter; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Veldink, Jan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of development and rupture of intracranial aneurysms (IA) is largely unknown. Also, screening for IA to prevent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is inefficient, as disease markers are lacking. We investigated gene expression profiles in blood of previous aSAH patients, who are still at risk for future IA, aiming to gain insight into the pathogenesis of IA and aSAH, and to make a first step towards improvement of aSAH risk prediction. Methods and Results We collected peripheral blood of 119 patients with aSAH at least two years prior, and 118 controls. We determined gene expression profiles using Illumina HumanHT-12v4 BeadChips. After quality control, we divided the dataset in a discovery (2/3) and replication set (1/3), identified differentially expressed genes, and applied (co-)differential co-expression to identify disease-related gene networks. No genes with a significant (false-discovery rate <5%) differential expression were observed. We detected one gene network with significant differential co-expression, but did not find biologically meaningful gene networks related to a history of aSAH. Next, we applied prediction analysis of microarrays to find a gene set that optimally predicts absence or presence of a history of aSAH. We found no gene sets with a correct disease state prediction higher than 40%. Conclusions No gene expression differences were present in blood of previous aSAH patients compared to controls, besides one differentially co-expressed gene network without a clear relevant biological function. Our findings suggest that gene expression profiles, as detected in blood of previous aSAH patients, do not reveal the pathogenesis of IA and aSAH, and cannot be used for aSAH risk prediction. PMID:26439625

  1. Atorvastatin ameliorates early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage via inhibition of AQP4 expression in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun-Hui; Yang, Li-Kun; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yu-Hai; Wu, Yun; Jiang, Bing-Jie; Zhu, Jie; Li, Pei-Pei

    2016-04-01

    The therapeutic effects of atorvastatin on early brain injury (EBI), cerebral edema and its association with aquaporin 4 (AQP4) were studied in rabbits after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) using western blot analysis and the dry-wet method. Seventy-two healthy male New Zealand rabbits weighing between 2.5 and 3.2 kg were randomly divided into three groups: the SAH group (n=24), sham-operated group (n=24) and the SAH + atorvastatin group (n=24). A double SAH model was employed. The sham-operated group were injected with the same dose of saline solution, the SAH + atorvastatin group received atorvastatin 20 mg/kg/day after SAH. All rabbit brain samples were taken at 72 h after the SAH model was established successfully. Brain edema was detected using the dry-wet method after experimental SAH was induced; AQP4 and caspase-3 expression was measured by western blot analysis, and neuronal apoptosis was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) staining at 72 h after SAH. The results indicated that brain edema and injury appeared soon after SAH, while brain edema and EBI were ameliorated and increased behavior scores were noted after prophylactic use of atorvastatin. Compared with the SAH group, the level of AQP4 and the cerebral content of water was significantly decreased (P<0.01) by atorvastatin, and TUNEL staining and studying the expression of caspase-3 showed that the apoptosis of neurons was reduced markedly both in the hippocampus and brain cortex by atorvastatin. The results suggest that atorvastatin ameliorated brain edema and EBI after SAH, which was related to its inhibition of AQP4 expression. Our findings provide evidence that atorvastatin is an effective and well-tolerated approach for treating SAH in various clinical settings. PMID:26935263

  2. Alteration of Basilar Artery Rho-Kinase and Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Protein Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Vasospasm following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Lee, Pei-Yu; Wu, Bin-Nan; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Loh, Joon-Khim; Tsai, Hung-Pei; Kassell, Neal F.; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose. The vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 (ET-1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Previous results showed that CGS 26303, an endothelin converting enzyme (ECE) inhibitor, effectively prevented and reversed arterial narrowing in animal models of SAH. In the present study, we assessed the effect of CGS 26303 on neurological deficits in SAH rats. The involvement of vasoactive pathways downstream of ET-1 signaling in SAH was also investigated. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups (n = 6/group): (1) normal control, (2) SAH, (3) SAH+vehicle, (4) SAH+CGS 26303 (prevention), and (5) SAH+CGS 26303 (reversal). SAH was induced by injecting autologous blood into cisterna magna. CGS 26303 (10 mg/kg) was injected intravenously at 1 and 24 hr after the initiation of SAH in the prevention and reversal protocols, respectively. Behavioral changes were assessed at 48 hr after SAH. Protein expression was analyzed by Western blots. Results. Deficits in motor function were obvious in the SAH rats, and CGS 26303 significantly improved the rate of paraplegia. Expressions of rho-kinase-II and membrane-bound protein kinase C-δ and rhoA were significantly increased, while those of soluble guanylyl cyclase α1 and β1 as well as protein kinase G were significantly decreased in the basilar artery of SAH rats. Treatment with CGS 26303 nearly normalized these effects. Conclusions. These results demonstrate that the rhoA/rho-kinase and sGC/cGMP/PKG pathways play pivotal roles in cerebral vasospasm after SAH. It also shows that ECE inhibition is an effective strategy for the treatment of this disease. PMID:24982890

  3. Blood clot placement model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ali Reza; Bakhtian, Kamran D; Marbacher, Serge; Fandino, Javier; Pluta, Ryszard M

    2015-01-01

    Despite ongoing extensive and promising research to prevent and treat cerebrovascular vasospasm and delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DIND) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), clinical outcomes remain unsatisfying. Neuroprotective strategies developed in basic science research laboratories need to be translated from bench-to-bedside using appropriate animal models. While a primate model is widely accepted as the best animal model mimicking development of delayed cerebral vasospasm after aSAH, its worldwide usage has dramatically decreased because of ethical and financial limitations. However, the use of primate models of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains a recommended bridge for translation of early preclinical studies in rodents to human clinical trials. This paper discusses the technical aspects as well as advantages and disadvantages of a blood clot placement model of subarachnoid hemorrhage in non-human primates. PMID:25366649

  4. Norrin protected Blood Brain Barrier via Frizzled 4/β-catenin Pathway after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yujie; Zhang, Yang; Tang, Junjia; Liu, Fei; Hu, Qin; Luo, Chunxia; Tang, Jiping; Feng, Hua; Zhang, John H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Norrin and its receptor Frizzled 4 have important roles in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) development. This study is to investigate a potential role and mechanism of Norrin/Frizzled 4 on protecting BBB integrity after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods One hundred and seventy-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. SAH model was induced by endovascular perforation. Frizzled 4 small interfering RNA (siRNA) was injected intracerebroventricularly 48 hours before SAH. Norrin was administrated intracerebroventricularly 3 hours after SAH. SAH grade, neurologic scores, brain water content, Evans blue extravasation, western blots and immunofluorescence were employed to study the mechanisms of Norrin and its receptor regulation protein TSPAN12, as well as neurological outcome. Results Endogenous Norrin and TSPAN12 expression were increased after SAH, and Norrin was colocalizated with astrocytes marker GFAP in cortex. Exogenous Norrin treatment significantly alleviated neurobehavioral dysfunction, reduced brain water content and Evans blue extravasation, promoted β-catenin nuclear translocation and increased Occludin, VE-Cadherin and ZO-1 expressions. These effects were abolished by Frizzled 4 siRNA pretreated before SAH. Conclusions Norrin protected BBB integrity and improved neurological outcome after SAH, and the action of Norrin seemed mediated by Frizzled 4 receptor activation which promoted β-catenin nuclear translocation, which then enhanced Occludin, VE-Cadherin and ZO-1 expression. Norrin might have potential to protect BBB after SAH. PMID:25550365

  5. [The relationship between aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage and meteorological parameters based on a series of 236 French patients].

    PubMed

    Rué, M; Camiade, E; Jecko, V; Bauduer, F; Vignes, J-R

    2014-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a sudden and potentially severe event with mortality rates ranging between 24 and 30 % depending on the initial clinical condition. Studies have attempted to assess the possible influence of meteorological parameters on the occurrence of SAH. However, this idea remains very controversial and the results vary widely from one study to another. Our study is the second largest French series, and first performed in a homogeneous series of patients. The aim of our study was to attempt to establish a relationship between the weather (i.e.) temperature variations and daily variations of atmospheric pressure in the days before the onset of SAH and the same day and the occurrence of non-traumatic SAH in a homogeneous population of 236 patients from a single center, over a period of 7 years (2002 to 2008). This retrospective study does not suggest any relationship between the occurrence of SAH and meteorological data studied. Moreover, no relationship was observed between mean changes in temperature or pressure and the occurrence of SAH, that the day of the bleeding or the days preceding the SAH. However, a female predominance was observed and a relatively high mortality rate of 18.3 %. The distribution of the occurrence of an SAH was random. As it seems impossible to provide logistics and organization of care for non-traumatic SAH, the care system must remain vigilant throughout the year. PMID:24856315

  6. Expression of high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the basilar artery after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu Dong; Mao, Hai Yan; Lv, Jing; Lu, Xiao Jie

    2016-05-01

    It has been suggested that inflammatory damage may be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). High-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) has been identified as a potent proinflammatory mediator, and may trigger increases in other inflammatory cytokines. However, little is known about the role of HMGB1 in SAH-induced cerebrovascular inflammation. In this study, 48 male rats were assigned randomly to four groups: a control group, or SAH day 3, day 5, or day 7 groups. The animals in SAH day 3, day 5, and day 7 groups were subjected to injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna twice, on day 0 and day 2, and were killed on days 3, 5, and 7, respectively. Cross-sectional area of the basilar artery was measured and the HMGB1 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The mRNA level of HMGB1 was also determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The basilar arteries exhibited vasospasm after SAH which was most severe on day 3 and 5. Elevated expression of HMGB1 was detected after SAH and was highest on day 3 and 5. HMGB1 is increasingly expressed in parallel to the development of CVS in this rat experimental model of SAH. These results suggest that HMGB1 may be related to the CVS observed after SAH and HMGB1 may play a key role in the inflammatory response in CVS after SAH. PMID:26765765

  7. Hemorrhagic stomatitis in a natural hybrid of Vipera ammodytes × Vipera berus due to inappropriate substrate in terrarium.

    PubMed

    Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Köbölkuti, Lóránd Béla; Tenk, Miklós; Szakács, Attila; Kelemen, Attila; Spînu, Marina

    2015-06-01

    A natural hybrid of Vipera ammodytes × Vipera berus was presented having low body weight, seizures and generalized swelling of the cephalic region. Based on the history of the case and clinical examination, hemorrhagic stomatitis of traumatic origin was diagnosed. The snake was kept in a terrarium with wood chips as a substrate, and the material had induced trauma in the oral mucosa which was further complicated with Salmonella Arizonae and Morganella morganii co-infection, abscessation and osteomyelitis. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of bacterial infection in European snake hybrids and one of a few case reports in European snakes. Although wood chips are an inexpensive substrate, based on our findings, they should be avoided when keeping and breeding European vipers. PMID:25715871

  8. Hemorrhagic stomatitis in a natural hybrid of Vipera ammodytes × Vipera berus due to inappropriate substrate in terrarium

    PubMed Central

    CZIRJÁK, Gábor Árpád; KÖBÖLKUTI, Lóránd Béla; TENK, Miklós; SZAKÁCS, Attila; KELEMEN, Attila; SPÎNU, Marina

    2015-01-01

    A natural hybrid of Vipera ammodytes × Vipera berus was presented having low body weight, seizures and generalized swelling of the cephalic region. Based on the history of the case and clinical examination, hemorrhagic stomatitis of traumatic origin was diagnosed. The snake was kept in a terrarium with wood chips as a substrate, and the material had induced trauma in the oral mucosa which was further complicated with Salmonella Arizonae and Morganella morganii co-infection, abscessation and osteomyelitis. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of bacterial infection in European snake hybrids and one of a few case reports in European snakes. Although wood chips are an inexpensive substrate, based on our findings, they should be avoided when keeping and breeding European vipers. PMID:25715871

  9. Changes in the Metabolism of Sphingolipids after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Dawson

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously described that ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigated the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Methods Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Results Compared to controls (n=8), SAH patients (n=26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0±3.5 IF/µl.min vs. 15.0±4.6 IF/µl.min; p=0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4±8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3±48.3 pmol/ml; p=0.001) and DHC (1.3±1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8±3.4 pmol/ml; p=0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7±1.2 IF/µg.min; SAH: 16.8±1.6 IF/µg.min; p<0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3422±26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7073±2467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; p<0.05) compared to controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a 2-fold increase in the activity of GCS but similar NSMase and SMS activities than controls. Conclusions Our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways here described in the outcome of SAH. PMID:25597763

  10. Changes in the metabolism of sphingolipids after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Testai, Fernando D; Xu, Hao-Liang; Kilkus, John; Suryadevara, Vidyani; Gorshkova, Irina; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Pelligrino, Dale A; Dawson, Glyn

    2015-05-01

    We previously described how ceramide (Cer), a mediator of cell death, increases in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. This study investigates the alterations of biochemical pathways involved in Cer homeostasis in SAH. Cer, dihydroceramide (DHC), sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and the activities of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase), neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase), sphingomyelinase synthase (SMS), S1P-lyase, and glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) were determined in the CSF of SAH subjects and in brain homogenate of SAH rats. Compared with controls (n = 8), SAH patients (n = 26) had higher ASMase activity (10.0 ± 3.5 IF/µl· min vs. 15.0 ± 4.6 IF/µl • min; P = 0.009) and elevated levels of Cer (11.4 ± 8.8 pmol/ml vs. 33.3 ± 48.3 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) and DHC (1.3 ± 1.1 pmol/ml vs. 3.8 ± 3.4 pmol/ml; P = 0.001) in the CSF. The activities of GCS, NSMase, and SMS in the CSF were undetectable. Brain homogenates from SAH animals had increased ASMase activity (control: 9.7 ± 1.2 IF/µg • min; SAH: 16.8 ± 1.6 IF/µg • min; P < 0.05) and Cer levels (control: 3,422 ± 26 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; SAH: 7,073 ± 2,467 fmol/nmol of total lipid P; P < 0.05) compared with controls. In addition, SAH was associated with a reduction of 60% in S1P levels, a 40% increase in S1P-lyase activity, and a twofold increase in the activity of GCS. In comparison, NSMase and SMS activities were similar to controls and SMS activities similar to controls. In conclusion, our results show an activation of ASMase, S1P-lyase, and GCS resulting in a shift in the production of protective (S1P) in favor of deleterious (Cer) sphingolipids after SAH. Additional studies are needed to determine the effect of modulators of the pathways described here in SAH. PMID:25597763

  11. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... Four different dengue viruses are known to cause dengue hemorrhagic fever. Dengue hemorrhagic fever occurs when a person is bitten by ...

  12. Expression of Cytoplasmic Gelsolin in Rat Brain After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guang-Bin; Wang, Chun-Xi; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Li, Hua; Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Zhou, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Li; Hang, Chun-Hua; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Shi, Ji-Xin

    2015-07-01

    Convincing evidence indicates that apoptosis contributes to the unfavorable prognosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a significant cause of morbidity and case fatality throughout the world. Gelsolin (GSN) is a Ca(2+)-dependent actin filament severing, capping, and nucleating protein, as well as multifunctional regulator of cell structure and metabolism, including apoptosis. In the present study, we intended to investigate the expression pattern and cell distribution of GSN in rat brain after experimental SAH. GSN expression was examined in sham group and at 3, 6, 12 h, day 1 (1 day), 2, 3, 5, and 7 days after SAH by Western blot analysis as well as real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were performed to detect the localization of GSN. The level of GSN protein expression was significantly decreased in SAH group and reached a bottoming point on 1 day after SAH. GSN mRNA level was significantly decreased in SAH groups in comparison with the sham group, and reached a minimum value at 12 h after SAH. Immunohistochemistry showed that GSN was constitutively and obviously expressed in the cortex of the normal rat brain and significantly decreased in the rat cortex after SAH. In addition, immunofluorescence results revealed that GSN expression could be found in both neurons and microglias, as well as in glialfibrillary acidic protein-positive astrocytes. The decreased expression of GSN could mainly be found in neurons and astrocytes as well, and GSN-positive microglias showed different cell morphological characteristics. Interestingly, the protein and gene levels of GSN seemed to be constant in the rat hippocampus of sham and SAH groups. These findings suggested a potential role of GSN in the pathophysiology of the brain at the early stage of SAH. PMID:25744577

  13. Prevalence of thoracic aortopathy in patients with juvenile Polyposis Syndrome-Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia due to SMAD4.

    PubMed

    Heald, Brandie; Rigelsky, Christina; Moran, Rocio; LaGuardia, Lisa; O'Malley, Margaret; Burke, Carol A; Zahka, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is characterized by abnormal vascular structures that may present as epistaxis, telangiectasias, and/or arteriovenous malformations. The genes associated with HHT (ACVRL1, ENG, and SMAD4) are members of the TGF? pathway. Other syndromes associated with abnormalities in TGF? signaling include Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome and related disorders. These disorders have aortic disease as a prominent finding. While there are case reports of patients with HHT and aortopathy (dilatation/aneurysm, dissection, and rupture), this has not been systematically investigated. We conducted a retrospective chart review to determine the prevalence of aortopathy in an HHT cohort. Patients from a single institution were identified who met the Curacao Criteria for a clinical diagnosis of HHT and/or had a mutation in ACVRL1, ENG, or SMAD4 and underwent echocardiogram. Two-dimensional echocardiograms were reviewed by a single pediatric cardiologist, and data were collected on demographics, genotype, HHT features, aortic root measurements, past medical history, and family history. Z scores and nomograms were utilized to identify abnormal results. Twenty-six patients from 15 families (one ACVRL1, four ENG, eight SMAD4, and two clinical diagnoses) were included in the analysis. Aortopathy was found in 6/26 (23%) patients; all had SMAD4 mutations. In our cohort, 6/16 (38%) SMAD4 mutation carriers had evidence of aortopathy. These data suggest that aortopathy could be part of the spectrum of SMAD4-induced HHT manifestations. Routine aortic imaging, including measurements of the aorta, should be considered in patients with SMAD4 mutations to allow for appropriate medical and surgical recommendations. PMID:25931195

  14. Abnormal cerebral vasodilation in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: use of serial 133Xe cerebral blood flow measurement plus acetazolamide to assess cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Tran Dinh, Y R; Lot, G; Benrabah, R; Baroudy, O; Cophignon, J; Seylaz, J

    1993-10-01

    A patient with cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was investigated by serial measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) using the xenon-133 emission tomography method. The CBF was measured before and after acetazolamide injection. On Day 2 after SAH, there was early local hyperperfusion in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory, ipsilateral to the left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. The regional CBF of this arterial territory decreased slightly after acetazolamide injection, probably because of vasoplegia and the "steal" phenomenon, and thus surgery was delayed. A right hemiplegia with aphasia and disturbed consciousness occurred 4 days later (on Day 6 after SAH) due to arterial vasospasm, despite treatment with a calcium-channel blocker. The initial hyperemia of the left MCA territory was followed by ischemia. The vasodilation induced by acetazolamide administration was significantly subnormal until Day 13, at which time CBF and vasoreactivity amplitude returned to normal and the patient's clinical condition improved. Surgery on Day 14 and outcome were without complication. It is concluded that serial CBF measurements plus acetazolamide injection are useful for monitoring the development of cerebral vasospasm to determine the most appropriate time for aneurysm surgery. PMID:8410215

  15. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  16. Functional response of cerebral blood flow induced by somatosensory stimulation in rats with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiguo; Huang, Qin; Liu, Peng; Li, Pengcheng; Ma, Lianting; Lu, Jinling

    2015-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often accompanied by cerebral vasospasm (CVS), which is the phenomenon of narrowing of large cerebral arteries, and then can produce delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND) such as lateralized sensory dysfunction. CVS was regarded as a major contributor to DIND in patients with SAH. However, therapy for preventing vasospasm after SAH to improve the outcomes may not work all the time. It is important to find answers to the relationship between CVS and DIND after SAH. How local cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated during functional activation after SAH still remains poorly understood, whereas, the regulation of CBF may play an important role in weakening the impact of CVS on cortex function. Therefore, it is worthwhile to evaluate the functional response of CBF in the activated cortex in an SAH animal model. Most evaluation of the effect of SAH is presently carried out by neurological behavioral scales. The functional imaging of cortical activation during sensory stimulation may help to reflect the function of the somatosensory cortex more locally than the behavioral scales do. We investigated the functional response of CBF in the somatosensory cortex induced by an electrical stimulation to contralateral forepaw via laser speckle imaging in a rat SAH model. Nineteen Sprague-Dawley rats from two groups (control group, n=10 and SAH group, n=9) were studied. SAH was induced in rats by double injection of autologous blood into the cisterna magna after CSF aspiration. The same surgical procedure was applied in the control group without CSF aspiration or blood injection. Significant CVS was found in the SAH group. Meanwhile, we observed a delayed peak of CBF response in rats with SAH compared with those in the control group, whereas no significant difference was found in magnitude, duration, and areas under curve of relative CBF changes between the two groups. The results suggest that the regulation function of local CBF during functional activation induced by somatosensory stimulation might not be seriously impaired in the somatosensory cortex of rats with SAH. Therefore, our findings might help to understand the clinical phenomenon that DIND might not occur even when CVS was found in SAH patients.

  17. Hemorrhagic shock occurring due to a concealed hematoma after insertion of a subclavian venous catheter in a patient undergoing anticoagulation therapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Boo-Young; Kim, Won-Sung; Cho, Ah-Reum; Cho, Mi-Jung; Lee, Chung-Won

    2014-01-01

    A 74-year-old man who had been receiving warfarin for atrial fibrillation, underwent emergency thrombectomy. A central venous catheter (CVC) was inserted via the left subclavian vein, and heparin was administered to prevent preoperative and postoperative thrombotic events. After an uneventful thrombectomy, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU). On the second postoperative day, the patient developed syncope and his blood pressure and oxygen saturation decreased. A computed tomography (CT) revealed a huge hematoma under the pectoralis major muscle. The patient was then treated with continuous renal replacement therapy and mechanical ventilation for multiorgan dysfunction syndrome, which developed due to hemorrhagic shock in the ICU. These findings suggest that when a CVC is inserted in patients requiring anticoagulant therapy, the possible risk of excessive bleeding must be carefully considered. Further, choosing a proper insertion site and performing an ultrasound-guided aspiration may be helpful in preventing these complications. PMID:25473468

  18. The role of rhynchophylline in alleviating early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Sun, Juan; Zhu, Shijie; Xu, Ting; Lu, Jianfei; Han, Hongbin; Zhou, Changman; Yan, Junhao

    2016-01-15

    Rhynchophylline (Rhy) has been demonstrated protective effects on some neurological diseases. However, the roles of Rhy in the subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are still to be cleared. In the present study, the effects of Rhy on attenuation of early brain injury (EBI) after SAH have been evaluated. The adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (280-300g) were used to establish the SAH models using endovascular perforation method. Rhy was administered by intraperitoneal injection immediately following SAH. Brain edema was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 24h after SAH. Neurological deficits, brain water content, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in hippocampus were also evaluated. Immunofluorescence and western blot were used to explore the underlying protective mechanism of Rhy. The results showed that, following 10mg/kg Rhy treatment, the brain edema and neurological deficits, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption were significantly attenuated at 24h after SAH. Additionally, in hippocampus, MDA concentration, MPO activity and ROS content were markedly decreased. Meanwhile, the levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO-1) were increased, while the expressions of p-p53, cleaved-caspase-3 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were significantly decreased. Our results indicated that Rhy could attenuate early brain injury by reducing inflammation and apoptosis in hippocampus after SAH. PMID:26631843

  19. Impact of anesthesia on pathophysiology and mortality following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anesthesia is indispensable for in vivo research but has the intrinsic potential to alter study results. The aim of the current study was to investigate the impact of three common anesthesia protocols on physiological parameters and outcome following the most common experimental model for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), endovascular perforation. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 38) were randomly assigned to (1) chloral hydrate, (2) isoflurane or (3) midazolam/medetomidine/fentanyl (MMF) anesthesia. Arterial blood gases, intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) were monitored before and for 3 hours after SAH. Brain water content, mortality and rate of secondary bleeding were also evaluated. Results Under baseline conditions isoflurane anesthesia resulted in deterioration of respiratory parameters (arterial pCO2 and pO2) and increased brain water content. After SAH, isoflurane and chloral hydrate were associated with reduced MAP, incomplete recovery of post-hemorrhagic rCBF (23 ± 13% and 87 ± 18% of baseline, respectively) and a high anesthesia-related mortality (17 and 50%, respectively). Anesthesia with MMF provided stable hemodynamics (MAP between 100-110 mmHg), high post-hemorrhagic rCBF values, and a high rate of re-bleedings (> 50%), a phenomenon often observed after SAH in humans. Conclusion Based on these findings we recommend anesthesia with MMF for the endovascular perforation model of SAH. PMID:22414527

  20. Concurrence of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Stanford Type A Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Inamasu, Joji; Suzuki, Takeya; Wakako, Akira; Sadato, Akiyo; Hirose, Yuichi

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of concurrent aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and acute aortic dissection (AAD). A 38-year-old man visited our hospital complaining of severe headache, and brain computed tomography (CT) revealed the presence of SAH. Thoracic to neck computed tomography angiography (CTA), performed in addition to brain CTA, suggested a tear in the aortic arch, and subsequent CT aortography established the diagnosis of Stanford type A AAD. The AAD in our patient, who reported no episodes of chest or back pain, was detected incidentally by thoracic to neck CTA. The imaging study has rarely been indicated for SAH except that it provides additional anatomical information in patients for whom extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery or endovascular treatment is considered. Nevertheless, our experience may highlight additional diagnostic value of thoracic to neck CTA in SAH patients. PMID:27083068

  1. Astaxanthin reduces matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and activity in the brain after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang-Sheng; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Rong; Wu, Qi; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tian-Wei; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2015-10-22

    We have previously shown that astaxanthin (ATX) reduces the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and neurovascular dysfunction following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) insults. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. It is known that the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after SAH. And ATX has the ability to regulate MMP-9 in other models. Herein, we investigated whether ATX could ameliorate MMP-9 activation and expression in a rat model of SAH. A total of 144 rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control group (n=36), SAH group (n=36), SAH+vehicle group (n=36), and SAH+ATX group (n=36). The SAH model was induced by injection of 0.3 ml autologous blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. ATX (20 μl of 0.1 mmol) or vehicle was administered intracerebroventricularly 30 min after SAH induction. Mortality, neurological function, brain edema and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability were measured at 24 and 72 h after SAH. Biochemical and zymographic methods were used to analyze MMP-9 expression and activity in brain samples. Immunohistochemistry and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining were also evaluated at 24h. Our data indicated that ATX could significantly reduce the expression and activity of MMP-9, leading to the amelioration of brain edema, BBB impairment, neurological deficits and TUNEL-positive cells at 24h but not 72 h after SAH. The ATX-mediated down-regulation of MMP-9 was correlated with the decreased levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, oxidative stress, activated microglia and infiltrating neutrophils. These results suggest that the neurovascular protection of ATX in SAH is partly associated with the inhibition of MMP-9 expression and activity. PMID:26210617

  2. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Spreading Depolarizations and Impaired Neurovascular Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Koide, Masayo; Sukhotinsky, Inna; Ayata, Cenk; Wellman, George C.

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has devastating consequences on brain function including profound effects on communication between neurons and the vasculature leading to cerebral ischemia. Physiologically, neurovascular coupling represents a focal increase in cerebral blood flow to meet increased metabolic demand of neurons within active regions of the brain. Neurovascular coupling is an ongoing process involving coordinated activity of the neurovascular unit—neurons, astrocytes, and parenchymal arterioles. Neuronal activity can also influence cerebral blood flow on a larger scale. Spreading depolarizations (SD) are self-propagating waves of neuronal depolarization and are observed during migraine, traumatic brain injury, and stroke. Typically, SD is associated with increased cerebral blood flow. Emerging evidence indicates that SAH causes inversion of neurovascular communication on both the local and global level. In contrast to other events causing SD, SAH-induced SD decreases rather than increases cerebral blood flow. Further, at the level of the neurovascular unit, SAH causes an inversion of neurovascular coupling from vasodilation to vasoconstriction. Global ischemia can also adversely affect the neurovascular response. Here, we summarize current knowledge regarding the impact of SAH and global ischemia on neurovascular communication. A mechanistic understanding of these events should provide novel strategies to treat these neurovascular disorders. PMID:23577279

  3. Impact of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Parenchymal Arteriolar Function

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, George C.; Koide, Masayo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracerebral or parenchymal arterioles play an important role in the regulation of both global and regional blood flow within the brain. Brain cortex lacks significant collateral sources of blood and are thus at risk if blood flow through parenchymal arterioles is restricted. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating that abnormal parenchymal arteriolar constriction contributes to the development of neurological deficits caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For example, parenchymal arterioles isolated from SAH model rats exhibit enhanced constriction in response to increased intravascular pressure. This increased pressure-dependent constriction or myogenic tone would result in a shift in the cerebral autoregulatory response and decreased cerebral perfusion. Here, we summarize our current knowledge regarding cellular mechanisms contributing to enhanced contractility of parenchymal arteriolar myocytes following SAH. Our studies demonstrate SAH-induced membrane potential depolarization involving altered K+ homeostasis leads to enhanced voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity, increased smooth muscle cytosolic Ca2+ and parenchymal arteriolar constriction. In summary, emerging evidence demonstrates that SAH can profoundly affect parenchymal arteriolar tone promoting decreased cortical blood flow and compromised neuronal viability. PMID:22890665

  4. Biomarkers of vasospasm development and outcome in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Ana; Egea-Guerrero, Juan José; Ruiz de Azúa-López, Zaida; Murillo-Cabezas, Francisco

    2014-06-15

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurologic emergency caused by a brain aneurysm burst, resulting in a bleeding into the subarachnoid space. Its incidence is estimated between 4 and 28/10,000 inhabitants and it is the main cause of sudden death from stroke. The prognosis of patients with SAH is directly related to neurological status on admission, to the magnitude of the initial bleeding, as well as to the development of cerebral vasospasm (CVS). Numerous researchers have studied the role of different biomarkers in CVS development. These biomarkers form part of the metabolic cascade that is triggered as a result of the SAH. Hence, among these metabolites we found biomarkers of oxidative stress, inflammation biomarkers, indicators of brain damage, and markers of vascular pathology. However, to the author knowledge, none of these biomarkers has been demonstrated as a useful tool for predicting neither CVS development nor outcome after SAH. In order to reach success on future researches, firstly it should be stated which pathophysiological process is mainly responsible for CVS development. Once this process has been determined, the temporal course of this pathophysiologic cascade should be characterized, and then, perform further studies on biomarkers already analyzed, as well as on new biomarkers not yet studied in the SAH pathology, focusing attention on the temporal course of the diverse metabolites and the sampling time for its quantification. PMID:24811975

  5. Using quantitative CT perfusion for evaluation of delayed cerebral ischemia following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sanelli, Pina C.; Ugorec, Igor; Johnson, Carl E.; Tan, Jessica; Segal, Alan Z.; Fink, Matthew; Heier, Linda A.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Comunale, Joseph P.; John, Majnu; Stieg, Philip E.; Zimmerman, Robert D.; Mushlin, Alvin I.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose To prospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CT perfusion (CTP) and determine a quantitative threshold for delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods SAH patients were prospectively enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. CTP was performed during the typical time-period for DCI, between days 6–8 following SAH. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and mean transit time (MTT) values were obtained using standard region-of-interest placement sampling gray matter. The reference standard for DCI is controversial and consisted of clinical and imaging criteria in this study. In a subanalysis of vasospasm, digital subtraction angiography was used as the reference standard. Receiver operating characteristic curves determined diagnostic accuracy using area under the curve. Optimal threshold values were calculated using patient population utility method. Results Ninety-seven patients were included; 41% (40/97) had DCI. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 93% CBF, 88% MTT and 72% CBV. Optimal threshold values were 35mL/100gm/min (90% sensitivity,68% specificity) for CBF and 5.5sec (73% sensitivity,79% specificity) for MTT. In the subanalysis (n=57), 63% (36/57) had vasospasm. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 94% CBF, 85% MTT and 72% CBV. Optimal threshold values were 36.5 mL/100gm/min (95% sensitivity,70% specificity) for CBF and 5.4 sec (78% sensitivity,70% specificity) for MTT. Conclusion CBF and MTT have the highest overall diagnostic accuracy. Threshold values of 35mL/100gm/min CBF and 5.5sec MTT are suggested for DCI based on patient population utility method. Absolute threshold values may not be generalizable due to differences in scanner equipment and post-processing methods. PMID:21960495

  6. A higher aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage incidence in women prior to menopause: a retrospective analysis of 4,895 cases from eight hospitals in China

    PubMed Central

    He, Jian; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yao; Zhao, Lin; Liu, Heng; Yang, Lin; Zeng, Xian Jun; Yang, Jian; Peng, Guang Ming; Ahuja, Anil; Yang, Zheng Han

    2016-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm is a devastating disease. Despite the risk factors, including hypertension, cigarette smoking and alcohol use, are more common in men, aneurysmal SAH belongs to a few diseases which the incidence is higher in women than in men. Sex hormones, especially estrogen, might be protective against this condition. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) seems to be associated with a reduced risk for aneurysmal SAH. This study aims to know the prevalence of aneurysmal SAH of men and women at different ages. Methods The age and gender information of 4,895 case of aneurysmal SAH (3,016 females, 1,879 males) were collected retrospectively from eight institutions in mainland China. The prevalence of aneurysmal SAH of men and women at different ages was analyzed. Results The data showed women had a higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH than men starting at late thirties, and men might have a higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH than women only before 37-year-old. Conclusions Menopause may not be the only dominant factor causing higher incidence of aneurysmal SAH in women than in men. PMID:27190767

  7. Phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 Prevents Iron Accumulation and Ameliorates Early Brain Injury in a Model of Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuangying; Song, Chuanhui; Shang, Longcheng; Yu, Jiang; Qiao, Tong; Li, Kuanyu

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that activation of Akt may alleviate early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study is undertaken to determine whether iron metabolism is involved in the beneficial effect of Akt activation after SAH. Therefore, we used a novel molecule, SC79, to activate Akt in an experimental Sprague-Dawley rat model of SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups as follows: sham, SAH, SAH + vehicle, SAH + SC79. The results confirmed that SC79 effectively enhanced the defense against oxidative stress and alleviated EBI in the temporal lobe after SAH. Interestingly, we found that phosphorylation of Akt by SC79 reduced cell surface transferrin receptor-mediated iron uptake and promoted ferroportin-mediated iron transport after SAH. As a result, SC79 administration diminished the iron content in the brain tissue. Moreover, the impaired Fe-S cluster biogenesis was recovered and loss of the activities of the Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes were regained, indicating that injured mitochondrial functions are restored to healthy levels. These findings suggest that disrupted iron homeostasis could contribute to EBI and Akt activation may regulate iron metabolism to relieve iron toxicity, further protecting neurons from EBI after SAH. PMID:26978329

  8. Sensitivity of a Clinical Decision Rule and Early Computed Tomography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Dustin G.; Kene, Mamata V.; Udaltsova, Natalia; Vinson, David R.; Ballard, Dustin W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Application of a clinical decision rule for subarachnoid hemorrhage, in combination with cranial computed tomography (CT) performed within six hours of ictus (early cranial CT), may be able to reasonably exclude a diagnosis of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). This study’s objective was to examine the sensitivity of both early cranial CT and a previously validated clinical decision rule among emergency department (ED) patients with aSAH and a normal mental status. Methods Patients were evaluated in the 21 EDs of an integrated health delivery system between January 2007 and June 2013. We identified by chart review a retrospective cohort of patients diagnosed with aSAH in the setting of a normal mental status and performance of early cranial CT. Variables comprising the SAH clinical decision rule (age ≥40, presence of neck pain or stiffness, headache onset with exertion, loss of consciousness at headache onset) were abstracted from the chart and assessed for inter-rater reliability. Results One hundred fifty-five patients with aSAH met study inclusion criteria. The sensitivity of early cranial CT was 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). The sensitivity of the SAH clinical decision rule was also 95.5% (95% CI [90.9–98.2]). Since all false negative cases for each diagnostic modality were mutually independent, the combined use of both early cranial CT and the clinical decision rule improved sensitivity to 100% (95% CI [97.6–100.0]). Conclusion Neither early cranial CT nor the SAH clinical decision rule demonstrated ideal sensitivity for aSAH in this retrospective cohort. However, the combination of both strategies might optimize sensitivity for this life-threatening disease. PMID:26587089

  9. Increased cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine correlate with adverse clinical outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Wu, Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Qing-Rong; Ni, Li; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2014-08-01

    Elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, have been found in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In addition, CSF levels of ADMA are associated with the severity of vasospasm. However, the relation between CSF ADMA levels and the clinical outcome of SAH patients is still unclear. We hypothesized that elevated ADMA levels in CSF might be related to the clinical outcome of SAH patients. CSF ADMA levels were measured in 20 SAH patients at days 3-5, days 7-9 and days 12-14 after SAH onset using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cerebral vasospasm was assessed by transcranial Doppler ultra sonography. Clinical outcome at 2year follow-up was evaluated using the Karnofsky Performance Status scale (KPS). CSF ADMA concentrations in all SAH patients were significantly increased at days 3-5 (p=0.002) after SAH, peaked on days 7-9 (p<0.001) and remained elevated until days 12-14 (p<0.001). In subgroup analysis, significant increases of CSF ADMA levels were found in patients both with and without vasospasm. The KPS scores significantly correlated with CSF levels of ADMA at days 7-9 (correlation coefficient=-0.55, p=0.012; 95% confidence interval -0.80 to -0.14). Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that higher ADMA level at days 7-9 predicted a poor clinical outcome at 2year follow-up after SAH (odds ratio=1.722, p=0.039, 95% confidence interval 1.029 to 2.882). ADMA may be directly involved in the pathological process and future adverse prognosis of SAH. PMID:24814854

  10. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Pappas, Anthony C.; Koide, Masayo

    2015-01-01

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K+) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca2+ events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca2+ signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca2+ signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca2+ signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca2+ and elevation of extracellular K+). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ release events leading to inversion of NVC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)—strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the brain surface—are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A common complication observed after SAH is the development of delayed cerebral ischemia at sites often remote from the site of rupture. Here, we provide evidence that SAH-induced changes in astrocyte Ca2+ signaling lead to a switch in the polarity of the neurovascular coupling response from vasodilation to vasoconstriction. Thus, after SAH, signaling events that normally lead to vasodilation and enhanced delivery of blood to active brain regions cause vasoconstriction that would limit cerebral blood flow. These findings identify astrocytes as a key player in SAH-induced decreased cortical blood flow. PMID:26424885

  11. Astrocyte Ca2+ Signaling Drives Inversion of Neurovascular Coupling after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Anthony C; Koide, Masayo; Wellman, George C

    2015-09-30

    Physiologically, neurovascular coupling (NVC) matches focal increases in neuronal activity with local arteriolar dilation. Astrocytes participate in NVC by sensing increased neurotransmission and releasing vasoactive agents (e.g., K(+)) from perivascular endfeet surrounding parenchymal arterioles. Previously, we demonstrated an increase in the amplitude of spontaneous Ca(2+) events in astrocyte endfeet and inversion of NVC from vasodilation to vasoconstriction in brain slices obtained from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) model rats. However, the role of spontaneous astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling in determining the polarity of the NVC response remains unclear. Here, we used two-photon imaging of Fluo-4-loaded rat brain slices to determine whether altered endfoot Ca(2+) signaling underlies SAH-induced inversion of NVC. We report a time-dependent emergence of endfoot high-amplitude Ca(2+) signals (eHACSs) after SAH that were not observed in endfeet from unoperated animals. Furthermore, the percentage of endfeet with eHACSs varied with time and paralleled the development of inversion of NVC. Endfeet with eHACSs were present only around arterioles exhibiting inversion of NVC. Importantly, depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores using cyclopiazonic acid abolished SAH-induced eHACSs and restored arteriolar dilation in SAH brain slices to two mediators of NVC (a rise in endfoot Ca(2+) and elevation of extracellular K(+)). These data indicate a causal link between SAH-induced eHACSs and inversion of NVC. Ultrastructural examination using transmission electron microscopy indicated that a similar proportion of endfeet exhibiting eHACSs also exhibited asymmetrical enlargement. Our results demonstrate that subarachnoid blood causes a delayed increase in the amplitude of spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) release events leading to inversion of NVC. Significance statement: Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)--strokes involving cerebral aneurysm rupture and release of blood onto the brain surface--are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. A common complication observed after SAH is the development of delayed cerebral ischemia at sites often remote from the site of rupture. Here, we provide evidence that SAH-induced changes in astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling lead to a switch in the polarity of the neurovascular coupling response from vasodilation to vasoconstriction. Thus, after SAH, signaling events that normally lead to vasodilation and enhanced delivery of blood to active brain regions cause vasoconstriction that would limit cerebral blood flow. These findings identify astrocytes as a key player in SAH-induced decreased cortical blood flow. PMID:26424885

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome following hemodynamic treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Awori, Jonathan; Rajajee, Venkatakrishna; Gemmete, Joseph J; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Thompson, B Gregory; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-04-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is an uncommon but significant complication of hemodynamic therapy after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH)-induced vasospasm. We performed a PubMed literature search for the period January 1999 to January 2015 using the search terms "posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome", "subarachnoid hemorrhage", "vasospasm", and "hypertensive encephalopathy", and identified nine cases of PRES after aSAH-induced vasospasm in the literature. We also present a 63-year-old man with aSAH complicated by vasospasm treated with hemodynamic augmentation who subsequently developed PRES. Imaging following development of PRES symptoms shows vasogenic edema in the white matter of the parietal and occipital lobes. Age, sex, history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure were variable among patients in the literature review. In all cases, patients improved both from a radiological and clinical perspective following blood pressure reduction. To summarize, PRES is a rare complication of hemodynamic therapy for vasospasm following aSAH. The literature at the time of writing demonstrates no common pattern with regard to patient demographics, medical history, or mode of treatment for symptomatic vasospasm. Given its sporadic and unpredictable nature, considering PRES in the differential diagnosis is important when addressing neurological decline following hemodynamic treatment of vasospasm related to aSAH. PMID:26755456

  13. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induces Gliosis and Increased Expression of the Pro-inflammatory Cytokine High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kentaro; Koide, Masayo; Dumont, Travis M.; Russell, Sheila R.; Tranmer, Bruce I.

    2011-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following cerebral aneurysm rupture is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Surviving SAH patients often suffer from neurological impairment, yet little is currently known regarding the influence of subarachnoid blood on brain parenchyma. The objective of the present study was to examine the impact of subarachnoid blood on glial cells using a rabbit SAH model. The astrocyte-specific proteins, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S100B, were up-regulated in brainstem from SAH model rabbits, consistent with the development of reactive astrogliosis. In addition to reactive astrogliosis, cytosolic expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, high-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) was increased in brain from SAH animals. We found that greater than 90% of cells expressing cytosolic HMGB1 immunostained positively for Iba1, a specific marker for microglia and macrophages. Further, the number of Iba1-positive cells was similar in brain from control and SAH animals, suggesting the majority of these cells were likely resident microglial cells rather than infiltrating macrophages. These observations demonstrate SAH impacts brain parenchyma by activating astrocytes and microglia, triggering up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokine HMGB1. PMID:21479116

  14. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Maher, Monica; Churchill, Nathan W; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Graham, Simon J; Macdonald, R Loch; Schweizer, Tom A

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into "impaired" and "unimpaired" groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life). In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes. PMID:26172281

  15. Altered Resting-State Connectivity within Executive Networks after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Monica; Churchill, Nathan W.; de Oliveira Manoel, Airton Leonardo; Graham, Simon J.; Macdonald, R. Loch; Schweizer, Tom A.

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with significant mortality rates, and most survivors experience significant cognitive deficits across multiple domains, including executive function. It is critical to determine the neural basis for executive deficits in aSAH, in order to better understand and improve patient outcomes. This study is the first examination of resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a group of aSAH patients, used to characterize changes in functional connectivity of the frontoparietal network. We scanned 14 aSAH patients and 14 healthy controls, and divided patients into “impaired” and “unimpaired” groups based on a composite executive function score. Impaired patients exhibited significantly lower quality of life and neuropsychological impairment relative to controls, across multiple domains. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis demonstrated that unimpaired patients were not significantly different from controls, but impaired patients had increased frontoparietal connectivity. Patients evidenced increased frontoparietal connectivity as a function of decreased executive function and decreased mood (i.e. quality of life). In addition, T1 morphometric analysis demonstrated that these changes are not attributable to local cortical atrophy among aSAH patients. These results establish significant, reliable changes in the endogenous brain dynamics of aSAH patients, that are related to cognitive and mood outcomes. PMID:26172281

  16. Embolic Signals during Routine Transcranial Doppler Ultrasonography in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Paschoal, Fernando Mendes; de Almeida Lins Ronconi, Karla; de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Nogueira, Ricardo de Carvalho; Paschoal, Eric Homero Albuquerque; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Cerebral emboli may occur in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracranial aneurysm surgery. Although embolic signs (ES) have been reported in SAH, their origin remains unclear. The aim of this study was to report the detection of ES during routine TCD monitoring in patients with aneurysmal SAH. Methods. A total of 105 patients with aneurysmal SAH were submitted to TCD evaluation. Patients were monitored almost daily (5 times per week). In each monitoring session, one experienced operator performed TCD to detect or assess vasospasm and ES in arteries of the Willis polygon. Results. Four patients out of a total of 105 patients with aneurysmal SAH were found to present spontaneous cerebral embolization during routine TCD monitoring. The average age of the 4 patients (mean ± standard deviation) was 59.5 ± 8.34 years (range 49–68 ys); female patients predominated representing 75% (3/4) of subjects. Conclusion. Although detection of ES was relatively rare in this study, rates of emboli occurrence may be higher under systematic monitoring. The detection of ES after SAH surgery reinforces the need to study the role of embolus in this condition and may be an indicator for prophylactic antithrombotic treatment. PMID:25893190

  17. Protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide nanoparticles on early brain injuries following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Xu, Rui; Xie, Fei; Xu, Wei; Zeng, Meng-Fei; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Ji

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the protective effects of perfluorooctyl-bromide (PFOB) nanoparticles on early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), a total of 120 rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: Sham operation group (n = 40), SAH group (n = 40), and SAH + PFOB group (n = 40). Endovascular perforation was performed to induce subarachnoid hemorrhage. Brain water content was measured 24 h after surgery. Meanwhile, morphological changes in the rat hippocampal CA1 region were examined using light and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of neuronal apoptosis in rat hippocampal CA1 region was determined using TUNEL assay. Protein and mRNA expression levels of Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 were measured using western blot and RT-PCR assays 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Compared to the SAH group, the SAH + PFOB group had significantly lower brain water content (P<0.01), with alleviated morphological abnormalities in HE-stained neurons and significantly decreased neurons with karyopyknosis and hyperchromatism in the hippocampal CA1 region. Electron microscopy revealed reduction of neuronal apoptosis, alleviation of glial cell swelling, and mitigation of perivascular edema in the hippocampal region. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression of apoptosis-related factors Caspase-3 and Bax was significantly reduced, while that of the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2 was significantly increased. TUNEL staining showed that neuronal apoptosis was significantly reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region (P<0.01). RT-PCR and Western-blot data indicated that expressions of Caspase-3 and Bax were both significantly reduced, while bcl-2 expression was increased significantly at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h after SAH (P<0.01). Together, our data support that PFOB nanoparticles with high oxygen content could counteract ischemia and hypoxia, block neuronal apoptotic pathways, reduce neuronal apoptosis, and therefore, achieve neuroprotective effects in EBI following SAH. PMID:26396671

  18. A modified double injection model of cisterna magna for the study of delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious medical complication, characterized by constriction of cerebral arteries leading to varying degrees of cerebral ischemia. Numerous clinical and experimental studies have been performed in the last decades; however, the pathophysiologic mechanism of cerebral vasospasm after SAH still remains unclear. Among a variety of experimental SAH models, the double hemorrhage rat model involving direct injection of autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna has been used most frequently for the study of delayed cerebral vasospasm following SAH in last years. Despite the simplicity of the technique, the second blood injection into the cisterna magna may result in brainstem injury leading to high mortality. Therefore, a modified double hemorrhage model of cisterna magna has been developed in rat recently. We describe here step by step the surgical technique to induce double SAH and compare the degree of vasospasm with other cisterna magna rat models using histological assessment of the diameter and cross-sectional area of the basilar artery. PMID:23194464

  19. Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 Agonist Attenuates Apoptosis by Activation of Phosphorylated CREB-Bcl-2 Pathway After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Mutsumi; Sherchan, Prativa; Soejima, Yoshiteru; Hasegawa, Yu; Flores, Jerry; Doycheva, Desislava; Zhang, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) which comprises of vasogenic edema and apoptotic cell death is an important component of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) pathophysiology. This study evaluated whether Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) agonist, JWH133, attenuates EBI after SAH and whether CB2R stimulation reduces pro-apoptotic caspase-3 via up-regulation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-Bcl-2 signaling pathway. Male Sprague Dawley rats (n=123) were subjected to SAH by endovascular perforation. Rats received vehicle or JWH133 at 1 hour after SAH. Neurological deficits and brain water content were evaluated at 24 hours after SAH. Western blot was performed to quantify phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), Bcl-2, and cleaved caspase-3 levels. Neuronal cell death was evaluated with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated uridine 5′-triphosphate-biotin nick end-labeling staining. Additionally, CREB siRNA was administered to manipulate the proposed pathway. JWH133 (1.0 mg/kg) improved neurological deficits and reduced brain water content in left hemisphere 24 hours after SAH. JWH133 significantly increased activated CREB (pCREB) and Bcl-2 levels and significantly decreased cleaved caspase-3 levels in left hemisphere 24 hours after SAH. CREB siRNA reversed the effects of treatment. TUNEL positive neurons in the cortex were reduced with JWH133 treatment. Thus, CB2R stimulation attenuated EBI after SAH possibly through activation of pCREB-Bcl-2 pathway. PMID:25058046

  20. Visualization of a Traumatic Pseudoaneurysm at Internal Carotid Artery Bifurcation due to Blunt Head Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ju-Hee; Choi, Ha-Young; Park, Jung-Soo; Lee, Jong-Myong

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic intracranial pseudoaneurysms occurring after blunt head injuries are rare. We report an unusual case of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by rupturing of the traumatic pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery (ICA) bifurcation that resulted from a non-penetrating injury. In a patient with severe headache and SAH in the right sylvian cistern, which developed within 7 days after a blunt-force head injury, a trans-femoral cerebral angiogram (TFCA) showed aneurysmal sac which was insufficient to confirm the pseudoaneurysm. We obtained a multi-slab image of three dimensional time of flight (TOF) of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). The source image of the gadolinium-enhanced MRA revealed an intimal flap within the intracranial ICA bifurcation, providing a clue for the diagnosis of a dissecting pseudoaneurysm at the ICA bifurcation due to blunt head trauma. We performed direct aneurysmal neck clipping, without neurological deficit. A follow-up TFCA did not show either aneurysm sac or luminal narrowing. We suggest that in the patient with a history of blunt head injury with SAH following shortly, multi-slab image of 3D TOF MRA can give visualization of the presence of a pseudoaneurysm. PMID:27169047

  1. Sudden Death Due to Cerebral Leukemic Hemorrhage in a 32-Year-Old Woman Who Had a Short-Term Benzene Exposure History.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zou, Donghua; Chen, Yijiu

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), also known as acute myelogenous leukemia, is associated with severe hemorrhagic coagulopathy, which is induced by the drop in red blood cells, platelets, and normal leukocyte and the increase of leukemic cells. The case described in this report was of a 32-year-old woman who unexpectedly and suddenly died because of cerebral hemorrhage caused by undiagnosed AML while hospitalized. Further investigation found that the decedent had been exposed to benzene and its derivatives 6 months before her death. This case suggests that underlying AML should be considered as a possible diagnosis when sudden death occurs with a fatal spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, especially if the deceased had occupational chemical exposure to benzene and its derivatives. PMID:27049659

  2. Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage After Lumboperitoneal Shunt for Fulminant Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Chandra, Ronil V; Gutman, Matthew; Ligtermoet, Matthew; Seneviratne, Udaya; Kempster, Peter

    2016-06-01

    A 33-year-old woman presented with severe visual loss from fulminant idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Her lumbar puncture opening pressure was 97 cm H2O. Soon after lumboperitoneal shunt surgery, she had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated frontal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and neuroimaging findings consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). We hypothesize that an abrupt drop in intracranial pressure after lumboperitoneal shunting led to maladjustment of cerebral vascular autoregulation, which caused SAH and PRES. PMID:26919070

  3. Molecular alterations in the hippocampus after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Myung; Wan, Hoyee; Kudo, Gen; Foltz, Warren D; Vines, Douglass C; Green, David E; Zoerle, Tommaso; Tariq, Asma; Brathwaite, Shakira; D'Abbondanza, Josephine; Ai, Jinglu; Macdonald, R Loch

    2014-01-01

    Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) frequently have deficits in learning and memory that may or may not be associated with detectable brain lesions. We examined mediators of long-term potentiation after SAH in rats to determine what processes might be involved. There was a reduction in synapses in the dendritic layer of the CA1 region on transmission electron microscopy as well as reduced colocalization of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and synaptophysin. Immunohistochemistry showed reduced staining for GluR1 and calmodulin kinase 2 and increased staining for GluR2. Myelin basic protein staining was decreased as well. There was no detectable neuronal injury by Fluoro-Jade B, TUNEL, or activated caspase-3 staining. Vasospasm of the large arteries of the circle of Willis was mild to moderate in severity. Nitric oxide was increased and superoxide anion radical was decreased in hippocampal tissue. Cerebral blood flow, measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and cerebral glucose metabolism, measured by positron emission tomography, were no different in SAH compared with control groups. The results suggest that the etiology of loss of LTP after SAH is not cerebral ischemia but may be mediated by effects of subarachnoid blood such as oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:24064494

  4. Mechanisms of hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Subhash; Dru, Christopher; Bhowmick, Neil A

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of cases of infectious cystitis are easily treated, and most patients have no long-term complications. However, hemorrhagic cystitis is a potentially deadly complication associated with pelvic radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and stem-cell transplant therapy. The focus of current understanding, and hence therapy, is directed toward urothelial cell death. However, the primary functional ramification of inflammatory bladder disease is the loss of compliance due to muscular expansion. Recent studies on smooth muscle response in models of bladder inflammation demonstrate a process of pyroptotic cell death that potentiates further muscle hyperplasia. These findings may support alternative interventions for subjects with hemorrhagic cystitis refractive to current therapy. PMID:25374922

  5. SUBPERITONEAL HEMORRHAGE

    PubMed Central

    Cushman, Glenn F.

    1953-01-01

    Clinical diagnosis of subperitoneal hemorrhage can be made in a substantial percentage of cases by recognition of a quite constant syndrome—provided the possibility of bleeding is considered. Progressive anemia, as indicated by repeated counts of erythrocytes in the blood or by hematocrit determinations, is confirmation of the diagnosis. The majority of patients recover spontaneously under conservative management. Surgical intervention is indicated if repeated episodes of hemorrhage occur or if the volume of circulating blood cannot be maintained by repeated transfusions of whole blood. PMID:13009511

  6. Health-Related Quality-of-Life Outcomes: Comparing Patients With Aneurysmal and Nonaneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Arthur P; Thomas, Ajith

    2015-10-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is divided into two major types (aneurysmal [ASAH] and nonaneurysmal [NASAH]) because, in approximately 15% of the patients who experience SAH, no source of hemorrhage can be identified. Anecdotal evidence and contradictory research suggest that patients with NASAH experience some of the same health-related quality of life (HRQOL) issues as patients with ASAH. This quantitative survey design study compared 1-3 years after hemorrhage the HRQOL in patients who had experienced an NASAH with those who had experienced an ASAH. This is the first U.S. study to specifically investigate HRQOL in NASAH and the second to compare HRQOL outcomes between patients with ASAH and NASAH. These study results corroborate those of the first-that the two groups are much more similar than different. It confirms that the impact on employment for both hemorrhage groups is significant, and it also finds an even greater inability to return to work for the patients with NASAH. Physical symptom complaints were more common in the group with NASAH, whereas the group with ASAH experienced more emotional symptoms. Both groups had low levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with those levels not differing significantly between groups. However, PTSD and social support were shown to impact HRQOL for both groups. The authors recommend that clinicians assess all patients with SAH for PTSD and institute treatment early. This may include offering psychological services or social work early in the hospital course. Further research and policy changes are needed to assist in interventions that improve vocational reintegration after SAH. Patients with NASAH should no longer be described as having experienced a "benign hemorrhage." They have had a life-changing hemorrhage that may forever change their lives and impact their HRQOL. PMID:26348436

  7. Increased ICP promotes CaMKII-mediated phosphorylation of neuronal NOS at Ser⁸⁴⁷ in the hippocampus immediately after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Makino, Kazushige; Osuka, Koji; Watanabe, Yasuo; Usuda, Nobuteru; Hara, Masahito; Aoyama, Masahiro; Takayasu, Masakazu; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    Early brain injury has recently been identified as an indicator of poor prognosis after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) has been shown to phosphorylate neuronal NOS (nNOS) at Ser(847), resulting in a reduction in nNOS activity. In this study, we revealed chronological changes in the phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) in the hippocampus and cortex immediately after SAH. In a rat single-hemorrhage model of SAH, the hippocampus and adjacent cortex were collected up to 24h after SAH. Samples from rats that were not injected with blood were used as controls. NOS was partially purified from the crude samples using ADP-agarose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis revealed that nNOS phosphorylated (p-nNOS) at Ser(847) was significantly increased in the hippocampus, but not in the cortex, at 1h after SAH compared with that resulting from the control treatment. Immunoreactivity of p-nNOS at Ser(847) was observed in interneurons of the hippocampus at 1h after SAH. Injection of saline instead of blood also significantly induced p-nNOS at Ser(847) levels in the hippocampus at 1h after injection. The colocalization of CaMKIIα and nNOS was transiently increased in the hippocampus at 0.5h after SAH. Our data suggest that immediately after SAH, an increase in intracranial pressure might induce transient cerebral ischemia, potentially promoting the phosphorylation of nNOS at Ser(847) by CaMKIIα in the hippocampus. The activation of p-nNOS at Ser(847) in the hippocampus may alleviate ischemic insults immediately after SAH to exert a neuroprotective effect against early brain injury. PMID:25940762

  8. Targeted over-expression of endothelin-1 in astrocytes leads to more severe brain damage and vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a potent vasoconstrictor, and astrocytic ET-1 is reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemic injury and cytotoxic edema. However, it is still unknown whether astrocytic ET-1 also contributes to vasogenic edema and vasospasm during subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). In the present study, transgenic mice with astrocytic endothelin-1 over-expression (GET-1 mice) were used to investigate the pathophysiological role of ET-1 in SAH pathogenesis. Results The GET-1 mice experienced a higher mortality rate and significantly more severe neurological deficits, blood–brain barrier breakdown and vasogenic edema compared to the non-transgenic (Ntg) mice following SAH. Oral administration of vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist, SR 49059, significantly reduced the cerebral water content in the GET-1 mice. Furthermore, the GET-1 mice showed significantly more pronounced middle cerebral arterial (MCA) constriction after SAH. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that the calcium-activated potassium channels and the phospho-eNOS were significantly downregulated, whereas PKC-α expression was significantly upregulated in the MCA of the GET-1 mice when compared to Ntg mice after SAH. Administration of ABT-627 (ETA receptor antagonist) significantly down-regulated PKC-α expression in the MCA of the GET-1 mice following SAH. Conclusions The present study suggests that astrocytic ET-1 involves in SAH-induced cerebral injury, edema and vasospasm, through ETA receptor and PKC-mediated potassium channel dysfunction. Administration of ABT-627 (ETA receptor antagonist) and SR 49059 (vasopressin V1a receptor antagonist) resulted in amelioration of edema and vasospasm in mice following SAH. These data provide a strong rationale to investigate SR 49059 and ABT-627 as therapeutic drugs for the treatment of SAH patients. PMID:24156724

  9. Perioperative critical care management for patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, H. Alex; Edwards, Nancy; Chang, Tiffany; Sladen, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant regional and risk factor-related variations, the overall mortality rate in patients suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains high. Compared to ischemic stroke, which is typically irreversible, hemorrhagic stroke tends to carry a higher mortality, but patients who do survive have less disability. Technologies to monitor and treat complications of SAH have advanced considerably in recent years, but good long-term functional outcome still depends on prompt diagnosis, early aggressive management, and avoidance of premature withdrawal of support. Endovascular procedures and open craniotomy to secure a ruptured aneurysm represent some of the numerous critical steps required to achieve the best possible result. In this review, we have attempted to provide a contemporary, evidence-based outline of the perioperative critical care management of patients with SAH. This is a challenging and potentially fatal disease with a wide spectrum of severity and complications and an often protracted course. The dynamic nature of this illness, especially in its most severe forms, requires considerable flexibility in clinician management, especially given the panoply of available treatment modalities. Judicious hemodynamic monitoring and adaptive therapy are essential to respond to the fluctuating nature of cerebral vasospasm and the varying oxygen demands of the injured brain that may readily induce acute or delayed cerebral ischemia. PMID:25237442

  10. Alterations in the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the basilar artery of rats following a subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    LI, GANG; WANG, QING-SONG; LIN, TING-TING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the expression of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced cerebral vasospasm (CVS). The rat models were established by twice injecting blood into the cisterna magna, after which the following experimental groups were established: The normal group, the SAH3d group, the SAH5d group and the SAH7d group. The rats were perfused and the basilar artery was removed for histological examination. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery lumen was measured using computer software; and the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was detected by immunohistochemistry. The cross-sectional area of the basilar artery of the rats in the SAH model groups was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner, as compared with the normal group. The protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α in the SAH3d, SAH5d and SAH7d groups was significantly increased over time (P<0.05), as compared with the normal group. CVS was detected in the basilar artery, and was associated with wall thickening and significant narrowing of the lumen, thus suggesting that the present model may be used for investigating cerebrovascular disease following SAH. The immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that the protein expression of PAR1 and TNF-α was significantly increased in the basilar artery of the SAH model rats, and were positively correlated with the degree of CVS. PMID:26997984

  11. Carotid rete mirabile associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage from intracranial aneurysm: A case report and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Júnior, Fernando Mendes Paschoal; Piske, Ronie Leo; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2015-01-01

    Carotid rete mirabile (CRM) is a rare physiological vascular network in humans that is most often found in Eastern populations. This paper describes a CRM associated with an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and discusses the details of the patient’s treatment. A 28-year-old woman was admitted to our service with clinical signs and symptoms of a spontaneous aSAH. Computed tomography revealed a diffuse and extensive SAH (Fisher group IV), while an angiogram showed an abnormal collateral network in the right carotid system and a hypoplastic aspect to the internal carotid artery (ICA) on the same side. In addition, a saccular aneurysm with a diameter of 9.5 mm was present in the ophthalmic segment of the left ICA. This case is extremely uncommon. To avoid rebleeding in the patient, we successfully treated the patient by clipping the aneurysmal lesion. No procedure was performed for the CRM. PMID:25934776

  12. Musical murmurs in human cerebral arteries after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Aaslid, R; Nornes, H

    1984-01-01

    A transcranial ultrasonic method for the recording of murmurs from cerebral vessels is described. Using the new approach the authors have observed musical murmurs of pure tone quality in 15 patients with increased flow velocities in the cerebral arteries after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The frequency range of the pure tones was from 140 to 820 Hz, corresponding to flow velocities between 73 and 215 cm/sec. The musical murmurs occurred as a transitional state between silent flow and the well known phenomenon of bruit. They were observed between the 4th and the 20th day after SAH. The most likely cause of the musical murmur is a periodic shedding of vortices in the cerebral arteries, commonly referred to as "a von Kármán vortex street." Clinically the presence of musical murmurs indicated that pathologically increased blood velocities were present in the artery under investigation. This probably reflected the degree of spasm. PMID:6689725

  13. Minocycline Protects Against NLRP3 Inflammasome-Induced Inflammation and P53-Associated Apoptosis in Early Brain Injury After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianru; Chen, Jingsen; Mo, Hangbo; Chen, Jingyin; Qian, Cong; Yan, Feng; Gu, Chi; Hu, Qiang; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2016-05-01

    Minocycline has beneficial effects in early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH); however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects have not been clearly identified. This study was undertaken to determine the influence of minocycline on inflammation and neural apoptosis and the possible mechanisms of these effects in early brain injury following subarachnoid hemorrhage. SAH was induced by the filament perforation model of SAH in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Minocycline or vehicle was given via an intraperitoneal injection 1 h after SAH induction. Minocycline treatment markedly attenuated brain edema secondary to blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation, which controls the maturation and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, especially interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Minocycline treatment also markedly reduced the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells. To further identify the potential mechanisms, we demonstrated that minocycline increased Bcl2 expression and reduced the protein expression of P53, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3. In addition, minocycline reduced the cortical levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are closely related to both NLRP3 inflammasome and P53 expression. Minocycline protects against NLRP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation and P53-associated apoptosis in early brain injury following SAH. Minocycline's anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effect may involve the reduction of ROS. Minocycline treatment may exhibit important clinical potentials in the management of SAH. PMID:26143258

  14. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES IN SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE LINK INFLAMMATION AND OUTCOME

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Albers, David; Schmidt, J. Michael; De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Falo, Christina Maria; Mayer, Stephan A.; Cremers, Serge; Agarwal, Sachin; Elkind, Mitchell SV; Connolly, E. Sander; Dukic, Vanja; Hripcsak, George; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nonconvulsive seizures (NCSz) are frequent following acute brain injury and have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury but mechanisms that cause NCSz are controversial. Pro-inflammatory states are common after many brain injuries and inflammatory mediated changes in blood-brain-barrier permeability have experimentally been linked to seizures. Methods In this prospective observational study of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients we explored the link between the inflammatory response following SAH and in-hospital NCSz studying clinical (systemic inflammatory response syndrome,SIRS) and laboratory markers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor receptor 1,TNF-R1; high sensitivity C-reactive protein,hsCRP). Logistic regression, cox proportional hazards regression, and mediation analyses were performed to investigate temporal and causal relationships. Results Among 479 SAH patients, 53(11%) had in-hospital NCSz. Patients with in-hospital NCSz had a more pronounced SIRS response (OR1.9 per point increase in SIRS; 95%-CI1.3-2.9), inflammatory surges were more likely immediately preceding NCSz onset, and the negative impact of SIRS on functional outcome at 3 months was mediated in part through in-hospital NCSz. In a subset with inflammatory serum biomarkers we confirmed these findings linking higher serum TNF-R1 and hsCRP to in-hospital NCSz (OR1.2 per 20 point hsCRP increase [95%-CI1.1-1.4]; OR2.5 per 100 point TNF-R1 increase [95%-CI2.1-2.9]). The association of inflammatory biomarkers with poor outcome was mediated in part through NCSz. Interpretation In-hospital NCSz were independently associated with a pro-inflammatory state following SAH reflected in clinical symptoms and serum biomarkers of inflammation. Our findings suggest that inflammation following SAH is associated with poor outcome and this effect is at least in part mediated through in-hospital NCSz. PMID:24771589

  15. Protective Role of P450 Epoxyeicosanoids in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Siler, Dominic A.; Martini, Ross; Ward, Jonathan; Nelson, Jonathan; Borkar, Rohan; Zuloaga, Kristen; Liu, Jesse; Fairbanks, Stacy; Raskin, Jeffrey; Anderson, Valerie; Dogan, Aclan; Wang, Ruikang K.; Alkayed, Nabil J.; Cetas, Justin S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients recovering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are at risk for developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Experimental and human studies implicate the vasoconstrictor P450 eicosanoid 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in the pathogenesis of DCI. To date, no studies have evaluated the role of vasodilator epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) in DCI. Methods Using mass spectrometry, we measured P450 eicosanoids in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 34 SAH patients from 1 to 14 days after admission. CSF eicosanoid levels were compared in patients who experienced DCI versus those who did not. We then studied the effect of EETs in a model of SAH using mice lacking the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase, which catabolizes EETs into their inactive diol. To assess changes in vessel morphology and cortical perfusion in the mouse brain we used optical microangiography, a non-invasive coherence based imaging technique. Results Along with increases in 20-HETE, we found that CSF levels of 14, 15-EET were elevated in SAH patients compared to control CSF, and levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced DCI compared to those who did not. Mice lacking sEH had elevated 14, 15-EET and were protected from the delayed decrease in microvascular cortical perfusion after SAH, compared to wild type mice. Conclusions Our findings suggest that P450 eicosanoids play an important role in the pathogenesis of DCI. While 20-HETE may contribute to the development of DCI, 14, 15-EET may afford protection against DCI. Strategies to enhance 14, 15-EET, including sEH inhibition, should be considered as part of a comprehensive approach to preventing DCI. PMID:25231529

  16. Subarachnoid hemorrhage of unknown origin: prognosis and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Brismar, J; Sundbärg, G

    1985-09-01

    The cases of 127 consecutive patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), in whom cerebral panangiography revealed no cause for the bleeding nor any sign of an intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, were reviewed in a study of the long-term prognosis and the possible prognostic factors in this condition. Data for all 127 patients in the study were obtained, with an average follow-up period of 5.4 years. After the 1st week post-SAH, only three rebleeds had occurred. In all, 80% of the patients had returned to full activity, 91% to at least part-time work; if the patients with hypertension were excluded, these figures rose to 86% and 95%, respectively. Decreased wakefulness on admission related to a slightly poorer prognosis, whereas age and red blood cell count in the cerebrospinal fluid had no prognostic significance. Of those patients who, at the end of the 2nd week following the SAH, were fully awake and had not developed any symptoms of delayed cerebral ischemia (87% of all patients admitted), 88% returned to full activity, 97% to at least part-time work. The survival rate for this group, as well as causes of death, seem to be within the range for normal individuals. It should thus be possible to inform these patients (at least the normotensive ones) of the benignity of their condition, directly after normal angiography. Even among the patients who were able to return to full activity, symptoms attributable to the SAH were common: 22% experienced problems such as frequent headaches, vertigo, irritability, and increased fatigability. PMID:4020460

  17. Causes of 30-day readmission after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jacob K; Washington, Chad W; Guniganti, Ridhima; Dacey, Ralph G; Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Hospital readmission is a common but controversial quality measure increasingly used to influence hospital compensation in the US. The objective of this study was to evaluate the causes for 30-day hospital readmission following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) to determine the appropriateness of this performance metric and to identify potential avenues for improved patient care. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who received surgical orendovas-cular treatment for aneurysmal SAH at Barnes-Jewish Hospital between 2003 and 2013. Two senior faculty identified by consensus the primary medical/surgical diagnosis associated with readmission as well as the underlying causes of rehospitalization. RESULTS Among 778 patients treated for aneurysmal SAH, 89 experienced a total of 97 readmission events, yielding a readmission rate of 11.4%. The median time from discharge to readmission was 9 days (interquartile range 3-17.5 days). Actual hydrocephalus or potential concern for hydrocephalus (e.g., headache) was the most frequent diagnosis (26/97, 26.8%), followed by infections (e.g., wound infection [5/97, 5.2%], urinary tract infection [3/97, 3.1%], and pneumonia [3/97, 3.1%]) and thromboembolic events (8/97, 8.2%). In most cases (75/97, 77.3%), we did not identify any treatment lapses contributing to readmission. The most common underlying causes for readmission were unavoidable development of SAH-related pathology (e.g., hydrocephalus; 36/97, 37.1%) and complications related to neurological impairment and immobility (e.g., thromboembolic event despite high-dose chemoprophylaxis; 21/97, 21.6%). The authors determined that 22/97 (22.7%) of the readmissions were likely preventable with alternative management. In these cases, insufficient outpatient medical care (for example, for hyponatremia; 16/97, 16.5%) was the most common shortcoming. CONCLUSIONS Most readmissions after aneurysmal SAH relate to late consequences of hemorrhage, such as hydrocephalus, or medical complications secondary to severe neurological injury. Although a minority of readmissions may potentially be avoided with closer medical follow-up in the transitional care environment, readmission after SAH is an insensitive and likely inappropriate hospital performance metric. PMID:26361278

  18. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol alleviates early brain injury by modulating oxidative stress and Akt and nuclear factor-κB pathways in a rat model of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    FU, PENG; HU, QUAN

    2016-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET) is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, present in olive oil and in the wastewater generated during olive oil processing. DOPET has various biological and pharmacological activities, including anticancer, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to determine whether DOPET alleviates early brain injury (EBI) associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) through suppression of oxidative stress and Akt and nuclear factor (NF)-κB pathways. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: Sham group, SAH group, SAH + vehicle group and SAH + DOPET group. Mortality, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and brain water content were assessed. Oxidative stress, Akt, NF-κB p65 and caspase-3 assays were also performed. DOPET induced a reduction in brain water content, and decreased the BBB permeability of SAH model rats. Furthermore, DOPET effectively controlled oxidative stress, NF-κB p65 and caspase-3 levels, in addition to significantly increasing Akt levels in the cortex following SAH. These results provide evidence that DOPET attenuates apoptosis in a rat SAH model through modulating oxidative stress and Akt and NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:27168841

  19. Functional analysis of Pro-inflammatory properties within the cerebrospinal fluid after subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To functionally characterize pro-inflammatory and vasoconstrictive properties of cerebrospinal fluid after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in vivo and in vitro. Methods The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 10 patients suffering from SAH was applied to the transparent skinfold chamber model in male NMRI mice which allows for in vivo analysis of the microcirculatory response to a superfusat. Microvascular diameter changes were quantified and the numbers of rolling and sticking leukocytes were documented using intravital multifluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory properties of CSF were assessed in vitro using a monocyte transendothelial migration assay. Results CSF superfusion started to induce significant vasoconstriction on days 4 and 6 after SAH. In parallel, CSF superfusion induced a microvascular leukocyte recruitment, with a significant number of leukocytes rolling (day 6) and sticking (days 2-4) to the endothelium. CSF of patients presenting with cerebral edema induced breakdown of blood vessel integrity in our assay as evidenced by fluorescent marker extravasation. In accordance with leukocyte activation in vivo, significantly higher in vitro monocyte migration rates were found after SAH. Conclusion We functionally characterized inflammatory and vasoactive properties of patients' CSF after SAH in vivo and in vitro. This pro-inflammatory milieu in the subarachnoid space might play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of early and delayed brain injury as well as vasospasm development following SAH. PMID:22316109

  20. Changes in responsiveness of the canine basilar artery to endothelin-1 after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Kamata, Katsuo; Nishiyama, Hiroshi; Kasuya, Yutaka ); Miyata, Noriyuki )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of endothelin-1 (ET-1) on the basilar arteries from control and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) dogs were examined. The maximal contraction of the basilar artery in response to ET-1 was markedly decreased in the SAH group. Treatment with 10{sup {minus}8}M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) reduced the contractile responses to ET-1 in the basilar arteries from control dogs. ET-1-induced contractions of the basilar arteries from control dogs were similar to those in strips from SAH dogs by the treatment with 10{sup {minus}8}M PMA. Ca{sup 2+}-induced contraction of the basilar arteries which were depolarized with isotonic K{sup +} were significantly attenuated in SAH dogs. Treatment with PMA also reduced the contractile responses to Ca{sup 2+} in the basilar arteries from control dogs. These results indicate that decreased contractile responses of the basilar arteries to ET-1 and Ca{sup 2+} in the SAH group may be related to changes in the activity of the protein kinase C in vascular smooth muscle.

  1. CSF and Serum Biomarkers Focusing on Cerebral Vasospasm and Ischemia after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Carla S.; Lange, Bettina; Zimmermann, Michael; Seifert, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Delayed cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) remain severe complications after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Although focal changes in cerebral metabolism indicating ischemia are detectable by microdialysis, routinely used biomarkers are missing. We therefore sought to evaluate a panel of possible global markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients after SAH. CSF and serum of SAH patients were analyzed retrospectively. In CSF, levels of inhibitory, excitatory, and structural amino acids were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In serum, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100B level were measured and examined in conjunction with CVS and DCI. CVS was detected by arteriography, and ischemic lesions were assessed by computed tomography (CT) scans. All CSF amino acids were altered after SAH. CSF glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine were significantly correlated with arteriographic CVS. CSF glutamate and serum S100B were significantly correlated with ischemic events after SAH; however, NSE did not correlate neither with ischemia nor with vasospasm. Glutamate, glutamine, glycine, and histidine might be used in CSF as markers for CVS. Glutamate also indicates ischemia. Serum S100B, but not NSE, is a suitable marker for ischemia. These results need to be validated in larger prospective cohorts. PMID:23509668

  2. Assessment of the Correlations Between Brain Weight and Brain Edema in Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Suzuki, Hidenori; Nakagawa, Takashi; Uekawa, Ken; Koibuchi, Nobutaka; Kawano, Takayuki; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei

    2016-01-01

    Because brain edema is correlated with poor outcome in clinical subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), appropriate evaluation methods for brain edema are important in experimental SAH studies. Although brain water content (BWC) is widely used to evaluate brain edema in stroke research, the usefulness of brain weight is undetermined. In this study, we examined the role of brain weight in the evaluation of brain edema in experimental SAH. The endovascular perforation model of SAH was used, and rats were assessed by neurological scoring (NS). The brains were quickly removed at 24 h after the operation, and the weights of wet cerebrum (WWC) and dry cerebrum (WDC) were measured to determine the brain water content (BWC). The correlations of those values with each other and to body weight (BW) were then examined to reveal the significance of brain weight. The rats were assigned to sham-operated (n = 8) and SAH (n = 16) groups. There were no significant differences in WWC between the groups (p = 0.61). WWC was correlated with BWC but not with NS in all rats. In addition, WWC was clearly correlated with BW and WDC, which is thought to substitute for the original brain weight. From these results, we suggest that the measurement of brain weight as an evaluation of brain edema is limited and that BW and original brain volume can be confounding factors in evaluation. PMID:26463928

  3. Microglia regulate blood clearance in subarachnoid hemorrhage by heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Schallner, Nils; Pandit, Rambhau; LeBlanc, Robert; Thomas, Ajith J.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.; Gallo, David; Otterbein, Leo E.; Hanafy, Khalid A.

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) carries a 50% mortality rate. The extravasated erythrocytes that surround the brain contain heme, which, when released from damaged red blood cells, functions as a potent danger molecule that induces sterile tissue injury and organ dysfunction. Free heme is metabolized by heme oxygenase (HO), resulting in the generation of carbon monoxide (CO), a bioactive gas with potent immunomodulatory capabilities. Here, using a murine model of SAH, we demonstrated that expression of the inducible HO isoform (HO-1, encoded by Hmox1) in microglia is necessary to attenuate neuronal cell death, vasospasm, impaired cognitive function, and clearance of cerebral blood burden. Initiation of CO inhalation after SAH rescued the absence of microglial HO-1 and reduced injury by enhancing erythrophagocytosis. Evaluation of correlative human data revealed that patients with SAH have markedly higher HO-1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared with that in patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Furthermore, cisternal hematoma volume correlated with HO-1 activity and cytokine expression in the CSF of these patients. Collectively, we found that microglial HO-1 and the generation of CO are essential for effective elimination of blood and heme after SAH that otherwise leads to neuronal injury and cognitive dysfunction. Administration of CO may have potential as a therapeutic modality in patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms. PMID:26011640

  4. The role of the microcirculation in delayed cerebral ischemia and chronic degenerative changes after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Østergaard, Leif; Aamand, Rasmus; Karabegovic, Sanja; Tietze, Anna; Blicher, Jakob Udby; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Iversen, Nina Kerting; Secher, Niels; Engedal, Thorbjørn Søndergaard; Anzabi, Mariam; Jimenez, Eugenio Gutierrez; Cai, Changsi; Koch, Klaus Ulrik; Næss-Schmidt, Erhard Trillingsgaard; Obel, Annette; Juul, Niels; Rasmussen, Mads; Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann

    2013-01-01

    The mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is 50%, and most survivors suffer severe functional and cognitive deficits. Half of SAH patients deteriorate 5 to 14 days after the initial bleeding, so-called delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Although often attributed to vasospasms, DCI may develop in the absence of angiographic vasospasms, and therapeutic reversal of angiographic vasospasms fails to improve patient outcome. The etiology of chronic neurodegenerative changes after SAH remains poorly understood. Brain oxygenation depends on both cerebral blood flow (CBF) and its microscopic distribution, the so-called capillary transit time heterogeneity (CTH). In theory, increased CTH can therefore lead to tissue hypoxia in the absence of severe CBF reductions, whereas reductions in CBF, paradoxically, improve brain oxygenation if CTH is critically elevated. We review potential sources of elevated CTH after SAH. Pericyte constrictions in relation to the initial ischemic episode and subsequent oxidative stress, nitric oxide depletion during the pericapillary clearance of oxyhemoglobin, vasogenic edema, leukocytosis, and astrocytic endfeet swelling are identified as potential sources of elevated CTH, and hence of metabolic derangement, after SAH. Irreversible changes in capillary morphology and function are predicted to contribute to long-term relative tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and neurodegeneration. We discuss diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these predictions. PMID:24064495

  5. SAHIT Investigators--on the outcome of some subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, R Loch; Jaja, Blessing; Cusimano, Michael D; Etminan, Nima; Hanggi, Daniel; Hasan, David; Ilodigwe, Don; Lantigua, Hector; Le Roux, Peter; Lo, Benjamin; Louffat-Olivares, Ada; Mayer, Stephan; Molyneux, Andrew; Quinn, Audrey; Schweizer, Tom A; Schenk, Thomas; Spears, Julian; Todd, Michael; Torner, James; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Wong, George K C; Singh, Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Outcome of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) has improved over the last decades. Yet, case fatality remains nearly 40% and survivors often have permanent neurological, cognitive and/or behavioural sequelae. Other than nimodipine drug or clinical trials have not consistently improved outcome. We formed a collaboration of SAH investigators to create a resource for prognostic analysis and for studies aimed at optimizing the design and analysis of phase 3 trials in aneurysmal SAH. We identified investigators with data from randomized, clinical trials of patients with aneurysmal SAH or prospectively collected single- or multicentre databases of aneurysmal SAH patients. Data are being collected and proposals to use the data and to design future phase 3 clinical trials are being discussed. This paper reviews some issues discussed at the first meeting of the SAH international trialists (SAHIT) repository meeting. Investigators contributed or have agreed to contribute data from several phase 3 trials including the tirilazad trials, intraoperative hypothermia for aneurysmal SAH trial, nicardipine clinical trials, international subarachnoid aneurysm trial, intravenous magnesium sulphate for aneurysmal SAH, magnesium for aneurysmal SAH and from prospectively-collected data from four institutions. The number of patients should reach 15,000. Some industry investigators refused to provide data and others reported that their institutional research ethics boards would not permit even deidentified or anonymized data to be included. Others reported conflict of interest that prevented them from submitting data. The problems with merging data were related to lack of common definitions and coding of variables, differences in outcome scales used, and times of assessment. Some questions for investigation that arose are discussed. SAHIT demonstrates the possibility of SAH investigators to contribute data for collaborative research. The problems are similar to those already documented in other similar collaborative efforts such as in head injury research. We encourage clinical trial and registry investigators to contact us and participate in SAHIT. Key issues moving forward will be to use common definitions (common data elements), outcomes analysis, and to prioritize research questions, among others. PMID:24323299

  6. High Risk for Seizures Following Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Regardless of Referral Bias

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Kathryn L.; Westover, M. Brandon; Phillips, Michael T.; Iftimia, Nicolae A.; Buckley, Deidre A.; Ogilvy, Christopher S.; Shafi, Mouhsin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the frequency, predictors, and clinical impact of electrographic seizures in patients with high clinical or radiologic grade non-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), independent of referral bias. Methods We compared rates of electrographic seizures and associated clinical variables and outcomes in patients with high clinical or radiologic grade non-traumatic SAH. Rates of electrographic seizure detection before and after institution of a guideline which made continuous EEG monitoring routine in this population were compared. Results Electrographic seizures occurred in 17.6 % of patients monitored expressly because of clinically suspected subclinical seizures. In unselected patients, seizures still occurred in 9.6 % of all cases, and in 8.6 % of cases in which there was no a priori suspicion of seizures. The first seizure detected occurred 5.4 (IQR 2.9–7.3) days after onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage with three of eight patients (37.5 %) having the first recorded seizure more than 48 h following EEG initiation, and 2/8 (25 %) at more than 72 h following EEG initiation. High clinical grade was associated with poor outcome at time of hospital discharge; electrographic seizures were not associated with poor outcome. Conclusions Electrographic seizures occur at a relatively high rate in patients with non-traumatic SAH even after accounting for referral bias. The prolonged time to the first detected seizure in this cohort may reflect dynamic clinical features unique to the SAH population. PMID:24723663

  7. A Site-Specific, Sustained-Release Drug Delivery System for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Daniel; Etminan, Nima; Steiger, Hans Jakob; Johnson, Mark; Peet, M Melissa; Tice, Tom; Burton, Kevin; Hudson, Bruce; Turner, Michele; Stella, Angela; Heshmati, Parissa; Davis, Cara; Faleck, Herbert J; Macdonald, R Loch

    2016-04-01

    Nimodipine is the only drug approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration for improving outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has less than optimal efficacy, causes dose-limiting hypotension in a substantial proportion of patients, and is administered enterally 6 times daily. We describe development of site-specific, sustained-release nimodipine microparticles that can be delivered once directly into the subarachnoid space or cerebral ventricles for potential improvement in outcome of patients with aneurysmal SAH. Eight injectable microparticle formulations of nimodipine in poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) polymers of varying composition were tested in vitro, and 1 was advanced into preclinical studies and clinical application. Intracisternal or intraventricular injection of nimodipine-PLGA microparticles in rats and beagles demonstrated dose-dependent, sustained concentrations of nimodipine in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid for up to 29 days with minimal toxicity in the brain or systemic tissues at doses <2 mg in rats and 51 mg in beagles, which would be equivalent of up to 612-1200 mg in humans, based on scaling relative to cerebrospinal fluid volumes. Efficacy was tested in the double-hemorrhage dog model of SAH. Nimodipine-PLGA microparticles significantly attenuated angiographic vasospasm. This therapeutic approach shows promise for improving outcome after SAH and may have broader applicability for similar diseases that are confined to body cavities or spaces, are self-limited, and lack effective treatments. PMID:26935204

  8. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Study for Medical Decision-Making Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Dredla, Brynn; Freeman, William D

    2016-04-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient's medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  9. Impact of electrolyte imbalances on the outcome of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alimohamadi, Maysam; Saghafinia, Masoud; Alikhani, Fariba; Danial, Zohreh; Shirani, Mohamad; Amirjamshidi, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Electrolyte disturbances are frequently observed during the acute and subacute period after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and may potentially worsen therapeutic outcome. This study was conducted to determine the pattern of electrolyte disturbance in the acute and subacute phase after SAH and their effect on the long-term outcome of the patients. Materials and Methods: Fifty-three patients were prospectively enrolled. The standards of care for all patients were uniformly performed. The serum levels of electrolytes (sodium, potassium and magnesium) were determined with measurements obtained on admission, 3–5 and 7–10 days after SAH. Radiographic intensity of hemorrhage (Fisher's scale), and the clinical grading (World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade) were documented in the first visit. The outcomes were evaluated using Glasgow outcome scale at 3 months after discharge. Results: Hyponatremia was the most common electrolyte imbalance among the patients but did not worsen the outcome. Although less common, hypernatremia in the subacute phase was significantly associated with poor outcome. Both hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia were predictive of poor outcomes. Conclusions: Because electrolyte abnormalities can adversely affect the outcome, the serum levels of electrolytes should be closely monitored with serial measurements and treated properly in patients with aneurysmal SAH. PMID:26889275

  10. Contrast Extravasation on Computed Tomography Angiography Imitating a Basilar Artery Trunk Aneurysm in Subsequent Conventional Angiogram-Negative Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Courses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Ho; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Nam, Kyoung Hyup

    2015-01-01

    Contrast extravasation on computed tomography angiography (CTA) is rare but becoming more common, with increasing use of CTA for various cerebral vascular diseases. We report on two cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in which the CTA showed an upper basilar trunk saccular lesion suggesting ruptured aneurysm. However, immediate subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA) failed to show a vascular lesion. In one case, repeated follow up DSA was also negative. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged without any neurologic deficit. In the other case, the patient showed sudden mental deterioration on the third hospital day and her brain CT showed rebleeding. The immediate follow up DSA showed contrast stagnation in the vicinity of the upper basilar artery, suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Double stents deployment at the disease segment was performed. Due to the frequent use of CTA, contrast extravasation is an increasingly common observation. Physicians should be aware that basilar artery extravasation can mimic the appearance of an aneurysm. PMID:27066442

  11. Postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, Cindy W

    2012-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a very common obstetric emergency with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Understanding its etiology is fundamental to effectively managing PPH in an acute setting. Active management of the third stage of labor is also a key component in its prevention. Management strategies include conservative measures (medications, uterine tamponade, and arterial embolization) as well as surgical interventions (arterial ligations, compression sutures, and hysterectomy). Creating a standardized PPH protocol and running simulation-based drills with a multidisciplinary team may also help decrease maternal morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes, although further studies are needed. PMID:22309588

  12. Intracranial hemorrhage following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Najima, Yuho; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Miyazawa, Maho; Nakano, Mikako; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Yamashita, Takuya; Akiyama, Hideki; Sakamaki, Hisashi

    2009-05-01

    Charts and radiographs of 622 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, over a 20-year period, were retrospectively reviewed for intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) following transplant. A total of 21 cases of ICH were identified (3.4%) including 15 cases of intraparenchymal hemorrhage (IPH), two cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and four cases of subdural hematoma (SDH). The median time from transplantation to the onset of ICH was 63 days (range, 6-3,488 days). The clinical features of post-transplant ICH patients were similar and included hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), systemic infection, and veno occlusive disease (VOD), recently referred to as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, in addition to severe thrombocytopenia. Mortality rate was especially high (89%) after IPH with a median survival of 2 days (range, 0-148 days). In contrast, all patients with SAH or SDH following HSCT survived. The cause of post-transplant ICH appears to be multifactorial, including thrombocytopenia, hypertension, acute GVHD, VOD, and radiation therapy. Most patients in our series displayed severe thrombocytopenia at the onset of ICH, even though adequate prophylactic platelet transfusions were given. By univariate analysis, cord blood transplantation, acute GVHD, systemic infection, and VOD were related to the incidence of ICH, whereas prior CNS episodes and radiation therapy did not reach statistical significance. A multivariate analysis with logistic regression identified acute GVHD as the only factor that significantly influenced ICH occurrence. PMID:19338041

  13. Minocycline Improves Functional Outcomes, Memory Deficits, and Histopathology after Endovascular Perforation-Induced Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sherchan, Prativa; Lekic, Tim; Suzuki, Hidenori; Hasegawa, Yu; Rolland, William; Duris, Kamil; Zhan, Yan; Tang, Jiping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) results in significant long-lasting cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, evaluating acute and long-term outcomes after therapeutic intervention is important for clinical translation. The aim of this study was to use minocycline, a known neuroprotectant agent, to evaluate the long-term benefits in terms of neurobehavior and neuropathology after experimental SAH in rats, and to determine which neurobehavioral test would be effective for long-term evaluation. SAH was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=118). The animals were treated with intraperitoneal injection of minocycline (45 mg/kg or 135 mg/kg) or vehicle 1 h after SAH induction. In the short-term, animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h for evaluation of neurobehavior, brain water content, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. In the long-term, neurobehavior was evaluated at days 21–28 post-SAH, and histopathological analysis was done at day 28. High-dose but not low-dose minocycline reduced brain water content at 24 h, and therefore only the high-dose regimen was used for further evaluation, which reduced MMP-9 activity at 24 h. Further, high-dose minocycline improved spatial memory and attenuated neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. The rotarod, T-maze, and water maze tests, but not the inclined plane test, detected neurobehavioral deficits in SAH rats at days 21–28. This study demonstrates that minocycline attenuates long-term functional and morphological outcomes after endovascular perforation-induced SAH. Long-term neurobehavioral assessments using the rotarod, T-maze, and water maze tests could be useful to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic intervention after experimental SAH. PMID:22013966

  14. Angiographic dimple of profound significance in cases of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaechan

    2015-12-01

    The occurrence of an angiographic dimple or irregularity due to indentation of the contrast column by an intraluminal thrombus at the dome of a ruptured aneurysm is not uncommon and does not draw much clinical attention. However, an angiographic dimple at the base of the ruptured aneurysm or division of the parent artery can signify a rupture point close to the dimple and an intraluminal thrombus, which has utmost clinical significance as it is close to the parent artery and necessitates a different treatment strategy from rupture of the aneurysm dome. The author reports on 2 cases of an angiographic dimple following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and subsequent surgical exploration. In the first patient, a 57-year-old-woman, angiography revealed a basal dimple in a superiorly directed anterior communicating artery aneurysm. A pterional craniotomy was performed, which revealed a bilobed aneurysm harboring a superiorly directed unruptured lobule and inferiorly directed ruptured lobule. An intraluminal thrombus in the inferiorly directed lobule apparently obscured the lobule and caused the appearance of the basal dimple on the angiograms. In the second patient, a 40-year-old man who had been transferred to the author's institution because of an angiographic evaluation that did not show any aneurysm despite SAH in the basal cisterns, initial angiography revealed a subtle dimple on the superior wall of the anterior communicating artery (ACoA). On follow-up angiography, a very small aneurysm was seen at the site of the dimple. A craniotomy then revealed a very small ruptured and thrombosed aneurysm on the superior wall of the ACoA. PMID:26053688

  15. Trends in blood pressure, osmolality and electrolytes after subarachnoid hemorrhage from aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Disney, L; Weir, B; Grace, M; Roberts, P

    1989-08-01

    Daily trends in blood pressure, osmolality and electrolytes were analyzed in a series of 173 operated aneurysm cases who had subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and were admitted within 4 days of the ictus. High blood pressure was associated with a greater risk of mortality and the development of clinically significant vasospasm (VSP). High osmolality shortly after admission was related to mortality but not VSP. Changes in sodium and potassium had no obvious relationship to mortality or VSP. PMID:2766122

  16. Time intervals from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage to treatment and factors contributing to delay.

    PubMed

    Robbert, Menno; Germans, Menno R; Hoogmoed, Jantien; van Straaten, H A Stéphanie; Coert, Bert A; Peter Vandertop, W; Verbaan, Dagmar

    2014-03-01

    In the management of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), aneurysm treatment as early as feasible is mandatory to minimize the risk of a rebleed and may thus improve outcome. We assessed the different time intervals from the first symptoms of aSAH to start of aneurysm treatment in an effort to identify which factors contribute mostly to a delay in time to treatment. In 278 aSAH patients, time intervals between the different steps from initial hemorrhage to aneurysm treatment were retrospectively reviewed, and delaying factors were determined. Half of the patients presented to a hospital within 115 min (IQR 60-431). The median (IQR) interval from hemorrhage to diagnosis was 169 min (96-513), and from diagnosis to treatment 1,057 min (416-1,428), or 17.6 h. Aneurysm treatment started within 24 h in 76 % of treated patients. Independent factors predicting delay to treatment were primary presentation at a referring hospital and admission to the treatment center later in the day. Delay in treatment was not independently related to poor outcome. The interval to aneurysm treatment might be improved upon by immediate and direct transport to the treatment center combined with optimization of in-hospital logistics, following the 'time-is-brain' concept so successfully adopted in the treatment of ischemic stroke. PMID:24366653

  17. Brain Volume Determination in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Hardy, Maurice; Fujii, Mutsumi; McBride, Devin W; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Brain edema is routinely measured using the wet-dry method. Volume, however, is the sum total of all cerebral tissues, including water. Therefore, volumetric change following injury may not be adequately quantified using percentage of edema. We thus tested the hypothesis that dried brains can be reconstituted with water and then re-measured to determine the actual volume. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was induced by endovascular perforation in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30). Animals were euthanized at 24 and 72 h after evaluation of neurobehavior for determination of brain water content. Dried brains were thereafter reconstituted with equal parts of water (lost from brain edema) and centrifuged to remove air bubbles. The total volume was quantified using hydrostatic (underwater) physics principles that 1 ml water (mass) = 1 cm(3) (volume). The amount of additional water needed to reach a preset level marked on 2-ml test tubes was added to that lost from brain edema, and from the brain itself, to determine the final volume. SAH significantly increased both brain water and volume while worsening neurological function in affected rats. Volumetric measurements demonstrated significant brain swelling after SAH, in addition to the brain edema approach. This modification of the "wet-dry" method permits brain volume determination using valuable post hoc dried brain tissue. PMID:26463930

  18. Severe microvascular injury induced by lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Increase in vasopermeability, hemorrhage, and microthrombosis due to degradation of subendothelial and perivascular matrices.

    PubMed Central

    Movat, H. Z.; Wasi, S.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the nature of the lesions in the microcirculation of the dermis of rabbits induced with lysosomal releasates of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). No attempt was made in the studies presented in this publication to deal with the offending agent in the releasate. Four parameters of microvascular injury were quantitated: increase in vascular permeability with 125I-labeled serum albumin, hemorrhage with 59Fe-labeled erythrocytes, accumulation (aggregation) of platelets with 111In-labeled platelets. In one experiment accumulation of 51Cr-PMNs was investigated. The lysosomal releasate induced a rapid increase in vasopermeability, but both hemorrhage and exudate formation peaked 1 hour after intradermal injection. Platelet accumulation was also demonstrable in these lesions, and microthrombosis was a very prominent feature. The microvascular injury, including microthrombosis, could be elicited also in animals rendered leukopenic with nitrogen mustard. Simultaneous injection of prostaglandin E2 with the releasate enhanced the microvascular injury. The morphologic changes in the microcirculation of the rabbit's dermis were assessed in lesions 5 minutes to 5 hours old. Several changes were encountered, primarily in the wall of venules and small veins and to a lesser degree in small arteries and capillaries. Ultrastructurally very early lesions (up to 15 minutes) had gaps or spaces in the endothelium, resembling those induced by mediators such as histamine or bradykinin. Older lesions were different, quite characteristic, and represent the hallmark of these lesions. Lysis and disappearance of vascular basement membrane, of perivascular collagen, and of the internal elastic lamina were a frequent finding, best demonstrable when microthrombi did not abut on vessel walls. Cellular components of vessels (endothelium, pericytes, smooth muscle) showed fragmentation, leading to complete disappearance of cellular elements. These lesions were usually walled off by platelet aggregates and fibrin. At times microthrombi occluded an entire vessel. These changes were interpreted as hemostasis. The mild accumulation of PMNs at the site of injury did not contribute significantly to the microvascular injury. The findings indicate that the unique changes in the microcirculation, not described before, may occur quite frequently, when the microvascular injury is elicited primarily by release of lysosomal constituents by phagocytic or nonphagocytic stimuli. One can conclude that the hallmark of this type of injury is disappearance of basement membrane followed secondarily by disintegration of the vascular wall, followed in turn by hemo Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:3907363

  19. Prognostic Value of Serum S100 Protein by Elecsys S100 Immunoassay in Patients with Spontaneous Subarachnoid and Intracerebral Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Jin; Kim, Hwi-Jun; Shim, Jai-Joon; Bae, Hack-Gun; Yun, Il-Gyu

    2008-01-01

    Objective The serum S100 protein has been known to reflect the severity of neuronal damage. The purpose of this study was to assess the prognostic value of the serum S100 protein by Elecsys S100 immunoassay in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and to establish reference value for this new method. Methods Serum S100 protein value was measured at admission, day 3 and 7 after bleeding in 42 consecutive patients (SAH : 20, ICH : 22) and 74 healthy controls, prospectively. Admission Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score, Hunt & Hess grade and Fisher grade for SAH, presence of intraventricular hemorrhage, ICH volume, and outcome at discharge were evaluated. Degrees of serum S100 elevation and their effect on outcomes were compared between two groups. Results Median S100 levels in SAH and ICH groups were elevated at admission (0.092 versus 0.283 µg/L) and at day 3 (0.110 versus 0.099 µg/L) compared to healthy controls (0.05 µg/L; p<0001). At day 7, however, these levels were normalized in both groups. Time course of S100 level in SAH patient was relatively steady at least during the first 3 days, whereas in ICH patient it showed abrupt S100 surge on admission and then decreased rapidly during the next 7 days, suggesting severe brain damage at the time of bleeding. In ICH patient, S100 level on admission correlated well with GCS score (r=-0.859; p=0.0001) and ICH volume (r=0.663; p=0.001). A baseline S100 level more than 0.199 µg/L predicted poor outcome with 92% sensitivity and 90% specificity. Logistic regression analyses showed Ln (S100) on admission as the only independent predictor of poor outcome (odd ratio 36.1; 95% CI, 1.98 to 656.3). Conclusion Brain damage in ICH patient seems to develop immediately after bleeding, whereas in SAH patients it seems to be sustained for few days. Degree of brain damage is more severe in ICH compared to SAH group based on the S100 level. S100 level is considered an independent predictor of poor outcome in patient with spontaneous ICH, but not in SAH. Further study with large population is required to confirm this result. PMID:19119467

  20. Erythropoietin for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Feasible Ingredient for a Successful Medical Recipe

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Noto, Marcello; Alafaci, Concetta; Cappello, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) following aneurysm bleeding accounts for 6% to 8% of all cerebrovascular accidents. Although an aneurysm can be effectively managed by surgery or endovascular therapy, delayed cerebral ischemia is diagnosed in a high percentage of patients resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Cerebral vasospasm occurs in more than half of all patients after aneurysm rupture and is recognized as the leading cause of delayed cerebral ischemia after SAH. Hemodynamic strategies and endovascular procedures may be considered for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. In recent years, the mechanisms contributing to the development of vasospasm, abnormal reactivity of cerebral arteries and cerebral ischemia following SAH, have been investigated intensively. A number of pathological processes have been identified in the pathogenesis of vasospasm, including endothelial injury, smooth muscle cell contraction from spasmogenic substances produced by the subarachnoid blood clots, changes in vascular responsiveness and inflammatory response of the vascular endothelium. To date, the current therapeutic interventions remain ineffective as they are limited to the manipulation of systemic blood pressure, variation of blood volume and viscosity and control of arterial carbon dioxide tension. In this scenario, the hormone erythropoietin (EPO) has been found to exert neuroprotective action during experimental SAH when its recombinant form (rHuEPO) is administered systemically. However, recent translation of experimental data into clinical trials has suggested an unclear role of recombinant human EPO in the setting of SAH. In this context, the aim of the current review is to present current evidence on the potential role of EPO in cerebrovascular dysfunction following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:26581085

  1. Intracranial hemorrhages and late hemorrhagic disease associated cholestatic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Per, Hüseyin; Arslan, Duran; Gümüş, Hakan; Coskun, Abdulhakim; Kumandaş, Sefer

    2013-01-01

    Deficiency of vitamin K predisposes to early, classic or late hemorrhagic disease of the newborn (HDN); of which late HDN may be associated with serious and life-threatening intracranial hemorrhage. Late HDN is characterized intracranial bleeding in infants aged 1 week to 6 months due to severe vitamin K deficiency. Late HDN is still an important cause of mortality and morbidity in developing countries where vitamin K prophylaxis is not routinely practiced. Children with cholestatic liver disease are at risk for developing secondary vitamin K deficiency because of fat malabsorbtion and inadequate dietary intake. In this study, we described 11 infants with cholestatic liver disease with different etiologies exhibiting intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Six patients underwent surgical evacuation of ICH, following the administration of vitamin K and/or fresh frozen plasma. The possibility of cholestatic liver disease should be considered in the treatment of ICH due to vitamin K deficiency. PMID:22327309

  2. Comparison of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers between idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced chronic hydrocephalus: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Dong-Hyuk; Back, Dong-Bin; Lee, Jea-Young; Lee, Chang-In; Park, Kyung-Jae; Kang, Shin-Hyuk; Cho, Tai-Hyoung; Chung, Yong-Gu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We examined the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced and idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) to investigate the pathophysiology and mechanism of communicating hydrocephalus compared to obstructive hydrocephalus. Material/Methods We obtained CSF samples from 8 INPH, 10 SAH-induced hydrocephalus, and 6 unmatched patients with non-hemorrhagic obstructive hydrocephalus during their ventriculoperitoneal shunt operations. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and total tau in the CSF were analyzed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results The mean VEGF levels in the CSF of patients with SAH-induced hydrocephalus, INPH, and obstructive hydrocephalus were 239±131, 239±75, and 163±122 pg/mL, respectively. The total tau concentrations in the CSF of the groups were 1139±1900, 325±325, and 1550±2886 pg/mL, respectively. TNF-α values were 114±34, 134±38, and 55±16 pg/mL, respectively. TGF-β1 values were 953±430, 869±447, and 136±63 pg/mL, respectively. A significant difference in TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels was observed only between SAH-induced and chronic obstructive hydrocephalus, and between INPH and chronic obstructive hydrocephalus (p<0.01). Conclusions No significant differences in the 4 CSF biomarker levels were observed between INPH and SAH-induced hydrocephalus, whereas CSF TNF-α and TGF-β1 levels were increased compared to those in patients with chronic obstructive hydrocephalus. Post-SAH hydrocephalus and INPH are probably more destructive to neural tissues, and then stimulate the inflammatory reaction and healing process, compared with obstructive hydrocephalus. PMID:23197244

  3. [Neurologic manifestations of subarachnoid and parenchymatous hemorrhages caused by arterial aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bykovnikov, L D

    1991-01-01

    Overall 155 patients with subarachnoidal and parenchymatous hemorrhages from arterial aneurysms, mainly of the anterior part of the circle of Willis, were examined. The intensity of subarachnoidal and parenchymatous hemorrhages varied, with the ++diencephalo-hypothalamic area being largely involved. The volume of intraparenchymatous hemorrhages ranged from 10 to 90 ml. Massive basal SAH was accompanied, in a number of cases, by blood congestion in the fourth ventricle. Correlations were established between the gravity of the health status, clinical cerebral decompensation, and the intensity of hemorrhage to the basal subarachnoidal space and cerebral parenchyma. Three variants of clinical decompensation of the brain were revealed: it ran a torpid course in the majority of cases (64%), it increased dramatically in every fourth patient, and gradually regressed in every 10th patient. PMID:1661472

  4. Impairment of cardiac metabolism and sympathetic innervation after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a nuclear medicine imaging study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is often complicated by myocardial injury, whether this neurogenic cardiomyopathy is associated with the modification of cardiac metabolism is unknown. This study sought to explore, by positron emission tomography/computed tomography, the presence of altered cardiac glucose metabolism after SAH. Methods During a 16-month period, 30 SAH acute phase patients underwent myocardial 18 F- fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDGPET), 99mTc-tetrofosmin and 123I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (123I-mIBG) scintigraphy, respectively, assessing glucose metabolism, cardiac perfusion, and sympathetic innervation. Patients with initial abnormalities were followed monthly for two months for 18F-FDG, and six months later for 123I-mIBG. Results In this SAH population, acute cardiac metabolic disturbance was observed in 83% of patients (n = 25), and sympathetic innervation disturbance affected 90% (n = 27). Myocardial perfusion was normal for all patients. The topography and extent of metabolic defects and innervation abnormalities largely overlapped. Follow-up showed rapid improvement of glucose metabolism in one or two months. Normalization of sympathetic innervation was slower; only 27% of patients (n = 8) exhibited normal 123I-mIBG scintigraphy after six months. Presence of initial altered cardiac metabolism was not associated with more unfavorable cardiac or neurological outcomes. Conclusions These findings support the hypothesis of neurogenic myocardial stunning after SAH. In hemodynamically stable acute phase SAH patients, cardiomyopathy is characterized by diffuse and heterogeneous 18F-FDG and 123I-mIBG uptake defect. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01218191. Registered 6 October 2010. PMID:24964817

  5. Effect of APOE Gene Polymorphism on Early Cerebral Perfusion After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chongjie; Jiang, Li; Yang, Yanhong; Wu, Haitao; Huang, Zhijian; Sun, Xiaochuan

    2015-12-01

    High mortality following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) occurs in the early phase, but the underlying mechanism of early brain injury (EBI) in aSAH was less elucidated. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes and early cerebral perfusion after aSAH. We collected venous blood of aSAH patients on admission for APOE genotype identification, applying computed tomography perfusion (CTP) scanning within 24 h after onset. The CTP parameters between patients with different APOE genotypes were compared. Then, a positive item was chosen for separate uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses to seek its risk factors. Our results showed mean transit time (MTT) rather than other parameters was significantly longer in patients with the APOEε4 allele, compared to those without APOEε4 (6.45 ± 1.17 versus 5.83 ± 0.84 s, P = 0.019). APOEε4 acted as an independent risk factor for MTT prolongation (>5.9 s) in uni- (P = 0.031, OR = 3.960, 95 % CI = 1.131-13.863) and multivariate (P = 0.019, OR = 9.822, 95 % CI = 1.458-66.193) logistic regression analyses, respectively. APOEε4 may induce cerebral perfusion impairment in the early phase, contributing to EBI following aSAH, and assessment of APOE genotypes could serve as a useful tool in the prognostic evaluation and therapeutic management of aSAH. PMID:26370543

  6. Coffee Consumption and Incidence of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: The Jichi Medical School Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Sakamaki, Tsuyako; Hara, Motohiko; Kayaba, Kazunori; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Shizukiyo

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies on the association between coffee consumption and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have provided inconsistent results. We examine the risk of SAH from coffee consumption in a Japanese population. Methods Our analyses were based on the Jichi Medical School Cohort Study, a large-scale population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 9941 participants (3868 men and 6073 women; mean age 55 years) with no history of cardiovascular disease or carcinoma were examined. Participants were asked to choose one of five options to indicate their daily coffee consumption: none, less than 1 cup a day, 1–2 cups a day, 3–4 cups a day, or 5 or more cups a day. The incidence of SAH was assessed independently by a diagnostic committee. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjustment for age and sex (HR1) and for additional potential confounders (HR2). Results During 10.7 years of follow-up, SAH occurred in 47 participants. When compared with the participants who consumed less than 1 cup of coffee a day, the HR of SAH was significantly higher in the group who consumed 5 or more cups a day in both models (HR1 4.49; 95% CI, 1.44–14.00; HR2 3.79; 95% CI, 1.19–12.05). Conclusions The present community-based cohort study showed that heavy coffee consumption was associated with an increased incidence of SAH after adjusting for age, sex, and multiple potential cardiovascular confounders. PMID:26460383

  7. 20-HETE is associated with unfavorable outcomes in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mark K; Crago, Elizabeth A; Conley, Yvette P; Balzer, Jeffery R; Ren, Dianxu; Ducruet, Andrew F; Kochanek, Patrick M; Sherwood, Paula R; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2015-09-01

    Emerging evidence has suggested that patients experiencing aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) develop vascular dysregulation as a potential contributor to poor outcomes. Preclinical studies have implicated the novel microvascular constrictor, 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) in aSAH pathogenesis, yet the translational relevance of 20-HETE in patients with aSAH is largely unknown. The goal of this research was to determine the relationship between 20-HETE cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels, gene variants in 20-HETE synthesis, and acute/long-term aSAH outcomes. In all, 363 adult patients (age 18 to 75) with aSAH were prospectively recruited from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center neurovascular Intensive Care Unit. Patients were genotyped for polymorphic variants and cytochrome P450 (CYP)-eicosanoid CSF levels were measured over 14 days. Outcomes included delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), clinical neurologic deterioration (CND), and modified Rankin Scores (MRS) at 3 and 12 months. Patients with CND and unfavorable 3-month MRS had 2.2- and 2.7-fold higher mean 20-HETE CSF levels, respectively. Patients in high/moderate 20-HETE trajectory groups (35.7%) were 2.5-, 2.1-, 3.1-, 3.3-, and 2.1-fold more likely to have unfavorable MRS at 3 months, unfavorable MRS at 12 months, mortality at 3 months, mortality at 12 months, and CND, respectively. These results showed that 20-HETE is associated with acute and long-term outcomes and suggest that 20-HETE may be a novel target in aSAH. PMID:25920956

  8. The prognostic value of ventricular rupture in cerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Constantinovici, A; Savu, C; Ciubotaru, V; Simionescu, N; Carp, N

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of 41 cerebral hemorrhage cases associated or not with intraparenchymatous hematoma and ventricular rupture shows the role played by these associated phenomena in the evaluation and prognosis of these patients. The death rate was 56.25% in simple cerebral hemorrhage, 100% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma, 30.76% in hemorrhage associated with ventricular rupture and 80% in hemorrhage associated with hematoma and ventricular rupture. The authors point out that the mere presence of ventricular rupture is not a really aggravating factor. A particular severity resulting from association of hemorrhage with hematoma seems to be due to the extension of the cerebral lesion produced by the two conditions associated. PMID:2781234

  9. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:26539501

  10. Arctigenin, a Potent Ingredient of Arctium lappa L., Induces Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Attenuates Subarachnoid Hemorrhage-Induced Vasospasm through PI3K/Akt Pathway in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Zen; Wu, Shu-Chuan; Chang, Chia-Mao; Lin, Chih-Lung; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) is observed within the cerebral arteries of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) animals. This study is of interest to examine Arctigenin, a potent antioxidant, on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and Akt pathways in a SAH in vitro study. Basilar arteries (BAs) were obtained to examine phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospho-PI3K, Akt, phospho-Akt (Western blot) and morphological examination. Endothelins (ETs) and eNOS evaluation (Western blot and immunostaining) were also determined. Arctigenin treatment significantly alleviates disrupted endothelial cells and tortured internal elastic layer observed in the SAH groups (p < 0.01). The reduced eNOS protein and phospho-Akt expression in the SAH groups were relieved by the treatment of Arctigenin (p < 0.01). This result confirmed that Arctigenin might exert dural effects in preventing SAH-induced vasospasm through upregulating eNOS expression via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and attenuate endothelins after SAH. Arctigenin shows therapeutic promise in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm following SAH. PMID:26539501

  11. Rutin Inhibits Neuroinflammation and Provides Neuroprotection in an Experimental Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage, Possibly Through Suppressing the RAGE-NF-κB Inflammatory Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Guangzhi; Dong, Yushu; Huo, Rentao; Wen, Kai; Zhang, Yinsong; Liang, Guobiao

    2016-06-01

    As is known to all, neuroinflammation plays a vital role in early brain injury pathogenesis following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). It has been shown that rutin have a property of inhibiting inflammation in many kinds of animal models. However, the effect of rutin on neuroinflammation after SAH remains uninvestigated. In this study, we investigated the potential effects of rutin on neuroinflammation and the underlying mechanism in an experimental rat model of SAH performed by endovascular perforation. Adult male SD rats were randomly divided into three groups, including sham group, SAH + vehicle group and SAH + rutin group (50 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered at 30 min after SAH. After sacrificed at 24 h after SAH, all rats were examined by following tests, including neurologic scores, blood-brain barrier permeability, brain water content and neuronal cell death in cerebral cortex. The level of inflammation in brain was estimated by means of multiple molecules, including RAGE, NF-κB, and inflammation cytokines. Our results indicated that rutin could significantly downregulate the increased level of REGE, NF-κB and inflammatory cytokines in protein level. In addition, rutin could also ameliorate a series of secondary brain injuries such as brain edema, destruction of blood-brain barrier, neurological deficits and neuronal death. This study indicated that rutin administration had a neuroprotective effect in an experimental rat model of SAH, possibly through inhibiting RAGE-NF-κB mediated inflammation signaling pathway. PMID:26869040

  12. Comprehensive Stroke Centers May Be Associated With Improved Survival in Hemorrhagic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, James S; Cheng, Jerry Q; Rybinnik, Igor; Kostis, John B

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive stroke centers (CSCs) provide a full spectrum of neurological and neurosurgical services to treat complex stroke patients. CSCs have been shown to improve clinical outcomes and mitigate disparities in ischemic stroke patients. It is believed that CSCs also improve outcomes in hemorrhagic stroke. Methods and Results We used the Myocardial Infarction Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) database, which includes data on patients discharged with a primary diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH; International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] 431) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH; ICD-9 430) from all nonfederal acute care hospitals in New Jersey (NJ) between 1996 and 2012. Out-of-hospital deaths were assessed by matching MIDAS records with NJ death registration files. The primary outcome variable was 90-day all-cause mortality. The primary independent variable was CSC versus primary stroke center (PSC) and nonstroke center (NSC) admission. Multivariate logistic models were used to measure the effects of available covariates. Overall, 36 981 patients were admitted with a primary diagnosis of ICH or SAH during the study period, of which 40% were admitted to a CSC. Patients admitted to CSCs were more likely to have neurosurgical or endovascular interventions than those admitted to a PSC/NSC (18.9% vs. 4.7%; P<0.0001). CSC admission was associated with lower adjusted 90-day mortality (35.0% vs. 40.3%; odds ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval, 0.89 to 0.97) for hemorrhagic stroke. This was particularly true for those admitted with SAH. Conclusions Hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted to CSCs are more likely to receive neurosurgical and endovascular treatments and be alive at 90 days than patients admitted to other hospitals. PMID:25950185

  13. Carnosine attenuates early brain injury through its antioxidative and anti-apoptotic effects in a rat experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zong-yong; Sun, Bao-liang; Yang, Ming-feng; Li, Da-wei; Fang, Jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2015-03-01

    Carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) has been demonstrated to provide antioxidative and anti-apoptotic roles in the animal of ischemic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this study was to examine whether carnosine prevents subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) in rats. We found that intraperitoneal administration of carnosine improved neurobehavioral deficits, attenuated brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, and decreased reactive oxygen species level at 48 h following SAH in rat models. Carnosine treatment increased tissue copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) enzymatic activities, and reduced post-SAH elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHDG), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in rats. Furthermore, carnosine treatment attenuated SAH-induced microglia activation and cortical neuron apoptosis. These results indicated that administration of carnosine may provide neuroprotection in EBI following SAH in rat models. PMID:25179154

  14. Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) is Associated with Cerebral Vasospasm and Delayed Cerebral Ischemia in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    MA, Chunxiao; ZHOU, Wei; YAN, Zhaoyue; QU, Mingqi; BU, Xingyao

    2015-01-01

    In the present prospective study, the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) levels on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were investigated in 30 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) and in 20 healthy controls (HCs). The relationship between TLR4 levels and the occurrence of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) was also analyzed. TLR4 expression level on cell surface of PBMCs on days 1, 3, and 7 after admission was determined by flow cytometry. Results showed that patients with aSAH presented a significantly higher TLR4 levels. For patients with Hunt-Hess grades IV–V, higher TLR4 levels were also observed; higher TLR4 levels have already been seen in patients developing CVS and/or delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Higher TLR4 levels were also associated with modified Fisher score, occurrence of dCVS, DCI, cerebral infarction (CT), and poor neurological functional recovery. Binary logistic regression analysis indicated that high TLR4 expression on blood monocytes was an independent predictive factor of the occurrence of dCVS, DCI, and poor neurological functional recovery. Taken together, TLR4 levels on PBMCs is significantly altered in the early stage of aSAH, especially in those patients experiencing CVS and DCI. Furthermore, higher TLR4 levels in the early stage of aSAH is also associated with the neurological function outcome. As far as we know, this is the first clinical study about TLR4's significance for patients with aSAH. PMID:26437797

  15. The Relationship between Clinical Outcome in Subarachnoidal Hemorrhage Patients with Emergency Medical Service Usage and Interhospital Transfer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hwa; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Ro, Young Sun; Kim, Min Jung; Holmes, James F

    2015-12-01

    Prompt diagnosis and appropriate transport of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is critical. We aimed to study differences in clinical outcomes by emergency medical services (EMS) usage and interhospital transfer in patients with SAH. We analyzed the CAVAS (CArdioVAscular disease Surveillance) database which is an emergency department-based, national cohort of cardiovascular disease in Korea. Eligible patients were adults with non-traumatic SAH diagnosed between January 2007 and December 2012. We excluded those whose EMS use and intershopital transfer data was unknown. The primary and secondary outcomes were mortality and neurologic status at discharge respectively. We compared the outcomes between each group using multivariable logistic regressions, adjusting for sex, age, underlying disease, visit time and social history. Of 5,461 patients with SAH, a total of 2,645 were enrolled. Among those, 258 used EMS and were transferred from another hospital, 686 used EMS only, 1,244 were transferred only, and 457 did not use EMS nor were transferred. In the regression analysis, mortality was higher in patients who used EMS and were transferred (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.02-1.92), but neurologic disability was not meaningfully different by EMS usage and interhospital transfer. In Korea, SAH patients' mortality is higher in the case of EMS use or receiving interhospital transfer. PMID:26713067

  16. Detection of Neuroinflammation in a Rat Model of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Using [18F]DPA-714 PET Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Clément; Vercouillie, Johnny; Doméné, Aurélie; Tauber, Clovis; Kassiou, Michael; Guilloteau, Denis; Destrieux, Christophe; Sérrière, Sophie; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to delayed cerebral ischemia, which increases the rate of morbidity and mortality. The detection of microglial activation may serve as a biomarker for the identification of patients at risk of this deleterious consequence. We assessed this hypothesis in a rat model of SAH in which the exploration of neuroinflammation related to microglial activation was correlated with the degree of bleeding. We used the rat filament model and evaluated (at 48 hours postsurgery) the intensity of neuroinflammation using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO) tracer [(18)F]DPA-714, quantitative autoradiography with [(3)H]PK-11195, and SAH grade by postmortem brain picture. High SAH grades were strongly and positively correlated with in vivo PET imaging of TSPO in the cortex and striatum. In addition, a positive correlation was found in the cortex in TSPO, with densities determined by imaging and autoradiographic approaches. Qualitative immunofluorescence studies indicated that overexpression of TSPO was linked to astrocytic/microglial activation. In this model, PET imaging of TSPO using [(18)F]DPA-714 appeared to be a relevant index of the degree of bleeding, indicating that this imaging method could be used in human patients to improve the management of patients with SAH. PMID:27118758

  17. Grading of Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Ruptured Middle Cerebral Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Yu Shik; Chun, Young Il; Koh, Young Cho

    2012-01-01

    Objective To propose grading of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in ruptured middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, which helps to predict the prognosis more accurately. Methods From August 2005 to December 2010, 27 cases of emergent hematoma evacuation and aneurysm clipping for MCA aneurysms were done in the author's clinic. Three variables were considered in grading the ICH, which were 1) hematoma volume, 2) diffuse subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) that extends to the contralateral sylvian cistern, and 3) the presence of midline shifting from computed tomography findings. For hematoma volume of greater than 25 mL, we assigned 2 points whereas 1 point for less than 25 cc. We also assigned 1 point for the presence of diffuse SAH whereas 0 point for the absence of it. Then, 1 point was assigned for midline shifting of greater than 5 mm whereas 0 point for less than 5 mm. Results According to the grading system, the numbers of patients from grade 1 to 4 were 4, 6, 8 and 9 respectively and 5, 7, 8, 4 and 3 patients belonged to Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) 5 to 1 respectively. It was found that the patients with higher GOS had lower ICH grade which were confirmed to be statistically significant (p<0.01). Preoperative Hunt and Hess grade and absence of midline shifting were the factors to predict favorable outcome. Conclusion The ICH grading system composed of above three variables was helpful in predicting the patient's outcome more accurately. PMID:22792422

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid nitrite/nitrate correlated with oxyhemoglobin and outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rejdak, Konrad; Petzold, Axel; Sharpe, Martyn A; Kay, Andrew D; Kerr, Mary; Keir, Geoff; Thompson, Edward J; Giovannoni, Gavin

    2004-04-15

    The findings of various studies reporting temporal changes in CSF total nitrite/nitrate (NOx) levels after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) vary considerably. The study group comprised 10 patients with SAH and 10 control subjects. Total nitrite/nitrate concentration was measured by a vanadium-based assay with the colorimetric Griess reaction. CSF oxyhemoglobin level was assessed by spectrophotometry. After an initial peak (22.6+/-10.1 microM) within first 24 h after SAH, CSF NOx decreased gradually during the period of observation. There was a significant correlation between CSF concentrations of NOx and OxyHb in the entire observation period (R=0.87, p<0.001). When the impact of bleeding into CSF was considered, patients with very good outcome [Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS)=5] had significantly lower CSF NOx (11.1+/-1.3 microM) than those with worse outcome (GOS<5) (21.8+/-11.2 microM, p<0.01). In conclusion, this study demonstrates that after aneurysm rupture CSF NOx levels correlate with OxyHb. We suggest this as a novel interpretation of other variable findings in relation to NO metabolites in the central nervous system (CNS) post SAH, and hence it could usefully be incorporated into the planning of future studies, correlating NOx with clinical outcome. PMID:15050440

  19. Evidence that a Panel of Neurodegeneration Biomarkers Predicts Vasospasm, Infarction, and Outcome in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Robert; Giovannone, Nicholas; Toraskar, Nikhil; Frangos, Suzanne; Stein, Sherman C.; Levine, Joshua M.; Kumar, Monisha A.

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers for neurodegeneration could be early prognostic measures of brain damage and dysfunction in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) with clinical and medical applications. Recently, we developed a new panel of neurodegeneration biomarkers, and report here on their relationships with pathophysiological complications and outcomes following severe aSAH. Fourteen patients provided serial cerebrospinal fluid samples for up to 10 days and were evaluated by ultrasonography, angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical examination. Functional outcomes were assessed at hospital discharge and 6–9 months thereafter. Eight biomarkers for acute brain damage were quantified: calpain-derived α-spectrin N- and C-terminal fragments (CCSntf and CCSctf), hypophosphorylated neurofilament H, 14-3-3 β and ζ, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1, neuron-specific enolase, and S100β. All 8 biomarkers rose up to 100-fold in a subset of patients. Better than any single biomarker, a set of 6 correlated significantly with cerebral vasospasm, brain infarction, and poor outcome. Furthermore, CSF levels of 14-3-3β, CCSntf, and NSE were early predictors of subsequent moderate-to-severe vasospasm. These data provide evidence that a panel of neurodegeneration biomarkers may predict lasting brain dysfunction and the pathophysiological processes that lead to it following aSAH. The panel may be valuable as surrogate endpoints for controlled clinical evaluation of treatment interventions and for guiding aSAH patient care. PMID:22174930

  20. Aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage in a Chilean population, with emphasis on risk factors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (SAH) is caused principally by the rupture of intracranial aneurisms. Important risk factors have been described such as age, sex, hypertension (HT) and season of the year, among others. The objective is to investigate the demographic characteristics and possible risk factors in a population of Chilean patients. Methods This retrospective study was based on the analysis of 244 clinical records of patients diagnosed with aneurismal SAH who were discharged from the Instituto de Neurocirugía ASENJO in Santiago, Chile. Results The mean age of patients was 49.85 years and the male:female ratio was 1:2.7. The signs and symptoms were not different between sexes; cephalea (85.7%) was predominant, followed by loss of consciousness, vomiting/nausea and meningeal signs. Risk factors included sex, age and HT. Concordant with other reports, the incidence of SAH was greatest in spring. Conclusions The demographic characteristics and risk factors observed in patients with aneurismal SAH treated in ASENJO were comparable to those of other populations. We were not able to conclude that tobacco and alcohol consumption were risk factors for this population. PMID:22035203

  1. Intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Reijmer, Yael D; Charidimou, Andreas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia are composed of cognitive deficits resulted from a range of vascular lesions and pathologies, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic. However the contribution of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presumed due to small vessel diseases on cognitive impairment is underestimated, in contrast to the numerous studies about the role of ischemic vascular disorders on cognition. In this review we summarize recent findings from clinical studies and appropriate basic science research to better elucidate the role and possible mechanisms of intracerebral hemorrhage in cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26692171

  2. Management of submacular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Matthew T S; Borrillo, Jesus L; Regillo, Carl D

    2002-12-01

    Submacular hemorrhage is a vision-threatening complication of choroidal and retinal disease. Visual outcome after submacular hemorrhage is dependent on the underlying disease process, amount of subretinal hemorrhage, and duration before treatment. Treatment options include observation, surgical evacuation with or without tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), or pneumatic displacement with or without tPA. The preoperative amount of subretinal hemorrhage may help dictate what treatment modality is chosen. PMID:12515076

  3. Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a thoracic radicular artery pseudoaneurysm after methamphetamine and synthetic cannabinoid abuse: case report.

    PubMed

    Ray, Wilson Z; Krisht, Khaled M; Schabel, Alex; Schmidt, Richard H

    2013-06-01

    Background Context?Isolated spinal artery aneurysms not associated with vascular malformations are exceedingly rare. Purpose?To present a rare case of subarachnoid hemorrhage after thoracic radiculomedullary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture in a patient who abused synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamines. Study Design?Case report. Methods?A 41-year-old man with a history of polysubstance abuse presented with acute-onset headache, back pain, and transient bilateral lower-extremity numbness. He reported daily use of the synthetic cannabinoid "Spice." He denied use of other illegal drugs, but laboratory testing was positive for methamphetamines. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a focal hematoma at T2-3, and spinal angiography was negative for vascular abnormalities; however, a follow-up angiogram 6 days later revealed interval development of an irregular dilation of the left T3 radiculomedullary artery originating from the left supreme intercostal artery. Results?Surgical trapping and resection of the lesion yielded a good clinical outcome. Conclusions?Although two previous case reports have described patients with thoracic radiculomedullary pseudoaneurysm causing spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), this is the first reported case associated with synthetic cannabinoids and methamphetamine abuse. Although this diagnosis is exceptionally rare, clinical presentation of SAH with associated back pain and lower-extremity symptoms warrants an aggressive imaging workup. Even in the setting of negative angiography, repeat cerebral and spinal angiograms may be necessary to identify a potentially treatable cause of spinal SAH. PMID:24436861

  4. Genetic determinants of cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ducruet, Andrew F; Gigante, Paul R; Hickman, Zachary L; Zacharia, Brad E; Arias, Eric J; Grobelny, Bartosz T; Gorski, Justin W; Mayer, Stephan A; Connolly, E Sander

    2010-01-01

    Despite extensive effort to elucidate the cellular and molecular bases for delayed cerebral injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), the pathophysiology of these events remains poorly understood. Recently, much work has focused on evaluating the genetic underpinnings of various diseases in an effort to delineate the contribution of specific molecular pathways as well as to uncover novel mechanisms. The majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage genetic research has focused on gene expression and linkage studies of these markers as they relate to the development of intracranial aneurysms and their subsequent rupture. Far less work has centered on the genetic determinants of cerebral vasospasm, the predisposition to delayed cerebral injury, and the determinants of ensuing functional outcome after aSAH. The suspected genes are diverse and encompass multiple functional systems including fibrinolysis, inflammation, vascular reactivity, and neuronal repair. To this end, we present a systematic review of 21 studies suggesting a genetic basis for clinical outcome after aSAH, with a special emphasis on the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. In addition, we highlight potential pitfalls in the interpretation of genetic association studies, and call for uniformity of design of larger multicenter studies in the future. PMID:20068580

  5. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P.; Logsdon, Aric F.; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C.; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D.; Rosen, Charles L.; Simard, J. Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  6. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Neuroinflammation: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Manoranjan, Branavan; Turner, Ryan C; McConnell, Evan; Vates, George Edward; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Simard, J Marc

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can lead to devastating outcomes including vasospasm, cognitive decline, and even death. Currently, treatment options are limited for this potentially life threatening injury. Recent evidence suggests that neuroinflammation plays a critical role in injury expansion and brain damage. Red blood cell breakdown products can lead to the release of inflammatory cytokines that trigger vasospasm and tissue injury. Preclinical models have been used successfully to improve understanding about neuroinflammation following aneurysmal rupture. The focus of this review is to provide an overview of how neuroinflammation relates to secondary outcomes such as vasospasm after aneurysmal rupture and to critically discuss pharmaceutical agents that warrant further investigation for the treatment of subarachnoid hemorrhage. We provide a concise overview of the neuroinflammatory pathways that are upregulated following aneurysmal rupture and how these pathways correlate to long-term outcomes. Treatment of aneurysm rupture is limited and few pharmaceutical drugs are available. Through improved understanding of biochemical mechanisms of injury, novel treatment solutions are being developed that target neuroinflammation. In the final sections of this review, we highlight a few of these novel treatment approaches and emphasize why targeting neuroinflammation following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage may improve patient care. We encourage ongoing research into the pathophysiology of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, especially in regards to neuroinflammatory cascades and the translation to randomized clinical trials. PMID:27049383

  7. Alterations of Voltage-Dependent Calcium Channel Currents in Basilar Artery Smooth Muscle Cells at Early Stage of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xianqing; Fu, Yongjian; Liao, Daqing; Chen, Yanfang; Liu, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes in the currents of voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in smooth muscle cells of basilar artery in a rabbit model of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into five groups: sham (C), normal (N), 24 hours (S1), 48 hours (S2) and 72 hours (S3) after SAH. Non-heparinized autologous arterial blood (1ml/kg) was injected into the cisterna magna to create SAH after intravenous anesthesia, and 1 ml/kg of saline was injected into cisterna magna in the sham group. Rabbits in group N received no injections. Basilar artery in S1, S2, S3 group were isolated at 24, 48, 72 hours after SAH. Basilar artery in group C was isolated at 72 hours after physiological saline injection. Basilar artery smooth muscle cells were isolated for all groups. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique was utilized to record cell membrane capacitance and VDCCs currents. The VDCCs antagonist nifedipine was added to the bath solution to block the Ca++ channels currents. Results There were no significant differences in the number of cells isolated, the cell size and membrane capacitance among all the five groups. VDCC currents in the S1S3 groups had higher amplitudes than those in control and sham groups. The significant change of current amplitude was observed at 72 hours after SAH, which was higher than those of 24 and 48 hours. The VDCCs were shown to expression in human artery smooth muscle cells. Conclusions The changes of activation characteristics and voltage-current relationship at 72 hours after SAH might be an important event which leads to a series of molecular events in the microenvironment of the basilar artery smooth muscle cells. This may be the key time point for potential therapeutic intervention against subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:24392110

  8. Vasospasm Risk in Surgical ICU Patients With Grade I Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lessen, Samantha; Keene, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high mortality. The initial hemorrhage causes death in approximately 25% of patients, with most subsequent mortality being attributable to delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Delayed cerebral ischemia generally occurs on post-bleed days 4 through 20, with the incidence peaking at day 8. Because of the risks of DCI, patients with SAH are usually monitored in an intensive care unit (ICU) for 14 to 21 days. Unfortunately, prolonged ICU admissions are expensive and are associated with well-documented risks to patients. We hypothesized that a subset of patients who are at low risk of DCI should be safe to transfer out of the ICU early. All patients admitted to Montefiore Medical Center from 2008 to 2013 with grade I SAH who had their aneurysms successfully protected, had an uncomplicated postoperative course, and had no clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 were retrospectively studied. The primary outcome was clinical or ultrasonographic evidence of the development of DCI after day 8. Secondary outcomes included length of ICU and hospital stay and hospital mortality. Forty patients who met the above-mentioned criteria were identified. Of these, only 1 (2.5%) developed ultrasonographic evidence of DCI after day 8 but required no intervention. The mean length of stay in the ICU was until post-bleed day 13, and the mean hospital length of stay was until post-bleed day 14. The in-hospital mortality was 0 of 40. Thus, we identified a low-risk subset of patients with grade I SAH who may be candidates for early transfer out of the ICU. PMID:26740854

  9. Use of cervical spinal cord stimulation in treatment and prevention of arterial vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Technical details.

    PubMed

    Slavin, K V; Vannemreddy, P S S V; Goellner, E; Alaraj, A M; Aydin, S; Eboli, P; Mlinarevich, N; Watson, K S; Walters, L E; Amin-Hanjani, S; Deveshwar, R; Aletich, V; Charbel, F T

    2011-03-29

    Based on past laboratory and anecdotal clinical experience, we hypothesized that prolonged cervical spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the acute settings of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) would be both safe and feasible, and that 2-week stimulation will reduce incidence of cerebral arterial vasospasm. The goal of our clinical study was to establish feasibility and safety of cervical SCS in a small group of selected aSAH patients. Single-arm non-randomized prospective study of cSCS in aSAH patients involved percutaneous implantation of 8-contact electrode in 12 consecutive aSAH patients that satisfied strict inclusion criteria. The electrode insertion was performed immediately upon surgical or endovascular securing of the ruptured aneurysm while the patient was still under general anesthesia. Patients were stimulated for 14 consecutive days or until discharge. There were no complications related to the electrode insertion or to SCS during the study and no long-term side effects of SCS during 1-year follow-up. There was 1 unrelated death and two electrode pullouts. This article summarizes technical details of SCS electrode insertion and the stimulation parameters used in the research study. Our study of SCS for prevention of vasospasm after aSAH conclusively shows both safety and feasibility of this promising treatment approach. Despite high level of acuity in aSAH patients, impaired level of consciousness, frequent patient re-positioning, need in multiple tests and variety of monitors, SCS electrodes may be safely implanted and maintained for the two-week period. Long-term follow up shows no adverse effects of cervical SCS in this patient category. PMID:24059581

  10. Bromo-deaza-SAH: a potent and selective DOT1L inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tempel, Wolfram; Fedorov, Oleg; Nguyen, Kong T.; Bolshan, Yuri; Al-Awar, Rima; Knapp, Stefan; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Vedadi, Masoud; Brown, Peter J.; Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Chemical inhibition of proteins involved in chromatin-mediated signaling is an emerging strategy to control chromatin compaction with the aim to reprogram expression networks to alter disease states. Protein methyltransferases constitute one of the protein families that participate in epigenetic control of gene expression, and represent a novel therapeutic target class. Recruitment of the protein lysine methyltransferase DOT1L at aberrant loci is a frequent mechanism driving acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias, particularly in infants, and pharmacological inhibition of DOT1L extends survival in a mouse model of mixed lineage leukemia. A better understanding of the structural chemistry of DOT1L inhibition would accelerate the development of improved compounds. Here, we report that the addition of a single halogen atom at a critical position in the cofactor product S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, an inhibitor of SAM-dependent methyltransferases) results in an 8-fold increase in potency against DOT1L, and reduced activities against other protein and non-protein methyltransferases. We solved the crystal structure of DOT1L in complex with Bromo-deaza-SAH and rationalized the observed effects. This discovery reveals a simple strategy to engineer selectivity and potency towards DOT1L into the adenosine scaffold of the cofactor shared by all methyltransferases, and can be exploited towards the development of clinical candidates against mixed lineage leukemia. PMID:23433670

  11. Retinal hemorrhage after cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compressions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hang; Enzenauer, Robert W; Elder, James E; Levin, Alex V

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemorrhages in children in the absence of risk factors are regarded to be pathognomonic of shaken baby syndrome or other nonaccidental injuries. The physician must decide whether the retinal hemorrhages in children without risk factors are due to abuse or cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compression (CPR-CC). The objective of this study was to determine if CPR-CC can lead to retinal hemorrhages in children. Twenty-two patients who received in-hospital CPR-CC between February 15, 1990, and June 15, 1990, were enrolled. Pediatric ophthalmology fellows carried a code beeper and responded to calls for cardiopulmonary arrest situations. At the scene of CPR-CC, an indirect funduscopic examination was conducted for presence of retinal hemorrhages in the posterior pole. Follow-up examinations were performed at 24 and 72 hours. Of the 22 patients, 6 (27%) had retinal hemorrhages at the time of CPR-CC. Of these 6 patients, 5 had risk factors for retinal hemorrhages. The sixth patient had no risk factors and may have represented the only true case of retinal hemorrhages due to CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages are uncommon findings after CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages that are found after CPR-CC usually occur in the presence of other risk factors for hemorrhage with a mild hemorrhagic retinopathy in the posterior pole. PMID:23629401

  12. Baincalein alleviates early brain injury after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats: possible involvement of TLR4/NF-κB-mediated inflammatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-xi; Xie, Guang-bin; Zhou, Chen-hui; Zhang, Xiang-sheng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jian-guo; Li, Ning; Ding, Ke; Hang, Chun-hua; Shi, Ji-xin; Zhou, Meng-liang

    2015-01-12

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) largely contributes to unfavorable outcomes. Hence, effective therapeutic strategies targeting on EBI have recently become a major goal in the treatment of SAH patients. Baicalein is a flavonoid that has been shown to offer neuroprotection in kinds of brain injury models. This study investigated the effects of baicalein on EBI in rats following SAH. SAH was inducted in male Sprauge-Dawley rats by injection of fresh non-heparinized arterial blood into the prechiasmatic cistern. Baicalein (30 or 100 mg/kg) or vehicle were administrated 30 min after injury. Neurological deficit, brain edema, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and neural cell apoptosis were assessed. To explore the further mechanisms, the change of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway and the levels of apoptosis associated proteins were also examined. Our study showed that treatment with baicalein (30 mg/kg) significantly improved neurological function at 24h after SAH and reduced brain edema at both 24h and 72 h after SAH. Baicalein also significantly reduced neural cell death, BBB permeability. These changes were associated with the remarkable reductions of TLR4 expression, IκB-α degradation, NF-κB translocation to nucleus, as well as the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase-9, tight junctions protein, interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor- ɑ. These findings suggest that baicalein may ameliorate EBI after SAH potentially via inhibition of inflammation-related pathway. PMID:25451085

  13. Metabolic Pattern of the Acute Phase of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in a Novel Porcine Model: Studies with Cerebral Microdialysis with High Temporal Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, Christoffer; Karlsson, Torbjrn; Hillered, Lars; Engstrm, Elisabeth Ronne

    2014-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may produce cerebral ischemia and systemic responses including stress. To study immediate cerebral and systemic changes in response to aneurysm rupture, animal models are needed. Objective To study early cerebral energy changes in an animal model. Methods Experimental SAH was induced in 11 pigs by autologous blood injection to the anterior skull base, with simultaneous control of intracranial and cerebral perfusion pressures. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to monitor concentrations of glucose, pyruvate and lactate. Results In nine of the pigs, a pattern of transient ischemia was produced, with a dramatic reduction of cerebral perfusion pressure soon after blood injection, associated with a quick glucose and pyruvate decrease. This was followed by a lactate increase and a delayed pyruvate increase, producing a marked but short elevation of the lactate/pyruvate ratio. Glucose, pyruvate, lactate and lactate/pyruvate ratio thereafter returned toward baseline. The two remaining pigs had a more severe metabolic reaction with glucose and pyruvate rapidly decreasing to undetectable levels while lactate increased and remained elevated, suggesting persisting ischemia. Conclusion The animal model simulates the conditions of SAH not only by deposition of blood in the basal cisterns, but also creating the transient global ischemic impact of aneurysmal SAH. The metabolic cerebral changes suggest immediate transient substrate failure followed by hypermetabolism of glucose upon reperfusion. The model has features that resemble spontaneous bleeding, and is suitable for future research of the early cerebral and systemic responses to SAH that are difficult to study in humans. PMID:24940881

  14. Cocaine use as an independent predictor of seizures after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tiffany R; Kowalski, Robert G; Carhuapoma, J Ricardo; Tamargo, Rafael J; Naval, Neeraj S

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Seizures are relatively common after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Seizure prophylaxis is controversial and is often based on risk stratification; middle cerebral artery (MCA) aneurysms, associated intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), poor neurological grade, increased clot thickness, and cerebral infarction are considered highest risk for seizures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of recent cocaine use on seizure incidence following aSAH. METHODS Prospectively collected data from aSAH patients admitted to 2 institutional neuroscience critical care units between 1991 and 2009 were reviewed. The authors analyzed factors that potentially affected the incidence of seizures, including patient demographic characteristics, poor clinical grade (Hunt and Hess Grade IV or V), medical comorbidities, associated ICH, intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), hydrocephalus, aneurysm location, surgical clipping and cocaine use. They further studied the impact of these factors on "early" and "late" seizures (defined, respectively, as occurring before and after clipping/coiling). RESULTS Of 1134 aSAH patients studied, 182 (16%) had seizures; 81 patients (7.1%) had early and 127 (11.2%) late seizures, with 26 having both. The seizure rate was significantly higher in cocaine users (37 [26%] of 142 patients) than in non-cocaine users (151 [15.2%] of 992 patients, p = 0.001). Eighteen cocaine-positive patients (12.7%) had early seizures compared with 6.6% of cocaine-negative patients (p = 0.003); 27 cocaine users (19%) had late seizures compared with 10.5% non-cocaine users (p = 0.001). Factors that showed a significant association with increased risk for seizure (early or late) on univariate analysis included younger age (< 40 years) (p = 0.009), poor clinical grade (p = 0.029), associated ICH (p = 0.007), and MCA aneurysm location (p < 0.001); surgical clipping was associated with late seizures (p = 0.004). Following multivariate analysis, age < 40 years (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.355-3.058, p = 0.001), poor clinical grade (OR 1.62, 95% CI 1.124-2.336, p = 0.01), ICH (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.164-3.273, p = 0.011), MCA aneurysm location (OR 3.3, 95% CI 2.237-4.854, p < 0.001), and cocaine use (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.330-3.175, p = 0.001) independently predicted seizures. CONCLUSIONS Cocaine use confers a higher seizure risk following aSAH and should be considered during risk stratification for seizure prophylaxis and close neuromonitoring. PMID:26315001

  15. Circulating microRNA 132-3p and 324-3p Profiles in Patients after Acute Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xian Wei; Chan, Anna Ho Yin; Lu, Gang; Lin, Marie; Sze, Johnny; Zhou, Jing Ye; Poon, Wai Sang; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Vera Zhi Yuan; Wong, George Kwok Chu

    2015-01-01

    Background Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a highly morbid and fatal condition with high rate of cognitive impairment and negative impact in quality of life among survivors. Delayed cerebral infarction (DCI) is one the major factors for these negative outcomes. In this study we compared the circulating microRNA profiles of SAH patients and healthy individuals, and the circulating microRNA profiles of SAH patients with and without DCI. Methods Peripheral blood samples on Day 7 after the onset of SAH were subjected to microarray analysis with Affymetrix miRNA 3.0 array and quantitative PCR analysis. SAH patients with (N = 20) and without DCI (N = 20) and Healthy controls (N = 20) were included for analyses. Results We demonstrated that 99 miRNAs were found to be dysregulated in the SAH patient group with DCI. 81 miRNAs were upregulated and 18 were downregulated. Findings from KEGG pathway analysis showed that miRNAs and target genes for axon guidance and TGF-beta signaling were involved, implying that the resulted differential miRNA expression pattern reflect the results of SAH instead of etiology of the disease. miR-132-3p and miR-324-3p showed distinctive upregulations in qPCR [miR-132: 9.5 fold (95%CI: 2.3 to 16.7) in DCI group and 3.4 fold (95%CI: 1.0 to 5.8) in Non-DCI group; miR-324: 4924 fold (95%CI: 2620 to 7228) in DCI group and 4545 fold (95%CI: 2408 to 6683) in non-DCI group]. However, there were no significant differences in fold changes between SAH patients with and without DCI [fold change ratios (mean+/-SD): 2.7+/-4.2 and 1.1+/-1.1 for miRNA-132 and miRNA-324]. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that as compared to healthy control, miR-132 and miR-324 showed a upregulation in both SAH DCI and Non-DCI groups. However, the differences between the SAH DCI and non-DCI groups were not statistically significant. PMID:26675167

  16. Intraventricular hemorrhage of the newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grade 1 is also referred to as germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH). Grades 3 and 4 involve more ... 2015:chap 60. Volpe JJ. Intracranial hemorrhage: germinal matrix-intraventricular hemorrhage. In Volpe JJ, ed. Neurology of ...

  17. Recurrent cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture within a short period due to invasive aspergillosis of the nasal sinus; pathological analysis of the catastrophic clinical course.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Yuki; Miyawaki, Satoru; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Okano, Atsushi; Imai, Hideaki; Shin, Masahiro; Sato, Kazuya; Tsuchida, Takeyuki; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Terao, Yasuo; Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Shibahara, Junji; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Tatsuno, Keita; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Tsuji, Shoji; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Destructive infiltration of invasive fungal sinusitis can easily occur into the central nervous system (CNS). Cerebral aneurysms associated with fungal infection are highly vulnerable to rupture, and can frequently and rapidly take a serious clinical course. We experienced a patient who twice developed cerebral aneurysm followed by rupture due to invasive fugal sinusitis. This 77-year-old man was admitted for progressive bilateral visual disturbance, which was initially treated as idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. The patient subsequently suffered subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) twice in only 12 days. Both SAH originated from different newly formed cerebral aneurysms. Trapping was performed for both ruptured aneurysms. Pathological examination of the resected aneurysms indicated the presence of fungi determined to be Aspergillus. This Aspergillus infection was also discovered inside the frontal sinus by endoscopic biopsy, so a regimen of antifungal agents was instituted. Prolonged antifungal therapy caused renal impairment, which ultimately led to the patient's death. Autopsy detected no mycotic infiltration of the major cerebral arteries, except for the 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, prolonged mycosis of the CNS, such as in the deep part in the falx cerebri and in the small veins proximal to the tentorium cerebelli, was observed, indicating that mycosis invading the cranium is refractory even to long-term administration of antifungal agents. The present case strongly suggests that urgent and proactive definitive diagnosis is essential to successfully treat invasive paranasal sinus aspergillosis. If infiltration of the CNS is suspected, early surgical resection and antifungal therapy must be initiated immediately. PMID:26722566

  18. Recurrent cerebral aneurysm formation and rupture within a short period due to invasive aspergillosis of the nasal sinus; pathological analysis of the catastrophic clinical course

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Yuki; Miyawaki, Satoru; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Okano, Atsushi; Imai, Hideaki; Shin, Masahiro; Sato, Kazuya; Tsuchida, Takeyuki; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Terao, Yasuo; Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Shibahara, Junji; Kikuta, Shu; Kondo, Kenji; Tatsuno, Keita; Mori, Harushi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Tsuji, Shoji; Saito, Nobuhito

    2015-01-01

    Destructive infiltration of invasive fungal sinusitis can easily occur into the central nervous system (CNS). Cerebral aneurysms associated with fungal infection are highly vulnerable to rupture, and can frequently and rapidly take a serious clinical course. We experienced a patient who twice developed cerebral aneurysm followed by rupture due to invasive fugal sinusitis. This 77-year-old man was admitted for progressive bilateral visual disturbance, which was initially treated as idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis. The patient subsequently suffered subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) twice in only 12 days. Both SAH originated from different newly formed cerebral aneurysms. Trapping was performed for both ruptured aneurysms. Pathological examination of the resected aneurysms indicated the presence of fungi determined to be Aspergillus. This Aspergillus infection was also discovered inside the frontal sinus by endoscopic biopsy, so a regimen of antifungal agents was instituted. Prolonged antifungal therapy caused renal impairment, which ultimately led to the patient’s death. Autopsy detected no mycotic infiltration of the major cerebral arteries, except for the 2 ruptured cerebral aneurysms. However, prolonged mycosis of the CNS, such as in the deep part in the falx cerebri and in the small veins proximal to the tentorium cerebelli, was observed, indicating that mycosis invading the cranium is refractory even to long-term administration of antifungal agents. The present case strongly suggests that urgent and proactive definitive diagnosis is essential to successfully treat invasive paranasal sinus aspergillosis. If infiltration of the CNS is suspected, early surgical resection and antifungal therapy must be initiated immediately. PMID:26722566

  19. The dilemma of complicated shunt valves: How to identify patients with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage who will benefit from a simple valve?

    PubMed Central

    von der Brelie, Christian; Meier, Ullrich; Gräwe, Alexander; Lemcke, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated shunt valves provide the possibility of pressure adjustment and antisiphon control but have a higher probability of valve dysfunction especially in a posthemorrhagic setting. The aim of the present study is to analyze the clinical outcome of patients with shunt dependent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus after aneurysmatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in order to identify patients who would benefit from a simple differential pressure valve. Methods: From 2000 to 2013, 547 patients with aneurysmatic SAH were treated at our institution, 114 underwent ventricular shunt placement (21.1%). 47 patients with available pre- and post-operative computed tomography scans, and an available follow-up of minimum 6 months were included. In order to measure the survival time which a nonprogrammable differential pressure valve would have had in an individual patient we defined the initial equalized shunt survival time (IESS). IESS is the time until surgical revisions of fixed differential pressure or flow-regulated valves for the treatment of over- or under-drainage as well as re-programming of adjustable valves due to over- or under-drainage. Results: Twenty patients were treated with fixed differential pressure valves, 15 patients were treated with flow-regulated valves, and 12 underwent ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement with differential pressure valves assisted by a gravitational unit. Patients who reacted with remarkable changes of the ventricular width after the insertion of external ventricular drainage (EVD), before shunt placement, showed a significantly longer IESS. Conclusions: Decline of the ventricular width after EVD placement was a predictor for successful VP shunt therapy in the later course of disease. Possibly, this could allow identifying patients who benefit from a simple differential pressure valve or a flow-regulated valve, and thus could possibly avoid valve-associated complications of a programmable valve in the later course of disease. PMID:26933344

  20. Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase scavenges biliverdin in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Inui, Takashi; Mase, Mitsuhito; Shirota, Ryoko; Nagashima, Mariko; Okada, Tetsuya; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin (PG) D synthase (L-PGDS) is the second major protein in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and belongs to the lipocalin superfamily composed of various secretory lipophilic ligand transporter proteins. However, the endogenous ligand of L-PGDS has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we purified L-PGDS from the CSF of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. Lipocalin-type PG D synthase showed absorbance spectra with major peaks at 280 and 392 nm and a minor peak at around 660 nm. The absorbance at 392 nm of L-PGDS increased from 1 to 9 days and almost disappeared at 2 months after SAH, whereas the L-PGDS activity decreased from 1 to 7 days and recovered to normal at 2 months after SAH. These results indicate that some chromophore had accumulated in the CSF after SAH and bound to L-PGDS, thus inactivating it. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry of L-PGDS after digestion of it with endoproteinase Lys-C revealed that L-PGDS had covalently bound biliverdin, a by-product of heme breakdown. These results suggest that L-PGDS acted as a scavenger of biliverdin, which is a molecule not found in normal CSF. This is the first report of identification of a pathophysiologically important endogenous ligand for this lipocalin superfamily protein in humans. PMID:25005874

  1. Intraventricular Injection of Noncellular Cerebrospinal Fluid from Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patient into Rat Ventricles Leads to Ventricular Enlargement and Periventricular Injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Peiliang; Chaudhary, Neeraj; Gemmete, Joseph J; Thompson, B Gregory; Hua, Ya; Xi, Guohua; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Early brain injury and hydrocephalus (HCP) are important mediators of poor outcome in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients. We aim to understand the development of HCP and subependymal cellular injury after intraventricular injection of noncellular human SAH cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) into rat ventricles. Two-hundred microliters of noncellular CSF from SAH patients or normal controls were injected into the right lateral ventricle of seven adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Propidium iodide (PI) was simultaneously injected to detect necrotic cellular death. Rats were then sacrificed 24 h after surgery and the brain specimens were cut and stained for heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), an oxidative stress marker. We found that the ventricular area at the bregma level in the CSF injection group was significantly larger than that in the control group (p < 0.05). The periventricular tissue in the CSF injection group had significantly more necrotic cell death as well as HO-1 expression as compared with the control group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, injection of SAH patients' CSF into the rat ventricle leads to HCP as well as subependymal injury compared with injection of control CSF. PMID:26463970

  2. Early identification of individuals at high risk for cerebral infarction after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: the BEHAVIOR score.

    PubMed

    Jabbarli, Ramazan; Reinhard, Matthias; Roelz, Roland; Shah, Mukesch; Niesen, Wolf-Dirk; Kaier, Klaus; Taschner, Christian; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Van Velthoven, Vera

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral infarction (CI) is a crucial complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) associated with poor clinical outcome. We aimed at developing an early risk score for CI based on clinical characteristics available at the onset of SAH. Out of a database containing 632 consecutive patients with SAH admitted to our institution from January 2005 to December 2012, computed tomography (CT) scans up to day 42 after ictus were evaluated for CIs. Different parameters from admission up to aneurysm treatment were collected with subsequent construction of a risk score. Seven clinical characteristics were independently associated with CI and included in the Risk score (BEHAVIOR Score, 0 to 11 points): Blood on CT scan according to Fisher grade ⩾3 (1 point), Elderly patients (age ⩾55 years, 1 point), Hunt&Hess grade ⩾4 (1 point), Acute hydrocephalus requiring external liquor drainage (1 point), Vasospasm on initial angiogram (3 points), Intracranial pressure elevation >20 mm Hg (3 points), and treatment of multiple aneurysms ('Overtreatment', 1 point). The BEHAVIOR score showed high diagnostic accuracy with respect to the absolute risk for CI (area under curve=0.806, P<0.0001) and prediction of poor clinical outcome at discharge (P<0.0001) and after 6 months (P=0.0002). Further validation in other SAH cohorts is recommended. PMID:25920954

  3. Thalamic infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Amici, Serena

    2012-01-01

    The anatomy and supply of thalamic arteries are briefly described here. Thalamic infarcts and small-size hemorrhages are classified according to their sites: (1) posterolateral, (2) anterolateral, (3) medial, and (4) dorsal. (1) Posterolateral hemorrhages or lateral thalamic infarcts are usually characterized by severe motor impairment and sensory loss. Transient reduced consciousness, vertical-gaze abnormalities, and small fixed pupils may be evidenced. (2) Patients with anterolateral hemorrhages or tuberothalamic artery infarcts present frontal-type neuropsychological symptoms associated with mild hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia. (3) Medially located hemorrhages or paramedian artery infarcts have decreased levels of consciousness, vertical- and horizontal-gaze abnormalities, amnesia, and abulia. (4) Dorsal hemorrhages or posterior choroidal artery infarcts present with minimal transient hemiparesis and hemihypesthesia; apraxia, aphasia, and amnesia have also been described. PMID:22377880

  4. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  5. Early release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from neurons in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Translocation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from nucleus could trigger inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 up-regulates inflammatory response in sepsis as a late mediator. However, little was known about its role in subarachnoid hemorrhage-inducible inflammation, especially in the early stage. This study aims to identify whether HMGB1 translocation occurred early after SAH and also to clarify the potential role of HMGB1 in brain injury following SAH. Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham group and SAH groups at 2 h, 12 h and on day 1, day 2. SAH groups suffered experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage by injection of 0.3 ml autoblood into the pre-chiasmatic cistern. Rats injected by recombinant HMGB1(rHMGB1) solution were divided into four groups according to different time points. Cultured neurons were assigned into control group and four hemoglobin (Hb) incubated groups. Mixed glial cells were cultured and stimulated in medium from neurons incubated by Hb. HMGB1 expression is measured by western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit P65 and inflammatory factor Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured by western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. Results Our results demonstrated HMGB1 translocation occurred as early as 2 h after experimental SAH with mRNA and protein level increased. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results indicated cytosolic HMGB1 was mainly located in neurons while translocated HMGB1 could also be found in some microglia. After subarachnoid injection of rHMGB1, NF-κB, downstream inflammatory response and cleaved caspase-3 were up-regulated in the cortex compared to the saline control group. In-vitro, after Hb incubation, HMGB1 was also rapidly released from neurons to medium. Incubation with medium from neurons up-regulated IL-1β in mixed glial cells. This effect could be inhibited by HMGB1 specific inhibitor glycyrrhizic acid (GA) treatment. Conclusion HMGB1 was released from neurons early after SAH onset and might trigger inflammation as an upstream inflammatory mediator. Extracellular HMGB1 contributed to the brain injury after SAH. These results might have important implications during the administration of specific HMGB1 antagonists early in order to prevent or reduce inflammatory response following SAH. PMID:24924349

  6. Measuring Serum Amyloid A for Infection Prediction in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Leire; Degos, Vincent; Tiberti, Natalia; Kapandji, Natacha; Sanchez, Paola; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Puybasset, Louis; Turck, Natacha; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2015-09-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Nosocomial infections, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infections, are among the main causes of worsening outcomes and death. The aim of this study was to discover a biomarker to predict infection in aSAH patients. For this purpose, the plasma of infected and noninfected patients was compared using quantitative mass spectrometry. The most interesting differentially expressed proteins were selected for validation by immunoassays on plasma samples taken from patients (n = 81) over 10 days of hospitalization. Predictive performances were established using Mann-Whitney U tests and receiver operating characteristic curves. Quantitative proteomics identified 17 significantly regulated proteins. Of these, levels of serum amyloid A (SAA) were significantly higher in infected patients (p < 0.007). ELISA confirmed that the concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.002) already at hospital admission in patients who subsequently developed an infection during their hospitalization, (AUC of 76%) for a cutoff value of 90.9 μg/mL. Our data suggested that measuring SAA could be an efficient means of detecting patients susceptible of developing an infection during hospitalization after an aSAH. Its predictive capacity could lead to earlier antibiotherapy, improved patient management, and potentially better long-term outcomes. PMID:26198378

  7. Plasma Catecholamine Profile of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients with Neurogenic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Moussouttas, Michael; Mearns, Elizabeth; Walters, Arthur; DeCaro, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the connection between sympathetic function and neurogenic cardiomyopathy (NC), and to determine whether NC is mediated primarily by circulating adrenal epinephrine (EPI) or neuronally transmitted norepinephrine (NE), following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods This is a prospective observational investigation of consecutive severe-grade SAH patients. All participants had transthoracic echocardiography and serological assays for catecholamine levels – dopamine (DA), NE and EPI – within 48 h of hemorrhage onset. Clinical and serological independent predictors of NC were determined using multivariate logistic regression analyses, and the accuracy of predictors was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Multivariate linear regression analyses were used to evaluate correlations among the catecholamines. Results The investigation included a total of 94 subjects: the mean age was 55 years, 81% were female and 57% were Caucasian. NC was identified in approximately 10% (9/94) of cases. Univariate analyses revealed associations between NC and worse clinical severity (p = 0.019), plasma DA (p = 0.018) and NE levels (p = 0.024). Plasma NE correlated with DA levels (ρ = 0.206, p = 0.046) and EPI levels (ρ = 0.392, p < 0.001), but was predicted only by plasma EPI in bivariate [parameter estimate (PE) = 1.95, p < 0.001] and multivariate (PE = 1.89, p < 0.001) linear regression models. Multivariate logistic regression analyses consistently demonstrated the predictive value of clinical grade for NC (p < 0.05 for all analyses) except in models incorporating plasma NE, where NC was independently predicted by NE level (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.01-1.55) over clinical grade (OR 4.19, 95% CI 0.874-20.1). ROC curves similarly revealed the greater accuracy of plasma NE [area under the curve (AUC) 0.727, 95% CI 0.56-0.90, p = 0.02] over clinical grade (AUC 0.704, 95% CI 0.55-0.86, p = 0.05) for identifying the presence or absence of NC. Conclusions Following SAH, the development of NC is primarily related to elevated plasma NE levels. Findings implicate a predominantly neurogenic process mediated by neuronal NE (and not adrenal EPI), but cannot exclude synergy between the catecholamines. PMID:26120322

  8. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  9. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  10. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the taxonomic classification of Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV). Included are: host, genome, classification, morphology, physicochemical and physical properties, nucleic acid, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, geographic range, phylogenetic properties, biological pro...

  11. Optimal Contrast of Cerebral Dual-Energy Computed Tomography Angiography in Patients With Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Qiaowei; Hu, Hongjie; Zhang, Wenming; Chen, Renbiao; Zee, Chi S.; Yu, Risheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the image quality of cerebral dual-energy computed tomography (CT) angiography using a nonlinear image blending technique as compared with the conventional linear blending method in patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods A retrospective review of 30 consecutive spontaneous SAH patients who underwent a dual-source, dual-energy (80 kV and Sn140 kV mode) cerebral CT angiography was performed with permission from hospital ethical committee. Optimized images using nonlinear blending method were generated and compared with the 0.6 linear blending images by evaluating cerebral artery enhancement, attenuation of SAH, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), respectively. Two neuroradiologists independently assessed subjective vessel visualization per segment using a 5-point scale. Results The nonlinear blending images showed higher cerebral artery enhancement (307.24 58.04 Hounsfield unit [HU]), lower attenuation of SAH (67.07 6.79 HU), and image noise (7.18 1.20 HU), thus achieving better SNR (43.92 11.14) and CNR (34.34 10.25), compared with those of linear blending images (235.47 46.45 HU for cerebral artery enhancement, 70.00 6.41 HU for attenuation of SAH, 8.39 1.25 HU for image noise, 28.86 8.43 for SNR, and 20.37 7.74 for CNR) (all P < 0.01). The segmental scorings of the nonlinear blending image (31.6% segments with a score of 5, 57.4% segments with a score of 4, 11% segments with a score of 3) ranged significantly higher than those of linear blending images (11.5% segments with a score of 5, 77.5% segments with a score of 4, 11% segments with a score of 3) (P < 0.01). The interobserver agreement was good (? = 0.762), and intraobserver agreement was excellent for both observers (? = 0.844 and 0.858, respectively). Conclusions The nonlinear image blending technique improved vessel visualization of cerebral dual-energy CT angiography by optimizing contrast enhancement in spontaneous SAH patients. PMID:26571057

  12. Neopterin plasma concentrations in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: correlation with infection and long-term outcome.

    PubMed

    Azurmendi, Leire; Degos, Vincent; Tiberti, Natalia; Kapandji, Natacha; Sanchez-Peña, Paola; Sarrafzadeh, Asita; Puybasset, Louis; Turck, Natacha; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. The main predictor for the poor outcome is the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies (WFNS) scale. However, this scale does not take into account proinflammatory events, such as infection occurring after the aSAH, which could modify the long-term status of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate neopterin as an inflammatory biomarker for outcome and infection prediction in aSAH patients. METHODS Plasma concentrations of neopterin were measured in 61 aSAH patients (22 male and 39 female; mean age [± SD] 52.8 ± 11.8 years) using a commercial ELISA kit. Samples were collected daily for 10 days. Outcome at 12 months was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and dichotomized as poor (GOS score 1, 2, or 3) or good (GOS score 4 or 5). Infection was determined by the presence of a positive bacterial culture. RESULTS Patients with poor outcome at 12 months had higher concentrations of neopterin than patients with good outcome. In the same way, patients who had an infection during the hospitalization had significantly higher concentrations of neopterin than patients without infection (p = 0.001). Moreover, neopterin concentrations were significantly (p < 0.008) elevated in infected patients 2 days before infection detection and antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS Neopterin is an efficient outcome predictor after aSAH. Furthermore, it is able to differentiate between infected and uninfected patients as early as 2 days before clinical signs of infection, facilitating earlier antibiotic therapy and better management. PMID:26406798

  13. Pramipexole-Induced Hypothermia Reduces Early Brain Injury via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junwei; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Chenglin; Shen, Haitao; Chen, Zhouqing; Yin, Jia; Zuo, Gang; Duan, Xiaochun; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown neuroprotective effects of hypothermia. However, its effects on subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) remain unclear. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the effects and mechanisms of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on EBI after SAH. Dose-response experiments were performed to select the appropriate pramipexole concentration and frequency of administration for induction of mild hypothermia (33-36 °C). Western blot, neurobehavioral evaluation, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining were used to detect the effects of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on SAH-induced EBI, as well as to study whether controlled rewarming could attenuate these effects. Inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway were administered to determine whether the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole-induced hypothermia was mediated by PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. The results showed that intraperitoneal injection of pramipexole at 0.25 mg/kg body weight once per 8 hours was found to successfully and safely maintain rats at mild hypothermia. Pramipexole-induced hypothermia ameliorated SAH-induced brain cell death, blood-brain barrier damage and neurobehavioral deficits in a PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling-dependent manner. Therefore, we may conclude that pramipexole-induced hypothermia could effectively inhibit EBI after SAH in rats via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:27026509

  14. Pramipexole-Induced Hypothermia Reduces Early Brain Injury via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junwei; Wang, Zhong; Liu, Chenglin; Shen, Haitao; Chen, Zhouqing; Yin, Jia; Zuo, Gang; Duan, Xiaochun; Li, Haiying; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown neuroprotective effects of hypothermia. However, its effects on subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI) remain unclear. In this study, a SAH rat model was employed to study the effects and mechanisms of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on EBI after SAH. Dose-response experiments were performed to select the appropriate pramipexole concentration and frequency of administration for induction of mild hypothermia (33–36 °C). Western blot, neurobehavioral evaluation, Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and Fluoro-Jade B (FJB) staining were used to detect the effects of pramipexole-induced hypothermia on SAH-induced EBI, as well as to study whether controlled rewarming could attenuate these effects. Inhibitors targeting the PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathway were administered to determine whether the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole-induced hypothermia was mediated by PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. The results showed that intraperitoneal injection of pramipexole at 0.25 mg/kg body weight once per 8 hours was found to successfully and safely maintain rats at mild hypothermia. Pramipexole-induced hypothermia ameliorated SAH-induced brain cell death, blood-brain barrier damage and neurobehavioral deficits in a PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling-dependent manner. Therefore, we may conclude that pramipexole-induced hypothermia could effectively inhibit EBI after SAH in rats via PI3K/AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:27026509

  15. Correlation between angiographic transit times and neurological status on admission in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander; Linninger, Andreas; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Amin-Hanjani, Sepideh; Aletich, Victor A; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for semiquantitative cerebral blood flow(CBF) assessment is a new technique. The aim of this study was to determine whether patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) with higher Hunt and Hess grades also had higher angiographic contrast transit times (TTs) than patients with lower grades. METHODS A cohort of 30 patients with aSAH and 10 patients without aSAH was included. Relevant clinical information was collected. A method to measure DSA TTs by color-coding reconstructions from DSA contrast-intensity images was applied. Regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen over major cerebral vessels. The estimated TTs included time-to-peak from 0% to 100% (TTP0-100), TTP from 25% to 100% (TTP25-100), and TT from 100% to 10% (TT100-10) contrast intensities. Statistical analysis was used to compare TTs between Group A (Hunt and Hess Grade I-II), Group B (Hunt and Hess Grade III-IV), and the control group. The correlation coefficient was calculated between different ROIs in aSAH groups. RESULTS There was no difference in demographic factors between Group A (n = 10), Group B (n = 20), and the control group (n = 10). There was a strong correlation in all TTs between ROIs in the middle cerebral artery (M1, M2) and anterior cerebral artery (A1, A2). There was a statistically significant difference between Groups A and B in all TT parameters for ROIs. TT100-10 values in the control group were significantly lower than the values in Group B. CONCLUSIONS The DSA TTs showed significant correlation with Hunt and Hess grades. TT delays appear to be independent of increased intracranial pressure and may be an indicator of decreased CBF in patients with a higher Hunt and Hess grade. This method may serve as an indirect technique to assess relative CBF in the angiography suite. PMID:26452118

  16. Aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage: who remains for surgical treatment in the post-ISAT era?

    PubMed Central

    Czapiga, Bogdan; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although there have been a number of studies on changes and trends in the management of aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) since publication of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT), no data exist on what category of patients still remains for surgical treatment. Our goal was to investigate the changes that occurred in the characteristics of a population of aSAH patients treated surgically in the post-ISAT period in a single neurosurgical center, with limited availability of endovascular service. Material and methods The study included 402 aSAH patients treated surgically in our unit between January 2004 and December 2011. Each year, data regarding number of admissions, age, aneurysm location and size, clinical and radiological presentation, outcome and mortality rates were collected and analyzed. Results The annual number of admissions more than halved in the study period (from 69 in 2004 to 32 in 2011). There were no linear trends regarding patients’ mean age, clinical presentation and outcomes, but the number of patients in Fisher grade 4 increased and mortality slightly decreased. An unexpected, statistically significant increase occurred in the incidence of anterior communicating artery aneurysms (from 36.2% to 50%) and medium size aneurysms (from 34.7% to 56.2%) treated surgically, with a corresponding decrease in the incidence of middle cerebral artery aneurysms (from 40.5% to 34.3%) and large aneurysms (from 21.7% to 12.5%). Conclusions Unexpected trends in characteristics of aSAH patients treated surgically could be related to treatment decision modality. Trend patterns could be properly expressed in the constant availability of endovascular services. PMID:26170846

  17. Molsidomine for the prevention of vasospasm-related delayed ischemic neurological deficits and delayed brain infarction and the improvement of clinical outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage: a single-center clinical observational study.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Angelika; Schmidt, Christoph; Wölfer, Johannes; Manthei, Gerd; Jacobs, Andreas H; Brüning, Roland; Heindel, Walter; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Stummer, Walter; Pluta, Ryszard M; Hesselmann, Volker

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs) and cerebral vasospasm (CVS) are responsible fora poor outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), most likely because of a decreased availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the cerebral microcirculation. In this study, the authors examined the effects of treatment with the NO donor molsidomine with regard to decreasing the incidence of spasm-related delayed brain infarctions and improving clinical outcome in patients with SAH. METHODS Seventy-four patients with spontaneous aneurysmal SAH were included in this post hoc analysis. Twenty-nine patients with SAH and proven CVS received molsidomine in addition to oral or intravenous nimodipine. Control groups consisted of 25 SAH patients with proven vasospasm and 20 SAH patients without. These patients received nimodipine therapy alone. Cranial computed tomography (CCT) before and after treatment was analyzed for CVS-related infarcts. A modified National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (mNIHSS) and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) were used to assess outcomes at a 3-month clinical follow-up. RESULTS Four of the 29 (13.8%) patients receiving molsidomine plus nimodipine and 22 of the 45 (48%) patients receiving nimodipine therapy alone developed vasospasm-associated brain infarcts (p < 0.01). Follow-up revealed a median mNIHSS score of 3.0 and a median mRS score of 2.5 in the molsidomine group compared with scores of 11.5 and 5.0, respectively, in the nimodipine group with CVS (p < 0.001). One patient in the molsidomine treatment group died, and 12 patients in the standard care group died (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS In this post hoc analysis, patients with CVS who were treated with intravenous molsidomine had a significant improvement in clinical outcome and less cerebral infarction. Molsidomine offers a promising therapeutic option in patients with severe SAH and CVS and should be assessed in a prospective study. PMID:26162034

  18. Inhibitory effects of omega-3 fatty acids on early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in rats: Possible involvement of G protein-coupled receptor 120/β-arrestin2/TGF-β activated kinase-1 binding protein-1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jia; Li, Haiying; Meng, Chengjie; Chen, Dongdong; Chen, Zhouqing; Wang, Yibin; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Gang

    2016-06-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids have been reported to improve neuron functions during aging and in patients affected by mild cognitive impairment, and mediate potent anti-inflammatory via G protein-coupled receptor 120 (GPR120) signal pathway. Neuron dysfunction and inflammatory response also contributed to the progression of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH)-induced early brain injury (EBI). This study was to examine the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on SAH-induced EBI. Two weeks before SAH, 30% Omega-3 fatty acids was administered by oral gavage at 1g/kg body weight once every 24h. Specific siRNA for GPR120 was exploited. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, fluoro-Jade B staining, and neurobehavioral scores and brain water content test showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced brain cell apoptosis and neuronal degradation, behavioral impairment, and brain edema. Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays results showed that omega-3 fatty acids effectively suppressed SAH-induced elevation of inflammatory factors, including cyclooxygenase-2, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and inducible nitric oxide synthase. In addition, omega-3 fatty acids could inhibit phosphorylation of transforming growth factor β activated kinase-1 (TAK1), MEK4, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and IkappaB kinase as well as activation of nuclear factor kappa B through regulating GPR120/β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1 pathway. Furthermore, siRNA-induced GPR120 silencing blocked the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids. Here, we show that stimulation of GPR120 with omega-3 fatty acids pretreatment causes anti-apoptosis and anti-inflammatory effects via β-arrestin2/TAK1 binding protein-1/TAK1 pathway in the brains of SAH rats. Fish omega-3 fatty acids as part of a daily diet may reduce EBI in an experimental rat model of SAH. PMID:27000704

  19. [Anesthesiological approach to postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Knapp, J; Hofer, S; Lier, H

    2016-03-01

    Peripartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a frequent obstetric emergency situation with increasing incidence in the last decades. It requires a fast, coordinated and interdisciplinary management. This life-threatening situation is often recognized too late and not adequately treated (too little is done too late); therefore, it is important to be aware of the most important risk factors for PPH known as the 4 Ts (i.e. tonus, trauma, tissue and thrombin). Due to the special patient population there is only little evidence-based data on hemostatic therapy in this situation; therefore, the currently available studies on the therapy of PPH is discussed. PMID:26955831

  20. [Gastrontestinal hemorrhage following thoracic surgery].

    PubMed

    Durić, O; Tvrtković, R; Budalica, M

    1976-01-01

    The authors discuss eight cases who suffered hemorrhaging stress ulcers out of 200 cases on whom Thoracotomies were performed. Presented is the common factor of the onset of this complication, it's diagnosis, and therapy. Listed below are the diagnoses and operative procedures used on these eight patients. Cysta Aerea Permagna Lobi Inf. Pulm. Dexter/operation: Mytomis Longitudinalis Ooesophagi. Caverna Bronchiectatica Permagna Lobi Inferior Pulmo Dexter/operation: Lobestomia Typica. Echinococcus Heaptis Complicatus, Empyema Pleurae Dexter/opetation: Decorticatio. Haemathorax Spontaneous Lobus Sinister/operation: Decorticatio Pleurae Sinister. Echi Comp. Cupolae Hepatis Permagnus/operation: Thoracotomia Phrenotomia, evacuatio, Triplex Drainage. Bronchiectasiae Lobi Medius et Inferior Pulmo Dexter/operation: Biblobectomia Typica. Carcinoma Bronchi Lobi Inferior Pulmo Dexter/operation: Lobectomia Typica. Gastric problems had troubled four of these eight patients in their past history. Bleeding in three patients occurred three days postoperatively, and in the remaining five, thirty days following their operation. Six patients had to be treated conservatively because of serious contraindications to reoperation. Four of them expired. Autopsy revealed: Pyothorax, Dehiscention Bronchi, Empyema, and Gastritis Errosiva with multiulcerations, hemoragia, and dilatation of the right heart. Two patients with recent stress ulcers were reoperated on, and were cured. The authors estimate that the occurrence of hemorrhaging stress ulcer following thoracic surgery are basically due to Hypoxia. The chain of events whic brought about the stress ulcer, however, began even before the operation, continued throughout the operation, and appeared postoperatively due to postoperative complications. The authors point out that these complications can be foreseen (early and late), but firstly, an attempt should be made to treat the patient with conservative therapy. Inasmuch as the hemorrhaging does not respond to conservative measures, conservative surgery is indicated; Suture and Vagotomy, and eventually pyloroplasty. PMID:1085089

  1. Microcatheter embolization of hemorrhages

    SciTech Connect

    Seppaenen, Seppo K.; Leppaenen, Martti J.; Pimenoff, Georg; Seppaenen, Janne M.

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of embolotherapy using microcatheters in patients with hemorrhage from various locations. Methods. Among 29 patients there were 13 with severe epistaxis, 7 with gastrointestinal bleeding, 4 with hemorrhage in the kidney, 4 with bleeding in pelvic organs and 1 with bleeding in the shoulder region. In all cases, a Tracker-18 or Tracker-10 microcatheter was advanced coaxially through a 4.1 Fr guiding catheter in order to reach the bleeding site as distally as possible. Polyvinyl alcohol microparticles and/or platinum microcoils were used as embolic material. Results. The bleeding was stopped in 90% (26 of 29) of cases. In 66% of cases the treatment was curative, in 7% preoperative, and in 17% palliative. There were 3 clinical failures. Conclusion. Microcatheter embolization is an effective and safe means of managing different kinds of hemorrhage of various causes from a variety of sites.

  2. Travelers' Health: Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    MedlinePlus

    ... VHFs) are caused by several families of enveloped RNA viruses: filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever), arenaviruses ( ... in hemorrhagic fever with high death rates. Old World (Eastern Hemisphere) and New World (Western Hemisphere) viruses ...

  3. [Management of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Lorenz, K; Sekulla, C; Kern, J; Dralle, H

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative hemorrhage following thyroid surgery stands at 1%-2 %. This low incidence contrasts with the significant potential complications of postoperative hemorrhage. Influencing factors and measures mentioned in the literature and own studies are discussed. Although an improvement in the postoperative hemorrhage rate was to be expected indirectly due to the increasing use of coagulation-relevant medication, there has been neither an increase in incidence nor a reduction in resultant complications, including primarily recurrent vocal cord paresis, tracheotomy and mortality. Factors that influence surgical success include a meticulous technique and caution, as well as ensuring intensive and qualified postoperative monitoring for a minimum of 4-6 h, thereby permitting immediate revision surgery at any time. PMID:25532753

  4. Contrast Extravasation on Computed Tomography Angiography Imitating a Basilar Artery Trunk Aneurysm in Subsequent Conventional Angiogram-Negative Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Report of Two Cases with Different Clinical Courses

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Ho; Choi, Hyuk Jin; Nam, Kyoung Hyup

    2015-01-01

    Contrast extravasation on computed tomography angiography (CTA) is rare but becoming more common, with increasing use of CTA for various cerebral vascular diseases. We report on two cases of spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in which the CTA showed a saccular lesion of the upper basilar trunk suggesting a ruptured aneurysm. However, no vascular lesion was observed on immediate subsequent digital subtraction angiography (DSA). In one case, repeated follow up DSA was also negative. The patient was treated conservatively and discharged with no neurologic deficit. In the other case, the patient showed sudden mental deterioration on the third hospital day and her brain CT showed rebleeding. The immediate follow up DSA showed contrast stagnation in the vicinity of the upper basilar artery, suggestive of pseudoaneurysm. Double stent deployment at the disease segment was performed. Due to the frequent use of CTA, contrast extravasation is an increasingly common observation. Physicians should be aware that basilar artery extravasation can mimic the appearance of an aneurysm. PMID:25874181

  5. [Countermeasure for obstetric hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Gen

    2010-03-01

    Although the number of maternal death in Japan has decreased especially since 1990's and its total number has reached the level of developed countries, obstetric hemorrhage is still equally important as obstetric embolism and hypertension in pregnancy as a cause of maternal death. Intrapartum abnormal bleeding is defined as hemorrhage which amounts to more than 500 ml during intrapartum period by Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG). However, according to the official register of peripartum data in Japan, the upper normal limit (mean + 1.5 SD) of the amount of hemorrhage during intrapartum period was 900 g at vaginal singleton delivery, 1600 g at singleton cesarean delivery, 1900 g at multifetal vaginal delivery and 2600 g at multifetal cesarean delivery. Thus, upper normal limit is varied depending on mode of deliveries and fetal number. The character of obstetric DIC is marked consumptive coagulopathy and increased fibrinolytic system. Principal strategy for treatment of obstetric DIC is compensation of expended coagulating factors. Thus, the most important strategy is to administer FFP However, it is necessary to be unfreezed for administration of FFP, and it is time-consuming. Prompt and firm decision for administration of FFP is important. Priority of administration of platelet concentrate is not high. Rather the use of antithrombin should be considered. Guideline of response to obstetric critical hemorrhage has been tentatively constructed by Japanese Society of Anesthesiologists, JSOG and other related academic societies. According to the guideline, recommended medical intervention depends on the shock index. At the extremely severe clinical state like placenta previa with accreta and placental abruption, multidisciplinary and prompt approach fulfills very important role to bring through. Strategy of treatment for obstetric DIC and the guideline of response to obstetric critical hemorrhage are also important at such state. Level 1 and other medical devices for critical care also become strong tools for severe cases. However, the most important is adequate and prompt estimation and direction by workforce. PMID:20229753

  6. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy with atypical imagingfindings of subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tempaku, Akira; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Nitta, Kazumi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is observed in most cases of nonhypertensive subcortical hemorrhage involving elderly patients. We herein describe the case of a female in whom a convexal subarachnoid hemorrhage was observed at 55 years of age. The cerebral hemorrhage occurred repeatedly; however, no obvious vascular lesions were observed on a cerebral angiography, and no signs of microbleeding or lesions in the deep white matter were identified on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Partial excision of the right frontal cortex and hematoma evacuation were performed, and histopathological examination showed deposition of an acidophilic substance with positive staining for Direct Fast Scarlet (DFS) in the cerebral vascular wall. Finally, brain hemorrhage due to CAA was diagnosed. This case suggests that CAA is an important differential diagnosis in patients with localized non-aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in the convexity sulcus. PMID:26705433

  7. [Hemorrhagic cystitis due to adenovirus in a renal transplant recipient: the first reported case in black Africa in a setting of a very beginning of a kidney transplantation program and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Ackoundou-N'Guessan, Clément; Coulibaly, Noël; Guei, Cyr Monley; Aye, Denis; N'guessan, Francis Yapi; N'Dah, Justin Kouame; Lagou, Delphine Amélie; Tia, Mélanie Weu; Coulibaly, Pessa Albert; Nzoue, Sita; Konan, Serges; Gnionsahe, Daze Apollinaire

    2015-04-01

    Viral infections are an important complication of transplantation. Polyomavirus are the commonest viruses that infect the renal allograft. Herpes virus nephropathy has also been described. In the past 15 years, adenovirus nephritis has emerged as a potentially life-threatening disease in renal transplant patients in developed countries. Most of the papers devoted to adenovirus nephritis are reported cases. The fate of such patients in resources-limited countries is not known. Herein, we describe the clinical, biological and prognostic findings of a black African transplanted patient with adenoviral hemorrhagic cystitis. This case is the very first of its kind reported in black Africa in a setting of a start of a renal transplantation pilot project. The patient is a 54-year-old man admitted at the nephrology service for gross haematuria and fever occurred 1 month after kidney transplantation. The diagnosis of adenoviral hemorrhagic cystitis has been suspected because the patient has displayed recurrent conjunctivitis and gastroenteritis well before transplantation, which was then confirmed by the real-time polymerase chain reaction performed on the blood. Conservatory measures associated with immunosuppression reduction have permitted the discontinuation of haematuria. This case has been discussed in regard of the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the treatment, the evolution and the prognosis of the adenoviral infection in the renal transplant patient. A review of the literature has been performed subsequently. PMID:25684056

  8. [Hemorrhagic complications during warfarin treatment].

    PubMed

    Gumulec, J; Kessler, P; Penka, M; Klodová, D; Králová, S; Brejcha, M; Wróbel, M; Sumná, E; Blatný, J; Klaricová, K; Riedlová, P; Lasota, Z

    2006-03-01

    Bleeding is probably the major complication of anticoagulant treatment with vitamin K antagonists represented nowadays mostly by warfarin in the Czech Republic. The main risk factors in hemorrhagic complications of warfarinisation are the intensity and instability of the anticoagulant treatment, individual patient characteristics, warfarin interactions with other drugs and the length of the anticoagulant therapy. Severe bleeding in warfarin patients is most effectively brought about by a fast and complete undoing of the anticoagulation effect of the drug employing the prothrombin complex concentrate and slow i.v. vitamin K1 infusion regardless of the reason for the anticoagulation. This approach can secure the minimalisation of the bleeding's negative consequences. A less severe bleeding or asymptomatic increase in the international normalized ratio can be treated effectively by skipping or decreasing of the warfarin dosage and/or oral administration of vitamin K1 (i.v. administration only in selected higher risk cases) that does result only in a partial consolidation of coagulopathy but of such type that the risk of thrombotic event requires. The article's goal is to contribute to the treatment standardization in patients with warfarin overdose and/or with hemorrhagic complications due to warfarin treatment and it is available at www.thrombosis.cz. The guidelines include a ready-reference chart whose objective is immediate and quick crash course in the clinical practice. PMID:16637455

  9. Tonic-Clonic Activity at Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Onset: Impact on Complications and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Gian Marco; Pugin, Deborah; Lantigua, Hector; Zammit, Christopher; Tadi, Prasanna; Schmidt, J. Michael; Falo, M. Cristina; Agarwal, Sachin; Mayer, Stephan A.; Claassen, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tonic-clonic activity (TCA) at onset complicates 3% to 21% of cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). The impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, including seizures, remains unclear. One study associated onset TCA with poor clinical outcome at 6 weeks after SAH, but to our knowledge no other studies have confirmed this relationship. This study aims to assess the impact of onset TCA on in-hospital complications, poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. Methods Analysis of a prospective study cohort of 1479 SAH patients admitted to Columbia University Medical Center between 1996 and 2012. TCA within 6 hours of hemorrhage onset was identified based on accounts of emergency care providers or family witnesses. Results TCA at onset was described in 170 patients (11%). Patients with onset TCA were younger (P = 0.002), presented more often with poor clinical grade (55% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and had larger amounts of cisternal, intraventricular, and intracerebral blood than those without onset TCA (all, P<0.001). After adjusting for known confounders, onset TCA was significantly associated with in-hospital seizures (OR 3.80, 95%-CI: 2.43–5.96, P<0.001), in-hospital pneumonia (OR 1.56, 95%-CI: 1.06–2.31, p = 0.02), and delayed cerebral ischemia (OR 1.77, 95%-CI: 1.21–2.58, P = 0.003). At 3 months, however, onset TCA was not associated with poor functional outcome, mortality, and epilepsy after adjusting for age, admission clinical grade, and cisternal blood volume. Conclusions Onset TCA is not a rare event as it complicates 11% of cases of SAH. New and clinically relevant findings are the association of onset TCA with in-hospital seizures, pneumonia and delayed cerebral ischemia. Despite the increased risk of in-hospital complications, onset TCA is not associated with disability, mortality, and epilepsy at 3 months. PMID:23951155

  10. Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Chung, Melissa G

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder that is characterized by multiple arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the skin, mucosal surfaces, and internal organs. HHT has an age-dependent penetrance and usually initially presents with recurrent epistaxis followed by the characteristic telangiectasias of the face, oropharynx, and hands over time. Patients often have vascular malformations that involve their lungs, brain, spinal cord, and gastrointestinal tract as well, which are the main causes of morbidity in patients with HHT. The sequelae of visceral organ involvement include ischemic stroke, cerebral bacterial abscesses, intracranial hemorrhage, chronic hypoxia, dyspnea with exertion, pulmonary hypertension, high output heart failure, gastrointestinal bleeds and liver failure. PMID:26564080

  11. Management of Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Holly E.; Ziai, Wendy C.

    2011-01-01

    Brain hemorrhage is the most fatal form of stroke and has the highest morbidity of any stroke subtype. Intraventricular extension of hemorrhage (IVH) is a particularly poor prognostic sign, with expected mortality between 50% and 80%. IVH is a significant and independent contributor to morbidity and mortality, yet therapy directed at ameliorating intraventricular clot has been limited. Conventional therapy centers on managing hypertension and intracranial pressure while correcting coagulopathy and avoiding complications such as rebleeding and hydrocephalus. Surgical therapy alone has not changed the natural history of the disease significantly. However, fibrinolysis in combination with extraventricular drainage shows promise as a technique to reduce intraventricular clot volume and to manage the concomitant complications of IVH. PMID:20425231

  12. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  13. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Trial WBC, white blood cells WFNS, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons PMID:26280117

  14. Hemorrhagic cystitis: a review.

    PubMed

    deVries, C R; Freiha, F S

    1990-01-01

    Acute, fulminant bladder hemorrhage usually is seen at tertiary care centers in which cancer patients are treated with oxazaphosphorine alkylating agents, particularly cyclophosphamide and isophosphamide. These agents also are used to treat benign conditions, such as lupus erythematosis and Wegener's granulomatosis. Radiation effects from treatment of prostatic or cervical carcinoma can appear for the first time as late as 15 to 20 years after initial treatment. Other iatrogenic causes of bleeding include treatment with penicillins and, rarely, danazol. Occasionally, bladder hemorrhage may be the presenting sign of metabolic disease, such as secondary amyloidosis in rheumatic arthritis. Cases of mild to moderate hemorrhagic cystitis arising in the otherwise healthy patients should lead one to pursue the possibility of environmental toxins, accidental poisoning, recreational drug use or viruses. In all cases the diagnosis should be reserved until more common causes of hematuria, such as bacterial or fungal infection, stones, cysts or tumors, have been ruled out. Prevention of chemotherapeutically induced cystitis ideally will follow careful attention to adequate hydration and the prophylactic use of antitoxins, such as mesna. Treatment, as outlined previously, consists of a series of measures beginning with the most conservative. Intervention thereby is tailored to the gravity of the clinical situation. PMID:2403595

  15. Effects of ischemic phrenic nerve root ganglion injury on respiratory disturbances in subarachnoid hemorrhage: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Recep; Aygl, Recep; Kotan, Dilcan; alik, Muhammet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Phrenic nerves have important roles on the management of respiration rhythm. Diaphragm paralysis is possible in phrenic nerve roots ischemia in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We examined whether there is a relationship between phrenic nerve root ischemia and respiratory disturbances in SAH. Material and methods This study was conducted on 5 healthy control and 14 rabbits with experimentally induced SAH by injecting autologous blood into their cisterna magna. Animals were followed up via monitors for detecting the heart and respiration rhythms for 20 days and then decapitaed by humanely. Normal and degenerated neuron densities of phrenic nerve root at the level of C4 dorsal root ganglia (C4DRG) were estimated by Stereological methods. Between the mean numerical density of degenerated neurons of C4DRG and respiratory rate/minute of groups were compared statistically. Results Phrenic nerve roots, artery and diaphragm muscles degeneration was detected in respiratory arrest developed animals. The mean neuronal density of C4DRG was 13272 1201/mm3 with a mean respiration rate of 23 4/min in the control group. The mean degenerated neuron density was 2.240 450/mm3 and respiration rhythm was 31 6/min in survivors. But, the mean degenerated neuron density was 5850 650/mm3 and mean respiration rhythm was 34 7/min in respiratory arrest developed animals (n = 7). A linear relationship was noticed between the degenerated neuron density of C4DRG and respiraton rate (r = 0.758; p < 0.001). Conclusions Phrenic nerve root ischemia may be an important factor in respiration rhythms deteriorations in SAH which has not been mentioned in the literature. PMID:24482661

  16. A Phase I proof-of-concept and safety trial of sildenafil to treat cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Washington, Chad W; Derdeyn, Colin P; Dhar, Rajat; Arias, Eric J; Chicoine, Michael R; Cross, DeWitte T; Dacey, Ralph G; Han, Byung Hee; Moran, Christopher J; Rich, Keith M; Vellimana, Ananth K; Zipfel, Gregory J

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Studies show that phosphodiesterase-V (PDE-V) inhibition reduces cerebral vasospasm (CVS) and improves outcomes after experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This study was performed to investigate the safety and effect of sildenafil (an FDA-approved PDE-V inhibitor) on angiographic CVS in SAH patients. METHODS A2-phase, prospective, nonrandomized, human trial was implemented. Subarachnoid hemorrhage patients underwent angiography on Day 7 to assess for CVS. Those with CVS were given 10 mg of intravenous sildenafil in the first phase of the study and 30 mg in the second phase. In both, angiography was repeated 30 minutes after infusion. Safety was assessed by monitoring neurological examination findings and vital signs and for the development of adverse reactions. For angiographic assessment, in a blinded fashion, pre- and post-sildenafil images were graded as "improvement" or "no improvement" in CVS. Unblinded measurements were made between pre- and post-sildenafil angiograms. RESULTS Twelve patients received sildenafil; 5 patients received 10 mg and 7 received 30 mg. There were no adverse reactions. There was no adverse effect on heart rate or intracranial pressure. Sildenafil resulted in a transient decline in mean arterial pressure, an average of 17% with a return to baseline in an average of 18 minutes. Eight patients (67%) were found to have a positive angiographic response to sildenafil, 3 (60%) in the low-dose group and 5 (71%) in the high-dose group. The largest degree of vessel dilation was an average of 0.8 mm (range 0-2.1 mm). This corresponded to an average percentage increase in vessel diameter of 62% (range 0%-200%). CONCLUSIONS The results from this Phase I safety and proof-of-concept trial assessing the use of intravenous sildenafil in patients with CVS show that sildenafil is safe and well tolerated in the setting of SAH. Furthermore, the angiographic data suggest that sildenafil has a positive impact on human CVS. PMID:26314998

  17. Protein biomarkers in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage, vasospasm, and delayed ischemic neurological deficits.

    PubMed

    Nyquist, Paul A; Wang, Honghui; Suffredini, Anthony F

    2013-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. It has many sequelae, including vasospasm and delayed ischemic neurological deficits (DINDs). We explored the blood proteome in patients with aSAH using transcranial Doppler (TCD) velocity as a guide to patients who are at risk for symptomatic vasospasm and DIND. Blood was drawn on all days that patients were observed in the neurocritical care unit (NCCU) after aSAH. A team of neurologists and neurosurgeons identified patients with clinical evidence of vasospasm and DIND. Serum was fractionated using protein chips and surface-enhanced laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). We detected a pattern of protein expression associated with those at risk for elevated TCD velocities by day 8, compared with blood collected in the presymptomatic stage (days 1-3). We further analyzed serum using pooled samples from study entry to the time of elevated TCD velocities using a protein microarray that analyzed 500 human proteins thematically oriented toward inflammation. After identifying several candidates with elevated concentrations in the pooled samples, we then used reverse protein arrays to quantitate the concentration of potential candidate proteins in the individual samples. Proteins with significantly elevated concentrations included apolipoprotein-E, apolipoprotein-A, serum amyloid protein-4, and serum amyloid protein-P. Future studies in larger sample populations are needed to evaluate these biomarkers further as representative of biosystems involved in vasospasm and DIND or as potential biomarkers predictive of risk associated with disease. PMID:22890638

  18. Surgical Clipping versus Endovascular Intervention for the Treatment of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Patients in New York State

    PubMed Central

    Bekelis, Kimon; Missios, Symeon; Coy, Shannon; Rahmani, Redi; Singer, Robert J.; MacKenzie, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Object Randomized trials have demonstrated a survival benefit for endovascular treatment of ruptured cerebral aneurysms. We investigated the association of surgical clipping and endovascular coiling with outcomes in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients in a real-world regional cohort. Methods We performed a cohort study involving patients with ruptured cerebral aneurysms, who underwent surgical clipping, or endovascular coiling from 2009–2013 and were registered in the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database. An instrumental variable analysis was used to investigate the association of treatment technique with outcomes. Results Of the 4,098 patients undergoing treatment, 2,585 (63.1%) underwent coiling, and 1,513 (36.9%) underwent clipping. Using an instrumental variable analysis, we did not identify a difference in inpatient mortality [marginal effect (ME), -0.56; 95% CI, -1.03 to 0.02], length of stay (LOS) (ME, 1.72; 95% CI, -3.39 to 6.84), or the rate of 30-day readmissions (ME, -0.30; 95% CI, -0.82 to 0.22) between the two treatment techniques for patients with SAH. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to rehabilitation (ME, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.24 to 1.01). In sensitivity analysis, mixed effect regression, and propensity score adjusted regression models demonstrated identical results. Conclusions Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of patients in New York State presenting with aneurysmal SAH we did not identify an association of treatment method with mortality, LOS or 30-day readmission. Clipping was associated with a higher rate of discharge to rehabilitation. PMID:26360422

  19. Retinal hemorrhagic lesions from femtosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Cindy D.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    We present our clinical evaluation of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic 90 fs single pulses in rabbits and primates. The rabbit and primate eye present unique in vivo models for evaluation of retinal and choroidal laser induced hemorrhages with distinct differences in their retinal anatomy. We found two different hemorrhagic events to occur in the posterior pole with delivery of 90 fs pulses. First, in the Dutch Belted rabbit, we found large amounts of energy per pulse (from 20 to 60 times ED50) were required for formation of subretinal hemorrhages. Second, in the Rhesus monkey, we found significant numbers of small intraretinal hemorrhages from relatively low energy 90 fs pulses. Both the Dutch Belted rabbit and the Rhesus monkey failed to consistently show subretinal hemorrhagic lesions form very high pulse energies. Our findings suggest more energy absorption at the level of the retinal circulation than the choroidal circulation with our pulse parameters. The effects of the laser on the retinal circulation may be due to the use of a wavelength of 580 nm. At this wavelength the oxyhemoglobin to melanin absorption ratio is nearly at its peak (approximately 0.40), perhaps allowing improved absorption in the retinal vasculature. One precaution with this finding, however, are the distinct differences between primate and non-primate ocular systems. Further studies are required to resolve the differences in damage at the level of the RPE and choroid between rabbits and primates.

  20. [APPLICATIONS ENDOVASCULAR HEMOSTASIS TREATMENT OF PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Severgin, V E; Shipulin, P P; Agrahari, A; Tronina, E Yu; Kyrylyuk, A A; Polyak, S D; Kozyar, N

    2015-06-01

    Rentgenoendovascular embolization of bronchial arteries was performed in 222 patients about pulmonary hemorrhage (PH) of different nature. Resistant hemostasis was achieved in 198 (89.9%) patients. The possibility of endovascular hemostasis in patients in advanced lung cancer complicated by PH. Hemostasis was ineffective in 24 (10.8%) patients. Died 5 (2.2%) patients due to unresectable lung cancer. The reasons for ineffective hemostasis were analysed. PMID:26521468

  1. Hemorrhagic radiation cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mendenhall, William M; Henderson, Randal H; Costa, Joseph A; Hoppe, Bradford S; Dagan, Roi; Bryant, Curtis M; Nichols, Romaine C; Williams, Christopher R; Harris, Stephanie E; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2015-06-01

    The optimal management of persistent hemorrhagic radiation cystitis is ill-defined. Various options are available and include oral agents (ie, sodium pentosan polysulfate), intravenous drugs (ie, WF10), topical agents (ie, formalin), hyperbaric oxygen, and endoscopic procedures (ie, electrical cautery, argon plasma coagulation, laser coagulation). In general, it is best to manage patients conservatively and intervene only when necessary with the option least likely to exacerbate the cystitis. More aggressive measures should be employed only when more conservative approaches fail. Bladder biopsies should be avoided, unless findings suggest a bladder tumor, because they may precipitate a complication. PMID:24322335

  2. Intravenous Flat-Detector Computed Tomography Angiography for Symptomatic Cerebral Vasospasm following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jin Pyeong; Sheen, Seung Hun; Cho, Yong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    The study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of intravenous flat-detector computed tomography (IV FDCT) angiography in assessing hemodynamically significant cerebral vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as the reference. DSA and IV FDCT were conducted concurrently in patients suspected of having symptomatic cerebral vasospasm postoperatively. The presence and severity of vasospasm were estimated according to location (proximal versus distal). Vasospasm >50% was defined as having hemodynamic significance. Vasospasms <30% were excluded from this analysis to avoid spectrum bias. Twenty-nine patients (311 vessel segments) were measured. The intra- and interobserver agreements were excellent for depicting vasospasm (k = 0.84 and 0.74, resp.). IV FDCT showed a sensitivity of 95.7%, specificity of 92.3%, positive predictive value of 93.6%, and negative predictive value of 94.7% for detecting vasospasm (>50%) with DSA as the reference. Bland-Altman plots revealed good agreement of assessing vasospasm between the two tests. The discrepancy of vasospasm severity was more noted in the distal location with high-severity. However, it was not statistically significant (Spearman's rank test; r = 0.15, P = 0.35). Therefore, IV FDCT could be a feasible noninvasive test to evaluate suspected significant vasospasm in SAH. PMID:25383367

  3. Intraventricular hemorrhage: emphasis on prevention.

    PubMed

    Hill, A

    1998-09-01

    Germinal matrix/intraventricular hemorrhage is a common type of cerebral injury in premature newborns. Based on the improved understanding of underlying pathogenetic mechanisms, numerous interventional strategies for prevention have been proposed. This article summarizes and evaluates the efficacy and safety of major interventions that are currently under consideration for the prevention of germinal matrix/intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:9777674

  4. [Intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Koh, Masaki; Kashiwazaki, Daina; Yamatani, Kazumasa; Kuroda, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that neurosyphilis is a cause of stroke and its main subtype is ischemic stroke. In this report, we present a rare case with intracranial hemorrhage in left frontal lobe and subarachnoid hemorrhage due to neurosyphilis. A 56-year-old man developed conscious disturbance, right hemiparesis, and motor aphasia, and was admitted to our hospital. Rapid plasma reagin(RPR)and fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption(FTA-ABS)serology was positive in blood and cerebrospinal fluid. MR angiography and 3D-CT angiography demonstrated no vascular abnormalities. He responded well to penicillin treatment, followed by complete resolution of his neurological symptoms. Diagnosis of neurosyphilis is sometimes difficult, as patients usually present with non-specific symptoms such as intracranial hemorrhage. To our knowledge, only 3 cases of intracranial hemorrhage caused by neurosyphilis have been reported previously. This case is reported to raise the awareness of this uncommon but important manifestation of neurosyphilis. PMID:25087758

  5. Lethal Hemorrhage Caused by Aortoenteric Fistula Following Endovascular Stent Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Kahlke, Volker; Brossmann, Joachim; Klomp, Hans-Juergen

    2002-06-15

    A 55-year-old women developed an aortointestinal fistula between the bifurcation of the aorta and the distal ileum following implantation of multiple endovascular stents into both common iliac arteries for treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease. Ten months before the acute onset of the gastrointestinal hemorrhage two balloon-expandable steel stents had been implanted into both common iliac arteries. Due to restenosis and recurrent intermittent claudication, three balloon-expandable covered stents were implanted 4 months later on reintervention. The patient presented with abdominal pain and melena, and fell into hemorrhagic shock with signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. After transfer to our hospital, she again developed hemorrhagic shock with massive upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding and died during emergency laparotomy. The development of aortoenteric fistulas following endovascular surgery/stent implantation is very rare and has to be considered in cases of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  6. [Intra-arterial injection of verapamil in treatment of cerebral vasospasm in a patient with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage from an aneurysm: case report].

    PubMed

    Mikeladze, K G; Éliava, Sh Sh; Shekhtman, O D; Lubnin, A Iu; Tabasaranskiĭ, T F; Iakovlev, S B

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm is a major cause of cerebral ischemia and neurological deficits in patients after SAH from the aneurysm. According to angiorraphy cerebral vasospasm in acute rupture of an aneurysm is detected in 50-70% of cases, and the risk of ischemia on it's background is 19-46%. One of the new trends of treatment of cerebral vasospasm is the intra-arterial injection of calcium channel blockers. The article presents a case of selective intra-arterial injection of verapamil for the treatment of cerebral vasospasm in patient after severe subarachnoid and parenchymal hemorrhage of the internal carotid artery bifurcation aneurysm with a good clinical outcome. PMID:24364247

  7. [Subdural hemorrhage of aneurysmal origin].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Alfaro, A; Perla, C; Blasco, R; Cortés, F; Solís, P

    1994-02-01

    Although most subdural hematomas are considered to be venous in origin, they may also be of arterial origin. When subdural bleeding is due to the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, most commonly at the middle cerebral or internal carotid arteries, the amount of subdural blood is usually small and of no clinical importance. We describe two patients with subdural hematomas secondary to rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, who needed prompt surgical treatment. The first patient had a left internal carotid artery aneurysm at the origin of the ophthalmic artery. In the second patient the aneurysm was at the anterior communicating artery and rebled into the subdural space directly through a right intraparenchymatous frontobasal hematoma. The most probable mechanism of subdural bleeding in our two patients was the existence of adhesions between the aneurysm and the arachnoid due to previous minor hemorrhages. The indication of cerebral angiography in a patient with subdural hematoma is based mainly upon the existence of meningeal signs, the presence of blood in more than one intracranial compartment or the rapid progression of bleeding. PMID:8204251

  8. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  9. Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Racsa, Lori D; Kraft, Colleen S; Olinger, Gene G; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-15

    There are 4 families of viruses that cause viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), including Filoviridae. Ebola virus is one virus within the family Filoviridae and the cause of the current outbreak of VHF in West Africa. VHF-endemic areas are found throughout the world, yet traditional diagnosis of VHF has been performed in large reference laboratories centered in Europe and the United States. The large amount of capital needed, as well as highly trained and skilled personnel, has limited the availability of diagnostics in endemic areas except in conjunction with governmental and nongovernmental entities. However, rapid diagnosis of VHF is essential to efforts that will limit outbreaks. In addition, increased global travel suggests VHF diagnoses may be made outside of the endemic areas. Thus, understanding how to diagnose VHF is imperative for laboratories worldwide. This article reviews traditional and current diagnostic modalities for VHF. PMID:26354968

  10. [Hemorrhagic disorders in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ludwig, H

    1999-10-01

    When bleeding disorders coincide with pregnancy, they might be congenital or acquired diseases, if not arising as a more acute complication of the pregnancy itself. The paper gives a review of the most common bleeding disorders out of internal medical constellations. History taking is the most effective way to open the diagnostic approach. If childbearing is desired the couple in question should be counselled accordingly in collaboration with a hematologist. Some conditions might be unfavourable, e.g. hemophila in male offspring, others might be serious but manageable, as in v. Willebrand-Disease or autoimmunologic thrombocytopenic purpura. Prenatal invasive diagnostics with fetal blood sampling at an early stage of pregnancy may reduce the hazards for the baby insofar, as it allows the more precise estimation of fetal risks at birth. Cesarean section will not in all cases be the way of choice (e.g. in v. Willebrand-Disease), in others it might be the better way to deliver a fetus at risk in order to avoid intracranial hemorrhage (in severe cases of ITP). Always both, mother and fetus, are at risk, but almost in any cases in different shades and grades of severeness. There is rarely a firm correlation of the maternal and the fetal hemostatic parameters in cases of connatal or acquired hemorrhagic disorders. Pregnancy itself leads to a certain compensation of defects in clotting factors, since the synthesis of factors increase or they are circulating more in activated form. Pregnancy is a state of a silently ongoing intravascular coagulation at least in the uteroplacental circulation. From there it is linked with the general circulation of the maternal organism. When immunologic etiologies in thrombocytopenias play a role, there will always be the incalculable rate of placental transfer of antiplatelet-antibodies to the fetus. The entire field requires knowledge, counseling, collaboration and foresight. PMID:10549234

  11. Prognosis Predicting Score for Endovascular Treatment of Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Risk Modeling Study for Individual Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Duan, Guoli; Yang, Pengfei; Li, Qiang; Zuo, Qiao; Zhang, Lei; Hong, Bo; Xu, Yi; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2016-02-01

    The elderly patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) have a greater risk of poor clinical outcome after endovascular treatment (EVT) than younger patients do. Hence, it is necessary to explore which factors are associated with poor outcome and develop a predictive score specifically for elderly patients with aSAH receiving EVT.The aim of this study was to develop and validate a predictive score for 1-year outcomes in individual elderly patients with aSAH underwent EVT.In this 10-year prospective study, 520 consecutive aSAH elderly (age ≥ 60 years) patients underwent EVT in a single center were included. The risk factors, periprocedural, and 1-year follow-up data of all patients were entered in a specific prospective database.The modified Rankin scale was used for evaluating clinical outcome. To optimize the model's predictive capacity, the original matrix was randomly divided in 2 submatrices (learning and testing). The predictive score was developed using Arabic numerals for all variables based on the variable coefficients (β) of multivariable logistic regression analysis in the learning set and the predictive performance evaluation was assessed in the testing set. The risk classes were constructed using classification criteria based on sensitivity and specificity.The poor outcome rate at 1 year was 26.15%. Six risk factors, including age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications, were independently associated with poor outcome and assembled the Changhai score. The discriminative power analysis with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the Changhai score was statistically significant (0.864, 0.824-0.904, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of the Changhai score were 82.07% and 78.06%, respectively.Our study indicated that age, hypertension, Hunt-Hess scale, Fisher scale, aneurysm location, and periprocedural complications were independent risk factors of poor outcome for elderly aSAH patients underwent EVT. In combination with these risk factors, the Changhai score can be a useful tool in the prediction of clinical outcome but needs to be validated in various centers before it can be recommended for application. PMID:26886607

  12. Impact of Comorbidity on Early Outcome of Patients with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Caused by Cerebral Aneurysm Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Avdagic, Selma Sijercic; Brkic, Harun; Avdagic, Harun; Smajic, Jasmina; Hodzic, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the complications aneurysms subarachnoid hemorrhage is the development of vasospasm, which is the leading cause of disability and death from ruptured cerebral aneurysm. Aim: To evaluate the significance of previous comorbidities on early outcome of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm in the prevention of vasospasm. Patients and methods: The study had prospective character in which included 50 patients, whose diagnosed with SAH caused by the rupture of a brain aneurysm in the period from 2011to 2013. Two groups of patients were formed. Group I: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered nimodipine at a dose of 15-30 mg / kg bw / h (3-10 ml) for the duration of the initial treatment. Group II: patients in addition to the standard initial treatment and “3H therapy” administered with MgSO4 at a dose of 12 grams in 500 ml of 0.9% NaCl / 24 h during the initial treatment. Results: Two-thirds of the patients (68%) from both groups had a good outcome measured with values according to GOS scales, GOS IV and V. The poorer outcome, GOS III had 20% patients, the GOS II was at 2% and GOS I within 10% of patients. If we analyze the impact of comorbidity on the outcome, it shows that there is a significant relationship between the presence of comorbidity and outcomes. The patients without comorbidity (83.30%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), the same outcome was observed (59.4%) with comorbidities, which has a statistically significant difference (p = 0.04). Patients without diabetes (32%) had a good outcome (GOS IV and V), while the percentage of patients with diabetes less frequent (2%) with a good outcome, a statistically significant difference (p = 0.009). Conclusion: The outcome of treatment 30 days after the subarachnoid hemorrhage analyzed values WFNS and GOS, is not dependent on the method of prevention and treatment of vasospasm. Most concomitant diseases in patients with SAH which, requiring additional treatment measures are arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. The best predictors in the initial treatment of patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by rupture of a cerebral aneurysm has the presence of comorbidity, which has statistical significance. PMID:26622076

  13. Fatal case of hemolytic-uremic syndrome in an adult due to a rare serogroup O91 Entero hemorrhagic Escherichia coli associated with a Clostridium difficile infection. More than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Guillard, Thomas; Limelette, Anne; Le Magrex-Debar, Elisabeth; Wynckel, Alain; Gouali, Malika; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Guyot-Colosio, Charlotte; de Champs, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic-uremic syndrome due to enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, belonging to serogroup O91 has rarely been described. We report here a case of post-diarrheal HUS due to EHEC O91 in an elderly patient for whom diagnosis was delayed given a previously diagnosed C. difficile infection. This case highlights the usefulness of Shiga-toxin detection. PMID:26135847

  14. Fatal subarachnoid hemorrhage associated with internal carotid artery dissection resulting from whiplash trauma.

    PubMed

    Uhrenholt, Lars; Freeman, Michael D; Webb, Alexandra L; Pedersen, Michael; Boel, Lene Warner Thorup

    2015-12-01

    Spinal injury following inertial loading of the head and neck (whiplash) is a common sequel of low speed traffic crashes. A variety of non-musculoskeletal injuries have been described in association with injury to the spine following whiplash trauma, including traumatic brain injury, vestibular derangement, and cranial nerve injury, among others. Vascular injuries in the head and neck have, however, only rarely been described. We present the case of a middle-aged male who sustained an ultimately fatal injury that resulted from injury to the internal carotid artery (ICA) and intracerebral vascular structures following a hard braking maneuver, with no direct head- or neck contact with the vehicular interior. Based on this unusual mechanism of injury we reviewed hospital data from the United States nationwide inpatient database (NIS) to assess the frequency of similar injuries reportedly resulting from traffic crashes. The post-mortem examination revealed a left internal carotid artery dissection associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Based on the close temporal association, the absent prior history, and the plausibility of the injury mechanism, the injury was attributed to the braking maneuver. An analysis of NIS data demonstrated that the prevalence of subarachnoid hemorrhage is significantly higher when there is a traumatic etiology, and higher yet when the trauma is a traffic crash (odds ratio 3.3 and 4.3, respectively). The presented case, together with the hospital inpatient data analysis, indicate that although SAH in combination with ICA dissection is relatively rare, it is substantially more probable following a traffic crash. In a clinical or forensic setting the inference that magnitude of a trauma was low should not serve as a basis for either excluding a cervical artery dissection from a differential diagnosis, or for excluding the trauma as a cause of a diagnosed dissection. This case report illustrates a rare fatal outcome of inertial load to the head and neck induced by a sudden braking event in a commonly experienced non-collision traffic incident. The likely mechanism of injury resulted from interaction between the occupant and the 3-point seat belt. These findings indicate that ICA dissections are substantially more likely to be associated with SAH following head and neck trauma, regardless of the magnitude of the traumatic event or whether an impact was involved. PMID:26499790

  15. Two cases of asymptomatic massive fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Peedin, Alexis R; Mazepa, Marshall A; Park, Yara A; Weimer, Eric T; Schmitz, John L; Raval, Jay S

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) in the immediate postpartum period is critical for the timely administration of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) prophylaxis to minimize the risk of alloimmunization in D-negative mothers of D-positive newborns. We report a series of two clinically-unsuspected cases of massive FMHs identified at our university medical center. Retrospective records of two cases of massive FMH were investigated using the electronic medical record. After positive fetal bleed screens, flow cytometric analysis for hemoglobin F was performed to quantify the volume of the hemorrhages in both cases. Flow cytometric enumeration with anti-D was also performed in one case. The two patients had 209.5 and 75 mL of fetal blood in circulation, resulting in 8 and 4 doses of RhIG administered, respectively. For the former patient, flow cytometric analysis with anti-D ruled out hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and supported the fetal origin of the red cells. Due to the clinically-silent nature of both hemorrhages, further evaluation of the newborns' blood was not performed. These cases highlight the importance of rapidly obtaining accurate measurements of fetal blood loss via flow cytometric analysis in cases of FMH, particularly in clinically-unsuspected cases, to ensure timely administration of adequate immunoprophylaxis to D-negative mothers. PMID:25736586

  16. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC) to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed Gaucher cells. Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD) and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures. PMID:25386355

  17. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  18. Spontaneous Absorption of Extensive Subinternal Limiting Membrane Hemorrhage in Shaken Baby Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Tatiana Tarules; Zacharias, Leandro Cabral; Pimentel, Sérgio Luis Gianotti

    2014-01-01

    The Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is characterized by subdural hematomas (SH), retinal hemorrhages (RH), and multiple fractures of long bones without external evidence of head trauma. Subinternal limiting membrane (ILM) hemorrhage, also known as macular schisis, is a characteristic finding of this entity. There is no guideline on the right time to indicate surgical treatment. This report describes an abused child with massive sub-ILM hemorrhage, which showed spontaneous absorption after less than two months of follow-up. Due to the possible spontaneous resolution, we suggest an initial conservative treatment in cases of sub-ILM hemorrhage related to SBS. PMID:25548698

  19. Dengue and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Gubler, Duane J.

    1998-01-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to devleop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:9665979

  20. [Subarachnoid hemorrhage: protective hypotension in delayed surgery].

    PubMed

    Massei, R; Tavola, M; Mottura, G; Ciceri, R; Pontiggia, M

    1998-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is frequently observed in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). Continuing systemic hypertension might augment the risk of rebleeding and also increase the blood flow and blood volume, resulting in more marked cerebral edema and intracranial hypertension. However, reduction of blood pressure might also decrease cerebral perfusion pressure in patient with an impaired autoregulation and in this way enhance the risk of cerebral ischemia. Anti-hypertensive therapy is not recommended to prevent rebleeding after SAH. The agents of choice for reduction of arterial blood pressure might be mixed alfa and beta adrenergic antagonists and barbiturates. PMID:9773659

  1. Internal iliac artery: embolization to control hemorrhage from pelvic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Pisco, J M; Martins, J M; Correia, M G

    1989-08-01

    The control of the massive and often fatal hemorrhage from pelvic neoplasms is a major therapeutic problem. Transcatheter embolization of the internal iliac arteries was performed in 108 patients with uncontrollable hemorrhage due to pelvic neoplasms (urinary bladder in 50, uterus in 39, ovary in 16, and prostate in three). Complete control of the hemorrhage was achieved in 74 patients, partial control in 23, and no control in 11. Seventy patients experienced postembolization syndrome (nausea, vomiting, gluteal pain, and fever due to tissue necrosis), and three had transient acute tubular necrosis caused by the contrast medium. It is important for success that the embolization be bilateral and that the embolic agent used be a permanent one. PMID:2748811

  2. Detection of fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeowon A; Makar, Robert S

    2012-04-01

    The prevention of Rhesus D alloimmunization through Rh immune globulin (RhIg) administration is the major indication for the accurate detection and quantification of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH). In the setting of D incompatibility, D-positive fetal cells can sensitize the D-negative mother, resulting in maternal anti-D alloantibody production. These anti-D alloantibodies may lead to undesirable sequelae such as hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN). Since the widespread adoption of FMH screening and RhIg immunoprophylaxis, the overall risk of Rh alloimmunization and infant mortality from HDN has substantially decreased. The rosette screen, the initial test of choice, is highly sensitive in qualitatively detecting 10 mL of fetal whole blood in the maternal circulation. As the screen is reliant on the presence of the D antigen to distinguish fetal from maternal cells, it cannot be used to detect FMH in D-positive mothers or in D-negative mothers carrying a D-negative fetus. The Kleihauer-Betke acid-elution test, the most widely used confirmatory test for quantifying FMH, relies on the principle that fetal RBCs contain mostly fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which is resistant to acid-elution whereas adult hemoglobin is acid-sensitive. Although the Kleihauer-Betke test is inexpensive and requires no special equipment, it lacks standardization and precision, and may not be accurate in conditions with elevated F-cells. Anti-HbF flow cytometry is a promising alternative, although its use is limited by equipment and staffing costs. Hematology analyzers with flow cytometry capabilities may be adapted for fetal cell detection, thus giving clinical laboratories a potentially attractive automated alternative for quantifying FMH. PMID:22231030

  3. Diagnostic Accuracy of Magnetic Resonance Angiography for Detection of Intracranial Aneurysms in Patients with Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; A Comparison to Digital Subtraction Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Farahmand, Mohammad; Farahangiz, Siamak; Yadollahi, Mahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) compared to intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in detection of intracranial aneurysms in those suffering from acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods: This observational diagnostic study was performed at a tertiary teaching hospital and reference center in Shiraz, Iran. We included 55 patients who presented to our center with the diagnosis of acute SAH. All the patients underwent MRA and DSA during their hospital course in order to detect the intracranial aneurysms. The time-of-flight MRA protocol was used and the results were compared to the results of DSA as the gold standard test. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for MRA. Results: The mean age of the patients was 46.3 ± 7.9 including 26 (47.3%%) men and 29 (52.7%) women. In 46 patients, 51 intracranial aneurysms were diagnosed by DSA (5 patients had two aneurysms). No evidence of intracranial aneurysm was found in 9 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. MRA correctly identified 42 of the 51 aneurysms (sensitivity 82%) and missed 9 small aneurysms (less than 10 mm). MRA revealed one false- positive finding, resulting in a specificity of 88.8%. The PPC and NPV for MRA were 97% and 47%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy per aneurysm was 0.83 for MRA. Conclusion: High sensitivity and specificity of MRA compared to DSA in diagnosis of intracranial aneurysms in those with acute SAH indicate that MRA could be reliably used as a diagnostic tool for this purpose. However we cannot recommend it as a routine substitute for DSA before surgery.

  4. Prolonged Cerebral Circulation Time Is the Best Parameter for Predicting Vasospasm during Initial CT Perfusion in Subarachnoid Hemorrhagic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chun Fu; Hsu, Sanford P. C.; Lin, Chung Jung; Guo, Wan Yuo; Liao, Chih Hsiang; Chu, Wei Fa; Hung, Sheng Che; Shih, Yang Shin; Lin, Yen Tzu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We sought to imitate angiographic cerebral circulation time (CCT) and create a similar index from baseline CT perfusion (CTP) to better predict vasospasm in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Forty-one SAH patients with available DSA and CTP were retrospectively included. The vasospasm group was comprised of patients with deterioration in conscious functioning and newly developed luminal narrowing; remaining cases were classified as the control group. The angiography CCT (XA-CCT) was defined as the difference in TTP (time to peak) between the selected arterial ROIs and the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). Four arterial ROIs were selected to generate four corresponding XA-CCTs: the right and left anterior cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRA2 and XA-CCTLA2) and right- and left-middle cerebral arteries (XA-CCTRM2 and XA-CCTLM2). The CCTs from CTP (CT-CCT) were defined as the differences in TTP from the corresponding arterial ROIs and the SSS. Correlations of the different CCTs were calculated and diagnostic accuracy in predicting vasospasm was evaluated. Results Intra-class correlations ranged from 0.96 to 0.98. The correlations of XA-CCTRA2, XA-CCTRM2, XA-CCTLA2, and XA-CCTLM2 with the corresponding CT-CCTs were 0.64, 0.65, 0.53, and 0.68, respectively. All CCTs were significantly prolonged in the vasospasm group (5.8–6.4 s) except for XA-CCTLA2. CT-CCTA2 of 5.62 was the optimal cut-off value for detecting vasospasm with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity 82.4% Conclusion CT-CCTs can be used to interpret cerebral flow without deconvolution algorithms, and outperform both MTT and TTP in predicting vasospasm risk. This finding may help facilitate management of patients with SAH. PMID:26986626

  5. Obstetric hemorrhage: A global review.

    PubMed

    Goffman, Dena; Nathan, Lisa; Chazotte, Cynthia

    2016-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage remains the number one cause of maternal death globally despite the fact that it is largely a preventable and most often a treatable condition. While the global problem is appreciated, some may not realize that in the United States postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of mortality and unfortunately, the incidence is on the rise. In New York, obstetric hemorrhage is the second leading cause of maternal mortality in the state. National data suggests that hemorrhage is disproportionally overrepresented as a contributor to severe maternal morbidity and we suspect as we explore further this will be true in New York State as well. Given the persistent and significant contribution to maternal mortality, it may be useful to analyze the persistence of this largely preventable cause of death within the framework of the historic "Three Delays" model of maternal mortality. The ongoing national and statewide problem with postpartum hemorrhage will be reviewed in this context of delays in an effort to inform potential solutions. PMID:26742599

  6. Pharmacologic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Quandt, C M; de los Reyes, R A; Diaz, F G; Ausman, J I

    1982-12-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage, following rupture of an intracranial aneurysm, affects about 25 000 people in the U.S. each year. Less than half the patients who survive until hospital admission have an overall favorable outcome. This high morbidity and mortality rate is a result of serious complications following the initial subarachnoid hemorrhage, the most significant of these being rebleeding and cerebral ischemia secondary to vasospasm. While surgical clipping of the aneurysm is the most definitive therapy, this procedure may be postponed for a week or two after the initial hemorrhage, depending on the patient's clinical condition. Pharmacological therapy is a critical part of the preoperative care of these patients and of the postoperative management of complications. This article discusses the syndromes of rebleeding and vasospasm and reviews the current pharmacologic therapy for each. PMID:6129959

  7. Hemangioblastoma presenting with intraparenchymatous hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Wakai, S; Inoh, S; Ueda, Y; Nagai, M

    1984-11-01

    The authors report six cases of hemangioblastoma presenting with apoplectic symptoms but with no history related to the tumor. In each case, computerized tomography disclosed an intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, which was located supratentorially in four and in the cerebellum in the remaining two. Angiography revealed an abnormal vascular blush in two cases, but no abnormal vessels or tumor blush in the other four. In all cases, a solid tumor with abnormal vessels, such as red veins and feeding arteries, was found within or adjacent to the hemorrhage at surgery. The possibility of hemangioblastoma should be kept in mind as a cause of intraparenchymatous hemorrhage, particularly subcortical. Evacuation of the hematoma should be carefully carried out, and the whole hematoma wall should be thoroughly investigated for abnormal vessels or a solid mass. PMID:6541682

  8. Pathogenic role of B-cells in the development of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage induced by pristane

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Tolga; Lee, Pui Y.; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra; Weinstein, Jason; Nacionales, Dina C.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Akira, Shizuo; Croker, Byron P.; Sobel, Eric S.; Reeves, Westley H.; Satoh, Minoru

    2011-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is an uncommon yet often fatal complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Advances in the treatment of alveolar hemorrhage have been hampered due to the heterogeneity of clinical findings and the lack of suitable animal models. A single intraperitoneal injection of pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome characterized by lupus-related autoantibodies and glomerulonephritis in non-autoimmune prone strains of mice. In addition, C57BL/6 (B6) mice frequently develop alveolar hemorrhage within a few weeks of pristane injection. Immunopathogenesis of pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage was investigated in the present study. Early (2-4 weeks after injection) mortality due to hemorrhage was unique to C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 strains of mice. Recruitment of the macrophages and neutrophils preceded the hemorrhage by several days and hemorrhage started 3-7 days after pristane injection in some mice, peaked at 2 weeks (84% in B6) and then resolved by 4 weeks in a majority of mice. Alveolar hemorrhage was independent of MyD88-, or TLR7 pathways, in contrast to autoantibody production and glomerulonephritis, and also was independent of FcγR or Fas. Rag1-/- mice had a reduced prevalence of alveolar hemorrhage compared to B6 (P = 0.01) congenics. However, T-cell receptor deficient mice developed alveolar hemorrhage at a rate comparable to wild type controls, while B6 Igμ-/- mice surprisingly had a strikingly reduced prevalence (7% vs 84% in B6, P < 0.0001). Reconstitution of B6 Igμ-/- mice with wild type B cells increased the prevalence to 50% (P = 0.028). Pristane-induced alveolar hemorrhage is a useful model to study the pathogenesis and develop new therapy for this underappreciated and often life-threatening complication of SLE. PMID:21808234

  9. Exsanguination due to gastric ulceration in a foal.

    PubMed

    Traub-Dagartz, J; Bayly, W; Riggs, M; Thomas, N; Pankowski, R

    1985-02-01

    An Arabian foal with a congenital heart disease died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. Previously, death of foals with gastric ulcers has been due to diffuse peritonitis resulting from gastric ulcer perforation. The foal in this case report died due to hemorrhage secondary to a large gastric ulcer. PMID:3972690

  10. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Muscle Hemorrhage Secondary to Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics)

    PubMed Central

    Sarcon, Anna; Botta, Gregory P.; Patel, Nikunj; Saven, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics) is the first Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitor of Burton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK). Attenuation of BTK signaling ultimately leads to inhibition of B-cell proliferation and apoptosis. After a series of clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved ibrutinib in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2014 and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia in 2015. Those trials included rare grade 3+ hemorrhagic events associated with ibrutinib. Herein, we report a unique presentation of back pain due to iliopsoas muscle hemorrhage in a patient with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia after initiation of ibrutinib. PMID:27231694

  11. Multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy: A common autoimmune etiology

    PubMed Central

    Pahadiya, Hans Raj; Lakhotia, Manoj; Gandhi, Ronak; Choudhary, Akanksha; Madan, Shiva

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder, primarily affect female in fertile age. Pregnancy in SLE female is a high-risk situation which can adversely affect maternal-fetal dyad. SLE can flare during pregnancy or in postpartum period. We describe a case of a young pregnant female who presented because of right hemiparesis due multiple hemorrhages in the brain. The first presentation of the SLE with multiple intracranial hemorrhages in pregnancy, preceding the other characteristic clinical symptoms is rare. Here, we high lighten the major neurological issues and maternal-fetal dyad issues in SLE pregnancy and treatment strategies for management of SLE in pregnancy. PMID:27114665

  12. Colloid cyst mimicking intracranial hemorrhage after head trauma.

    PubMed

    Buyukkaya, Ayla; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Özel, Mehmet Ali; Sarıtas, Ayhan

    2015-02-01

    Trauma patients consist vast majority of the patients who admit to emergency department, and most of them have a head trauma. A 58-year-old patient was taken to emergency department with head trauma, and a hyperdense lesion neighboring to third ventricle was detected. A diagnosis of colloid cyst was made in the patient who was being followed up for hemorrhage. In patients with head trauma, colloid cyst may easly be confused with intracranial hemorrhage due to hyperdensity. The aim of this report is to emphasize the importance of clinical thinking in the differential diagnosis of hyperdense lesion on computed tomography imaging of a patient with head injury. PMID:25195045

  13. [Suspected azodicarbonamide poisoning in a patient with acute hemorrhaging pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Marcin; Maksymowicz, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    The report describes the case of death of a 22-year old man due to acute hemorrhaging pancreatitis. Azodicarbonamide poisoning was suspected in this patient. Autopsy results, data from the literature and the knowledge about mechanisms of azodicarbonamide toxicity allowed for excluding poisoning with this substance as the cause of death. PMID:18432145

  14. Growing Hemorrhagic Choroidal Fissure Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Gelal, Fazıl; Gurkan, Gokhan; Feran, Hamit

    2016-01-01

    Choroidal fissure cysts are often incidentally discovered. They are usually asymptomatic. The authors report a case of growing and hemorrhagic choroidal fissure cyst which was treated surgically. A 22-year-old female presented with headache. Cranial MRI showed a left-sided choroidal fissure cyst. Follow-up MRI showed that the size of the cyst had increased gradually. Twenty months later, the patient was admitted to our emergency department with severe headache. MRI and CT showed an intracystic hematoma. Although such cysts usually have a benign course without symptoms and progression, they may rarely present with intracystic hemorrhage, enlargement of the cyst and increasing symptomatology. PMID:26962426

  15. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  16. Traumatic Injury Causing Intraperitoneal Hemorrhage of an Occult Pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Arpit; Biswas, Saptarshi; Baccay, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-secreting tumor derived from chromaffin cells. The diagnosis is usually suggested by classic history in a symptomatic patient, presence of a strong family history in a patient, or discovery of an incidental mass on imaging in an asymptomatic patient. Traumatic hemorrhage into an occult pheochromocytoma presenting as hypovolemic shock is a rare presentation of pheochromocytoma. We report a case of a 48-year-old female, who presented in hypovolemic shock due to unilateral adrenal hemorrhage secondary to a fall from horse. Computed tomographic imaging revealed that the source of the hypovolemic shock was hemorrhagic right adrenal mass with active extravasation. The patient underwent emergent selective arterial embolization of right superior adrenal artery and a small adrenal branch from the right renal artery to control the hemorrhage. The patient subsequently progressed to sepsis and MODS, needing multiple surgical procedures and a protracted recovery in the ICU. In the ICU, the patient suffered from rapid cyclic fluctuation of her systolic blood pressure and was subsequently diagnosed with pheochromocytoma secondary to traumatic hemorrhage. We discuss this rare case along with the presentation and diagnostic workup of this critically ill patient with a previously undiagnosed pheochromocytoma. PMID:24826336

  17. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  18. Remote Ischemic Limb Preconditioning After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Sebastian; Katsnelson, Michael; Dong, Chuanhui; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Making a limb transiently ischemic has been shown to induce ischemic tolerance in a distant organ. This phenomenon is known as remote ischemic limb preconditioning. We conducted a Phase IB study of remote ischemic limb preconditioning to determine the safety and feasibility of increasing durations of limb ischemia in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods Patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage underwent limb preconditioning every 24 to 48 hours for 14 days. Limb preconditioning consisted of 3 5-minute inflations of a blood pressure cuff to 200 mm Hg around a limb followed by 5 minutes of reperfusion. In the lead-in phase, we preconditioned the upper extremities, but this proved impractical and we began preconditioning the leg in a similar manner. Ischemia times were then escalated to 7.5 and 10 minutes. After each session, a visual analog scale was obtained and the extremity examined for neurovascular complications. Results A total of 33 patients completed the study. Mean age was 53±12 years and mean Hunt Hess score was 2.4±0.9. In the lead-in phase, an average of 7.7±2.4 preconditioning sessions was completed with mean visual analog scale 3.6±3.4. In the dose escalation phase, an average of 8.6±2.1 preconditioning sessions was done with mean visual analog scale 1.8±2.2 and 2.5±2.9 for the 7.5- and 10-minute cohorts, respectively. No session was prematurely terminated due to subject discomfort. No objective signs of neurovascular injury were observed. Conclusions We found limb preconditioning to be safe and well tolerated, even at ischemia times of 10 minutes, in critically ill patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:21415404

  19. Prolonged abulia following putaminal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Nagaratnam, N; Fanella, S; Gopinath, S; Goodwin, A

    2001-01-01

    Abulia, akinetic mutism, and other conditions causing reduced activity and slowness are a continuum of severity of behavior. Unilateral lesions usually cause transient symptoms. This article describes a patient with prolonged abulia lasting 12 weeks after aspontaneous left putaminal hemorrhage. He developed seizures that could be a contributing factor. The pathophysiologic mechanisms are discussed. PMID:17903806

  20. Cerebral Cavernous Malformation and Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Alliance HOME ABOUT CAVERNOUS ANGIOMA GET CONNECTED RESEARCH PROFESSIONALS GET INVOLVED WAYS TO GIVE Text Size: SMALL • LARGE Cerebral Cavernous Angioma and Hemorrhage By Jack Hoch; Reviewed by Dr. Issam Awad Background Although cerebral cavernous angiomas (CCMs) have been diagnosed ...

  1. Preventive effect of continuous cisternal irrigation with magnesium sulfate solution on angiographic cerebral vasospasms associated with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhages: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takuji; Mori, Kentaro; Esaki, Takanori; Nakao, Yasuaki; Tokugawa, Joji; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Although cerebral vasospasm (CV) is one of the most important predictors for the outcome in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), no treatment has yet been established for this condition. This study investigated the efficacy of continuous direct infusion of magnesium sulfate (MgSO4) solution into the intrathecal cistern in patients with an aneurysmal SAH. METHODS An SAH caused by a ruptured aneurysm was identified on CT scans within 72 hours after SAH onset. All patients were treated by surgical clipping and randomized into 2 groups: a control group of patients undergoing a standard treatment and a magnesium (Mg) group of patients additionally undergoing continuous infusion of 5 mmol/L MgSO4 solution for 14 days. The Mg(2+) concentrations in serum and CSF were recorded daily. Neurological examinations were performed by intensive care clinicians. Delayed cerebral ischemia was monitored by CT or MRI. To assess the effect of the Mg treatment on CV, the CVs were graded on the basis of the relative degree of constriction visible on cerebral angiograms taken on Day 10 after the SAH, and transcranial Doppler ultrasonography was performed daily to measure blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Neurological outcomes and mortality rates were evaluated with the Glasgow Outcome Scale and modified Rankin Scale at 3 months after SAH onset. RESULTS Seventy-three patients admitted during the period of April 2008 to March 2013 were eligible and enrolled in this study. Three patients were excluded because of violation of protocol requirements. The 2 groups did not significantly differ in age, sex, World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade, or Fisher grade. In the Mg group, the Mg(2+) concentration in CSF gradually increased from Day 4 after initiation of the continuous MgSO4 intrathecal administration. No such increase was observed in the control group. No significant changes in the serum Mg(2+) levels were observed for 14 days, and no cardiovascular complications such as bradycardia or hypotension were observed in any of the patients. However, bradypnea was noted among patients in the Mg group. The Mg group had a significantly better CV grade than the control group (p < 0.05). Compared with the patients in the Mg group, those in the control group had a significantly elevated blood flow velocity in the MCA. Both groups were similar in the incidences of cerebral infarction, and the 2 groups also did not significantly differ in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Continuous cisternal irrigation with MgSO4 solution starting on Day 4 and continuing to Day 14 significantly inhibited CV in patients with aneurysmal SAH without severe cardiovascular complications. However, this improvement in CV neither reduced the incidence of delayed cerebral ischemia nor improved the functional outcomes in patients with SAH. PMID:26230471

  2. The effect of window rooms on critically ill patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage admitted to intensive care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Clinicians and specialty societies often emphasize the potential importance of natural light for quality care of critically ill patients, but few studies have examined patient outcomes associated with exposure to natural light. We hypothesized that receiving care in an intensive care unit (ICU) room with a window might improve outcomes for critically ill patients with acute brain injury. Methods This was a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort study. Seven ICU rooms had windows, and five ICU rooms did not. Admission to a room was based solely on availability. We analyzed data from 789 patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) admitted to the neurological ICU at our hospital from August 1997 to April 2006. Patient information was recorded prospectively at the time of admission, and patients were followed up to 1 year to assess mortality and functional status, stratified by whether care was received in an ICU room with a window. Results Of 789 SAH patients, 455 (57.7%) received care in a window room and 334 (42.3%) received care in a nonwindow room. The two groups were balanced with regard to all patient and clinical characteristics. There was no statistical difference in modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score at hospital discharge, 3 months or 1 year (44.8% with mRS scores of 0 to 3 with window rooms at hospital discharge versus 47.2% with the same scores in nonwindow rooms at hospital discharge; adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.67 to 1.50, P = 0.98; 62.7% versus 63.8% at 3 months, aOR 0.85, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.26, P = 0.42; 73.6% versus 72.5% at 1 year, aOR 0.78, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.19, P = 0.25). There were also no differences in any secondary outcomes, including length of mechanical ventilation, time until the patient was able to follow commands in the ICU, need for percutaneous gastrostomy tube or tracheotomy, ICU and hospital length of stay, and hospital, 3-month and 1-year mortality. Conclusions The presence of a window in an ICU room did not improve outcomes for critically ill patients with SAH admitted to the ICU. Further studies are needed to determine whether other groups of critically ill patients, particularly those without acute brain injury, derive benefit from natural light. PMID:21371299

  3. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH. PMID:26755452

  4. Eosinophilic Gastroenteritis Due to Rhus Ingestion Presenting with Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Wonsuk; Choi, Chan; Cho, Kyuman; Park, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Rhus-related illnesses in Korea are mostly caused by ingestion of parts of the Rhus tree. Contact dermatitis occurrence after ingestion of Rhus-related food is very common in Korea. However, Rhus-related gastrointestinal disease is very rare. Herein, we present a case of eosinophilic gastroenteritis caused by Rhus ingestion. A 75-year-old woman was admitted with hematemesis and hematochezia after Rhus extract ingestion. Routine laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis without eosinophilia. Endoscopy showed friable and granular mucosal changes with touch bleeding in the second portion of the duodenum. Abdominal computed tomography revealed edematous wall thickening of the duodenum and proximal jejunal loops. Patch testing with Rhus extracts showed a strong positive reaction, suggesting Rhus as the allergen. Her symptoms improved after avoidance of the allergen. PMID:25844348

  5. [Pulmonary hemorrhage associated with celiac disease].

    PubMed

    Testa, María Eugenia; Maffey, Alberto; Colom, Alejandro; Agüero, Luis; Rogé, Ignacio; Andrewartha, María Sol; Teper, Alejandro

    2012-08-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a severe and potentially fatal disease characterized by recurrent episodes of alveolar hemorrhage, hemoptysis, and anemia. His association with celiac disease, described as Lane- Hamilton syndrome, could be due to the fact that both entities share a common pathogenic immune pathway. We report two patients of 13 years who consulted for hemoptysis and severe anemia that had not responded to immunosuppressive treatment with pulses of methyl prednisolone, oral meprednisone and hydroxychloroquine. Although both children highlight the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms at the time of consultation, the dosage of anti-endomysial and anti-transglutaminase antibodies was positive and biopsy confirmed the presence of intestinal enteropathy. It is emphasized that in patients with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms, the concomitant presence of celiac disease should be evaluated. If celiac disease is present, the incorporation of a gluten-free diet helps to control the symptoms, allows reducing the immunosuppressive treatment and improves the clinical course of both entities. PMID:22859336

  6. [Enteroviruses responsible for acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis].

    PubMed

    Lévêque, N; Huguet, P; Norder, H; Chomel, J-J

    2010-04-01

    Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) is an epidemic form of highly contagious conjunctivitis, characterized by conjunctival hemorrhages. The first AHC outbreak was described in 1969 in Ghana, West Africa, and was called Apollo disease, from the Apollo landing on the moon. This outbreak was caused by Enterovirus 70 (EV70) together with a Coxsackievirus A24 (CVA24v) variant, which are the major etiological agents involved in AHC outbreaks worldwide. AHC is known to be directly transmitted by close person-to-person contact or indirectly through soiled ophthalmological materials or unsafe recreational water. Recently, a possible airborne virus spread was suggested which could explain the high transmission rate of the disease. In the absence of a specific antiviral therapy, a rapid diagnosis of the causative agent is required to distinguish AHC due to enteroviruses from other ocular infectious diseases, for there are active drugs, or to quickly implement proper public health measures to limit the extension of the outbreak. However, virus identification remains difficult and time-consuming. Moreover, virological diagnosis is difficult to implement in developing countries where AHC has recently become a major problem for public health. PMID:19836177

  7. Accidental head trauma and retinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D L; Braun, D; Friendly, D

    1993-08-01

    Retinal hemorrhage and intracranial hemorrhage in a child with little external evidence of trauma and with a poorly documented history are considered pathognomonic child abuse. The mechanism and magnitude of force required to produce the injuries are seldom witnessed or known. This study was designed to determine the incidence of retinal hemorrhage in pediatric head injuries under known accidental circumstances, in association with forces sufficient to cause skull fracture and/or intracranial hemorrhage. Of 525 consecutive hospital admissions for head injuries, 200 children filled these criteria. Thirty children were excluded because of suspected child abuse or gunshot wounds. Of the remaining 170, 140 were evaluated by an ophthalmologist for retinal hemorrhage. Two children, who were both involved in side-impact car accidents, had retinal hemorrhages in associated with severe head injury. Retinal hemorrhage occurs rarely in accidental head injury and is associated with extraordinary force. PMID:8367044

  8. Putative Role of Prostaglandin Receptor in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Shekher; Ahmad, Abdullah S.; Glushakov, Alexander V.; Chambers, Chase; Doré, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Each year, approximately 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke. Of all strokes, 84% are ischemic, 13% are intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) strokes, and 3% are subarachnoid hemorrhage strokes. Despite the decreased incidence of ischemic stroke, there has been no change in the incidence of hemorrhagic stroke in the last decade. ICH is a devastating disease 37–38% of patients between the ages of 45 and 64 die within 30 days. In an effort to prevent ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes we and others have been studying the role of prostaglandins and their receptors. Prostaglandins are bioactive lipids derived from the metabolism of arachidonic acid. They sustain homeostatic functions and mediate pathogenic mechanisms, including the inflammatory response. Most prostaglandins are produced from specific enzymes and act upon cells via distinct G-protein coupled receptors. The presence of multiple prostaglandin receptors cross-reactivity and coupling to different signal transduction pathways allow differentiated cells to respond to prostaglandins in a unique manner. Due to the number of prostaglandin receptors, prostaglandin-dependent signaling can function either to promote neuronal survival or injury following acute excitotoxicity, hypoxia, and stress induced by ICH. To better understand the mechanisms of neuronal survival and neurotoxicity mediated by prostaglandin receptors, it is essential to understand downstream signaling. Several groups including ours have discovered unique roles for prostaglandin receptors in rodent models of ischemic stroke, excitotoxicity, and Alzheimer disease, highlighting the emerging role of prostaglandin receptor signaling in hemorrhagic stroke with a focus on cyclic-adenosine monophosphate and calcium (Ca2+) signaling. We review current ICH data and discuss future directions notably on prostaglandin receptors, which may lead to the development of unique therapeutic targets against hemorrhagic stroke and brain injuries alike. PMID:23097645

  9. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Shayan, Sara; Bokaean, Mohammad; Shahrivar, Mona Ranjvar; Chinikar, Sadegh

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Bunyaviridae family and Nairovirus genus. The viral genome consists of 3 RNA segments of 12 kb (L), 6.8 kb (M), and 3 kb (S). Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is the most widespread tickborne viral infection worldwide: it has been reported in many regions of Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The geographical distribution of CCHFV corresponds most closely with the distribution of members of the tick genera, and Hyalomma ticks are the principal source of human infection. In contrast to human infection, CCHFV infection is asymptomatic in all species. Treatment options for CCHF are limited; immunotherapy and ribavirin are effective in the treatment of CCHF; the efficacy of ribavirin in the treatment of CCHF has not yet been proven. This article reviews the history, epidemiology, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of CCHFV, as well as the development of a vaccine against it. PMID:26199256

  10. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy. PMID:26808448

  11. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  12. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  13. Heterologous Expression of sahH Reveals That Biofilm Formation Is Autoinducer-2-independent in Streptococcus sanguinis but Is Associated with an Intact Activated Methionine Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Redanz, Sylvio; Standar, Kerstin; Podbielski, Andreas; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have claimed deleterious effects of LuxS mutation on many bacterial phenotypes, including bacterial biofilm formation. Genetic complementation mostly restored the observed mutant phenotypes to WT levels, leading to the postulation that quorum sensing via a family of molecules generically termed autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is essential for many phenotypes. Because LuxS mutation has dual effects, this hypothesis needs to be investigated into the details for each bacterial species. In this study we used S. sanguinis SK36 as a model biofilm bacterium and employed physiological characterization and transcriptome approaches on WT and luxS-deficient strains, in combination with chemical, luxS, and sahH complementation experiments. SahH enables a direct conversion of SAH to homocysteine and thereby restores the activated methionine cycle in a luxS-negative background without formation of the AI-2 precursor 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione. With this strategy we were able to dissect the individual contribution of LuxS and AI-2 activity in detail. Our data revealed that S. sanguinis biofilm formation is independent from AI-2 substance pools and is rather supported by an intact activated methyl cycle. Of 216 differentially transcribed genes in the luxS mutant, 209 were restored by complementation with a gene encoding the S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase. Only nine genes, mainly involved in natural competence, were directly affected by the AI-2 quorum-sensing substance pool. Cumulatively, this suggested that biofilm formation in S. sanguinis is not under control of AI-2. Our study suggests that previously evaluated LuxS mutants in other species need to be revisited to resolve the precise contribution of AI-2 substance pools and the methionine pathways. PMID:22942290

  14. Role of external ventricular drainage in the management of intraventricular hemorrhage; its complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Kirmani, Altaf Rehman; Sarmast, Arif Hussain; Bhat, Abdul Rashid

    2015-01-01

    Background: External ventricular drainage (EVD) is the procedure of choice for the treatment of acute hydrocephalus and increased intracranial pressure in patients of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and intracerebral hemorrhage with hydrocephalus and its sequelae. We evaluated the use of EVD in patients of SAHs (spontaneous/posttraumatic with/without hydrocephalus), hypertensive intracerebral bleeds with interventricular extensions, along with evaluation of the frequency of occurrence of complications of the procedure, infectious and noninfectious, and their management. Methods: During the period of 2½ years, between September 2012 and February 2015, 130 patients were subjected to external drainage procedure and were prospectively enrolled in this study. Information was collected on each patient regarding age, sex, diagnosis, underlying illness, secondary complications, other coexisting infections, use of systemic steroids, antibiotic treatment (systemic and intraventricular), and whether any other neurosurgical procedures were performed within 2 weeks of EVD insertion or any time the duration of ventriculostomy. Results: The study population of 130 patients underwent a total of 193 ventriculostomies. Thirty-six patients had ventriculostomy infection (27.6%). Evaluation of the use of EVD was done by comparing preoperative and postoperative grading scores. Forty-nine patients survived and improved their score from Grade 3–5 to Grade 2–4. Twenty-nine patients were moderately disable, 16 were severely disable, and 5 were left in the vegetative state. Evaluation of outcome of patients revealed that there was an overall mortality of 61 (46.9%) patients both in the acute phase and later. 33 of the 39 patients having Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) 3–5 at the time of EVD insertion expired, as against 20 of the 51 patients in GCS 6–8. Patients in GCS 9–12 had an even better outcome, with 8 of the 35 patients in this group expiring. Conclusions: The use of EVD should be undertaken only in situation where it is absolutely necessary and ventriculostomy should be kept only for the duration required, and this should be monitored on a daily basis, given the exponential increase in infection after 5 days. PMID:26759733

  15. [Use of Bakri Balloon in postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Poreba, Ryszard; Nowosielski, Krzysztof; Belowska, Anna; Poreba, Aneta

    2010-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is one of the leading causes of maternal death and one of the major causes of mortality in women in developing countries. According to the Central Statistical Office, in 2006, in Poland 540 maternal peripartum deaths were noted, 34.7% of which due to PPH. Therefore, active postpartum management should be the main goal in contemporary obstetrics. Some PPH management algorithms have been proposed by the World Health Organization, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Polish Gynecological Society. In the event of unsuccessful conventional management of PPH (uterotonics, curettage, etc.) a new technique, intrauterine Bakri balloon tamponade, has been recently proposed. The current paper presents two case reports where this method has been successfully applied. PMID:20486546

  16. A Long-Term Follow-up of Pontine Hemorrhage With Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Ki; Kim, Ae Ryoung; Kim, Joon Yeop

    2015-01-01

    A pontine intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) evokes several neurological symptoms, due to the various nuclei and nerve fibers; however, hearing loss from a pontine ICH is rare. We have experienced a non-traumatic pontine ICH patient, with hearing loss. A 43-year-old male patient had a massive pontine hemorrhage; his brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed the hemorrhage on the bilateral dorsal pons, with the involvement of the trapezoid body. Also, profound hearing loss on the pure-tone audiogram and abnormal brainstem auditory evoked potential were noticed. Fifty-two months of long-term follow-up did not reveal any definite improvement on the patient's hearing ability. PMID:26361602

  17. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Image Analysis Methods: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Noel; Valdés, Jose; Guevara, Miguel; Silva, Augusto

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) account for 10-30% of all strokes and are a result of acute bleeding into the brain due to ruptures of small penetrating arteries. Despite major advancements in the management of ischemic strokes and other causes of hemorrhagic strokes, such as ruptured aneurysm, arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), or cavernous angioma, during the past several decades, limited progress has been made in the treatment of ICH, and the prognosis for patients who suffer them remains poor. The societal impact of these hemorrhagic strokes is magnified by the fact that affected patients typically are a decade younger than those afflicted with ischemic strokes. The ICH continues to kill or disable most of their victims. Some studies show that those who suffer ICH have a 30-day mortality rate of 35-44% and a 6-month mortality rate approaching 50%. Approximately 700,000 new strokes occur in the United States annually and approximately 15% are hem-orrhagic strokes related to ICH. The poor outcome associated with ICH is related to the extent of brain damage. ICH produces direct destruction and compression of surrounding brain tissue. Direct compression causes poor perfusion and venous drainage to surrounding penumbra at risk, resulting in ischemia to the tissues that most need perfusion [16].

  18. Clinical Features and Patient Management of Lujo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Sewlall, Nivesh H.; Richards, Guy; Duse, Adriano; Swanepoel, Robert; Paweska, Janusz; Blumberg, Lucille; Dinh, Thu Ha; Bausch, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth study of their clinical manifestations, transmission dynamics, pathogenesis, or response to treatment options typically available in industrialized countries. Methods and Findings We describe the clinical features of five cases of Lujo hemorrhagic fever and summarize their clinical management, as well as providing additional epidemiologic detail regarding the 2008 outbreak. Illness typically began with the abrupt onset of fever, malaise, headache, and myalgias followed successively by sore throat, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, rash, minor hemorrhage, subconjunctival injection, and neck and facial swelling over the first week of illness. No major hemorrhage was noted. Neurological signs were sometimes seen in the late stages. Shock and multi-organ system failure, often with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, ensued in the second week, with death in four of the five cases. Distinctive treatment components of the one surviving patient included rapid commencement of the antiviral drug ribavirin and administration of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), N-acetylcysteine, and recombinant factor VIIa. Conclusions Lujo virus causes a clinical syndrome remarkably similar to Lassa fever. Considering the high case-fatality and significant logistical impediments to controlled treatment efficacy trials for viral hemorrhagic fever, it is both logical and ethical to explore the use of the various compounds used in the treatment of the surviving case reported here in future outbreaks. Clinical observations should be systematically recorded to facilitate objective evaluation of treatment efficacy. Due to the risk of secondary transmission, viral hemorrhagic fever precautions should be implemented for all cases of Lujo virus infection, with specialized precautions to protect against aerosols when performing enhanced-risk procedures such as endotracheal intubation. PMID:25393244

  19. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Dutta, Tanya; Melcer, Joshua; Aronow, Wilbert S

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac manifestations are recognized complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Neurogenic stress cardiomyopathy is one complication that is seen in acute subarachnoid hemorrhage. It can present as transient diffuse left ventricular dysfunction or as transient regional wall motion abnormalities. It occurs more frequently with neurologically severe-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with increased morbidity and poor clinical outcomes. Managing this subset of patients is challenging. Early identification followed by a multidisciplinary team approach can potentially improve outcomes. PMID:25606704

  20. Remote hemorrhage from the site of craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Landeiro, José Alberto; Flores, Marlo Steiner; Lapenta, Mário Alberto; Galdino, Alexandre C; Lázaro, Bruno C R

    2004-09-01

    Postoperative intracranial hemorrhage is a serious and sometimes a fatal neurosurgical complication. Hemorrhage occurring at regions remote from the site of intracranial operations comprises an uncommon affection, most ignored by the assistant physicians. It bares a still incomprehensive pathophysiology, despite several theories trying to explain it. Looks like a common sense that the presence of the remote site hemorrhage cannot be related to concomitant presence of hypertension, coagulopathy or undiscovered lesions. We report three cases of postoperative hemorrhages occurring in a remote site of supratentorial craniotomies, two patients presented cavernous sinus meningeoma and one patient was submitted to intracranial vascular surgery. PMID:15476078

  1. Bilateral parotid oncocytoma with spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage: a rare hypervascular parotid tumor with ASL perfusion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Etsushi; Wiggins, Richard H; Anzai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of bilateral parotid oncocytoma with spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple, bilateral, well-defined masses within the parotid glands with increased vascularity based on arterial spin labeling Magnetic Resonance (MR) perfusion imaging and restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging. During the clinical follow-up, the patient developed extensive hemorrhage from the largest tumor, presumably due to a combination of the hypervascular nature of oncocytoma and hemodialysis. PMID:27133667

  2. Management of atypical eclampsia with intraventricular hemorrhage: A rare experience and learning!

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kewal Krishan; Goyal, Lajya Devi

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident during hypertensive disorder of pregnancy is a rare entity, but carries high risk of mortality and morbidity due to its unpredictable onset and late diagnosis. Here, we report an unusual case of 20-year-old primigravida with 34 weeks gestation having no risk factor, which developed sudden atypical eclampsia and intracranial hemorrhage within few hours. She was successfully managed by multidisciplinary approach including emergency cesarean section and conservative neurological treatment for intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:26417139

  3. Chondromyxoid fibroma invasion of the transverse-sigmoid sinus junction causing posterior fossa hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hersh, David S; Firempong, Alexander O; Chesler, David; Castellani, Rudolph J; Woodworth, Graeme F

    2016-02-01

    We report a 50-year-old woman with a chondromyxoid fibroma of the occipital bone, who presented with a cerebellar hemorrhage due to invasion of the adjacent sinus. Chondromyxoid fibromas are benign cartilaginous tumors. However, this case represents the first example, to our knowledge, of a chondromyxoid fibroma invading the transverse-sigmoid junction, resulting in intracranial hemorrhage. Our report highlights that the location of an intracranial chondromyxoid fibroma is an important factor in guiding surgical management. PMID:26481053

  4. Femoral compressive neuropathy from iliopsoas haematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ganu, Sneha; Mehta, Yesha

    2013-05-13

    Dengue fever is a debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by dengue virus. We reported a case of femoral compression neuropathy due to iliopsoas hematoma complicating dengue hemorrhagic fever. Iliopsoas muscle hematoma can cause femoral neuropathy with resultant pain and paralysis. Such manifestations are not well documented in the literature. The pathogenesis of hematoma and compressive neuropathy with its appropriate management is discussed. PMID:23608387

  5. [Treatment of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Proust, François; Douvrin, Françoise; Gilles-Baray, Marie; Levêque, Sophie

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhages is about 10.5/100,000 persons/year. Early obliteration of the aneurysmal sac is necessary to avoid rebleeding. The neurovascular staff meeting must decide the appropriate obliteration procedure for each patient. Intraoperative morbidity is 8% after endovascular coiling and 10% after microsurgical clipping. Endovascular coiling leads to complete obliteration of the aneurysm in 60% of patients and microsurgical clipping in 95%. Delayed ischemic deficits may be prevented by volemic expansion and calcium channel blockers. Hospitalization and general prophylaxis against deep venous thrombosis, pain and seizures are essential. Curative treatment is required against common complications such as intraparenchymatous hematoma, hydrocephalus, and delayed ischemic deficit. PMID:17296483

  6. Influence of Fever and Hospital-Acquired Infection on the Incidence of Delayed Neurological Deficit and Poor Outcome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Douds, G. Logan; Tadzong, Bi; Agarwal, Akash D.; Krishnamurthy, Satish; Lehman, Erik B.; Cockroft, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Although fever and infection have been implicated in the causation of delayed neurological deficits (DND) and poor outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), the relationship between these two often related events has not been extensively studied. We reviewed these events through of our retrospective database of patients with SAH. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine independent predictors of DND and poor outcome. A total of 186 patients were analyzed. DND was noted in 76 patients (45%). Fever was recorded in 102 patients (55%); infection was noted in 87 patients (47%). A patient with one infection was more likely to experience DND compared to a patient with no infections (adjusted OR 3.73, 95% CI 1.62, 8.59). For those with more than two infections the likelihood of DND was even greater (adjusted OR 4.24, 95% CI 1.55, 11.56). Patients with 1-2 days of fever were less likely to have a favorable outcome when compared to their counterparts with no fever (adjusted OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06, 0.62). This trend worsened as the number of days febrile increased. These data suggest that the presence of infection is associated with DND, but that fever may have a stronger independent association with overall outcome. PMID:23091718

  7. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neetika; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Kumar, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1) or ACVRLK1 (HHT2) genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals), liver (~40%–70%), brain (~10%), and spine (~1%). Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs), presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. PMID:25342923

  8. Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Birks, Eric K; Durando, Mary M; McBride, Steve

    2003-04-01

    EIPH is a condition affecting virtually all horses during intense exercise worldwide. The hemorrhage originates from the pulmonary vasculature and is distributed predominantly bilaterally in the dorsocaudal lung lobes. As the condition progresses, the lung abnormalities extend cranially along the dorsal portions of the lung. An inflammatory response occurs in association with the hemorrhage and may contribute to the chronic sequela. Although conflicting opinions exist as to its affect on performance, it is a syndrome that is thought to increase in severity with age. The most commonly performed method to diagnose EIPH at the present time is endoscopy of the upper airway alone or in combination with tracheal wash analysis for the presence of erythrocytes and hemosiderophages. Because horses may not bleed to the same extent every time and the bleeding may originate from slightly different locations, these diagnostic procedures may not be extremely sensitive or quantitative. At this time, there is no treatment that is considered a panacea, and the currently allowed treatments have not proven to be effective in preventing EIPH. Future directions for therapeutic intervention may need to include limiting inflammatory responses to blood remaining within the lungs after EIPH. PMID:12747663

  9. Macrovascular Lesions Underlying Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jacky; Cord, Branden J; O'Rourke, Timothy K; Maina, Renee M; Sommaruga, Samuel; Matouk, Charles C

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a morbid disease with a high case fatality rate. Prognosis, rehemorrhage rates, and acute, clinical decision making are greatly affected by the underlying etiology of hemorrhage. This review focuses on the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of structural, macrovascular lesions presenting with ICH, including ruptured aneurysms, brain arteriovenous malformations, cranial dural arteriovenous fistulas, and cerebral cavernous malformations. PMID:27214699

  10. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage Associated with Warfarin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Bülent; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Baha, Reshat Mehmet; Zeytun, Neslihan Ebru Eryaşar; Yetisgen, Azize

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to therapy of warfarin use. In this case report, we present the diffuse alveolar hemorrhage case as a rare and life-threatening complication of warfarin. PMID:26347781

  11. Bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana Isabel; Lopes, Leonor; Soares-Almeida, Luis; Filipe, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    The bullous hemorrhagic dermatosis induced by enoxaparin is a rare adverse reaction, which may be under-reported given its favorable evolution. We report a 71-year-old man who developed hemorrhagic bullae at sites distant from subcutaneous enoxaparin injections. It is important that clinicians be aware of the different adverse reactions of these widely used drugs. PMID:25942690

  12. Successfully Treated Isolated Posterior Spinal Artery Aneurysm Causing Intracranial Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HORIO, Yoshinobu; KATSUTA, Toshiro; SAMURA, Kazuhiro; WAKUTA, Naoki; FUKUDA, Kenji; HIGASHI, Toshio; INOUE, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    There are very few published reports of rupture of an isolated posterior spinal artery (PSA) aneurysm, and consequently the optimal therapeutic strategy is debatable. An 84-year-old man presented with sudden onset of restlessness and disorientation. Neuroradiological imaging showed an intracranial subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with no visible intracranial vascular lesion. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a localized subarachnoid hematoma at Th10–11. Both contrast-enhanced spinal computed tomography and enhanced MRI and magnetic resonance angiography revealed an area of enhancement within the hematoma. Superselective angiography of the left Th12 intercostal artery demonstrated a faintly enhanced spot in the venous phase. Thirteen days after the onset of symptoms, a small fusiform aneurysm situated on the radiculopial artery was resected. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful and he was eventually discharged in an ambulatory condition. To our knowledge, this 84-year-old man is the oldest reported case of surgical management of a ruptured isolated PSA aneurysm. This case illustrates both the validity and efficacy of this therapeutic approach. PMID:26522607

  13. Sonographic Diagnosis of Fetal Adrenal Hemorrhage Complicating a Vein of Galen Aneurysmal Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kütük, Mehmet Serdar; Doğanay, Selim; Özdemir, Ahmet; Görkem, Süreyya Burcu; Öztürk, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    Background: The vein of Galen aneurysmal malformation (VGAM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation which causes end-organ ischemia or venous congestion due to heart failure. Adrenal hemorrhage associated with VGAM has not been reported in the literature. We present the imaging findings of a fetal VGAM with adrenal hemorrhage. Case Report: A 26 year-old primigravida woman whose fetus with VGAM and mild cardiomegaly was scanned in the 34th week. On fetal ultrasound, a hyperechoic, well-circumscribed mass in the left suprarenal region was shown. Fetal and postnatal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage. The baby died after delivery. Conclusion: Adrenal hemorrhage can complicate VGAM in fetuses with severe heart failure. Evaluation of the adrenal gland in affected cases may contribute to the prenatal counseling, and postnatal management. PMID:26966627

  14. Recent advances in research on Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Mirazimi, Ali; Köksal, Iftihar; Estrada-Pena, Augustin; Feldmann, Heinz

    2015-03-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an expanding tick-borne hemorrhagic disease with increasing human and animal health impact. Immense knowledge was gained over the past 10 years mainly due to advances in molecular biology, but also driven by an increased global interest in CCHFV as an emerging/re-emerging zoonotic pathogen. In the present article, we discuss the advances in research with focus on CCHF ecology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment. Despite tremendous achievements, future activities have to concentrate on the development of vaccines and antivirals/therapeutics to combat CCHF. Vector studies need to continue for better public and animal health preparedness and response. We conclude with a roadmap for future research priorities. PMID:25453328

  15. Recent advances in research on Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Anna; Mirazimi, Ali; Köksal, Iftihar; Estrada-Pena, Augustin; Feldmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an expanding tick-borne hemorrhagic disease with increasing human and animal health impact. Immense knowledge was gained over the past 10 years mainly due to advances in molecular biology, but also driven by an increased global interest in CCHFV as an emerging/re-emerging zoonotic pathogen. In the present article we discuss the advances in research with focus on CCHF ecology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, prophylaxis and treatment. Despite tremendous achievements, future activities have to concentrate on the development of vaccines and antivirals/therapeutics to combat CCHF. Vector studies need to continue for better public and animal health preparedness and response. We conclude with a roadmap for future research priorities. PMID:25453328

  16. Thrombo-hemorrhagic deaths in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Lo Coco, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) has become the most curable form of acute myeloid leukemia after the advent of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). However, early deaths (ED) mostly due to the disease-associated coagulopathy remain the major cause of treatment failure. In particular, hemorrhagic events account for 40-65% of ED and several prognostic factors have been identified for such hemorrhagic deaths, including poor performance status, high white blood cell (WBC) count and coagulopathy. Occurrence of thrombosis during treatment with ATRA may be associated with differentiation syndrome (DS) or represent an isolated event. Some prognostic factors have been reported to be associated with thrombosis, including increased WBC or aberrant immunophenotype of leukemic promyelocytes. Aim of this review is to report the incidence, severity, possible pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of thrombo-haemorrhagic deaths in APL. PMID:24862130

  17. [Alveolar hemorrhage associated with intestinal inflammatory disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Rabec, C; Barcat, J; Rey, D

    2003-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is characterized by diffuse bleeding into alveolar spaces. Three histopathological patterns may be seen: 1) pulmonary capillaritis due to immunological aggression to the membrane, 2) diffuse alveolar damage within the context of acute respiratory distress syndrome, and 3) and "bland" DAH without alveolar or capillary damage. In the first two groups, pulmonary damage usually occurs within the context of a systemic disease. In the last, injury is usually found only in the lung, an entity called pulmonary hemosiderosis. We present a case of DAH with neither capillaritis nor diffuse alveolar damage in association with inflammatory bowel disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis. The case is interesting both because the association has not yet been described in the literature and because the presence of alveolar bleeding without evident tissue damage within the context of known autoimmune diseases may extend the field to include a new pathophysiological mechanism of pulmonary hemorrhage. PMID:12797945

  18. [Severe hemorrhagic form of Rift Valley Fever in Mauritania].

    PubMed

    Boushab, M B; Savadogo, M; Sow, M S; Fall-Malick, F Z; Seydi, M

    2015-03-01

    We report three severe cases of hemorrhagic form of Rift Valley Fever which have been observed in the Hospital of Aïoun (two cases) and in the regional hospital of Tidjikdja (one case). The disease manifested itself by an infectious syndrome, an early infectious syndrome (on the second day) with onset of hemorrhagic complications and disorder of consciousness ranging from an agitation to deep coma. The biological examinations showed a severe anemia. Multiple organ failures were also observed. Of the three patients treated one died. Therefore, the management of both suspected and confirmed cases must be initiated as soon as possible in order to control organ damages and prevent fatality. There is no specific treatment. The importance of the epidemiological survey must be emphasized to avoid outbreaks and control any epidemic due to this virus. PMID:25925806

  19. Massive hemoptysis due to welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Oğuz; İnce, Ozgur; Bakalov, Veli; Tuna, Tibel

    2012-01-01

    Many pulmonary problems such as lung cancer, occupational asthma, and pneumoconiosis have been described due to welding in the literature until now. This is the first case report of alveolar hemorrhage due to welding fumes presented with massive hemoptysis. We report a rare case of massive hemopthisis associated with welder’s lung, with a discussion based on a review of the literature. Established facts Many pulmonary diseases such as lung cancer, occupational asthma, and pneumoconiosis have been attributed welding fumes in the literature. Alveolar hemorrhage due to welding fumes has never defined before. Novel insights We herein report a case of alveolar hemorrhage presented with massive hemoptysis due to welding fumes. Clinicians should be aware of such rare but serious clinical picture which can occur in welding workers. Palliative measures and bronchoscopic Ankaferd Blood Stopper® application may help to stop bleeding. PMID:26029581

  20. Genetic markers in the EET metabolic pathway are associated with outcomes in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Mark K; Conley, Yvette P; Crago, Elizabeth A; Ren, Dianxu; Sherwood, Paula R; Balzer, Jeffery R; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical studies show that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) regulate cerebrovascular tone and protect against cerebral ischemia. We investigated the relationship between polymorphic genes involved in EET biosynthesis/metabolism, cytochrome P450 (CYP) eicosanoid levels, and outcomes in 363 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (DHET) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels, as well as acute outcomes defined by delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) or clinical neurologic deterioration (CND), were assessed over 14 days. Long-term outcomes were defined by Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) at 3 and 12 months. CYP2C8*4 allele carriers had 44% and 36% lower mean EET and DHET CSF levels (P=0.003 and P=0.007) and were 2.2- and 2.5-fold more likely to develop DCI and CND (P=0.039 and P=0.041), respectively. EPHX2 55Arg, CYP2J2*7, CYP2C8*1B, and CYP2C8 g.36785A allele carriers had lower EET and DHET CSF levels. CYP2C8 g.25369T and CYP2C8 g.36755A allele carriers had higher EET levels. Patients with CYP2C8*2C and EPHX2 404del variants had worse long-term outcomes while those with EPHX2 287Gln, CYP2J2*7, and CYP2C9 g.816G variants had favorable outcomes. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid levels were associated with Fisher grade and unfavorable 3-month outcomes. Dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids were not associated with outcomes. No associations passed Bonferroni multiple testing correction. These are the first clinical data demonstrating the association between the EET biosynthesis/metabolic pathway and the pathophysiology of aSAH. PMID:25388680

  1. The Development of Neuroendocrine Disturbances over Time: Longitudinal Findings in Patients after Traumatic Brain Injury and Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kopczak, Anna; Krewer, Carmen; Schneider, Manfred; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Schneider, Harald Jörn; Stalla, Günter Karl

    2015-01-01

    Previous reports suggest that neuroendocrine disturbances in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may still develop or resolve months or even years after the trauma. We investigated a cohort of n = 168 patients (81 patients after TBI and 87 patients after SAH) in whom hormone levels had been determined at various time points to assess the course and pattern of hormonal insufficiencies. Data were analyzed using three different criteria: (1) patients with lowered basal laboratory values; (2) patients with lowered basal laboratory values or the need for hormone replacement therapy; (3) diagnosis of the treating physician. The first hormonal assessment after a median time of three months after the injury showed lowered hormone laboratory test results in 35% of cases. Lowered testosterone (23.1% of male patients), lowered estradiol (14.3% of female patients) and lowered insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) values (12.1%) were most common. Using Criterion 2, a higher prevalence rate of 55.6% of cases was determined, which correlated well with the prevalence rate of 54% of cases using the physicians’ diagnosis as the criterion. Intraindividual changes (new onset insufficiency or recovery) were predominantly observed for the somatotropic axis (12.5%), the gonadotropic axis in women (11.1%) and the corticotropic axis (10.6%). Patients after TBI showed more often lowered IGF-I values at first testing, but normal values at follow-up (p < 0.0004). In general, most patients remained stable. Stable hormone results at follow-up were obtained in 78% (free thyroxine (fT4) values) to 94.6% (prolactin values). PMID:26703585

  2. Genetic markers in the EET metabolic pathway are associated with outcomes in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Mark K; Conley, Yvette P; Crago, Elizabeth A; Ren, Dianxu; Sherwood, Paula R; Balzer, Jeffery R; Poloyac, Samuel M

    2015-02-01

    Preclinical studies show that epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) regulate cerebrovascular tone and protect against cerebral ischemia. We investigated the relationship between polymorphic genes involved in EET biosynthesis/metabolism, cytochrome P450 (CYP) eicosanoid levels, and outcomes in 363 patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids and dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (DHET) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels, as well as acute outcomes defined by delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) or clinical neurologic deterioration (CND), were assessed over 14 days. Long-term outcomes were defined by Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) at 3 and 12 months. CYP2C8*4 allele carriers had 44% and 36% lower mean EET and DHET CSF levels (P=0.003 and P=0.007) and were 2.2- and 2.5-fold more likely to develop DCI and CND (P=0.039 and P=0.041), respectively. EPHX2 55Arg, CYP2J2*7, CYP2C8*1B, and CYP2C8 g.36785A allele carriers had lower EET and DHET CSF levels. CYP2C8 g.25369T and CYP2C8 g.36755A allele carriers had higher EET levels. Patients with CYP2C8*2C and EPHX2 404del variants had worse long-term outcomes while those with EPHX2 287Gln, CYP2J2*7, and CYP2C9 g.816G variants had favorable outcomes. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid levels were associated with Fisher grade and unfavorable 3-month outcomes. Dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids were not associated with outcomes. No associations passed Bonferroni multiple testing correction. These are the first clinical data demonstrating the association between the EET biosynthesis/metabolic pathway and the pathophysiology of aSAH. PMID:25388680

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage: a case report.

    PubMed

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We report a rare case of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) causing large contralateral hemorrhage during surgery for lobar hemorrhage. A 62-year-old woman presented with lobar hemorrhage in the left frontal and parietal lobes recurring over the previous 1 month. Because we could not detect the origin of the lobar hemorrhage, we performed a biopsy around the lobar hemorrhage site with the removal of a hematoma. During the surgery, we identified acute brain swelling without bleeding from the operative field. Intraoperative computed tomography demonstrated new large lobar hemorrhage of the right parietal lobe, which we could promptly remove. Specimens around hematomas on both sides were pathologically diagnosed as CAA on immunohistochemical examination. After the surgery, she suffered from lobar hemorrhage three times in the space of only 3 months. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no reported case of CAA causing intracranial hemorrhage of another lesion during surgery. Neurosurgeons should know a possibility of intraoperative hemorrhage in surgeries for lobar hemorrhage caused by CAA. PMID:25601180

  4. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  5. [Bacterial infection and its relation to the genesis and course of varicose hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Husov, L; Jurnkov, J; Lata, J; Senkyrk, M; Prbramsk, V; Dastych, M; Kroupa, R; Krlov, D

    2007-12-01

    Acute hemorrhage from esophageal varices due to portal hypertension is a frequent and serious complication of liver cirrhosis. Bacterial infection may be one of the factors influencing such hemorrhage. Endotoxins may increase portal tension and at the same time result in primary hemostasis disorder, thus becoming one of the causes of hemorrhage. The authors of the paper compared the incidence of bacterial infection in 53 patients with varicose hemorrhage due to portal hypertension with 62 patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension without varicose hemorrhage. At least one pathogen was found in considerable 61.1% of the total of patients in the liver cirrhosis group, while the difference between the two groups was but insignificant. No statistically significant difference was found between the group of patients with hemorrhage and those without hemorrhage in terms of presence of bacterial infection in hemoculture, urine, throat, faeces and ascites, nor was there a difference in the etiology of the G+ bacteria, G- bacteria or fungi and yeast infectious agents in the hemoculture, urine, throat, faeces and ascites in either of the groups. No statistically significant difference was found in comparing the patients with a recurrence of hemorrhage (or with mortality) and with infection with those without recurrence of hemorrhage. Bacterial infection was more often found in patients with a recurrence of hemorrhage (75%) as compared with those without any recurrence (52%), and also in patients who died bacterial infection was proven more often than in those who survived (61.9% vs. 58.1%, respectively). There was no difference in morbidity or recurrence of hemorrhage between the patients treated with norfloxacin and ampicilin/sulbactam. No statistically significant difference was recorded between the 1st and 5th day in terms of decrease in bacterial infection. A significant difference was found in the urine etiological agent, where a significant increase in the share of fungal and yeast urine infection (p = 0.011) was recorded after the application of the therapy, as well as a drop in urine infection caused by the G- bacterial agent (p = 0.057). PMID:18357859

  6. [Hemorrhagic colitis caused by dasatinib following cytomegalovirus enterocolitis in a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia in the second chronic phase].

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoshitaka; Sato, Eriko; Ichikawa, Kunimoto; Yasuda, Hajime; Komatsu, Norio

    2011-05-01

    A 26-year-old female progressed to blastic crisis (BC) after three months administration of imatinib for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) chronic phase (CP) and was treated with a dasatinib containing chemotherapy regimen. After remission to second CP, she was hospitalized because of fever and hemorrhagic diarrhea during dasatinib maintenance therapy. She was diagnosed as having cytomegalovirus (CMV) colitis because CMV antigen in blood leukocytes was positive and CMV-positive cells were also detected on staining of an ileocecal mucosal biopsy specimen with an anti-CMV antibody. Although blood leukocyte CMV antigen and CMV staining in colonic mucosa became negative after ganciclovir treatment, hemorrhagic diarrhea did not improve. However, after discontinuance of dasatinib, hemorrhagic colitis drastically improved and did not recur after administration of nilotinib. It is possible that hemorrhagic diarrhea occurred due to dasatinib-related hemorrhagic colitis. Previous case reports have indicated that CD8-positive T-lymphocytes infiltrate the colonic mucosa in dasatinib-related hemorrhagic colitis, and the same pathological findings were seen in our case. Dasatinib may cause hemorrhagic colitis via immunological mechanisms in CML. Dasatinib-related gastrointestinal bleeding is less frequent in Japan compared to that in western countries, and Japanese cases diagnosed as having hemorrhagic colitis are extremely rare. PMID:21646774

  7. A Case of Spontaneous Postpartum Thyroid Hemorrhage Leading to Upper Airway Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Boris D.; Borrego, Robert; Harding, Patricia A.; Hristov, Dimiter B.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 36 Final Diagnosis: Thyroid hemorrhage Symptoms: Shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Thyroidectomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spontaneous goiter hemorrhage is a rare entity that can lead to life-threatening respiratory compromise. Goiter hemorrhages are usually due to effects of anticoagulation or neoplastic processes. The hormonal effects of pregnancy may also lead to such life-threatening goiter hemorrhages in the immediate postpartum period. Case Report: We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who complained of progressive neck swelling as well as eventual shortness of breath in the immediate postpartum period. Computed tomography scans and ultrasound of the neck revealed an enlarged and heterogenous thyroid with airway compression. The patient underwent an emergent subtotal thyroidectomy to alleviate the mass effect on the airway. Upon resection, the thyroid was noted to contain a goiter hemorrhage with no signs of neoplastic degeneration on pathology. Conclusions: Pregnancy is a known hormonal stressor that routinely increases the size of the thyroid and also predisposes patients to goiter formation. In rare cases, thyroid goiters may be predisposed to hemorrhage, causing airway obstruction and necessitating urgent surgical intervention. PMID:27012654

  8. Clinical Features and Prognosis of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Secondary to Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Woo; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Sang Man; Kong, Tae Hoon; Park, Sang Yoo; Bong, Jeong Pyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives A number of etiologies of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL) have been proposed, including viral infection, vascular disturbance, and immune-mediated mechanisms. Intralabyrinthine hemorrhage (ILH) as a cause of SSNHL is extremely rare, and there have been no studies defining the characteristics of hearing impairment and prognosis in patients with ISSNHL due to ILH. This study aimed to investigate the difference in impaired hearing patterns and prognosis for hearing recovery between patients with ISSNHL due to ILH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and sex- and age-matched patients with ISSNHL due to causes other than ILH. Subjects and Methods We compared the results of audiometry and MRI in 12 patients who had ILH on MRI (hemorrhage group) and in 23 sex- and age-matched controls without abnormal findings related to their hearing loss on MRI (non-hemorrhage group). Initial hearing impairment, progression, and recovery of hearing loss were compared between the two groups. Results A majority of patients (92%) in the hemorrhage group complained of dizziness. Initial hearing impairment was more frequent in the hemorrhage group than in the non-hemorrhage group (94.09±35.9 vs. 66.66±30.1, p-value=0.036). The final recovery threshold in the hemorrhage group was worse (78.19±46.26 vs. 37.17±31.96, p-value=0.014) than that in the non-hemorrhage group. In the hemorrhage group, hearing recovery seemed to occur less often at high frequencies (2,000, 4,000, and 8,000 Hz) than at low frequencies (250, 500, and 1,000 Hz). Conclusions The presence of ILH was associated with poor hearing prognosis and the occurrence of vertigo. The abrupt onset of hearing loss associated with vertigo and the presence of hyperresonance on fat-suppressed T1-weighted MRI images of labyrinthic fluid strongly suggests acute intralabyrinthine hemorrhage, and is predictive of considerable hearing impairment and poor prognosis. PMID:27144231

  9. Circulatory contributors to the phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Shovlin, Claire L

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is mechanistically and therapeutically challenging, not only because of the molecular and cellular perturbations that generate vascular abnormalities, but also the modifications to circulatory physiology that result, and are likely to exacerbate vascular injury. First, most HHT patients have visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Significant visceral AVMs reduce the systemic vascular resistance: supra-normal cardiac outputs are required to maintain arterial blood pressure, and may result in significant pulmonary venous hypertension. Secondly, bleeding from nasal and gastrointestinal telangiectasia leads to iron losses of such magnitude that in most cases, diet is insufficient to meet the 'hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement.' Resultant iron deficiency restricts erythropoiesis, leading to anemia and further increases in cardiac output. Low iron levels are also associated with venous and arterial thromboses, elevated Factor VIII, and increased platelet aggregation to circulating 5HT (serotonin). Third, recent data highlight that reduced oxygenation of blood due to pulmonary AVMs results in a graded erythrocytotic response to maintain arterial oxygen content, and higher stroke volumes and/or heart rates to maintain oxygen delivery. Finally, HHT-independent factors such as diet, pregnancy, sepsis, and other intercurrent illnesses also influence vascular structures, hemorrhage, and iron handling in HHT patients. These considerations emphasize the complexity of mechanisms that impact on vascular structures in HHT, and also offer opportunities for targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25914716

  10. Circulatory contributors to the phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Shovlin, Claire L.

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is mechanistically and therapeutically challenging, not only because of the molecular and cellular perturbations that generate vascular abnormalities, but also the modifications to circulatory physiology that result, and are likely to exacerbate vascular injury. First, most HHT patients have visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Significant visceral AVMs reduce the systemic vascular resistance: supra-normal cardiac outputs are required to maintain arterial blood pressure, and may result in significant pulmonary venous hypertension. Secondly, bleeding from nasal and gastrointestinal telangiectasia leads to iron losses of such magnitude that in most cases, diet is insufficient to meet the ‘hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement.’ Resultant iron deficiency restricts erythropoiesis, leading to anemia and further increases in cardiac output. Low iron levels are also associated with venous and arterial thromboses, elevated Factor VIII, and increased platelet aggregation to circulating 5HT (serotonin). Third, recent data highlight that reduced oxygenation of blood due to pulmonary AVMs results in a graded erythrocytotic response to maintain arterial oxygen content, and higher stroke volumes and/or heart rates to maintain oxygen delivery. Finally, HHT-independent factors such as diet, pregnancy, sepsis, and other intercurrent illnesses also influence vascular structures, hemorrhage, and iron handling in HHT patients. These considerations emphasize the complexity of mechanisms that impact on vascular structures in HHT, and also offer opportunities for targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25914716

  11. Massive pulmonary hemorrhage before living donor liver transplantation in infants.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Yoshimaru, Koichiro; Yanagi, Yusuke; Esumi, Genshiro; Hayashida, Makoto; Taguchi, Tomoaki

    2016-02-01

    A massive pulmonary hemorrhage in patients with liver cirrhosis is a life-threatening complication that may result in a contraindication of a liver transplantation because of its high mortality rate. Herein, we present two infant biliary atresia cases that successfully underwent an LDLT that was followed by intensive respiratory care for the pretransplant massive pulmonary hemorrhage. Both cases exhibited severe respiratory failure (minimum PaO2 /FiO2 ; 46 mmHg and 39 mmHg, respectively). To arrest the bleeding, we applied a very high positive pressure ventilation treatment (maximum PIP/PEEP; 38/14 cmH2 O and 55/15 cmH2 O, respectively), plasma exchange, several FFP transfusions, and recombinant factor VIIa via intrapulmonary administration. In addition, we used CHDF treatment, applied HFOV transiently, and treated the patient with inhalation of nitric oxide. Although we prepared ECMO for intra-operative use, both cases were successfully managed with conventional mechanical ventilation without using ECMO, which may have worsened the pulmonary hemorrhage due to the use of an anticoagulant. Use of an excessive positive pressure management, although it poses a risk for barotrauma, could be acceptable to arrest the pulmonary bleeding in selected cases of liver failure patients who have no time remaining before LDLT. PMID:26691206

  12. Clinical aspects of Marburg hemorrhagic fever

    PubMed Central

    Mehedi, Masfique; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Marburg virus belongs to the genus Marburgvirus in the family Filoviridae and causes a severe hemorrhagic fever, known as Marburg hemorrhagic fever (MHF), in both humans and nonhuman primates. Similar to the more widely known Ebola hemorrhagic fever, MHF is characterized by systemic viral replication, immunosuppression and abnormal inflammatory responses. These pathological features of the disease contribute to a number of systemic dysfunctions including hemorrhages, edema, coagulation abnormalities and, ultimately, multiorgan failure and shock, often resulting in death. A detailed understanding of the pathological processes that lead to this devastating disease remains elusive, a fact that contributes to the lack of licensed vaccines or effective therapeutics. This article will review the clinical aspects of MHF and discuss the pathogenesis and possible options for diagnosis, treatment and prevention. PMID:22046196

  13. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  14. Retinal hemorrhage in abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Levin, Alex V

    2010-11-01

    Retinal hemorrhage is a cardinal manifestation of abusive head trauma. Over the 30 years since the recognition of this association, multiple streams of research, including clinical, postmortem, animal, mechanical, and finite element studies, have created a robust understanding of the clinical features, diagnostic importance, differential diagnosis, and pathophysiology of this finding. The importance of describing the hemorrhages adequately is paramount in ensuring accurate and complete differential diagnosis. Challenges remain in developing models that adequately replicate the forces required to cause retinal hemorrhage in children. Although questions, such as the effect of increased intracranial pressure, hypoxia, and impact, are still raised (particularly in court), clinicians can confidently rely on a large and solid evidence base when assessing the implications of retinal hemorrhage in children with concern of possible child abuse. PMID:20921069

  15. The risk of hemorrhagic complications in hospital in-patients who fall while receiving antithrombotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Andrew J; Molnar, Frank J; Li, Marilyn; Mackey, Marlene; Man-Son-Hing, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Background The use of antithrombotic agents and falls are independently associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic injury. However, few studies have delineated the risk of fall-related hemorrhagic complications in persons who are taking antithrombotic therapy. The objective of this study was to compare the rates of fall-related hemorrhagic injury in hospital in-patients who are taking and not taking antithrombotic therapy. Methods A 4-year retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who fell during admission to a 500-bed tertiary-care teaching hospital was conducted. Major hemorrhagic injuries including subdural hematomas and major bleeding/cuts, patients' use of antithrombotic medication (warfarin, aspirin, clopidogrel and heparin) and their anticoagulation status at the time of their fall were recorded. Results A total of 2635 falls in 1861 patients were reviewed. Approximately 10% of falls caused major hemorrhagic injury. One fall resulted in a subdural hematoma. Persons taking warfarin were less likely to suffer a fall-related major hemorrhagic injury compared with persons not taking antithrombotic therapy (warfarin, 6%; no therapy, 11%; p = 0.01). Logistic regression showed that fall-related major hemorrhagic injury was associated with female gender (odds ratio 1.6; 95% CI 1.3, 2.1), use of aspirin (odds ratio 1.4; 95% CI 1.1, 1.8) and use of clopidogrel (odds ratio 2.2; 95% CI 1.1, 4.8), but not with the use of warfarin or heparin, or the intensity of anticoagulation. Conclusions In this study, compared with persons taking no antithrombotic therapy, those taking warfarin had lower rates of fall-related hemorrhagic injuries. The absolute rate of the development of fall-related intracranial hemorrhagic injury such as subdural hematomas was low, even in persons taking warfarin. These counter-intuitive results may be due to selection bias, and suggest that physicians are very conservative in selecting patients for warfarin therapy, choosing only those who are sufficiently healthy to be at much lower than average risk of suffering fall-related hemorrhagic injuries. This phenomenon may lead to physicians overestimating the potential for fall-related major hemorrhagic injury in persons taking antithrombotic therapy, with the possible denial of warfarin therapy to many of those who would benefit. This perception may contribute to the care gap between the number of patients who would theoretically derive overall benefit from warfarin therapy and those who are actually receiving it. PMID:15638939

  16. Atypical hemorrhagic bullous pyoderma gangrenosum.

    PubMed

    Altunay, I K; Sezgin, S A; Ileri, U; Ekmekçi, T R; Kuran, I; Köşlü, A; Baş, L

    2001-05-01

    A 55-year-old woman was seen in the Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Clinic because of a nonhealing wound on her left leg of approximately 2 months' duration. She had an 8-month history of multiple wounds appearing on her arms and legs. The patient noted that the majority of the wounds had been treated and healed with the use of topical medications. One wound on her left leg had continued to enlarge rapidly despite topical treatments. Therefore, hyperbaric oxygen therapy had been administered for 15 sessions. No additional healing had occurred with this treatment. Skin grafting was performed on the affected area. She developed ulcers and blistering lesions at surgical and nonsurgical sites after skin grafting. The patient was referred to the Dermatology Department. Dermatologic examination revealed a deep, necrotic ulcer, 30 cm x 10 cm, with surrounding violaceous erythema on the donor area, ulceration (18 cm x 8 cm) on the graft area, a hemorrhagic bullous plaque (5 cm x 15 cm) over the right malleolus, scattered ecchymotic lesions and small hemorrhagic bullae on both legs, and small pustules around the staplers (Fig. 1a,b). Cutaneous biopsy of a new lesion revealed a focal, dense neutrophilic infiltrate, liquefaction degeneration in the center, lymphocytic and mild plasmacytic infiltration around the venules, and fibrinoid deposits in the walls and lumen of the vessels (Fig. 2a). In addition, excessive polymorphonuclear leukocytes and extravasated erythrocytes were present in the papillary and reticular dermis (Fig. 2b). The patient had a 14-year history of asthma bronchiale. Physical examination did not reveal any abnormality, except for crackling rales at the base of each lung. Laboratory examinations were within normal limits, except for the sedimentation rate (55 mm/h). Protein electrophoresis, peripheral blood smear, abdominal ultrasound, and thorax and abdominopelvic computed tomography scans were all normal. Swab cultures from the ulcers were negative. Bullous pyoderma gangrenosum was diagnosed on clinical and histopathologic grounds. Prednisolone 80 mg/day was started. Rapid epithelialization was observed within 2 months of treatment. The dose of prednisolone was gradually decreased to 20 mg/day, and was used as a maintenance dose for an additional 6 months. Complete improvement was achieved in 8 months. The patient has been followed up for approximately 1 year. There were no side effects observed during the treatment and in addition no new lesions developed at the follow-up. PMID:11554994

  17. Reperfusion Hemorrhage Following Superior Mesenteric Artery Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Michael; McSweeney, Sean; Fulton, Gregory; Buckley, John; Maher, Michael Guiney, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement is now an established treatment option for chronic mesenteric ischemia and is associated with low mortality and morbidity rates. We present a case of reperfusion hemorrhage complicating endovascular repair of superior mesenteric artery stenosis. Although a recognized complication following repair of carotid stenosis, hemorrhage has not previously been reported following mesenteric endovascular reperfusion. We describe both spontaneous cessation of bleeding and treatment with coil embolization.

  18. Spontaneous Splenic Hemorrhage in the Newborn

    PubMed Central

    Tiboni, Sonia; Abdulmajid, Umar; Pooboni, Suneel; Wighton, Christopher; Eradi, Balgopal; Dagash, Haitham

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous splenic hemorrhage in the newborn is a rare entity. The presentation is usually with a triad of bleeding, abdominal distension, and hemoperitoneum. Rapid diagnosis is essential as left untreated, death is inevitable. We present a case with an unusual initial presentation of a scrotal hematocele and ultrasonography suggesting an adrenal hemorrhage. At laparotomy, splenic preservation was unsuccessful, and therefore, splenectomy was performed. The child recovered well from the procedure. PMID:26788451

  19. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  20. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and the kidney.

    PubMed

    Vachvanichsanong, Prayong; Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus infection (DVI)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is a common febrile illness with a variety of severities. The mortality rate is high in dengue shock syndrome (DSS), caused by circulatory failure due to plasma leakage resulting in multi-organ failure. However, acute kidney injury (AKI) is rarely reported. In areas of endemic DVI, the prevalence of AKI due to DVI has been reported to be as high as 6.0 % in children with AKI, and 0.9 % in children with DVI who were admitted to a hospital. The mechanism of AKI in DVI is not clear. It may result from (a) direct injury as in other infectious diseases, (b) an indirect mechanism such as via the immune system, since DHF is an immunological disease, or (c) hypotensive DSS, leading in turn to reduced renal blood supply and renal failure. The mortality rates of DF/DHF, DSS and DHF/DSS-related AKI are <1 %, 12-44 %, and >60 %, respectively. Kidney involvement is not actually that rare, but is under-recognized and often only reported when microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, electrolyte imbalance, or even AKI is found. The prevalence of proteinuria and hematuria has been reported as high as 70-80 % in DVI. A correct diagnosis depends on basic investigations of kidney function such as urinalysis, serum creatinine and electrolytes. Although DVI-related renal involvement is treated supportively, it is still important to make an early diagnosis to prevent AKI and its complications, and if AKI does occur, dialysis may be required. Fortunately, in patients who recover, kidney function usually completely recovers as well. PMID:26699788

  1. Fatal cerebellar hemorrhage as an initial presentation of medulloblastoma in a child

    PubMed Central

    Menekse, Guner; Gezercan, Yurdal; Demirturk, Pelin; Uysal, Ismail; Okten, Ali Ihsan

    2015-01-01

    Children with medulloblastomas most commonly present with signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure due to obstructive hydrocephalus, especially headaches and vomiting. However, some pediatric patients present with sudden neurological deterioration due to intracerebellar hemorrhage associated with medulloblastoma, although very few reports exist that document this phenomenon. An 8-year-old girl was admitted to our emergency department who presented with sudden loss of consciousness, vomiting, and bradycardia. The neuroradiological evaluation revealed a hemorrhagic mass lesion in the posterior fossa. Urgent evacuation of the hematoma was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative histopathological examination revealed the lesion to be a medulloblastoma. This report presents an unusual case of a medulloblastoma presenting with fatal intracranial hemorrhage in a child. The clinical features and intraoperative and pathologic findings of the case are discussed. PMID:26557180

  2. Pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome associated with an autochthonous case of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Setlik, Robert F; Ouellette, Daniel; Morgan, Julia; McAllister, C Kenneth; Dorsey, David; Agan, Brian K; Horvath, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michelle K; Purcell, Bret

    2004-07-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a much rarer form of the disease, occurs when a person previously infected with dengue is re-infected with a different viral serotype. In recent years the infection rates of dengue and both clinical syndromes have increased along the United States-Mexico border. We present the case of a 61-year-old Laotian female who presented with a 1-week history of fever, altered mental status, oral ulceration, and rash. The patient developed diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and anemia requiring multiple transfusions. She eventually sustained multi-organ system failure and expired. Both the titer data and serologies were consistent with the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. We hypothesize that this syndrome was the result of re-infection occurring within the United States. This case is also unusual in that it is the second reported in the literature of pulmonary hemorrhages associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever. PMID:15301127

  3. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook

    2015-01-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature. PMID:26771018

  4. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Su-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature. PMID:26771018

  5. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed. PMID:21990534

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen: Primary treatment of radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.P.; Neville, E.C.

    1989-07-01

    Of 8 patients with symptoms of advanced cystitis due to pelvic radiation treated with hyperbaric oxygen 7 are persistently improved during followup. All 6 patients treated for gross hematuria requiring hospitalization have been free of symptoms for an average of 24 months (range 6 to 43 months). One patient treated for stress incontinence currently is dry despite little change in bladder capacity, implying salutary effect from hyperbaric oxygen on the sphincter mechanism. One patient with radiation-induced prostatitis failed to respond. This experience suggests that hyperbaric oxygen should be considered the primary treatment for patients with symptomatic radiation-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  7. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W; van der Groen, G

    1989-01-01

    Hantaviruses, the causative agents of HFRS, have become more widely recognized. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that these pathogens are distributed worldwide. People who come into close contact with infected rodents in urban, rural and laboratory environments are at particular risk. Transmission to man occurs mainly via the respiratory tract. The epidemiology of the hantaviruses is intimately linked to the ecology of their principal vertebrate hosts. Four distinct viruses are now recognized within the hantavirus genus and that number is likely to increase to six very soon; however, further investigations are necessary. Much more work is still needed before we fully understand the wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms of HFRS as well as the pathogenicity of the different viruses in the hantavirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. HFRS is difficult to diagnose on clinical grounds alone and serological evidence is often needed. A fourfold rise in IgG antibody titer in a 1-week interval, and the presence of the IgM type of antibodies against hantaviruses are good evidence for an acute hantavirus infection. Physicians should be alert for HFRS each time they deal with patients with acute febrile flu-like illness, renal failure of unknown origin and sometimes hepatic dysfunction. Especially the mild form of HFRS is difficult to diagnose. Acute onset, headache, fever, increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and polyuria are signs and symptoms compatible with a mild form of HFRS. Differential diagnosis should be considered for the following diseases in the endemic areas of HFRS: acute renal failure, hemorrhagic scarlet fever, acute abdomen, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, murine typhus, spotted fevers, non-A, non-B hepatitis, Colorado tick fever, septicemia, dengue, heartstroke and DIC. Treatment of HFRS is mainly supportive. Recently, however, treatment of HFRS patients with ribavirin in China and Korea, within 7 days after onset of fever, resulted in a reduced mortality as well as shortened course of illness. PMID:2573914

  8. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 × 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose. PMID:25656330

  9. Adventitial Perfusion and Intraplaque Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Song, Yan; Chen, Huijun; Kerwin, William S.; Hippe, Daniel S.; Dong, Li; Chen, Min; Zhou, Cheng; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Yuan, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Autopsy studies have suggested a relationship between intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH) and vasa vasorum, which arise primarily from the adventitia. Adventitial vasa vasorum can be characterized in the carotid arteries by estimating perfusion parameters via dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. The purpose of this investigation was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI to test in vivo in a clinical population whether adventitial perfusion, indicative of vasa vasorum microstructure, is associated with IPH. Methods Symptomatic patients with carotid plaque ipsilateral to the ischemic event underwent bilateral carotid artery MRI examination, which included multicontrast sequences for detecting IPH and a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequence for characterizing adventitial perfusion. Kinetic modeling of the dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI time series was performed to estimate adventitial vp (fractional plasma volume, reflecting local blood supply) and Ktrans (transfer constant, reflecting vessel surface area, and permeability). Results From the 27 patients (22 men; 69±10 years of age) recruited, adventitial perfusion parameters were obtained in 50 arteries. The presence of IPH was associated with a significantly higher value in adventitial Ktrans (0.142±0.042 vs 0.112±0.029 min−1; P<0.001) but not in vp (0.163±0.064 vs 0.149±0.062; P=0.338). This relationship remained after adjusting for symptomatic status, degree of stenosis, and other confounding factors. Conclusions This study demonstrated an independent pathophysiological link between the adventitia and IPH and related it to the microstructure of adventitial vasa vasorum. Adventitial perfusion imaging may be useful in studying plaque pathogenesis, but further examination through prospective studies is needed. PMID:23471271

  10. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice. PMID:22424898

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging in hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya S; Gemmete, Joseph J; Hua, Ya; Huang, Yining; Gu, Yuxiang; Xi, Guohua

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has evolved considerably over the last decade to now be knocking on the doors of wider clinical applications. There have been several efforts over the last decade to seek valuable and reliable application of DTI in different neurological disorders. The role of DTI in predicting outcomes in patients with brain tumors has been extensively studied and has become a fairly established clinical tool in this scenario. More recently DTI has been applied in mild traumatic brain injury to predict clinical outcomes based on DTI of the white matter tracts. The resolution of white matter fiber tractography based on DTI has improved over the years with increased magnet strength and better tractography post-processing. The role of DTI in hemorrhagic stroke has been studied preliminarily in the scientific literature. There is some evidence that DTI may be efficacious in predicting outcomes of motor function in animal models of intracranial hemorrhage. Only a handful of studies of DTI have been performed in subarachnoid hemorrhage or intraventricular hemorrhage scenarios. In this manuscript we will review the evolution of DTI, the existing evidence for its role in hemorrhagic stroke and discuss possible application of this non-invasive evaluation technique of human cerebral white matter tracts in the future. PMID:26015333

  12. Overview of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    It is well documented that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage can occur in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs, and monkeys. Our own experimental studies have focused on mice, rats, and pigs as animal models. The characteristics of the lesions produced in mice, rats and pigs were similar to those described in studies by our research group and others, suggesting a common pathogenesis for the initiation and propagation of the lesions at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Five experimental in vivo studies have been conducted to evaluate whether cavitation is responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage. The studies evaluated the dependencies of hydrostatic pressure, frequency, pulse polarity, contrast agents and lung inflation, and the results of each study appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that the mechanism for the production of a lung hemorrhage was inertial cavitation. Other dependencies evaluated included beam width, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, exposure duration, and animal species and age. The thresholds for producing ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, in general, were less than the FDA's regulatory limit of a Mechanical Index (MI) of 1.9. Further, the MI does not appear to provide a risk-based index for lung hemorrhage. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  13. Radiation-induced spinal cord hemorrhage (hematomyelia).

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam; Thamburaj, Krishnamurthy; Vijay, Kanupriya

    2014-10-23

    Intraspinal hemorrhage is very rare and intramedullary hemorrhage, also called hematomyelia, is the rarest form of intraspinal hemorrhage, usually related to trauma. Spinal vascular malformations such intradural arteriovenous malformations are the most common cause of atraumatic hematomyelia. Other considerations include warfarin or heparin anticoagulation, bleeding disorders, spinal cord tumors. Radiation-induced hematomyelia of the cord is exceedingly rare with only one case in literature to date. We report the case of an 8 year old girl with Ewing's sarcoma of the thoracic vertebra, under radiation therapy, presenting with hematomyelia. We describe the clinical course, the findings on imaging studies and the available information in the literature. Recognition of the clinical pattern of spinal cord injury should lead clinicians to perform imaging studies to evaluate for compressive etiologies. PMID:25568739

  14. [Spontaneous intraparenchymatous hemorrhage: findings at computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Soares, Celso Monteiro; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Rodrigues, Andréa de Jesus

    2004-09-01

    Computed tomography studies of 250 patients with spontaneous hemorrhage were examined in three hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The goal of this study was to identify the aspects of this disease that appear most frequently in this type of exam. Deep intracerebral hematomas have had the highest incidence followed by lobar hemorrhage, with thalamus being more frequently affected. Cerebellar hemorrhage was much rarer, with brainstem bleeding observed in few patients. The age group with a peak incidence was at 61 to 70 years. Headache was the most frequently related symptom and elevated levels of blood pressure were found in most of the cases. There was no pronounced difference as to predominance in either sex or side most affected but it was observed that the onset of this disease occurs at an earlier age in men than in women. Blood draining into the ventricular system occurred more frequently in deep hematomas. PMID:15334231

  15. Traumatic Hemorrhage within a Cerebellar Dermoid Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Yongxin; Wang, Haifeng; Zhong, Yanping; Bian, Xinchao; Luo, Yinan; Ge, Pengfei

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial dermoid cysts with hemorrhage are fairly rare. Herein, we reported a 28-year-old female patient with a cerebellar dermoid cyst, which was found accidently on neuro-imaging after head trauma. MR scanning revealed that the lesion was located within the cerebellar vermis and was measured 3.5cm×3.9cm×3.0cm, with hyper-intensity on T1WI and hypo-intensity on T2WI. However, on CT imaging, it showed hyper-dense signals. It was removed completely via midline sub-occipital approach under surgical microscope. Histological examination proved it was a dermoid cyst with internal hemorrhage. In combination with literature review, we discussed the factors that might be responsible for the hemorrhage within dermoid cysts. PMID:22211083

  16. Jugular Foramen Arteriovenous Shunt with Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Rodesch, G.; Comoy, J.; Hurth, M.; Lasjaunias, P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 37-year-old man with an extracerebral arteriovenous fistula at the skull base, revealed by subarachnoid and intraventricular hemorrhage. The malformation was fed by the neuromeningeal trunk of the ascending pharyngeal artery and drained into left laterobulbar veins. Embolization with bucrylate was performed and occluded totally the shunting zone. A 1-year follow-up angiogram confirmed the good stability of the result, the patient being asymptomatic. This case emphasizes the quality of results that can be obtained with bucrylate in arterioverious fistulas presenting with hemorrhage. It confirms that the external carotid artery must be studied when dealing with intracranial hemorrhage. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography may depict vascular abnormalities but do not always indicate the shunting area, thus the pathologic type of the malformation. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 5p136-b PMID:17170835

  17. Complications and follow up of subarachnoid hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Danière, F; Gascou, G; Menjot de Champfleur, N; Machi, P; Leboucq, N; Riquelme, C; Ruiz, C; Bonafé, A; Costalat, V

    2015-01-01

    Complications of subarachnoid hemorrhage are the major life threatening and functional components of the follow up of a ruptured aneurysm. Knowing how to identify these is a key challenge. They vary in type throughout the postoperative follow up period. The aim of this article is firstly to list the main complications of the acute phase (rebleeding, acute hydrocephalus, acute ischemic injury and non-neurological complications), the subacute phase (vasospasm) and the chronic phase of subarachnoid hemorrhages: (chronic hydrocephalus and cognitive disorders) and to describe their major clinical and radiological features. Secondly, we describe the long-term follow up strategy for patients who have suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and have been treated endovascularly or by surgery. This follow up involves a combination of clinical consultations, cerebral MRI and at least one review angiogram. PMID:26119863

  18. A case of anaphylactoid purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    REN, XIANQING; ZHANG, WENJUAN; DANG, WEILI; ZHAI, WENSHENG; GUO, QINGYIN; DING, YIN; YANG, XIAOQING

    2013-01-01

    Cases of Henoch-Schönlein purpura and purpura nephritis accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage are rare. Mild cases are easily ignored due to a lack of evident bleeding, and severe cases may be fatal. We have only treated one patient with Henoch-Schönlein nephritis (HSPN), a female child. The clinical manifestations were not evident, however, the imaging manifestations were clear. Finally, the patient was definitively diagnosed with HSPN accompanied by pulmonary hemorrhage. Following treatment with antiinflammatory and steroidal agents, tripterygium glycosides and traditional Chinese medicine, the patient recovered. In the present study, we report the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, with a review of the literature. PMID:23737885

  19. Hyperkinetic Movement Disorder Secondary to Punctate Hemorrhage in Lateral Ventricle Lining

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Atif; Abdin, Sahrish

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of an elderly male with hyperkinetic movements of the right arm and leg due to a small hemorrhage in the lateral aspect of the left lateral ventricle atrium. As per our database search, this is a unique presentation of a stroke in this particular location. PMID:25802502

  20. Visual field defect as a presenting sign for hemorrhagic stroke caused by sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh, Morteza; Hosseini, Hamid; Yazdchi, Taher; Farahangiz, Siamak

    2008-01-01

    Herein, we describe the presenting symptoms, history, ophthalmic examination, visual fields and brain magnetic resonance imaging of a patient who developed left homonymous hemianopia due to right occipital lobe hemorrhage after ingestion of sildenafil citrate (Novagra Forte). To the best of our knowledge, association of homonymous hemianopia with sildenafil usage has not been reported before. PMID:18292633

  1. The hemorrhagic fevers of Southern Africa with special reference to studies in the South African Institute for Medical Research.

    PubMed Central

    Gear, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    In this review of studies on the hemorrhagic fevers of Southern Africa carried out in the South African Institute for Medical Research, attention has been called to occurrence of meningococcal septicemia in recruits to the mining industry and South African Army, to cases of staphylococcal and streptococcal septicemia with hemorrhagic manifestations, and to the occurrence of plague which, in its septicemic form, may cause a hemorrhagic state. "Onyalai," a bleeding disease in tropical Africa, often fatal, was related to profound thrombocytopenia possibly following administration of toxic witch doctor medicine. Spirochetal diseases, and rickettsial diseases in their severe forms, are often manifested with hemorrhagic complications. Of enterovirus infections, Coxsackie B viruses occasionally caused severe hepatitis associated with bleeding, especially in newborn babies. Cases of hemorrhagic fever presenting in February-March, 1975 are described. The first outbreak was due to Marburg virus disease and the second, which included seven fatal cases, was caused by Rift Valley fever virus. In recent cases of hemorrhagic fever a variety of infective organisms have been incriminated including bacterial infections, rickettsial diseases, and virus diseases, including Herpesvirus hominis; in one patient, the hemorrhagic state was related to rubella. A boy who died in a hemorrhagic state was found to have Congo fever; another patient who died of severe bleeding from the lungs was infected with Leptospira canicola, and two patients who developed a hemorrhagic state after a safari trip in Northern Botswana were infected with Trypanosoma rhodesiense. An illness manifested by high fever and melena developed in a young man after a visit to Zimbabwe; the patient was found to have both malaria and Marburg virus disease. PMID:6897472

  2. Psychopharmacologic intervention after hemorrhagic basal ganglia damage.

    PubMed

    Al Owesie, Rafat Mohammed; Morton, Catherine Saino

    2012-11-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in cognitive and behavioral impairments such as poor attention, learning, memory and planning ability and uncontrolled crying that can be more persistent problems than the physical disabilities. Cognitive enhancers have been shown to improve cognitive and behavioral impairments in patients with hemorrhagic basal ganglia lesions as well as other forms of TBI. There is little research about the use of cognitive enhancers after hemorrhagic basal ganglia damage. We present a case of a 38 year old male who made significant recovery with the use of cognitive enhancers. PMID:22795553

  3. Crohn's disease presenting as acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Podugu, Amareshwar; Tandon, Kanwarpreet; Castro, Fernando J

    2016-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a rare complication of Crohn’s disease (CD). Although several surgical and non-surgical approaches have been described over the last 2 decades this complication still poses significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Given the relative infrequency of severe bleeding in CD, available medical literature on this topic is mostly in the form of retrospective case series and reports. In this article we review the risk factors, diagnostic modalities and treatment options for the management of CD presenting as GI hemorrhage. PMID:27122659

  4. Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous malformations: clinical features and risk of hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sandalcioglu, Ibrahim Erol; Wiedemayer, Helmut; Gasser, Thomas; Asgari, Siamek; Engelhorn, Tobias; Stolke, Dietmar

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study was to review the natural history of symptomatic intramedullary spinal cord (IMSC) cavernous malformations in order to analyze the underlying mechanisms leading to symptoms and determine the potential risk of lesional hemorrhage. Between January 1990 and June 2001, ten consecutive patients with IMSC cavernous malformations were treated surgically in our institution. Age ranged from 17 to 73 years (mean 34.5). All patients became symptomatic due to one or more hemorrhages leading to neurological deficits of different severity, with a more aggressive course for upper cervical lesions. Pre- and postoperative patient condition was classified according to the Frankel scale. Four patients experienced one hemorrhage, four patients two, one patient three, and another one five repeated hemorrhages. The annual retrospective hemorrhage rate for symptomatic IMSC cavernous malformations was 4.5% per patient/year, with a prospective rehemorrhage risk of 66% per patient/year. The postoperative condition was improved in four patients and unchanged in six, and none grew worse. Detailed analysis of history and clinical course in all patients revealed an acute onset of symptoms with subsequent neurological deterioration after each bleeding episode. Based on the significant risk of rehemorrhage and the gratifying functional results, surgery is indicated for symptomatic IMSC cavernous malformations. PMID:12690529

  5. Treatment of Hemorrhagic Vocal Polyps by Pulsed Dye Laser-Assisted Laryngomicrosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Han, Ji Hyuk; Choi, Byeong Il; Hwang, Hye Jin; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Choi, Hong-Shik

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Conventional surgical techniques of laryngomicrosurgery (LMS) on hemorrhagic vocal polyps are often difficult due to obscuration of the surgical field by inadvertent bleeding from the lesion, and there are often significant amounts of mucosal epithelium loss. Here, we introduce our surgical technique using pulsed dye laser (PDL), which can effectively resect the polyp with vocal fold mucosa preservation. Methods. Patients who were diagnosed with hemorrhagic vocal polyp and who were surgically managed using PDL from March 2013 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes and surgical findings were evaluated. Results. A total of 39 patients were treated with PDL-assisted enucleation LMS. The average age was 43.7 years (range 20–73), and there were 20 males and 19 females (17 professional voice users). In all cases, the hemorrhagic polyp was successfully enucleated after application of PDL, thereby preserving the overlying epithelium. Postoperative voice outcomes were favorable with clear preservation of the vocal fold mucosal wave. Conclusion. PDL-assisted enucleation LMS for the treatment of hemorrhagic vocal polyps can be a safe and effective surgical technique. It can be considered a promising treatment option for hemorrhagic vocal polyps. PMID:26557700

  6. Systemic alterations induced by a Bothrops alternatus hemorrhagic metalloproteinase (baltergin) in mice.

    PubMed

    Gay, C C; Maruñak, S L; Teibler, P; Ruiz, R; Acosta de Pérez, O C; Leiva, L C

    2009-01-01

    Systemic alterations induced by a Bothrops alternatus hemorrhagin, named baltergin, a 55kDa fibrinogenolytic metalloproteinase isolated from venom of north-eastern Argentina specimens, were studied in mice. It caused macroscopic hemorrhagic spots in lungs which was injected intravenously with a minimum pulmonary hemorrhagic dose of 10microg. Histological observations of lungs showed mainly hemorrhagic areas, evidenced by the presence of erythrocytes in the alveolar spaces, congestion and increase of thickness of alveolar septum due to polymorphonuclear infiltrate and mononuclear cells. Neither macroscopic hemorrhage in other organs nor histological alterations in heart and cerebrum/cerebellum were observed at doses assayed. However, kidney and liver were mildly affected. Kidney examination revealed congestion, subcapsular hemorrhage with local capsule detachment, inflammatory infiltrate and degeneration of tubular cells. Congestion of blood vessels and hydropic degeneration of hepatocytes were observed in liver. Besides, baltergin was able to further hydrolyze type IV collagen. Although the enzyme showed to be less lethal than whole venom, it induced severe pulmonary bleeding and affected kinder and liver in minor grade. In conclusion, baltergin is able to alter the integrity of capillary vessels and simultaneously, to interfere on the hemostatic system. Thus, this metalloproteinase contribute markedly to systemic alterations characteristic of B. alternatus envenomations. PMID:18983866

  7. Life or Death? A Physiogenomic Approach to Understand Individual Variation in Responses to Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Klemcke, Harold G; Joe, Bina; Rose, Rajiv; Ryan, Kathy L

    2011-01-01

    Severe hemorrhage due to trauma is a major cause of death throughout the world. It has often been observed that some victims are able to withstand hemorrhage better than others. For decades investigators have attempted to identify physiological mechanisms that distinguish survivors from nonsurvivors for the purpose of providing more informed therapies. As an alternative approach to address this issue, we have initiated a research program to identify genes and genetic mechanisms that contribute to this phenotype of survival time after controlled hemorrhage. From physiogenomic studies using inbred rat strains, we have demonstrated that this phenotype is a heritable quantitative trait, and is therefore a complex trait regulated by multiple genes. Our work continues to identify quantitative trait loci as well as potential epigenetic mechanisms that might influence survival time after severe hemorrhage. Our ultimate goal is to improve survival to traumatic hemorrhage and attendant shock via regulation of genetic mechanisms and to provide knowledge that will lead to genetically-informed personalized treatments. PMID:22379396

  8. Intraspinal hemorrhage in spontaneous intracranial hypotension: link to superficial siderosis? Report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Schievink, Wouter I; Wasserstein, Philip; Maya, M Marcel

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal CSF leak has become a well-recognized cause of headaches, but such spinal CSF leaks also are found in approximately half of patients with superficial siderosis of the CNS. It has been hypothesized that friable vessels at the site of the spinal CSF leak are the likely source of chronic bleeding in these patients, but such an intraspinal hemorrhage has never been visualized. The authors report on 2 patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension and intraspinal hemorrhage, offering support for this hypothesis. A 33-year-old man and a 62-year-old woman with spontaneous intracranial hypotension were found to have a hemorrhage within the ventral spinal CSF collection and within the thecal sac, respectively. Treatment consisted of microsurgical repair of a ventral dural tear in the first patient and epidural blood patching in the second patient. The authors suggest that spontaneous intracranial hypotension should be included in the differential diagnosis of spontaneous intraspinal hemorrhage, and that the intraspinal hemorrhage can account for the finding of superficial siderosis when the CSF leak remains untreated. PMID:26588500

  9. Low-dose ribavirin potentiates the antiviral activity of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    Westover, Jonna B; Sefing, Eric J; Bailey, Kevin W; Van Wettere, Arnaud J; Jung, Kie-Hoon; Dagley, Ashley; Wandersee, Luci; Downs, Brittney; Smee, Donald F; Furuta, Yousuke; Bray, Mike; Gowen, Brian B

    2016-02-01

    Favipiravir is approved in Japan to treat novel or re-emerging influenza viruses, and is active against a broad spectrum of RNA viruses, including Ebola. Ribavirin is the only other licensed drug with activity against multiple RNA viruses. Recent studies show that ribavirin and favipiravir act synergistically to inhibit bunyavirus infections in cultured cells and laboratory mice, likely due to their different mechanisms of action. Convalescent immune globulin is the only approved treatment for Argentine hemorrhagic fever caused by the rodent-borne Junin arenavirus. We previously reported that favipiravir is highly effective in a number of small animal models of Argentine hemorrhagic fever. We now report that addition of low dose of ribavirin synergistically potentiates the activity of favipiravir against Junin virus infection of guinea pigs and another arenavirus, Pichinde virus infection of hamsters. This suggests that the efficacy of favipiravir against hemorrhagic fever viruses can be further enhanced through the addition of low-dose ribavirin. PMID:26711718

  10. Double consecutive retrobulbar hemorrhage in a high-risk patient in treatment with aspirin and warfarin.

    PubMed

    Viterbo, Stefano; Boffano, Paolo; Guglielmi, Valeria; Fasolis, Massimo; Palumbo, Carlo; Berrone, Sid

    2012-11-01

    Retrobulbar hemorrhage is a vision-threatening emergency that may occur spontaneously or following facial trauma, orbital surgery, endoscopic sinus surgery, and retrobulbar injections. It may determine visual loss because of central retinal artery occlusion, optic neuropathy from direct compression, or compression of the circulation from mechanical tamponade. In addition to a deterioration in visual acuity with total blindness in the most severe cases, several symptoms and signs can be found, such as a sudden onset of severe pain, proptosis, and ophthalmoplegia.The knowledge of past medical history and underlying medical conditions is crucial in patients with retrobulbar hemorrhages. In fact, patients with blood dyscrasias have to be considered high-risk patients due to their increased propensity for uncontrolled bleeding.The aim of this article was to present and discuss the management of a case of double consecutive retrobulbar hemorrhage in a high-risk patient in treatment with aspirin and warfarin. PMID:23147322

  11. Acute brainstem compression by intratumoral hemorrhages in an intracranial hypoglossal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakagawa, Yasuhisa; Ikemura, Mayumi; Usugi, Eri; Kiyofuji, Yuma; Nata, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    A 77-year-old female in the hospital was found tachycardic and hypothermic by a nurse, and the patient's respiration subsequently ceased. Forensic autopsy revealed an intracranial cystic tumor that would have compressed the brainstem. On microscopic examination, the tumor was diagnosed as an Antoni A schwannoma growth, and recent multiple intratumoral hemorrhages in the intracranial schwannoma were observed, suggesting the sudden enlargement of the intracranial schwannoma due to intratumoral hemorrhaging. Accordingly, we diagnosed the cause of death as brainstem compression induced by the intratumoral hemorrhaging in the intracranial schwannoma. Meanwhile, a rhinopharyngeal tumor was also detected by the autopsy, which was compatible with an antemortem diagnosis of a dumbbell-shaped hypoglossal schwannoma. PMID:23541888

  12. Case Report: Postpartum hemorrhage associated with Dengue with warning signs in a term pregnancy and delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phi Hung, Le; Diem Nghi, Tran; Hoang Anh, Nguyen; Van Hieu, Mai; Thien Luan, Nguyen; Phuoc Long, Nguyen; Trong Thach, Than

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dengue infection during peripartum period, although rare in endemic regions, has challenged clinicians regarding its management, especially if a parturient woman experiences postpartum hemorrhage due to a classical risk factor of maternal bleeding. Case: A full-term pregnant Vietnamese woman was diagnosed with polyhydramnios and Dengue with warning signs (DWS). She was administered platelet transfusion prior to delivery and then gave birth to a healthy newborn. After active management of the third stage of labor, the patient suffered a postpartum hemorrhage which was caused by uterine atony and accompanied with thrombocytopenia. Therefore, we decided to administer uterotonic drugs and additionally transfuse platelets. Conclusion: We describe a case of postpartum hemorrhage caused by uterine atony and coinciding with Dengue infection during delivery period, which is a rare clinical entity. With timely detection and management, the patient was finally discharged without complications. PMID:26925224

  13. Clinical strategies for supporting the untransfusable hemorrhaging patient

    PubMed Central

    Hulsey, Meredith E.; Newhouse, Mike; Holmes, Houston E.; Mays, Edward J.

    2009-01-01

    Hemorrhaging patients who cannot be transfused due to personal beliefs or the lack of compatible blood products provide a unique challenge for clinicians. Here we describe a 58-year-old African American man with a history of sickle cell–beta+ thalassemia who had recently received a multiunit exchange transfusion and developed hematochezia followed by severe anemia. Due to the presence of multiple alloantibodies, no compatible packed red blood cell (pRBC) units could initially be located. The patient was managed with mechanical ventilation, colloid and crystalloid solutions, procoagulants, and recombinant erythropoietin. After an extensive search by our blood bank, enough compatible pRBC units were identified and the patient survived without significant clinical sequelae. Management of the untransfusable hemorrhaging patient requires a multidisciplined approach, with coordination between blood banks, hematologists, intensivists, and other specialists. Steps should be taken to avoid or limit blood loss, identify compatible pRBC units, control hypotension, maximize oxygen delivery, minimize metabolic demand, and stimulate erythropoiesis. In dire circumstances, use of experimental hemoglobin substitutes or transfusion of the least serologically incompatible pRBCs available may be considered. PMID:19865501

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis AtsG (Rv0296c), GlmU (Rv1018c) and SahH (Rv3248c) Proteins Function as the Human IL-8-Binding Effectors and Contribute to Pathogen Entry into Human Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dziadek, Bozena; Brzostek, Anna; Grzybowski, Marcin; Fol, Marek; Krupa, Agnieszka; Kryczka, Jakub; Plocinski, Przemyslaw; Kurdowska, Anna; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an extremely successful intracellular pathogen that has evolved a broad spectrum of pathogenic mechanisms that enable its manipulation of host defense elements and its survival in the hostile environment inside phagocytes. Cellular influx into the site of mycobacterial entry is mediated by a variety of chemokines, including interleukin-8 (IL-8), and the innate cytokine network is critical for the development of an adaptive immune response and infection control. Using affinity chromatography, liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, we identified M. tuberculosis AtsG arylsulphatase, bifunctional glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GlmU) and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SahH) as the pathogen proteins that bind to human IL-8. The interactions of all of the identified proteins (AtsG, GlmU and SahH) with IL-8 were characterized by high binding affinity with KD values of 6.83x10-6 M, 5.24x10-6 M and 7.14x10-10 M, respectively. Furthermore, the construction of Mtb mutant strains overproducing AtsG, GlmU or SahH allowed determination of the contribution of these proteins to mycobacterial entry into human neutrophils. The significantly increased number of intracellularly located bacilli of the overproducing M. tuberculosis mutant strains compared with those of "wild-type" M. tuberculosis and the binding interaction of AtsG, GlmU and SahH proteins with human IL-8 may indicate that these proteins participate in the modulation of the early events of infection with tubercle bacilli and could affect pathogen attachment to target cells. PMID:26829648

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis AtsG (Rv0296c), GlmU (Rv1018c) and SahH (Rv3248c) Proteins Function as the Human IL-8-Binding Effectors and Contribute to Pathogen Entry into Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Dziadek, Bozena; Brzostek, Anna; Grzybowski, Marcin; Fol, Marek; Krupa, Agnieszka; Kryczka, Jakub; Plocinski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an extremely successful intracellular pathogen that has evolved a broad spectrum of pathogenic mechanisms that enable its manipulation of host defense elements and its survival in the hostile environment inside phagocytes. Cellular influx into the site of mycobacterial entry is mediated by a variety of chemokines, including interleukin-8 (IL-8), and the innate cytokine network is critical for the development of an adaptive immune response and infection control. Using affinity chromatography, liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, we identified M. tuberculosis AtsG arylsulphatase, bifunctional glucosamine-1-phosphate acetyltransferase and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GlmU) and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase (SahH) as the pathogen proteins that bind to human IL-8. The interactions of all of the identified proteins (AtsG, GlmU and SahH) with IL-8 were characterized by high binding affinity with KD values of 6.83x10-6 M, 5.24x10-6 M and 7.14x10-10 M, respectively. Furthermore, the construction of Mtb mutant strains overproducing AtsG, GlmU or SahH allowed determination of the contribution of these proteins to mycobacterial entry into human neutrophils. The significantly increased number of intracellularly located bacilli of the overproducing M. tuberculosis mutant strains compared with those of “wild-type” M. tuberculosis and the binding interaction of AtsG, GlmU and SahH proteins with human IL-8 may indicate that these proteins participate in the modulation of the early events of infection with tubercle bacilli and could affect pathogen attachment to target cells. PMID:26829648

  16. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C

    2015-08-28

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼ 32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼ 80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible "dog leash," allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation. PMID:26175154

  17. The Inner Centromere Protein (INCENP) Coil Is a Single α-Helix (SAH) Domain That Binds Directly to Microtubules and Is Important for Chromosome Passenger Complex (CPC) Localization and Function in Mitosis*

    PubMed Central

    Samejima, Kumiko; Platani, Melpomeni; Wolny, Marcin; Ogawa, Hiromi; Vargiu, Giulia; Knight, Peter J.; Peckham, Michelle; Earnshaw, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosome passenger complex (CPC) is a master regulator of mitosis. Inner centromere protein (INCENP) acts as a scaffold regulating CPC localization and activity. During early mitosis, the N-terminal region of INCENP forms a three-helix bundle with Survivin and Borealin, directing the CPC to the inner centromere where it plays essential roles in chromosome alignment and the spindle assembly checkpoint. The C-terminal IN box region of INCENP is responsible for binding and activating Aurora B kinase. The central region of INCENP has been proposed to comprise a coiled coil domain acting as a spacer between the N- and C-terminal domains that is involved in microtubule binding and regulation of the spindle checkpoint. Here we show that the central region (213 residues) of chicken INCENP is not a coiled coil but a ∼32-nm-long single α-helix (SAH) domain. The N-terminal half of this domain directly binds to microtubules in vitro. By analogy with previous studies of myosin 10, our data suggest that the INCENP SAH might stretch up to ∼80 nm under physiological forces. Thus, the INCENP SAH could act as a flexible “dog leash,” allowing Aurora B to phosphorylate dynamic substrates localized in the outer kinetochore while at the same time being stably anchored to the heterochromatin of the inner centromere. Furthermore, by achieving this flexibility via an SAH domain, the CPC avoids a need for dimerization (required for coiled coil formation), which would greatly complicate regulation of the proximity-induced trans-phosphorylation that is critical for Aurora B activation. PMID:26175154

  18. Redefining secondary injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage in light of multimodal advanced neuroimaging, intracranial and transcranial neuromonitoring: beyond vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Kapinos, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The classic idea that arterial narrowing, called vasospasm (VSP), represents the hallmark of secondary injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, has been challenged. The more complex and pleiotropic pathophysiological repercussions from the irruption of arterial blood into the subarachnoid layers go beyond the ascribed VSP. Putting adjectives in front of this term, such as "symptomatic," "microdialytic," or "angiographic" VSP, is misleading. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) is a better term but remains restrictive to severe hypoperfusive injury and neglects oligemia, edema, and metabolic nonischemic injuries. In recognition of these issues, the international conference on VSP integrated "neurovascular events" into its name ( www.vasospasm2013.com ) and a multidisciplinary research group was formed in 2010 to study subgroups of DCI/VSP and their respective significance.In three parts, this tiered article provides a broader definitional envelope for DCI and secondary neurovascular insults after SAH, with a rubric for each subtype of delayed neuronal dysfunction. First, it pinpoints the need for nosologic precision and covers current terminological inconsistency. Then, it highlights the input of neuroimaging and neuromonitoring in defining secondary injurious processes. Finally, a new categorization of deteriorating patients is proposed, going beyond a hierarchical or dichotomized definition of VSP/DCI, and common data elements are suggested for future trials. PMID:25366634

  19. Association between S100B Levels and Long-Term Outcome after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Systematic Review and Pooled Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Pui Man Rosalind; Du, Rose

    2016-01-01

    S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), a well-studied marker for neurologic injury, has been suggested as a candidate for predicting outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. We performed a pooled analysis summarizing the associations between S100B protein in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with radiographic vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurologic deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) outcome. A literature search using PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and the EMBASE databases was performed to identify relevant studies published up to May 2015. The weighted Stouffer’s Z method was used to perform a pooled analysis of outcome measures with greater than three studies. A total of 13 studies were included in this review. Higher serum S100B level was found to be associated with cerebral infarction as diagnosed by CT (padj = 3.1 x 10−4) and worse GOS outcome (padj = 5.5 x 10−11). There was no association found between serum and CSF S100B with radiographic vasospasm or DIND. S100B is a potential prognostic marker for aSAH outcome. PMID:27007976

  20. Hemorrhage-Adjusted Iron Requirements, Hematinics and Hepcidin Define Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia as a Model of Hemorrhagic Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Finnamore, Helen; Le Couteur, James; Hickson, Mary; Busbridge, Mark; Whelan, Kevin; Shovlin, Claire L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency anemia remains a major global health problem. Higher iron demands provide the potential for a targeted preventative approach before anemia develops. The primary study objective was to develop and validate a metric that stratifies recommended dietary iron intake to compensate for patient-specific non-menstrual hemorrhagic losses. The secondary objective was to examine whether iron deficiency can be attributed to under-replacement of epistaxis (nosebleed) hemorrhagic iron losses in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Methodology/Principal Findings The hemorrhage adjusted iron requirement (HAIR) sums the recommended dietary allowance, and iron required to replace additional quantified hemorrhagic losses, based on the pre-menopausal increment to compensate for menstrual losses (formula provided). In a study population of 50 HHT patients completing concurrent dietary and nosebleed questionnaires, 43/50 (86%) met their recommended dietary allowance, but only 10/50 (20%) met their HAIR. Higher HAIR was a powerful predictor of lower hemoglobin (p = 0.009), lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin content (p<0.001), lower log-transformed serum iron (p = 0.009), and higher log-transformed red cell distribution width (p<0.001). There was no evidence of generalised abnormalities in iron handling Ferritin and ferritin2 explained 60% of the hepcidin variance (p<0.001), and the mean hepcidinferritin ratio was similar to reported controls. Iron supplement use increased the proportion of individuals meeting their HAIR, and blunted associations between HAIR and hematinic indices. Once adjusted for supplement use however, reciprocal relationships between HAIR and hemoglobin/serum iron persisted. Of 568 individuals using iron tablets, most reported problems completing the course. For patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, persistent anemia was reported three-times more frequently if iron tablets caused diarrhea or needed to be stopped. Conclusions/significance HAIR values, providing an indication of individuals’ iron requirements, may be a useful tool in prevention, assessment and management of iron deficiency. Iron deficiency in HHT can be explained by under-replacement of nosebleed hemorrhagic iron losses. PMID:24146883

  1. Nosocomial Outbreak of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Aradaib, Imadeldin E.; Erickson, Bobbie R.; Mustafa, Mubarak E.; Khristova, Marina L.; Saeed, Nageeb S.; Elageb, Rehab M.

    2010-01-01

    To confirm the presence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Sudan, we tested serum of 8 patients with hemorrhagic fever in a rural hospital in 2008. Reverse transcription–PCR identified Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus. Its identification as group III lineage indicated links to virus strains from South Africa, Mauritania, and Nigeria. PMID:20409377

  2. Candidate gene analysis: Severe intraventricular hemorrhage in inborn preterm neonates

    PubMed Central

    Ådén, Ulrika; Lin, Aiping; Carlo, Waldemar; Leviton, Alan; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P.; Zhang, Heping; Ment, Laura R.

    2013-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage is a disorder of complex etiology. We analyzed genotypes for 7 genes from 224 inborn preterm neonates treated with antenatal steroids and Grade 3-4 intraventricular hemorrhage and 389 matched controls. Only methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase was more prevalent in cases of intraventricular hemorrhage, emphasizing the need for more comprehensive genetic strategies. PMID:23896193

  3. [Factor VII deficiency revealed by intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Sfaihi Ben Mansour, L; Thabet, A; Aloulou, H; Turki, H; Chabchoub, I; Mhiri, F; Mnif, Z; Ben Ali, H; Kammoun, T; Hachicha, M

    2009-07-01

    Constitutional factor VII deficiency is a hereditary disease with recessive autosomic transmission. Its incidence is estimated to be 1/1,000,000 in the general population. We report a case of severe factor VII deficiency in infancy revealed by an intracranial hemorrhage in a 2-month-old infant. We describe the clinical, biological and therapeutic characteristics of this disease. PMID:19409767

  4. Vitreous Hemorrhage in Pediatric Age Group

    PubMed Central

    AlHarkan, Dora H.; Kahtani, Eman S.; Gikandi, Priscilla W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify and study causes of vitreous hemorrhage (VH) in pediatric age group and to investigate factors predicting visual and anatomical outcomes. Procedure. A retrospective review of patients aged 16 years or less with the diagnosis of vitreous hemorrhage from January 2005 until December 2010. Results. A total number of 230 patients (240 eyes) were identified. Traumatic vitreous hemorrhage accounted for 82.5%. In cases of accidental trauma, final visual acuity of 20/200 was significantly associated with visual acuity of ≥20/200 at presentation and the absence of retinal detachment at last follow-up. Patients with nontraumatic vitreous hemorrhage were significantly younger with higher rates of enucleation/evisceration/exenteration and retinal detachment at last follow-up compared to traumatic cases. Conclusion. Trauma is the most common cause of VH in pediatric age group. In this group, initial visual acuity was the most important predictor for visual outcome, and the presence of retinal detachment is a negative predictor for final good visual outcome. The outcome is significantly worse in nontraumatic cases compared to traumatic cases. PMID:25505975

  5. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, Greece.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Sidira, Persefoni; Larichev, Victor; Gavrilova, Ludmila; Kuzmina, Ksenia; Mousavi-Jazi, Mehrdad; Mirazimi, Ali; Ströher, Ute; Nichol, Stuart

    2014-02-01

    Seroprevalence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is high in some regions of Greece, but only 1 case of disease has been reported. We used 4 methods to test 118 serum samples that were positive for CCHFV IgG by commercial ELISA and confirmed the positive results. A nonpathogenic or low-pathogenicity strain may be circulating. PMID:24447877

  6. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak. PMID:24807363

  7. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events. PMID:26133054

  8. Hypertension and Cerebral Hemorrhage: A Malpractice Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Hunt, Marshall T.; Vogt, Thomas; Walsh, Gregory; Paglia, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The plaintiff alleged that failure of the attending physician to manage her husband's hypertension properly resulted in his death from intracerebral hemorrhage. Four lines of evidence supported the defendant: (1) In 1970 to 1971 there was uncertainty in the medical community whether mild hypertension should be treated with drugs; this uncertainty still existed at the time of the trial. (2) Severe hypertension and advanced age are the two most important predisposing factors leading to intracerebral hemorrhage; the deceased patient had neither. (3) Hemorrhage into the cerebral cortex and underlying white matter is not typical of hypertensive intracerebral bleeding; more likely, rupture of an arteriovenous malformation occurred. (4) A diagnosis of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage is not one of exclusion but requires objective evidence of vascular change in the brain, heart and kidney; these changes were not found in the deceased patient. In conclusion, an expert witness should testify objectively rather than be the advocate of a lawyer's theory of liability. ImagesFig. 6.Fig. 7.Fig. 9.Fig. 10. PMID:7233893

  9. Unraveling the distinctive features of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinases using molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Raoni Almeida; Daz, Natalia; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Surez, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases are important toxins that play fundamental roles during envenomation. They share a structurally similar catalytic domain, but with diverse hemorrhagic capabilities. To understand the structural basis for this difference, we build and compare two dynamical models, one for the hemorrhagic atroxlysin-I from Bothrops atrox and the other for the non-hemorraghic leucurolysin-a from Bothrops leucurus. The analysis of the extended molecular dynamics simulations shows some changes in the local structure, flexibility and surface determinants that can contribute to explain the different hemorrhagic activity of the two enzymes. In agreement with previous results, the long ?-loop (from residue 149 to 177) has a larger mobility in the hemorrhagic protein. In addition, we find some potentially-relevant differences at the base of the S1' pocket, what may be interesting for the structure-based design of new anti-venom agents. However, the sharpest differences in the computational models of atroxlysin-I and leucurolysin-a are observed in the surface electrostatic potential around the active site region, suggesting thus that the hemorrhagic versus non-hemorrhagic activity is probably determined by protein surface determinants. PMID:26676823

  10. [Duodenal adenoma--a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Al, Hajjar N; Szasz, A; Miftode, S; Iancu, C; Bodea, R; Bălă, O

    2008-01-01

    The tumors of the small bowel are rare entities, whose incidence comprises ca. 1-5% of the total amount of tumors in the digestive tract. Most of the cases involve the ileum and duodenum is least involved. The most frequently encountered duodenal tumors are the Brunner's Gland Adenomas. We can encounter unique or multiple lesions, sessile or pedunculated which develop proximal to duodenal papilla and are usually less than 1 cm in diameter although 12 cm lesions have been reported. In most of the cases they remain asymptomatic and constitute incidental discoveries. Sometimes they can present complications such as obstruction, hemorrhage and malignant transformation. Diagnosis is difficult due to the lack of symptoms and is delayed by an average of 6 months from symptoms onset. Barium contrast studies and superior digestive endoscopy is performed in most of the cases to reveal the diagnosis, but other methods, such as CT or ultrasound can be useful. A case of duodenal adenoma is described; the patient was admitted suffering digestive hemorrhage, which resulted in melena, secondary anemia, and ulcerous dyspeptic syndrome. PMID:18459509

  11. Bilateral spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage in an acquired cystic kidney disease hemodialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Hirohama, Daigoro; Miyakawa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) is a well-known late stage complication of chronic kidney disease. Cysts tend to grow with time on dialysis and could lead to malignant transformation, and intra- or perirenal hemorrhage is a rare complication of ACKD. Here we describe one case of bilateral spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage of ACKD in a 44-year-old man, on hemodialysis for 15 years. One was due to cyst rupture, and the other was due to aneurism rupture, both were controlled with transcatheter arterial embolization. In renal arteriography at the second rupture, we demonstrated extravasation from an aneurysm being present at the periphery of right renal artery. Several spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage cases were reported but its clinical information is limited, moreover, bilateral cases were extremely rare. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first report of spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage caused by intraparenchymal renal artery aneurysm rupture in ACKD patients. We report this case because of its rarity and significance with respect to the complication of dialysis patients, review reported bilateral cases, and discuss some clinical characteristics. PMID:24533199

  12. Effects of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction Program on Depression, Anxiety and Stress in Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Hye Myung; Lee, Sung Jae; Chung, Yong Gu

    2010-01-01

    Objective In this study, the Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program was applied to patients presenting with depression and anxiety after surgery from spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) and the effects were assessed. Methods The subjects were patients admitted for cerebral aneurysm rupture and treated by means of surgery from March to December, 2007. More than 6 months had passed after surgery, without any special lesions showing up on computed tomography (CT), and the Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) was 5 points. Among patients with anxiety and depression symptoms, 11 patients completed the program. The MBSR program was conducted once a week, 2.5 hours each, for 8 weeks. The evaluation criteria were : 1) the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI): it measures the type and level of depression, 2) the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory : the anxiety state of normal adults without mental disorder, and 3) Heart Rate Variability (HRV) : the influence of the autonomous nervous system on the sinoarterial node varies continuously in response to the change of the internal/external environment. Results The BDI value was decreased from 18.5 ± 10.9 to 9.5 ± 7.1 (p = 0.013) : it was statistically significant, and the depression level of patients was lowered. The state anxiety was decreased from 51.3 ± 13.9 to 42.3 ± 15.2; the trait anxiety was reduced from 50.9 ± 12.3 to 41.3 ± 12.8, and a borderline significant difference was shown (p = 0.091, p = 0.056). In other words, after the treatment, although it was not statistically significant, a decreased tendency in anxiety was shown. In the HRV measurement, standard deviation normal to normal (SDNN), square root of the square root of the mean sum of squared differences between adjacent normal to normal intervals (RMSSD), and total power (TP) showed significant increase, Physical Stress Index (PSI) showed a significant reduction, and thus an improvement in the homeostatic control mechanism of the autonomic nervous system was ween. Conclusion The MBSR program was applied to the patients showing anxiety and depression reaction after SAH treatment, and a reduction in depression symptoms and physiological reactions were observed. The application of the MBSR program may be considered as a new tool in improving the quality of life for patients after surgery. PMID:20539793

  13. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  14. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  15. Alteration of cytokine profile following hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sumin; Aguilar, Alex; Subramani, Kumar; Poulose, Ninu; Ayub, Ahmar; Raju, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Hemorrhage is one of the leading causes of death in patients with trauma. We recently demonstrated that resveratrol can improve cardiac function and prolong life following severe hemorrhagic injury (HI) in a rat model. The present work is focused on determining changes in NF-κB dependent gene expression in the heart and the systemic cytokine milieu following HI and the effect of resveratrol treatment. The results indicate an increase in phosphorylated NF-κB in the heart with a concomitant increase in the expression of NF-κB dependent genes following HI. There was also a significant increase of systemic cytokine levels, both pro and anti-inflammatory, following HI and resolution when treated with resveratrol. This study demonstrates the potential role NF-κB has in the physiological response to HI and the effectiveness of resveratrol in reducing immune activation. PMID:26851979

  16. Infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic Fever outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Raabea, Vanessa N; Borcherta, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  17. Critical Care Management of Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Morawo, Adeolu O; Gilmore, Emily J

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the most devastating and debilitating form of stroke, remains a major healthcare concern all over the world. Intracerebral hemorrhage is frequently managed in critical care settings where intensive monitoring and treatment are employed to prevent and address primary and secondary brain injury as well as other medical complications that may arise. Although there has been increasing data guiding the management of ICH in the past decade, prognosis remains dismal. In this article, the authors discuss the risk factors for ICH, the role of imaging, the major targets of neurocritical care management, the etiology and management of raised intracranial pressure, as well as prevention of and prompt response to the emergence of medical complications. They also discuss the effect of early withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy on prognosis. Finally, we outline several clinical trials that hold promise in improving our management of ICH in the near future. PMID:27214697

  18. [Rare causes of serious digestive hemorrhages].

    PubMed

    Polignano, F M; Caradonna, P; De Ceglie, A; Ferrarese, F; Camporeale, S; Ferrarese, S

    1997-04-01

    The rare causes of massive hemorrhage in the gastrointestinal tract are not completely classifiable. They are characterized by high variability, as shown in several isolated reports. In our experience of 17 cases, clinical and endoscopic features were sometimes typical of a rare pathology, others were referable to common pathologies and exactly diagnosed only by angiography or surgery. Our experience points out the difficulties in the surgical prescription and timing, when the endoscopic diagnosis was lacking or unsure, or when a massive haemorrhagic recurrence forced diagnostic laparatomy. The role of endoscopy and the advantages of intraoperative enteroscopy have been compellingly demonstrated. Diagnostic and therapeutic angiography has been the main method in vascular hemorrhage. PMID:9265118

  19. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  20. Subperiosteal Orbital Hemorrhage Complicating Cardiac Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Peden, Marc C.; Bhatti, M. Tariq

    2004-09-15

    Subperiosteal orbital hemorrhage (SPOH) following cardiac surgery has not been previously reported. We present a patient who developed diplopia and right eye proptosis immediately after cardiac surgery for a mitral valve repair and coronary artery bypass graft. A computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated a right superior SPOH. The diplopia and proptosis resolved spontaneously within 4 weeks. Follow-up CT showed complete resolution of the SPOH.

  1. Renal Hemorrhagic Actinomycotic Abscess in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Bhardwaj, Neha R.; Di Giovanni, Laura M.; Eggener, Scott; Torre, Micaela Della

    2014-01-01

    Actinomyces israelii is a gram-positive, filamentous anaerobic bacteria colonizing the oral and gastrointestinal tracts. Retroperitoneal actinomycotic abscess is uncommon and its rare presentation as a hemorrhagic mass may be confused with malignancy. We present a case of this unusual infection complicating pregnancy. Increased awareness of actinomycotic abscess in the differential diagnosis of renal mass concerning for malignancy is critical to early recognition and treatment of this rare infection and most importantly, avoidance of unnecessary surgical intervention. PMID:24757509

  2. Diagnostics and Discovery in Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Lipkin, W. Ian; Palacios, Gustavo; Briese, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The rate of discovery of new microbes and of new associations of microbes with health and disease is accelerating. Many factors contribute to this phenomenon including those that favor the true emergence of new pathogens as well as new technologies and paradigms that enable their detection and characterization. This chapter reviews recent progress in the field of pathogen surveillance and discovery with a focus on viral hemorrhagic fevers. PMID:19751404

  3. Hemorrhage control by microsecond electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Yossi; Manivanh, Richard; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Phil; Wang, Jenny; Brinton, Mark; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Non-compressible hemorrhages are the most common preventable cause of death on battlefield or in civilian traumatic injuries. We report the use of sub-millisecond pulses of electric current to induce rapid constriction in femoral and mesenteric arteries and veins in rats. Extent of vascular constriction could be modulated by pulse duration, amplitude and repetition rate. Electrically-induced vasoconstriction could be maintained at steady level until the end of stimulation, and blood vessels dilated back to their original size within a few minutes after the end of stimulation. At higher settings, a blood clotting could be introduced, leading to complete and permanent occlusion of the vessels. The latter regime dramatically decreased the bleeding rate in the injured femoral and mesenteric arteries, with a complete hemorrhage arrest achieved within seconds. The average blood loss from the treated femoral artery was about 7 times less than that of a non-treated control. This new treatment modality offers a promising approach to non-damaging control of bleeding during surgery, and to efficient hemorrhage arrest in trauma patients.

  4. Biomarkers and vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jordan, J Dedrick; Nyquist, Paul

    2010-04-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage from the rupture of a saccular aneurysm is a devastating neurological disease that has a high morbidity and mortality not only from the initial hemorrhage, but also from the delayed complications, such as cerebral vasospasm. Cerebral vasospasm can lead to delayed ischemic injury 1 to 2 weeks after the initial hemorrhage. Although the pathophysiology of vasospasm has been described for decades, the molecular basis remains poorly understood. With the many advances in the past decade in the development of sensitive molecular biological techniques, imaging, biochemical purification, and protein identification, new insights are beginning to reveal the etiology of vasospasm. These findings will not only help to identify markers of vasospasm and prognostic outcome, but will also yield potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of this disease. This review focuses on the methods available for the identification of biological markers of vasospasm and their limitations, the current understanding as to the utility and prognostic significance of identified biomarkers, the utility of these biomarkers in predicting vasospasm and outcome, and future directions of research in this field. PMID:20380977

  5. Vaccines for Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers – Progress and Shortcomings

    PubMed Central

    Falzarano, Darryl; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    With a few exceptions, vaccines for viruses that cause hemorrhagic fever remain unavailable or lack well-documented efficacy. In the past decade this has not been due to a lack of the ability to develop vaccine platforms against highly pathogenic viruses, but rather the lack of will/interest to invest in platforms that have the potential to become successful vaccines. The two exceptions to this are vaccines against Dengue virus and Rift Valley Fever virus, which recently have seen significant progress in putting forward new and improved vaccines, respectively. Experimental vaccines for filoviruses and Lassa virus do exist but are hindered by a lack of financial interest and only partially or ill-defined correlates/mechanisms of protection that could be assessed in clinical trials. PMID:23773330

  6. A predictive model for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever epidemics.

    PubMed

    Halide, Halmar; Ridd, Peter

    2008-08-01

    A statistical model for predicting monthly Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) cases from the city of Makassar is developed and tested. The model uses past and present DHF cases, climate and meteorological observations as inputs. These inputs are selected using a stepwise regression method to predict future DHF cases. The model is tested independently and its skill assessed using two skill measures. Using the selected variables as inputs, the model is capable of predicting a moderately-severe epidemic at lead times of up to six months. The most important input variable in the prediction is the present number of DHF cases followed by the relative humidity three to four months previously. A prediction 1-6 months in advance is sufficient to initiate various activities to combat DHF epidemic. The model is suitable for warning and easily becomes an operational tool due to its simplicity in data requirement and computational effort. PMID:18668414

  7. Animal Models of Tick-Borne Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zivcec, Marko; Safronetz, David; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Tick-borne hemorrhagic fever viruses (TBHFV) are detected throughout the African and Eurasian continents and are an emerging or re-emerging threat to many nations. Due to the largely sporadic incidences of these severe diseases, information on human cases and research activities in general have been limited. In the past decade, however, novel TBHFVs have emerged and areas of endemicity have expanded. Therefore, the development of countermeasures is of utmost importance in combating TBHFV as elimination of vectors and interrupting enzootic cycles is all but impossible and ecologically questionable. As in vivo models are the only way to test efficacy and safety of countermeasures, understanding of the available animal models and the development and refinement of animal models is critical in negating the detrimental impact of TBHFVs on public and animal health. PMID:25437041

  8. Subarachnoid hemorrhage in the African-American population: a cooperative study.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, G. C.; Welch, B.; Cole, A. N.; Mendoza, R.; Morgan, J.; Epps, J.; Bernard, E.; St Louis, P.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage is complicated by delayed cerebral ischemia and contributing factors such as hypertension. To observe the impact of hypertension and delayed cerebral ischemia on the outcome of a predominantly African-American cohort following subarachnoid hemorrhage, both retrospective (n = 42) and prospective (n = 21) studies were conducted. In the total pool (n = 63), the mean age was 49.7 years (range: 17 to 80) with a preponderance of female patients (70%). Aneurysm formation was significant in the region of the posterior communicating artery. Of the patients reviewed, 73.8% had preexisting hypertension and 45.9% developed delayed cerebral ischemia. Approximately 89% of the patients who suffered from delayed cerebral ischemia had hypertension. Results failed to display any significant beneficial association between the use of the calcium channel blocker nimodipine and delayed cerebral ischemia. Use of the antifibrinolytic drug aminocaproic acid demonstrated a worse patient outcome. It is not recommended that aminocaproic acid be used in this population. Subsequently, due to the proportional occurrence of delayed cerebral ischemia in hypertensive patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage, it is suggested that prophylactic surgical management of unruptured intracranial aneurysms be considered in hypertensive patients. Further study is needed to discern the association between hypertension, delayed cerebral ischemia, and stroke in patients following subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:9046763

  9. Terson Syndrome in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hee; Seo, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Sung-Hee; Won, Yu Hui; Ko, Myoung-Hwan

    2015-08-01

    Terson syndrome refers to oculocerebral syndrome of retinal and vitreous hemorrhage associated with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage or all forms of intracranial bleeding. Recent observations have indicated that patients with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage have an 18% to 20% concurrent incidence of retinal and vitreous hemorrhages with about 4% incidence of vitreous hemorrhage alone. Clinical ophthalmologic findings may have significant diagnostic and prognostic value for clinicians. Here we report a 45-year-old female patient who suffered from blurred vision after subarachnoid hemorrhage. She was diagnosed as Terson syndrome. After vitrectomy, she recovered with normal visual acuity which facilitated the rehabilitative process. We also performed visual evoked potentials to investigate abnormalities of visual dysfunction. Based on this case, we emphasize the importance of early diagnosis of Terson syndrome. PMID:26361603

  10. Hemorrhage, infection, toxemia, and cardiac disease, 1954-85: causes for their declining role in maternal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Sachs, B P; Brown, D A; Driscoll, S G; Schulman, E; Acker, D; Ransil, B J; Jewett, J F

    1988-01-01

    Hemorrhage, infection, toxemia, and cardiac disease are no longer the leading causes of maternal death. We studied factors causing their decline in incidence using data collected by the Committee on Maternal Welfare of the Massachusetts Medical Society between 1954 and 1985. The dramatic decline in incidence of these conditions in the Commonwealth during the study period appears to have been due to both legislative actions and improvements in medical practice. The legislative actions included licensing of maternity services, blood banks, and legalization of abortion. Cardiac-related mortality has declined due to a reduction in the prevalence of rheumatic heart disease. Changes in clinical practice that stand out were the aggressive control of the hypertensive component of toxemia leading to a reduced incidence of intracranial hemorrhage, the prompt recourse to blood transfusion for hemorrhage, and the use of broad spectrum antibiotics. PMID:3369599

  11. Pathology of retinal hemorrhage in abusive head trauma.

    PubMed

    Wygnanski-Jaffe, Tamara; Morad, Yair; Levin, Alex V

    2009-12-01

    Abusive head injury, characterized by repeated acceleration-deceleration forces, is associated with retinal hemorrhages as demonstrated in many clinical and postmortem studies. The theory that vitreoretinal traction is the major factor in the pathogenesis of retinal hemorrhages is presently the most widely accepted explanation based on different lines of research. Postmortem examination of the eye and orbital structures is essential for recognizing abusive head injury and also for identifying other possible medical conditions which can cause retinal hemorrhage. PMID:20024631

  12. Experimental and clinical observations on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lakhanpal, V

    1993-01-01

    We have been able to create a reproducible experimental model of nonexpulsive massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage in a rabbit eye. Massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage was demonstrated on echography and confirmed on histopathologic examination in all eyes. The natural course of the disease suggests that there is very little change in the size of the choroidal detachment in the first 7 days. Maximum liquefaction of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage clot was seen to occur between 7 and 14 days. However, increased retinal and ciliary body atrophy was also noted at 14 days. Therefore, the optimum time to drain massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage appears to be between 7 and 14 days. Immediate sclerotomy during the acute formation of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage resulted in further increase in the suprachoroidal hemorrhage, with marked extension of the hemorrhage into the retina and vitreous. Therefore, in our opinion, immediate sclerotomy during massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is detrimental to the eye. Our clinical data have shown that eyes with massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage can be treated successfully by secondary surgery, and the majority of the eyes can be salvaged with good visual results. No serious complications of this surgery were encountered in our cases. We advocate early surgical intervention between 7 and 14 days. Aggressive anterior and posterior segment reconstruction by anterior and posterior vitrectomy after sclerotomy drainage of the suprachoroidal hemorrhage is essential for better anatomic and visual results. Our animal data and clinical experience suggest that the optimum time of drainage of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage is between 7 and 14 days. The results of our animal experiments in relation to human clinical application should be taken with caution. Furthermore, we had a small number of animals to study the various groups. In addition, longer follow-up may be needed for comparing controls with the treatment groups. Our animal model may help in such future studies on massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage. PMID:8140705

  13. Acute Arthritis in Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Ahmeti, Salih; Ajazaj-Berisha, Lindita; Halili, Bahrije; Shala, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is a severe viral disease caused by a Nairovirus. An atypical manifestation in the form of acute arthritis was found in a confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Kosova-Hoti strain positive patient. Acute arthritis in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) may be as a result of immune mechanisms or the bleeding disorder underlying CCHF. PMID:24926169

  14. [Diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy with cerebral hemorrhage by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cystatin C in the cerebrospinal fluid].

    PubMed

    Shimode, K; Fujihara, S; Nakamura, M; Kobayashi, S; Tsunematsu, T

    1990-03-01

    The lower level of cystatin C in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is one of the useful diagnostic markers of hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis in Iceland. We attempted to establish an assay to determine the level of cystatin C in CSF for diagnosis of CAA due to the deposition of cystatin C in CSF for diagnosis of CAA due to the deposition of cystatin C. We carried out the sandwich enzyme immunosorbent assay with the use of monoclonal mouse anti-cystatin C and polyclonal rabbit anti-cystatin C antibodies. CSF from nine cases of cerebral hemorrhage and fifty reference cases with other neurological diseases were examined. Four patients with cerebral hemorrhage showed a low level of cystatin C and clinical manifestations suggestive of CAA. Our study showed the feasibility of using ELISA for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy that causes cerebral hemorrhage with the deposition of cystatin C. PMID:2364630

  15. Spontaneous Primary Intraventricular Hemorrhage: Clinical Features and Early Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Vicens, Adela; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients. PMID:22966468

  16. Two Cases of Cervical Hemorrhage with Upper Airway Obstruction: A Life-Threatening Condition

    PubMed Central

    Amadei, Enrico Maria; Benedettini, Laura; Piccin, Ottavio

    2014-01-01

    Several are the causes of cervical masses and among them a spontaneous hemorrhage presents a rare and life-threatening condition. Sometimes hemorrhage develops from a previous silent neck lesion as in the case of an anaplastic thyroid carcinoma associated with bleeding. We present two cases: a 70-year-old woman suffering from enlarging cervical mass causing respiratory distress because of upper airway compression due to a spontaneous rupture of the superior thyroid artery and a 74-year-old woman who drew our attention because of a progressively worsening dyspnea due to a large medial cervical mass with rapid onset. We removed it surgically, finding out an anaplastic thyroid carcinoma that is associated with internal bleeding. We discuss our management of these rare and life-threatening conditions, recalling that the patency of upper airway should always be the prerogative in every emergency. Besides, we make a review of the recent literature. PMID:24592280

  17. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  18. Holmes' Tremor Associated with Bilateral Hypertrophic Olivary Degeneration Following Brain Stem Hemorrhage: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyu; Park, Se-Hyuck; Yoon, Dae Young

    2014-01-01

    Holmes' tremor is a condition characterized by a mixture of postural, rest, and action tremors due to midbrain lesions in the vicinity of the red nucleus. Hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD) is a rare type of neuronal degeneration involving the dento-rubro-olivary pathway and may present clinically as Holmes tremor. We report on a 59-year-old female patient who developed Holmes tremor in association with bilateral HOD, following brain stem hemorrhage. PMID:25340035

  19. Endothelial Cells in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Therapies to prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and vascular leak found in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) have not been identified. In this review we summarize dengue viruses and the spectrum of human disease and highlight evidence of endothelial cell dysfunction in DHF based on studies in patients and mouse and tissue culture models. Evidence suggests that both virus antigen and host immune response, can cause endothelial cell dysfunction and weaken endothelial barrier integrity. We suggest possible therapeutic interventions and highlight how therapies targeting altered endothelial function might be evaluated in animal models and in patients with DHF. PMID:25025934

  20. Update on exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stacey; Hinchcliff, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) is an important disease of horses that perform high-intensity athletic activity. EIPH is an ongoing concern for the racing industry because of its high prevalence; potential impact on performance; welfare concerns; and use of prophylactic medications, such as furosemide, on race day. During the last 10 years, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis and risk factors for EIPH and the impact of the disease on performance and career. This article summarizes the most recent advances in EIPH. PMID:25770069

  1. Hemorrhage Near Fetal Rat Bone: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy A.; Miller, Rita J.; Blue, James P.; O'Brien, William D.

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity ultrasound has shown potential in treating many ailments requiring noninvasive tissue necrosis. However, little work has been done on using ultrasound to ablate pathologies on or near the developing fetus. For example, Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (cyst on lungs), Sacrococcygeal Teratoma (benign tumor on tail bone), and Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (one twin pumps blood to other twin) are selected problems that will potentially benefit from noninvasive ultrasound treatments. Before these applications can be explored, potential ultrasound-induced bioeffects should be understood. Specifically, ultrasound-induced hemorrhage near the fetal rat skull was investigated. An f/1 spherically focused transducer (5.1-cm focal length) was used to expose the skull of 18- to 19-day-gestation exteriorized rat fetuses. The ultrasound pulse had a center frequency of 0.92 MHz and pulse duration of 9.6 μs. The fetuses were exposed to 1 of 4 exposure conditions (denoted A, B, C, and D) in addition to a sham exposure. Three of the exposures consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 10 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 6.7 MPa, and pulse repetition frequencies of 100 Hz (A), 250 Hz (B), and 500 Hz (C), corresponding to time-average intensities of 1.9 W/cm2, 4.7 W/cm2, and 9.4 W/cm2, respectively. Exposure D consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 6.7 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 5.0 MPa, and a PRF of 500 Hz corresponding to a time-average intensity of 4.6 W/cm2. Hemorrhage occurrence increased slightly with increasing time-average intensity (i.e., 11% for A, 28% for B, 31% for C, and 19% for D with a 9% occurrence when the fetuses were not exposed). The low overall occurrence of hemorrhaging may be attributed to fetal motion (observed in over half of the fetuses from the backscattered echo during the exposure). The mean hemorrhage sizes were 3.1 mm2 for A, 2.5 mm2 for B, 2.7 mm2 for C, and 5.1 mm2 for D. The larger lesions at D may be related to these fetuses moving less as only 40% of the fetuses were observed moving for this exposure condition.

  2. Endothelial cells in dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Kelley, James F

    2014-09-01

    Therapies to prevent or reverse endothelial dysfunction and vascular leak found in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) have not been identified. In this review we summarize dengue viruses and the spectrum of human disease and highlight evidence of endothelial cell dysfunction in DHF based on studies in patients and mouse and tissue culture models. Evidence suggests that both virus antigen and host immune response, can cause endothelial cell dysfunction and weaken endothelial barrier integrity. We suggest possible therapeutic interventions and highlight how therapies targeting altered endothelial function might be evaluated in animal models and in patients with DHF. PMID:25025934

  3. Fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after taking anticoagulation medication

    PubMed Central

    Hammar, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 64-year-old man with extensive diffuse acute lung hemorrhage, presumably as a result of anticoagulation therapy. We evaluated reports in the literature concerning acute exacerbation (acute lung injury of unknown cause) in UIP and other forms of fibrotic interstitial pneumonias. We also evaluated autopsy tissue in this case in order to determine the cause of death in this 64-year-old man, who was initially thought to have an asbestos-related disease. Based on the autopsy findings, this man died as a result of anticoagulation therapy; specifically, the use of Xarelto® (rivaroxaban). PMID:26236607

  4. Hemorrhagic fevers, with special reference to recent outbreaks in southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Gear, J H

    1979-01-01

    In considering the diagnosis of a patient admitted to the Johannesburg Hospital, suffering from an illness characterized by high fever and complicated by a hemorrhagic state from which he died, a list of possible causes of his illness was drawn up. This list included the arthropodborne viral infections prevalent in southern Africa, namely, chikungunya fever, Sindbis fever, West Nile fever, yellow fever, and Rift Valley fever; viral infections associated with rodents, such as Lassa fever; the viral infection associated with monkeys, Marburg virus disease; the rickettsial infections; tick-bite fever (the variety of spotted fever of tick typhus occurring in southern Africa) and Q fever; the bacterial infections, especially the coccal infections, plague septicemia, and meningococcal, staphylococcal, and streptococcal septicemia; and the blood protozoal infections malaria and trypanosomiasis. In addition, rubella, Gasser's syndrome, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and viperine snakebite were briefly described in this review. All of these conditions may be complicated by the development of a hemorrhagic state. The circulation of large numbers of infecting organisms, by they viruses, rickettsiae, bacteria, or protozoa, may initiate the coagulation cascade, the formation of fibrin and its deposition in the finer blood vessels, and the aggregation and entanglement of platelets resulting in marked thrombocytopenia and bleeding. This bleeding tendency is greatly aggravated when the infection specifically involves the parenchymal cells of the liver; such a condition results in defective formation of coagulation factors such as prothrombin. The proper care of patients in whom a hemorrhagic state has developed requires urgent and accurate diagnosis followed by immediate and appropriate treatment that will combat the infection and alleviate the hemorrhagic state and liver disorder. If the hemorrhagic state is due to one of the dangerous infectious fevers, adequate protection of the medical, nursing, and laboratory staff concerned is also vital. PMID:399369

  5. Fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome in the backyard chicken: a retrospective histopathologic case series.

    PubMed

    Trott, K A; Giannitti, F; Rimoldi, G; Hill, A; Woods, L; Barr, B; Anderson, M; Mete, A

    2014-07-01

    Fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome, characterized by sudden death in overconditioned hens due to hepatic rupture and hemorrhage, is one of the leading noninfectious idiopathic causes of mortality in backyard chickens. Nutritional, genetic, environmental, and hormonal factors, or combinations of these, have been proposed yet not proven as the underlying cause. In an attempt to characterize the hepatic changes leading to the syndrome, this retrospective case study examined 76 backyard chickens that were diagnosed with fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome between January 2007 and September 2012 and presented for necropsy to the diagnostic laboratory of the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System. A majority of the birds were female (99%), obese (97.5%), and in active lay (69.7%). Livers were examined histologically, and the degree of hepatocellular vacuolation (lipidosis), the reticular stromal architecture, the presence of collagenous connective tissue, and vascular wall changes were evaluated and graded using hematoxylin and eosin, Gomori's reticulin, oil red O, Masson's trichrome, and Verhoeff-Van Gieson stains. Interestingly, there was no correlation between lipidosis and reticulin grades; hepatocellular lipidosis was absent in 22% of the cases and mild in 26% of the cases. Additionally, there was evidence of repeated bouts of intraparenchymal hemorrhage before the acute "bleed-out" in 35.5% of the cases. These data are not supportive of the previously proposed causes and provide a framework for future studies to elucidate the pathogenesis of this condition. Furthermore, the data shown in this study support hemorrhagic liver syndrome as a more accurate name, as hepatic lipidosis is absent in a significant proportion of ruptured livers. PMID:24091813

  6. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. PMID:25468497

  7. Multiple Intracerebral Hemorrhages in an Old Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Ştefănescu, V; Traşcă, Daniela; Şerban-Pereţeanu, Adelina; Chicoş, B; Cojocaru, M

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old Caucasian man was admitted in the Department of Neurology for visual disturbances, started two days before. The next day the patient experienced headache, fever and gait disturbances. He had hypertension, diabetes mellitus, an ischemic stroke 13 years ago, longstanding seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (17 years), polynodular goiter, right ischio-pubian fracture and right femoral vein thrombosis a year ago due to a car accident, since he is treated with oral anticoagulants associated to antiaggregant, hypotensors, statin and oral antidiabetics. The neurologic examination had evidenced nuchal rigidity, left homonymous hemianopsia, left central facial palsy, ataxia of the inferior limbs with wide-based gait, achilean reflexes abolished bilaterally, bilaterally abolished plantar reflexes, ideomotor apraxia, dysarthria, hypoprosexia, and preserved consciousness patient. A non-contrast cerebral CT scan had shown right temporal and parieto-occipital intraparenchymatous hemorrhages, a right frontal sequelar lesion, multiple old lacunar infarets, cortical atrophy. Laboratory findings included an inflammatory syndrome, absence of rheumatoid arthritis positive serology, normal coagulogram, an elevated proteinuria. The cerebral IRM performed on the seventh day of hospitalisation was suggestive for subacute right parietal hemorrhage, old cerebral infarction in the right anterior cerebral artery area, old lacunar infarcts and cerebral atrophy. The anticoagulant and antiaggregant treatment was stopped after a generalized tonic-clonic seizure occurred. Antiedematous, hypotensor, anticonvulsivant, beta-blocker, and symptomatic treatment was started, while the antidiabetic treatment was continued. All symptoms remitted. Arguments for amyloid angiopathy in our patient are previous non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke and a chronic inflammatory disease- rheumatoid arthritis in his personal medical history. PMID:26939215

  8. Thalamic Reorganization in Chronic Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Young Jin; Hong, Ji Heon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate changes of synaptic area of the spinothalamic tract and its thalamocortical pathway (STT) in the thalamus in chronic patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Twenty four patients with a lesion in the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) of the thalamus following putaminal hemorrhage were recruited for this study. The subscale for tactile sensation of the Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA) was used for the determination of somatosensory function. Diffusion tensor tractography of the STT was reconstructed using the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Software Library. We classified patients according to 2 groups: the VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in the VPL; and the non-VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in other thalamic areas, except for the VPL. Thirteen patients belonged to the VPL group, and 8 patients belonged to the non-VPL group. Three patients were excluded from grouping due to interrupted integrity of the STTs. The tactile sensation score of the NSA in the non-VPL group (10.50 ± 0.93) was significantly decreased compared with that of the VPL group (19.45 ± 1.33) (P < 0.05). We found that 2 types of patient had recovered via the VPL area or other areas of the STT. It appears that patients who showed shifting of the thalamic synaptic area of the STT might have recovered by the process of thalamic reorganization following thalamic injury. In addition, thalamic reorganization appears to be related to poorer somatosensory outcome. PMID:26313781

  9. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus in captive bison, elk, white-tailed deer, cattle, and goats from Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A captive wildlife research facility in Fort Collins, Colorado experienced mortality in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) due to epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection in late summer and early fall of 2007. RNA from EHDV was amplified by RT-PCR from the spleen and lung tissue...

  10. Current management of massive hemorrhage in trauma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Hemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Trauma and massive transfusion are associated with coagulopathy secondary to tissue injury, hypoperfusion, dilution, and consumption of clotting factors and platelets. Concepts of damage control surgery have evolved prioritizing early control of the cause of bleeding by non-definitive means, while hemostatic control resuscitation seeks early control of coagulopathy. Hemostatic resuscitation provides transfusions with plasma and platelets in addition to red blood cells in an immediate and sustained manner as part of the transfusion protocol for massively bleeding patients. Although early and effective reversal of coagulopathy is documented, the most effective means of preventing coagulopathy of massive transfusion remains debated and randomized controlled studies are lacking. Viscoelastical whole blood assays, like TEG and ROTEM however appear advantageous for identifying coagulopathy in patients with severe hemorrhage as opposed the conventional coagulation assays. In our view, patients with uncontrolled bleeding, regardless of its cause, should be treated with hemostatic control resuscitation involving early administration of plasma and platelets and earliest possible goal-directed, based on the results of TEG/ROTEM analysis. The aim of the goal-directed therapy should be to maintain a normal hemostatic competence until surgical hemostasis is achieved, as this appears to be associated with reduced mortality. PMID:22776724

  11. Infectious bursal disease and hemorrhagic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Saif, Y M

    1998-08-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) of chickens and hemorrhagic enteritis (HE) of turkeys are caused by infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) and hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), respectively. Both diseases have common features, including an acute stage followed by immunosuppression, resulting in lowered resistance to a variety of infectious agents and poor response to commonly used vaccines. The IBDV and HEV infections are widespread in commercial chicken and turkey flocks, respectively. The acute stage of the disease, the immunosuppression that follows, and the widespread distribution of both diseases, are major factors contributing to the economic significance of both diseases. The mechanism of immunosuppression for both infections has similarities, both affect lymphocytes and macrophages, and both are lymphocidal. In this report, an overview of both diseases with emphasis on some of the recent findings will be presented. There has been greater research activity on IBD than on HE, reflecting the relative economic importance of the species affected and the recent changes in the antigenic make up and pathogenicity of the IBDV. PMID:9706087

  12. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Gessner, J. Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:26169941

  13. Thrombolytic Evacuation of Intracerebral and Intraventricular Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Mahua; Stadnik, Agnieszka; Awad, Issam A.

    2012-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10–15% of all strokes, however it causes 30–50% of stroke related mortality, disability and cost. The prevalence increases with age with only 2 cases/100,000/year for age less than 40 years to almost 350 cases/100,000/year for age more than 80 years. Several trials of open surgical evacuation of ICH have failed to show clear benefit over medical management. But, some small trials of minimal invasive hematoma evacuation in combination with thrombolytics have shown encouraging results. Based on these findings larger clinical trials are being undertaken to optimize and define therapeutic benefit of minimally invasive surgery in combination with thrombolytic clearance of hematoma. In this article we will review some of the background of minimally invasive surgery and the use of thrombolytics in the setting of ICH and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and will highlight the early findings of MISTIE and CLEAR trials for these two entities respectively. PMID:22945285

  14. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Gessner, J Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît; Vestweber, Dietmar; Goerge, Tobias

    2015-07-27

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:26169941

  15. Treatment of subretinal hemorrhages with tissue plasminogen activator.

    PubMed

    Borrillo, J L; Regillo, C D

    2001-06-01

    Submacular hemorrhages pose a danger to visual acuity. Intervention may help prevent or mitigate severe visual loss. Pneumatic displacement and vitrectomy with direct evacuation are two methods of treating submacular hemorrhages. Tissue plasminogen activator may be an important adjunct to these techniques. PMID:11389348

  16. Ascent to altitude: a benign cause of splinter hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Musher, Daniel M

    2012-07-01

    Splinter hemorrhages appear in a variety of conditions. One identified cause is ascent to altitude, but trauma and extreme conditions have been thought to be responsible. We document the appearance of splinter hemorrhages in a group of adults during several days of easy touring at an altitude of 11,000 feet (3,350 m). PMID:22776388

  17. Prognostic factors in intraparenchymatous hematoma with ventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ruscalleda, J; Peiró, A

    1986-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage following intraparenchymatous hematoma is thought to be a frequent and often fatal event. Computerized tomography has proved to be valuable for its diagnosis. Hospital records of seventy-eight patients with intraparenchymatous hematoma and intraventricular hemorrhage diagnosed by computerized tomography were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate initial clinical features and CT findings in order to assess potential prognostic factors. PMID:3951686

  18. Glibenclamide for the treatment of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Caffes, Nicholas; Kurland, David B; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes are associated with severe functional disability and high mortality. Except for recombinant tissue plasminogen activator, therapies targeting the underlying pathophysiology of central nervous system (CNS) ischemia and hemorrhage are strikingly lacking. Sur1-regulated channels play essential roles in necrotic cell death and cerebral edema following ischemic insults, and in neuroinflammation after hemorrhagic injuries. Inhibiting endothelial, neuronal, astrocytic and oligodendroglial sulfonylurea receptor 1-transient receptor potential melastatin 4 (Sur1-Trpm4) channels and, in some cases, microglial KATP (Sur1-Kir6.2) channels, with glibenclamide is protective in a variety of contexts. Robust preclinical studies have shown that glibenclamide and other sulfonylurea agents reduce infarct volumes, edema and hemorrhagic conversion, and improve outcomes in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Retrospective studies suggest that diabetic patients on sulfonylurea drugs at stroke presentation fare better if they continue on drug. Additional laboratory investigations have implicated Sur1 in the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic CNS insults. In clinically relevant models of subarachnoid hemorrhage, glibenclamide reduces adverse neuroinflammatory and behavioral outcomes. Here, we provide an overview of the preclinical studies of glibenclamide therapy for CNS ischemia and hemorrhage, discuss the available data from clinical investigations, and conclude with promising preclinical results that suggest glibenclamide may be an effective therapeutic option for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:25749474

  19. Variant Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus in Young Rabbits, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Kevin P.; Nicieza, Inés; Balseiro, Ana; Muguerza, María A.; Rosell, Joan M.; Casais, Rosa; Álvarez, Ángel L.

    2012-01-01

    Outbreaks of rabbit hemorrhagic disease have occurred recently in young rabbits on farms on the Iberian Peninsula where rabbits were previously vaccinated. Investigation identified a rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus variant genetically related to apathogenic rabbit caliciviruses. Improved antivirus strategies are needed to slow the spread of this pathogen. PMID:23171812

  20. Subtotal gastrectomy for diffused hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiation, following liver resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Vasileios, Tatsis; Evaggelia, Peponi; Georgios, Papadopoulos; Periklis, Tsekeris; Michael, Fatouros; Georgios, Glantzounis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A rare case of hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiation is presented, which was resistant to conservative treatment and required subtotal gastrectomy. Presentation of case A 56-year-old male was initially undergone right hepatectomy, resection of the extrahepatic biliary tree, hilar lymph node dissection and hepatico-jejunostomy due to advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Because of the extent of the disease, chemo-radiotherapy was administered. The patient received a total radiotherapy dose of 57.6 Gy in 32 sessions. Unfortunately, diffused hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiation was developed, which was resistant to conservative treatment (endoscopic hemostasis, transfusion). A subtotal gastrectomy was performed. The patient is in good condition 45 months after the liver resection, but with local recurrence. Conclusion In resistant situations to conservative treatment and recurred bleeding of diffused hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiation, surgical management may have a role. PMID:26686486

  1. Hemorrhagic hemangioma in the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Min; Chung, Woo Jin; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kim, Yong Hoon; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Choi, Mi Sun

    2015-01-01

    Hemangioma is the most common type of benign tumor that arises in the liver. Although rupture and hemorrhage of hepatic hemangioma are rare complications, they can be the cause of mortality. The authors report a case of hemorrhagic hepatic hemangioma: in a 54-year-old woman who was admitted with epigastric pain. She had taken oral contraceptives several weeks prior. The results of a blood examination were normal. An abdominal computed tomography scan revealed a tumor in hepatic segment 4, and a hemorrhage inside the cystic mass was suspected. The mass was removed laparoscopically to confirm the tumor properties and control the hemorrhage. The pathologic findings of the resected mass were consistent with hepatic hemangioma with intratumoral hemorrhage. The patient was discharged 8 d after the surgery, without further complications or complaints, and the patient’s condition was found to have improved during follow-up. PMID:26109822

  2. Hemorrhagic Transformation of Scrub Typhus Encephalitis: A Rare Entity.

    PubMed

    Kim, H-C; Yoon, K-W; Yoo, D-S; Cho, C-S

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement of scrub typhus infection is well known. Most CNS involvement of scrub typhus infection present as meningitis or encephalitis. We report on a patient suffering from hemorrhagic transformation of intracranial lesions caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. A 53-year-old female farmer who was infected by scrub typhus was treated with doxycycline and recovered from the systemic illness. However, headache persisted. Brain radiologic studies revealed acute intracranial hemorrhage and enhancing lesion, which implied a CNS involvement. Hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis by scrub typhus is very rare complication and to our best knowledge, this is the first report of hemorrhagic transformation of scrub typhus encephalitis. Clinician should consider the possibility of hemorrhagic transformation of encephalitis in cases of scrub typhus infection. PMID:25373351

  3. Effects of Prophylactic Antiepileptic Drugs on Clinical Outcomes in Patients with a Good Clinical Grade Suffering from Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seon Jin; Joo, Jin-Yang; Kim, Yong Bae; Hong, Chang-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Routine use of prophylactic antiepileptic drugs (AED) has been debated. We retrospectively evaluated the effects of prophylactic AED on clinical outcomes in patients with a good clinical grade suffering from aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). Materials and Methods Between September 2012 and December 2014, 84 patients who met the following criteria were included: (1) presence of a ruptured aneurysm; (2) Hunt-Hess grade 1, 2, or 3; and (3) without seizure presentation. Patients were divided into two groups; the AED group (n = 44) and the no AED group (n = 40). Clinical data and outcomes were compared between the two groups. Results Prophylactic AEDs were used more frequently in patients who underwent microsurgery (84.1%) compared to those who underwent endovascular surgery (15.9%, p < 0.001). Regardless of prophylactic AED use, seizure episodes were not observed during the six-month follow-up period. No statistical difference in clinical outcomes at discharge (p = 0.607) and after six months of follow-up (p = 0.178) were between the two groups. After six months, however, favorable outcomes in the no AED group tended to increase and poor outcomes tended to decrease. Conclusion No difference in the clinical outcomes and systemic complications at discharge and after six months of follow-up was observed between the two groups. However, favorable outcomes in the no AED group showed a slight increase after six months. These findings suggest that discontinuation of the current practice of using prophylactic AED might be recommended in patients with a good clinical grade. PMID:26526008

  4. Cerebral Vasospasm in Critically III Patients with Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Does the Evidence Support the Ever-Growing List of Potential Pharmacotherapy Interventions?

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Tyree H.

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a significant event resulting in decreased cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm is vital to avert neurological damage and reduced functional outcomes. A variety of pharmacotherapy interventions for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm have been evaluated. Unfortunately, very few large randomized trials exist to date, making it difficult to make clear recommendations regarding the efficacy and safety of most pharmacologic interventions. Considerable debate exists regarding the efficacy and safety of hypervolemia, hemodilution, and hypertension (triple-H therapy), and the implementation of each component varies substantially amongst institutions. There is a new focus on euvolemic-induced hypertension as a potentially preferred mechanism of hemodynamic augmentation. Nimodipine is the one pharmacologic intervention that has demonstrated favorable effects on patient outcomes and should be routinely administered unless contraindications are present. Intravenous nicardipine may offer an alternative to oral nimodipine. The addition of high-dose magnesium or statin therapy has shown promise, but results of ongoing large prospective studies are needed before they can be routinely recommended. Tirilazad and clazosentan offer new pharmacologic mechanisms, but clinical outcome results from prospective randomized studies have largely been unfavorable. Locally administered pharmacotherapy provides a targeted approach to the treatment of cerebral vasospasm. However, the paucity of data makes it challenging to determine the most appropriate therapy and implementation strategy. Further studies are needed for most pharmacologic therapies to determine whether meaningful efficacy exists. PMID:25477565

  5. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma and intracerebral hemorrhage in a patient with thrombotic microangiopathy during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wayhs, Sâmia Yasin; Wottrich, Joise; Uggeri, Douglas Prestes; Dias, Fernando Suparregui

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low-platelet count), and acute fatty liver of pregnancy are the main causes of thrombotic microangiopathy and severe liver dysfunction during pregnancy and represent different manifestations of the same pathological continuum. The case of a 35-week pregnant woman who was admitted to an intensive care unit immediately after a Cesarean section due to fetal death and the presence of nausea, vomiting, and jaundice is reported. Postpartum preeclampsia and acute fatty liver of pregnancy were diagnosed. The patient developed an acute subdural hematoma and an intracerebral hemorrhage, which were subjected to neurosurgical treatment. The patient died from refractory hemolytic anemia and spontaneous bleeding of multiple organs. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy might overlap and be associated with potentially fatal complications, including intracranial hemorrhage, as in the present case. Early detection and diagnosis are crucial to ensure appropriate management and treatment success. PMID:23917984

  6. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; a Review Article

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Saeed; Baratloo, Alireza; Rouhipour, Alaleh; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Yousefifard, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) was first reported in 1976 with two concurrent outbreaks of acute viral hemorrhagic fever centered in Yambuku (near the Ebola river), Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Nzara, Sudan. The current outbreak of the Ebola virus was started by reporting the first case in March 2014 in the forest regions of southeastern Guinea. Due to infection rates raising over 13,000% within a 6-month period, Ebola is now considered as a global public health emergency and on August 8th, 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. With more than 5000 involved cases and nearly 3000 deaths, this event has turned into the largest and most dangerous Ebola virus outbreak in the world. Based on the above-mentioned, the present article aimed to review the virologic characteristics, transmission, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Ebola virus disease. PMID:26512362

  7. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleoprotein suppresses IFN-beta-promoter-mediated gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fajs, Luka; Resman, Katarina; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana

    2014-02-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the family Bunyaviridae and is a causative agent of severe hemorrhagic disease. Knowledge regarding the pathogenesis of CCHFV is limited due to the requirement for high-containment laboratories and the lack of an immunocompetent animal host. Previous studies have shown that CCHFV delays the activation of the human innate immune response, specifically, the type I interferon response. Our study results show that antagonism of the interferon-beta promoter is mediated by the nucleoprotein of CCHFV strain Hoti, while strains IbAr10200 and AP92 do not suppress the activity of the IFN-beta promoter. Our results also suggest that several viral factors may provide antagonistic action against the type I interferon response. PMID:23990053

  8. Thromboelastometric Profiles of Horses Affected by Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Alessia; Meazza, Cecilia; Salvadori, Marco; Paltrinieri, Saverio

    2010-01-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) commo